485APOS 1 d220805d485apos.htm ARTISAN PARTNERS FUNDS, INC. Artisan Partners Funds, Inc.
1933 Act Reg. No. 33-88316
1940 Act File No. 811-08932
As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 13, 2021
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM N-1A
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
POST-EFFECTIVE AMENDMENT NO. 131
and
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940
AMENDMENT NO. 133

Artisan Partners Funds, Inc.
(Registrant)
875 East Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 800
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202
Telephone Number: (414) 390-6100
Sarah A. Johnson
Artisan Partners Funds, Inc.
875 East Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 800
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202
John M. Loder
Ropes & Gray LLP
Prudential Tower, 800 Boylston Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02199
(Agents for Service)

It is proposed that this filing will become effective:
immediately upon filing pursuant to rule 485(b)
on pursuant to rule 485(b)
60 days after filing pursuant to rule 485(a)(1)
on pursuant to rule 485(a)(1)
75 days after filing pursuant to rule 485(a)(2)
on pursuant to rule 485(a)(2)
EXPLANATORY NOTE
This Post-Effective Amendment No. 131 to the Registration Statement contains a Prospectus and Statement of Additional Information describing Artisan Floating Rate Fund, a new series of the Registrant. This Post-Effective Amendment to the Registration Statement is organized as follows: (a) Prospectus relating to Artisan Floating Rate Fund; (b) Statement of Additional Information relating to Artisan Floating Rate Fund; (c) Part C Information relating to all series of the Registrant.
This Post-Effective Amendment No. 131 relates solely to Artisan Floating Rate Fund and does not supersede or amend any disclosure to the Registrant's Registration Statement relating to any other series or shares of the Registrant.


The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. The Fund may not sell these securities until the
registration statement filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to
sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state or jurisdiction where the offer or sale is
not permitted.

Subject to Completion, dated 13 September 2021
2021
[________ 2021]
PROSPECTUS
Artisan Partners Funds
 
Share Class
 
Investor
Advisor
Institutional
Artisan Floating Rate Fund
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
As permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the Fund’s annual and semi-annual shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from the Fund or from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be made available online at http://hosted.rightprospectus.com/Artisan, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the Fund electronically anytime by contacting your financial intermediary or, if you invest directly with the Fund, by calling 800.344.1770 or by enrolling on the Fund’s website at www.artisanpartners.com.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. If you invest through a financial intermediary, you can contact your financial intermediary to request that you continue to receive paper copies of your shareholder reports. If you invest directly with the Fund, you can call 800.344.1770 to let the Fund know you wish to continue receiving paper copies of your shareholder reports. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all Funds held in your account if you invest through your financial intermediary or all Funds held with the fund complex if you invest directly with the Fund.
If you have any questions about any part of the prospectus or wish to obtain additional information about Artisan Partners Funds, please call 800.344.1770 or visit www.artisanpartners.com.
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved any of the Fund’s shares or determined whether this prospectus is truthful or complete. Anyone who tells you otherwise is committing a crime.
Artisan Partners Funds • P.O. Box 219322 • Kansas City, MO 64121-9322

Table of Contents
2
8
10
17
17
17
17
19
19
20
20
21
21
23
23
23
24
24
24
24
26
26
27
27
28
28
29
30
30
30
30
30
31
32
32
32
33
34
34
35
35
35
37

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds

Artisan Floating Rate Fund
Investor: [    ] |  Advisor: [    ] |  Institutional: [    ]
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks to provide total return through a combination of current income and long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. The table and expense example do not reflect any transaction fees or commissions that may be charged by a shareholder’s financial intermediary when buying or selling shares.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Investor
Advisor
Institutional
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases
(as a percentage of offering price)
None
None
None
Exchange Fee
None
None
None
Redemption Fee (as a percentage of amount redeemed
or exchanged within 90 days or less)
2.00%
2.00%
2.00%
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Investor
Advisor
Institutional
Management Fees
[ ]%
[ ]%
[ ]%
Distribution (12b-1) Fees
None
None
None
Other Expenses1
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses2
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
Fee Waiver and Expense Reimbursement3
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and
Expense Reimbursement
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]
1 “Other Expenses” are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
2 “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses” shown are estimated amounts for the current fiscal year and are indirect expenses the Fund incurred from the Fund’s investment in various money market funds and other investment companies (acquired funds).
3 [Artisan Partners Limited Partnership, the Fund’s investment adviser (“Artisan Partners”), has contractually agreed to bear certain expenses and waive its management fees to the extent necessary to cause total annual fund operating expenses (excluding taxes, interest, all commissions and other normal charges incident to the purchase and sale of portfolio securities, acquired fund fees and expenses, borrowing costs such as dividends on securities sold short, and extraordinary charges such as litigation costs, but including management fees paid to Artisan Partners) not to exceed [ %] of the average daily net assets of Investor Shares, [ %] of the average daily net assets of Advisor Shares and [ %] of the average daily net assets of Institutional Shares. This contract continues through [ ].]
Expense Example
The example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes a 5% return each year, and that the Fund’s operating expenses are equal to Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and Expense Reimbursement in the first year and Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses thereafter. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
Investor
[$ ]
[$ ]
Advisor
[$ ]
[$ ]
Institutional
[$ ]
[$ ]
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate is not available.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
2

Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund seeks to invest in issuers with high quality business models that have compelling risk-adjusted return characteristics. The Fund employs a fundamental investment process to construct a diversified portfolio comprised primarily of floating rate debt instruments that are attractively valued, including, without limitation, floating rate leveraged loans, which could include, among other types of loans, senior secured loans, unsecured loans, second lien loans, bridge loans and junior loans.
The Fund’s investment team’s research process has four primary pillars:
Business Quality—The team uses a variety of sources to understand the resiliency of an issuer’s business model. The team analyzes the general health of the industry in which an issuer operates, the issuer’s competitive position, barriers to entry, the dynamics of industry participants, and the decision-making history of the issuer’s management and, when applicable, financial equity sponsor. As part of the team’s analysis of a company’s business quality, among other factors, the team considers environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) factors relating to the company.
Financial Strength and Flexibility—The team believes that analyzing the history and trend of free cash flow generation is critical to understanding an issuer’s financial health. The team’s financial analysis also considers an issuer’s capital structure, refinancing options, asset or collateral coverage, financial covenants, amortization schedules and overall financial transparency.
Downside Analysis—The team believes that credit instruments by their nature have an asymmetric risk profile. The risk of loss is often greater than the potential for gain, particularly when looking at below investment grade issuers. The team seeks to manage this risk with what it believes to be conservative financial projections that account for industry position, competitive dynamics and positioning within the capital structure.
Value Identification—The team uses multiple metrics to determine the value of an investment opportunity. The team looks for credit improvement potential, relative value within an issuer’s capital structure and against industry peers, catalysts for business improvement and potential value stemming from market or industry dislocations and/or mergers and acquisitions (“M&A”).
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest no less than 80% of its net assets plus any borrowings for investment purposes at market value at the time of purchase in floating rate debt instruments and other investments that are the economic equivalent of floating rate debt instruments or enable the Fund to achieve a floating rate of income.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest primarily in instruments that are rated, at the time of purchase, below investment grade (below BBB- by Standard & Poor’s Rating Services (“S&P”) or Fitch, Inc. (“Fitch”) or below Baa3 by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”)), or comparably rated by another nationally recognized statistical rating organization (“NRSRO”), or unrated but determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality, commonly known as “junk bonds.”  Although the Fund expects to primarily invest in instruments that are rated below investment grade (or unrated but determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality) at the time of purchase, the Fund may invest without limit in instruments of any credit quality, including investment grade instruments and securities of stressed or distressed issuers.
The Fund may invest without limit in securities and other instruments of US and non-US issuers, including issuers economically tied to “emerging market” countries, securities traded principally outside of the United States, and securities denominated in currencies other than the US dollar. The Fund usually seeks (but is not required) to hedge against the risk of loss resulting from currency fluctuation.
In addition to floating rate debt instruments, the Fund also may invest in other corporate fixed income instruments of varying maturities, including fixed-rate instruments, debentures, notes, commercial paper and other types of corporate debt instruments across the credit quality spectrum, such as stressed and distressed debt securities. The Fund may invest in private placements and other restricted securities (i.e., securities that are purchased in private placements and, accordingly, are subject to restrictions on resale as a matter of contract or under federal securities laws). The Fund also may invest in exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”).
The Fund may use derivatives for investment, duration management or hedging purposes, or with the purpose or effect of creating investment leverage. The Fund may also use derivatives to manage liquidity risk. The Fund’s investments in derivative instruments may include investments in, among other instruments, futures contracts, swap contracts and certain currency instruments such as currency forward contracts and currency swap contracts.
Principal Risks
Like all mutual funds, the Fund takes investment risks and it is possible for you to lose money by investing in the Fund. The team’s ability to choose suitable investments for the Fund has a significant impact on the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. The Fund’s principal risks include:
Market Risks—Markets may perform poorly and the securities in which the Fund invests may underperform the general securities markets. Securities markets may experience periods of high volatility and reduced liquidity in response to governmental actions, intervention and/or policies, economic or market developments, or other external factors. The value of a company’s securities may rise or fall in response to company, market, economic, political, regulatory or other news.
Loan Risk—Investments in loans, including floating or adjustable rate loans, are generally subject to the same risks as investments in other types of debt obligations, including, among others, the credit risk of nonpayment of principal and interest. In addition, in many cases loans are subject to the risks associated with below investment grade securities. The Fund may invest in loans made in connection with highly

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
3

leveraged transactions, which are subject to greater credit and liquidity risks than other types of loans. Although the loans in which the Fund invests may be secured by specific collateral, there can be no assurance that liquidation of such collateral would satisfy the borrower’s obligation in the event of nonpayment of scheduled interest or principal, or that such collateral could be readily liquidated. In the event of the bankruptcy of a borrower, the Fund could experience delays or limitations with respect to its ability to realize the benefits of the collateral securing a loan or could recover nothing of what it is owed on the loan. Uncollateralized (i.e., non-secured) loans are subject to greater risk of loss (i.e., nonpayment) in the event of default than secured loans since they do not afford the Fund recourse to collateral. Investments in loans may be difficult to value and may be illiquid, including due to legal or contractual restrictions on resale. Transactions in many loans settle on a delayed basis, and the Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of a loan for a substantial period after the sale. As a result, sale proceeds related to the sale of loans may not be available to make additional investments or meet redemption obligations until a substantial period after the sale of the loans.
Credit Risk—An issuer or counterparty may fail to pay its obligations to the Fund when they are due. Financial strength and solvency (or the perceived financial strength or solvency) of an issuer are the primary factors influencing credit risk. Changes in the financial condition of an issuer or counterparty, changes in specific economic, social or political conditions that affect a particular type of security or other instrument or an issuer, and changes in economic, social or political conditions generally can increase the risk of default by an issuer or counterparty, which can affect a security’s or other instrument’s credit quality or value and an issuer’s or counterparty’s ability to pay interest and principal when due. The values of lower quality debt, including loans, tend to be particularly sensitive to these changes.
High Yield Securities (“Junk Bond”) Risk—Fixed income instruments rated below investment grade, or unrated securities that are determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality, are high yield, high risk bonds, commonly known as “junk bonds.”  These bonds are predominantly speculative. They are usually issued by companies without long track records of sales and earnings, or by companies with questionable credit strength. These bonds have a higher degree of default risk and may be less liquid than higher-rated bonds. These securities may be subject to greater price volatility due to such factors as specific corporate developments, interest rate sensitivity, negative perceptions of junk bonds generally and less secondary market liquidity. This potential lack of liquidity may make it more difficult for the Fund to accurately value these securities.
Interest Rate Risk—The values of debt instruments held by the Fund may fall in response to increases in interest rates. The value of a security with a longer duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a similar security with a shorter duration. Given the current low interest rate environment, risks associated with rising rates are heightened. If interest rates rise, repayments of principal on certain debt securities, including loans, may occur at a slower rate than expected and the expected length of repayment of those securities could increase as a result.
Debt Securities Risks—The value of a debt security changes in response to various factors, including, for example, market-related factors, such as changes in interest rates or changes in the actual or perceived ability of an issuer to meet its obligations. In general, the value of a debt security may fall in response to increases in interest rates. The Fund may invest in debt securities without considering the maturity of the instrument. The value of a security with a longer duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a similar security with a shorter duration. As a result, changes in interest rates in the US and outside the US may affect the Fund’s debt investments unfavorably.
Debt securities in which the Fund invests may be rated below investment grade or unrated securities that are determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality. Debt securities of below investment grade quality are high yield, high risk bonds, commonly known as “junk bonds.”  These bonds are predominantly speculative. They are usually issued by companies without long track records of sales and earnings, or by companies with questionable credit strength. These bonds have a higher degree of default risk, may be less liquid and may be subject to greater price volatility than higher-rated bonds.
Liquidity Risk—Liquidity risk is the risk that the Fund may be unable to sell a portfolio investment at a desirable time or at the value the Fund has placed on the investment. It may be more difficult for the Fund to determine a fair value of an illiquid investment than that of a more liquid comparable investment.
Valuation Risk—The Fund’s investments are valued in accordance with Artisan Partners Funds’ valuation policies. The valuation of any investment involves inherent uncertainty. The value of a security determined in accordance with the valuation policies may differ materially from the value that could have been realized in an actual sale or transfer for a variety of reasons, including the timing of the transaction and liquidity in the market.
Stressed and Distressed Instruments Risk—Investments in the securities of financially stressed or distressed issuers involve substantial risks, including the risk that all or a portion of principal will not be repaid. These securities may present a substantial risk of default or may be in default at the time of investment. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek recovery upon a default in the payment of principal or interest on its portfolio holdings. As with any issuer, the team’s judgments about the credit quality of a financially stressed or distressed issuer and the relative value of its securities may prove to be wrong.
Futures Contract Risk—The Fund may enter into futures contracts, in which the Fund agrees to buy or sell a security or other asset on a specified future date at a specified price or rate. There are risks associated with futures contracts, including the success of such an investment strategy may depend on an ability to predict movements in the prices of individual securities, fluctuations in markets and movements in interest rates; there may be an imperfect or no correlation between the changes in market value of the securities held by the Fund and the prices of futures; there may not be a liquid secondary market for a futures contract; trading restrictions or limitations may be imposed by an exchange; and government regulations may restrict trading in futures contracts.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
4

Counterparty Risks—The Fund will be subject to credit risk with respect to the counterparties to the derivative contracts and other instruments entered into by the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or insolvent or otherwise fails to perform its obligations to the Fund due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant losses or delays in obtaining any recovery (including recovery of any collateral it has provided to the counterparty) from the counterparty.
Foreign Investing Risks—Foreign securities may underperform US securities and may be more volatile than US securities. Risks relating to investments in foreign securities and to securities of issuers with significant exposure to foreign markets include currency exchange rate fluctuation; less available public information about the issuers of securities; less stringent regulatory standards; lack of uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; and country risks, including less liquidity, high inflation rates, unfavorable economic practices, political instability and expropriation and nationalization risks.
Emerging and Developing Markets Risks—Investment risks typically are greater in emerging and less developed markets. For example, in addition to the risks associated with investments in any foreign country, political, legal and economic structures in these less developed countries may be new and changing rapidly, which may cause instability and greater risk of loss. Their securities markets may be less developed, and securities in those markets are generally more volatile and less liquid than those in the developed markets. Investing in emerging market countries may involve substantial risk due to, among other reasons, limited information; higher brokerage costs; different accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; less developed legal systems and thinner trading markets as compared to those in developed countries; different clearing and settlement procedures and custodial services; and currency blockages or transfer restrictions. Emerging market countries also are more likely to experience high levels of inflation, deflation or currency devaluations, which could hurt their economies and securities markets. Certain emerging markets also may face other significant internal or external risks, including a heightened risk of war or ethnic, religious or racial conflicts. In addition, governments in many emerging market countries participate to a significant degree in their economies and securities markets, which may impair investment and economic growth of companies in those markets. Such markets may also be heavily reliant on foreign capital and, therefore, vulnerable to capital flight.
Currency Risks—Foreign securities usually are denominated and traded in foreign currencies and the exchange rates between foreign currencies and the US dollar fluctuate continuously. The Fund’s performance will be affected by its direct or indirect exposure to a particular currency due to favorable or unfavorable changes in currency exchange rates relative to the US dollar. The Fund’s direct or indirect exposure to a particular currency may be hedged to mitigate currency volatility or because the Fund believes a currency is overvalued. There can be no guarantee that any hedging activity will be successful. Hedging activity and/or use of forward foreign currency contracts may reduce or limit the opportunity for gain and involves counterparty risk, which is the risk that the contracting party will not fulfill its contractual obligation to deliver the currency contracted for at the agreed upon price to the Fund.
Private Placement and Restricted Securities Risk— In addition to the general risks to which all securities are subject, securities acquired in a private placement generally are subject to strict restrictions on resale, and there may be no liquid secondary market or ready purchaser for such securities, and a liquid secondary market may never develop. Therefore, the Fund may be unable to dispose of such securities when it desires to do so or at a favorable time or price. This potential lack of liquidity may make it more difficult for the Fund to accurately value these securities. Issuers of private placements or other restricted securities may include special purpose vehicles (“SPVs”) that hold underlying assets to which the Fund wants to gain exposure. The Fund may have the right to receive payments only from the SPV, and may not have direct rights against the issuer of the underlying assets. Investors in such SPVs generally pay their share of the SPV’s administrative and other expenses, including management fees.
Leverage Risk—Certain transactions, including, for example, the use of certain derivatives, can result in leverage. Leverage generally has the effect of increasing the amounts of loss or gain the Fund might realize, and creates the likelihood of greater volatility of the value of the Fund’s investments. There is risk of loss in excess of invested capital.
LIBOR Replacement Risk—The coupons on variable and floating rate investments in which the Fund may invest are not fixed and may fluctuate based upon changes in market rates. The coupon on a floating rate investment is generally based on an interest rate such as a money-market index, London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or a Treasury bill rate. In addition, certain floating and variable rate obligations have an interest rate floor feature, which prevents the interest rate payable by the security from dropping below a specified level as compared to a reference interest rate (the “reference rate”), such as LIBOR. The future elimination of LIBOR, among other “inter-bank offered” reference rates, may adversely affect the interest rates on, and value of, certain Fund investments for which the value is tied to LIBOR.
ETF Risk—ETFs generally expose their shareholders to the risks associated with the assets in which the ETF invests. Additionally, as exchange-traded investment vehicles, ETFs may involve market risk, management risk and (for index funds) tracking risk. If the Fund acquires shares of an ETF, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of expenses in the Fund (including management and advisory fees) and, indirectly, the expenses of the ETF.
Convertible Securities Risks—Investing in convertible securities subjects the Fund to the risks of debt, but also the risks associated with an investment in the underlying equity security. Convertible securities are frequently issued with a call feature that allows the issuer to choose when to redeem the security, which could result in the Fund being forced to redeem, convert, or sell the convertible security under circumstances unfavorable to the Fund.
Derivatives Risk —A derivative is a financial contract whose value depends on changes in the value of one or more underlying assets, reference rates or indexes. These instruments include, among others, participation certificates, credit default swaps, currency forward

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
5

contracts, currency swap contracts and other swap agreements and similar instruments. The Fund’s use of derivatives may involve risks different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives can be highly complex and may perform in ways unanticipated by Artisan Partners.
In addition to the risks of an adverse change in the value of the underlying reference asset, the Fund’s use of derivatives involves the risk that the other party to the derivative contract will fail to make required payments or otherwise to comply with the terms of the contract. Derivatives transactions can create investment leverage and may be highly volatile, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invests. Derivatives may be difficult to value and highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative position at a particular time or at an anticipated price.
Recent US and non-US legislative and regulatory reforms, including those related to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act have resulted in, and may in the future result in, new regulation of derivative instruments and the Fund’s use of such instruments. New regulations could, among other things, restrict the Fund’s ability to engage in derivative transactions (for example, by making certain types of derivative instruments or transactions no longer available to the Fund) and/or increase the costs of such transactions, and the Fund may as a result be unable to execute its investment strategies in a manner Artisan Partners might otherwise choose.
Government Securities Risk—The Fund invests in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or its agencies and instrumentalities (such as the Government National Mortgage Association (“Ginnie Mae”), the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), or the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”)). Unlike Ginnie Mae securities, securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. Government-related organizations, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government and no assurance can be given that the U.S. Government would provide financial support.
Risks of Emphasizing a Region, Country, Sector or Industry—If the Fund has invested a higher percentage of its total assets in a particular region, country, sector or industry, changes affecting that region, country, sector or industry may have a significant impact on the performance of the Fund’s overall portfolio.
Impact of Actions by Other Shareholders—The Fund, like all mutual funds, pools the investments of many investors. Actions by one investor or multiple investors in the Fund may have an adverse effect on the Fund and on other investors. For example, shareholder purchase and redemption activity may affect the per share amount of the Fund’s distributions of its net income and net realized gains, if any, thereby increasing or reducing the tax burden on the Fund’s shareholders subject to income tax who receive Fund distributions.
Operational and Cybersecurity Risks—Operational failures, cyber-attacks or other disruptions that affect the Fund’s service providers, the Fund’s counterparties, other market participants or the issuers of securities held by the Fund may adversely affect the Fund and its shareholders, including by causing losses for the Fund or impairing Fund operations.
No Operating History Risk—The Fund is a newly formed fund and has no operating history for investors to evaluate.
Performance
Performance information has not been presented because the Fund has not been in existence for a full calendar year as of the date of this prospectus.
Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser: Artisan Partners
Portfolio Managers
Title
Length of Service
Bryan C. Krug
Managing Director and Lead Portfolio Manager, Artisan Partners
Since [December 2021] (inception)
Seth B. Yeager
Portfolio Manager, Artisan Partners
Since [December 2021] (inception)
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Minimum Investments
Investor
Advisor
Institutional
To open an account
$1,000
$250,000
$1,000,000
To add to an account
No minimum
No minimum
No minimum
Minimum balance required
$1,000
$250,000
$1,000,000
The Fund will waive the minimum investment requirements for certain employee benefit plans and certain financial intermediaries that submit orders on behalf of their customers, although the intermediaries may impose their own minimum investment requirements. The Fund may also reduce or waive the minimum investment requirements under certain circumstances.
You may purchase, exchange or redeem shares of the Fund each day the New York Stock Exchange is open for regular session trading at the Fund’s net asset value next calculated after receipt and acceptance of your request in good order. To purchase, exchange or redeem shares you should contact your financial intermediary, or, if you hold your shares or plan to purchase shares directly through the Fund, you should

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
6

contact the Fund by phone at 800.344.1770 (866.773.7233 for Institutional Shares), by regular mail at Artisan Partners Funds, P.O. Box 219322, Kansas City, MO 64121-9322, or by express, certified or registered mail at Artisan Partners Funds, 430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219322, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407. Some redemptions require Medallion signature guarantees.
Tax Information
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income, or capital gains, except when you are investing through a tax-advantaged arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. If you invest through such tax-advantaged arrangements, you may be subject to tax upon withdrawal from those arrangements.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase Fund shares through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial advisor), the Fund, the investment adviser and/or the distributor may pay the financial intermediary for the services provided to the Fund and its shareholders. The investment adviser and/or the distributor may also pay the financial intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
7

Additional Information about the Fund’s Investment Strategies
The following supplements the information regarding the Fund’s investment objective and principal investment strategies set forth in the “Fund Summary.”  The investment objective of the Fund may be changed by the board of directors without shareholder approval. Investors in the Fund will receive at least 30 days’ prior written notice of implementation of any such change in the Fund’s investment objective.
The Fund seeks to provide total return through a combination of current income and long-term capital appreciation.
The Fund seeks to invest in issuers with high quality business models that have compelling risk-adjusted return characteristics. The Fund employs a fundamental investment process to construct a diversified portfolio comprised primarily of floating rate debt instruments that are attractively valued, including, without limitation, floating rate leveraged loans, which could include, among other types of loans, senior secured loans, unsecured loans, second lien loans, bridge loans and junior loans.
The Fund’s investment team’s research process has four primary pillars:
Business Quality—The team uses a variety of sources to understand the resiliency of an issuer’s business model. The team analyzes the general health of the industry in which an issuer operates, the issuer’s competitive position, barriers to entry, the dynamics of industry participants, and the decision-making history of the issuer’s management and, when applicable, financial equity sponsor. As part of the team’s analysis of a company’s business quality, among other factors, the team considers environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) factors relating to the company.
Financial Strength and Flexibility—The team believes that analyzing the history and trend of free cash flow generation is critical to understanding an issuer’s financial health. The team’s financial analysis also considers an issuer’s capital structure, refinancing options, asset or collateral coverage, financial covenants, amortization schedules and overall financial transparency.
Downside Analysis—The team believes that credit instruments by their nature have an asymmetric risk profile. The risk of loss is often greater than the potential for gain, particularly when looking at below investment grade issuers. The team seeks to manage this risk with what it believes to be conservative financial projections that account for industry position, competitive dynamics and positioning within the capital structure.
Value Identification—The team uses multiple metrics to determine the value of an investment opportunity. The team looks for credit improvement potential, relative value within an issuer’s capital structure and against industry peers, catalysts for business improvement and potential value stemming from market or industry dislocations and/or mergers and acquisitions (“M&A”).
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest no less than 80% of its net assets plus any borrowings for investment purposes at market value at the time of purchase in floating rate debt instruments and other investments that are the economic equivalent of floating rate debt instruments or enable the Fund to achieve a floating rate of income. Floating rate debt instruments for this purpose are those debt obligations of companies or other entities that have (a) interest at rates that adjust periodically, often, though not necessarily, based on a benchmark rate plus a premium or spread over the benchmark rate, or (b) maturities of six months or less even if the interest rates do not adjust periodically. The benchmark rate usually is the Prime Rate, LIBOR, Secured Overnight Funding Rate (“SOFR”), the Federal Reserve federal funds rate, or other base lending rates used by commercial lenders. For purposes of the 80% policy, money market holdings with a remaining maturity of less than 60 days will be deemed floating rate investments. In addition, fixed-rate investments with respect to which the Fund has entered into derivative instruments to effectively convert the fixed-rate interest payments into floating or adjustable rate interest payments; exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) or notes that provide exposure to floating or adjustable rate loans or obligations; and money market investment companies, as applicable, are examples of other investments considered by the Fund to be eligible for the purpose of satisfying the 80% policy. The Fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days prior to any change in this 80% policy.
The Fund may invest directly in secured or unsecured loans or invest in loan assignments or participations with respect to borrowers operating in any industry. Secured loans are secured by collateral, while unsecured loans are not secured by any collateral. The Fund may invest in senior loans, which hold senior positions in the borrower’s capital structure. The Fund also may invest in subordinated loans (e.g., second-lien loans and mezzanine loans), whole loans, commercial real estate and other commercial loans and structured loans. In the case of subordinated loans, there may be significant indebtedness ranking ahead of the borrower’s obligation to the holder of such a loan, including in the event of the borrower’s insolvency.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest primarily in instruments that are rated, at the time of purchase, below investment grade (below BBB- by S&P or Fitch or below Baa3 by Moody’s), or comparably rated by another NRSRO, or unrated but determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality, commonly known as “junk bonds.”  The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in high-yield securities that are rated in the lower rating categories by one or more NRSRO (for example, CCC+ or lower by S&P or Fitch or Caa1 or lower by Moody’s) or, if unrated, are determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality. Although the Fund expects to primarily invest in instruments that are rated below investment grade (or unrated but determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality) at the time of purchase, the Fund may invest without limit in instruments of any credit quality, including investment grade instruments and securities of stressed or distressed issuers. Investment grade instruments are subject to lower credit risk but typically have relatively low rates. Instruments issued by stressed and distressed issuers are subject to very high credit risk but typically have relatively high rates.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
8

The Fund may invest without limit in securities and other instruments of US and non-US issuers, including issuers economically tied to “emerging market” countries, securities traded principally outside of the United States, and securities denominated in currencies other than the US dollar. The Fund usually seeks (but is not required) to hedge against the risk of loss resulting from currency fluctuation.
In addition to floating rate debt instruments, the Fund also may invest in other corporate fixed income instruments of varying maturities, including fixed-rate instruments, debentures, notes, commercial paper and other types of corporate debt instruments across the credit quality spectrum, such as stressed and distressed debt securities. The Fund may invest in private placements and other restricted securities (i.e., securities that are purchased in private placements and, accordingly, are subject to restrictions on resale as a matter of contract or under federal securities laws). The Fund also may invest in exchange-traded funds.
Generally, the Fund uses the terms debt security, debt obligation, bond, fixed income security and fixed income instrument interchangeably and regards them to mean a security or instrument having one or more of the following characteristics: a fixed income security, a security or instrument issued at a discount to its face value, a security or instrument that pays interest in cash or in-kind at a fixed, floating or variable rate or a security or instrument with a stated principal amount that requires repayment of some or all of that principal amount to the holder of the security. The terms debt security, debt obligation, bond, fixed income security and fixed income instrument are interpreted broadly by Artisan Partners as an instrument or security evidencing what is commonly referred to as an IOU rather than evidencing the corporate ownership of equity unless that equity represents an indirect or derivative interest in one or more debt securities. For this purpose, the terms also include instruments that are intended to provide one or more of the characteristics of a direct investment in one or more debt securities. As new fixed income instruments are developed, the Fund may invest in those opportunities as well.
The Fund also may invest in debt obligations issued by governments (including, without limitation, obligations issued or guaranteed by the US government) and/or their agencies and instrumentalities. From time to time, the Fund may invest in or hold common stock, preferred stock, convertible securities, and other equity securities or warrants. The Fund may purchase securities on a when-issued or delayed delivery basis.
The Fund may use derivatives for investment, duration management or hedging purposes, or with the purpose or effect of creating investment leverage. The Fund may also use derivatives to manage liquidity risk. To the extent the Fund invests in derivative instruments, the Fund may count the value of derivative securities with floating rate loan characteristics towards its 80% policy. The Fund’s investments in derivative instruments may include investments in, among other instruments, futures contracts, swap contracts and certain currency instruments such as currency forward contracts and currency swap contracts.
The Fund may borrow up to the amount allowed by applicable law to fund redemptions, post collateral for hedges, or to purchase investments prior to settlement of pending sale transactions.
The Fund may sell an investment when the team thinks changing circumstances have affected the original reasons for the instrument’s purchase, the issuer of the instrument exhibits deteriorating credit or other fundamentals, or more attractive investment opportunities are identified.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
9

Risks You Should Consider
Like all mutual funds, the Fund takes investment risks and it is possible for you to lose money by investing in the Fund. Investors in the Fund should have a long-term perspective and be able to tolerate potentially sharp declines in value. This section describes the principal risks associated with investing in the Fund, but is not a complete list of every risk involved in investing in the Fund and the Fund may be exposed to additional risks not listed below. The “Investment Techniques and Risks” section in the Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) includes more information about the Fund, its investments and the related risks. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit, and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
The principal risks that apply to the Fund include:
Market Risks—Various market risks can affect the price or liquidity of securities in which the Fund may invest. The securities in which the Fund invests may underperform the various general securities markets or different asset classes. Different types of securities tend to go through cycles of outperformance and underperformance in comparison to the general securities markets. Adverse events occurring with respect to an issuer’s performance or financial position can depress the value of the issuer’s securities. The liquidity in a market for a particular security will affect its value and may be affected by factors relating to the issuer, as well as the depth of the market for that security. Other factors that can affect an investment’s value include, without limitation, investor sentiment regarding certain types of securities or asset classes, market reactions to political or economic events, litigation relating to a particular issuer or industry, and tax and regulatory environments or developments (including lack of adequate regulations for a market or particular type of instrument).
Securities markets may experience periods of high volatility and reduced liquidity in response to governmental actions, intervention and/or policies, economic or market developments, or other external factors. During those periods, the Fund may experience high levels of shareholder redemptions, and may have to sell securities at times when the Fund would otherwise not do so, and potentially at unfavorable prices. Securities may be difficult to value during such periods. These risks may be heightened for fixed income securities due to the current low interest rate environment.
Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators may take actions that affect the regulation of the securities in which the Fund invests or the issuers of such securities in ways that are unforeseeable. Legislation or regulation also may change the way in which the Fund or Artisan Partners are regulated, limit or preclude the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective and/or affect the Fund’s performance. Governmental and quasi-governmental authorities and regulators have in the past responded to major economic disruptions with a variety of significant fiscal and monetary policy changes, including but not limited to direct capital infusions into companies, increased government spending, new monetary programs and dramatically lower interest rates. While such policies or actions generally are intended to strengthen markets, the financial system and public finances, there can be no guarantee that such policies or actions will be sufficient or will have their intended effect. In addition, discontinuation or reversal of such policies could increase volatility in or otherwise adversely affect securities markets, which could adversely affect the Fund’s investments.
Political, social or financial instability, civil unrest and acts of terrorism are among other potential risks that could adversely affect securities markets generally or the values of individual securities.
Loan Risk—The Fund may make loans directly to borrowers or may acquire an interest in a loan by means of either an assignment or a participation. Investments in loans are generally subject to the same risks as investments in other types of debt obligations, including, among others, credit risk, interest rate risk, prepayment risk and extension risk. In addition, in many cases loans are subject to the risks associated with below investment grade securities. This means loans are often subject to significant credit risks, including a greater possibility that the borrower will be adversely affected by changes in market or economic conditions and may default or enter bankruptcy. This risk of default will increase in the event of an economic downturn or a substantial increase in interest rates (which will increase the cost of the borrower’s debt service). Opportunities to invest in loans or certain types of loans may be limited.
The Fund may invest in loans made in connection with highly leveraged transactions. These transactions may include operating loans, leveraged buyout loans, leveraged capitalization loans and other types of acquisition financing. Those loans are subject to greater credit and liquidity risks than other types of loans. The Fund may invest in loans of borrowers that are experiencing, or are likely to experience, financial difficulty.
Loans in which the Fund may invest typically pay interest at floating rates. It is possible that the borrower may have the ability to change or to adjust the interest rate on a loan under circumstances or in ways that are unfavorable to the Fund, or that the timing or calculation of scheduled changes in the interest rate on a loan held by the Fund may delay, or prevent, the Fund from realizing the effects of favorable changes in interest rates.
Although the loans in which the Fund invests may be secured by specific collateral, there can be no assurance that liquidation of such collateral would satisfy the borrower’s obligation in the event of nonpayment of scheduled interest or principal, or that such collateral could be readily liquidated. In the event of the bankruptcy of a borrower, the Fund could experience delays or limitations in realizing the benefits of the collateral securing a loan or could recover nothing of what it is owed on the secured loan. If the terms of a secured loan do not require the borrower to pledge additional collateral in the event of a decline in the value of the already pledged collateral, the Fund will be exposed to the risk that the value of the collateral will not at all times equal or exceed the amount of the borrower’s obligations under the loan. To the extent that a loan is collateralized by stock in the borrower or its subsidiaries, such stock may lose all of its value in the event of the bankruptcy of the borrower. Uncollateralized (i.e., non-secured) loans are subject to greater risk of loss (i.e., nonpayment) in the event of default than secured loans since they do not afford the Fund recourse to collateral. The claims of holders of unsecured loans may be

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
10

subordinated, and thus lower in priority, to claims of creditors holding secured indebtedness and possibly other classes of creditors holding unsecured debt.
The Fund may invest in bridge loans, which may be designed to provide temporary or “bridge” financing to a borrower pending the purchase of identified assets or the arrangement of longer-term loans or the issuance and sale of debt obligations. If the Fund enters into a commitment with a borrower regarding a delayed draw term loan or bridge loan, the Fund may be obligated on one or more dates in the future to lend funds to the borrower (up to an aggregate stated amount) if called upon to do so by the borrower, which may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its exposure to a company at a time when it might not otherwise be desirable to do so (including a time when the company’s financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid or which the Fund needs to sell other assets to raise cash to satisfy its obligor). Because investing in these types of loans creates a future obligation for the Fund to provide funding to a borrower upon demand in exchange for a fee, the Fund will segregate or earmark liquid assets with the Fund’s custodian in amounts sufficient to satisfy any such future obligations.
Investments in loans may be difficult to value and may be illiquid for reasons including legal or contractual restrictions on resale. The secondary market for loans may be subject to irregular trading activity, wide bid/ask spreads and extended trade settlement periods, which may cause the Fund to be unable to realize the full value of its investment in the loan, resulting in a material decline in the Fund’s net asset value.
Transactions in many loans settle on a delayed basis, and the Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of a loan for a substantial period after the sale. As a result, sale proceeds related to the sale of loans may not be available to make additional investments or meet redemption obligations until a substantial period after the sale of the loans.
In a loan participation, the Fund purchases a participating interest in a portion of the rights of a lending institution in a loan. In such case, the Fund will generally be entitled to receive from the lending institution amounts equal to the payments of principal, interest and premium, if any, on the loan received by the institution, but generally will not be entitled to enforce its rights directly against the agent bank or the borrower, and must rely for that purpose on the lending institution.
If the Fund holds a loan through another financial intermediary, as is the case with a participation, or relies on another financial intermediary to administer the loan, as is the case with most multi-lender facilities, the Fund’s receipt of principal and interest on the loan and the value of the Fund’s loan investment will depend at least in part on the credit standing of the financial intermediary and therefore will be subject to the credit risk of the intermediary. The Fund will be required to rely upon the financial intermediary from which it purchases a participation interest to collect and pass on to the Fund such payments and to enforce the Fund’s rights and may not be able to cause the financial intermediary to take what it considers to be appropriate action. As a result, an insolvency, bankruptcy or reorganization of the financial intermediary may delay or prevent the Fund from receiving principal, interest and other amounts with respect to the Fund’s interest in the loan. In addition, if the Fund relies on a financial intermediary to administer a loan, the Fund is subject to the risk that the financial intermediary may be unwilling or unable to demand and receive payments from the borrower in respect of the loan, or otherwise unwilling or unable to perform its administrative obligations. The Fund may be subject to heightened or additional risks by investing in mezzanine and other subordinated loans due to increased credit risk. The Fund may be subject to potential liabilities or costs, including liabilities and costs arising under bankruptcy, fraudulent conveyance, equitable subordination, lender liability, environmental, the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act the Office of Foreign Assets Control and other laws and regulations, and risks and costs associated with debt servicing and taking foreclosure actions associated with the loans.
Investments in loans through a direct loan may involve additional risks to the Fund. For example, if a loan is foreclosed, the Fund could become part owner of any collateral, and would bear the costs and liabilities associated with owning and disposing of the collateral. In addition, it is conceivable that under emerging legal theories of lender liability, the Fund could be held liable as co-owner. It is unclear whether certain loans and other forms of direct indebtedness offer securities law protections against fraud and misrepresentation.
Credit Risk—An issuer or counterparty may fail to pay its obligations to the Fund when they are due. Financial strength and solvency (or the perceived financial strength or solvency) of an issuer are the primary factors influencing credit risk. Changes in the financial condition of an issuer or counterparty, changes in specific economic, social or political conditions that affect a particular type of security or other instrument or an issuer, and changes in economic, social or political conditions generally can increase the risk of default by an issuer or counterparty, which can affect a security’s or other instrument’s credit quality or value and an issuer’s or counterparty’s ability to pay interest and principal when due. The values of lower quality debt, including loans, tend to be particularly sensitive to these changes. The values of investments also may decline for a number of other reasons that relate directly to the issuer, such as management performance, financial leverage and reduced demand for the issuer’s goods and services, as well as the historical and prospective earnings of the issuer and the value of its assets. In addition, lack or inadequacy of collateral or credit enhancements for a debt obligation may affect its credit risk. Credit risk of an investment may change over time, and securities or other instruments that are rated by ratings agencies may be subject to downgrade. Ratings are only opinions of the agencies issuing them as to the likelihood of payment. They are not guarantees as to quality and they do not reflect market risk. If an issuer or counterparty fails to pay interest, the Fund’s income might be reduced and the value of the investment might fall, and if an issuer or counterparty fails to pay principal, the value of the investment might fall and the Fund could lose the amount of its investment.
High Yield Securities (“Junk Bond”) Risk—Fixed income instruments rated below investment grade, or unrated securities that are determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality, are high yield, high risk bonds, commonly known as “junk bonds.”  These bonds are predominantly speculative. They are usually issued by companies without long track records of sales and earnings, or by companies with

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
11

questionable credit strength. These bonds have a higher degree of default risk and may be less liquid than higher-rated bonds. These securities may be subject to greater price volatility due to such factors as specific corporate developments, interest rate sensitivity, negative perceptions of junk bonds generally and less secondary market liquidity. This potential lack of liquidity may make it more difficult for the Fund to accurately value these securities. In the event that the Fund disposes of a portfolio security after it is downgraded, the Fund may experience a greater loss than if such security had been sold prior to the downgrade.
Interest Rate Risk—The values of debt instruments held by the Fund may fall in response to increases in interest rates. In general, the values of debt securities fall in response to increases in interest rates and rise in response to decreases in interest rates. The value of a security with a longer duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a similar security with a shorter duration. Duration is a measure of the expected life of a bond that is used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates. For example, the price of a bond fund with an average duration of three years generally would be expected to fall approximately 3% if interest rates rose by one percentage point. Inverse floaters, interest-only and principal-only securities are especially sensitive to interest rate changes, which can affect not only their prices but can also change the income flows and repayment assumptions for those investments. Floating and other adjustable rate loan and debt instruments also react to interest rate changes in a similar manner, although generally to a lesser degree (depending, however, on the characteristics of the reset terms, including the index chosen, frequency of reset and reset caps or floors, among other things). Because rates on certain floating rate loans and floating rate debt instruments reset only periodically, changes in prevailing interest rates (and particularly sudden and significant changes) can be expected to cause fluctuations in the Fund's NAV. Because the Fund invests primarily in floating rate loans and floating rate debt securities, a decrease in interest rates will typically reduce the amount of income the Fund receives from such loans. In addition, interest rates in the United States are near historically low levels. As such, funds that hold bonds may currently face an increased exposure to the risks associated with rising interest rates. This is especially true as the Federal Reserve Board ended its quantitative easing program in October 2014 and has begun, and may continue, to raise interest rates. To the extent the Federal Board continues to raise interest rates, there is a risk that rates across the financial system may rise.
If interest rates rise, repayments of principal on certain debt securities, including loans, may occur at a slower rate than expected and the expected length of repayment of those securities could increase as a result (i.e., extension risk). Securities that are subject to extension risk generally have a greater potential for loss when prevailing interest rates rise, which could cause their values to fall sharply. Prepayment risk results from borrowers paying debt securities prior to their maturity date. When a prepayment happens, all or a portion of the obligation will be prepaid. A borrower is more likely to prepay an obligation which bears a relatively high rate of interest. This means that in times of declining interest rates, a portion of the Fund’s higher yielding securities are likely to be prepaid and the Fund will probably be unable to reinvest those proceeds in an investment with as high a yield. A decline in income received by the Fund from its investments is likely to have a negative effect on the yield and total return of the Fund’s shares.
Debt Securities Risks—The value of a debt security changes in response to various factors, including, for example, market-related factors, such as changes in interest rates or changes in the actual or perceived ability of an issuer to meet its obligations. In general, the value of a debt security may fall in response to increases in interest rates. The Fund may invest in debt securities without considering the maturity of the instrument. The value of a security with a longer duration will be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than a similar security with a shorter duration. As a result, changes in interest rates in the US and outside the US may affect the Fund’s debt investments unfavorably.
Debt securities in which the Fund invests may be rated below investment grade or unrated securities that are determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality. Debt securities of below investment grade quality are high yield, high risk bonds, commonly known as “junk bonds.”  These bonds are predominantly speculative. They are usually issued by companies without long track records of sales and earnings, or by companies with questionable credit strength. These bonds have a higher degree of default risk, may be less liquid and may be subject to greater price volatility than higher-rated bonds.
Liquidity Risk—The Fund may invest in securities that trade in lower volumes and may be less liquid than other investments. Additionally, the market for certain investments may become illiquid under actual or perceived adverse market or economic conditions (e.g., if interest rates rise or fall significantly, if there is significant inflation or deflation, or increased selling of debt securities generally across other funds, pools and accounts) independent of any specific adverse changes in the conditions of a particular issuer. In such cases, shares of the Fund, due to limitations on investments in illiquid securities and the difficulty in purchasing and selling such securities or instruments, may decline in value or the Fund may be unable to achieve its desired level of exposure to a certain issuer or sector. When there is no willing buyer and investments cannot be readily sold or closed out, the Fund may have to sell at a lower price than the price at which the Fund is carrying the investments or may not be able to sell the investments at all, each of which would have a negative effect on the Fund’s performance. It is possible that the Fund may be unable to sell a portfolio investment at a desirable time or at the value the Fund has placed on the investment or that the Fund may be forced to sell large amounts of securities more quickly than it normally would in the ordinary course of business. In such a case, the sale proceeds received by the Fund may be substantially less than if the Fund had been able to sell the securities in more-orderly transactions, and the sale price may be substantially lower than the price previously used by the Fund to value the securities for purposes of determining the Fund’s net asset value. In addition, if the Fund sells investments with extended settlement times, the settlement proceeds from the sales may not be available to meet the Fund’s redemption obligations, or for reinvestment in other securities, for a substantial period of time. The values of illiquid investments are often more volatile than the values of more liquid investments. It may be more difficult for the Fund to determine a fair value of an illiquid investment than that of a more liquid comparable investment.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
12

Valuation Risk—The Fund’s investments are valued in accordance with Artisan Partners Funds’ valuation policies. The valuation of any investment involves inherent uncertainty. The value of a security determined in accordance with the valuation policies may differ materially from the value that could have been realized in an actual sale or transfer for a variety of reasons, including the timing of the transaction and liquidity in the market.
Stressed and Distressed Instruments Risk—Investments in the securities of financially stressed or distressed issuers involve substantial risks, including the risk that all or a portion of principal will not be repaid. These securities may present a substantial risk of default or may be in default at the time of investment. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek recovery upon a default in the payment of principal or interest on its portfolio holdings. As with any issuer, the team’s judgments about the credit quality of a financially stressed or distressed issuer and the relative value of its securities may prove to be wrong.
Futures Contracts Risk—The Fund may buy and sell futures contracts. A futures contract provides for the future sale by one party and purchase by another party of a specified amount of a financial instrument or money at a specified time and price.
The Fund may use futures contracts for hedging, risk management or portfolio management purposes, including to offset changes in the value of securities held or expected to be acquired or be disposed of, to minimize fluctuations in foreign currencies, or to gain exposure to a particular market or instrument.
To avoid leveraging and related risks, when the Fund invests in futures contracts, it will cover its position by earmarking or segregating an amount of cash or liquid securities, equal to the market value of the futures positions held less margin deposits. The market value of a futures contract is equal to the gains or losses on the contract, which are marked to market at least daily. Variation margin payments equal to the amount of mark-to-market gains or losses on futures contracts are made to, or from, the account of the holder each day generally through the clearinghouse. Because of the daily marking to market and payment of variation margin of futures contracts, a position begins each day with “zero” market value.
There are risks associated with futures contracts including the success of such an investment strategy may depend on an ability to predict movements in the prices of individual securities, fluctuations in markets and movements in interest rates; there may be an imperfect or no correlation between the changes in market value of the securities held by the Fund and the prices of futures; there may not be a liquid secondary market for a futures contract; trading restrictions or limitations may be imposed by an exchange; and government regulations may restrict trading in futures contracts.
Counterparty Risks—The Fund will be subject to credit risk with respect to the counterparties to the derivative contracts and other instruments entered into by the Fund. If a counterparty becomes bankrupt or insolvent or otherwise fails to perform its obligations to the Fund due to financial difficulties, the Fund may experience significant losses or delays in obtaining any recovery (including recovery of any collateral it has provided to the counterparty) from the counterparty. Counterparty risk with respect to certain exchange-traded and over-the-counter derivatives may be further complicated by US financial reform legislation.
Foreign Investing Risks—Foreign securities may underperform US securities and may be more volatile than US securities. Risks relating to investments in foreign securities (including, but not limited to, depositary receipts and participation certificates) and to securities of issuers with significant exposure to foreign markets include currency exchange rate fluctuation; less available public information about the issuers of securities; less stringent regulatory standards; lack of uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; and country risks, including less liquidity, high inflation rates and unfavorable economic practices; and political instability and expropriation and nationalization risks.
Emerging and Developing Markets Risks—Investment risks typically are greater in emerging, less developed and developing markets. For example, in addition to the risks associated with investments in any foreign country, political, legal and economic structures in these less developed countries may be new and changing rapidly, which may cause instability and greater risk of loss. Their securities markets may be less developed, and securities in those markets are generally more volatile and less liquid than those in the developed markets. Emerging and developing market countries also are more likely to experience high levels of inflation, deflation or currency devaluations, which could hurt their economies and securities markets. Certain emerging and developing markets also may face other significant internal or external risks, including a heightened risk of war, or ethnic, religious or racial conflicts. In addition, governments in many emerging and developing market countries participate to a significant degree in their economies and securities markets, which may impair investment and economic growth of companies in those markets. Such markets may also be heavily reliant on foreign capital and, therefore, vulnerable to capital flight.
Investing in emerging and developing market countries involves substantial risk due to, among other reasons, limited information; higher brokerage costs; different accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; less developed legal systems and thinner trading markets as compared to those in developed countries; and currency blockages or transfer restrictions. The securities markets of emerging and developing market countries may be substantially smaller, less developed, less liquid and more volatile than the major securities markets in the US and other developed nations. The limited size of many securities markets in emerging and developing market countries and limited trading volume in issuers compared to the volume in US securities or securities of issuers in other developed countries could cause prices to be erratic for reasons other than factors that affect the quality of the securities. In addition, emerging and developing market countries’ exchanges and broker-dealers may generally be subject to less regulation than their counterparts in developed countries. Brokerage commissions and dealer mark-ups, custodial expenses and other transaction costs are generally higher in emerging and developing market countries than in developed countries, all of which can increase fund operating expenses and/or negatively impact fund performance.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
13

Emerging and developing market countries may have different clearance and settlement procedures than in the US, and in certain markets there may be times when settlements fail to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions, making it difficult to conduct such transactions. Further, satisfactory custodial services for investment securities may not be available in some emerging and developing market countries, which may result in additional costs and delays in trading and settlement. The inability of the Fund to make intended security purchases due to settlement problems or the risk of intermediary or counterparty failures could cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities. The inability to dispose of a portfolio security due to settlement problems could result either in losses to the Fund due to subsequent declines in the value of such portfolio security or, if the Fund has entered into a contract to sell the security, could result in possible liability to the purchaser.
Currency Risks—Foreign securities usually are denominated and traded in foreign currencies, while the Fund values its assets in US dollars. The exchange rates between foreign currencies and the US dollar fluctuate continuously. As a result, the Fund’s performance will be affected by its direct or indirect exposure, which may include exposure through US dollar denominated depositary receipts and participation certificates, to a particular currency due to favorable or unfavorable changes in currency exchange rates relative to the US dollar. Currency exchange rates fluctuate significantly for many reasons, including changes in supply and demand in the currency exchange markets, actual or perceived changes in interest rates, intervention (or the failure to intervene) by US or foreign governments, central banks, or supranational agencies such as the International Monetary Fund and currency controls or other political and economic developments in the US or abroad.
The Fund’s direct or indirect exposure to a particular currency may be hedged to mitigate currency volatility or because the Fund believes a currency is overvalued. There can be no guarantee that any hedging activity will be successful. Hedging activity and/or use of forward foreign currency contracts may mitigate the risk of loss from changes in currency exchange rates, but also may reduce or limit the opportunity for gain and involves the risk that the contracting party will not fulfill its contractual obligation to deliver the currency contracted for at the agreed upon price to the Fund (see “Counterparty Risk”).
Private Placement and Restricted Securities Risk—A private placement involves the sale of securities that have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, or relevant provisions of applicable non-US law. In addition to the general risks to which all securities are subject, securities acquired in a private placement generally are subject to strict restrictions on resale, and there may be no liquid secondary market or ready purchaser for such securities, and a liquid secondary market may never develop. Therefore, the Fund may be unable to dispose of such securities when it desires to do so or at a favorable time or price. This potential lack of liquidity may make it more difficult for the Fund to accurately value these securities. Issuers of private placements or other restricted securities may include special purpose vehicles (“SPVs”) that hold underlying assets to which the Fund wants to gain exposure. The Fund may have the right to receive payments only from the SPV, and may not have direct rights against the issuer of the underlying assets. Investors in such SPVs generally pay their share of the SPV’s administrative and other expenses, including management fees.
Leverage Risk —Certain transactions can result in leverage and may expose the Fund to greater risk and increased costs. These transactions can include the use of certain derivatives (for example, swap transactions and options), entering into certain loan transactions that entail an obligation by the Fund to extend credit in the future (for example, revolving credit facilities), and the purchase of when-issued and delayed-delivery securities. Leverage generally has the effect of increasing the amounts of loss or gain the Fund might realize, and creates the likelihood of greater volatility of the value of the Fund’s investments. In transactions involving leverage, a relatively small market movement or change in other underlying indicator can lead to significantly larger losses to the Fund. There is generally the risk of loss in excess of invested capital. In addition, guidance provided by the SEC and its staff regarding mutual fund borrowing restrictions effectively requires that the Fund segregate liquid assets or engage in other measures to “cover” open positions with respect to certain instruments that create leverage. The use of leverage may cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it may not be advantageous to do so to satisfy its contractual obligations or to meet any applicable asset segregation or position coverage requirements. Borrowing for investment purposes will also result in leverage. The costs of borrowing, such as interest on borrowed funds, may increase the Fund's expenses.
LIBOR Replacement Risk—The coupons on variable and floating rate investments in which the Fund may invest are not fixed and may fluctuate based upon changes in market rates. The coupon on a floating rate investment is generally based on an interest rate such as a money-market index, LIBOR or a Treasury bill rate. In addition, certain floating and variable rate obligations have an interest rate floor feature, which prevents the interest rate payable by the security from dropping below a specified level as compared to a reference interest rate (the “reference rate”), such as LIBOR. In 2017, the United Kingdom's Financial Conduct Authority warned that LIBOR may cease to be available, or appropriate for use, by 2021. However, on November 30, 2020, LIBOR's administrator, the ICE Benchmark Administration, signaled that LIBOR may continue to be published and available for use until June 30, 2023. The unavailability or replacement of LIBOR may affect the value, liquidity or return on certain Fund investments and may result in costs incurred in connection with closing out positions and entering into new trades. Regulators and market participants are working together to identify or develop a replacement rate. For instance, the US Federal Reserve, based on the recommendations of the New York Federal Reserve's Alternative Reference Rate Committee (comprised of major derivative market participants and their regulators), has begun publishing the SOFR that is intended to replace US dollar LIBOR. Any pricing adjustments to the Fund's investments resulting from a substitute reference rate including but not limited to SOFR, may also adversely affect the Fund's performance and/or NAV. There remains uncertainty regarding the future utilization of LIBOR and the nature of any replacement rate. As such, the potential effect of a transition away from LIBOR on the Fund or the financial instruments in which the Fund invests cannot yet be determined and may vary depending on factors that include, but are not limited to, existing fallback or termination provisions in individual contracts.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
14

ETF Risk—ETFs generally expose their shareholders to the risks associated with the assets in which the ETF invests. Additionally, as exchange-traded investment vehicles, ETFs may involve market risk, management risk and (for index funds) tracking risk. If the Fund acquires shares of an ETF, shareholders bear both their proportionate share of expenses in the Fund (including management and advisory fees) and, indirectly, the expenses of the ETF.
Convertible Securities Risks—Investing in convertible securities subjects the Fund to the risks of debt, but also the risks associated with an investment in the underlying equity security. Convertible securities are frequently issued with a call feature that allows the issuer to choose when to redeem the security, which could result in the Fund being forced to redeem, convert, or sell the convertible security under circumstances unfavorable to the Fund.
Derivatives Risk —A derivative is a financial contract whose value depends on changes in the value of one or more underlying assets, reference rates or indexes. These instruments include, among others, participation certificates, credit default swaps, currency forward contracts, currency swap contracts and other swap agreements and similar instruments. The Fund’s use of derivatives may involve risks different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. Derivatives can be highly complex and may perform in ways unanticipated by Artisan Partners.
In addition to the risks of an adverse change in the value of the underlying reference asset, the Fund’s use of derivatives involves the risk that the other party to the derivative contract will fail to make required payments or otherwise to comply with the terms of the contract. Derivatives transactions can create investment leverage and may be highly volatile, and the Fund could lose more than the amount it invests. Derivatives may be difficult to value and highly illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative position at a particular time or at an anticipated price.
Recent US and non-US legislative and regulatory reforms, including those related to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act have resulted in, and may in the future result in, new regulation of derivative instruments and the Fund’s use of such instruments. New regulations could, among other things, restrict the Fund’s ability to engage in derivative transactions (for example, by making certain types of derivative instruments or transactions no longer available to the Fund) and/or increase the costs of such transactions, and the Fund may as a result be unable to execute its investment strategies in a manner Artisan Partners might otherwise choose. In October 2020, the SEC adopted Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act providing for the regulation of a registered investment company's use of derivatives and certain related instruments. Among other things, Rule 18f-4 limits a fund's derivatives exposure through a value-at-risk test and requires the adoption and implementation of a derivatives risk management program for certain derivatives users. Subject to certain conditions, limited derivatives users (as defined in Rule 18f-4), however, would not be subject to the full requirements of Rule 18f-4. In connection with the adoption of Rule 18f-4, the SEC also eliminated the asset segregation framework arising from prior SEC guidance for covering derivatives and certain financial instruments. Compliance with Rule 18f-4 will not be required until September 2022. As the Fund come into compliance, the Fund's approaches to asset segregation and coverage requirements will be impacted. In addition, Rule 18f-4 could restrict the Fund's abilities to engage in certain derivatives transactions and/or increase the costs of such derivatives transactions, which could adversely affect the value or performance of the Fund.
Government Securities Risk—The Fund invests in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or its agencies and instrumentalities (such as the Government National Mortgage Association (“Ginnie Mae”), the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), or the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”)). Unlike Ginnie Mae securities, securities issued or guaranteed by U.S. Government-related organizations, such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government and no assurance can be given that the U.S. Government would provide financial support.
Inflation/Deflation Risk—The value of assets or income from the Fund’s investments may be worth less in the future as inflation decreases the value of payments at future dates. As inflation increases, the real value of the Fund’s portfolio could decline. Deflation risk is the risk that prices throughout the economy decline over time. Deflation may have an adverse effect on the creditworthiness of issuers and may make issuer default more likely, which may result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
Risks of When-Issued and Delayed-Delivery Securities—The Fund may purchase securities on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis. When-issued and delayed-delivery purchases involve a risk of loss if the value of the securities declines prior to the settlement date. The risk is in addition to the risk that the Fund’s other assets will decline in value. Therefore, these transactions may result in a form of leverage and increase the Fund’s overall investment exposure. Typically, no income accrues on securities the Fund has committed to purchase prior to the time delivery of the securities is made.
Cash Position Risk —To the extent that the Fund invests in cash (which may include cash equivalents, such as money market instruments and repurchase agreements), the ability of the Fund to meet its objective may be limited.
Confidential Information Access Risk —In managing the Fund, Artisan Partners may seek to avoid the receipt of material, non-public information (“Confidential Information”) about the investments being considered for acquisition by the Fund or held in the Fund’s portfolio if the receipt of the Confidential Information would restrict the Fund or other Artisan Partners clients from trading in securities they hold or in which they may invest. In many instances, issuers offer to furnish Confidential Information to prospective purchasers or holders of the issuer’s loans or other securities. In circumstances when Artisan Partners declines to receive Confidential Information from these issuers, the Fund may be disadvantaged in comparison to other investors, including with respect to evaluating the issuer and the price the Fund would pay or receive when it buys or sells those investments. Further, in situations when the Fund is asked, for example, to grant consents, waivers or amendments with respect to such investments, Artisan Partners’ ability to assess such consents, waivers and amendments may be compromised by its lack of access to Confidential Information. In certain situations, Artisan Partners may choose to receive Confidential

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
15

Information but create information walls around persons having access to the Confidential Information (“walled-off personnel”) to limit the restrictions on others at Artisan Partners. Those measures could impair the ability of walled-off personnel from accessing information from others at Artisan Partners.
Risks of Emphasizing a Region, Country, Sector or Industry—If the Fund has invested a higher percentage of its total assets in a particular region, country, sector or industry, changes affecting that region, country, sector or industry may have a significant impact on the performance of the Fund’s overall portfolio.
Impact of Actions by Other Shareholders—The Fund, like all mutual funds, pools the investments of many investors. Actions by one investor or multiple investors in the Fund may have an adverse effect on the Fund and on other investors. For example, significant levels of new investments may cause the Fund to have more cash than would otherwise be the case, which might have a positive or negative effect on Fund performance. Similarly, redemption activity might cause the Fund to sell portfolio securities or borrow money, which might generate a capital gain or loss or cause the Fund to incur costs that, in effect, would be borne by all shareholders, not just those investors who redeemed. Shareholder purchase and redemption activity may also affect the per share amount of the Fund’s distributions of its net income and net realized gains, if any, thereby increasing or reducing the tax burden on the Fund’s shareholders subject to income tax who receive Fund distributions. In addition, large or frequent redemptions and purchases of the Fund’s shares may adversely affect the Fund’s performance if the Fund is forced to sell portfolio securities or invest cash when Artisan Partners would not otherwise choose to do so. This risk will be heightened if one or a few shareholders own a substantial portion of the Fund, in which case a purchase or redemption may have a more pronounced effect on the Fund. Redemptions of a large number of shares increase the Fund’s transaction costs. In addition, the Fund may be forced to sell its more liquid positions, which may affect the liquidity of the Fund’s portfolio.
Operational and Cybersecurity Risks—Artisan Partners Funds, its service providers, including its adviser Artisan Partners, and other market participants increasingly depend on complex information technology and communications systems to conduct business functions. These systems are subject to a number of different threats or risks that could adversely affect the Fund and its shareholders, despite the efforts of Artisan Partners Funds and its service providers to adopt technologies, processes and practices intended to mitigate these risks.
For example, unauthorized third parties may attempt to improperly access, modify, disrupt the operations of or prevent access to these systems or data within them (a “cyber-attack”), whether systems of Artisan Partners Funds, its service providers, counterparties or other market participants. Power or communications outages, acts of God, epidemics and pandemics, information technology equipment malfunctions, operational errors and inaccuracies within software or data processing systems may also disrupt business operations or impact critical data. Market events also may occur at a pace that overloads current information technology and communication systems and processes of Artisan Partners Funds, its service providers or other market participants, impacting the ability to conduct the Fund’s operations.
Cyber-attacks, disruptions or failures that affect Artisan Partners Funds’ service providers or counterparties may adversely affect the Fund and its shareholders, including by causing losses for the Fund or impairing Fund operations. For example, the Fund’s or Artisan Partners Funds’ service providers’ assets or sensitive or confidential information may be misappropriated, data may be corrupted and operations may be disrupted (e.g., cyber-attacks or operational failures may cause the release of private shareholder information or confidential Fund information, interfere with the processing of shareholder transactions, impact the ability to calculate the Fund’s net asset value and impede trading). In addition, cyber-attacks, disruptions or failures may cause reputational damage and subject the Fund or Artisan Partners Funds’ service providers to regulatory fines, litigation costs, penalties or financial losses, reimbursement or other compensation costs and/or additional compliance costs. While Artisan Partners Funds and its service providers may establish business continuity and other plans and processes to address the possibility of cyber-attacks, disruptions or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems, including that they do not apply to third parties, such as other market participants, as well as the possibility that certain risks have not been identified or that unknown threats may emerge in the future. The Fund and Artisan Partners Funds’ service providers may also incur substantial costs for cybersecurity risk management, including insurance, in order to prevent or mitigate future cyber security incidents, and the Fund and its shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result of such costs.
Similar types of operational and technology risks are also present for issuers of securities or other instruments in which the Fund invests, which could result in material adverse consequences for such issuers, and may cause the Fund’s investments to lose value. In addition, cyber-attacks involving the Fund’s counterparty could affect such counterparty’s ability to meet its obligations to the Fund, which may result in losses to the Fund and its shareholders. Furthermore, as a result of cyber-attacks, disruptions or failures, an exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on specific securities or the entire market, which may result in the Fund being, among other things, unable to buy or sell certain securities or unable to accurately price its investments. Artisan Partners Funds cannot directly control any cybersecurity plans and systems put in place by its service providers, Fund counterparties, issuers in which the Fund invests or securities markets and exchanges.
No Operating History Risk—The Fund is a newly formed fund and has no operating history for investors to evaluate.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
16

Organization, Management and Management Fees
Organization. The Fund is a series of Artisan Partners Funds, Inc. (“Artisan Partners Funds”). The Fund consists of three classes of shares: Investor Shares, Advisor Shares and Institutional Shares.
Management. The Fund is managed by Artisan Partners, which selects the Fund’s investments and handles its business affairs under the direction of Artisan Partners Funds’ board of directors. Artisan Partners is a limited partnership organized under the laws of Delaware. Artisan Partners provides investment management services to, among others, pension and profit sharing plans, trusts, endowments, foundations, charitable organizations, governmental entities and investment companies and similar pooled investment vehicles, and also provides administrative services to each series of Artisan Partners Funds. Artisan Partners is managed by its general partner, Artisan Investments GP LLC, a Delaware limited liability company wholly-owned by Artisan Partners Holdings LP (“Artisan Partners Holdings”). Artisan Partners Holdings is a limited partnership organized under the laws of Delaware whose sole general partner is Artisan Partners Asset Management Inc., a publicly traded Delaware corporation. Artisan Partners was founded in March 2009 and succeeded to the investment management business of Artisan Partners Holdings during 2009. Artisan Partners Holdings was founded in December 1994 and began providing investment management services in March 1995. Artisan Partners’ principal address is 875 East Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 800, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202.
Portfolio Managers
The portfolio managers of the Fund are identified below. The portfolio managers are responsible for management of the Fund as well as other Artisan Partners client portfolios. The portfolio managers develop the investment strategy for the Fund in order to achieve the Fund’s investment objective and are supported by a staff of research analysts and traders. The portfolio managers are jointly responsible for the overall management of the Fund, including making buy and sell decisions for the Fund. The Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers and the portfolio managers’ ownership of Fund shares.
Bryan C. Krug, CFA—Mr. Krug is a Managing Director of Artisan Partners. He joined Artisan Partners in December 2013 and has managed Artisan High Income Fund since its inception in March 2014 and Artisan Floating Rate Fund since its inception in [December 2021]. Prior to joining Artisan Partners in 2013, Mr. Krug was the portfolio manager of Ivy High Income Fund at Waddell & Reed Investment Management Company from February 2006 to November 2013. He holds a B.S. degree in Finance from Miami University, Richard T. Farmer School of Business.
Seth B. Yeager, CFA—Mr. Yeager joined Artisan Partners in May 2018 as a credit analyst working with Mr. Krug and has managed Artisan Floating Rate Fund since its inception in [December 2021]. Prior to joining Artisan Partners in 2018, Mr. Yeager was a high yield credit analyst at UBS Asset Management supporting multiple portfolios in the US and Europe from March 2015 to May 2018. Previously, Mr. Yeager worked at Jefferies in high yield research. He holds a bachelor's degree in information systems from Michigan State University and a master's degree in business administration from Oakland University.
Management Fees
The Fund pays a management fee to Artisan Partners for serving as its investment adviser and providing administrative services. The annual fee is determined as a percentage of average daily net assets and is accrued daily and paid a monthly fee at the annual rate of [ ]% of the Fund’s average daily net assets up to [ ]; [ ]% of average daily net assets from [ ]; [ ]% of average daily net assets from [ ]; [ ]% of average daily net assets from []; and [ ]% of average daily net assets over [ ].
Artisan Partners has contractually agreed to bear certain expenses and waive its management fees to the extent necessary to cause total annual fund operating expenses (excluding taxes, interest, all commissions and other normal charges incident to the purchase and sale of portfolio securities, acquired fund fees and expenses, borrowing costs such as dividends on securities sold short, and extraordinary charges such as litigation costs, but including management fees paid to Artisan Partners) not to exceed the percentages of average daily net assets indicated below. This contract continues through [ ].
Fund
Expense Limit as a
% of Average
Daily Net Assets
Investor Shares
[ ]%
Advisor Shares
[ ]%
Institutional Shares
[ ]%
The management fee and other expenses related to the Fund’s operations are reflected in its net asset value.
A discussion regarding the basis for the initial approval by the board of directors of the investment advisory contract for the Fund is expected to be available in Artisan Partners Funds’ 31 March 2022 semiannual report to shareholders.
Additional Information
Artisan Partners Funds enters into contractual arrangements with various parties, including, among others, the Fund’s investment adviser, distributor, custodian, transfer agent and financial intermediaries, who provide services to the Fund. Shareholders are not parties to, or

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
17

intended (or “third-party”) beneficiaries of, those contractual arrangements. The contractual arrangements are not intended to create in any individual shareholder or group of shareholders any right to enforce them against the service providers or to seek any remedy under the arrangement against the service providers, either directly or on behalf of the Fund.
This prospectus provides information concerning Artisan Partners Funds and the Fund that you should consider in determining whether to purchase shares of the Fund. None of this prospectus, the SAI or any contract that is an exhibit to Artisan Partners Funds’ registration statement, is intended to, nor does it, give rise to an agreement or contract between Artisan Partners Funds or the Fund and any investor, or give rise to any contract or other rights in any individual shareholder, group of shareholders or other person other than any rights conferred explicitly by federal or state securities laws that may not be waived.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
18

Investing with Artisan Partners Funds
Share Price
The Fund is open for business every day the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is open for regular session trading. Shares are not priced on days when the NYSE is closed. The Fund buys and sells its shares each day the NYSE is open, at the net asset value per share (“NAV”) next calculated after a purchase or redemption order is received and accepted by the Fund or its authorized agent.
The NAV of each class of shares of the Fund is determined by dividing the value of the Fund’s securities and other assets attributable to that class, less its liabilities attributable to that class, by the number of outstanding shares of that class of the Fund. For purposes of calculating the NAV, securities transactions and shareholder transactions are accounted for no later than one business day after the trade date. The NAV is normally computed as of the NYSE regular session closing time – usually 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time on each day the NYSE is open for regular session trading.
In determining the Fund’s NAV, each equity security and ETF traded on a securities exchange, including the Nasdaq Stock Market, and over-the-counter securities are valued at the closing price on the exchange or market designated by the Fund’s accounting agent or pricing vendor as the principal exchange (each, a “principal exchange”). The closing price provided by the pricing vendor for an exchange may differ from the price quoted elsewhere and may represent information such as last sales price, an official closing price, a closing auction price or other information, depending on exchange or market convention. Absent closing price information for an equity security from the principal exchange as of the date of valuation, the security is valued using (i) the closing price on another exchange on which the security is traded (if such price is made available by a pricing vendor) or (ii) the most recent bid quotation on the principal exchange, or, if such bid is not available, from a secondary exchange or in the over-the-counter market. Equity-linked securities, such as participation certificates, participation notes or access notes, are valued by referencing the underlying security if market quotations are not readily available. Repurchase agreements are valued at cost plus accrued interest. Exchange traded option contracts are valued at the mid price (average of the bid price and ask price) as provided by the pricing vendor at the close of trading on the contract’s principal exchange. Exchange traded futures contracts and exchange-traded options on futures are valued at the settlement price as provided by the pricing vendor at the close of trading on the principal exchange. Over-the-counter derivatives (including total return swaps, over-the-counter options on total return swaps, and certain other derivatives) are valued using prices provided by the Fund’s pricing vendors. Prices obtained from independent pricing services may use various observable and unobservable inputs, including, but not limited to, information provided by broker-dealers, pricing formulas, estimates of market values obtained from data relating to investments or securities with similar characteristics and/or discounted cash flow or spread curve models that might be applicable. Shares of open-end investment companies are valued at the latest NAV reported by the investment company.
Fixed income securities are valued at market value. Market values are generally evaluations based on the judgment of the Fund’s pricing vendors, which may consider, among other factors, the prices at which securities actually trade, broker-dealer quotations, pricing formulas, estimates of market values obtained from yield data relating to investments or securities with similar characteristics and/or discounted cash flow models that might be applicable.
Securities, or other assets for which market quotations are not readily available, are valued by Artisan Partners Funds’ valuation committee at a fair value determined in good faith under procedures established by and under the general supervision of Artisan Partners Funds’ board of directors. A market quotation will be considered not readily available, and the Fund may therefore use fair value pricing, if, among other things, there are no quotations, pricing data is not provided by an approved pricing vendor, the valuation committee believes that the quotation, price or market value resulting from the Fund’s valuation procedures does not reflect a fair value of the security or asset or the value of the security or asset might have been materially affected by events occurring after the close of the market in which the security or asset was principally traded but before the time for determination of NAV (a “subsequent event”). A subsequent event might include a company-specific development (for example, announcement of a merger that is made after the close of the foreign market), a development that might affect an entire market or region (for example, imposition of foreign exchange controls by a foreign government), a potentially global development (such as a terrorist attack that may be expected to have an impact on investor expectations worldwide) or a significant change in values of market indices, exchange traded funds or other financial instruments in the US or other markets. The Fund monitors for subsequent events using several tools. In fair valuing non-US equity securities and equity-linked securities, the Fund may use adjustment factors provided by a third party valuation service when there are subsequent events or expected or unexpected market closures. The third party valuation service may utilize statistical data based on historical performance of securities, markets and other data in developing factors used to estimate a fair value.
When fair value pricing is employed, the value of a security or asset used by the Fund to calculate its NAV may differ from quoted or published prices for the same security or asset. Estimates of fair value utilized by the Fund as described above could differ from the value realized on the sale of those securities or assets in the future and the differences may be material to the NAV of the Fund. Values of foreign securities are translated from local currencies into US dollars using current exchange rates.
The Fund may invest in securities principally traded in markets outside the US. The foreign markets in which the Fund may invest are sometimes open on days when the NYSE is not open and the Fund does not calculate its NAV, and sometimes are not open on days when the Fund does calculate its NAV. Even on days on which both the foreign market and the NYSE are open, several hours may pass between the time when trading in the foreign market closes and the time as of which the Fund calculates its NAV. That is generally the case for markets in Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Australia and other Far Eastern markets. The regular closing time of foreign markets in North and South America is

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
19

generally the same as the closing time of the NYSE and the time as of which the Fund calculates its NAV. So, the value of the Fund’s portfolio may be affected on days when the Fund does not calculate its NAV and you cannot purchase or redeem Fund shares.
The Fund relies on various service providers and data sources to calculate its NAV. The ability of the Fund to calculate its NAV per share is subject to operational risks associated with processing or human errors, systems or technology failures, cyber-attacks and errors caused by third party service providers, data sources, or trading counterparties. Such failures may result in delays in the calculation of the Fund’s NAV and/or the inability to calculate NAV over extended time periods and may make it necessary for the Fund to use alternative procedures to determine the Fund’s NAV. The Fund may be unable to recover any losses associated with such failures.
On 3 December 2020, the SEC adopted Rule 2a-5 under the 1940 Act, which is intended to address valuation practices and the role of the board of directors with respect to the fair value of the investments of a registered investment company or business development company. Among other things, Rule 2a-5 will permit a fund’s board to designate the fund’s primary investment adviser to perform the fund’s fair value determinations, which will be subject to board oversight and certain reporting and other requirements intended to ensure that the board receives the information it needs to oversee the investment adviser’s fair value determinations. Compliance with Rule 2a-5 will not be required until September 2022. Artisan Partners continues to review Rule 2a-5 and its impact on Artisans Partners’ and the Fund’s valuation policies and related practices.
Who Can Invest in the Fund?
In general, to invest in the Fund, you should be an adult US citizen or resident or a US entity with a US tax identification (social security or employer identification) number. You or the person authorized to place transactions on your behalf may not place transactions in your account for the benefit of any person other than yourself (except for a transfer of shares to another account). If the Fund determines that the registered owner of an account has permitted another person or entity who is not the registered or beneficial owner of the account to hold shares through that account, the Fund may reject future purchases in that account and any related accounts.
As of the date of this prospectus, shares of the Fund are qualified for sale in the US and its territories and possessions. Residents of Guam may purchase shares of the Fund only through approved financial intermediaries, and only to the extent that financial intermediary is otherwise eligible to sell mutual fund shares in Guam. The Fund sells shares to investors residing outside the US only in limited circumstances. Any sale to an investor residing outside of the US requires prior approval of the Fund.
Financial intermediaries must contact the Fund for approval before opening an omnibus account.
Share Class Eligibility
INVESTOR SHARES
Investor Shares of the Fund are offered to members of the general public. You can open the following types of accounts in Investor Shares:
Individual or Joint – Individual accounts are owned by one person. Joint accounts can have two or more owners.
Uniform Gift or Transfer to a Minor (UGMA, UTMA) – Custodial accounts let you give money to a minor for any purpose. This gift is irrevocable, and the minor gains control of the account once he or she reaches the age of majority.
Trust.
Corporation or Other Entity – This type of account is for a corporation, association, partnership or similar institution.
Retirement Account – This type of account includes traditional individual retirement accounts (IRAs), Roth IRAs, rollover IRAs, simplified employee pension plans (SEP-IRAs), SIMPLE IRAs, Keogh plans, profit sharing and money purchase plans, 403(b) plans and 401(k) plans.
Coverdell Education Savings Account (ESAs) – ESAs provide a tax-favored vehicle through which educational expenses can be funded on behalf of the individual for whom the account is established.
To transact in Investor Shares, you may do so either directly with the Fund or through a financial intermediary. If you invest through a financial intermediary, the policies and procedures by which you can purchase or redeem shares may be governed by your intermediary. See “Other Information – Financial Intermediaries.” Please contact your financial intermediary for additional information.
ADVISOR SHARES
Advisor Shares of the Fund are generally available for investment only by:
individuals, trusts, estates, corporations, endowments, foundations and other investors who purchase shares directly from the Fund with an initial minimum purchase of $250,000;
employee benefit plans that consolidate and hold all of their Advisor Shares of the Fund in plan level or omnibus accounts on behalf of participants; and
any other individual or entity investor who purchases Advisor Shares through a financial intermediary, where (i) the intermediary has entered into an agreement with Artisan Partners Funds or Artisan Partners Distributors LLC and (ii) the intermediary holds the investor’s shares through an omnibus account with the Fund.
To transact in Advisor Shares, you may do so either directly with the Fund or through a financial intermediary. If you purchase Advisor Shares directly from the Fund, see “Share Class Eligibility – Investor Shares” above for a list of available account types. If you invest through a financial

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
20

intermediary, the policies and procedures by which you can purchase or redeem shares may be governed by your intermediary. See “Other Information – Financial Intermediaries.” Please contact your financial intermediary for additional information.
INSTITUTIONAL SHARES
Institutional Shares of the Fund are generally available for investment only by:
individuals, trusts, estates, corporations, endowments, foundations and other investors who purchase shares directly from the Fund with an initial minimum purchase of $1,000,000;
employee benefit plans that consolidate and hold all of their Institutional Shares of the Fund in plan level or omnibus accounts on behalf of participants; and
any other individual or entity investor who purchases Institutional Shares through a financial intermediary, where (i) the intermediary has entered into an agreement with Artisan Partners Funds or Artisan Partners Distributors LLC and (ii) the intermediary holds the investor’s shares through an omnibus account with the Fund.
To transact in Institutional Shares, you may do so either directly with the Fund or through a financial intermediary. If you purchase Institutional Shares directly from the Fund, see “Share Class Eligibility – Investor Shares” above for a list of available account types. If you invest through a financial intermediary, the policies and procedures by which you can purchase or redeem shares may be governed by your intermediary. See “Other Information – Financial Intermediaries.” Please contact your financial intermediary for additional information.
Minimum Investments
Minimum Investments
Investor
Advisor
Institutional
To open an account
$1,000
$250,000
$1,000,000
To add to an account
No minimum
No minimum
No minimum
The Fund will waive the initial minimum investment of $1,000 for Investor Shares if you invest through the Automatic Investment Plan. See “Buying Shares – Automatic Investment Plan (AIP).”
The Fund will waive its minimum investment requirements on (1) certain employee benefit plans that hold their shares through plan-level or omnibus accounts on behalf of participants; or (2) investors who purchase shares through financial intermediaries where (i) the intermediary has entered into an agreement with Artisan Partners Funds or Artisan Partners Distributors LLC and (ii) the intermediary holds shares through an omnibus account, although the intermediary maintaining such an account may impose its own minimum investment requirements (see “Other Information – Financial Intermediaries.”).
The Fund may, at its discretion, accept a smaller initial investment or waive the minimum initial investment requirement for investment if:
you are already a shareholder (in your name or as beneficial owner of shares held in someone else’s name) (for example, a nominee or a custodian holding shares for the benefit of an investor would not be eligible to open a new account for its own benefit or for the benefit of another customer, but the investor would be eligible to open a new account) of Advisor Shares or Institutional Shares of the Fund;
you, together with any affiliated organizations or related persons, will hold two or more accounts in your own or the affiliated organization’s or related person’s name or as beneficial owner of shares held in someone else’s name of Advisor Shares or Institutional Shares of the Fund and such accounts, in the aggregate, exceed the minimum initial investment requirement for the Fund; or
Artisan Partners determines that your investment would not have a material adverse impact on the Fund.
Minimum Balances
INVESTOR SHARES
If you purchase Investor Shares directly from the Fund, the Fund reserves the right to close your account and redeem your shares if the value of your account falls below $1,000. However, before closing a small account, the Fund will notify you and give you at least 30 days to bring your account’s value up to the minimum.
The Fund will waive the $1,000 minimum balance requirement if an account value has declined below $1,000 due solely to investment performance.
If you discontinue an AIP before your account reaches $1,000, that account also may be closed and the Fund may redeem your shares.
If you participate in systematic withdrawal and your account has insufficient funds to meet a withdrawal, the amount remaining will be completely redeemed.
ADVISOR SHARES
If you purchase Advisor Shares directly from the Fund, the Fund reserves the right to automatically convert Advisor Shares in your account to Investor Shares, or to close your account and redeem your shares, if the value of your account falls below $250,000, unless the reduction in value is due solely to investment performance. The Fund will notify you and allow you at least 30 days to bring your account’s value up to the applicable minimum before converting your shares to Investor Shares or closing your account and redeeming your shares. If your shares are converted, the conversion will have no effect on the value of your investment in Advisor Shares of the Fund at the time of conversion.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
21

However, the number of shares you own after the conversion may be greater or lower than the number of shares you owned before the conversion, depending on the net asset value of the respective share classes.
INSTITUTIONAL SHARES
If you purchase Institutional Shares directly from the Fund, the Fund reserves the right to automatically convert Institutional Shares in your account to Investor Shares or Advisor Shares or close your account and redeem your shares if the value of your account falls below $1 million, unless the reduction in value is due solely to investment performance. The Fund will notify you and allow you at least 30 days to bring your account’s value up to the applicable minimum before converting your shares to Investor Shares or Advisor Shares or closing your account and redeeming your shares. If your shares are converted, the conversion will have no effect on the value of your investment in Institutional Shares of the Fund at the time of conversion. However, the number of shares you own after the conversion may be greater or lower than the number of shares you owned before the conversion, depending on the net asset value of the respective share classes.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
22

Buying Shares
Important Information about Opening an Account
Federal law requires all financial institutions, including mutual funds, to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account. Consequently, when you open an Artisan Partners Funds account, you will be asked to provide certain identifying information on your account application. If you fail to provide the appropriate information to the Fund, the Fund may try to contact you to obtain the necessary information. For more information, see “Other Information – Anti-Money Laundering Compliance.”
How to Open an Account
If you meet the applicable share class eligibility requirements and the the Fund’s other criteria, you may be able to purchase shares of the Fund by contacting your financial intermediary. You can also open an account and purchase Investor Shares or Advisor Shares (if available) of the Fund by contacting the Fund's transfer agent, DST Asset Manager Solutions, Inc., at 800.344.1770 and completing a new account application. See “Investing with Artisan Partners Funds – Who Can Invest in the Fund?,” and “– Share Class Eligibility.”  Applications for direct purchases of Institutional Shares are only made available through Artisan Partners Distributors LLC by calling 866.773.7233.
By Mail—Complete and sign a new account application. Mail the application, along with your check for the applicable purchase amount to the address listed below (use the address that matches the delivery mechanism you are using – regular mail or overnight delivery). All checks must be made payable to  “Artisan Partners Funds” or to "Artisan Floating Rate Fund" in which you are investing. Artisan Partners Funds will not accept cash, money orders, traveler’s checks, credit card payments, credit card checks, third-party checks, starter checks or checks drawn on non-US financial institutions.
For regular mail delivery:
For overnight mail delivery:
Artisan Partners Funds
Artisan Partners Funds
P.O. Box 219322
430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219322
Kansas City, MO 64121-9322
Kansas City, MO 64105-1407
 
800.344.1770
All investment checks must be delivered to one of the addresses above. Artisan Partners Funds and Artisan Partners Distributors LLC do not accept shareholder investment checks at their corporate offices; checks received at those offices will be forwarded to the Fund's transfer agent, and purchases will not be effective until the order is received and accepted by the Fund's transfer agent. A purchase by check is priced at the NAV next calculated after the Fund's transfer agent receives the check and accepts the order.
By Wire—You may purchase shares by instructing your financial institution to wire money pursuant to the wire transfer instructions included below. Your financial institution may charge you a fee to send (or receive) funds by wire. Wire transfers from a bank outside the US generally will not be accepted. A purchase by wire is priced at the NAV next calculated after the Fund receives your wire. Therefore, if your wire is received after the time as of which the NAV is calculated for the day, your funds may be held by the Fund until the next business day. If you are opening a new account by wire transfer, a new account application must be received in proper form at the Fund's transfer agent prior to the receipt of the wire. Artisan Partners Funds will not be responsible for the consequences of delays, including delays in the banking or Federal Reserve wire systems.
Wire transfer instructions are:
State Street Bank and Trust Company
Attn: Mutual Funds
Boston, MA 02110
Routing #011000028
Credit to:
Artisan Partners Funds
 
Deposit DDA 99050882
Further credit:
[your account registration]
 
[your account number]
If the proper account information is not included, the wire order may be rejected.
By Exchange—You may open a new account in Investor Shares or Advisor Shares of the Fund by telephone by calling 800.344.1770 with an exchange of $1,000 or more for Investor Shares or $250,000 or more for Advisor Shares from your identically registered account in another series of Artisan Partners Funds. You may open a new account in Institutional Shares by telephone by calling 866.773.7233 with an exchange of $1,000,000 or more from your identically registered account in Institutional Shares of another series of Artisan Partners Funds. See
“– Telephone Exchange Plan.”  A purchase by exchange is priced at the NAV next calculated after your call.
By Automatic Investment Plan (AIP)—You may purchase Investor Shares or Advisor Shares of the Fund through an AIP. Complete and sign the account application, including the AIP section. See “– Automatic Investment Plan (AIP).”
By Purchases in Kind—You may, subject to Artisan Partners Funds’ approval, purchase Investor Shares, Advisor Shares or Institutional Shares of the Fund with securities that are eligible for purchase by the Fund (consistent with the Fund’s investment process, goal and philosophy) and

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
23

that have values that are readily ascertainable in accordance with the Fund’s valuation policies. Call Artisan Partners Funds at 866.773.7233 if you would like to purchase shares of the Fund with other securities.
How to Add to an Account
If you opened an account directly with the Fund in accordance with the previous section, you may make subsequent investments by wire transfer using the instructions provided, or by submitting a check, along with either the stub from your Fund account statement or a letter indicating the amount of the purchase, your account number and the name in which your account is registered. All checks must be made payable to  “Artisan Partners Funds” or to the name of the Fund in which you are investing. Please print your account number on your check. Artisan Partners Funds will not accept cash, money orders, traveler’s checks, credit card payments, credit card checks, third-party checks, starter checks or checks drawn on non-US financial institutions.
To make additional purchases of Investor Shares or Advisor Shares of the Fund, you may also add from $50 to $50,000 to your account by telephone. You may elect the telephone purchase option on your application or by completing the shareholder account options form after your account has been opened. A telephone purchase with funds to be drawn from your bank account is generally effective on the business day of your call if you call before the time as of which the Fund calculates its NAV, or on the next business day after your call if you call after the time as of which the Fund’s NAV has been calculated for the day. See “Investing with Artisan Partners Funds – Share Price.” Your financial institution may impose a fee for wire or electronic funds transfer (“EFT”).
You may exchange between identically registered accounts within the same share class by telephone. Telephone exchanges are subject to a minimum exchange of $50 and other limits. See “– Telephone Exchange Plan.”
You may also add AIP to your existing account in Investor Shares or Advisor Shares of Artisan Partners Funds. Please call 800.344.1770 or visit www.artisanpartners.com for a shareholder account options form. Your financial institution may charge you a fee for electronic transfers of funds. See “– Automatic Investment Plan (AIP)” for more information.
Telephone Exchange Plan
You may open a new account in the Fund by exchange from your identically registered account in the same share class of another Artisan Partners Fund. To open the new account, your exchange must meet the applicable share class minimum. You also may transfer investments between already existing identically registered accounts by exchanging at least $50.
Telephone exchanges are subject to these restrictions:
Both accounts must be registered in the same name, with the same address and taxpayer identification (social security or employer identification) number.
Your exchange will be processed on the business day on which you call if you call before the time as of which each Artisan Partners Fund calculates its NAV, or on the next business day after your call if you call after the time as of which an Artisan Partners Fund’s NAV has been calculated for the day. See “Investing with Artisan Partners Funds – Share Price.”
If your account is subject to backup withholding, you may not use the telephone exchange plan.
If you use the telephone exchange plan more than four times in any rolling twelve-month period, Artisan Partners Funds may terminate your access to the plan. Exchanges conducted through an omnibus account are not subject to this limitation because Artisan Partners Funds may not be able to identify the underlying investors but you may be subject to restrictions imposed by the financial intermediary.
Artisan Floating Rate Fund may charge you a 2% redemption fee on exchanges of shares owned for 90 days or less. See “Redeeming Shares – Redemption Fee.”
Automatic Investment Plan (AIP)
The AIP allows you to make regular, systematic investments into Investor Shares or Advisor Shares of the Fund. You purchase shares by transferring money from your designated checking or savings account directly into your Fund account. Simply designate your monthly investment amount (the monthly minimum is $50) and the day (between the 3rd and the 28th) you want the transfer to take place. If you do not select a day, the withdrawal from your account will be made on the 15th of the month. If a withdrawal date falls on a weekend or holiday, your payment will be transferred from your bank account on the business day prior to the date you selected. It may take up to 10 days to establish your AIP once your instructions have been received. Artisan Partners Funds will not be responsible for non-sufficient funds fees. If your AIP does not clear, your purchase will be cancelled. You will be liable for any resulting losses or fees the Fund or its transfer agent incurs. If your purchase through the AIP fails to clear on two consecutive occasions, the Fund will terminate your AIP.
If you choose the AIP when you open your account, the minimum initial investment for Investor Shares will be waived. However, your Investor Shares may be redeemed and your account closed if you discontinue the AIP before your account reaches the minimum initial investment size. See “Investing with Artisan Partners Funds – Minimum Balances.”  To change an AIP, please notify us at least 14 days prior to the next scheduled investment date. For complete instructions on changing an AIP, please visit www.artisanpartners.com or contact a customer service representative at 800.344.1770.
Purchases—General Information
Your purchases must be in US dollars.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
24

If your check or telephone purchase order does not clear, your purchase will be cancelled. You also will be liable for any resulting losses or fees the Fund or its transfer agent incurs.
You may not change or cancel a purchase request once it has been received in good order.
An order typically is accepted when the Fund or its authorized agent has received a completed application or appropriate instruction along with the intended investment, if applicable, and any other required documentation. An order is not binding until accepted and entered on the books of the Fund.
The Fund reserves the right to reject any order deemed inappropriate or not to be in the best interests of existing Fund shareholders, to limit exchanges or to take such other actions as the Fund deem appropriate or, for Institutional Shares, any purchase order that has not been previously approved by the Fund or Artisan Partners Distributors LLC. Further, the Fund reserve the right to reject any purchase order in its sole discretion. For example, the Fund may reject an order that appears so large that it would disrupt management of the Fund or an order from someone ineligible to invest. The Fund also may reject orders as described below under “Other Information – Anti-Money Laundering Compliance” and “Other Information – Inappropriate Trading.”  The Fund and its transfer agent will not be responsible for any loss, liability, cost or expense resulting from rejecting any purchase order.
A holiday, weekend or other interruption can affect the normal processing of an investment.
The Fund cannot accept a purchase order specifying a specific purchase date or price per share. Purchase checks greater than $50,000 that are post-dated or have a partial date or no date will be rejected. However, if a purchase check is less than $50,000, it will not be held for processing on the designated date, but will be processed upon acceptance.
The Fund may terminate your ability to make automatic investments and telephone purchases if an item is not paid by your financial institution on two consecutive occasions.
To prevent unauthorized transactions in your account, the Fund will take precautions designed to verify that information communicated by telephone is genuine. The Fund and its transfer agent may record a call, request identifying information and send written confirmation of telephone transactions. The Fund and its transfer agent will not be responsible for any loss, liability, cost or expense resulting from acting upon instructions furnished by telephone if we follow reasonable procedures designed to verify the identity of the caller. We recommend that you take precautions to keep confidential your personal information, including your account number and tax identification (social security or employer identification) number. You should verify the accuracy of each telephone transaction as soon as you receive your confirmation statement.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
25

Redeeming Shares
If you invest through a financial intermediary, you can redeem shares of the Fund by contacting your financial intermediary. See “Other Information – Financial Intermediaries.” You may redeem some or all of your shares by telephone or written request sent to the Fund by mail on any day that the NYSE is open for regular session trading. You may also redeem Investor Shares or Advisor Shares of the Fund by systematic withdrawals on any day that the NYSE is open for regular session trading. Your redemption will be processed on the business day that your order is accepted by the Fund or its authorized agent if it is received before the time as of which the Fund calculates its NAV (NYSE closing time – usually 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time). If your order is received after that time, your order will be processed on the next business day. The Fund will redeem your shares at the NAV per share next calculated after your redemption order is received in good order by the Fund or its authorized agent. The Fund may reject your redemption order under certain circumstances, which are discussed below. Artisan Partners Funds will generally wire transfer the proceeds of your redemption to the bank account designated in your purchase application or on a telephone authorization form. Some redemptions require Medallion signature guarantees. See – Medallion Signature Guarantees.”
How to Redeem Shares
By Mail
Non-IRA Accounts—To redeem shares in an account other than an IRA, complete the Non-IRA Redemption form or mail a letter of instruction including: the Fund’s name; your account number; the dollar amount or number of shares to be sold; and the signature of the shareholder(s) as it appears on the account or by a duly authorized agent of the shareholder(s). Some redemptions require Medallion signature guarantees. See “– Medallion Signature Guarantees.”  The letter of instruction should be sent to the address shown below (use the address that matches the delivery mechanism you are using – regular mail or overnight delivery).
For regular mail delivery:
For overnight mail delivery:
Artisan Partners Funds
Artisan Partners Funds
P.O. Box 219322
430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219322
Kansas City, MO 64121-9322
Kansas City, MO 64105-1407
 
800.344.1770
IRA Accounts—To redeem shares in an Artisan Partners Funds IRA account, you may send a letter of instruction or complete the IRA Distribution Request Form. Call 800.344.1770 or visit www.artisanpartners.com for instructions. Some redemptions require Medallion signature guarantees. See “– Medallion Signature Guarantees.” We encourage you to consult your tax advisor regarding the tax consequences and tax reporting requirements of your redemptions prior to redeeming shares in an IRA account. For further instructions, documents or the IRA Disclosure Statement and Custodial Agreement, please call 800.344.1770 or visit www.artisanpartners.com.
By Telephone
You automatically have the telephone redemption option unless you decline it on your account application. If you decline this option, but would like to add it at a later date, call 800.344.1770 or visit www.artisanpartners.com for a shareholder account options form if you hold Investor Shares or Advisor Shares. To authorize telephone redemption on an existing Institutional Shares account, call us at 866.773.7233 to obtain a telephone redemption authorization form. That form must be signed by a person authorized to act on behalf of the registered owner of an account and may require a form of signature validation.
To redeem Investor Shares or Advisor Shares by telephone, call the Fund's transfer agent at 800.344.1770. To redeem Institutional Shares by telephone, call the Fund's transfer agent at 866.773.7233. If you redeem shares by telephone, any amount of shares may be redeemed if a bank account was designated on your account application, or updated on a shareholder account options form after your account was opened, to receive the proceeds by wire transfer or EFT. If you have not designated a bank account to receive the proceeds by wire or EFT, telephone redemptions will be limited to $100,000 each and will be sent by check to your mailing address of record. Your bank may charge you a fee for an incoming wire or EFT; Artisan Partners Funds reserves the right to charge fees for these services in the future. Payment by EFT usually will arrive at your bank two banking days after your redemption is processed. Payment by wire usually is credited to your bank account on the next banking day after your redemption is processed.
To reduce the risk of loss from a fraudulent instruction, we will send your redemption proceeds only to the bank account designated in your application or telephone authorization form or letter signed by an authorized person and with a Medallion signature guarantee. See “– Medallion Signature Guarantees.”  A request to change your existing US bank account must be submitted in writing or on a shareholder account options form and may require a form of signature validation.
The Fund and its transfer agent will not be responsible for the authenticity of instructions provided by telephone, nor for any loss, liability, cost or expense for acting upon instructions furnished by telephone, if we follow reasonable procedures designed to identify the caller. We may record a call, request identifying information or send written confirmation of telephone transactions. Please verify the accuracy of each telephone transaction as soon as you receive your confirmation statement. We recommend that you take precautions to keep confidential your account information, including your account number and tax identification number.
During periods of volatile economic and market conditions, you may have difficulty making a redemption request by telephone, in which case you should make your redemption request in writing.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
26

Systematic Withdrawals
This service lets you withdraw a set amount from your account in Investor Shares or Advisor Shares of the Fund at regular intervals. To be eligible for systematic withdrawal, you must have at least $5,000 in your Artisan Partners Fund account and must withdraw at least $50 per transaction.
If you would like to add this option, please call us at 800.344.1770 or visit www.artisanpartners.com for a shareholder account options form. You must use the IRA Distribution Request Form to request systematic withdrawals from your IRA account.
If you select the systematic withdrawal option, you may choose to have the Fund send payment: (i) by mail to the address of record; (ii) by EFT to a pre-authorized US bank account; or (iii) to your pre-authorized US bank account by wire transfer. In order to receive funds by EFT or wire transfer, you must identify your US bank account on your application, or if you are changing your US bank account or adding this feature after your account is open, on a shareholder account options form. Your request to change your US bank account or add options must be submitted in writing and may require a form of signature validation. Your bank may charge you a fee for the incoming wire or EFT; Artisan Partners Funds reserves the right to charge fees for these services in the future. Payment by EFT usually will arrive at your bank two banking days after your redemption is processed. Payment by wire usually is credited to your bank account on the next banking day after your redemption is processed.
Redemptions—General Information
Normally, payment of redemption proceeds is made as soon as practicable and typically within two business days after receipt and acceptance of your redemption request. Redemption proceeds may be withheld or delayed as required or permitted by applicable law, but must be made no later than seven days after receipt of your redemption request.
Subject to applicable law, the Fund may reject your redemption request if:
the identification information you provided in your account application cannot be verified;
your identification information matches information on a government list of suspicious persons; or
the Fund believes that you may be involved in suspicious activity.
Further documentation may be requested to evidence the authority of the person or entity making a written redemption request. Please call 800.344.1770 with questions if you hold Investor Shares or Advisor Shares. Please call 866.773.7233 with questions if you hold Institutional Shares.
If you recently have made a purchase by check or EFT, the Fund may withhold redemption proceeds until it is reasonably satisfied that it has received good funds. This confirmation process can take up to 15 days. To reduce such delays, Artisan Partners Funds recommends that your purchase be made by federal funds wire through your financial institution.
You may not change or cancel a redemption request once it has been received in good order.
The Fund cannot accept a redemption request that is post-dated, specifies a particular date for processing, specifies a price for redemption or contains any other special conditions. All redemptions will be processed upon acceptance.
Redemptions may be suspended or payment dates postponed when the NYSE is closed, its trading is restricted or as permitted by the SEC.
The Fund intends to pay all redemptions in cash. During any 90-day period for any one shareholder, the Fund is obligated to redeem shares solely in cash up to the lesser of $250,000 or 1% of the Fund’s net assets. Redemptions in excess of these limits may be paid wholly or partly by an in-kind distribution of securities. Redemption payments are typically paid in cash held by the Fund. During periods of significant redemptions or stressed market conditions, the Fund may meet redemption requests by selling securities, borrowing under Artisan Partners Funds’ line of credit, or, in limited circumstances, redeeming certain shareholders through an in-kind distribution consistent with the limitation described above.
The redemption price you receive depends upon the NAV per share of a class of the Fund at the time of redemption. It may be more or less than the price you originally paid for the shares and may result in a realized capital gain or loss.
Shares in any account you maintain with Artisan Partners Funds may be redeemed to the extent necessary to reimburse Artisan Partners Funds for any loss it sustains that is caused by you (such as losses from uncollected checks or any Fund liability under the backup withholding provisions of the Code relating to your account).
If the Fund sends you a check for a redemption, systematic withdrawal payment or cash distribution that is returned “undeliverable” or remains uncashed for at least six months, the Fund may cancel the check and reinvest the proceeds in your Fund account at the NAV per share on the date of reinvestment and, if applicable, the Fund may (a) cancel your systematic withdrawal payments, honoring redemptions only by request and (b) automatically reinvest your future dividends and capital gains, even if you had elected cash payment. If you hold your investment in an IRA, or other circumstances exist such that reinvesting the proceeds is not in your or the Fund’s best interest, your check will not be cancelled and the Fund may attempt to contact you to obtain further instruction.
Before submitting your redemption request, please call 800.344.1770 if you have any questions about requirements for a redemption and hold Investor Shares or Advisor Shares. If you hold Institutional Shares, please call 866.773.7233.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
27

Redemption Fee
If you redeem or exchange shares of Artisan Floating Rate Fund that you have held for 90 days or less, the Fund will charge you a redemption fee of 2% of the redemption proceeds. The redemption fee will be deducted from your redemption proceeds and retained by the Fund.
Artisan Floating Rate Fund reserves the right to waive or reduce the 2% redemption fee on shares held 90 days or less at its discretion when the Fund believes such waiver is in the best interests of the Fund, including but not limited to when it determines that imposition of the redemption fee is not necessary to protect the Fund from the effects of short-term trading.
For example, the following transactions for direct shareholders of shares of Artisan Floating Rate Fund (if known by the Fund) would not be subject to redemption fees:
Redemptions of shares purchased through reinvestment of dividends and distributions;
Redemptions of shares pursuant to certain automatic rebalancing programs;
Redemptions requested following the death of a registered shareholder on an account or the settler of a living trust that is the registered shareholder of an account, for shares held in the account at the time of death;
Redemptions of shares that were purchased as participant contributions through an employer-sponsored retirement plan;
Transaction activity due to processing errors; or
Shares exchanged from one share class to another within the Fund.
This list is not exclusive. To request a waiver or if you have any questions about whether your transaction will be subject to the redemption fee, please call us at 800.344.1770 if you hold Investor Shares or Advisor Shares. If you hold Institutional Shares, please call 866.773.7233.
Artisan Floating Rate Fund will waive the redemption fee on redemptions of shares held by certain retirement or profit-sharing plans and shares purchased through certain financial intermediaries. In those cases where a financial intermediary passes the redemption fee through to underlying investors, the amount of the fee and the holding period generally will be consistent with the Fund’s criteria. However, due to differences in operational capacities, the financial intermediaries’ methods for tracking and calculating the fee may be different in some respects from the methods employed by the Fund. If you purchase Fund shares through a financial intermediary, you should contact the intermediary for more information on how redemption fees will be applied to your shares.
Waivers of redemption fees are reported to the board of directors of Artisan Partners Funds.
Medallion Signature Guarantees
To protect you and the Fund from fraud, the following transaction requests must be submitted in writing and include a medallion signature guarantee for each account owner:
If you wish to redeem more than $100,000 where proceeds are requested to be sent by check.
If you ask that a check, wire transfer or EFT be delivered to an address or bank account not on record.
If you ask that a check or wire be made payable to someone other than the account owner.
If you transfer or change the ownership of your account.
If you request to redeem shares and your address (for redemptions by check) or bank account (for redemptions by wire transfer or EFT) has been changed within the last 30 calendar days.
The Fund may waive any of the above requirements in certain instances. In addition to the situations described above, the Fund and/or the Transfer Agent reserve the right to require a medallion signature guarantee or additional documentation in other instances based on the circumstances of the particular situation.
All medallion signature guarantees must use a STAMP2000 Medallion imprint appropriate for the nature and dollar amount of the transaction. Medallion signature guarantee is a bar-coded signature guarantee and must be executed by an eligible guarantor. Eligible guarantors include Commercial Banks, Trust Companies, Savings Associations and Credit Unions, as defined by the Federal Deposit Insurance Act. Member firms of a domestic stock exchange are also considered eligible guarantors. Non bar-coded guarantees or stamps from a Notary Public are not acceptable.
If you are signing on behalf of an entity, you must indicate your capacity beside or beneath your signature (for example, “Jane Doe, as Trustee”). If you are signing in a capacity, further documentation may be required by the guarantor. Prior to signing, inquire what documentation needs to be provided and the maximum transaction amount the guarantee will insure. Request that the guarantor provide a legible bar-coded medallion signature guarantee. A form or transaction request received without a valid STAMP2000 Medallion imprint may be rejected.
If you are redeeming shares through your financial intermediary, you should contact that intermediary to determine whether medallion signature guarantee requirements apply.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
28

Exchanging Shares
If you meet the minimum investment requirements for opening a new account, and any other eligibility criteria described in this prospectus, you may exchange shares of the Fund for the same class of shares of any other Artisan Partners Fund that is open to new investors or any closed Artisan Partners Fund (if you also meet the requirements described in that Fund's prospectus under “Investing with Artisan Partners Funds – Who is Eligible to Invest in a Closed Fund?” and “Share Class Eligibility”). A fund exchange may be made by following the redemption procedures described under “Redeeming Shares – How to Redeem Shares.”  The Fund will exchange your shares at the respective NAVs per share next calculated after your exchange order is received in good order by the Fund or their authorized agent. If you exchange shares of Artisan Floating Rate Fund that you have held for 90 days or less for the same class of shares of another Fund, the Fund will charge you a redemption fee of 2% of the redemption proceeds. An exchange of shares of the Fund for shares of another Fund will be a taxable transaction. See “Distributions & Taxes – Taxes.”
Shareholders may also exchange shares of the Fund for a different class of shares offered by the Fund, provided that the shareholder meets the eligibility requirements, including any investment requirements for opening a new account in shares of the class into which the shareholder seeks to exchange. Such an exchange may be made by following the procedures described under “Redeeming Shares – How to Redeem Shares.”  The Fund will exchange your shares at the respective NAVs per share next calculated after your exchange order is received in good order by the Fund or its authorized agent. If you exchange shares of Artisan Floating Rate Fund that you have held for 90 days or less for a different class of shares offered by that Fund, generally the Fund will not charge you a redemption fee, unless you trade electronically under certain circumstances. For US federal income tax purposes, an exchange of shares of the Fund directly for shares of a different class of the Fund generally is not expected to be a taxable event, or to result in recognition of a gain or loss by the exchanging shareholder. See “Distributions & Taxes – Taxes.”
Artisan Partners Funds reserves the right, without notice, to revise or terminate the exchange privilege, limit the amount of any exchange, or reject an exchange, at any time, for any reason.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
29

Shareholder and Account Procedures
Account Option Changes
To further protect the Fund and its shareholders from fraud, some shareholder account changes may require additional signature validation. Please refer to our shareholder account options form for further information or call us at 800.344.1770 if you hold Investor Shares or Advisor Shares, or at 866.773.7233 if you hold Institutional Shares.
Address Changes
You may change the address on your account by:
sending a written request to the Fund’s transfer agent signed by the registered owner(s) of the account (please note, if you wish to redeem shares within 30 days after a change of address in writing, each owner’s signature must be guaranteed using a STAMP2000 Medallion. See “Redeeming Shares – Medallion Signature Guarantees”),
calling us at 800.344.1770 if you hold Investor Shares or Advisor Shares, or at 866.773.7233 if you hold Institutional Shares, or
accessing your account through www.artisanpartners.com/accountaccess.
Artisan Partners Funds will send a written confirmation of the change to both your old and new addresses. Artisan Partners Funds will change your address in response to a US Postal Service notification, but will attempt to contact you at the new address so that you can confirm the address change.
If your address is changed in response to a US Postal Service notification, in writing without proper signature validation, by phone or through www.artisanpartners.com, we will not honor any redemption request for the following 30 days, unless that redemption is in writing with a Medallion signature guarantee. See “Redeeming Shares – Medallion Signature Guarantees.”  The Fund and its transfer agent will not be responsible for any loss, liability, cost or expense resulting from acting upon address changes if we follow reasonable procedures to verify the identity of the caller or website user.
If a piece of mail that we send to you is returned as undeliverable, we will attempt to resend the mail two more times. If it remains undeliverable after those three attempts, we will discontinue all mail to your mailing address of record until you notify us of a new address by one of the previously stated methods.
Statements and Reports
As a Fund shareholder, you will receive:
Confirmation statements.
Quarterly account statements.
Annual and semiannual reports with financial statements.
Year-end tax statements.
Transactions made under certain periodic investment and withdrawal programs (including dividend reinvestment plans) will be confirmed on quarterly account statements. We suggest you keep each of your quarterly and year-end account and tax statements with your other important financial papers. You may need them for tax purposes.
If you need copies of statements and hold Investor Shares or Advisor Shares, call 800.344.1770 or visit www.artisanpartners.com. If you need copies of statements and hold Institutional Shares, call 866.773.7233. Copies of this year’s or last year’s statements are free of charge; for earlier years, there is a per statement processing fee (currently $10) for each year for which statements (account or tax) are requested. If more than one member of a household has an account with the Fund, we reduce the number of duplicate annual and semiannual reports your household receives by sending only one copy of each to the address shared by those accounts. If you hold more than one account in the Fund, we will only send one summary prospectus for the Fund, but your household may receive more than one copy if two or more members of your household hold accounts in the Fund. Call us at 800.344.1770 to request individual copies of these documents. We will begin sending individual copies within 30 days after receiving your request.
E-Delivery of Documents
If you hold your account directly with Artisan Partners Funds, and you prefer to view Fund documents online rather than receiving paper documents, you may enroll in E-Delivery through www.artisanpartners.com/accountaccess. To enroll in E-Delivery, you will need to provide your social security number or employer identification number and a valid email address. All accounts associated with the social security or employer identification number you provide will be enrolled for E-Delivery.
When a Fund document becomes available, you will receive an email containing a link to that document. If the email we send to you is returned as undeliverable, we will attempt to resend the email two more times. If your email remains undelivered after those three attempts, your E-Delivery enrollment will be discontinued and paper copies of Fund documents will be sent to your mailing address on record. There are risks to electronic delivery of Fund documents, including, but not limited to, delay or failure of delivery due to technical difficulties and other matters beyond the Fund's control. The Fund has no liability for the failure or disruption of the E-Delivery service due to circumstances beyond our reasonable control.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
30

Abandoned Property
If your account is deemed “abandoned” or “unclaimed” under state law, Artisan Partners Funds may be required to “escheat” or transfer the assets in your account to the applicable state’s unclaimed property administration. The state may redeem escheated shares and, if you subsequently seek to reclaim your proceeds of liquidation from the state, you may only be able to recover the amount received when the shares were redeemed. It is your responsibility to ensure that you maintain a correct address for your account, keep your account active by contacting the Fund by mail or telephone or accessing your account through the Fund's website at least once a year, and promptly cash all checks for dividends, capital gains and redemptions. The Fund's transfer agent can be contacted by phone at 800.344.1770 (866.773.7233 for Institutional Shares), by regular mail at Artisan Partners Funds, P.O. Box 219322, Kansas City, MO 64121-9322, or by express, certified or registered mail at Artisan Partners Funds, 430 W. 7th Street, Suite 219322, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
Please check your state’s unclaimed or abandoned property website for specific information.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
31

Other Information
Financial Intermediaries
The Fund may authorize certain financial services companies, broker-dealers, banks or other authorized agents, and in some cases, other organizations designated by an authorized agent (with their designees, collectively “authorized agents”), to accept purchase, exchange and redemption orders on the Fund's behalf. An order properly received by an authorized agent will be deemed to have been accepted by the Fund. Some authorized agents directly charge their customers transaction fees, brokerage commissions, account fees and/or other fees. If you buy, exchange or redeem shares through an authorized agent, you will pay or receive the Fund’s NAV per share next calculated after receipt and acceptance of the order by the authorized agent, after giving effect to any transaction charge or brokerage commission imposed by the authorized agent and the application of a 2% redemption fee (if applicable). The authorized agent’s procedures will apply in lieu of purchase, exchange and redemption procedures described in this prospectus. The Fund, Artisan Partners, Artisan Partners Distributors LLC, the Fund's transfer agent and each of their respective directors, trustees, officers, employees and agents are not responsible for the failure of any authorized agent to carry out its obligations to its customers.
If you attempt to purchase shares of the Fund through an unauthorized intermediary, your purchase request will be rejected. Please contact your financial intermediary or Artisan Partners Funds at 800.344.1770 to find out whether your financial intermediary is eligible to purchase Fund shares and, if so, how purchases, redemptions or exchanges may be made.
Some authorized agents charge a fee for accounting and shareholder services that the agent provides to Fund shareholders on the Fund’s behalf. These services may include recordkeeping, transaction processing for shareholders’ accounts and other services. This fee may be based on the number of accounts or may be a percentage of the average value of accounts for which the authorized agent provides services. For Investor Shares or Advisor Shares of the Fund, the Fund pays all or a portion of this fee, which is intended to compensate the authorized agent for its provision of services of the type that would be provided by the Fund’s transfer agent or other service providers if the shares were registered on the books of the Fund. Institutional Shares of the Fund do not pay fees to intermediaries in connection with recordkeeping, transaction processing for shareholders’ accounts or any other services that an intermediary may provide to its clients.
Artisan Partners, at its own expense, pays certain authorized agents for accounting and shareholder services (to the extent those fees are not paid by the Fund), and for distribution and marketing services performed with respect to the Fund. This fee may be based on a flat fee, a fee for each share class available at the authorized agent or may be a percentage of the average value of accounts for which the authorized agent provides services. Such payments for distribution and marketing services may be made as compensation or reimbursement for one or more of the following: (1) expenses incurred by authorized agents for their sales activities with respect to the Fund, such as preparing, printing and distributing sales literature and advertising materials and compensating registered representatives or other employees of authorized agents for their sales activities; (2) marketing and promotional services by authorized agents, such as business planning assistance, educating personnel about the Fund and sponsoring sales meetings; (3) transaction or processing fees; and (4) conferences and events sponsored by the authorized agent. A number of factors may be considered in determining the amount of the payments associated with such services, including that authorized agent’s sales, client assets invested in the Fund and redemption rates, the quality of the authorized agent’s relationship with Artisan Partners, and the nature of the services provided by the authorized agent to its clients. Authorized agents that receive these types of payments may have a conflict of interest in recommending or selling Fund shares rather than other mutual funds, particularly where such payments exceed those associated with other funds. Although neither the Fund nor Artisan Partners pays for the Fund to be included in an authorized agent’s “preferred list” or other promotional program, some authorized agents that receive compensation as described above may have such programs in which the Fund may be included.
Please contact your authorized agent for details about payments it may receive from the Fund, Artisan Partners or their affiliates.
The Fund reserves the right to waive or reduce the minimum investment requirements as described under “Investing with Artisan Partners Funds – Minimum Investments.”  Artisan Floating Rate Fund reserves the right to waive or reduce the 2% redemption fee on shares held for 90 days or less for any account held through an authorized agent or other financial intermediary and currently waives the redemption fee on redemptions of shares held by certain retirement or profit-sharing plans and shares purchased through certain authorized agents or financial intermediaries.
In those cases where a financial intermediary passes the redemption fee through to underlying investors, the amount of the fee and the holding period generally will be consistent with Artisan Floating Rate Fund's criteria. However, due to differences in operational procedures and policies, the financial intermediaries’ methods for tracking and calculating the fee may be different in some respects from the methods employed by the Fund. If you purchase shares of Artisan Floating Rate Fund through a financial intermediary, you should contact the financial intermediary for more information on how redemption fees will be applied to your shares.
Anti-Money Laundering Compliance
Artisan Partners Funds is required to comply with various anti-money laundering laws and regulations. Federal law requires all financial institutions, including mutual funds, to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account. Consequently, when you open an Artisan Partners Funds account, you must provide certain identifying information on your account application. If you are transferring the ownership of your account, you also will need to provide identification information about the transferee. If you fail to provide the appropriate information to the Fund, the Fund may try to contact you to obtain the necessary information. If you are unable to provide the requested information, the Fund is unable to contact you within the period of time the Fund considers appropriate, or the Fund believes that

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
32

the nature of the information needed is such that follow-up contact is not appropriate, your application will be rejected and the monies received to establish your account will be returned to you. For some investors and types of accounts, this could have adverse consequences. For example, an IRA holder with a limited amount of time to accomplish a rollover of IRA assets could suffer unfavorable tax consequences as a result of the Fund's inability to process an application. As a result, it is very important that the application be filled out completely. If you have questions about completing your application, please call 800.344.1770.
After your account is established, the Fund also may take other actions or ask to see other identifying documents to verify your identity. These actions may include checking your identifying information against various databases and requesting identifying documents, such as a business license, for an entity, or a driver’s license or other state identification card, for an individual, to verify your identity. If the Fund is unable to verify your identity from the information you provide, your account will be closed and the redemption proceeds will be paid to you (unless the Fund is required to “freeze” your account as described below). You will receive the share price next calculated after the Fund determines its unable to verify your identity (so your redemption proceeds may be more or less than the amount you paid for your shares and the redemption may be a taxable transaction).
If at any time the Fund believes you may be involved in suspicious activity or if your identifying information matches information on government lists of suspicious persons, the Fund may choose not to establish a new account or may be required to “freeze” your account. The Fund also may be required to provide a governmental agency with information about your attempt to establish a new account or about transactions that have occurred in your account.
The Fund also may be required to transfer monies received to establish a new account, transfer an existing account or transfer the proceeds of an existing account to a governmental agency. In some circumstances, the law may not permit the Fund to inform you that it has taken the actions described above.
Inappropriate Trading
Artisan Partners Funds attempts to identify investors who appear to engage in trading the Fund considers inappropriate, which may include frequent or short-term trading, and to take reasonable steps to deter such activity.
The Fund cannot always identify or reasonably detect frequent, short-term or other inappropriate trading. In particular, it may be difficult to identify frequent, short-term or other inappropriate trading in certain omnibus accounts and other accounts traded through financial intermediaries (which may include broker-dealers, retirement plan administrators, insurance company separate accounts, bank trust departments or other financial services organizations), some of which may be authorized agents of the Fund. By their nature, omnibus accounts conceal from the Fund the identity of individual investors and their transactions. Artisan Partners Funds complies fully with applicable federal rules requiring it to reach an agreement with each of its financial intermediaries pursuant to which certain information regarding purchases, redemptions, transfers and exchanges of Fund shares by underlying beneficial owners through financial intermediary accounts will be provided to the Fund upon request, but there can be no guarantee that all frequent, short-term or other trading activity the Fund may consider inappropriate will be detected, even with such agreements in place. If Artisan Partners Funds is unsuccessful in reaching such an agreement with any financial intermediary, Artisan Partners Funds will terminate that financial intermediary’s ability to purchase shares of the Fund for its customers.
Artisan Partners Funds’ board of directors has adopted policies and procedures to address frequent or short-term trading. The Fund attempts to deter frequent or short-term trading through various methods, which include:
exchange limitations as described under “Buying Shares – Telephone Exchange Plan”;
fair valuation of securities as described under “Investing with Artisan Partners Funds – Share Price”; and
redemption fees on Artisan Floating Rate Fund as described under “Redeeming Shares – Redemption Fee.”
The nature of the efforts undertaken and the resulting action by Artisan Partners Funds depends, among other things, on the type of shareholder account. Trading activity is monitored selectively on a daily basis in an effort to detect frequent, short-term or other inappropriate trading. If Artisan Partners Funds believes that an investor has engaged in frequent, short-term or other inappropriate trading, it may reject future purchases of Fund shares in that account or related accounts, or by that investor, with or without prior notice; reject a particular purchase order; limit exchanges among Artisan Partners Funds; and/or refuse to open an account. If inappropriate trading is detected in an account registered in the name of a financial intermediary or plan sponsor (as applicable), Artisan Partners Funds may request that the financial intermediary or plan sponsor (as applicable) take action to prevent the particular investor or investors from engaging in that trading.
Rejection of future purchases by a retirement plan because of inappropriate trading activity by one or more plan participants is likely to impose adverse consequences on the plan and on other participants who did not engage in inappropriate trading. To avoid those collateral consequences, for retirement plans, Artisan Partners Funds generally will communicate with the financial intermediary or plan sponsor and request that the financial intermediary or plan sponsor take action to cause the inappropriate trading activity to cease. If inappropriate trading activity recurs, Artisan Partners Funds may refuse all future purchases from the plan, including those of plan participants not involved in the inappropriate activity.
A financial intermediary through which you may purchase shares of the Fund may also independently attempt to identify trading it considers inappropriate, which may include frequent or short-term trading, and take steps to deter such activity. In some cases, the financial

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
33

intermediary may require the Fund's consent or direction to undertake those efforts. In other cases, Artisan Partners Funds may elect to allow the financial intermediary to apply its own policies with respect to inappropriate trading in lieu of seeking to apply Artisan Partners Funds’ policies to shareholders investing in the Fund through such financial intermediary, based upon Artisan Partners Funds’ conclusion that the financial intermediary’s policies sufficiently protect shareholders of the Fund. In either case, the Fund may have little or no ability to modify the parameters or limits on trading activity set by the financial intermediary. As a result, a financial intermediary may limit or permit trading activity of its customers who invest in Fund shares using standards different from the standards used by the Fund and discussed in this prospectus. The Fund's ability to impose restrictions on trading activity with respect to accounts traded through a particular financial intermediary may also vary depending on the system capabilities, applicable contractual and legal restrictions and cooperation of the particular financial intermediary. If you purchase Fund shares through a financial intermediary, you should contact the financial intermediary for more information about whether and how restrictions or limitations on trading activity will be applied to your account.
Artisan Partners Funds expects direct investors in Institutional Shares of the Fund who do not trade through a financial intermediary that trades electronically to engage in relatively few transactions. Artisan Partners Funds considers more excessive transactions (purchase or redemption) in Institutional Shares by such a direct investor inappropriate.
The identification of inappropriate trading involves judgments that are inherently subjective and the above actions alone or taken together with the other means by which Artisan Partners Funds seeks to discourage certain types of inappropriate trading (through the use of short term redemption fees on Artisan Floating Rate Fund and fair value pricing, for example) cannot eliminate the possibility that inappropriate trading activity in the Fund will occur. Trading activity, appropriate or inappropriate, may affect the Fund and other shareholders (see “Risks You Should Consider”).
Portfolio Security Holdings Disclosure
A complete list of the Fund’s portfolio holdings as of the close of each calendar quarter will be made publicly available on the 15th day of the following calendar quarter, or such other date as Artisan Partners Funds may determine for the Fund on Artisan Partners Funds’ website (www.artisanpartners.com). A complete list of portfolio holdings is also included in reports the Fund files with the SEC after the end of each quarter. The Fund may disclose its top ten holdings or an incomplete list of its holdings or discuss one or more portfolio holdings provided that the holdings have been made publicly available on Artisan Partners Funds’ website at least one day prior to disclosure of such information or has been included in an SEC filing that is required to include the information. Any such list of holdings or discussion of one or more portfolio holdings will remain available on Artisan Partners Funds’ website at least until the date on which the Fund files a report with the SEC that includes a list of portfolio holdings and is for the period that includes the date as of which such information is current. Portfolio holdings information can be found on Artisan Partners Funds’ website at www.artisanpartners.com/individual-investors/news-insights/research-data/holdings.html. Further discussion about the Fund's policies and procedures in connection with the disclosure of portfolio holdings is available in the SAI.
Cost Basis Reporting
Upon the redemption or exchange of your shares in the Fund, the Fund or, if you purchase your shares through a financial intermediary, your financial intermediary generally will be required to provide you and the IRS with cost basis and certain other related tax information about the Fund shares you redeemed or exchanged. If you do not select a particular cost basis reporting method, the Fund or financial intermediary will apply its default cost basis reporting method to your shares. If you hold your shares directly in a Fund account, the Fund’s default method of average cost (or the method you have selected by notifying the Fund) will apply; if you hold your shares in an account with a financial intermediary, the intermediary’s default method (or the method you have selected by notifying the intermediary) will apply. Please see Artisan Partners Funds’ website (www.artisanpartners.com) or call Artisan Partners Funds at 800.344.1770, or consult your financial intermediary, as applicable, for more information regarding available methods for cost basis reporting and how to select or change a particular method. Please consult your tax advisor to determine which available cost basis method is best for you.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
34

Distributions and Taxes
The Fund intends to distribute substantially all of its net income and net realized capital gains to investors at least annually. Artisan Floating Rate Fund typically declares income distributions daily and pays income distributions monthly, and distributes net realized capital gains no less frequently than annually. The Fund’s investment decisions generally are made without regard to tax consequences to shareholders. As a result, the Fund may be less tax-efficient than other mutual funds that take tax consequences into account in the investment process. The “Fund Summary” section of this prospectus will include information on the Fund’s after-tax returns, when available.
Distribution Options
When you open an account, you may specify on your application how you want to receive your distributions. If you later want to change your selection, you may submit a written request to the Fund's transfer agent, call us at 800.344.1770 or visit www.artisanpartners.com if you hold Investor Shares or Advisor Shares. Please call 866.773.7233 if you hold Institutional Shares.
The Fund offers the following options, which you may select on your application:
Reinvestment Option—Your income dividends and capital gain distributions will be reinvested in additional shares of the Fund. If you do not indicate a choice on your application, we will automatically reinvest your distributions.
Income-Only Option—We will automatically reinvest your capital gain distributions, but send income dividends to you by check or to your predesignated US bank account by EFT.
Capital Gains-Only Option—We will automatically reinvest your income dividends, but send capital gain distributions to you by check or to your predesignated US bank account by EFT.
Cash Option—We will send all distributions to you by check or to your predesignated US bank account by EFT.
In IRA accounts, all distributions are automatically reinvested because payments in cash likely would be subject to income tax and penalties. After you are 59 ½, you may request payment of distributions in cash. Distributions paid in cash, even after you are 59 ½, likely will be subject to income tax.
The Fund does not pay dividends or distributions by Federal Reserve wire transfer.
When you reinvest, the reinvestment price is the Fund’s NAV per share of a class of the Fund at the close of business on the reinvestment date.
Distribution checks usually will begin to be mailed promptly after the payment date.
Taxes
The following discussion is a summary of some important US federal income tax considerations generally applicable to investments in the Fund. Your investment in the Fund may have other tax implications. For example, if your investment is held through a tax-advantaged account such as an employee benefit plan or if you are a foreign person (defined below), other results may be obtained and other considerations may apply. Please consult your tax advisor about US federal, state, local or foreign tax laws applicable to you.
When you sign your account application, you are asked to furnish your Social Security or taxpayer identification number and certify that your Social Security or taxpayer identification number is correct, that you are a US person and that you are not subject to backup withholding for failing to report income to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). If you fail to comply with this procedure, the Fund is required to withhold a percentage of your taxable dividends, distributions and proceeds from redemptions.
The Fund intends to elect and intends to qualify each year to be treated as a “regulated investment company.”  A regulated investment company is not subject to US federal income taxes at the fund level on income and gains that are distributed to shareholders in a timely manner.
Taxes on Redemptions—When you redeem shares in the Fund, you will generally recognize a capital gain or loss if there is a difference between the basis of your shares (typically, their cost) and the price you receive when you redeem them. Capital gain or loss realized from a redemption of shares held for more than one year will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss. Otherwise, the gain or loss will generally be treated as short-term capital gain or loss.
Whenever you redeem shares of the Fund, you will receive a confirmation statement showing how many shares you sold and at what price. Shareholders holding shares in taxable accounts also may receive a year-end statement early in the following year. This will allow you or your tax preparer to determine the tax consequences of each redemption. (See also “Other Information – Cost Basis Reporting” above.) However, be sure to keep your regular account statements and tax forms; that information will be essential in verifying the amount of your capital gains or losses.
Taxes on Exchanges of Fund Shares—An exchange of shares of the Fund for shares of another Fund will be a taxable transaction. Any gain or loss resulting from such an exchange will generally be treated as a capital gain or loss for US federal income tax purposes, and will be long-term or short-term capital gain or loss depending on how long you have held your shares. For US federal income tax purposes, an exchange of shares of the Fund directly for shares of a different class of the Fund generally is not expected to be a taxable event or to result in recognition of a gain or loss by the exchanging shareholder.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
35

Taxes on Distributions—Distributions are generally subject to US federal income tax, and may be subject to state or local taxes. If you are a US citizen residing outside the United States, your distributions also may be taxed by the country in which you reside.
Your distributions are generally taxable in the year they are paid, whether you take them in cash or reinvest them in additional shares. However, distributions declared in October, November or December and paid in January of the following year are taxable as if you received them on December 31 of the year in which they were declared.
For US federal income tax purposes, the Fund’s income and short-term capital gain distributions are generally taxed as ordinary income, whether paid in cash or in additional shares, except to the extent such distributions are attributable to “qualified dividend income,” as described below.
Long-term capital gain distributions properly reported by the Fund as capital gain dividends will be taxable as long-term capital gains includible in net capital gains and taxed to individuals at reduced rates. Whether gains realized by the Fund are long-term or short-term depends on the length of time that the Fund held the asset it sold.
Net capital gains rates apply to distributions received by noncorporate shareholders that are attributable to “qualified dividend income,” provided certain holding period and other requirements are satisfied. The amount of Fund dividends eligible to be taxed as qualified dividend income at the reduced rate generally is not permitted to exceed the amount of the aggregate qualifying dividends received by the Fund. To the extent the Fund distributes amounts of dividends that the Fund determines are eligible for the reduced rates, it will identify the relevant amounts in its annual tax information reports to its shareholders. Artisan Floating Rate Fund generally does not expect a significant portion of its distributions to be derived from qualified dividend income.
A 3.8% Medicare contribution tax is imposed on the “net investment income” of certain individuals, estates and trusts to the extent their income exceeds certain threshold amounts. Net investment income generally includes for this purpose dividends, including any capital gain dividends paid by the Fund, and net gains recognized on the sale, redemption or exchange of shares of the Fund.
A portion of the Fund’s dividends also may be eligible for the dividends-received deduction generally available to corporations. The eligible portion may not exceed the aggregate dividends the Fund receives from US corporations. Artisan Floating Rate Fund generally does not expect a significant portion of its distributions to qualify for the corporate dividends-received deduction.
The Fund’s income or proceeds from investments in foreign securities may be subject to foreign withholding or other taxes, which, where applicable, will reduce the return on those securities. If more than 50% of the value of the Fund’s total assets at the end of its taxable year is invested in foreign securities, the Fund will be eligible to elect to permit shareholders to claim a credit or deduction with respect to foreign taxes incurred by the Fund. The Fund may choose not to make such an election, even if it is eligible to do so.
Early in each calendar year, the Fund will send you and the IRS a Form 1099 showing the amount and character of taxable distributions you received (including those reinvested in additional shares) in the previous calendar year. Certain shareholders may receive an annual statement and not a Form 1099.
The Fund’s distributions are generally subject to tax as described herein even if such distributions are paid from income or gains earned by the Fund prior to a shareholder’s investment and thus were included in the price paid for the shares. As a result, if you invest in the Fund shortly before it makes a distribution, the distribution will be taxable even though it may economically represent a return of your investment.
The Fund generally publishes estimates of its distributions in advance of the planned record and payment dates, except that Artisan Floating Rate Fund does not publish estimates of daily income dividends. There is no assurance that the Fund will publish such estimates in the future. Those estimates, if published, are for planning purposes and are subject to change.
Taxation of Certain Investments—Certain of the Fund’s investment practices, including transactions in respect of foreign currencies, investments in certain debt obligations and derivatives can affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to shareholders, and may cause the Fund to recognize taxable income in excess of the cash generated by such investments. Thus, the Fund could be required at times to dispose of investments, including when it is not otherwise advantageous to do so, in order to satisfy distribution requirements for treatment as a regulated investment company. Such dispositions could increase the amount of short-term capital gain distributions (taxed at ordinary income rates) and capital gain dividends made to shareholders.
Tax rules are not entirely clear about certain issues relating to debt obligations that are in the lowest rating categories; the Fund will need to address these issues as they arise in order to seek to ensure that it continues to qualify as a regulated investment company.
Non-US Investors—Distributions by the Fund to shareholders that are not “United States persons” within the meaning of the Code (“foreign persons”) properly reported by the Fund as (i) capital gain dividends, (ii) “interest-related dividends” (i.e., dividends attributable to US-source interest income that, in general, would not be subject to US federal income tax if earned directly by an individual foreign person) and (iii) “short-term capital gain dividends” (i.e., dividends attributable to net short-term capital gains in excess of net long-term capital losses) generally are not subject to withholding of US federal income tax. Distributions by the Fund to foreign persons other than capital gain dividends, interest-related dividends, and short-term capital gain dividends generally are subject to withholding of US federal income tax at a rate of 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate). Foreign persons should refer to the SAI for further information and should consult their tax advisors as to the tax consequences to them of owning Fund shares.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
36

Financial Highlights
The financial highlights for the Fund are not presented because the Fund had not begun investment operations prior to the date of this prospectus.

Prospectus—Artisan Partners Funds
|
37

For more detail on the Fund, you may request the SAI, which is incorporated in this prospectus by reference. For purposes of any electronic version of this prospectus, the universal resource locators (URLs) referenced in this prospectus are not intended to incorporate the contents of any website referenced into this prospectus.
You can find more information about the Fund’s investments in its annual and semiannual reports to shareholders. The annual report contains a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund’s performance during its most recent fiscal period.
To view or print the SAI, the annual and semiannual reports to shareholders and other information about Artisan Partners Funds, visit www.artisanpartners.com or http://hosted.rightprospectus.com/Artisan. Call 800.344.1770 to receive a free copy of those documents or if you have a question or would like to receive other information about Artisan Partners Funds.
HTML and text-only versions of the Fund’s documents can be viewed online or downloaded from the EDGAR database on the SEC’s Internet website at www.sec.gov. Copies may also be obtained, after mailing the appropriate duplicating fee, by e-mail request at publicinfo@sec.gov.
 811-8932


The information in this Statement of Additional Information is not complete and may be changed. The Fund may not sell
these securities until the registration statement filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This
Statement of Additional Information, which is not a prospectus, is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an
offer to buy these securities in any state or jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

Subject to completion, dated 13 September 2021
2021
[ ] 2021
Statement of
Additional Information
Artisan Partners Funds
 
Share Class
 
Investor
Advisor
Institutional
Artisan Floating Rate Fund
[ ]
[ ]
[ ]

Statement of Additional Information
Artisan Floating Rate Fund (the “Fund”) is a series of Artisan Partners Funds, Inc. (“Artisan Partners Funds”). This Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) is not a prospectus. It should be read in conjunction with the prospectus of the Fund dated [ 2021] and any supplement to the prospectus. Because the Fund was not offered prior to the date of this SAI, the financial statements for the Fund are not included in this SAI. A copy of the Fund’s prospectus and the annual and semiannual reports to shareholders, when available, can be obtained without charge by calling 800.344.1770, by writing to Artisan Partners Funds, P.O. Box 219322, Kansas City, MO 64121-9322, or by accessing Artisan Partners Funds’ website at www.artisanpartners.com.

Table of Contents

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds

Information about the Fund and Artisan Partners
The Fund is a series of Artisan Partners Funds. Artisan Partners Limited Partnership (“Artisan Partners”) provides investment advisory services to the Fund.
The discussion below supplements the description in the prospectus of the Fund’s investment objective, policies and restrictions.
Investment Objective and Policies
The investment objective of the Fund is non-fundamental and may be changed by the board of directors without shareholder approval. However, investors in the Fund will receive at least 30 days’ prior written notice of implementation of any change in the Fund’s investment objective.
Investment Techniques and Risks
Foreign Securities
The Fund can invest in securities of non-US companies, including from emerging and less developed markets. For the purposes of testing compliance with the Fund’s investment restrictions related to investing in non-US companies, Artisan Partners generally considers an issuer to be from a particular country as designated by Artisan Partners’ securities information vendors, which may change from time to time. However, the investment team, in its own judgment, may consider an issuer to be from a country other than the country designated by the securities information vendors. Therefore, classifications may differ by Fund and investment team. In determining the country designations of issuers, the investment team and/or Artisan Partners’ vendors may use a range of criteria, including the identity of the jurisdiction of the issuer’s incorporation, the main equity trading market for the issuer’s securities, the geographical distribution of the issuer’s operations, the location of the issuer’s headquarters or other criteria, such as the source of a company’s revenues. Over time, country designations may change. As a result of this classification, the Fund may hold securities of issuers classified as US, but which are organized outside the US or, vice versa, the Fund may hold securities of issuers classified as non-US, but which are organized in the US and/or trade in the US. In addition, the country and regional classifications shown in the Fund's shareholder reports, financial statements and other reports may differ from the classifications used for purposes of testing compliance with the Fund’s investment restrictions.
Securities of non-US companies include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), New York Shares, European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”), Continental Depositary Receipts (“CDRs”), Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”), or other securities representing underlying shares of foreign issuers. ADRs, New York Shares, EDRs, CDRs and GDRs are receipts, typically issued by a financial institution (a “depositary”), evidencing ownership interests in a security or pool of securities issued by an issuer and deposited with the depositary. ADRs, EDRs, CDRs and GDRs may be available for investment through “sponsored” or “unsponsored” facilities. A sponsored facility is established jointly by the issuer of the security underlying the receipt and a depositary, whereas an unsponsored facility may be established by a depositary without participation by the issuer of the receipt’s underlying security. The Fund may invest in sponsored or unsponsored ADRs, EDRs, CDRs, GDRs or other forms of depositary receipts, certain of which may include voting rights with respect to the underlying foreign shares, and certain of which may not.
With respect to portfolio securities that are issued by foreign issuers or denominated in foreign currencies (including, among others, participation certificates and depositary receipts), the Fund’s investment performance is affected by the strength or weakness of the US dollar against these currencies. For example, if the dollar falls in value relative to the Japanese yen, the dollar value of a yen-denominated stock held in the portfolio will rise even though the price of the stock remains unchanged. Conversely, if the dollar rises in value relative to the yen, the dollar value of the yen-denominated stock will fall. (See discussion of transaction hedging and portfolio hedging under “Managing Investment Exposure.”)
Investors should understand and consider carefully the risks involved in foreign investing, including the risks of transacting on foreign exchanges or with foreign clearinghouses. Investing in foreign securities (including through positions denominated in foreign currencies or dollar-denominated securities or other instruments that expose the Fund to foreign securities or currencies) and utilization of forward foreign currency exchange contracts involve certain considerations comprising both risks and opportunities not typically associated with investing in US securities. These considerations include fluctuations in exchange rates of foreign currencies; possible imposition of exchange control regulation or currency restrictions that would prevent cash from being brought back to the US; less public information with respect to issuers of securities; less governmental supervision of stock exchanges, securities brokers and issuers of securities; lack of uniform accounting, auditing, financial reporting and disclosure standards; lack of uniform settlement periods and trading practices; less liquidity and frequently greater price volatility in foreign markets than in the US; possible imposition of foreign taxes; and sometimes less advantageous or uncertain legal, operational and financial protections applicable to foreign sub-custodial arrangements and investments through complex structures that may lack transparency.
There is the possibility of expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure or nationalization of foreign bank deposits or other assets, establishment of exchange controls, the adoption of foreign government restrictions, or other adverse political, social or diplomatic developments that could affect international investments. For example, continuing uncertainty as to the status of the Euro and the European Monetary Union (“EMU”) and the potential for certain countries to withdraw from the institution has created volatility in currency and financial markets. The United Kingdom approved a referendum to withdraw from the EU (commonly referred to as “Brexit”) in June 2016. In March 2017, the British government formally notified the EU of the country’s intention to withdraw from the EU. The withdrawal agreement between the

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
2

United Kingdom and the EU took effect on January 31, 2020, at which time the United Kingdom ceased to be a member of the EU. The United Kingdom’s departure from the EU may result in a sustained period of market uncertainty, as new trade and other agreements between the United Kingdom and the EU take effect. The United Kingdom’s departure from the EU may also destabilize some or all of the other EU member countries and/or the Eurozone. These developments could result in losses to the Fund, as there may be negative effects on the value of the Fund’s investments and/or on the Fund’s ability to enter into certain transactions or value certain investments, and these developments may make it more difficult for the Fund to exit certain investments at an advantageous time or price.
Income, gains and proceeds from non-US securities held by the Fund could be reduced by taxes withheld from that income, gains and proceeds, or other taxes that may be imposed by the countries in which the Fund invests. The net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund also may be affected by changes in the rates or methods of taxation applicable to the Fund or to entities in which the Fund has invested.
Emerging, Less Developed and Developing Markets. The Fund may invest in securities of emerging, less developed and developing market companies. Artisan Partners considers emerging and less developed markets (“emerging markets”) to be those markets in any country other than Canada, Luxembourg, the US and the countries comprising the MSCI EAFE Index (currently, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Hong Kong, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom).
Investments in emerging and developing markets’ securities involve special risks in addition to those generally associated with foreign investing. Many investments in emerging and developing markets can be considered speculative, and the value of those investments can be more volatile than investments in more developed foreign markets. This difference reflects the greater uncertainties of investing in less established markets and economies. Costs associated with transactions in emerging and developing markets’ securities typically are higher than costs associated with transactions in US securities. Such transactions also may involve additional costs for the purchase or sale of foreign currency.
Investing in emerging and developing market countries involves substantial risk due to, among other reasons, limited information; higher brokerage costs; different accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards; less developed legal systems and thinner trading markets as compared to those in developed countries; and currency blockages or transfer restrictions. The securities markets of emerging and developing market countries may be substantially smaller, less developed, less liquid and more volatile than the major securities markets in the US and other developed nations. The limited size of many securities markets in emerging and developing market countries and limited trading volume in issuers compared to the volume in US securities or securities of issuers in other developed countries could cause prices to be erratic for reasons other than factors that affect the quality of the securities. In addition, emerging and developing market countries’ exchanges and broker-dealers may generally be subject to less regulation than their counterparts in developed countries. Brokerage commissions and dealer mark-ups, custodial expenses and other transaction costs are generally higher in emerging and developing market countries than in developed countries, all of which can increase fund operating expenses and/or create a drag on fund performance.
Emerging and developing market countries may have different clearance and settlement procedures than in the US, and in certain markets there may be times when settlements fail to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions, making it difficult to conduct such transactions. Further, satisfactory custodial services for investment securities may not be available in some emerging and developing market countries, which may result in additional costs and delays in trading and settlement. The inability of the Fund to make intended security purchases due to settlement problems or the risk of intermediary or counterparty failures could cause the Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities. The inability to dispose of a portfolio security due to settlement problems could result either in losses to the Fund due to subsequent declines in the value of such portfolio security or, if the Fund has entered into a contract to sell the security, in possible liability to the purchaser.
The Fund may invest in some emerging and developing markets through trading structures or protocols that subject them to the risks described above (such as risks associated with illiquidity, custodying assets, different settlement and clearance procedures, asserting legal title under a developing legal and regulatory regime and other risks) to a greater degree than in developed markets or even in other emerging and developing markets. For example, some of the markets in which the Fund may invest do not provide for settlement on a delivery versus payment basis and the risk in relation to such settlements are borne by the Fund.
China-Related Investments. The Fund may invest in certain eligible Chinese securities (“China A Shares”) listed and traded on the Shanghai Stock Exchange (“SSE”) and Shenzhen Stock Exchange through stock connect programs (each, a “Stock Connect”). The Stock Connects are securities trading and clearing programs for the establishment of mutual market access between markets. The Stock Connects are subject to regulations promulgated by regulatory authorities for each market and further regulations or restrictions, such as trading suspensions, may adversely affect the Stock Connects and the value of the China A Shares held by the Fund. There is no guarantee that the systems required to operate a Stock Connect will function properly or that exchanges will continue to support Stock Connects in the future. While the Stock Connects may not currently be subject to individual investment quotas, daily and aggregate investment quotas generally apply to all participants on Stock Connects on a “net buy” basis, which may restrict or preclude the Fund’s ability to invest in securities traded through the Stock Connects on a timely basis or at all on any given day. In addition, such securities generally may not be sold, purchased or otherwise transferred other than through the applicable Stock Connect in accordance with the program’s rules, which may further subject the Fund to liquidity risk with respect to China A Shares. The Fund may be restricted in its ability to dispose of its China A Shares purchased through Stock Connect in a timely manner. As an example, the Stock Connects are generally available only on business days when both markets are open.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
3

When either market is closed, the Fund will not be able to trade securities on that Stock Connect at a time that may otherwise be beneficial to trade. Because of the way in which China A Shares are held in a Stock Connect, the Fund may not be able to exercise the rights of a shareholder and may be limited in its ability to pursue claims against the issuer of a security, and may suffer losses in the event the depository of the Stock Connect becomes insolvent. The limitations and risks described above with respect to the Stock Connects are specific to those programs; however, these and other risks may exist to varying degrees in connection with the Fund's investments through other trading structures, protocols and platforms in other emerging and developing markets.
In addition to investing through a Stock Connect, the Fund may also invest in China A Shares through a Qualified Foreign Institutional Investor (“QFII”) arrangement. Artisan Partners has applied for and received a QFII license from the China Securities Regulatory Commission. Artisan Partners is permitted to invest directly in China A Shares denominated in Chinese renminbi or other currencies, on behalf of clients whose portfolios Artisan Partners manages, including the Fund. Under Chinese law, Artisan Partners, as holder of the QFII license, is required to maintain custody of China A Share assets held as part of the QFII license with a local custodian in Artisan Partners’ name for the benefit of the Fund, and the Fund bears the costs of maintaining its sub-account on the books and records of the Chinese custodian. Artisan Partners' ability to invest in China A Shares through a QFII arrangement on behalf of the Fund is subject to the applicable Chinese laws, rules and regulations, including relating to, without limitation, restrictions on investment and repatriation of principal and profits. The investment regulations under which the Fund would invest in the China A Shares market are relatively new. In addition, the application and interpretation of these regulations is often unclear and there is no certainty as to how they will be applied.
Certain foreign markets (including certain emerging and developing markets) may require governmental approval for the repatriation of investment income, capital or the proceeds of sales of securities by foreign investors. The Fund could be adversely affected by delays in, or a refusal to grant, required governmental approval for repatriation of capital, as well as by the application to the Fund of any restrictions on investments.
Many emerging and developing markets have experienced substantial rates of inflation for extended periods. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had and may continue to have adverse effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging and developing market countries. In an attempt to control inflation, certain emerging and developing market countries have imposed wage and price controls. Some of those countries, in recent years, have begun to control inflation through economic policies.
Governments of many emerging and developing market countries have exercised and continue to exercise substantial influence over many aspects of the private sector through ownership or control of many companies. The future actions of those governments could have a significant effect on economic conditions in emerging and developing markets, which in turn, may adversely affect companies in the private sector, general market conditions and prices and yields of certain of the securities in the Fund’s portfolio. Expropriation, confiscatory taxation, nationalization and political, economic and social instability have occurred throughout the history of certain emerging and developing market countries and could adversely affect Fund assets should any of those conditions recur. In addition, high levels of national debt tend to make emerging and developing markets heavily reliant on foreign capital and, therefore, vulnerable to capital flight.
Privatizations. Some governments have been engaged in programs of selling part or all of their interests in government owned or controlled enterprises (“Privatizations”). The Fund may invest in Privatizations. In certain countries, the ability of a US entity such as the Fund to participate in Privatizations may be limited by local law, and/or the terms on which the Fund may be permitted to participate may be less advantageous than those afforded local investors. There can be no assurance that governments will continue to sell their interests in companies currently owned or controlled by them or that Privatization programs will be successful.
Foreign Sovereign Debt. The Fund may invest in sovereign debt securities, which are issued or guaranteed by foreign governmental entities. Investment in sovereign debt can involve a high degree of risk. The governmental entity that controls the repayment of sovereign debt may not be able or willing to repay the principal and/or interest when due in accordance with the terms of such debt. A governmental entity’s willingness or ability to repay principal and interest due in a timely manner may be affected by, among other factors, its cash flow situation, the extent of its foreign reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date a payment is due, the relative size of the debt service burden to the economy as a whole, the governmental entity’s policy towards the International Monetary Fund, and the political constraints to which a governmental entity may be subject. Governmental entities may also be dependent on expected disbursements from foreign governments, multilateral agencies and others abroad to reduce principal and interest arrearages on their debt. The commitment on the part of these governments, agencies and others to make such disbursements may be conditioned on a governmental entity’s implementation of economic reforms and/or economic performance and the timely service of such debtor’s obligations. Failure to implement such reforms, achieve such levels of economic performance or repay principal or interest when due may result in the cancellation of such third parties’ commitments to lend funds to the governmental entity, which may further impair such debtor’s ability or willingness to service its debts in a timely manner. Consequently, governmental entities may default on their sovereign debt. Holders of sovereign debt may be requested to participate in the rescheduling of such debt and to extend further loans to governmental entities. There is no bankruptcy proceeding by which sovereign debt on which governmental entities have defaulted may be collected in whole or in part.
Participation Certificates
The Fund may invest in equity-linked securities (called “participation certificates” in this SAI but may be called different names by issuers). In a typical transaction, the Fund would buy a participation certificate from a bank or broker-dealer (“counterparty”) that would entitle the Fund to

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
4

a return measured by the change in value of an identified underlying security.1 The purchase price of the participation certificate is based on the market price of the underlying security at the time of purchase converted into US dollars, plus transaction costs. The counterparty may, but is not required to, purchase the shares of the underlying security to hedge its obligation. When the participation certificate expires or the Fund exercises the participation certificate and closes its position, the Fund receives a payment that is based upon the then-current value of the underlying security converted into US dollars (less transaction costs).
The price, performance and liquidity of the participation certificate are all linked directly to the underlying security. The Fund’s ability to redeem or exercise a participation certificate generally is dependent on the liquidity in the local trading market for the security underlying the participation certificate. Participation certificates are typically privately placed securities that have not been registered for sale under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “1933 Act”). Pursuant to Rule 144A under the 1933 Act, participation certificates are eligible for purchase or sale to certain qualified institutional buyers.
There are risks associated with participation certificates. If the Fund invests in a participation certificate, it will bear the full counterparty risk with respect to the issuing counterparty. Counterparty risk in this context is the risk that the issuing counterparty will not fulfill its contractual obligation to timely pay the Fund the amount owed under the participation certificate. The Fund attempts to mitigate that risk by purchasing only from issuers with investment grade credit ratings. A participation certificate is a general unsecured contractual obligation of the issuing counterparty. The Fund typically has no rights under a participation certificate against the issuer of the securities underlying the participation certificate and is therefore typically unable to exercise any rights with respect to the issuer (including, without limitation, voting rights and fraud or bankruptcy claims). There is also no assurance that there will be a secondary trading market for a participation certificate or that the trading price of a participation certificate will equal the value of the underlying security. Participation certificates also may have a longer settlement period than the underlying shares and during that time the Fund’s assets could not be deployed elsewhere. The issuers of participation certificates may be deemed to be broker-dealers or engaged in the business of underwriting as defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). As a result, the Fund’s investment in participation certificates issued by a particular institution may be limited by certain investment restrictions contained in the 1940 Act.
For the purposes of determining compliance with the Fund’s limitations on investing in certain markets, regions, securities or industries, the Fund looks through the participation certificate to the issuer of the underlying security. . The Fund will consider the country classification of the issuer of the security underlying the participation certificate for the purpose of testing compliance with this and other similar investment restrictions.
Fixed Income Securities
The Fund may invest in corporate bonds, notes and debentures of long and short maturities and of various credit qualities, including unrated securities. The Fund may invest in a broad range of fixed income securities, including high yield corporate bonds, loans and other corporate fixed income instruments of varying maturities, including fixed-, variable- and floating-rate bonds, debentures, notes, commercial paper and other types of corporate debt instruments across the credit quality spectrum, such as convertible debt securities and stressed and distressed debt securities, as well as credit default swaps and other derivatives related to, referencing or with similar economic characteristics to corporate fixed income securities. Each of the Funds noted above may invest in fixed income securities across the credit quality spectrum, including high yield fixed income securities (i.e., “junk” bonds) (see “Junk Bond Securities” below). Fixed income securities include a broad array of short-, medium-, and long-term obligations issued by the US or foreign governments, government or international agencies and instrumentalities, and corporate and private issuers of various types. The maturity date is the date on which a fixed income security matures. This is the date on which the borrower must pay back the borrowed amount, which is known as the principal. Some fixed income securities represent uncollateralized obligations of their issuers; in other cases, the securities may be backed by specific assets (such as mortgages or other receivables) that have been set aside as collateral for the issuer’s obligation. Fixed income securities generally involve an obligation of the issuer to pay interest or dividends on either a current basis or at the maturity of the security, as well as the obligation to repay the principal amount of the security at maturity. The rate of interest on fixed income securities may be fixed, floating or variable. Some securities pay a higher interest rate than the current market rate. An investor may have to pay more than the security’s principal to compensate the seller for the value of the higher interest rate. This additional payment is a premium.
Fixed income securities are subject to credit risk, market risk and interest rate risk. Except to the extent values are affected by other factors, such as developments relating to a specific issuer, industry, sector or region, generally the value of a fixed income security can be expected to rise when interest rates decline and, conversely, fall when interest rates rise. Some fixed income securities also involve prepayment or call risk. This is the risk that the issuer will repay the Fund the principal on the security before it is due, thus depriving the Fund of a favorable stream of future interest or dividend payments. The Fund could buy another security, but that other security might pay a lower interest rate. In addition, many fixed income securities contain call or buy-back features that permit their issuers to call or repurchase the securities from their holders. Such securities may present risks based on payment expectations. Although the Fund would typically receive a premium if an issuer were to redeem a security, if an issuer were to exercise a call option and redeem the security during times of declining interest rates, the Fund may realize a capital loss on its investment if the security was purchased at a premium and the Fund may be forced to replace the called security with a lower yielding security.

1
The Fund may also invest in a participation certificate in which a basket of equity securities serves as the underlying reference security for determining the value of the participation certificate.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
5

Changes by nationally recognized securities rating organizations (“NRSROs”) in their ratings of any fixed income security or the issuer of a fixed income security and changes in the actual or perceived ability of an issuer to make payments of interest and principal may also affect the value of these investments. Changes in the value of portfolio securities generally will not affect income derived from these securities, but will affect the Fund’s NAV.
Because interest rates vary, it is impossible to predict the income, if any, for any particular period for the Fund that invests in fixed income securities. Fluctuations in the value of the Fund’s investments in fixed income securities will cause the NAV of each share class of the Fund to fluctuate also.
Duration is an estimate of how much a bond fund’s share price will fluctuate in response to a change in interest rates. For example, if interest rates rise by one percentage point, the share price of a portfolio of debt securities with an average duration of five years would be expected to decline by about 5%. If rates decrease by a percentage point, the share price of a portfolio of debt securities with an average duration of five years would be expected to rise by about 5%. The greater the duration of a bond, the greater its percentage price volatility. Only a pure discount bond – that is, one with no coupon or sinking-fund payments – has a duration equal to the remaining maturity of the bond, because only in this case does the present value of the final redemption payment represent the entirety of the present value of the bond. For all other bonds, duration is less than maturity.
The Fund may invest in variable- or floating-rate securities, which bear interest at rates subject to periodic adjustment or provide for periodic recovery of principal on demand. The value of the Fund’s investment in certain of these securities may depend on the Fund’s right to demand that a specified bank, broker-dealer, or other financial institution either purchase such securities from the Fund at par or make payment on short notice to the Fund of unpaid principal and/or interest on the securities. These securities are subject to, among others, interest rate risk and credit risk.
The Fund may invest in fixed income securities that are issued by special purpose entities and that directly or indirectly represent an interest in, or are secured by and are payable from, a stream of payments generated from particular assets, such as operating contracts and/or intellectual property. Such securities are subject to the risks associated with fixed income securities generally, and may be subject to additional risks. The additional risks may include, among others, risks associated with service providers managing the collateral held by the special purpose entity and/or administering the security, the extent and nature of any internal or external credit support, and subordination to other securities issued by the special purpose entity.
Generally, the Fund uses the terms debt security, debt obligation, bond, fixed income security and fixed income instrument interchangeably, and regard them to mean a security or instrument having one or more of the following characteristics: a fixed income security, a security or instrument issued at a discount to its face value, a security or instrument that pays interest at a fixed, floating or variable rate or a security or instrument with a stated principal amount that requires repayment of some or all of that principal amount to the holder of the security. The terms debt security, debt obligation, bond, fixed income security and fixed income instrument are interpreted broadly by Artisan Partners as an instrument or security evidencing what is commonly referred to as an IOU rather than evidencing the corporate ownership of equity unless that equity represents an indirect or derivative interest in one or more debt securities. For this purpose, the terms also include instruments that are intended to provide one or more of the characteristics of a direct investment in one or more debt securities. As new fixed income instruments are developed, the Fund may invest in those opportunities as well.
Junk Bond Securities. The Fund may invest in securities that are rated, at the time of purchase, below investment grade (below BBB- by Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC, a division of McGraw-Hill Financial, Inc., or Fitch Ratings Inc. or below Baa3 by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. or comparably rated by another NRSRO or unrated but are determined by Artisan Partners to be of comparable quality, which are often referred to as “junk bonds”). While offering a greater potential opportunity for capital appreciation and higher yields compared to higher-rated fixed income securities, junk bonds typically entail greater potential price volatility and may be less liquid than higher-rated securities. Junk bonds may be regarded as predominately speculative with respect to the issuer’s continuing ability to meet principal and interest payments. They may also be more susceptible to real or perceived adverse economic and competitive industry conditions than higher-rated securities. Issuers of securities in default may fail to resume principal or interest payments, in which case the Fund may lose its entire investment.
The lower ratings of certain securities held by the Fund reflect a greater possibility that adverse changes in the financial condition of the issuer, or in general economic conditions, or both, or an unanticipated rise in interest rates, may impair the ability of the issuer to make payments of interest and principal. The inability (or perceived inability) of issuers to make timely payment of interest and principal would likely make the values of securities held by the Fund more volatile and could limit the Fund’s ability to sell its securities at prices approximating the values the Fund had placed on such securities. In the absence of a liquid trading market for securities held by it, the Fund may be unable at times to establish the fair market value of such securities. The rating assigned to a security does not reflect an assessment of the volatility of the security’s market value or of the liquidity of an investment in the security.
Like those of other fixed income securities, the values of lower-rated securities fluctuate in response to changes in interest rates. Thus, a decrease in interest rates generally will result in an increase in the value of the Fund’s fixed income securities. Conversely, during periods of rising interest rates, the value of the Fund’s fixed income securities generally will decline. In addition, the values of such securities are also affected by changes in general economic conditions and business conditions affecting the specific industries of their issuers. Changes by recognized rating services in their ratings of any fixed income security and in the ability of an issuer to make payments of interest and principal

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
6

may also affect the value of these investments. Changes in the values of portfolio securities generally will not affect cash income derived from such securities, but will affect the Fund’s NAV.
Issuers of lower-rated securities are often highly leveraged, so that their ability to service their debt obligations during an economic downturn or during sustained periods of rising interest rates may be impaired. In addition, such issuers may not have more traditional methods of financing available to them and may be unable to repay debt at maturity by refinancing. The risk of loss due to default in payment of interest or principal by such issuers is significantly greater because such securities frequently are unsecured and subordinated to the prior payment of senior indebtedness. Certain of the lower-rated securities in which the Fund may invest are issued to raise funds in connection with the acquisition of a company, in so-called leveraged buy-out transactions. The highly leveraged capital structure of such issuers may make them especially vulnerable to adverse changes in economic conditions.
Under adverse market or economic conditions or in the event of adverse changes in the financial condition of the issuer, the Fund could find it more difficult to sell lower-rated securities when Artisan Partners believes it advisable to do so or may be able to sell such securities only at prices lower than might otherwise be available. In many cases, lower-rated securities may be purchased in private placements and, accordingly, will be subject to restrictions on resale as a matter of contract or under securities laws. Under such circumstances, it may also be more difficult to determine the fair value of such securities for purposes of computing the Fund’s NAV. In order to enforce its rights in the event of a default under lower-rated securities, the Fund may be required to take possession of and manage assets securing the issuer’s obligations on such securities, which may increase the Fund’s operating expenses and adversely affect the Fund’s NAV. The Fund may also be limited in its ability to enforce its rights and may incur greater costs in enforcing its rights in the event an issuer becomes the subject of bankruptcy proceedings. In addition, the Fund’s intention to qualify as a regulated investment company under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”) may limit the extent to which the Fund may exercise its rights by taking possession of such assets.
Certain securities held by the Fund may permit the issuer at its option to call, or redeem, its securities. If an issuer were to redeem securities held by the Fund during a time of declining interest rates, the Fund may not be able to reinvest the proceeds in securities providing the same investment return as the securities redeemed.
Lower-rated securities may be subject to certain risks not typically associated with investment grade securities, such as the following: (1) reliable and objective information about the value of lower rated obligations may be difficult to obtain because the market for such securities may be thinner and less active than that for investment grade obligations; (2) adverse publicity and investor perceptions, whether or not based on fundamental analysis, may decrease the values and liquidity of lower than investment grade obligations, and, in turn, adversely affect their market; (3) companies that issue lower rated obligations may be in the growth stage of their development, or may be financially troubled or highly leveraged, so they may not have more traditional methods of financing available to them; (4) when other institutional investors dispose of their holdings of lower rated debt securities, the general market and the prices for such securities could be adversely affected; and (5) the market for lower rated securities could be impaired if legislative proposals to limit their use in connection with corporate reorganizations or to limit their tax and other advantages are enacted.
Unrated Securities. The Fund may purchase unrated securities (which are not rated by a rating agency) if Artisan Partners determines that the securities are of comparable quality to rated securities that the Fund may purchase. Unrated securities may be less liquid than comparable rated securities and involve the risk that Artisan Partners may not accurately evaluate the security’s comparative creditworthiness. Analysis of creditworthiness of issuers of high yield securities may be more complex than for issuers of higher-quality fixed income securities. To the extent the Fund invests in high yield and/or unrated securities, the Fund’s success in achieving its investment objective may depend more heavily on Artisan Partners’ analysis than if the Fund invested exclusively in higher-quality and rated securities.
Floating and Variable Rate Investments. The coupons on variable and floating rate investments in which the Fund may invest are not fixed and may fluctuate based upon changes in market rates. The coupon on a floating rate investment is generally based on an interest rate such as a money-market index, London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) or a Treasury bill rate. Variable and floating rate investments are subject to interest rate risk and may fluctuate in value in response to interest rate changes if there is a delay between changes in market interest rates and the interest reset date for the obligation, or for other reasons. U.S. Government and related obligations and other types of debt instruments may be structured as floating- and variable-rate obligations. As short-term interest rates decline, the coupons on variable and floating rate investments typically should decrease. Alternatively, during periods of rising interest rates, changes in the coupons of variable and floating rate investments may lag behind changes in market rates or may have limits on the maximum increases in the coupon rates. The value of variable and floating rate investments may decline if their coupons do not rise as much, or as quickly, as interest rates in general. Conversely, variable and floating rate investments will not generally increase in value if interest rates decline. Variable and floating rate investments are less effective than fixed rate investments at looking in a particular yield and may be subject to credit risk. Certain types of floating rate instruments may also be subject to greater liquidity risk than other debt investments.
Certain floating and variable rate obligations have an interest rate floor feature, which prevents the interest rate payable by the security from dropping below a specified level as compared to a reference interest rate (the “reference rate”), such as LIBOR. Such a floor protects the Fund from losses resulting from a decrease in the reference rate below the specified level. However, if the reference rate is below the floor, there will be a lag between a rise in the reference rate and a rise in the interest rate payable by the obligation, and the Fund may not benefit from increasing interest rates for a significant amount of time.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
7

In 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority warned that LIBOR may cease to be available, or appropriate for use, by 2021. However, on November 30, 2020, LIBOR’s administrator, the ICE Benchmark Administration, signaled that LIBOR may continue to be published and available for use until June 30, 2023. The unavailability or replacement of LIBOR may affect the value, liquidity or return on certain Fund investments and may result in costs incurred in connection with closing out positions and entering into new trades. Regulators and market participants are working together to identify or develop a replacement rate. For instance, the US Federal Reserve, based on the recommendations of the New York Federal Reserve’s Alternative Reference Rate Committee (comprised of major derivative market participants and their regulators), has begun publishing a Secured Overnight Funding Rate (“SOFR”) that is intended to replace US dollar LIBOR. Any pricing adjustments to the Fund’s investments resulting from a substitute reference rate including but not limited to SOFR, may also adversely affect the Fund’s performance and/or NAV. There remains uncertainty regarding the future utilization of LIBOR and the nature of any replacement rate. As such, the potential effect of a transition away from LIBOR on the Fund or the financial instruments in which the Fund invests cannot yet be determined and may vary depending on factors that include, but are not limited to, existing fallback or termination provisions in individual contracts.
Inverse Floating Rate Instruments. Inverse floaters have variable interest rates that typically move in the opposite direction from movements in prevailing interest rates, most often short-term rates. Accordingly, the values of inverse floaters, or other instruments or certificates structured to have similar features, generally move in the opposite direction from interest rates. The value of an inverse floater can be considerably more volatile than the value of other debt instruments of comparable maturity and quality. Inverse floaters incorporate varying degrees of leverage. Generally, greater leverage results in greater price volatility for any given change in interest rates. Inverse floaters may be subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale and therefore may be less liquid than other types of instruments.
Loans, Assignments and Participations
The Fund may invest directly in secured or unsecured loans or invest in loan assignments or participations with respect to borrowers operating in any industry and/or geographical region. The Fund may acquire some or all of the interest of a bank or other lending institution in a loan to a particular borrower, by means of an assignment or a participation. In an assignment, the Fund assumes all of the rights of a lending institution in a loan, including the right to receive payments of principal and interest and other amounts directly from the borrower and to enforce its rights as a lender directly against the borrower. The Fund assumes the position of a co-lender with other syndicate members. As an alternative, the Fund may purchase a participating interest in a portion of the rights of a lending institution in a loan. In such case, the Fund will generally be entitled to receive from the lending institution amounts equal to the payments of principal, interest and premium, if any, on the loan received by the institution, but will not generally be entitled to enforce its rights directly against the agent bank or the borrower, and must rely for that purpose on the lending institution. In the case of a participation, the value of the Fund’s loan investment will depend at least in part on the credit standing of the participating institution.
The loans in which the Fund may invest include those that pay fixed rates of interest and those that pay floating rates – i.e., rates that adjust periodically based on a known lending rate, such as a bank’s prime rate. Investments in loans may be of any quality, including “distressed” loans. The Fund also may gain exposure to loans and related investments through the use of total return swaps and/or other derivative instruments and through private funds and other pooled investment vehicles, including some which may be sponsored or advised by Artisan Partners.
Many loans are made by a syndicate of banks, represented by an agent bank (the “Agent”) which has negotiated and structured the loan and which is responsible generally for collecting interest, principal and other amounts from the borrower on its own behalf and on behalf of the other lending institutions in the syndicate (the “Lenders”), and for enforcing its and their other rights against the borrower. Each of the lending institutions, which may include the Agent, lends to the borrower a portion of the total amount of the loan, and retains the corresponding interest in the loan. Unless, under the terms of the loan or other indebtedness, the Fund has direct recourse against the borrower, the Fund may have to rely on the Agent or other financial intermediary to apply appropriate credit remedies against a borrower.
The Fund’s ability to receive payments of principal and interest and other amounts in connection with loan participations held by it will depend primarily on the financial condition of the borrower (and, in some cases, the lending institution from which it purchases the loan). The value of collateral, if any, securing a loan can decline, or may be insufficient to meet the borrower’s obligations or may be difficult to liquidate. In addition, the Fund’s access to collateral may be limited by bankruptcy or other insolvency laws. The failure by the Fund to receive scheduled interest or principal payments on a loan would adversely affect the income, gains and proceeds of the Fund and would likely reduce the value of its assets, which would be reflected in a reduction in the Fund’s NAV. Loans that are fully secured offer the Fund more protection than an unsecured loan in the event of non-payment of scheduled interest or principal. However, there is no assurance that the liquidation of collateral from a secured loan would satisfy the corporate borrower’s obligation, or that the collateral can be liquidated. Indebtedness of companies whose creditworthiness is poor involves substantially greater risks and may be highly speculative. Some companies may never pay off their indebtedness, or may pay only a small fraction of the amount owed. Consequently, when investing in indebtedness of companies with poor credit, the Fund bears a substantial risk of losing the entire amount invested.
Unsecured loans are loans that are not collateralized. The claims of holders of unsecured loans may be subordinated, and thus lower in priority, to claims of creditors holding secured indebtedness and possibly other classes of creditors holding unsecured debt. Since they will not afford the Fund recourse to collateral, unsecured loans are subject to greater risk of nonpayment in the event of default than secured loans.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
8

Banks and other lending institutions generally perform a credit analysis of the borrower before originating a loan or participating in a lending syndicate. In selecting the loans in which the Fund will invest, however, Artisan Partners will not rely solely on that credit analysis, but will perform its own investment analysis of the borrowers. Artisan Partners’ analysis may include consideration of the borrower’s financial strength and managerial experience, debt coverage, additional borrowing requirements or debt maturity schedules, changing financial conditions, and responsiveness to changes in business conditions and interest rates. Because loans in which the Fund may invest may not be rated by independent credit rating agencies, a decision by the Fund to invest in a particular loan may depend heavily on Artisan Partners’ or the original lending institution’s credit analysis of the borrower.
Loans and other types of direct indebtedness may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete. Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what Artisan Partners believes to be a fair price. Additionally, even where there is a market for certain loans the settlement period may be extended, up to several weeks or longer. That means the Fund may have a limited ability to receive payment promptly on the sale of some of the loans in its portfolio. As a result, payment proceeds will not be available to make additional investments until a substantial period after the settlement of a loan. In addition, valuation of illiquid indebtedness involves a greater degree of judgment in determining the Fund’s NAV than if that value were based on available market quotations, and could result in significant variations in the Fund’s daily share price. At the same time, some loan interests are traded among certain financial institutions and accordingly may be deemed liquid. Artisan Partners Funds' liquidity committee will determine the liquidity of the Fund’s investments by reference to, among other things, trading volumes, market conditions and contractual provisions.
Investments in loans through a direct loan may involve additional risks to the Fund. For example, if a loan is foreclosed, the Fund could become part owner of any collateral and would bear the costs and liabilities associated with owning and disposing of the collateral. In addition, it is conceivable that under emerging legal theories of lender liability, the Fund could be held liable as co-owner. It is unclear whether certain loans and other forms of direct indebtedness offer securities law protections against fraud and misrepresentation.
It is the position of the SEC that, in the case of loan participations where a bank or other lending institution serves as a financial intermediary between the Fund and the corporate borrower, if the participation does not shift to the Fund the direct debtor-creditor relationship with the borrower, the Fund should treat both the lending bank or other lending institution and the borrower as “issuers.” If and to the extent the Fund treats a financial intermediary as an issuer of indebtedness, the Fund may in certain circumstances be limited in its ability to invest in indebtedness related to a single financial intermediary, or a group of intermediaries engaged in the same industry, even if the underlying borrowers represent many different companies and industries.
Economic exposure to loan interests through the use of derivative transactions, including, among others, credit default swaps and total return swaps, may involve greater risks than if the Fund had invested in the loan interest directly during a primary distribution or through assignments of, or participations in, a bank loan acquired in secondary markets since, in addition to the risks described above, certain derivative transactions may be subject to leverage risk and greater illiquidity risk, counterparty risk, valuation risk and other risks.
Lending Fees. In the process of buying, selling and holding loans, the Fund may receive and/or pay certain fees. These fees are in addition to interest payments received and may include upfront fees, commitment fees, commissions and prepayment penalty fees. When the Fund buys a loan it may receive an upfront fee and when it sells a loan it may pay an upfront fee. On an ongoing basis, the Fund may receive a commitment fee based on the undrawn portion of the underlying line of credit portion of the loan. In certain circumstances, the Fund may receive a prepayment penalty fee upon the prepayment of a loan by a borrower. Other fees received by the Fund may include covenant waiver fees and covenant modification fees.
Borrower Covenants. A borrower under a loan typically may be required to comply with various restrictive covenants contained in a loan agreement or note purchase agreement between the borrower and the Lender or lending syndicate (the “Loan Agreement”). Such covenants, in addition to requiring the scheduled payment of interest and principal, may include restrictions on dividend payments and other distributions to stockholders, provisions requiring the borrower to maintain specific minimum financial ratios and limits on total debt. In addition, the Loan Agreement may contain a covenant requiring the borrower to prepay the loan with a certain portion of excess cash flow. Excess cash flow is generally defined as net income after scheduled debt service payments, cash taxes and permitted capital expenditures but before depreciation and amortization among other adjustments. A breach of a covenant which is not waived by the Agent, or by the lenders directly, as the case may be, is normally an event of acceleration; i.e., the Agent, or the lenders directly, as the case may be, has the right to call the outstanding loan. The typical practice of an Agent or a Lender in relying exclusively or primarily on reports from the borrower may involve a risk of fraud by the borrower. In the case of a loan in the form of a participation, the agreement between the buyer and seller may limit the rights of the participant to vote on certain changes which may be made to the Loan Agreement, such as waiving a breach of a covenant.
Administration of Loans. In certain loans, the Agent administers the terms of the Loan Agreement. In such cases, the Agent is normally responsible for the collection of principal and interest payments from the borrower and the apportionment of these payments to the credit of all institutions which are parties to the Loan Agreement. The Fund will generally rely upon the Agent or an intermediate participant to receive and forward to the Fund its portion of the principal and interest payments on the loan. Furthermore, unless under the terms of a participation agreement the Fund has direct recourse against the borrower, the Fund will rely on the Agent and the other members of the lending syndicate to use appropriate credit remedies against the borrower. The Agent is typically responsible for monitoring compliance with the financial and operating covenants contained in the Loan Agreement based upon reports prepared by the borrower. The Agent usually

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
9

does, but is often not obligated to, notify holders of loans of any failures of compliance. In certain loans such as asset-backed loans, the Agent may monitor the value of the collateral, if any, and if the value of such collateral declines, may accelerate the loan, may give the borrower an opportunity to provide additional collateral or may seek other protection for the benefit of the participants in the loan. The Agent is compensated by the borrower for providing these services under a Loan Agreement, and such compensation may include special fees paid upon structuring and funding the loan and other fees paid on a continuing basis. With respect to loans for which the Agent does not perform such administrative and enforcement functions, the Adviser will perform such tasks on behalf of the Fund, although a collateral bank will typically hold any collateral on behalf of the Fund and the other lenders pursuant to the applicable Loan Agreement.
A financial institution’s appointment as Agent may usually be terminated in the event that it fails to observe the requisite standard of care or becomes insolvent, enters Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) receivership, or, if not FDIC insured, enters into bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings. A successor Agent would generally be appointed to replace the terminated Agent, and assets held by the Agent under the Loan Agreement should remain available to holders of loans. However, if assets held by the Agent for the benefit of the Fund were determined to be subject to the claims of the Agent’s general creditors, the Fund might incur certain costs and delays in realizing payment on a loan, or suffer a loss of principal and/or interest. In situations involving other intermediate participants similar risks may arise.
Bridge Financings. Loans may be designed to provide temporary or “bridge” financing to a borrower pending the purchase of identified assets or the arrangement of longer-term loans or the issuance and sale of debt obligations. Loans may also be obligations of borrowers who have obtained bridge loans from other parties. A borrower’s use of bridge loans involves a risk that the borrower may be unable to locate permanent financing to replace the bridge loan, which may impair the borrower’s perceived creditworthiness or its willingness or ability to repay the bridge loan. If the Fund enters into a commitment with a borrower regarding a bridge loan, the Fund may be obligated on one or more dates in the future to lend funds to the borrower (up to an aggregate stated amount) if called upon to do so by the borrower, which may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its exposure to a company at a time when it might not otherwise be desirable to do so (including a time when the company’s financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid or which the Fund needs to sell other assets to raise cash to satisfy its obligor). Because investing in these types of loans creates a future obligation for the Fund to provide funding to a borrower upon demand in exchange for a fee, the Fund will segregate or earmark liquid assets with the Fund’s custodian in amounts sufficient to satisfy any such future obligations.
Senior Loans. Senior floating rate loans may be made to or issued by US or non-US banks or other corporations (“Senior Loans”). Senior Loans include senior floating rate loans and institutionally traded senior floating rate debt obligations issued by asset-backed pools and other issues, and interests therein. Senior Loan interests may be acquired from US or foreign commercial banks, insurance companies, finance companies or other financial institutions that have made loans or are members of a lending syndicate or from other holders of loan interests. Senior Loans typically pay interest at rates which are re-determined periodically on the basis of a floating base lending rate (such as LIBOR) plus a premium. Senior Loans generally (but not always) hold the most senior position in the capital structure of a borrower and, if below investment grade quality, are often secured with collateral.
From time to time, Artisan Partners and its affiliates may borrow money from various banks in connection with their business activities. Such banks may also sell Senior Loans to or acquire them from the Fund or may be intermediate participants with respect to Senior Loans in which the Fund owns interests. Such banks may also act as Agents for Senior Loans held by the Fund.
To the extent that the collateral, if any, securing a Senior Loan consists of the stock of the borrower’s subsidiaries or other affiliates, the Fund will be subject to the risk that this stock will decline in value. Such a decline, whether as a result of bankruptcy proceedings or otherwise, could cause the Senior Loan to be undercollateralized or unsecured. In most credit agreements there is no requirement to pledge additional collateral. In addition, a Senior Loan may be guaranteed by, or fully secured by assets of, shareholders or owners, even if the Senior Loans are not otherwise collateralized by assets of the borrower. There may be temporary periods when the principal asset held by a borrower is the stock of a related company, which may not legally be pledged to secure a secured Senior Loan. On occasions when such stock cannot be pledged, the secured Senior Loan will be temporarily unsecured until the stock can be pledged or is exchanged for or replaced by other assets, which will be pledged as security for such Senior Loan. However, the borrower’s ability to dispose of such securities, other than in connection with such pledge or replacement, will be strictly limited for the protection of the holders of secured Senior Loans.
If a borrower becomes involved in bankruptcy proceedings, a court under certain circumstances potentially could invalidate the Fund’s security interest in any loan collateral or subordinate the Fund’s rights under a secured Senior Loan to the interests of the borrower’s unsecured creditors. Such action by a court could be based, for example, on a “fraudulent conveyance” claim to the effect that the borrower did not receive “reasonably equivalent value” for granting the security interest in the loan collateral to the Fund. For secured Senior Loans made in connection with a highly leveraged transaction, consideration for granting a security interest may be deemed inadequate if the proceeds of such loan were not received or retained by the borrower, but were instead paid to other persons, such as shareholders of the borrower, in an amount which left the borrower insolvent or without sufficient working capital. There are also other events, such as the failure to perfect a security interest due to faulty documentation or faulty official filings, which could lead to the invalidation of the Fund's security interest in any loan collateral. If the Fund's security interest in loan collateral is invalidated or a secured Senior Loan is subordinated to other debt of a borrower in bankruptcy or other proceedings, it is unlikely that the Fund would be able to recover the full amount of the principal and interest due on the secured Senior Loan.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
10

Delayed Funding Loans and Revolving Credit Facilities. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are borrowing arrangements in which the lender agrees to make loans up to a maximum amount upon demand by the borrower during a specified term. A revolving credit facility differs from a delayed funding loan in that as the borrower repays the loan, an amount equal to the repayment may be borrowed again during the term of the revolving credit facility. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities usually provide for floating or variable rates of interest. These commitments may have the effect of requiring the Fund to increase its exposure to a company at a time when it might not otherwise be desirable to do so (including a time when the company’s financial condition makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid or which the Fund needs to sell other assets to raise cash to satisfy its obligor). Because investing in these types of loans creates a future obligation for the Fund to provide funding to a borrower upon demand in exchange for a fee, the Fund will segregate or earmark liquid assets with the Fund's custodian in amounts sufficient to satisfy any such future obligations.
Commercial Real Estate Loans. The Fund may acquire performing commercial whole mortgage loans secured by a first mortgage lien on commercial property, which may be structured to either permit the Fund to retain the entire loan, or sell the lower yielding senior portions of the loans and retain the higher yielding subordinate investment. Typically, borrowers of these loans are institutions and real estate operating companies and investors. These loans are generally secured by commercial real estate assets in a variety of industries with a variety of characteristics. The Fund may own entire whole loans or in some cases may choose to syndicate a portion of the risk or participate in syndications led by other institutions. In some cases, the Fund may fund a first mortgage loan with the intention of selling the senior tranche, or an A-Note, and retaining the subordinated tranche, or a B-Note or mezzanine loan tranche. The Fund may seek, in the future, to enhance the returns of all or a senior portion of its commercial mortgage loans through securitizations, should the market to securitize commercial mortgage loans recover. In addition to interest, the Fund may receive extension fees, modification or similar fees in connection with whole mortgage loans.
B-Notes. The Fund may invest in B-Notes. A B-Note is a mortgage loan typically (i) secured by a first mortgage on a single large commercial property or group of related properties and (ii) subordinated to an A-Note secured by the same first mortgage on the same collateral. As a result, if a borrower defaults, there may not be sufficient funds remaining for B-Note holders after payment to the A-Note holders. Since each transaction is privately negotiated, B-Notes can vary in their structural characteristics and risks. For example, the rights of holders of B-Notes to control the process following a borrower default may be limited in certain investments. The Fund cannot predict the terms of each B-Note investment and does not have control over the terms of the investments held by an investment fund. Further, B-Notes typically are secured by a single property, and so reflect the increased risks associated with a single property compared to a pool of properties.
Mezzanine Loans. The Fund may invest in mezzanine loans, which are loans that are subordinate in the capital structure of the borrower, meaning that there may be significant indebtedness ranking ahead of the borrower’s obligation to that Fund in the event of the borrower’s insolvency. Such loans may be collateralized with tangible fixed assets such as real property or interests in real property, or may be uncollateralized. As with other loans to corporate borrowers, repayment of a mezzanine loan is dependent on the successful operation of the borrower. Mezzanine loans may also be affected by the successful operation of other properties, the interests in which are not pledged to secure the mezzanine loan. While mezzanine investments may benefit from the same or similar financial and other covenants as those enjoyed by the indebtedness ranking ahead of the mezzanine investments and may benefit from cross-default provisions and security over the borrower’s assets, some or all of such terms may not apply to particular mezzanine investments. Mezzanine investments generally are subject to various risks including, without limitation, (i) a subsequent characterization of an investment as a “fraudulent conveyance”; (ii) the recovery as a “preference” of liens perfected or payments made on account of a debt incurred in the 90 days before a bankruptcy filing; (iii) equitable subordination claims by other creditors; (iv) so-called “lender liability” claims by the issuer of the obligations; and (v) environmental liabilities that may arise with respect to collateral securing the obligations. In addition to interest, the Fund may receive extension fees, modification or similar fees in connection with investments in mezzanine loans.
Stressed and Distressed Instruments
The Fund may also invest in securities or other instruments of stressed or distressed issuers. Stressed or distressed debt securities may be issued by companies involved in reorganizations, financial restructurings or bankruptcy or otherwise experiencing, or likely to experience, financial difficulty. The Fund’s investment in stressed or distressed debt typically involves the purchase of bank debt, lower-rated or defaulted debt securities, comparable unrated debt securities, or other indebtedness (or participations in the indebtedness) of such companies. Such other indebtedness generally represents a specific commercial loan or portion of a loan made to a company by a financial institution such as a bank. Loan participations represent fractional interests in a company’s indebtedness and generally are made available by banks or other institutional investors. By purchasing all or a part of a loan participation, the Fund, in effect, steps into the shoes of the lender. Stressed or distressed debt purchased by the Fund may be in the form of loans, notes or bonds. If the loan is secured, the Fund will have a priority claim to the assets of the company ahead of unsecured creditors and stockholders otherwise no such priority of claims exists.
Investments in the securities of financially stressed or distressed issuers involve substantial risks. These securities may present a substantial risk of default or may be in default at the time of investment. The Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek recovery upon a default in the payment of principal or interest on its portfolio holdings. In any reorganization or liquidation proceeding relating to an investment, the Fund may lose its entire investment or may be required to accept cash or securities with a value substantially less than its original investment. Among the risks inherent in investments in a troubled issuer is that it frequently may be difficult to obtain information as to the true financial condition of such issuer. The Fund’s judgments about the credit quality of a financially stressed or distressed issuer and the relative value of its securities may prove to be wrong.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
11

Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”)
The Fund may invest in REITs. REITs are trusts that invest primarily in commercial real estate and/or real estate-related loans. A REIT is not taxed on income distributed to its shareholders or unitholders if it complies with certain requirements under the Code relating to its organization, ownership, assets and income, as well as with a requirement that it distribute to its shareholders or unitholders at least 90% of its taxable income for each taxable year. By investing in REITs indirectly through the Fund, shareholders will bear not only their proportionate share of the expenses of the Fund, but also, indirectly, similar expenses of underlying REITs.
The Fund may be subject to certain risks associated with a REIT’s direct investment in real property and real estate-related loans. A REIT that invests in real estate-related loans may be affected by the quality of the credit extended, is dependent on specialized management skills, is subject to risks inherent in financing a limited number of properties, interest rate risk, and may be subject to defaults by borrowers and to self-liquidations. In addition, a REIT may be affected by its failure to qualify for favorable tax treatment under the Code or its failure to maintain exemption from registration under the 1940 Act.
Convertible Securities
The Fund may invest in convertible securities. Convertible securities include any corporate debt security or preferred stock that may be converted into, or carries the right to purchase, underlying shares of common stock. The common stock underlying convertible securities may be issued by a different entity than the issuer of the convertible securities. Convertible securities entitle the holder to receive interest payments paid on corporate debt securities or the dividend preference on a preferred stock until such time as the convertible security matures or is redeemed or until the holder elects to exercise the conversion privilege. As a result of the conversion feature, however, the interest rate or dividend preference on a convertible security generally is less than would be the case if the security were a non-convertible obligation.
The value of convertible securities is influenced by both the yield of non-convertible securities of comparable issuers and by the value of a convertible security viewed without regard to its conversion feature (i.e., strictly on the basis of its yield). The estimated price at which a convertible security would be valued by the marketplace if it had no conversion feature is sometimes referred to as its “investment value.”  The investment value of the convertible security typically will fluctuate inversely with changes in prevailing interest rates. However, at the same time, the convertible security will be influenced by its “conversion value,” which is the market value of the underlying common stock that would be obtained if the convertible security were converted. Conversion value fluctuates directly with the price of the underlying common stock.
If, because of a low price of the common stock, a convertible security’s conversion value is substantially below its investment value, the convertible security’s price is governed principally by its investment value. If a convertible security’s conversion value increases to a point that approximates or exceeds its investment value, the convertible security’s value will be principally influenced by its conversion value. A convertible security will sell at a premium over its conversion value to the extent investors place value on the right to acquire the underlying common stock while holding a fixed-income security. Holders of convertible securities have a claim on the issuer’s assets prior to the common stockholders, but may be subordinated to holders of similar non-convertible securities of the same issuer.
A convertible security may be called for redemption or conversion by the issuer after a particular date and under certain circumstances (including a specified price) established upon issue. If a convertible security held by the Fund is called for redemption or conversion, the Fund could be required to tender it for redemption, convert it into the underlying common stock, or sell it to a third party, which may have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objectives.
A convertible security generally entitles the holder to receive interest paid or accrued until the convertible security matures or is redeemed, converted or exchanged. Convertible securities rank senior to common stock in a company’s capital structure and, therefore, generally entail less risk than the company’s common stock, although the extent to which such risk is reduced depends in large measure upon the degree to which the convertible security sells above its value as a debt obligation. Before conversion, convertible securities have characteristics similar to non-convertible debt obligations and are designed to provide for a stable stream of income with generally higher yields than common stocks. However, there can be no assurance of current income because the issuers of the convertible securities may default on their obligations. Convertible securities are subordinate in rank to any senior debt obligations of the issuer, and, therefore, an issuer’s convertible securities entail more risk than its debt obligations. Moreover, convertible securities are often rated below investment grade or not rated because they fall below debt obligations and just above common equity in order of preference or priority on an issuer’s balance sheet.
In determining whether to purchase a convertible security, Artisan Partners will consider the same criteria that would be considered in purchasing the underlying security.
Preferred Stock
The Fund may invest in preferred stock. Preferred stock represents an equity interest in a company that generally entitles the holder to receive, in preference to the holders of other stocks such as common stocks, dividends and a fixed share of the proceeds resulting from a liquidation of the company. Some preferred stocks also entitle their holders to receive additional liquidation proceeds on the same basis as holders of a company’s common stock, and thus also represent an ownership interest in that company. Preferred stocks may pay fixed or adjustable rates of return, and may be convertible into, or carry the right to purchase, the company’s common stock.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
12

The value of a company’s preferred stock (like its common stock) may fall as a result of factors relating directly to that company’s products or services or due to factors affecting companies in the same industry or in a number of different industries. The value of preferred stock also may be affected by changes in financial markets that are relatively unrelated to the company or its industry, such as changes in interest rates or currency exchange rates. In addition, a company’s preferred stock generally pays dividends only after the company makes required payments to holders of its bonds and other debt. For this reason, the value of the preferred stock usually will react more strongly than bonds and other debt to actual or perceived changes in the company’s financial condition or prospects. Preferred stocks of smaller companies may be more vulnerable to adverse developments than those of larger companies.
Because the claim on an issuer’s earnings represented by preferred stocks may become disproportionately large when interest rates fall below the rate payable on the securities or for other reasons, the issuer may redeem preferred stocks, generally after an initial period of call protection in which the stock is not redeemable. Thus, in declining interest rate environments in particular, the Fund’s holdings of higher dividend-paying preferred stocks may be reduced and the Fund may be unable to acquire securities paying comparable rates with the redemption proceeds.
Common Stock Warrants and Rights
The Fund may invest in common stock warrants and rights and may acquire, receive and retain common stock warrants and rights that are attached to securities held by the Fund. Common stock warrants entitle the holder to buy common stock from the issuer of the warrant at a specific price (the “strike price”) for a specific period of time. The market price of warrants may be substantially lower than the current market price of the underlying common stock, yet warrants are subject to similar price fluctuations. As a result, warrants may be more volatile investments than the underlying common stock. Rights are similar to warrants but normally have a shorter duration and are typically distributed directly by the issuers to existing shareholders, while warrants are typically attached to new debt or preferred stock issuances. Warrants and rights generally do not entitle the holder to dividends or voting rights with respect to the underlying common stock and do not represent any rights in the assets of the issuer company. Warrants and rights will expire if not exercised on or prior to the expiration date.
Investment Companies
The Fund may invest in other investment companies, including money market funds, other open-end funds, closed-end funds, private funds and exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder. Investing in other investment companies, including ETFs, will result in higher fees and expenses for the Fund and its shareholders. As a shareholder of another investment company, the Fund would bear, along with other shareholders, a pro rata portion of the other investment company’s expenses, including advisory fees, and such fees and other expenses will be borne indirectly by the Fund’s shareholders. These expenses would be in addition to the advisory and other expenses that the Fund bears directly in connection with its own operations.
Investment companies, including ETFs, generally are subject to the same risks as the underlying securities in which the investment company invests. For example, an ETF that tracks an index will subject the Fund to risks of the specific sector or industry to which the ETF relates. Investment companies that trade on exchanges, including ETFs, also are subject to the risk that their prices may not totally correlate to the prices of the underlying securities in which the investment companies invest and the risk of possible trading halts due to market conditions or for other reasons.
The SEC has adopted Rule 12d1-4 under the 1940 Act. Subject to certain conditions on both the acquired fund and acquiring fund, Rule 12d1-4 provides an exemption to permit the acquiring fund to invest in the securities of other registered investment companies in excess of the limits of Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act.
Exchange Traded Notes (“ETNs”)
The Fund may, from time to time, invest in ETNs. An ETN is a type of senior, unsecured, unsubordinated debt security issued by financial institutions that combines both aspects of bonds and ETFs. An ETN’s return is based on the performance of a market index less fees and expenses. Similar to ETFs, ETNs are listed on an exchange and traded in the secondary market. However, unlike an ETF, an ETN can be held until the ETN’s maturity, at which time the issuer will pay a return linked to the performance of the market index to which the ETN is linked less certain fees and expenses. ETNs do not make periodic interest payments, and principal is not protected. An ETN’s ability to track an index may be impeded if components comprising the index are temporarily unavailable, and an ETN that is tied to a specific index may not be able to replicate and maintain exactly the composition and relative weighting of securities, commodities or other components in that index. ETNs also incur certain expenses not incurred by their applicable indices. Some ETNs that use leverage can, at times, be relatively illiquid and, thus, they may be hard to purchase or sell at a fair price. Levered ETNs are subject to the same risk as other instruments that use leverage in any form. While leverage allows for greater potential return, the potential for loss is also greater. Finally, additional losses may be incurred if the investment loses value because, in addition to the money lost on the investment, the loan still needs to be repaid.
The market value of an ETN is determined by supply and demand, the current performance of the index and the credit rating of the ETN issuer. The market value of ETN shares may differ from their net asset value. This difference in price may be due to the fact that the supply and demand in the market for ETN shares at any point in time is not always identical to the supply and demand in the market for the securities underlying the index that the ETN seeks to track. The value of an ETN may also change due to a change in the issuer’s credit rating. As a result, there may be times when an ETN share trades at a premium or discount to its net asset value.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
13

The Fund's investments in any commodities-linked ETNs may be limited by tax considerations, including each of those Fund’s intention to qualify annually as a regulated investment company under the Code. See “Additional Federal Income Tax Information” below.
Managing Investment Exposure
The Fund may (but is not obligated to) use various techniques, such as derivatives, to increase or decrease its exposure to the effects of possible changes in security prices, currency exchange rates or other factors that affect the value of their portfolios. These techniques include buying and selling options, futures contracts or options on futures contracts, forward contracts, or entering into currency exchange contracts.
Artisan Partners may use these techniques to adjust the risk and return characteristics of the Fund’s portfolio. If Artisan Partners judges market conditions incorrectly or employs a strategy that does not correlate well with the Fund’s investments, or if the counterparty to the transaction does not perform as promised, the transaction could result in a loss. Use of these techniques may increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed. The Fund may use these techniques for hedging, risk management or portfolio management purposes and not for currency speculation.
In addition to the techniques described above, The Fund may use various swap agreements, including, among others, credit default swaps and interest rate swaps, for hedging or investment purposes, risk management, portfolio management, duration management or with the purpose or effect of creating investment leverage.
Derivatives can be highly complex and may perform in ways unanticipated by Artisan Partners. When the Fund enters into a derivatives transaction as a substitute for or alternative to a direct cash investment, the Fund is exposed to the risk that the derivative transaction may not provide a return that corresponds precisely with that of the underlying investment. It is possible that, when the Fund uses a derivative for hedging purposes, the derivative will not in fact provide the anticipated protection, and the Fund could lose money on both the derivative transaction and the exposure the Fund sought to hedge. Because most derivatives involve contractual arrangements with a counterparty, no assurance can be given that a particular type of derivative contract can be completed or terminated when desired by the Fund. While hedging strategies involving derivatives can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other Fund investments. Certain derivatives may create a risk of loss greater than the amount invested.
Derivatives may be highly volatile and the Fund’s use of derivatives may cause its portfolio to be leveraged. Leverage increases the Fund’s portfolio losses when the value of its investments declines. Since many derivatives involve leverage, adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, rate, or index may result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. Some derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment.
In addition to the risks of an adverse change in the value of the underlying asset, the Fund’s use of derivatives involves the risk that the other party to the derivative contract will fail to make required payments or otherwise to comply with the terms of the contract. In the event the counterparty to a derivative instrument becomes insolvent, the Fund potentially could lose all or a large portion of its investment in the derivative instrument. Derivatives may be difficult to value and illiquid, and the Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative position at a particular time or at an anticipated price. Use of derivatives may increase the amount and affect the timing and character of taxes payable by Fund shareholders.
On October 28, 2020, the SEC adopted Rule 18f-4 under the 1940 Act providing for the regulation of a registered investment company's use of derivatives and certain related instruments. Among other things, Rule 18f-4 limits a fund's derivatives exposure through a value-at-risk test and requires the adoption and implementation of a derivatives risk management program for certain derivatives users. Subject to certain conditions, limited derivatives users (as defined in Rule 18f-4), however, would not be subject to the full requirements of Rule 18f-4. In connection with the adoption of Rule 18f-4, the SEC also eliminated the asset segregation framework arising from prior SEC guidance for covering derivatives and certain financial instruments. Compliance with Rule 18f-4 will not be required until September 2022. As the Fund come into compliance, the Fund's approaches to asset segregation and coverage requirements will be impacted. In addition, Rule 18f-4 could restrict the Fund's abilities to engage in certain derivatives transactions and/or increase the costs of such derivatives transactions, which could adversely affect the value or performance of the Fund.
Currency Exchange Transactions. Currency exchange transactions may be conducted either on a spot (i.e., cash) basis at the spot rate for purchasing or selling currency prevailing in the foreign exchange market or through forward currency exchange contracts (“forward contracts”). Forward contracts are contractual agreements to purchase or sell a specified currency at a specified future date (or within a specified time period) and at a price set at the time of the contract. Forward contracts usually are entered into with banks and broker-dealers and are not exchange traded.
Forward currency transactions may involve currencies of the different countries to which the Fund may have exposure and serve as hedges against possible variations in the exchange rate between these currencies. Currency transactions may be used for transaction hedging and portfolio hedging involving either specific transactions or portfolio positions (including positions obtained through, among other instruments, participation certificates and depositary receipts that may be denominated in US dollar or foreign currencies). Transaction hedging is the purchase or sale of forward contracts with respect to specific receivables or payables of the Fund accruing in connection with the purchase and sale of its portfolio securities or income receivables. Portfolio hedging is the use of forward contracts with respect to portfolio security positions (including positions obtained through, among other instruments, participation certificates and depositary receipts that may be denominated in US dollar or foreign currencies) denominated or quoted in a particular currency. Portfolio hedging allows the

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
14

Fund to limit or reduce exposure to a foreign currency by entering into a forward contract to sell or buy such foreign currency (or another foreign currency that acts as a proxy for that currency) so that the US dollar value of certain underlying foreign portfolio positions can be approximately matched by an equivalent US dollar liability. The Fund may not engage in portfolio hedging with respect to the currency of a particular country to an extent greater than the aggregate market value (at the time of making such sale) of the Fund’s exposure to that particular currency, except that the Fund may hedge all or part of its foreign currency exposure through the use of a basket of currencies or a proxy currency where such currencies or currency act as an effective proxy for other currencies. In such a case, the Fund may enter into a forward contract where the amount of the foreign currency to be sold exceeds the value of the Fund’s exposure to such currency. The use of this basket hedging technique may be more efficient and economical than entering into separate forward contracts for each currency held in the portfolio of a particular Fund. The Fund may not engage in speculative currency exchange transactions.
At the maturity of a forward contract to deliver a particular currency, the Fund may either sell the portfolio security related to such contract and make delivery of the currency, or it may retain the security and either acquire the currency on the spot market or terminate its contractual obligation to deliver the currency by purchasing an offsetting contract with the same currency counterparty obligating it to purchase on the same maturity date the same amount of the currency.
It is impossible to forecast with precision the market value of portfolio securities at the expiration of a forward contract. Accordingly, it may be necessary for the Fund to purchase additional currency on the spot market (and bear the expense of such purchase) if the market value of the security is less than the amount of currency the Fund is obligated to deliver and if a decision is made to sell the security and make delivery of the currency. Conversely, it may be necessary to sell on the spot market some of the currency received upon the sale of the portfolio security if its market value exceeds the amount of currency the Fund is obligated to deliver. If the Fund retains the portfolio security and engages in an offsetting transaction, the Fund will incur a gain or a loss to the extent that there has been movement in forward contract prices. If the Fund engages in an offsetting transaction, it may subsequently enter into a new forward contract to sell the currency. Should forward prices decline during the period between the Fund’s entering into a forward contract for the sale of a currency and the date it enters into an offsetting contract for the purchase of the currency, the Fund will realize a gain to the extent the price of the currency it has agreed to sell exceeds the price of the currency it has agreed to purchase. Should forward prices increase, the Fund will suffer a loss to the extent the price of the currency it has agreed to purchase exceeds the price of the currency it has agreed to sell. A default on the contract would deprive the Fund of unrealized profits or force the Fund to cover its commitments for purchase or sale of currency, if any, at the current market price.
Hedging against a decline in the value of a currency does not eliminate fluctuations in the prices of portfolio securities or prevent losses if the prices of such securities decline. Such transactions also preclude the opportunity for gain if the value of the hedged currency should rise. Moreover, it may not be possible for the Fund to hedge against a devaluation that is so generally anticipated that the Fund is not able to contract to sell the currency at a price above the devaluation level it anticipates. The cost to the Fund of engaging in currency exchange transactions varies with such factors as the currency involved, the length of the contract period and prevailing market conditions. Because currency exchange transactions are usually conducted on a principal basis, no fees or commissions are involved.
Options on Securities and Indices. The Fund may purchase and write (sell) put options and call options on securities, indices or foreign currencies in standardized contracts traded on recognized securities exchanges, boards of trade, or similar entities. The Fund may also purchase and write (sell) over-the-counter (“OTC”) put options and call options.
An option on a security (or index) is a contract that gives the purchaser (holder) of the option, in return for a premium, the right to buy from (call) or sell to (put) the seller (writer) of the option the security underlying the option (or the cash value of the index) at a specified exercise price at any time during the term of the option (normally not exceeding nine months). The writer of an option on an individual security or on a foreign currency has the obligation upon exercise of the option to deliver the underlying security or foreign currency upon payment of the exercise price or to pay the exercise price upon delivery of the underlying security or foreign currency. Upon exercise, the writer of an option on an index is obligated to pay the difference between the cash value of the index and the exercise price multiplied by the specified multiplier for the index option. (An index is designed to reflect specified facets of a particular financial or securities market, a specific group of financial instruments or securities, or certain economic indicators.) In contrast to exchange-traded options, OTC options are two-party contracts with negotiated exercise prices and expiration dates.
The Fund will write call options and put options only if they are “covered.” Generally, a written call is covered if the Fund owns, or has the right to acquire, without additional cash consideration (or for additional cash consideration held for the Fund by its custodian in a segregated account) the underlying security subject to the option, or otherwise segregates sufficient cash or other liquid assets to cover the outstanding position. A written call is also covered if the Fund holds a purchased call option on the same security as the underlying security of the written call, where the exercise price of the call used for coverage is equal to or less than the exercise price of the written call. A written put is covered if, at all times during the option period, the Fund maintains, in a segregated account, cash or other liquid assets in an amount equal to at least the exercise price of the written put. Similarly, a written put could be covered by the Fund by its purchase of a put option on the same security as the underlying security of the written option, where the exercise price of the purchased put is equal to or more than the exercise price of the written put or less than the exercise price of the written put if the marked to market difference is maintained by the Fund in cash or other liquid assets which the Fund holds in a segregated account.
If an option written by the Fund expires unexercised, the Fund realizes a gain for tax purposes equal to the premium received at the time the option was written. If an option purchased by the Fund expires unexercised, the Fund realizes a loss equal to the premium paid.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
15

The Fund will realize a capital gain from a closing purchase transaction if the cost of the closing option is less than the premium received from writing the option, or, if it is more, the Fund will realize a capital loss. If the premium received from a closing sale transaction is more than the premium paid to purchase the option, the Fund will realize a capital gain or, if it is less, the Fund will realize a capital loss. The principal factors affecting the market value of a put or a call option include supply and demand, interest rates, the current market price of the underlying security or index in relation to the exercise price of the option, the volatility of the underlying security or index, and the time remaining until the expiration date.
Risks Associated with Options on Securities and Indices. There are several risks associated with transactions in options. For example, there are significant differences between the securities markets, the currency markets, and the options markets that could result in an imperfect correlation between these markets, causing a given transaction not to achieve its objectives. A decision as to whether, when and how to use options involves the exercise of skill and judgment, and even a well-conceived transaction may be unsuccessful to some degree because of market behavior or unexpected events.
There can be no assurance that a liquid market will exist when the Fund seeks to close out an option position. If the Fund were unable to close out an option that it had purchased on a security, it would have to exercise the option in order to realize any profit or the option would expire and become worthless. As the writer of a covered call option on a security, the Fund foregoes, during the option’s life, the opportunity to profit from increases in the market value of the security covering the call option above the sum of the premium and the exercise price of the call.
If trading were suspended in an option purchased or written by the Fund, the Fund would not be able to close out the option. If restrictions on exercise were imposed, the Fund might be unable to exercise an option it has purchased.
Risks Associated with OTC Options. OTC options are contracts between the Fund and its counterparty (usually a securities dealer or bank) with no clearing organization guarantee. Thus, if the Fund purchases an OTC option and the option is exercised, there is a risk that the counterparty will fail to perform, which could result in the loss of any premium paid by the Fund and the loss of any anticipated benefit from the transaction. Under certain circumstances, OTC options also may be considered illiquid and thus subject to the Fund’s restriction on investing in illiquid securities.
Forward Contracts, Futures Contracts and Options on Futures Contracts. The Fund may buy and sell forward contracts or futures contracts. A forward contract or futures contract provides for the future sale by one party and purchase by another party of a specified amount of a financial instrument or money at a specified time and price. The Fund also may purchase and write call and put options on futures contracts. Options on futures contracts give the holder the right, in return for the premium paid, to assume a position in a futures contract at a specified exercise price at any time during the period of the option. Options on futures contracts possess many of the same characteristics as options on securities, indices and foreign currencies, as previously discussed.
The Fund may use forward contracts, futures contracts and options on futures contracts for hedging, risk management or portfolio management purposes, including to offset changes in the value of securities held or expected to be acquired or be disposed of, to minimize fluctuations in foreign currencies, or to gain exposure to a particular market or instrument.
To avoid leveraging and related risks, when the Fund invests in forward contracts or futures contracts, it will cover its position by earmarking or segregating an amount of cash or liquid securities, equal to the market value of the futures positions held less margin deposits. The market value of a forward contract or futures contract is equal to the gains or losses on the contract, which are marked to market at least daily. Variation margin payments equal to the amount of mark-to-market gains or losses on futures contracts are made to, or from, the account of the holder each day generally through the clearinghouse. Because of the daily marking to market and payment of variation margin of futures contracts, a position begins each day with “zero” market value.
There are risks associated with forward contracts, futures contracts and options on futures contracts including the success of such an investment strategy may depend on an ability to predict movements in the prices of individual securities, fluctuations in markets and movements in interest rates; there may be an imperfect or no correlation between the changes in market value of the securities held by the Fund and the prices of futures and options on futures; there may not be a liquid secondary market for a forward contract, futures contract or futures option; trading restrictions or limitations may be imposed by an exchange; and government regulations may restrict trading in futures contracts and futures options.
Swap Agreements. The Fund may enter into swap agreements and other types of over-the-counter transactions such as caps, floors and collars with broker-dealers or other financial institutions for hedging or investment purposes. An example of one type of swap involves the exchange by the Fund with another party of their respective commitments to pay or receive cash flows, for example, an exchange of floating rate payments for fixed-rate payments. The purchase of a cap entitles the purchaser, to the extent that a specified index or other underlying financial measure exceeds a predetermined value on a predetermined date or dates, to receive payments on a notional principal amount from the party selling the cap. The purchase of a floor entitles the purchaser, to the extent that a specified index or other underlying financial measure falls or other underlying measure below a predetermined value on a predetermined date or dates, to receive payments on a notional principal amount from the party selling the floor. A collar combines elements of a cap and a floor.
Swap agreements and similar transactions can be individually negotiated and structured to include exposure to a variety of different types of investments or market factors. Depending on their structures, swap agreements may increase or decrease the Fund’s exposure to long-or short-term interest rates (in the United States or abroad), foreign currency values, mortgage securities, mortgage rates, corporate borrowing

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
16

rates, or other factors such as security prices, inflation rates or the volatility of an index or one or more securities. For example, if the Fund agrees to exchange payments in US dollars for payments in a non-US currency, the swap agreement would tend to decrease the Fund’s exposure to US interest rates and increase its exposure to that non-US currency and interest rates. The Fund may also engage in total return swaps, in which payments made by the Fund or the counterparty are based on the total return of a particular reference asset or assets (such as an equity or fixed income security, a combination of such securities, or an index). The value of the Fund’s swap positions would increase or decrease depending on the changes in value of the underlying rates, currency values, volatility or other indices or measures. Caps and floors have an effect similar to buying or writing options. Depending on how they are used, swap agreements may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the Fund’s investments and its share price. The Fund’s ability to engage in certain swap transactions may be limited by tax considerations.
The Fund’s ability to realize a profit from such transactions will depend on the ability of the financial institutions with which it enters into the transactions to meet their obligations to the Fund. If a counterparty’s creditworthiness declines, the value of the agreement would be likely to decline, potentially resulting in losses. If a default occurs by the other party to such transaction, the Fund will have contractual remedies pursuant to the agreements related to the transaction, which may be limited by applicable law in the case of a counterparty’s insolvency. Under certain circumstances, suitable transactions may not be available to the Fund, or the Fund may be unable to close out its position under such transactions at the same time, or at the same price, as if it had purchased comparable publicly traded securities. Swaps carry counterparty risks that cannot be fully anticipated. Also, because swap transactions typically involve a contract between the two parties, such swap investments can be extremely illiquid, as it is uncertain as to whether another counterparty would wish to take assignment of the rights under the swap contract at a price acceptable to the Fund.
A credit default swap on a bond is an agreement between the Fund and a counterparty that enables the Fund to buy or sell protection against a credit event related to a particular issuer. One party, acting as a protection buyer, makes periodic payments, which may be based on, among other things, a fixed or floating rate of interest, to the other party, a protection seller, in exchange for a promise by the protection seller to make a payment to the protection buyer if a negative credit event (such as a delinquent payment or default) occurs with respect to a referenced bond or group of bonds. Credit default swaps may also be structured based on the debt of a basket of issuers, rather than a single issuer, and may be customized with respect to the default event that triggers purchase or other factors (for example, the Nth default within a basket, or defaults by a particular combination of issuers within the basket, may trigger a payment obligation). As a credit protection seller in a credit default swap contract, the Fund would be required to pay the par (or other agreed-upon) value of a referenced debt obligation to the counterparty following certain negative credit events as to a specified third-party debtor, such as default by a US or non-US corporate issuer on its debt obligations. In return for its obligation, the Fund would receive from the counterparty a periodic stream of payments, which may be based on, among other things, a fixed or floating rate of interest, over the term of the contract provided that no event of default has occurred. If no default occurs, the Fund would keep the stream of payments, and would have no payment obligations to the counterparty. The Fund may sell credit protection in order to earn additional income and/or to take a synthetic long position in the underlying security or basket of securities.
The Fund may enter into credit default swap contracts as protection buyer in order to hedge against the risk of default on the debt of a particular issuer or basket of issuers or attempt to profit from a deterioration or perceived deterioration in the creditworthiness of the particular issuer(s) (also known as buying credit protection). This would involve the risk that the investment may expire worthless and would only generate gain in the event of an actual default by the issuer(s) of the underlying obligation(s) (or, as applicable, a credit downgrade or other indication of financial instability). It would also involve the risk that the seller may fail to satisfy its payment obligations to the Fund. The purchase of credit default swaps involves costs, which will reduce the Fund’s return.
Credit default swaps involve a number of special risks. A protection seller may have to pay out amounts following a negative credit event greater than the value of the reference obligation delivered to it by its counterparty and the amount of periodic payments previously received by it from the counterparty. When the Fund acts as a seller of credit default swap protection, it is exposed to, among other things, leverage risk because if an event of default occurs the seller must pay the buyer up to the full notional value of the reference obligation. Each party to a credit default swap is subject to the credit risk of its counterparty (the risk that its counterparty may be unwilling or unable to perform its obligations on the swap as they come due). The value of the credit default swap to each party will change based on changes in the actual or perceived creditworthiness of the underlying issuer.
A protection buyer may lose its investment and recover nothing should an event of default not occur. The Fund may seek to realize gains on its credit default swap positions, or limit losses on its positions, by selling those positions in the secondary market. There can be no assurance that a liquid secondary market will exist at any given time for any particular credit default swap or for credit default swaps generally.
The market for credit default swaps has become more volatile in recent years as the creditworthiness of certain counterparties has been questioned and/or downgraded. The parties to a credit default swap may be required to post collateral to each other. If the Fund posts initial or periodic collateral to its counterparty, it may not be able to recover that collateral from the counterparty in accordance with the terms of the swap. In addition, if the Fund receives collateral from its counterparty, it may be delayed or prevented from realizing on the collateral in the event of the insolvency or bankruptcy of the counterparty. The Fund may exit its obligations under a credit default swap by terminating the contract and paying applicable breakage fees, novating the contract to a third-party or by entering into an offsetting credit default swap position, which may cause the Fund to incur more losses.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
17

The Fund may also enter into options on swap agreements (“swaptions”). A swaption is a contract that gives a counterparty the right (but not the obligation) to enter into a new swap agreement or to shorten, extend, cancel or otherwise modify an existing swap agreement, at some designated future time on specified terms. The Fund may write (sell) and purchase put and call swaptions to the same extent it may make use of standard options on securities or other instruments. Swaptions are generally subject to the same risks involved in the Fund’s use of options.
Many swaps are complex and often valued subjectively. Many over-the-counter derivatives are complex and their valuation often requires modeling and judgment, which increases the risk of mispricing or incorrect valuation. The pricing models used may not produce valuations that are consistent with the values the Fund realizes when it closes or sells an over-the-counter derivative. Valuation risk is more pronounced when the Fund enters into over-the-counter derivatives with specialized terms because the market value of those derivatives in some cases is determined in part by reference to similar derivatives with more standardized terms. Incorrect valuations may result in increased cash payment requirements to counterparties, undercollateralization and/or errors in calculation of the Fund’s NAV.
Risks Related to a Fund’s Clearing Broker and Central Clearing Counterparty. To the extent it uses swaps or futures contracts, the Fund will be required to deposit margin and other assets with its swaps and futures clearing brokers. There is a risk that assets deposited by the Fund with any swaps or futures clearing broker as margin for futures contracts or cleared swaps may, in certain circumstances, be used to satisfy losses of other clients of the Fund’s clearing broker. In addition, the assets of the Fund might not be fully protected in the event of the clearing broker’s bankruptcy, as the Fund would be limited to recovering only a pro rata share of all available funds segregated on behalf of the clearing broker’s customers for the relevant account class. Similarly, all customer funds held at a clearing organization in connection with any futures contracts are held in a commingled omnibus account and are not identified to the name of the clearing member’s individual customers. All customer funds held at a clearing organization with respect to cleared swaps of customers of a clearing broker are also held in an omnibus account, but Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) rules require that the clearing broker notify the clearing organization of the amount of the initial margin provided by the clearing broker to the clearing organization that is attributable to each customer. With respect to futures and options contracts, a clearing organization may use assets of a non-defaulting customer held in an omnibus account at the clearing organization to satisfy payment obligations of a defaulting customer of the clearing member to the clearing organization. With respect to cleared swaps, a clearing organization generally cannot do so, but may do so if the clearing member does not provide accurate reporting to the clearing organization as to the attribution of margin among its clients. Also, since clearing brokers generally provide to clearing organizations the net amount of variation margin required for cleared swaps for all of its customers in the aggregate, rather than the gross amount of each customer, the Fund is subject to the risk that a clearing organization will not make variation margin payments owed to the Fund if another customer of the clearing member has suffered a loss and is in default. As a result, in the event of a default or the clearing broker’s other clients or the clearing broker’s failure to extend its own funds in connection with any such default, the Fund may not be able to recover the full amount of assets deposited by the clearing broker on behalf of the Fund with the clearing organization.
CPO Exclusion. The Fund is operated by a person who has claimed an exclusion from the definition of the term “commodity pool operator” under the Commodity Exchange Act (the “CEA”) pursuant to Rule 4.5 under the CEA (the “exclusion”) promulgated by the CFTC. In order to claim the exclusion, the Fund is limited in its ability to trade certain commodity instruments (such as futures contracts, options on futures contracts, commodity options and certain swaps) other than for bona fide hedging purposes (as defined by the CFTC) or must limit its use of such instruments for non-bona fide hedging purposes to certain de minimis amounts. Accordingly, neither the Fund nor Artisan Partners (with respect to the Fund) are subject to registration or regulation as “commodity pool operators” under the CEA. The Fund's ability to invest in certain financial instruments regulated under the CEA (“commodity interests”) (including, but not limited to, futures and swaps on broad-based securities indices and interest rates) is limited by Artisan Partners’ intention to operate the Fund in a manner that would permit Artisan Partners to continue to claim the exclusion under Rule 4.5, which may adversely affect the Fund's total return. In the event that Artisan Partners becomes unable to rely on the exclusion in Rule 4.5 and is required to register with the CFTC as a commodity pool operator with respect to the Fund, the Fund's expenses may increase, adversely affecting the Fund's total return.
Private Placements and Restricted Securities
The Fund may invest in private placement and other restricted securities (i.e., securities that are purchased in private placements and, accordingly, are subject to restrictions on resale as a matter of contract or under federal securities laws). Rule 144A permits certain qualified institutional buyers, including investment companies that own and invest at least $100 million in securities, to trade in privately placed securities that have not been registered for sale under the 1933 Act.
Pursuant to the Fund's liquidity risk management program, the Fund's liquidity committee will classify private placements and restricted securities, such as 144A securities, as illiquid unless it reasonably expects that the Fund could sell or dispose of such investment in seven calendar days or less under then current market conditions without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. If the committee determines that a private placement or restricted security is illiquid, the Fund’s holdings of illiquid securities would be reviewed to determine what steps, if any, are required to assure that the Fund does not invest more than 15% of its net assets in illiquid investments. Investing in private placements and restricted securities could have the effect of increasing the amount of the Fund's assets invested in illiquid securities. The potential lack of liquidity for these securities may make it more difficult to accurately value these securities.
Private Investment Vehicles. The Fund may also invest in private investment funds, pools, vehicles, or other structures such as, without limitation, hedge funds, private equity funds or other pooled investment vehicles, which may take the form of corporations, partnerships,

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
18

trusts, limited partnerships, limited liability companies, or any other form of business organization (collectively, “private funds”), including, to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder, those sponsored or advised by Artisan Partners or its related parties. Private funds may utilize leverage without limit and, to the extent the Fund invests in private funds that utilize leverage, the Fund will indirectly be exposed to the risks associated with that leverage and the values of its shares may be more volatile as a result. If a private fund in which a Fund invests is not publicly offered or there is no public market for its shares, the Fund will typically be prohibited by the terms of its investment from selling its shares in the private fund, or may not be able to find a buyer for those shares at an acceptable price. Securities issued by private funds are generally issued in private placements and are restricted securities. An investment in a private fund may be highly volatile and difficult to value. The Fund would bear its pro rata share of the expenses of any private fund in which it invests.
Special Purpose Acquisition Companies. The Fund may invest in stock, warrants, and other securities of special purpose acquisition companies (“SPACs”) or similar special purpose entities that pool funds to seek potential acquisition opportunities. Unless and until an acquisition is completed, a SPAC generally invests its assets (less a portion retained to cover expenses) in US government securities, money market securities or holds cash; if an acquisition that meets the requirements for the SPAC is not completed within a pre-established period of time, the invested funds are returned to the entity's shareholders. Because SPACs and similar entities are in essence blank check companies without operating history or ongoing business other than seeking acquisitions, the value of their securities is particularly dependent on the ability of the entity's management to identify and complete a profitable acquisition. A SPAC’s structure may result in significant dilution of a stockholder’s share value immediately upon the completion of a business combination due to, among other reasons, interests held by the SPAC sponsor, conversion of warrants into additional shares, shares issued in connection with a business combination and/or certain embedded costs. There is no guarantee that the SPACs in which the Fund invests will complete an acquisition or that any acquisitions that are completed will be profitable. Some SPACs may pursue acquisitions only within certain industries or regions, which may increase the volatility of their prices. In addition, these securities, which are typically traded in the over-the-counter market, may be considered illiquid and/or be subject to restrictions on resale.
Private Investments in Public Equity. The Fund may invest in private investments in public equity ("PIPEs"), which are equity securities in a private placement that are issued by issuers who have outstanding, publicly-traded equity securities of the same class. Shares in PIPEs generally are not registered with the SEC until after a certain time period from the date the private sale is completed. This restricted period can last many months. Until the public registration process is completed, PIPEs are restricted as to resale and the Fund cannot freely trade the securities. Generally, such restrictions cause the PIPEs to be illiquid during this time. PIPEs may contain provisions that the issuer will pay specified financial penalties to the holder if the issuer does not publicly register the restricted equity securities within a specified period of time, but there is no assurance that the restricted equity securities will be publicly registered, or that the registration will remain in effect.
Lending of Portfolio Securities
In order to generate incremental revenue, the Fund may participate in a securities lending program, in which securities from its portfolio may be loaned to third parties, who typically will engage in short selling the loaned securities. As a matter of policy, securities loans by the Fund are made to broker-dealers or other financial institutions pursuant to agreements requiring that the loans be continuously secured by collateral consisting of cash or short-term debt obligations at least equal at all times to the value of the securities on loan, “marked-to-market” daily. The risks in lending portfolio securities, as with other extensions of credit, consist of possible delay in recovery of the securities or possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially. If a borrower defaults, the value of the collateral may decline before a Fund can dispose of it. The borrower pays to a participating Fund an amount equal to any dividends or interest received on securities lent. A participating Fund retains all or a portion of the interest received on investment of the cash collateral and/or receives a fee from the borrower. A participating Fund bears the risk of any loss on the investment of the collateral; any such loss may exceed, potentially by a substantial amount, any profit to the Fund from its securities lending activities. Although voting rights, or rights to consent, with respect to the loaned securities may pass to the borrower, a participating Fund retains the right to call the loans at any time, and it will do so to enable the fund to exercise voting rights on any matters materially affecting the investment. A participating Fund may also call such loans in order to sell the securities. A participating Fund may pay fees in connection with arranging loans of its portfolio securities.
Goldman Sachs Bank USA, doing business as Goldman Sachs Agency Lending (“GSAL”), currently serves as the securities lending agent for Artisan Partners Funds. As securities lending agent, GSAL is responsible for marketing to approved borrowers available securities from each participating Fund’s portfolio. In addition, GSAL is responsible for the administration and management of each participating Fund’s securities lending program, including the preparation and execution of an agreement with each approved borrower governing the terms and conditions of any securities loan, ensuring that securities loans are properly coordinated and documented with the Fund’s custodian, ensuring that loaned securities are daily valued and that the corresponding required cash collateral is delivered by the approved borrower(s), and arranging for the investment of cash collateral received from borrowers in accordance with the Fund’s investment guidelines. GSAL also arranges for the return of loaned securities to a participating Fund at loan termination, and, as applicable, in connection with proxy votes.
GSAL receives as compensation for its services a portion of the amount earned by the Fund for lending securities. Because the Fund had not yet begun investment operations as of the date of this SAI, the Fund did not previously participate in a securities lending program.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
19

Cash, Money Market Funds and Repurchase Agreements
The Fund typically holds a portion of its available cash at its custodian and invests the remaining available cash in shares of US dollar denominated money market funds, which are a type of investment company, or in repurchase agreements. Accordingly, the term “cash,” as used in the prospectus and this SAI, includes investments in such instruments.
An investment in a money market fund is not a deposit of any bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any other government agency. Certain money market funds seek to preserve the value of their shares at $1.00 per share, although there can be no assurance that they will do so, and it is possible to lose money by investing in such a money market fund. Investments in money market funds are also subject to the risks of investing in other investment companies. See "Investment Companies" in this SAI.
Repurchase agreements are transactions in which the Fund purchases a security from a bank or recognized securities dealer and simultaneously commits to resell that security to the bank or dealer at an agreed-upon price, date and market rate of interest unrelated to the coupon rate or maturity of the purchased security. Although repurchase agreements carry certain risks not associated with direct investments in securities, the Fund will enter into repurchase agreements only with banks and dealers believed by Artisan Partners to present minimal credit risks. Artisan Partners will review and monitor the creditworthiness of such institutions and will consider the capitalization of the institution, Artisan Partners’ prior dealings with the institution, any rating of the institution’s senior long-term debt by independent rating agencies and other relevant factors.
The Fund will invest only in repurchase agreements collateralized at all times in an amount at least equal to the repurchase price plus accrued interest. To the extent that the proceeds from any sale of such collateral upon a default in the obligation to repurchase were less than the repurchase price, the Fund would suffer a loss. If the financial institution that is party to the repurchase agreement petitions for bankruptcy or otherwise becomes subject to bankruptcy or other liquidation proceedings, there may be restrictions on the Fund’s ability to sell the collateral and the Fund could suffer a loss. However, with respect to financial institutions whose bankruptcy or liquidation proceedings are subject to the US Bankruptcy Code, the Fund intends to comply with provisions under the Bankruptcy Code that would allow it immediately to resell such collateral.
When-Issued and Delayed-Delivery Securities; Reverse Repurchase Agreements
The Fund may purchase securities on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis. Although the payment and interest terms of these securities are established at the time the Fund enters into the commitment, the securities may be delivered and paid for a month or more after the date of purchase, when their value may have changed. The Fund makes such commitments only with the intention of actually acquiring the securities, but may sell the securities before settlement date if Artisan Partners deems it advisable for investment reasons. The Fund currently does not intend to have commitments to purchase when-issued securities in excess of 10% of its total assets.
The Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements with banks and securities dealers. A reverse repurchase agreement is a repurchase agreement in which the Fund is the seller of, rather than the investor in, securities and agrees to repurchase them at an agreed-upon time and price. Use of a reverse repurchase agreement may be preferable to a regular sale and later repurchase of securities because it avoids certain market risks and transaction costs. However, reverse repurchase agreements will be treated as borrowing and subject to the Fund’s fundamental limitation on borrowing.
At the time the Fund enters into a binding obligation to purchase securities on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis or enters into a reverse repurchase agreement, assets of the Fund having a value at least as great as the purchase price of the securities to be purchased will be segregated on the books of the Fund and held by the custodian throughout the period of the obligation. The use of these investment strategies, as well as borrowing under a line of credit as described below, may give rise to a form of leverage and increase the Fund’s overall investment exposure, resulting in increased volatility of the Fund’s NAV.
Index Securities; Structured Products
The Fund may invest in structured products. The term “structured products” is used to describe a variety of investment instruments that give the holder of the product some investment exposure to a specified asset without actually, or directly, acquiring ownership of that asset. Holders of structured products bear risks of the underlying investments, index or reference obligation and are subject to counterparty risk. Structured products include asset securitizations, in which an owner of assets transfers them to a special purpose vehicle (“SPV”), which in turn issues certificates that entitle the holder to certain cash flows derived from the underlying assets. The Fund, as a holder of such certificates, may have the right to receive payments only from the SPV, and generally does not have direct rights against the issuer or the entity that sold the assets to the SPV. While certain structured products enable the investor to acquire interests in a pool of securities without the brokerage and other expenses associated with directly holding the same securities, investors in structured products generally pay their share of the structured product’s administrative and other expenses. Although it is difficult to predict whether the prices of indices and securities underlying structured products will rise or fall, these prices (and, therefore, the prices of structured products) are generally influenced by the same types of political and economic events that affect issuers of securities and capital markets generally. If the issuer of a structured product uses shorter term financing to purchase longer term securities, the issuer may be forced to sell its securities at below market prices if it experiences difficulty in obtaining such financing, which may adversely affect the value of the structured products. Structured products generally entail risks associated with derivative instruments.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
20

Structured notes are derivative debt securities, the interest rate or principal of which is typically determined by an unrelated indicator. Indexed securities include structured notes as well as securities other than debt securities, the interest rate or principal of which is determined by an unrelated indicator. Indexed securities may include a multiplier that multiplies the indexed element by a specified factor and, therefore, the value of such securities may be very volatile.
The terms of structured and indexed securities may provide that in certain circumstances no principal is due at maturity and therefore, may result in a loss of invested capital. Structured and indexed securities may be positively or negatively indexed, so that appreciation of the reference may produce an increase or a decrease in the interest rate or the value of the structured or indexed security at maturity may be calculated as a specified multiple of the change in the value of the reference; therefore, the value of such security may be very volatile. Structured and indexed securities may entail a greater degree of market risk than other types of debt securities because the investor bears the risk of the reference. Structured or indexed securities also may be more volatile, less liquid and more difficult to accurately price than less complex securities or more traditional debt securities.
Credit-linked Notes. The Fund may invest in credit-linked notes. A credit-linked note is a type of structured note whose value is linked to an underlying reference asset. Credit-linked notes typically provide periodic payments of interest as well as payment of principal upon maturity. The value of the periodic payments and the principal amount payable upon maturity are tied (positively or negatively) to a reference asset, such as an index, government bond, interest rate or currency exchange rate. The ongoing payments and principal upon maturity typically will increase or decrease depending on increases or decreases in the value of the reference asset. A credit-linked note typically is issued by a special purpose trust or similar entity and is a direct obligation of the issuing entity. The entity, in turn, invests in bonds or derivative contracts in order to provide the exposure set forth in the credit-linked note. The periodic interest payments and principal obligations payable under the terms of the note typically are conditioned upon the entity’s receipt of payments on its underlying investment. If the underlying investment defaults, the periodic payments and principal received by the Fund will be reduced or eliminated. The buyer of a credit-linked note assumes the risk of default by the issuer and the underlying reference asset or entity. Generally, investors in credit-linked notes assume the risk of default by the issuer and the reference entity in return for a potentially higher yield on their investment or access to an investment that they could not otherwise obtain. In the event the issuer defaults or there is a credit event that relates to the reference asset, the recovery rate is generally less than the Fund’s initial investment and the Fund may lose money.
Commercial Paper
The Fund may invest in commercial paper. Commercial paper represents short-term unsecured promissory notes issued in bearer form by corporations such as banks or bank holding companies and finance companies. The rate of return on commercial paper may be linked or indexed to the level of exchange rates between the US dollar and a foreign currency or currencies.
US Government Securities
The Fund may invest in US Government Securities. US Government securities are obligations of and, in certain cases, guaranteed by, the US Government, its agencies or instrumentalities. The US Government does not guarantee the NAV of the Fund’s shares. Some US Government securities, such as Treasury bills, notes and bonds, and securities guaranteed by the Government National Mortgage Association, are supported by the full faith and credit of the United States; others, such as those of the Federal Home Loan Banks, are supported by the right of the issuer to borrow from the US Department of the Treasury (the “US Treasury”); others, such as those of the Federal National Mortgage Association, are supported by the discretionary authority of the US Government to purchase the agency’s obligations; and still others, such as those of the Student Loan Marketing Association, are supported only by the credit of the instrumentality. US Government securities may include zero coupon securities, which do not distribute interest on a current basis and tend to be subject to greater risk than interest-paying securities of similar maturities.
Inflation-Indexed Bonds
The Fund may invest in inflation-indexed bonds. Inflation-indexed bonds are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. Two structures are common. The US Treasury and some other issuers use a structure that accrues inflation into the principal value of the bond. Most other issuers pay out the accruals as part of a semiannual coupon. Inflation-indexed securities issued by the US Treasury have maturities of five, ten or thirty years, although it is possible that securities with other maturities will be issued in the future. The US Treasury securities pay interest on a semiannual basis, equal to a fixed percentage of the inflation-adjusted principal amount. For example, if an investor purchased an inflation-indexed bond with a par value of $1,000 and a 3% real rate of return coupon (payable 1.5% semiannually), and inflation over the first six months was 1%, the mid-year par value of the bond would be $1,010 and the first semiannual interest payment would be $15.15 ($1,010 times 1.5%). If inflation during the second half of the year resulted in the whole years’ inflation equaling 3%, the end-of-year par value of the bond would be $1,030 and the second semiannual interest payment would be $15.45 ($1,030 times 1.5%).
If the periodic adjustment rate measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds will be adjusted downward, and, consequently, the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of US Treasury inflation-indexed bonds, even during a period of deflation. However, the current market value of the bonds is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. The Fund also may invest in

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
21

other inflation related bonds which may or may not provide a similar guarantee. If a guarantee of principal is not provided, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal.
The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates in turn are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. Therefore, if inflation were to rise at a faster rate than nominal interest rates, real interest rates might decline, leading to an increase in value of inflation-indexed bonds. In contrast, if nominal interest rates increased at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates might rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-indexed bonds.
While these securities may provide protection from long-term inflationary trends, short-term increases in inflation may lead to a decline in value. If interest rates rise due to reasons other than inflation (for example, due to changes in currency exchange rates), investors in these securities may not be protected to the extent that the increase is not reflected in the bond’s inflation measure.
The periodic adjustment of US inflation-indexed bonds is tied to the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (“CPI-U”), which is calculated monthly by the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. The CPI-U is a measurement of changes in the cost of living, made up of components such as housing, food, transportation and energy. Inflation-indexed bonds issued by a foreign government are generally adjusted to reflect a comparable inflation index, calculated by that government. There can be no assurance that the CPI-U or any foreign inflation index will accurately measure the real rate of inflation in the prices of goods and services. Moreover, there can be no assurance that the rate of inflation in a foreign country will be correlated to the rate of inflation in the United States.
Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though investors do not receive their principal until maturity.
Short Sales
The Fund may make short sales “against the box.” In a short sale, the Fund sells a borrowed security and is required to return the identical security to the lender. A short sale against the box involves the sale of a security with respect to which the Fund already owns an equivalent security in kind and amount. A short sale against the box enables the Fund to obtain the current market price of a security that it desires to sell but is unavailable for settlement. The Fund currently does not intend to make short sales against the box in excess of 5% of its total assets.
The Fund may also make short sales “not against the box,” which are generally short sales of securities the Fund does not own. Short sales that are not made against the box create opportunities to increase the Fund’s return but, at the same time, involve special risk considerations and may be considered a speculative technique. Since the Fund, in effect, profits from a decline in the price of the securities sold short without the need to invest the full purchase price of the securities on the date of the short sale, the Fund’s NAV will tend to increase more when the securities it has sold short decrease in value, and to decrease more when the securities it has sold short increase in value, than would otherwise be the case if it had not engaged in short sales. Under adverse market conditions, the Fund might have difficulty purchasing securities to meet its short sale delivery obligations, and might have to sell portfolio securities to raise the capital necessary to meet its short sale obligations at a time when the Fund would not otherwise sell the portfolio securities.
In order to engage in short sales, the Fund must arrange with its custodian or a broker to borrow the security being sold short. The Fund generally must segregate cash or other liquid assets for the benefit of its custodian or broker to secure the Fund’s obligation to replace the security, so that the total of the amounts segregated is equal to the market value of the securities sold short. In addition, the Fund typically pays its custodian or broker fees for lending the security and must also pay the equivalent of the interest or dividends paid by the issuer on the securities borrowed during the time the short position is open. In order to close out its short position, the Fund replaces the security by purchasing the security at the price prevailing at the time of replacement or taking the security the Fund otherwise holds and delivering it to its custodian or broker. If the price of the security sold short has increased since the time of the short sale, the Fund will incur a loss in addition to the costs associated with establishing, maintaining and closing out the short position. The Fund’s loss on a short sale is potentially unlimited because there is no upward limit on the price the security sold short could attain.
Line of Credit
Artisan Partners Funds maintains a line of credit with a syndicate of banks in order to permit borrowing for temporary or emergency purposes, including, without limitation, the funding of redemptions and trade settlement in circumstances in which temporary borrowing may be preferable to liquidation of portfolio securities. The Fund paid agents fees, up-front fees to the lenders and legal expenses, in connection with entering into the line of credit and is charged its share of commitment fees on the aggregate commitment amount, in each case on a pro rata basis based on its net assets. Any borrowings under that line of credit by the Fund would be subject to restriction (5) under “Investment Restrictions” in this SAI. Borrowings under the line of credit bear interest at a variable rate. Borrowing results in interest expense on the amount borrowed and other fees and expenses for the borrowing Fund which will impact the Fund’s net expenses.
Operational and Cybersecurity Risks
Artisan Partners Funds, its service providers, including its adviser Artisan Partners, and other market participants increasingly depend on complex information technology and communications systems to conduct business functions. These systems are subject to a number of different threats or risks that could adversely affect the Fund and its shareholders, despite the efforts of Artisan Partners Funds and its service providers to adopt technologies, processes and practices intended to mitigate these risks.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
22

For example, unauthorized third parties may attempt to improperly access, modify, disrupt the operations of or prevent access to these systems or data within them (a “cyber-attack”), whether systems of Artisan Partners Funds, its service providers, counterparties or other market participants. Power or communications outages, acts of God, epidemics and pandemics, information technology equipment malfunctions, operational errors and inaccuracies within software or data processing systems may also disrupt business operations or impact critical data. Market events also may occur at a pace that overloads current information technology and communication systems and processes of Artisan Partners Funds, its service providers or other market participants, impacting the ability to conduct the Fund’s operations.
Cyber-attacks, disruptions or failures that affect Artisan Partners Funds’ service providers or counterparties may adversely affect the Fund and its shareholders, including by causing losses for the Fund or impairing Fund operations. For example, the Fund’s or Artisan Partners Funds’ service providers’ assets or sensitive or confidential information may be misappropriated, data may be corrupted and operations may be disrupted (e.g., cyber-attacks or operational failures may cause the release of private shareholder information or confidential Fund information, interfere with the processing of shareholder transactions, impact the ability to calculate the Fund’s NAV and impede trading). In addition, cyber-attacks, disruptions or failures may cause reputational damage and subject the Fund or Artisan Partners Funds’ service providers to regulatory fines, litigation costs, penalties or financial losses, reimbursement or other compensation costs, and/or additional compliance costs. While Artisan Partners Funds and its service providers may establish business continuity and other plans and processes to address the possibility of cyber-attacks, disruptions or failures, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems, including that they do not apply to third parties, such as other market participants, as well as the possibility that certain risks have not been identified or that unknown threats may emerge in the future. The Fund and Artisan Partners Funds’ service providers may also incur substantial costs for cybersecurity risk management, including insurance, in order to prevent or mitigate future cyber security incidents, and the Fund and its shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result of such costs.
Similar types of operational and technology risks are also present for issuers of securities or other instruments in which the Fund invests, which could result in material adverse consequences for such issuers, and may cause the Fund’s investments to lose value. In addition, cyber-attacks involving the Fund’s counterparty could affect such counterparty’s ability to meet its obligations to the Fund, which may result in losses to the Fund and its shareholders. Furthermore, as a result of cyber-attacks, disruptions or failures, an exchange or market may close or issue trading halts on specific securities or the entire market, which may result in the Fund being, among other things, unable to buy or sell certain securities or unable to accurately price its investments. Artisan Partners Funds cannot directly control any cybersecurity plans and systems put in place by its service providers, Fund counterparties, issuers in which the Fund invests, or securities markets and exchanges.
Coronavirus Outbreak Risks
The global outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus (“COVID-19”), together with resulting voluntary and US federal and state and non-US governmental actions, including, without limitation, mandatory business closures, public gathering limitations, restrictions on travel and quarantines, has meaningfully disrupted the global economy and markets. Although the long-term economic fallout of COVID-19 is difficult to predict, it is expected to continue to have ongoing material effects across many, if not all, aspects of the regional, national and global economy. Furthermore, Artisan Partners’ ability to operate effectively, including the ability of its personnel or its service providers and other contractors to function, communicate and travel to the extent necessary to carry out the Fund's investment strategies and objectives and Artisan Partners’ business and to satisfy its obligations to the Fund, their investors, and pursuant to applicable law, may be impaired. To the extent the spread of COVID-19 affects Artisan Partners’ personnel and/or the personnel of its service providers, it could significantly affect Artisan Partners’ ability to oversee the affairs of the Fund (particularly to the extent such impacted personnel include key investment professionals or other members of senior management).
Portfolio Turnover
Although the Fund does not purchase securities with a view to rapid turnover, there are no limitations on the length of time that portfolio securities must be held and the Fund may have short-term capital gains and losses. Portfolio turnover can occur for a number of reasons such as general conditions in the securities markets, more favorable investment opportunities in other securities or other factors relating to the desirability of holding or changing a portfolio investment. Because of the Fund’s flexibility of investment and emphasis on growth of capital, it may have greater portfolio turnover than that of mutual funds that have primary objectives of income or maintenance of a balanced investment position.
Because the Fund had not yet begun investment operations prior to the date of this SAI, the Fund has no portfolio turnover to report for prior fiscal years.
Future turnover rates for the Fund may vary significantly from year to year. A high rate of portfolio turnover results in increased transaction costs, which must be borne by the Fund. High portfolio turnover also may result in the realization of capital gains or losses and, to the extent net short-term capital gains are realized, any distributions resulting from such gains will be considered ordinary income for US federal income tax purposes. See “Distributions and Taxes” in the prospectus, and “Additional Federal Income Tax Information” in this SAI.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
23

Investment Restrictions
Fundamental Restrictions
Artisan Partners Funds has adopted investment restrictions (which may not be changed without the approval of the lesser of (i) 67% of the Fund’s shares present at a meeting if more than 50% of the shares outstanding are present or (ii) more than 50% of the Fund’s outstanding shares) under which the Fund may not:
(1)
act as an underwriter of securities, except insofar as it may be deemed an underwriter for purposes of the Securities Act of 1933 on disposition of securities acquired subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale;
(2)
purchase or sell real estate, although it may purchase securities of issuers that deal in real estate, including securities of real estate investment trusts, and may purchase securities that are secured by interests in real estate. The Fund reserves the freedom of action to hold and to sell real estate acquired as a result of the ownership of securities;
(3)
purchase or sell commodities or commodity contracts, except the Fund may purchase and sell options on securities, securities indices and currency, futures contracts on securities, securities indices and currency and options on such futures, swap contracts subject to the regulation by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission, forward foreign currency exchange contracts, forward commitments, securities index put or call warrants, repurchase agreements and other derivative instruments entered into in accordance with the Fund’s investment policies;
(4)
make loans, except to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder and any applicable exemptive relief, including, without limitation, (a) purchasing loan participations or otherwise investing in loans or similar obligations, (b) making loans directly to issuers, itself or as part of a lending syndicate, (c) purchasing debt obligations or other financial instruments in which the Fund may invest consistent with its investment policies, (d) entering into repurchase agreements and (e) lending its portfolio securities;
(5)
borrow money except under the following circumstances: (a) the Fund may borrow money from banks so long as after such a transaction, the total assets (including the amount borrowed) less liabilities other than debt obligations, represent at least 300% of outstanding debt obligations; (b) the Fund may also borrow amounts equal to an additional 5% of its total assets without regard to the foregoing limitation for temporary purposes, such as for the clearance and settlement of portfolio transactions and to meet shareholder redemption requests; and (c) the Fund may enter into transactions that are technically borrowings under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, because they involve the sale of a security coupled with an agreement to repurchase that security (e.g., reverse repurchase agreements, dollar rolls and other similar investment techniques) without regard to the asset coverage restriction described in (a) above, so long as and to the extent that the Fund earmarks and maintains liquid securities equal in value to its obligations in respect of these transactions;
(6)
invest more than 25% of its total assets (taken at market value at the time of a particular purchase) in the securities of one or more issuers in any particular industry (excluding the US Government or its agencies or instrumentalities);
(7)
issue any class of securities that is senior to the Fund’s shares of beneficial interest, except to the extent the Fund is permitted to borrow money or otherwise to the extent consistent with applicable law; or
(8)
with respect to 75% of the Fund’s total assets purchase securities of an issuer (other than the US Government, its agencies, instrumentalities or authorities or repurchase agreements collateralized by US Government securities and other investment companies), if: (a) such purchase would cause more than 5% of the Fund’s total assets taken at market value at the time of a particular purchase to be invested in the securities of such issuer; or (b) such purchase would result in more than 10%, taken at the time of a particular purchase, of the outstanding voting securities of such issuer being held by the Fund.
The Fund’s investment objective is not a fundamental restriction and, therefore, a change in the objective is not subject to shareholder approval. However, investors in the Fund will receive written notification at least 30 days prior to any change in the Fund’s investment objective.
For purposes of investment restriction (5) above, borrowing shall not be considered to include (without limitation): investments in derivative instruments, such as options, futures contracts, options on futures contracts, forward commitments and swaps, short sales and roll transactions made in accordance with the Fund’s investment policies.
For the purposes of investment restriction (6) above, Artisan Partners generally classifies securities in accordance with the industry classifications of Artisan Partners’ securities information vendors, which may change from time to time. However, each investment team, in its own judgment, may determine that a different classification is more appropriate. Therefore, classifications may differ by Fund and investment team. In determining a security's industry classification, each investment team and/or Artisan Partners’ vendors may use a range of criteria, including using information or classifications of other securities information vendors, the company description and/or other publicly available information. In addition, the industry classifications shown in the Funds’ shareholder reports, financial statements and other reports may differ from the classifications used for purposes of testing compliance with a Fund's industry concentration policy.
Non-Fundamental Restrictions
The Fund is also subject to a non-fundamental restriction and policy (which may be changed by the board of directors), under which the Fund, under normal circumstances, invests no less than 80% of its net assets plus any borrowings for investment purposes at market value at

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
24

the time of purchase in floating rate debt instruments and other investments that are the economic equivalent of floating rate debt instruments. The Fund will notify its shareholders at least 60 days prior to any change in the policy described in the previous sentence.
These investment restrictions only apply at the time of an investment. Accordingly, any subsequent increase or decrease in the percentage of the Fund’s holdings as a result of a change in market conditions, the amount of the Fund’s total or net assets or other circumstances will not be considered in determining whether any investment complies with the Fund’s investment restrictions.
In October 2016, the SEC adopted Rule 22e-4 under the Investment Company Act (the “Liquidity Rule”), which requires open-end funds, such as the Fund, to establish a liquidity risk management program. Effective 1 December 2018, as required by the Liquidity Rule, the Fund implemented a liquidity risk management program and the board of directors of Artisan Partners Funds appointed the Fund’s liquidity committee, consisting of Fund officers, as the liquidity risk management program administrator. Under the liquidity risk management program, the liquidity committee is responsible for making liquidity determinations and evaluating any issues that arise in connection with the program. In accordance with the program, the Fund will not acquire any illiquid investment, as determined by the liquidity committee, if, immediately after the acquisition, the Fund would have invested more than 15% of its net assets in illiquid investments that are assets.
Organization
The Fund is a series of Artisan Partners Funds, Inc., an open-end management investment company that was incorporated under Wisconsin law on 5 January 1995. The Fund is classified as a diversified fund under the 1940 Act .
The Fund consists of three classes of shares: Investor Shares, Advisor Shares and Institutional Shares.
Each class of shares has equal rights with respect to portfolio assets and voting privileges with respect to the Fund in general. Each class of shares has exclusive voting rights with respect to any matters involving only that class. The classes of the Fund pay pro rata the costs of management of the Fund’s portfolio, including the management fee. Each class of the Fund bears the cost of its own transfer agency and shareholder servicing arrangements, and any other class-specific expenses, which will result in differing expenses by class. Because of the different expenses, the Advisor Shares of the Fund generally may have a lower expense ratio and correspondingly higher total return than the Investor Shares of the Fund and Institutional Shares of the Fund generally may have a lower expense ratio and correspondingly higher total return than the Investor Shares and Advisor Shares of the Fund.
The Wisconsin Business Corporation Law permits registered investment companies to operate without an annual meeting of shareholders under specified circumstances, such as if an annual meeting is not required by the 1940 Act (the federal securities law that governs the regulation of investment companies). Artisan Partners Funds has adopted the appropriate provisions in its bylaws and does not expect to hold an annual meeting in any year in which the election of directors or any other action requiring shareholder approval is not required to be acted upon by shareholders. Artisan Partners Funds believes that not holding shareholder meetings except as otherwise required reduces the Fund’s expenses and enhances shareholder returns.
The Fund may hold special meetings of shareholders to elect or remove directors, change fundamental policies, approve a management contract, or for other purposes. The Fund will distribute proxy materials in advance, including information about the proposals to be voted on and instructions on how to vote. You are entitled to one vote, or fraction thereof, for each share of any Fund, or fraction thereof, that you own. With respect to any matter that affects only one or more Funds or classes, only the shares of the affected Funds or classes are entitled to vote. Shareholders not attending these meetings are encouraged to vote by proxy.
The Wisconsin Business Corporation Law permits a registered investment company to hold annual and special meetings of shareholders solely by means of remote communication if the bylaws of the registered investment company authorize its board of directors to hold them remotely, subject to certain limitations. Artisan Partners Funds has adopted the appropriate provision in its bylaws to hold meetings of shareholders solely by means of remote communication, subject to certain conditions, as may be determined by the board of directors in its sole discretion.
All shares participate equally in dividends and other distributions declared by the board of directors with respect to the applicable class of shares, and all shares of a class have pro rata rights to the residual assets of the respective class in the event of liquidation. Shares of the Fund have no preemptive, conversion or subscription rights.
Artisan Partners Funds is governed by a board of directors that is responsible for protecting the interests of the Fund's shareholders. The directors are experienced executives and professionals who meet at regular intervals to oversee the Funds’ activities, review contractual arrangements with companies that provide services to the Fund and review performance. A majority of directors are not otherwise affiliated with Artisan Partners Funds or Artisan Partners.
Directors and Officers
The board of directors has overall responsibility for the conduct of the affairs of Artisan Partners Funds. The chair of the board is an independent director.2 Each director serves an indefinite term until the next meeting of shareholders at which the directors are elected and until the election and qualification of his or her successor or until he or she retires, resigns or is removed from office. Artisan Partners Funds’

2
Directors who are not “interested” as defined by the 1940 Act are deemed to be “independent directors.”

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
25

bylaws provide that each director must retire by the end of the calendar year in which he or she attains the age of 72. The board of directors may fill any vacancy on the board provided that, after such appointment, at least two-thirds of the directors have been elected by the shareholders. The shareholders may remove a director by a vote of a majority of the outstanding shares of Artisan Partners Funds at any meeting of shareholders called for the purpose of removing such director.
The board of directors’ role is one of oversight, rather than active management. This oversight extends to Artisan Partners Funds’ risk management processes. Those processes are embedded in the responsibilities of officers of Artisan Partners Funds. Senior officers of Artisan Partners Funds, including the president, chief financial officer, general counsel, and chief compliance officer, report directly to the full board on a variety of matters at regular meetings of the board of directors. The chief financial officer also reports regularly to Artisan Partners Funds’ audit committee, which is comprised of all of Artisan Partners Funds’ independent directors.
The board’s leadership structure features independent directors serving as board chair and chairs of the audit committee, education committee and governance and nominating committee. This structure is reviewed by the board regularly and the board believes it to be appropriate and effective. All independent directors are currently members of the audit, education and governance and nominating committees. Inclusion of independent directors in the audit, education and governance and nominating committees allows all such directors to participate in the full range of the board’s oversight duties, including oversight of risk management processes.
The board of directors elects the officers of Artisan Partners Funds, provided that the chief compliance officer must be approved by a majority of the independent directors. Each officer holds office for one year and until the election and qualification of his or her successor, or until he or she sooner dies, resigns, or is removed or disqualified. The board of directors may remove any officer, with or without cause, at any time, provided that a majority of the independent directors must approve the removal of the chief compliance officer.
The names and ages of the directors and officers, the date each first was elected to office, their principal business occupations and other directorships they have held during the last five years in any publicly-traded company or any registered investment company are shown below. There are 17 series of Artisan Partners Funds, all of which are overseen by the board of directors and officers of Artisan Partners Funds.
Name and
Age at
1 January 2021
Position(s)
Held with
Artisan
Partners
Funds
Date First
Elected or
Appointed
to Office
Principal Occupation(s)
during Past 5 Years
Other Public
Company or
Registered
Investment
Company
Directorships Held
Experience, Qualifications,
Attributes, Skills for Board
Membership
Directors who are not “interested persons” of Artisan Partners Funds:*
Coleen Downs Dinneen, 60
Director and
Chair of the
Education
Committee
1 Jan 2018
Retired; until 2016, Executive
Vice President and General
Counsel, Natixis Global Asset
Management – US
Distribution and Chief Legal
Officer and Secretary,
Natixis/Loomis Funds
None
Significant executive
experience including past
service as chief legal officer
of investment management
company and responsibility
for mutual fund legal
administration, compliance
and fund administration
Gail L. Hanson, 65
Director and
Independent
Chair of the
Board of
Directors
Director
since 1 Jan
2012;
Independent
Chair since 1
Jan 2019
Retired; from February 2011
to April 2018, Chief Financial
Officer, Aurora Health Care
(not for profit health care
provider); from September
2004 to February 2011,
Deputy Executive Director,
State of Wisconsin
Investment Board
Director, Northwestern
Mutual Series Fund, Inc.
(investment company) (27
portfolios)
Significant executive
experience including past
service as chief financial
officer and service as deputy
executive director of a state
investment board; certified
financial analyst and
certified public accountant;
audit committee financial
expert

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
26

Name and
Age at
1 January 2021
Position(s)
Held with
Artisan
Partners
Funds
Date First
Elected or
Appointed
to Office
Principal Occupation(s)
during Past 5 Years
Other Public
Company or
Registered
Investment
Company
Directorships Held
Experience, Qualifications,
Attributes, Skills for Board
Membership
Bonnie L. Howard, 67
Director and
Chair of the
Audit
Committee
9 Mar 2018
Director, Chair of the Audit
Committee and member of
the Compensation
Committee and Nominating
and Governance Committee
(May 2020 to present), and
Chair of the Risk Oversight
Committee and member of
the Audit Committee
(August 2012 to May 2020),
Assured Guaranty Ltd.;
Director, BMO Financial
Corp and BMO Harris Bank,
N.A. (September 2013 to
April 2018); until December
2011, Chief Auditor and
Global Head of Emerging
Risk, Citigroup, Inc.
Director, Assured Guaranty
Ltd (insurance company)
Significant board
experience; significant
executive experience
including past service as
chief auditor of a global
financial services firm;
certified public accountant;
audit committee financial
expert
William J. Kelly, 60
Director
1 Jan 2020
Chief Executive Officer,
Chartered Alternative
Investment Analyst (CAIA)
Association (2014-present)
None
Significant board
experience; significant
executive experience
including past service as
chief executive officer of an
investment management
company; audit committee
financial expert
Peter M. Lebovitz, 65
Director and
Chair of the
Governance
and
Nominating
Committee
1 Jul 2014
Managing Partner, Harkness
Partners, LLC (provider of
strategic consulting to
investment management
firms)
Independent Director and
Chair, Emles Trust
(investment company) (6
portfolios)
Significant board
experience; significant
executive experience
including past service as
chief executive officer of an
investment management
company; audit committee
financial expert
Peter E. Sundman, 61
Director
1 Jan 2020
Trustee, IES Abroad (since
2012); Trustee, The College
of Wooster (since 2003);
Trustee, Frost Valley YMCA
(since 1998). Formerly, Chief
Executive Officer,
ClearBridge Advisors
(2009-2011); Chairman and
Chief Executive Officer,
Neuberger Funds
(1999-2008); President,
Neuberger Berman
Management (1999-2008)
None
Significant board
experience; significant
executive experience
including past service as
chief executive officer of an
investment management
company
*
Directors who are not “interested” as defined by the 1940 Act are deemed to be “independent directors”.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
27

Name and
Age at
1 January 2021
Position(s)
Held with
Artisan
Partners
Funds
Date First
Elected or
Appointed
to Office
Principal Occupation(s)
during Past 5 Years
Other Public
Company or
Registered
Investment
Company
Directorships Held
Experience, Qualifications,
Attributes, Skills for Board
Membership
Directors who are “interested persons” of Artisan Partners Funds:
Eric R. Colson, 51
Director
12 Nov 2013
Director, Chief Executive
Officer and Chair of
Artisan Partners Asset
Management Inc.; until
January 2021 President of
Artisan Partners Asset
Management Inc.; Managing
Director and Chief Executive
Officer of Artisan Partners;
until January 2021 President
of Artisan Partners; until
February 2020, President and
Chief Executive Officer of
Artisan Partners Funds
None
Significant executive
experience; continuing
service as Chief Executive
Officer and Managing
Director of Artisan Partners;
continuing service as Chief
Executive Officer and
Director of Artisan Partners
Asset Management Inc.
Gregory K. Ramirez, 50††
Director,
President
and Chief
Executive
Officer
Director
since 1 Jan
2020;
President
and Chief
Executive
Officer since
12 Feb 2020
Managing Director and Vice
President of Artisan Partners;
Executive Vice President of
Artisan Partners Asset
Management Inc.; until
February 2020, Chief
Financial Officer, Vice
President and Treasurer of
Artisan Partners Funds; Chair
and President of
Artisan Partners Distributors
LLC (“Distributors”); prior
thereto, Vice President,
Treasurer and Chief Financial
Officer of Distributors;
Director of Artisan Partners
Global Funds plc; Director
(since October 2016) of
certain private funds
sponsored by
Artisan Partners
None
Significant executive
experience; continuing
service as Managing Director
and Vice President of
Artisan Partners; continuing
service as Executive Vice
President of Artisan Partners
Asset Management Inc. and
continuing service as Chair
and President of Distributors
Mr. Colson is an “interested person” of Artisan Partners Funds, as defined in the 1940 Act, because he is a Director of Artisan Partners Funds and holds various positions with Artisan Partners and its affiliates and beneficially owns interests in Artisan Partners and/or its parent company.
††
Mr. Ramirez is an “interested person” of Artisan Partners Funds, as defined in the 1940 Act, because he is a Director, President and Chief Executive Officer of Artisan Partners Funds and holds various positions with Artisan Partners and its affiliates and beneficially owns interests in Artisan Partners and/or its parent company.
Name and
Age at
1 January 2021
Position(s)
Held with
Artisan
Partners
Funds
Date First
Elected or
Appointed
to Office
Principal
Occupation(s)
during Past 5 Years
Other Public Company
or Registered
Investment Company
Directorships Held
Officers of Artisan Partners Funds:
Shannon K. Jagodinski, 43
Chief
Financial
Officer, Vice
President
and Treasurer
Chief
Financial
Officer and
Treasurer
since 12 Feb
2020; Vice
President
since 10 Feb
2015
Director (since January 2016) of Vehicle
Administration of Artisan Partners; prior
thereto, Senior Manager; until February
2020, Assistant Treasurer of Artisan Partners
Funds
None

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
28

Name and
Age at
1 January 2021
Position(s)
Held with
Artisan
Partners
Funds
Date First
Elected or
Appointed
to Office
Principal
Occupation(s)
during Past 5 Years
Other Public Company
or Registered
Investment Company
Directorships Held
Sarah A. Johnson, 48
General
Counsel, Vice
President
and
Secretary
8 Feb 2011
Managing Director, Vice President, Secretary
and General Counsel of Artisan Partners;
Executive Vice President, Chief Legal Officer
and Secretary of Artisan Partners Asset
Management Inc.; Vice President and
Secretary of Distributors
None
Jill M. Demski, 46
Chief
Compliance
Officer and
Anti-Money
Laundering
Compliance
Officer
12 Feb 2020
Chief Compliance Officer of Artisan Partners
Funds since February 2020; Associate
Counsel (since January 2019) and Director of
Compliance of Artisan Partners; Chief
Compliance Officer of Distributors since
October 2019
None
Laura E. Simpson, 45
Vice
President
and Assistant
Secretary
10 Feb 2015
Deputy General Counsel of Artisan Partners;
Director (since January 2018) of
Artisan Partners Global Funds plc; Director
(since July 2020) of certain private funds
sponsored by Artisan Partners
None
Timothy K. Weston, 46
Vice
President
13 Feb 2019
Associate General Counsel of
Artisan Partners
None
Timothy A. Kahn, 37
Vice
President
12 Feb 2020
Associate General Counsel (since January
2021) of Artisan Partners; prior thereto,
Associate Counsel of Artisan Partners
None
Blake A. Rigel, 50
Assistant
Treasurer
9 Feb 2016
Global Tax Director and Tax Counsel of
Artisan Partners
None
The business address of the officers and directors affiliated with Artisan Partners is 875 E. Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 800, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202. The address of the other directors is: c/o Artisan Partners Funds, 875 E. Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 800, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202.
The board of directors has an audit committee, an education committee and a governance and nominating committee. In addition, the board of directors has appointed a valuation committee. The following table identifies the members of those committees as of the date of this SAI, the number of meetings of each committee held during the fiscal year ended 30 September 2021, and the function of each committee:
Committee
Members of
Committee
Number of
Meetings
Principal Functions of Committee
Audit
Committee
Coleen Downs Dinneen
Gail L. Hanson
Bonnie L. Howard*
William J. Kelly
Peter M. Lebovitz
Peter E. Sundman
[4]
The audit committee selects the independent auditors; meets with the independent
auditors and management to review the scope and the results of the audits of
Artisan Partners Funds’ financial statements; confirms the independence of the
independent auditors; reviews with the independent auditors and management the
effectiveness and adequacy of Artisan Partners Funds’ internal controls; pre-approves
the audit and certain non-audit services provided by the independent auditors;
receives regular reports from Artisan Partners Funds’ chief compliance officer regarding
the operation of Artisan Partners Funds’ compliance program and procedures and
related matters; and reviews legal and regulatory matters.
Education
Committee
Coleen Downs Dinneen*
Gail L. Hanson
Bonnie L. Howard
William J. Kelly
Peter M. Lebovitz
Peter E. Sundman
[4]
The education committee is responsible for creating and overseeing a program of
continuing education for directors.
Governance and
Nominating
Committee
Coleen Downs Dinneen
Gail L. Hanson
Bonnie L. Howard
William J. Kelly
Peter M. Lebovitz*
Peter E. Sundman
[3]
The governance and nominating committee makes recommendations to the board
regarding board committees and committee assignments, the composition of the
board, candidates for election as non-interested directors, executive officers of
Artisan Partners Funds, compensation of directors who are not affiliated persons of
Artisan Partners and proposed changes to Artisan Partners Funds’ governing
documents, and oversees the process for evaluating the functioning of the board.
Pursuant to procedures and policies adopted under its charter, the governance and
nominating committee will consider shareholder recommendations regarding
candidates for election as directors.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
29

Committee
Members of
Committee
Number of
Meetings
Principal Functions of Committee
Valuation
Committee
Shannon K. Jagodinski
Sarah A. Johnson
Gregory K. Ramirez
Laura E. Simpson
Timothy K. Weston
[557]
The valuation committee is responsible for determining, in accordance with
Artisan Partners Funds’ valuation procedures, a fair value for any portfolio security for
which market quotations are not readily available.
*
Chair of the committee.
The number shown represents the number of valuation actions taken by the committee, not the number of times the committee met.
Shareholders wishing to recommend a candidate for election to the board may do so by: (a) mailing the recommendation in writing to the attention of the secretary of Artisan Partners Funds at 875 East Wisconsin Avenue, Suite 800, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202; and (b) including in the recommendation: (i) the class or series and number of all shares of any Artisan Partners Fund owned beneficially or of record by the nominating shareholder at the time the recommendation is submitted and the dates on which such shares were acquired, specifying the number of shares owned beneficially; (ii) a full listing of the proposed candidate’s education, experience (including knowledge of the investment company industry, experience as a director or senior officer of public or private companies, and directorships on other boards of other public companies, identifying any other registered investment companies), current employment, date of birth, business and residence addresses, and the names and addresses of at least three professional references; (iii) information as to whether the candidate is or may be an “interested person” (as such term is defined in the 1940 Act) of Artisan Partners Funds, Artisan Partners or Artisan Partners Distributors LLC (“Distributors”), and, if believed not to be an “interested person,” information regarding the candidate that will be sufficient for Artisan Partners Funds to make such determination; (iv) the written and signed consent of the candidate to be named as a nominee and to serve as a director of Artisan Partners Funds, if elected; (v) a description of all arrangements or understandings between the nominating shareholder, the candidate and/or any other person or persons (including their names) pursuant to which the recommendation is being made, and if none, a statement to that effect; (vi) the class or series and number of all shares of each Artisan Partners Fund owned of record or beneficially by the candidate, as reported by the candidate; and (vii) any other information that would be helpful to the committee in evaluating the candidate. The committee also may require the nominating shareholder to furnish such other information as it may reasonably require or deem necessary to verify any information submitted in the recommendation or to determine the qualifications and eligibility of the candidate proposed by the nominating shareholder to serve as a director of Artisan Partners Funds, and if the nominating shareholder fails to provide such other information in writing within seven days of receipt of a written request from the committee, the recommendation of such candidate as a nominee will be deemed not properly submitted for consideration, and the committee will not be required to consider such candidate. The committee will consider only those shareholder recommendations that follow the procedures outlined above. Recommendations for candidates as directors of Artisan Partners Funds will be evaluated, among other things, in light of whether the number of directors is expected to change and whether the directors expect any vacancies. The committee need not consider any shareholder recommendation received fewer than 90 days before the date of an anticipated nomination. When the committee is not actively recruiting new directors, shareholder recommendations will be kept on file for two years after receipt of the shareholder recommendation. A shareholder recommendation considered by the committee in connection with the committee’s nomination of any candidate(s) for appointment or election as an independent director need not be considered again by the committee in connection with any subsequent nomination(s).
As of the date of this SAI, the compensation paid to the directors of Artisan Partners Funds who are not affiliated persons of Artisan Partners for their services as such is based on an annual fee of $290,000, payable quarterly. In addition, the independent chair of the board of directors receives an additional $85,000 annually, payable quarterly, the chair of the audit committee receives an additional $45,000 annually, payable quarterly and the chair of the education committee and the chair of the governance and nominating committee each receives an additional $30,000 annually, payable quarterly.
Compensation is paid only to directors who are not affiliated persons of Artisan Partners and is allocated among the series of Artisan Partners Funds in accordance with a procedure determined from time to time by the board. Artisan Partners Funds has no retirement or pension plan.
Artisan Partners Funds has a deferred compensation plan (the “Plan”) that permits any director who is not an affiliated person of Artisan Partners to elect to defer receipt of all or a portion of his or her Compensation (as defined under the Plan) as a director for two or more years. The deferred compensation of a participating director is credited to a book entry account of Artisan Partners Funds on the date that such Compensation otherwise would have been paid to the director. The value of the director’s deferral account at any time is equal to the value that the account would have had if contributions to the account had been invested and reinvested in shares of one or more series of Artisan Partners Funds as designated by the participating director. At the time of making a deferral election, the director may elect to receive distributions from his or her deferral account in a lump sum or over a period of five years, which distributions must commence, at the latest, within 90 days of when the director ceases to be a member of the board of directors. Any obligation of an Artisan Partners Fund to make distributions under the Plan is a general obligation of that Fund. No Artisan Partners Fund will be liable for any other Artisan Partners Fund’s obligations to make distributions under the Plan.
The following table sets forth the aggregate compensation paid by Artisan Partners Funds and the total compensation paid by the Artisan Partners Funds complex to each director for the fiscal year ended 30 September 2021.

Statement of Additional Information—Artisan Partners Funds
|
30

Directors
Aggregate
Compensation
from Artisan Partners Funds
Pension or
Retirement Benefits
Accrued as Part
of Director Expenses
Estimated Annual
Benefits upon
Retirement
Aggregate
Compensation
from the Artisan
Partners Funds
Complex1
Coleen Downs Dinneen2
$[ ]
$0
$0
$[ ]
Gail L. Hanson3
$[ ]
$0
$0
$[ ]
Bonnie L. Howard4
$[ ]
$0