Subject: Comments for File Number S7-12-11

May 27, 2011

My family has been affected by the economic collapse in the following ways: 2 of my husband's sisters have been out of work for over a year. They were laid-off because of the "SLOW DOWN", and have been told in interviews that they are TOO OLD, TOO EXPERIENCED for the jobs the have applied. They are 50 & 52, not old enough to retire, based on the sentiment of the Congress.

My 82 yr old mother was just contacted by her Pension Fund and will be receiving 30% less/ month due to a lack of funding in her Pension Plan.

My husbands brother, a teacher for over 20 years, has been told his Pension plan is underfunded, yet he must retire within the next 2 years.

My 401K that I have been saving for 30 years, decreased 30%, and has the same value it had in 1998.

In the late 80's, I worked for a company that overpaid our INCENTIVE COMPENSATION for one quota period. They proceeded to deduct the overpayment from my next quota period. THERE IS NO EXCUSE! THE FRAUDULENT PRACTICES OF THE BANKING INDUSTRY REQUIRES THAT WE TAKE THE FRAUDULENT COMPENSATION BACK! THIS MONEY NEEDS TO BE PUT BACK INTO THE ECONOMY FOR GOOD PAYING JOBS!

If it turns out that the profits in a given year were built on shoddy practices that become clear in the out-years, those bonus payments should be forfeited.

Thank you for considering my comment,

Wall Street greed and outrageous pay practices were a major cause of the collapse. One way to change the incentives so they donít collapse our economy again would be for regulators to use a *safety index* for incentive compensation, instead of a profit index.

Currently, most bankers receive stock options. So if they can generate more profits, the stock price goes up, and their options become more valuable.

Instead, what if they used the bankís bond price, which measures the overall ability of the bank to repay its own debt? Another measure of bank stability is the spread on credit default swaps (the insurance-like policies that are essentially bets, where one gambler bets with another that a particular firm will fail). The closer a bank comes to failing (such as in failing to pay of its bond debt), the bigger the spread on credit default swaps.

Thank you for considering my comment,

DAWN Stanko

Dublin, OH