EX-13 6 ex13.htm EXHIBIT 13 ex13.htm

Exhibit 13

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 2

   
For Years Ended
December 31,
 
Consolidated statements of income
 
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
[Millions of dollars, except share and per-share amounts]
 
                 
Revenue
  $ 10,427     $ 12,501     $ 13,835  
Cost of revenue
    5,428       6,256       6,466  
Gross profit
    4,999       6,245       7,369  
Research and development
    1,476       1,940       2,140  
Selling, general and administrative
    1,320       1,614       1,680  
Restructuring expense
    212       254       52  
Operating profit
    1,991       2,437       3,497  
Other income (expense) net
    26       44       195  
Income from continuing operations before income taxes
    2,017       2,481       3,692  
Provision for income taxes
    547       561       1,051  
Income from continuing operations
    1,470       1,920       2,641  
Income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes
                16  
Net income
  $ 1,470     $ 1,920     $ 2,657  
                         
Basic earnings per common share:
                       
Income from continuing operations
  $ 1.16     $ 1.46     $ 1.86  
Net income
  $ 1.16     $ 1.46     $ 1.87  
Diluted earnings per common share:
                       
Income from continuing operations
  $ 1.15     $ 1.44     $ 1.82  
Net income
  $ 1.15     $ 1.44     $ 1.83  
Average shares outstanding (millions):
                       
Basic
    1,260       1,308       1,417  
Diluted
    1,269       1,321       1,444  
Cash dividends declared per share of common stock
  $ 0.45     $ 0.41     $ 0.30  
 
See accompanying notes.

 
 

 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 3
 
   
For Years Ended
December 31,
Consolidated statements of comprehensive income
   
2009
     
2008
     
2007
 
[Millions of dollars]
 
                       
Income from continuing operations
 
$
1,470
   
$
1,920
   
$
2,641
 
Other comprehensive income (loss):
                       
Available-for-sale investments:
                       
Unrealized gains (losses), net of tax benefit (expense) of ($9), $20 and ($3)
   
17
     
(38
)
   
8
 
Reclassification of recognized transactions, net of tax benefit (expense) of ($3), $0 and $0
   
6
     
     
(1
)
Net actuarial loss of defined benefit plans:
                       
Annual adjustment, net of tax benefit (expense) of ($38), $282 and ($19)
   
91
     
(476
)
   
5
 
Reclassification of recognized transactions, net of tax benefit (expense) of ($27), ($17) and ($12)
   
62
     
32
     
28
 
Prior service cost of defined benefit plans:
                       
Annual adjustment, net of tax benefit (expense) of $1, $1 and $2
   
(1
)
   
14
     
(2
)
Reclassification of recognized transactions, net of tax benefit (expense) of $3, ($1) and $1
   
(6
)
   
2
     
1
 
Total
   
169
     
(466
)
   
39
 
Total comprehensive income from continuing operations
   
1,639
     
1,454
     
2,680
 
Income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes
   
     
     
16
 
Total comprehensive income
 
$
1,639
   
$
1,454
   
$
2,696
 
 
See accompanying notes.

 
 

 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 4
 
   
 
December 31,
 
Consolidated balance sheets
 
2009
   
2008
 
[Millions of dollars, except share amounts]
 
           
Assets
           
Current assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 1,182     $ 1,046  
Short-term investments
    1,743       1,494  
Accounts receivable, net of allowances
    1,277       913  
Inventories
    1,202       1,375  
Deferred income taxes
    546       695  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    164       267  
Total current assets
    6,114       5,790  
Property, plant and equipment at cost
    6,705       7,321  
Less accumulated depreciation
    (3,547 )     (4,017 )
Property, plant and equipment, net
    3,158       3,304  
Long-term investments
    637       653  
Goodwill
    926       840  
Acquisition-related intangibles
    124       91  
Deferred income taxes
    926       990  
Capitalized software licenses, net
    119       182  
Overfunded retirement plans
    64       17  
Other assets
    51       56  
Total assets
  $ 12,119     $ 11,923  
                 
Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity
               
Current liabilities:
               
Accounts payable
  $ 503     $ 324  
Accrued expenses and other liabilities
    841       1,034  
Income taxes payable
    128       40  
Accrued profit sharing and retirement
    115       134  
Total current liabilities
    1,587       1,532  
Underfunded retirement plans
    425       640  
Deferred income taxes
    67       59  
Deferred credits and other liabilities
    318       366  
Total liabilities
    2,397       2,597  
Stockholders’ equity:
               
Preferred stock, $25 par value. Authorized – 10,000,000 shares.
               
Participating cumulative preferred. None issued.
           
Common stock, $1 par value. Authorized – 2,400,000,000 shares.
               
Shares issued: 2009 – 1,739,811,721; 2008 – 1,739,718,073
    1,740       1,740  
Paid-in capital
    1,086       1,022  
Retained earnings
    22,066       21,168  
Less treasury common stock at cost.
               
Shares: 2009 – 499,693,704; 2008 – 461,822,215
    (14,549 )     (13,814 )
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss), net of taxes
    (621 )     (790 )
Total stockholders’ equity
    9,722       9,326  
Total liabilities and stockholders’ equity
  $ 12,119     $ 11,923  
 
See accompanying notes.

 
 

 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 5
 
   
For Years Ended
December 31,
 
Consolidated statements of cash flows
 
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
[Millions of dollars]
 
                 
Cash flows from operating activities:
                 
Net income
  $ 1,470     $ 1,920     $ 2,657  
Adjustments to net income:
                       
Income from discontinued operations
                (16 )
Depreciation
    877       1,022       1,022  
Stock-based compensation
    186       213       280  
Amortization of acquisition-related intangibles
    48       37       48  
Gains on sales of assets
                (39 )
Deferred income taxes
    146       (182 )     34  
Increase (decrease) from changes in:
                       
Accounts receivable
    (364 )     865       40  
Inventories
    177       43       11  
Prepaid expenses and other current assets
    35       (125 )     13  
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
    (17 )     (382 )     77  
Income taxes payable
    73       38       304  
Accrued profit sharing and retirement
    (16 )     (84 )     33  
Other
    28       (35 )     (57 )
Net cash provided by operating activities
    2,643       3,330       4,407  
                         
Cash flows from investing activities:
                       
Additions to property, plant and equipment
    (753 )     (763 )     (686 )
Proceeds from sales of assets
                61  
Purchases of short-term investments
    (2,273 )     (1,746 )     (5,035 )
Sales and maturities of short-term investments
    2,030       1,300       5,981  
Purchases of long-term investments
    (9 )     (9 )     (30 )
Redemptions and sales of long-term investments
    64       55       11  
Acquisitions, net of cash acquired
    (155 )     (19 )     (87 )
Net cash (used in) provided by investing activities
    (1,096 )     (1,182 )     215  
                         
Cash flows from financing activities:
                       
Payments on long-term debt
                (43 )
Dividends paid
    (567 )     (537 )     (425 )
Sales and other common stock transactions
    109       210       761  
Excess tax benefit from stock option exercises
    1       19       116  
Stock repurchases
    (954 )     (2,122 )     (4,886 )
Net cash used in financing activities
    (1,411 )     (2,430 )     (4,477 )
                         
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
    136       (282 )     145  
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year
    1,046       1,328       1,183  
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year
  $ 1,182     $ 1,046     $ 1,328  
 
See accompanying notes.

 
 

 

TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 6
 
Consolidated statements of stockholders’ equity
 
Common
Stock
   
Paid-in
Capital
   
Retained Earnings
   
Treasury Common Stock
   
Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
[Millions of dollars, except per-share amounts]
 
                             
                               
Balance, December 31, 2006
  $ 1,739     $ 885     $ 17,529     $ (8,430 )   $ (363 )
                                         
2007
                                       
Net income
                2,657              
Dividends declared on common stock ($.30 per share)
                (425 )            
Common stock issued on exercise of stock options
    1       (437 )           1,191        
Stock repurchases
                      (4,921 )      
Stock-based compensation transactions
          280                    
Tax impact from exercise of options
          204                    
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
                            39  
Adjustment for uncertain tax positions
                29              
Other
          (1 )     (2 )            
Balance, December 31, 2007
    1,740       931       19,788       (12,160 )     (324 )
                                         
2008
                                       
Net income
                1,920              
Dividends declared on common stock ($.41 per share)
                (537 )            
Common stock issued on exercise of stock options
          (153 )           360        
Stock repurchases
                      (2,014 )      
Stock-based compensation transactions
          213                    
Tax impact from exercise of options
          31                    
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
                            (466 )
Other
                (3 )            
Balance, December 31, 2008
    1,740       1,022       21,168       (13,814 )     (790 )
                                         
2009
                                       
Net income
                1,470              
Dividends declared on common stock ($.45 per share)
                (567 )            
Common stock issued on exercise of stock options
          (120 )           226        
Stock repurchases
                      (961 )      
Stock-based compensation transactions
          186                    
Tax impact from exercise of options
          (2 )                  
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax
                            169  
Other
                (5 )            
Balance, December 31, 2009
  $ 1,740     $ 1,086     $ 22,066     $ (14,549 )   $ (621 )
 
See accompanying notes.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 7
 
Notes to financial statements

1. Description of business and significant accounting policies and practices

Business: At Texas Instruments (TI), we design and make semiconductors that we sell to electronics designers and manufacturers all over the world. We have three reportable segments, which are established along major product categories as follows:

Analog – consists of high-performance analog (includes data converters, amplifiers and interface products), high-volume analog & logic and power management,

Embedded Processing – consists of digital signal processors (DSPs) and microcontrollers used in catalog, communications infrastructure and automotive applications, and

Wireless – consists of DSPs and analog used in basebands for handsets, OMAP™ applications processors and connectivity products for wireless applications.

In addition, we report the results of our remaining business activities in Other. Other includes DLP® products, calculators, reduced-instruction set computing (RISC) microprocessors, application-specific integrated circuits (ASIC) products and royalties received for our patented technology that we license to other electronics companies. See Note 14 for additional information on our business segments.

Acquisitions – In the second quarter of 2009, we expanded our microcontroller portfolio by acquiring Luminary Micro for net cash of $51 million and other consideration of $7 million. We recognized $15 million of goodwill, which is not expected to be deductible for tax purposes, $41 million of intangible assets, and $2 million of other net assets and liabilities. The former Luminary Micro operations were integrated into our Embedded Processing segment.
In the first quarter of 2009, we acquired CICLON Semiconductor Device Corporation (CICLON), a designer of high-frequency, high-efficiency power management semiconductors, for net cash of $104 million and other consideration of $7 million. We recognized $70 million of goodwill, which is not expected to be deductible for tax purposes, $40 million of intangible assets, and $1 million of other net assets and liabilities. The former CICLON operations were integrated into our Analog segment.
In the second quarter of 2008, to obtain design expertise and technology, we made two acquisitions, both of which were integrated into our Analog segment, for net cash of $19 million. We recognized $2 million of goodwill and $13 million of intangible assets.
During 2007, to obtain design expertise and technology, we made three acquisitions, including an asset acquisition, for net cash of $87 million. The asset acquisition was integrated into our Wireless segment and the remaining two acquisitions were integrated into our Analog segment. We recognized $48 million of goodwill and $45 million of intangible assets.
With the exception of the asset acquisition, all acquisitions were accounted for as purchase business combinations. The results of operations for these acquisitions have been included in our financial statements from their respective acquisition dates. Pro forma information has not been presented for these acquisitions because it would not be materially different from amounts reported.

Dispositions – In July 2007, we completed the sale of our broadband digital subscriber line (DSL) customer-premises equipment semiconductor product line, which was included in Other, to Infineon Technologies AG (Infineon) for $61 million and recognized a pre-tax gain of $39 million in cost of revenue.

Discontinued operations – Income from discontinued operations in 2007 of $16 million (or $0.01 per share) includes an income tax benefit related to a reduction of a state tax liability associated with the sale of our former Sensors & Controls business, which was renamed Sensata Technologies (Sensata).

Basis of presentation: The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States (U.S. GAAP). The basis of these financial statements is comparable for all periods presented herein, except for the adoption of:

A new accounting standard on business combinations as of January 1, 2009, the impact of which was not significant, and
A new accounting standard on fair-value measurements for financial assets and liabilities as of January 1, 2008, and for non-financial assets and liabilities as of January 1, 2009, which primarily resulted in additional disclosures regarding fair-value measurements.
 
The consolidated financial statements include the accounts of all subsidiaries. All intercompany balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. All dollar amounts in the financial statements and tables in the notes, except per-share amounts, are stated in millions of U.S. dollars unless otherwise indicated. All amounts in the notes reference continuing operations unless otherwise indicated.
The preparation of financial statements requires the use of estimates from which final results may vary.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 8
 
Revenue recognition: We recognize revenue from direct sales of our products to our customers, including shipping fees, when title passes to the customer, which usually occurs upon shipment or delivery, depending upon the terms of the sales order; when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists; and when collectibility is reasonably assured. Estimates of product returns for quality reasons and of price allowances (based on historical experience, product shipment analysis and customer contractual arrangements) are recorded when revenue is recognized. Allowances include volume-based incentives and special pricing arrangements. In addition, we record allowances for accounts receivable that we estimate may not be collected.
We recognize revenue from direct sales of our products to our distributors, net of allowances, consistent with the principles discussed above. Title transfers to the distributors at delivery or when the products are pulled from consignment inventory and payment is due on our standard commercial terms; payment terms are not contingent upon resale of the products. We also grant discounts to some distributors for prompt payments. We calculate credit allowances based on historical data, current economic conditions and contractual terms. For instance, we sell to distributors at standard published prices, but we may grant them price adjustment credits in response to individual competitive opportunities they may have. To estimate allowances for this type of credit, we use statistical percentages of revenue, determined quarterly, based upon recent historical adjustment trends.
We also provide distributors an allowance to scrap certain slow-moving or obsolete products in their inventory, estimated as a negotiated fixed percentage of each distributor’s purchases from us. In addition, if we publish a new price for a product that is lower than that paid by distributors for the same product still remaining in each distributor’s on-hand inventory, we may credit them for the difference between those prices. The allowance for this type of credit is based on the identified product price difference applied to our estimate of each distributor’s on-hand inventory of that product. We believe we can reasonably and reliably estimate allowances for credits to distributors in a timely manner.
We determine the amount and timing of royalty revenue based on our contractual agreements with intellectual property licensees. We recognize royalty revenue when earned under the terms of the agreements and when we consider realization of payment to be probable. Where royalties are based on a percentage of licensee sales of royalty-bearing products, we recognize royalty revenue by applying this percentage to our estimate of applicable licensee sales. We base this estimate on historical experience and an analysis of each licensee’s sales results. Where royalties are based on fixed payment amounts, we recognize royalty revenue ratably over the term of the royalty agreement. Where warranted, revenue from licensees may be recognized on a cash basis.
We include shipping and handling costs in cost of revenue.

Stock-based compensation: We have several stock-based employee compensation plans, which are more fully described in Note 3. We account for all awards granted under those plans at fair value and estimate fair values for non-qualified stock options using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the assumptions listed in Note 3.

Advertising costs: We expense advertising and other promotional costs as incurred. This expense was $42 million in 2009, $123 million in 2008 and $194 million in 2007.

Income taxes: We account for income taxes using an asset and liability approach. We record the amount of taxes payable or refundable for the current year and the deferred tax assets and liabilities for future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in the financial statements or tax returns. We record a valuation allowance when it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

Other assessed taxes: Some transactions require us to collect taxes such as sales, value-added and excise taxes from our customers. These transactions are presented in our statements of income on a net (excluded from revenue) basis.

Earnings per share (EPS): In 2008, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued an update to Accounting Standards Codification (ASC) 260, Earnings per Share, that required us to calculate EPS using the two-class method beginning January 1, 2009. As a result, unvested awards of share-based payments with rights to receive dividends or dividend equivalents, such as our restricted stock units (RSUs), are considered to be participating securities. Under the two-class method, a portion of income from continuing operations or net income is allocated to these participating securities and, therefore, is excluded from the calculation of EPS allocated to common stock, as shown in the table below. We have adopted the two-class method retroactively and, as a result, all prior period earnings per share data presented herein have been adjusted to conform to these provisions. The adoption of this standard resulted in a decrease of $.01 per share to the previously reported basic and diluted EPS for 2008 and a decrease of $.01 to the previously reported diluted EPS for 2007.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 9
 
Computation and reconciliation of earnings per common share from continuing operations are as follows (shares in millions):

   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
   
Income from Continuing Operations
   
Shares
   
EPS
   
Income from
Continuing Operations
   
Shares
   
EPS
   
Income from Continuing Operations
   
Shares
   
EPS
 
Basic EPS:
                                                     
Income
  $ 1,470                 $ 1,920                 $ 2,641              
Less income allocated to RSUs
    (14 )                 (12 )                 (10 )            
Income allocated to common stock for basic EPS calculation
  $ 1,456       1,260     $ 1.16     $ 1,908       1,308     $ 1.46     $ 2,631       1,417     $ 1.86  
                                                                         
Adjustment for dilutive shares:
                                                                       
Stock-based compensation plans
            9                       13                       27          
                                                                         
Diluted EPS:
                                                                       
Income
  $ 1,470                     $ 1,920                     $ 2,641                  
Less income allocated to RSUs
    (14 )                     (12 )                     (10 )                
Income allocated to common stock for diluted EPS calculation
  $ 1,456       1,269     $ 1.15     $ 1,908       1,321     $ 1.44     $ 2,631       1,444     $ 1.82  

Options to purchase 135 million, 123 million and 46 million shares of common stock were outstanding during 2009, 2008, and 2007 that were not included in the computation of diluted earnings per share because their exercise price was greater than the average market price of the common shares and, therefore, the effect would be anti-dilutive.

Investments: We present investments on our balance sheets as cash equivalents, short-term investments or long-term investments. More specific details are as follows:

Cash equivalents and short-term investments: We consider investments in debt securities with original maturities of three months or less to be cash equivalents. We consider investments in liquid debt securities with maturities beyond three months from the date of our investment as being available for use in current operations, and include these investments in short-term investments. The primary objectives of our cash equivalent and short-term investment activities are to preserve capital and maintain liquidity while generating appropriate returns.

Long-term investments: Long-term investments consist of auction-rate securities (debt instruments with variable interest rates), mutual funds, venture capital funds and non-marketable equity securities.

Classification of investments: Depending on our reasons for holding the investment and our ownership percentage, we classify investments in securities as available-for-sale, trading, equity method or cost method investments, which are more fully described in Note 7. We determine cost or amortized cost, as appropriate, on a specific identification basis.

Inventories: Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or estimated net realizable value. Cost is generally computed on a currently adjusted standard cost basis, which approximates costs on a first-in first-out basis. Standard costs are based on the normal utilization of installed factory capacity. Costs associated with underutilization of capacity are expensed as incurred. Inventory held at consignment locations is included in our finished goods inventory, as we retain full title and rights to the product.
We review inventory quarterly for salability and obsolescence. A specific allowance is provided for inventory considered unlikely to be sold. Remaining inventory includes a salability and obsolescence allowance based on an analysis of historical disposal activity. We write off inventory in the period in which disposal occurs.

Property, plant and equipment and other capitalized costs: Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost and depreciated over their estimated useful lives using the straight-line method. Leasehold improvements are amortized using the straight-line method over the shorter of the remaining lease term or the estimated useful lives of the improvements. We amortize acquisition-related intangibles on a straight-line basis over the estimated economic life of the assets. Capitalized software licenses generally are amortized on a straight-line basis over the term of the license. Fully depreciated or amortized assets are written off against accumulated depreciation or amortization.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 10
 
Impairments of long-lived assets: We regularly review whether facts or circumstances exist that indicate the carrying values of property, plant and equipment or other long-lived assets, including intangible assets, are impaired. We assess the recoverability of assets by comparing the projected undiscounted net cash flows associated with those assets to their respective carrying amounts. Any impairment charge is based on the excess of the carrying amount over the fair value of those assets. Fair value is determined by available market valuations, if applicable, or by discounted cash flows (DCF).

Goodwill: Goodwill is not amortized but is reviewed for impairment annually, or more frequently if certain impairment indicators arise. We complete our annual goodwill impairment tests as of October 1 for our reporting units. The test compares the fair value for each reporting unit to its associated carrying value including goodwill.

Foreign currency: The functional currency for our non-U.S. subsidiaries is the U.S. dollar. Accounts recorded in currencies other than the U.S. dollar are remeasured into the functional currency. Current assets (except inventories), deferred income taxes, other assets, current liabilities and long-term liabilities are remeasured at exchange rates in effect at the end of each reporting period. Inventories, and property, plant and equipment and depreciation thereon, are remeasured at historic exchange rates. Revenue and expense accounts other than depreciation for each month are remeasured at the appropriate daily rate of exchange. Currency exchange gains and losses from remeasurement are credited or charged to other income (expense) net (OI&E).

Derivatives and hedging: We use derivative financial instruments to manage exposure to foreign exchange risk. These instruments are primarily forward foreign currency exchange contracts that are used as economic hedges to reduce the earnings impact exchange rate fluctuations may have on our non-U.S. dollar net balance sheet exposures or for specified non-U.S. dollar forecasted transactions. Gains and losses from changes in the fair value of these forward foreign currency exchange contracts are credited or charged to OI&E. We do not use derivatives for speculative or trading purposes. We do not apply hedge accounting to our foreign currency derivative instruments.

Changes in accounting standards: In June 2009, the FASB Accounting Standards Codification™ (Codification) became the single source of authoritative U.S. GAAP. The Codification did not create any new GAAP standards, but incorporated existing accounting and reporting standards into a new topical structure with a new referencing system to identify authoritative accounting standards, replacing the prior references to Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS), Emerging Issues Task Force (EITF), FASB Staff Position (FSP), etc. Authoritative standards included in the Codification are designated by their ASC topical reference, and new standards issued after July 1, 2009, are designated as Accounting Standards Updates (ASUs), with a year and assigned sequence number. References to prior standards have been updated to reflect the new system.
In October 2009, the FASB concurrently issued the following ASUs:

ASU No. 2009 – 14 - Software (Topic 985): Certain Revenue Arrangements That Include Software Elements. This standard removes tangible products from the scope of software revenue recognition guidance and also provides guidance on determining whether software deliverables in an arrangement that includes a tangible product, such as embedded software, are within the scope of the software revenue guidance.
ASU No. 2009 – 13 - Revenue Recognition (Topic 605): Multiple-Deliverable Revenue Arrangements. This standard modifies the revenue recognition guidance for arrangements that involve the delivery of multiple elements, such as product, software, services and support, to a customer at different times as part of a single revenue generating transaction. This standard provides principles and application guidance to determine whether multiple deliverables exist, how the individual deliverables should be separated and how to allocate the revenue in the arrangement among those separate deliverables. The standard also expands the disclosure requirements for multiple deliverable revenue arrangements.

We expect to apply these standards on a prospective basis for revenue arrangements entered into or materially modified beginning January 1, 2011. We have evaluated the potential impact of these standards and expect they will have no significant impact on our financial position and results of operations.

2. Restructuring activities

Costs incurred with restructuring activities generally consist of voluntary and involuntary severance-related expenses, asset impairments and other costs to exit activities. We recognize voluntary termination benefits when the employee accepts the offered benefit arrangement. We recognize involuntary severance-related expenses depending on whether the termination benefits are provided under an ongoing benefit arrangement or under a one-time benefit arrangement. We recognize involuntary severance-related expenses associated with an ongoing benefit arrangement once they are probable and the amounts are estimable. We recognize involuntary severance-related expenses associated with a one-time benefit arrangement once the benefits have been communicated to employees.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 11
 
Restructuring activities have also resulted in asset impairments, which are included in restructuring expense and are recorded as an adjustment to the basis of the asset, not as a liability relating to a restructuring charge. When we commit to a plan to abandon a long-lived asset before the end of its previously estimated useful life, we accelerate the recognition of depreciation to reflect the use of the asset over its shortened useful life. When an asset is held to be sold, we write down the carrying value to its net realizable value and cease depreciation.

2008 and 2009 actions
In October 2008, we announced actions to reduce expenses in our Wireless segment, especially our baseband operation. In January 2009, we announced actions that included broad-based employment reductions to align our spending with weakened demand. Combined, these actions eliminated about 3,900 jobs; they were completed in 2009.

2007 actions
In January 2007, we announced plans to change how we develop advanced digital manufacturing process technology. Instead of separately creating our own core process technology, we now work collaboratively with our foundry partners to specify and drive the next generations of digital process technology. Additionally, we stopped production at an older digital factory. These actions eliminated about 300 jobs and were completed in 2007.

The table below reflects the changes in accrued restructuring balances associated with these actions:

   
2008 and 2009 Actions
   
2007 Action
       
   
Severance and Benefits
   
Impairments and Other Charges
   
Impairments and Other Charges
   
Total
 
Accrual at December 31, 2007
  $     $     $ 17     $ 17  
Restructuring expense
    218       12       24       254  
Non-cash charges
    (30 )*     (7 )     (28 )     (65 )
Payments
    (2 )           (8 )     (10 )
Remaining accrual at December 31, 2008
    186       5       5       196  
                                 
Restructuring expense
    201       11             212  
Non-cash (charges) credit
    (26 )*     1       (4 )     (29 )
Payments
    (277 )     (7 )           (284 )
Remaining accrual at December 31, 2009
  $ 84     $ 10     $ 1     $ 95  

* Reflects charges and credits for postretirement benefit plan settlement, curtailment and special termination benefits.

The accrual balances above are a component of Accrued expenses and other liabilities or Deferred credits and other liabilities on our balance sheets, depending on the expected timing of payment.

Restructuring expense recognized by segment from the actions above are as follows:

   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
Analog
  $ 87     $ 60     $ 18  
Embedded Processing
    43       24       4  
Wireless
    59       130       20  
Other
    23       40       10  
Total restructuring expense
  $ 212     $ 254     $ 52  

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 12
 
3. Stock-based compensation

   
2009
   
2008
   
2007
 
Stock-based compensation expense recognized:
                 
Cost of revenue
  $ 35     $ 41     $ 53  
Research and development
    54       62       83  
Selling, general and administrative
    97       110       144  
Total
  $ 186     $ 213     $ 280  

These amounts include expense related to non-qualified stock options, RSUs and to stock options offered under our employee stock purchase plan.
We issue awards of non-qualified stock options generally with graded vesting provisions (e.g., 25 percent per year for four years). In such cases, we recognize the related compensation cost on a straight-line basis over the minimum service period required for vesting of the award. For awards to employees who are retirement eligible or nearing retirement eligibility, we recognize compensation cost on a straight-line basis over the longer of the service period required to be performed by the employee in order to earn the award, or a six-month period.
We also issue RSUs, which generally vest four years after the date of grant. In such cases, we recognize the related compensation costs on a straight-line basis over the vesting period.

Fair value methods and assumptions
We estimate the fair values for non-qualified stock options under the long-term incentive plans and director plans using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following weighted average assumptions:

   
2009
 
2008
 
2007
Weighted average grant date fair value, per share
 
$
5.43
   
$
8.86
   
$
9.72
 
Weighted average assumptions used:
                       
Expected volatility
   
48
%
   
31
%
   
28
%
Expected lives
   
5.9 yrs
   
5.7 yrs
   
5.6 yrs
Risk-free interest rates
   
2.63
%
   
3.01
%
   
4.73
%
Expected dividend yields
   
2.94
%
   
1.34
%
   
0.57
%

We determine expected volatility on all options granted after July 1, 2005, using available implied volatility rates rather than on an analysis of historical volatility. We believe that market-based measures of implied volatility are currently the best available indicators of the expected volatility used in these estimates.
We determine expected lives of options based on the historical share option exercise experience of our optionees using a rolling 10-year average. We believe the historical experience method is the best estimate of future exercise patterns currently available.
Risk-free interest rates are determined using the implied yield currently available for zero-coupon U.S. government issues with a remaining term equal to the expected life of the options.
Expected dividend yields are based on the approved annual dividend rate in effect and the current market price of our common stock at the time of grant. No assumption for a future dividend rate change is included unless there is an approved plan to change the dividend in the near term.
The fair value per share of RSUs that we grant is determined based on the market price of our common stock on the date of grant.
The TI Employees 2005 Stock Purchase Plan is a discount-purchase plan and consequently, the Black-Scholes option-pricing model is not used to determine the fair value per share of these awards. The fair value per share under this plan equals the amount of the discount.

Long-term incentive and director compensation plans
We have stock options outstanding to participants under the Texas Instruments 1996 Long-Term Incentive Plan, the Texas Instruments 2000 Long-Term Incentive Plan, the Texas Instruments 2003 Long-Term Incentive Plan and the Texas Instruments 2009 Long-Term Incentive Plan. No further grants may be made under the 1996, 2000 or 2003 plans. We also assumed stock options granted under the Burr-Brown 1993 Stock Incentive Plan and the Radia Communications, Inc. 2000 Stock Option/Stock Issuance Plan. Unless the options are acquisition-related replacement options, the option price per share may not be less than 100 percent of the fair market value of our common stock on the date of the grant. Substantially all the options have a 10-year term and vest ratably over four years. Our options generally continue to vest after the option recipient retires.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 13
        
We have RSUs outstanding under the 2000 Long-Term Incentive Plan, the 2003 Long-Term Incentive Plan and the 2009 Long-Term Incentive Plan. Each RSU represents the right to receive one share of TI common stock on the vesting date, which is generally four years after the date of grant. Upon vesting, the shares are issued without payment by the grantee. RSUs generally do not continue to vest after the recipient’s retirement date.
Under the 2009 Long-Term Incentive Plan approved by stockholders in April 2009, we may grant stock options, including incentive stock options, restricted stock and RSUs, performance units and other stock-based awards. The plan provides for the issuance of 75,000,000 shares of TI common stock. Shares issued under acquisition-related replacement awards do not count against the shares available for grant under the plan. In addition, if a stock-based award (other than an acquisition-related replacement award) under any predecessor plan terminates, the unissued shares subject to the award become available for grant under the 2009 plan.
Under our 2003 Director Compensation Plan, we made annual grants of stock options, RSUs and other stock-based awards to each non-employee director. Beginning in 2007, the plan provided for annual grants of 2,500 RSUs and of a stock option for 7,000 shares. The plan also provided for a one-time grant of 2,000 RSUs to each new non-employee director of TI. No further grants of stock-based awards may be made under the 2003 Director Compensation Plan.
In April 2009, our stockholders approved the Texas Instruments 2009 Director Compensation Plan. The plan permits the grant of stock options, RSUs and other stock-based awards to non-employee directors, as well as issuance of TI common stock upon the distribution of stock units credited to deferred-compensation accounts established for such directors. The plan provides for annual grants to non-employee directors, and for a one-time grant of RSUs to each new non-employee director, at the same levels described above under the 2003 plan. The plan provides for the issuance of 2,000,000 shares of TI common stock.

Stock option and RSU transactions under the above-mentioned long-term incentive and director compensation plans (including assumed stock options previously granted under the Burr-Brown and Radia Communications, Inc. plans) during 2009 were as follows:

   
Stock Options
   
Restricted Stock Units
 
   
Shares
   
Weighted Average Exercise Price per Share
   
Shares
   
Weighted Average Grant-Date Fair Value per Share
 
Outstanding grants, December 31, 2008
    182,465,078     $ 31.29       10,350,724     $ 28.63  
Granted
    15,227,681       14.99       5,778,648       15.78  
Vested RSUs
                (1,149,500 )     24.05  
Expired and forfeited
    (19,659,953 )     27.91       (570,870 )     28.02  
Exercised
    (3,319,584 )     16.67              
Outstanding grants, December 31, 2009
    174,713,222     $ 30.53       14,409,002     $ 23.86  

The weighted average grant-date fair value of RSUs granted during the years 2009, 2008 and 2007 was $15.78, $29.09 and $29.46 per share. For the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, the total fair value of shares vested from RSU grants was $28 million, $20 million and $12 million.

Summarized information about stock options outstanding under the various long-term plans mentioned above at December 31, 2009, is as follows:

 
Stock Options Outstanding
   
Options Exercisable
 
 
Range of Exercise Prices
 
Number Outstanding (shares)
   
Weighted Average Remaining Contractual Life (years)
   
Weighted Average Exercise Price per Share
   
Number Exercisable (shares)
   
Weighted Average Exercise Price per Share
 
$ .26 to 10.00     40,159       2.6     $ 5.32       40,159     $ 5.32  
 
10.01 to 20.00
    39,622,107       5.4       15.76       24,552,126       16.24  
 
20.01 to 30.00
    53,831,869       4.6       25.87       43,773,811       25.11  
 
30.01 to 40.00
    51,033,106       4.0       33.08       46,645,309       33.14  
 
40.01 to 50.00
    329,260       0.9       43.87       329,260       43.87  
 
50.01 to 84.32
    29,856,721       0.5       54.05       29,856,721       54.05  
$ .26 to 84.32     174,713,222       3.9     $ 30.53       145,197,386     $ 32.18  

During the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, the aggregate intrinsic value (i.e., the difference in the closing market price and the exercise price paid by the optionee) of options exercised under these plans was $21 million, $110 million and $606 million.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 14
 
Summarized information as of December 31, 2009, about outstanding stock options that are vested and expected to vest, as well as stock options that are currently exercisable, is as follows:

   
Outstanding Stock Options (Fully Vested and Expected to Vest) (a)
   
Options Exercisable
 
Number of outstanding (shares)
    173,539,877       145,197,386  
Weighted average remaining contractual life
 
3.9 yrs
   
3.0 yrs
 
Weighted average exercise price per share
  $ 30.60     $ 32.18  
Intrinsic value
  $ 475     $ 316  

(a)
Includes effects of expected forfeitures. Excluding the effects of expected forfeitures, the aggregate intrinsic value of stock options outstanding was $483 million.

As of December 31, 2009, the total future compensation cost related to unvested stock options and RSUs not yet recognized in the statements of income was $117 million and $139 million. Of that total, $118 million, $85 million, $48 million and $5 million will be recognized in 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Employee stock purchase plan
Under the TI Employees 2005 Stock Purchase Plan, options are offered to all eligible employees in amounts based on a percentage of the employee’s compensation. Under the plan, the option price per share is 85 percent of the fair market value on the exercise date, and options have a three-month term.
Options outstanding under the plan at December 31, 2009, had an exercise price of $22.11 per share (85 percent of the fair market value of TI common stock on the date of automatic exercise). Of the total outstanding options, none were exercisable at year-end 2009.

Employee stock purchase plan transactions during 2009 were as follows:

   
Employee Stock Purchase Plan (shares) (a)
   
Exercise Price
 
Outstanding grants, December 31, 2008
    1,039,543     $ 13.64  
Granted
    3,009,785       17.75  
Exercised
    (3,469,647 )     15.79  
Outstanding grants, December 31, 2009
    579,681     $ 22.11  

(a)
Excludes options offered but not granted.

The weighted average grant-date fair value of options granted under the employee stock purchase plans during the years 2009, 2008 and 2007 was $3.13, $3.37 and $5.10 per share. During the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007, the total intrinsic value of options exercised under these plans was $10 million, $11 million and $11 million.

Effect on shares outstanding and treasury shares
Our practice is to issue shares of common stock upon exercise of stock options generally from treasury shares and, on a limited basis, from previously unissued shares. We settled stock option plan exercises using treasury shares of 6,695,583 in 2009; 11,217,809 in 2008 and 39,791,295 in 2007; and previously unissued common shares of 93,648 in 2009; 85,472 in 2008 and 511,907 in 2007.
Upon vesting of RSUs, we issued treasury shares of 977,728 in 2009; 544,404 in 2008 and 515,209 in 2007; and previously unissued common shares of zero in 2009; zero in 2008 and 12,000 in 2007.

Shares available for future grant and reserved for issuance are summarized below:

   
As of December 31, 2009
 
Shares
 
Long-term Incentive and Director Compensation Plans
   
TI Employees 2005 Stock Purchase Plan
 
Available for future grant
    79,542,009       31,935,700  
Reserved for issuance (a)
    268,802,866       32,515,381  
 
(a)
Includes 138,633 shares credited to directors’ deferred compensation accounts that may settle in shares of TI common stock on a one-for-one basis. These shares are not included as grants outstanding at December 31, 2009.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 15
 
Effect on cash flows
Cash received from the exercise of options was $109 million in 2009, $210 million in 2008 and $761 million in 2007. The related net tax impact realized was ($2) million, $31 million and $204 million (which includes excess tax benefits realized of $1 million, $19 million and $116 million) in 2009, 2008 and 2007.

4. Profit sharing plans

Profit sharing benefits are generally formulaic and determined by one or more subsidiary or company-wide financial metrics. We pay profit sharing benefits primarily under the company-wide TI Employee Profit Sharing Plan. This plan provides for profit sharing to be paid based solely on TI’s operating margin for the full calendar year. Under this plan, TI must achieve a minimum threshold of 10 percent operating margin before any profit sharing is paid. At 10 percent operating margin, profit sharing will be 2 percent of eligible payroll. The maximum amount of profit sharing available under the plan is 20 percent of eligible payroll, which is paid only if TI’s operating margin is at or above 35 percent for a full calendar year.
We recognized $102 million, $121 million and $180 million of profit sharing expense under the TI Employee Profit Sharing Plan in 2009, 2008 and 2007.

5. Income taxes

Income from continuing operations before income taxes
 
U.S.
   
Non-U.S.
   
Total
 
2009
  $ 1,375     $ 642     $ 2,017  
2008
    1,749       732       2,481  
2007
    2,738       954       3,692  

Provision (benefit) for income taxes
 
U.S. Federal
 
Non-U.S.
 
U.S. State
 
Total
2009:
                               
Current
 
$
334
   
$
63
   
$
4
   
$
401
 
Deferred
   
117
     
30
     
(1
)
   
146
 
Total
 
$
451
   
$
93
   
$
3
   
$
547
 
                                 
2008:
                               
Current
 
$
646
   
$
89
   
$
8
   
$
743
 
Deferred
   
(214
)
   
43
     
(11
)
   
(182
)
Total
 
$
432
   
$
132
   
$
(3
)
 
$
561
 
                                 
2007:
                               
Current
 
$
823
   
$
198
   
$
(4
)
 
$
1,017
 
Deferred
   
(3
)
   
37
     
     
34
 
Total
 
$
820
   
$
235
   
$
(4
)
 
$
1,051
 

Principal reconciling items from income tax computed at the statutory federal rate follow:

   
2009
 
2008
 
2007
Computed tax at statutory rate
 
$
706
   
$
868
   
$
1,292
 
Effect of non-U.S. rates
   
(101
)
   
(197
)
   
(94
)
Research and development tax credits
   
(28
)
   
(75
)
   
(69
)
U.S. tax benefits for manufacturing and foreign sales
   
(21
)
   
(18
)
   
(24
)
Other
   
(9
)
   
(17
)
   
(54
)
Total provision for income taxes
 
$
547
   
$
561
   
$
1,051
 

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 16
 
The primary components of deferred income tax assets and liabilities were as follows:

   
December 31,
   
2009
 
2008
Deferred income tax assets:
               
Postretirement benefit costs recognized in AOCI
 
$
380
   
$
441
 
Inventories and related reserves
   
347
     
428
 
Stock-based compensation
   
339
     
294
 
Accrued expenses
   
219
     
293
 
Deferred loss and tax credit carryforwards
   
201
     
180
 
Intangibles
   
71
     
77
 
Investments
   
40
     
58
 
Other
   
93
     
132
 
     
1,690
     
1,903
 
Less valuation allowance
   
(2
)
   
(2
)
     
1,688
     
1,901
 
Deferred income tax liabilities:
               
Property, plant and equipment
   
(39
)
   
(104
)
Accrued retirement costs (defined benefit and retiree health care)
   
(176
)
   
(140
)
Other
   
(68
)
   
(31
)
     
(283
)
   
(275
)
Net deferred income tax asset
 
$
1,405
   
$
1,626
 

As of December 31, 2009 and 2008, net deferred income tax assets of $1.41 billion and $1.63 billion were presented in the balance sheets, based on tax jurisdiction, as deferred income tax assets of $1.47 billion and $1.69 billion and deferred income tax liabilities of $67 million and $59 million. The decrease in net deferred income tax assets from December 31, 2008 to December 31, 2009, exceeds the $146 million deferred tax provision primarily due to the recording of deferred tax assets associated with postretirement benefit costs recognized in accumulated other comprehensive income (AOCI). We make an ongoing assessment regarding the realization of U.S. and non-U.S. deferred tax assets. While these assets are not assured of realization, our assessment is that a valuation allowance is not required for the remaining balance of the deferred tax assets. This assessment is based on our evaluation of relevant criteria including the existence of (a) deferred tax liabilities that can be used to absorb deferred tax assets, (b) taxable income in prior carryback years and (c) expectations for future taxable income.
We have aggregate U.S. and non-U.S. tax loss carryforwards of approximately $289 million, of which $149 million expire through the year 2024.
Provision has been made for deferred taxes on undistributed earnings of non-U.S. subsidiaries to the extent that dividend payments from these subsidiaries are expected to result in additional tax liability. The remaining undistributed earnings (approximately $3.06 billion at December 31, 2009) have been indefinitely reinvested; therefore, no provision has been made for taxes due upon remittance of these earnings. It is not practicable to determine the amount of unrecognized deferred tax liability on these unremitted earnings.
Cash payments made for income taxes (net of refunds) were $331 million, $772 million and $733 million for the years ended December 31, 2009, 2008 and 2007.

Uncertain tax positions: We operate in a number of tax jurisdictions and are subject to examination of our income tax returns by tax authorities in those jurisdictions who may challenge any item on these tax returns. Because the matters challenged by authorities are typically complex, their ultimate outcome is uncertain. We recognize accrued interest related to uncertain tax positions and penalties as components of OI&E. Before any benefit can be recorded in the financial statements, we must determine that it is “more likely than not” that a tax position will be sustained by the appropriate tax authorities.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 17
 
The following table summarizes the changes in the total amounts of uncertain tax positions for 2009 and 2008:

   
2009
   
2008
 
Balance, January 1
  $ 148     $ 137  
Additions based on tax positions related to the current year
    10       18  
Additions for tax positions of prior years
    6       17  
Reductions for tax positions of prior years
    (18 )     (24 )
Settlements with tax authorities
    (90 )      
Balance, December 31
  $ 56     $ 148  
Interest expense recognized in the year ended December 31
  $     $ 6  
Accrued interest (receivable) payable as of December 31
  $ (9 )   $ 11  

The liabilities for uncertain tax positions and accrued interest payable are a component of Deferred credits and other liabilities, and accrued interest receivable is a component of Other assets on our balance sheets.
During 2009, a $90 million payment was made in respect of U.S. tax return audits for the years 2003 through 2006 for all settled audit adjustments on which the adjustment amount had been agreed with the IRS. The audit adjustments had been previously reflected in our liability for uncertain tax positions and the payment had no income statement impact. Other U.S. tax audit issues for these years remain unresolved and subject to issue resolution processes. A $20 million tax interest payment was also made in 2009 for the interest liability that had been accrued on the same agreed U.S. tax audit adjustments.
The $56 million liability for uncertain tax positions as of December 31, 2009, represents tax positions that, if recognized, would impact the effective tax rate. If these tax liabilities are ultimately realized, $28 million of deferred tax assets would also be realized, primarily related to refunds from counterparty jurisdictions resulting from procedures for relief from double taxation.
As of December 31, 2009, the statute of limitations remains open for U.S. federal tax returns for 1999 and following years. Our returns for the years 2000 through 2006 are the subject of tax treaty procedures for relief from double taxation; and our returns for the years 2003 through 2006 will be the subject of an appeals proceeding in 2010. Cases currently before the United States Tax Court could have an impact on the determination of our uncertain tax positions and the outcome of the 2010 appeals proceeding. It is reasonably possible that the appeals proceeding will be completed within the next 12 months.
In foreign jurisdictions, the years open to audit represent the years still subject to the statute of limitations. Years still open to audit by foreign tax authorities in major jurisdictions include Germany (2004 onward), France (2007 onward), Japan (2002 onward) and Taiwan (2004 onward).
We are unable to estimate the range of any reasonably possible increase or decrease in uncertain tax positions that may occur within the next 12 months resulting from the eventual outcome of the years currently under audit or appeal. However, we do not anticipate any such outcome will result in a material change to our financial condition or results of operations.

6. Financial instruments and risk concentration

Financial instruments: We hold derivative financial instruments such as forward foreign currency exchange contracts, forward purchase contracts and investment warrants, the fair value of which is not material at December 31, 2009. Our forward foreign currency exchange contracts outstanding at December 31, 2009, had a notional value of $465 million to hedge our non-U.S. dollar net balance sheet exposures (including $220 million to sell Japanese yen, $37 million to sell euros and $49 million to buy Taiwan dollars).
Cash equivalents, short-term investments, certain long-term investments, postretirement plan assets and deferred compensation liabilities are carried at fair value. The carrying values for other current financial assets and liabilities, such as accounts receivable and accounts payable, approximate fair value due to their short maturity.

Risk concentration: Financial instruments that could subject us to concentrations of credit risk are primarily cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments and accounts receivable. In order to manage our credit risk exposure, we place cash investments in investment-grade debt securities and limit the amount of credit exposure to any one issuer. We also limit counterparties on forward foreign currency exchange contracts to investment-grade-rated financial institutions.
Concentrations of credit risk with respect to accounts receivable are limited due to the large number of customers in our customer base and their dispersion across different industries and geographic areas. We maintain an allowance for losses based on the expected collectibility of accounts receivable. These allowances are deducted from accounts receivable on our balance sheets.

 
 

 
 
TEXAS INSTRUMENTS 2009 ANNUAL REPORT n PAGE 18
 
Details of these allowances are as follows:

Accounts receivable allowances
 
Balance at Beginning of Year
   
Additions Charged to Operating Results
   
Recoveries and Write-offs, Net
   
Balance at End of Year
 
2009
  $ 30     $ 1     $ (8 )   $ 23  
2008
  $ 26     $ 7     $ (3 )   $ 30  
2007
  $ 26     $     $     $ 26  

7. Valuation of debt and equity investments and certain liabilities

Debt and equity investments
We classify our investments as available-for-sale, trading, equity method or cost method. Most of our investments are classified as available-for-sale.
Available-for-sale securities consist primarily of money market funds and debt securities. Available-for-sale securities are stated at fair value, which is generally based on market prices, broker quotes or, when necessary, financial models (see fair value discussion below). We record other-than-temporary losses (impairments) on these securities in OI&E in our statements of income, and all other unrealized gains and losses as an increase or decrease, net of taxes, in AOCI on our balance sheet.
Trading securities are stated at fair value based on market prices. Our trading securities consist exclusively of mutual funds that hold a variety of debt and equity investments intended to generate returns that offset changes in certain deferred compensation liabilities. We record changes in the fair value of our trading securities and the related deferred compensation liabilities in selling, general and administrative (SG&A) expense in our statements of income.
Our other investments are not measured at fair value but are accounted for using either the equity method or cost method. These investments consist of interests in venture capital funds and other non-marketable equity securities. Gains or losses from equity method investments are reflected in OI&E based on our ownership share of the investee’s financial results. Gains and losses on cost method investments are recorded in OI&E when realized or when an impairment of the investment’s value is warranted based on our assessment of the recoverability of each investment.

Details of our investments and related unrealized gains and losses included in AOCI are as follows:

   
December 31, 2009
   
December 31, 2008
 
   
Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
Short-term Investments
 
Long-term Investments
 
Cash and Cash Equivalents
 
Short-term Investments
 
Long-term Investments
Measured at fair value:
                                               
Available-for-sale
                                               
Money market funds
 
$
563
   
$
   
$
   
$
796
   
$
   
$
 
Corporate obligations
   
100
     
438
     
     
50
     
590
     
 
U.S. Government agency and Treasury securities
   
360
     
1,305
     
     
     
654
     
 
Mortgage-backed and other securities
   
     
     
     
     
250
     
 
Auction-rate securities
   
     
     
458
     
     
     
482
 
                                                 
Trading
                                               
Mutual funds
   
     
     
123
     
     
     
96
 
Total
   
1,023
     
1,743
     
581
     
846
     
1,494
     
578
 
                                                 
Other measurement basis:
                                               
Equity method investments
   
     
     
33
     
     
     
53
 
Cost method investments
   
     
     
23
     
     
     
22
 
Cash on hand
   
159
     
     
     
200
     
     
 
Total
 
$
1,182
   
$
1,743
   
$
637
   
$
1,046
   
$
1,494
   
$
653
 
                                                 
Amounts included in AOCI from available-for-sale securities:
                                               
Unrealized gains (pre-tax)
 
$