SEC Charges 14 Sales Agents In $415 Million Long Island-Based Ponzi Scheme

Press Release

SEC Charges 14 Sales Agents In $415 Million Long Island-Based Ponzi Scheme

 
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
2012-112
Washington, D.C., June 12, 2012

The Securities and Exchange Commission today charged 14 sales agents who misled investors and illegally sold securities for a Long Island-based investment firm at the center of a $415 million Ponzi scheme.

The SEC alleges that the sales agents — which include four sets of siblings — falsely promised investor returns as high as 12 to 14 percent in several weeks when they sold investments offered by Agape World Inc. They also misled investors to believe that only 1 percent of their principal was at risk. The Agape securities they peddled were actually non-existent, and investors were merely lured into a Ponzi scheme where earlier investors were paid with new investor funds. The sales agents turned a blind eye to red flags of fraud and sold the investments without hesitation, receiving more than $52 million in commissions and payments out of investor funds. None of these sales agents were registered with the SEC to sell securities, nor were they associated with a registered broker or dealer. Agape also was not registered with the SEC.

“This Ponzi scheme spread like wildfire through Long Island’s middle-class communities because this small group of individuals blindly promoted the offerings as particularly safe and profitable,” said Andrew M. Calamari, Acting Regional Director for the SEC’s New York Regional Office. “These sales agents raked in commissions without regard for investors or any apparent concern for Agape’s financial distress and inability to meet investor redemptions.”

According to the SEC’s complaint filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of New York, more than 5,000 investors nationwide were impacted by the scheme that lasted from 2005 to January 2009, when Agape’s president and organizer of the scheme Nicholas J. Cosmo was arrested. He was later sentenced to 300 months in prison and ordered to pay more than $179 million in restitution.

The SEC alleges that the sales agents misrepresented to investors that their money would be used to make high-interest bridge loans to commercial borrowers or businesses that accepted credit cards. Little, if any, investor money actually went toward this purpose. Investor funds were instead used for Ponzi scheme payments and the agents’ sales commissions, and Cosmo lost $80 million while trading futures in personal accounts. Meanwhile, the sales agents assuredly offered and sold Agape securities to investors despite numerous red flags of fraud including Cosmo’s prior conviction for fraud, the too-good-to-be-true returns, and the incredible safety of principal promised to investors. The sales agents also ignored Agape’s relatively small and unknown status as a private issuer of securities, Agape’s series of extensions and defaults, and other dire warnings about Agape’s financial condition. None of the Agape securities offerings were registered with the SEC.

The SEC’s complaint charges the following sales agents:

  • Brothers Bryan Arias and Hugo A. Arias of Maspeth, N.Y., who offered and sold Agape securities to at least 195 and 1,419 investors respectively. They received more than $9.5 million combined in commissions and payments.
     
  • Brothers Anthony C. Ciccone of Locust Valley, N.Y. and Salvatore Ciccone of Maspeth, N.Y., who offered and sold Agape securities to at least 535 and 348 investors respectively. They received more than $17 million combined in commissions and payments.
     
  • Brothers Jason A. Keryc of Wantagh, N.Y. and Michael D. Keryc of Baldwin, N.Y. Jason Keryc offered and sold Agape securities to at least 1,617 investors and received at least $16 million in commissions and payments. He also paid sub-brokers, including his brother, at least $7.4 million to sell Agape securities for him. Michael Keryc offered and sold Agape securities to at least 177 investors and received more than $1 million in commissions and payments.
     
  • Siblings Martin C. Hartmann III of Massapequa, N.Y. and Laura Ann Tordy of Wantagh, N.Y. Hartmann enlisted his sister in his sales effort while he worked as a sub-broker for Jason Keryc. Hartmann and Tordy offered and sold Agape securities to at least 441 investors and received more than $3.5 million in commissions and payments.
     
  • Christopher E. Curran of Amityville, N.Y., who worked as a sub-broker for Keryc. Curran offered and sold Agape securities to at least 132 investors and received at least $531,890 in commissions and payments.
     
  • Ryan K. Dunaske of Ronkonkoma, N.Y., who worked as a sub-broker for Keryc. Dunaske offered and sold Agape securities to at least 70 investors and received more than $700,000 in commissions and payments.
     
  • Michael P. Dunne of Massapequa, N.Y., who worked as a sub-broker for Keryc. Dunne offered and sold Agape securities to at least 99 investors and received more than $1.5 million in commissions and payments.
     
  • Diane Kaylor of Bethpage, N.Y., who offered and sold Agape securities to at least 249 investors and received at least $3.7 million in commissions and payments.
     
  • Anthony Massaro of Boynton Beach, Fla., who offered and sold Agape securities to at least 826 investors and received more than $5.9 million in commissions and payments.
     
  • Ronald R. Roaldsen, Jr. of Wantagh, N.Y., who worked as a sub-broker for Keryc. Roaldsen offered and sold Agape securities to at least 159 investors and received more than $600,000 in commissions and payments.

The SEC’s complaint charges Bryan and Hugo Arias, Anthony and Salvatore Ciccone, Jason and Michael Keryc, Dunne, Hartmann, Kaylor, Massaro, and Tordy with violations of Section 17(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, and Section 10(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 and Rule 10b-5 thereunder. The complaint charges all 14 defendants with violations of Section 15(a) of the Exchange Act, and Sections 5(a) and 5(c) of the Securities Act.

The SEC thanks the U.S. Attorney’s Office of the Eastern District of New York and the Federal Bureau of Investigation for its assistance in this matter. Anthony Ciccone, Kaylor, Jason Keryc, and Massaro have previously been arrested on a criminal complaint charging each of them with conspiracy to commit mail fraud based on their conduct as Agape sales agents. The SEC also acknowledges the assistance of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

The SEC’s investigation was conducted by Celeste Chase, Philip Moustakis, and Yvette Panetta in the New York Regional Office. The SEC’s related examination that led to the enforcement case was conducted by Richard A. Heaphy, Yvette Q. Panetta, Dawn M. Sacco, Joseph P. DiMaria, James E. Anastasia, Marianne Cala, and Steven Gilchrist. The SEC’s litigation will be led by Paul G. Gizzi and Mr. Moustakis.

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