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Section 31 Transaction Fees

"SEC Fee" — Section 31 Transaction Fees

When you sell a stock, you may have noticed that a small transaction fee, often just a few pennies, appears on your confirmation slip. Although some broker-dealers have described this charge as an "SEC Fee," the SEC does not actually impose this fee on individual investors.

The SEC does not impose or set any of the fees that investors must pay to their brokers. Instead, under Section 31 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, self-regulatory organizations (SROs) -- such as the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (FINRA) and all of the national securities exchanges -- must pay transaction fees to the SEC based on the volume of securities that are sold on their markets. These fees are designed to recover the costs incurred by the government, including the SEC, for supervising and regulating the securities markets and securities professionals.

The SROs have adopted rules that require their broker-dealer members to pay a share of these fees. Broker-dealers, in turn, impose fees on their customers that provide the funds to pay the fees owed to their SROs. Thus, a broker-dealer that has questions about how its fees are calculated should contact its SRO, and a customer who has questions about how his or her fees are calculated should contact the broker-dealer.

Section 31 requires the SEC to make annual and, in some cases, mid-year adjustments to the fee rate. These adjustments are necessary to make the SEC's total collection of transaction fees in a given year as close as possible to the amount of the regular appropriation to the Commission by Congress for that fiscal year. If transaction volume in a given year increases, the SEC will lower the fee rate because each transaction has to contribute less to the target collection amount. But if transaction volume falls, each transaction will have to be charged a higher fee in order for the SEC to collect the target amount.  To find the current rate for Section 31 transaction fees, please visit the Division of Market Regulation's Frequently Requested Documents webpage, and click on the most recent Fee Rate Advisory under "Section 31 Fees." You'll also find Fee Rate Advisories in the Press Releases section of our website. For official Commission Orders concerning fee rate adjustments, please visit the Other Commission Orders, Notices, and Information section of our website.

The charges on most securities transactions are known as Section 31 "fees." But the charges imposed by Section 31 on transactions in security futures are termed "assessments." As of fiscal year 2013, the assessment charged is $0.0042 for each round turn transaction (i.e., one purchase and one sale of a contract of sale for future delivery).



The Office of Investor Education and Advocacy has provided this information as a service to investors.  It is neither a legal interpretation nor a statement of SEC policy.  If you have questions concerning the meaning or application of a particular law or rule, please consult with an attorney who specializes in securities law.