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UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
_________________________________________________
FORM 10-K
_________________________________________________
(Mark One)
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020 or
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                      to                      .
Commission file number 1-5353
_________________________________________________
TELEFLEX INCORPORATED
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
_________________________________________________
 
Delaware
 
23-1147939
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 (I.R.S. employer identification no.)
   
550 East Swedesford Road, Suite 400, Wayne, Pennsylvania
 
19087
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (610225-6800

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, par value $1.00 per share
TFX
New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
NONE
_________________________________________________ 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  ý     No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.     Yes  ¨    No  ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x     No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer x
 
Accelerated filer ¨
 
Non-accelerated filer ¨
 
Smaller reporting company 
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨ ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes     No  x
The aggregate market value of the Common Stock of the registrant held by non-affiliates of the registrant (28,959,834 shares) on June 26, 2020 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed fiscal second quarter) was $10,305,936,126(1). The aggregate market value was computed by reference to the closing price of the Common Stock on such date, as reported by the New York Stock Exchange.
The registrant had 46,689,810 shares of Common Stock outstanding as of February 23, 2021
DOCUMENT INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:
Certain provisions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement in connection with its 2021 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, to be filed within 120 days of the close of the registrant’s fiscal year, are incorporated by reference in Part III hereof.
(1) For purposes of this computation only, the registrant has defined “affiliate” as including executive officers and directors of the registrant and owners of more than five percent of the common stock of the registrant, without conceding that all such persons are “affiliates” for purposes of the federal securities laws.





TELEFLEX INCORPORATED
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
FOR THE YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2020
TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 Page

2


Information Concerning Forward-Looking Statements
All statements made in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, other than statements of historical fact, are forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “plan,” “will,” “would,” “should,” “guidance,” “potential,” “continue,” “project,” “forecast,” “confident,” “prospects” and similar expressions typically are used to identify forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements are based on the then-current expectations, beliefs, assumptions, estimates and forecasts about our business and the industry and markets in which we operate. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks and uncertainties, which are difficult to predict. Therefore, actual outcomes and results may differ materially from what is expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements due to a number of factors, including:
changes in business relationships with and purchases by or from major customers or suppliers;
delays or cancellations in shipments;
demand for and market acceptance of new and existing products;
our inability to provide products to our customers, which may be due to, among other things, events that impact key distributors, suppliers and vendors that sterilize our products;
our inability to integrate acquired businesses into our operations, realize planned synergies and operate such businesses profitably in accordance with our expectations;
our inability to effectively execute our restructuring programs;
our inability to realize anticipated savings resulting from restructuring plans and programs;
the impact of enacted healthcare reform legislation and proposals to amend, replace or repeal the legislation;
changes in Medicare, Medicaid and third-party coverage and reimbursements;
the impact of tax legislation and related regulations;
competitive market conditions and resulting effects on revenues and pricing;
increases in raw material costs that cannot be recovered in product pricing;
global economic factors, including currency exchange rates, interest rates, trade disputes, sovereign debt issues
public health epidemics including the novel coronavirus (referred to as COVID-19);
difficulties entering new markets; and
general economic conditions.
For a further discussion of the risks relating to our business, see Item 1A, “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We expressly disclaim any obligation to update these forward-looking statements, except as otherwise explicitly stated by us or as required by law or regulation.

3


PART I
ITEM 1.    BUSINESS
Teleflex Incorporated is referred to herein as “we,” “us,” “our,” “Teleflex” and the “Company.”
THE COMPANY
Teleflex is a global provider of medical technology products that enhance clinical benefits, improve patient and provider safety and reduce total procedural costs. We primarily design, develop, manufacture and supply single-use medical devices used by hospitals and healthcare providers for common diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in critical care and surgical applications. We market and sell our products to hospitals and healthcare providers worldwide through a combination of our direct sales force and distributors. Because our products are used in numerous markets and for a variety of procedures, we are not dependent upon any one end-market or procedure. We manufacture our products at approximately 35 manufacturing sites, with major manufacturing operations located in the Czech Republic, Germany, Malaysia, Mexico and the United States (the "U.S.").
We are focused on achieving consistent, sustainable and profitable growth and improving our financial performance by increasing our market share and improving our operating efficiencies through:
development of new products and product line extensions;
investment in new technologies and broadening the application of our existing technologies;
expansion of the use of our products in existing markets and introduction of our products into new geographic markets;
achievement of economies of scale as we continue to expand by utilizing our direct sales force and distribution network to sell new products, as well as by increasing efficiencies in our sales and marketing organizations, research and development activities and manufacturing and distribution facilities; and
expansion of our product portfolio through select acquisitions, licensing arrangements and business partnerships that enhance, expand or expedite our development initiatives or our ability to increase our market share.
Our research and development capabilities, commitment to engineering excellence and focus on low-cost manufacturing enable us to bring to market cost effective, innovative products that improve the safety, efficacy and quality of healthcare. Our research and development initiatives focus on developing these products for both existing and new therapeutic applications, as well as developing enhancements to, and product line extensions of, existing products. During 2020 we introduced several product line extensions and three new products. Our portfolio of existing products and products under development consists primarily of Class I and Class II medical devices, most of which require 510(k) clearance by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration ("FDA") for sale in the U.S., and some of which are exempt from the requirement to obtain 510(k) clearance. We believe that seeking 510(k) clearance or qualifying for 510(k)-exempt status reduces our research and development costs and risks, and typically results in a shorter timetable for new product introductions as compared to the premarket approval, or PMA, process that would be required for Class III medical devices. See "Government Regulation" below for additional information.
HISTORY AND RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
Teleflex was founded in 1943 as a manufacturer of precision mechanical push/pull controls for military aircraft. From this original single market, single product orientation, we expanded and evolved through entries into new businesses, development of new products, introduction of products into new geographic or end-markets and acquisitions and dispositions of businesses. Throughout our history, we have continually focused on providing innovative, technology-driven, specialty-engineered products that help our customers meet their business requirements.
Beginning in 2007, we significantly changed the composition of our portfolio of businesses, expanding our presence in the medical device industry, while divesting all of our other businesses, which served the aerospace, automotive, industrial and marine markets. Following the divestitures of our marine business and cargo container and systems businesses in 2011, we became exclusively a medical device company.
In 2017, we completed two large scale acquisitions: NeoTract, Inc. ("NeoTract") and Vascular Solutions, Inc. (“Vascular Solutions”). NeoTract was a medical device company that developed and commercialized the UroLift System, a minimally invasive medical device for treating lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH. Vascular Solutions was a medical device company that developed and marketed clinical products for use in minimally invasive coronary and peripheral vascular procedures.
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We expect to continue to increase the size of our business through a combination of acquisitions and organic growth initiatives.
Restructuring programs
We continue to execute our footprint realignment and other restructuring programs designed to improve efficiencies in our manufacturing and distribution facilities and, to a lesser extent, our sales and marketing and research and development organizations. See Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.
OUR SEGMENTS
We have four segments: Americas, EMEA (Europe, the Middle East and Africa), Asia (Asia Pacific) and OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer and Development Services).
Each of our three geographic segments provides a comprehensive portfolio of medical technology products used by hospitals and healthcare providers. However, certain of our products are more heavily concentrated within certain segments. For example, most of our urology products are sold by our EMEA segment and most of our interventional urology products are sold by our Americas segment. Our product portfolio is described in the products section below.
Our OEM segment designs, manufactures and supplies devices and instruments for other medical device manufacturers. Our OEM division, which includes the TFX Medical OEM, TFX OEM, Deknatel and HPC Medical brands, provides custom extrusions, micro-diameter film-cast tubing, diagnostic and interventional catheters, balloons and balloon catheters, film-insulated fine wire, coated mandrel wire, conductors, sheath/dilator introducers, specialized sutures and performance fibers, bioabsorbable sutures, yarns and resins.
The following charts depict our net revenues by reportable operating segment as a percentage of our total consolidated net revenues for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018.
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OUR PRODUCTS
Our product categories within our geographic segments include vascular access, anesthesia, interventional, surgical, interventional urology, respiratory and urology. Each of these categories and the key products sold therein are described in more detail below.
Vascular Access: Our Vascular Access product category offers devices that facilitate a variety of critical care therapies and other applications with a focus on helping reduce vascular-related complications. These products primarily consist of our Arrow branded catheters, catheter navigation and tip positioning systems and our intraosseous, or in the bone, access systems.
Our catheters are used in a wide range of procedures, including the administration of intravenous therapies, the measurement of blood pressure and the withdrawal of blood samples through a single puncture site. Many of our catheters provide antimicrobial and antithrombogenic protection technology that have been shown to reduce the risk of catheter related bloodstream infections and microbial colonization and thrombus accumulation on catheter surfaces.
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Our intraosseous access systems are designed for the delivery of medications and fluids when intravenous access is difficult to obtain in emergent, urgent or medically necessary cases. Our products offer a method for vascular access that can be administered quickly and effectively in the hospital and pre-hospital environments and include the EZ-IO Intraosseous Vascular Access System and Arrow FAST1 Sternal Intraosseous Infusion System.
Interventional: Our Interventional product category offers devices that facilitate a variety of applications to diagnose and deliver treatment via the vascular system of the body. These products primarily consist of a variety of coronary catheters, structural heart therapies, peripheral intervention products and cardiac assist products that are used by interventional cardiologists, interventional radiologists and vascular surgeons. Clinical benefits of our products include increased vein and artery access and increased support during complex medical procedures. Our product offerings consists of a portfolio of Arrow branded catheters, Guideline and Trapliner catheters, the Manta Vascular Closure and Arrow OnControl devices.
Anesthesia: Our Anesthesia product category is comprised of airway and pain management product lines that support hospital, emergency medicine and military channels.
Our airway management products and related devices are designed to enable use of standard and advanced anesthesia techniques in both pre-hospital emergency and hospital settings. Our key products include laryngoscopes, supraglottic airways, endotracheal tubes and atomization devices, which are branded under our LMA, Rusch and MAD tradenames.
Our pain management product line includes catheters and disposable pain pumps for regional anesthesia, designed to improve patients’ post-operative pain experience, which are branded under our Arrow tradename.
Surgical: Our Surgical product category consists of single-use and reusable products designed to provide surgeons with devices for use in a variety of surgical procedures. These products primarily consist of metal and polymer ligation clips, fascial closure surgical systems used in laparoscopic surgical procedures, percutaneous surgical systems and other surgical instruments. Our significant surgical brands include Weck, Minilap, Pleur-Evac, Deknatel, KMedic and Pilling.
Interventional Urology: Our interventional urology product category includes the UroLift System, a minimally invasive technology for treating lower urinary tract symptoms due to benign prostatic hyperplasia, or BPH. The UroLift System involves the placement of permanent implants, typically through a transurethral outpatient procedure, that hold the prostate lobes apart to relieve compression on the urethra without cutting, heating or removing prostate tissue. Our Interventional Urology product portfolio is most heavily weighted in our Americas segment.
Respiratory: Our respiratory products are used in a variety of care settings and include oxygen therapy products, aerosol therapy products, spirometry products and ventilation management products marketed under the Hudson RCI brand name.
Urology: Our urology product portfolio provides bladder management for patients in the hospital and individuals in the home care markets. The product portfolio consists principally of a wide range of catheters (including Foley, intermittent, external and suprapubic), urine collectors, catheterization accessories and products for operative endourology, which are marketed under the Rusch brand name. Our urology product portfolio is most heavily weighted in our EMEA segment.
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OUR MARKETS
We generally serve three end-markets: hospitals and healthcare providers, medical device manufacturers and home care. These markets are affected by a number of factors, including demographics, utilization and reimbursement patterns. The following charts depict the percentage of net revenues for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018 derived from each of our end markets.
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GOVERNMENT REGULATION
We are subject to comprehensive government regulation both within and outside the U.S. relating to the development, manufacture, sale and distribution of our products.
Regulation of Medical Devices in the U.S
All of our medical devices manufactured or distributed in the U.S. are subject to requirements set forth by the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (“FDC Act”) and regulations promulgated by the FDA under the FDC Act, which are enforced by the FDA. The FDA and, in some cases, other government agencies administer requirements for the methods used in, and the facilities and controls used for, the design, manufacture, packaging, labeling, storage, installation, servicing, marketing, importing and exporting of all finished devices intended for human use. Additional FDA requirements include premarket clearance and approval, advertising and promotion, distribution and post-market surveillance of our medical devices and establishment of registration and device listing for our facilities.

Unless an exemption, pre-amendment grandfather status (that is, medical devices legally marketed in the U.S. before May 28, 1976) or FDA enforcement discretion applies, each medical device that we market in the U.S. must first receive either clearance as a Class I or, typically, a Class II device (after submitting a premarket notification (“510(k)”) or approval as a Class III device (after filing a premarket approval application (“PMA”)) from the FDA pursuant to the FDC Act. To obtain 510(k) clearance, a manufacturer must demonstrate to the FDA that the proposed device is substantially equivalent to a legally marketed device (a 510(k)-cleared device, pre-amendment device for which FDA has not called for PMAs or a device with a de novo authorization), referred to as the "predicate device." Substantial equivalence is established by the applicant showing that the proposed device has the same intended use as the predicate device, and it either has the same technological characteristics or has been shown to be equally safe and effective and does not raise different questions of safety and effectiveness as compared to the predicate device. The FDA’s 510(k) clearance process requires regulatory competence to execute and usually takes four to nine months, but it can last longer. A device that is not eligible for the 510(k) process because there is no predicate device may be reviewed by the FDA through the de novo process (the process for granting marketing authorization when no substantially equivalent device exists) if the FDA agrees it is a low to moderate risk device. A device not eligible for 510(k) clearance or de novo authorization is categorized as Class III and must follow the PMA approval pathway, which requires proof of the safety and effectiveness of the device to the FDA’s satisfaction. The process of obtaining PMA approval also requires specific regulatory competence and is more costly, lengthy and uncertain than the 510(k) or de novo processes. The PMA process generally takes from one to three years or even longer. Our portfolio of existing products and pipeline of potential new products consist primarily of Class I (510(k) exempt) and Class II devices that require 510(k) clearance, although a few are 510(k)-
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exempt. In addition, certain modifications made to devices after they receive clearance or approval may require a new 510(k) clearance or approval of a PMA or PMA supplement. We cannot be sure that 510(k) clearance or PMA approval will be obtained in a timely matter if at all for any device that we propose to market.
A clinical trial is almost always required to support a PMA application and is sometimes required for a 510(k) clearance or a de novo authorization. The sponsor of a clinical trial must comply with and conduct the study in accordance with the applicable federal regulations, including FDA’s requirements for investigational device exemptions (“IDE”) requirements and good clinical practice (“GCP”). Clinical trials must also be approved by an institutional review board ("IRB"), which is an appropriately constituted group that has been formally designated to review biomedical research involving human subjects and which has the authority to approve, require modifications to, or disapprove research to protect the rights, safety, and welfare of human research subjects. The FDA may order the temporary or permanent hold or discontinuation of a clinical trial at any time, or impose other sanctions, if it believes that the clinical trial either is not being conducted in accordance with FDA requirements or presents an unacceptable risk to the clinical trial subjects. An IRB may also require the clinical trial to be halted at a given clinical trial site for failure to comply with the IRB’s requirements or to adequately ensure the protection of human subjects, or may impose other conditions. Conducting medical device clinical trials is a complex and costly activity and frequently requires the use of outsourced resources that specialize in planning, conducting and/or monitoring the clinical trial for the medical device manufacturer.
A device placed on the market must comply with numerous regulatory requirements. Those regulatory requirements include, but are not limited to, the following:
device listing and establishment registration;
adherence to the Quality System Regulation (“QSR”), which requires stringent design, testing, control, documentation, complaint handling and other quality assurance procedures;
labeling, including advertising and promotion, requirements;
prohibitions against the promotion of off-label uses or indications;
adverse event and malfunction reporting (Medical Device Reports or "MDRs");
post-approval restrictions or conditions, potentially including post-approval clinical trials or other required testing;
post-market surveillance requirements;
the FDA’s recall authority, whereby it can require or request the recall of products from the market; and
reporting and documentation of voluntary corrections or removals.
The FDA has issued final regulations regarding the Unique Device Identification (“UDI”) System, which requires manufacturers to label or mark certain medical devices and/or their packaging with unique identifiers. Although the FDA expects that the UDI System will help track products during recalls and improve patient safety, it has required us to make changes to our manufacturing and labeling, which could increase our costs. The UDI System is being implemented in stages based on device risk, with the first requirements having taken effect in September 2014 and the last taking effect in September 2022.
Certain of our medical devices are sold in kits that include a drug component, such as lidocaine. These types of kits are generally regulated as combination products within the Center for Devices and Radiological Health ("CDRH") under the device regulations because the device provides the primary mode of action of the kit. Although the kit as a whole is regulated as a medical device, it may be subject to certain drug requirements such as current good manufacturing practices (“cGMPs”) and adverse drug experience reporting requirements, to the extent applicable to the drug-component repackaging activities and subject to inspection to verify compliance with cGMPs as well as other regulatory requirements.
Our manufacturing facilities, as well as those of certain of our suppliers, are subject to periodic and for-cause inspections by FDA personnel to verify compliance with the QSR (21 CFR Part 820) as well as other regulatory requirements. Similar inspections and audits are performed by Notified Bodies to verify compliance to applicable ISO standards (e.g. ISO 13485:2016), by auditing organizations under the Medical Device Single Audit Program ("MDSAP") applicable to regulatory requirements of Australia, Brazil, Canada, Japan and the U.S., and/or by regulatory authorities to verify compliance with medical device regulations and requirements from the countries in which we distribute product. If the FDA were to find that we or certain of our suppliers have failed to comply with
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applicable regulations, it could institute a wide variety of enforcement actions, ranging from issuance of a warning or untitled letter to more severe sanctions, such as product recalls or seizures, civil penalties, consent decrees, injunctions, criminal prosecution, operating restrictions, partial suspension or total shutdown of production, refusal to permit importation or exportation, refusal to grant, or delays in granting, clearances or approvals or withdrawal or suspension of existing clearances or approvals. The FDA also has the authority under certain circumstances to request repair, replacement or refund of the cost of any medical device manufactured or distributed by us.  Any of these actions could have an adverse effect on our business.
Regulation of Medical Devices Outside of the U.S.
Medical device laws also are in effect in many of the markets outside of the U.S. in which we do business. These laws range from comprehensive device approval requirements for some or all of our products to requests for product data or certifications. Inspection of and controls over manufacturing, as well as monitoring of device-related adverse events, are components of most of these regulatory systems. Manufacturing certification requirements and audits through the MDSAP program or other regulatory authority inspections also apply. In addition, the European Union (“EU”) has adopted the EU Medical Device Regulation (the “EU MDR”), which imposes stricter requirements for the marketing and sale of medical devices (as compared to the predecessor Medical Device Directive), including in the area of clinical evaluation requirements, quality systems, economic operators and post-market surveillance. Manufacturers of currently marketed medical devices will have until May 2021 to meet the requirements of the EU MDR. Failure to meet these requirements could adversely impact our business in the EU and other regions that tie their product registrations to the EU requirements.
Healthcare Laws
We are subject to various federal, state and local laws in the U.S. targeting fraud and abuse in the healthcare industry.  These laws prohibit us from, among other things, soliciting, offering, receiving or paying any remuneration to induce the referral or use of any item or service reimbursable under Medicare, Medicaid or other federally or state financed healthcare programs. Violations of these laws are punishable by imprisonment, criminal fines, civil monetary penalties and exclusion from participation in federal healthcare programs. In addition, we are subject to federal and state false claims laws in the U.S. that prohibit the submission of false payment claims under Medicare, Medicaid or other federally or state funded programs. Certain marketing practices, such as off-label promotion, and violations of federal anti-kickback laws may also constitute violations of these laws.
In addition, we are subject to various federal and state reporting and disclosure requirements related to the healthcare industry. Rules issued by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services ("CMS") require us to collect and report information on payments or transfers of value to physicians and teaching hospitals, as well as investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members. Effective January 2022, we will also be required to collect and report information on payments or transfers of value to physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, certified registered nurse anesthetists and certified nurse-midwives. The reported data is available to the public on the CMS website. Failure to submit required information may result in civil monetary penalties. In addition, several states now require medical device companies to report expenses relating to the marketing and promotion of device products and to report gifts and payments to individual physicians in these states.  Other states prohibit various other marketing-related activities. The federal government and certain other states require the posting of information relating to clinical studies and their outcomes. The shifting commercial compliance environment and the need to build and maintain robust and expandable systems to comply with the different compliance and/or reporting requirements among a number of jurisdictions increases the possibility that a healthcare company may violate one or more of the requirements, resulting in increased compliance costs that could adversely impact our results of operations.
Further, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act (collectively, the “Affordable Care Act”), imposed regulatory mandates and other measures designed to contain the cost of healthcare, in addition to annual reporting and disclosure requirements on device manufacturers for any “transfer of value” made or distributed to physicians or teaching hospitals. Violations of these laws are punishable by a range of fines, penalties and other sanctions.
Other Regulatory Requirements
We are also subject to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar anti-bribery laws applicable in jurisdictions outside the U.S. that generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from improperly offering or paying anything of value to non-U.S. government officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Because of the predominance of government-sponsored healthcare systems around the world, most of our
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customer relationships outside of the U.S. are with government entities and are therefore subject to such anti-bribery laws. Our policies mandate compliance with these anti-bribery laws. We operate in many parts of the world that have experienced government corruption to some degree, and in certain circumstances strict compliance with anti-bribery laws may conflict with local customs and practices. In the sale, delivery and servicing of our medical devices and software outside of the U.S., we must also comply with various export control and trade embargo laws and regulations, including those administered by the Department of Treasury’s Office of Foreign Assets Control (“OFAC”) and the Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) which may require licenses or other authorizations for transactions relating to certain countries and/or with certain individuals identified by the U.S. government. Despite our global trade and compliance program, our internal control policies and procedures may not always protect us from reckless or criminal acts committed by our employees, distributors or other agents. Violations of these requirements are punishable by criminal or civil sanctions, including substantial fines and imprisonment.
COMPETITION
The medical device industry is highly competitive. We compete with many companies, ranging from small start-up enterprises to companies that are larger and more established than us and have access to significantly greater financial resources. Furthermore, extensive product research and development and rapid technological advances characterize the market in which we compete. We must continue to develop and acquire new products and technologies for our businesses to remain competitive. We believe that we compete primarily on the basis of clinical superiority and innovative features that enhance patient benefit, product reliability, performance, customer and sales support, and cost-effectiveness.
SALES AND MARKETING
Our product sales are made directly to hospitals, healthcare providers, distributors and to original equipment manufacturers of medical devices through our own sales forces, independent representatives and independent distributor networks.
BACKLOG
Most of our products are sold to hospitals or healthcare providers on orders calling for delivery within a few days or weeks, with longer order times for products sold to medical device manufacturers. Therefore, our backlog of orders is not indicative of revenues to be anticipated in any future 12-month period.
PATENTS AND TRADEMARKS
We own a portfolio of patents, patents pending and trademarks. We also license various patents and trademarks. Patents for individual products extend for varying periods based upon the date of patent filing or grant and the legal term of patents in the various countries where patent protection is obtained. Trademark rights may potentially extend for longer periods of time and are dependent upon national laws and use of the marks. All product names throughout this document are trademarks owned by, or licensed to, us or our subsidiaries. Although these have been of value and are expected to continue to be of value in the future, we do not consider any single patent or trademark, except for the Teleflex and Arrow brands, to be essential to the operation of our business.
SUPPLIERS AND MATERIALS
Materials used in the manufacture and sterilization of our products are purchased from a large number of suppliers in diverse geographic locations. We are not dependent on any single supplier for a substantial amount of the materials used, the components supplied and the sterilization services provided for our overall operations. Most of the materials, components and sterilization services we utilize are available from multiple sources, and where practical, we attempt to identify alternative suppliers. However, our ability to establish alternate sources of supply of materials and sterilization services may be delayed due to FDA and other regulatory authority requirements regarding the manufacture and sterilization of our products. Volatility in commodity prices, particularly with respect to aluminum, steel and plastic resins, can have a significant impact on the cost of producing certain of our products. We may not be able to successfully pass cost increases through to all of our customers, particularly original equipment manufacturers.
RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT
We are engaged in both internal and external research and development. Our research and development efforts support our strategic objectives to provide innovative new, safe and effective products that enhance clinical value by
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reducing infections, improving patient and clinician safety, enhancing patient outcomes and enabling less invasive procedures.
We also acquire or license products and technologies that are consistent with our strategic objectives and enhance our ability to provide a full range of product and service options to our customers.
SEASONALITY
Portions of our revenues are subject to seasonal fluctuations. Incidence of flu and other disease patterns and, to a lesser extent, the frequency of elective medical procedures affect revenues related to single-use products. Historically, we have experienced higher sales in the fourth quarter as a result of these factors.
HUMAN CAPITAL RESOURCES
As of December 31, 2020, we employed approximately 14,000 employees including 4,000 employees in the U.S. and 10,000 employees in 31 other countries around the world. Our manufacturing employees make up 58% of the total employee population, and are located primarily in Mexico, Malaysia and the Czech Republic. Our commercial organization comprises 25% of the employee base, located throughout the globe. The remaining 17% of employees work in various corporate functions, based in each of our locations.
We believe our employees are a significant differentiating factor and play a critical role in our ability to deliver on our commitments to patients and execute our strategy to our customers and shareholders. Our management team places significant focus and attention to matters affecting our people, particularly our commitment to our Core Values, capability development, total rewards and diversity, as well as how each employee experiences our culture.
Culture
The culture of our organization is critical to the human capital we attract, develop and retain and who, in turn, contribute to the results and success of our organization. Our culture is framed by our Core Values – building trust, entrepreneurial spirit and making our workplace fun, with people at the center of all we do. We strive to develop and sustain our culture by embedding these values in all aspects of our organization, including our human capital strategies.
Talent Management, Development and Learning
We are committed to providing our employees with opportunities for growth, development and career advancement and to building a high-performance culture that supports our Core Values throughout the employee lifecycle. We have implemented a talent management process that provides regular coaching check-ins between employees and their manager to review the employee’s developmental objectives and career progression. We also regularly review our talent portfolio and succession plans to ensure we can deliver on our company strategy.
In addition, we offer a number of internal educational and training resources to employees throughout our organization. Among these resources is the Teleflex Academy, a curriculum that provides learning opportunities for our employees to further develop their skills and receive training across broad subject areas such as leadership; communications; diversity, equity and inclusion; sales; customer service; and business acumen.
Diversity, Equity and Inclusion
We believe that diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) drives value for employees, patients, customers and shareholders by engaging a broad range of perspectives and experiences to enrich our offering to these communities. We are continuing to cultivate this diversity through the efforts of our Corporate DEI Council and four regional DEI councils (North America, Latin America, EMEA and APAC), whose goals include supporting the attraction, development and retention of diverse employees in alignment with our Core Values.
One pillar of our DEI platform includes sponsoring our globally expanding Employee Resource Groups (ERGs) which we initiated with Women Inspiring Learning and Leadership in 2016, and which have since grown to include several other ERGs as of the end of 2020. Our ERGs are managed by employees and participation is open to all.
In our efforts to provide a diverse slate of candidates to our hiring managers, we deploy several recruitment channels to source talent from a variety of organizations including multiple social media outlets, co-op placement, local universities and technology institutes. We also work with numerous external recruiting firms that focus on diverse candidates.
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Total Rewards
We actively manage our global compensation and benefit programs to ensure we can attract and retain the critical human capital we need to continue to deliver on our commitments to employees, customers, patients and shareholders. We believe our compensation offering is aligned to competitive market pay levels and, along with our culture and Core Values, acts to incentivize the right behaviors and actions to achieve the best results for the organization. We structure our compensation to include a mix of pay components of base salary, short-term cash incentives and long-term incentives. We offer our employees health, welfare and retirement benefits and have implemented policies addressing paid time off, flexible work schedules, employee assistance, parental leave and family benefits, among others.
Environmental, Health and Safety
Our Environmental Health and Safety (EHS) vision is to protect the safety and health of Teleflex personnel and the environments in which we operate. We have a vested interest in protecting our most valuable assets – our employees. Everyone is a steward of EHS, fostering a culture of being actively responsible in all our operations. We remain fully committed to complying with all relevant EHS legislation and to achieving our vision. We have and will continue to expend resources to construct, maintain, operate and improve our facilities across the globe for environmental, health, safety and sustainability of our operations. For example, in response to the risks associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, we have expended resources to implement various safety measures, including implementing social distancing protocols and expanding personal protective equipment availability and usage, across our facilities globally in an effort to protect the health and safety of our employees and others.
ENVIRONMENTAL
We are subject to various environmental laws and regulations both within and outside the U.S. Our operations, like those of other medical device companies, involve the use of substances regulated under environmental laws, primarily in manufacturing and sterilization processes. While we continue to devote resources to compliance with existing environmental laws and regulations, we cannot ensure that our costs of complying with current or future environmental protection, health and safety laws and regulations will not exceed our estimates or will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Further, we cannot ensure that we will not be subject to environmental claims for personal injury or cleanup in the future based on our past, present or future business activities.
INVESTOR INFORMATION
We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”). Therefore, we file reports, proxy statements and other information with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). The SEC maintains a website (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.
You can access financial and other information about us in the Investors section of our website, which can be accessed at www.teleflex.com. We make available through our website, free of charge, copies of our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed with or furnished to the SEC under Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after electronically filing or furnishing such material to the SEC. The information on our website is not part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The reference to our website address is intended to be an inactive textual reference only.
We are a Delaware corporation incorporated in 1943. Our executive offices are located at 550 East Swedesford Road, Suite 400, Wayne, PA 19087.
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INFORMATION ABOUT OUR EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
The names and ages of our executive officers and the positions and offices held by each such officer are as follows:
NameAgePositions and Offices with Company
Liam J. Kelly54Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer
Thomas E. Powell59Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
Cameron P. Hicks56Corporate Vice President, Human Resources and Communications
Daniel V. Logue47Corporate Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary
Jay White47Corporate Vice President and President, Global Commercial
Mario Wijker53Corporate Vice President, QA/RA
James Winters48Corporate Vice President, Manufacturing and Supply Chain
Mr. Kelly has been our President and Chief Executive Officer since January 2018 and has been Chairman of our Board of Directors since May 2020. From May 2016 to December 31, 2017, Mr. Kelly served as our President and Chief Operating Officer. From April 2015 to April 2016, he served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer. From April 2014 to April 2015, Mr. Kelly served as Executive Vice President and President, Americas. From June 2012 to April 2014 Mr. Kelly served as Executive Vice President and President, International. He also has held several positions with regard to our EMEA segment, including President from June 2011 to June 2012, Executive Vice President from November 2009 to June 2011, and Vice President of Marketing from April 2009 to November 2009. Prior to joining Teleflex, Mr. Kelly held various senior level positions with Hill-Rom Holdings, Inc., a medical device company, from October 2002 to April 2009, serving as its Vice President of International Marketing and R&D from August 2006 to February 2009.
Mr. Powell has been our Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since February 2013. From March 2012 to February 2013, Mr. Powell was Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer. He joined Teleflex in August 2011 as Senior Vice President, Global Finance. Prior to joining Teleflex, Mr. Powell served as Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer of Tomotherapy Incorporated, a medical device company, from June 2009 until June 2011. In 2008, he served as Chief Financial Officer of Textura Corporation, a software provider. From April 2001 until January 2008, Mr. Powell was employed by Midway Games, Inc., a software provider, serving as its Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer from September 2001 until January 2008. Mr. Powell has also held leadership positions with Dade Behring, Inc., PepsiCo, Bain & Company, Tenneco Inc. and Arthur Andersen & Company.
Mr. Hicks has been our Corporate Vice President, Human Resources and Communications since April 2013. Prior to joining Teleflex, Mr. Hicks served as Executive Vice President of Human Resources & Organizational Effectiveness for Harlan Laboratories, Inc., a private global provider of pre-clinical and non-clinical research services, from July 2010 to March 2013. From April 1990 to January 2010, Mr. Hicks held various leadership roles with MDS Inc., a provider of products and services for the development of drugs and the diagnosis and treatment of disease, including Senior Vice President of Human Resources for MDS’ global Pharma Services division from November 2000 to January 2010.
Mr. Logue has been our Corporate Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary since January 2021. Mr. Logue joined Teleflex in 2004 and previously held the positions of Deputy General Counsel from February 2017 to December 2020, Associate General Counsel from March 2013 to January 2017 and Assistant General Counsel from June 2004 to February 2013. Prior to joining Teleflex, Mr. Logue was an associate at the law firm of Pepper Hamilton LLP (now Troutman Pepper Hamilton Sanders LLP) from September 1999 to June 2004.
Mr. White has been our Corporate Vice President and President, Global Commercial since February 2021. From February 2017 to January 2021, Mr. White served as our President, The Americas, and from December 2013 to January 2017 he served as President and General Manager, Vascular. From January 2013 to November 2013, Mr. White served as our President and General Manager, Surgical. Prior to that, he served as our Vice President and General Manager, Surgical from January 2010 to December 2012. Mr. White joined Teleflex in March 2005 as our Director of Marketing, North America. Prior to joining Teleflex, Mr. White worked at Covidien plc (now part of Medtronic plc) where he held senior leadership positions in sales and marketing over a five-year period.
Mr. Wijker has been our Corporate Vice President, Quality Assurance and Regulatory Affairs since January 2019. Prior to joining Teleflex, Mr. Wijker served as Global Vice President Quality and Regulatory for Mölnlycke Health Care AB, a medical device company, from May 2016 to December 2018. From April 2014 to January 2016,
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Mr. Wijker served as Senior Director Global Regulatory Affairs for Boston Scientific Corporation, a medical device company. From January 2012 to March 2014, he held the position of Director Quality and Regulatory Affairs International for the American Medical Systems division of Endo International plc, a pharmaceutical company. From September 2003 to December 2011, Mr. Wijker held various regulatory affairs and quality assurance positions with Life Technologies Corporation, a life sciences and in vitro diagnostics company.
Mr. Winters has been our Corporate Vice President, Manufacturing and Supply Chain since February 2020. He previously held the position of Vice President, Global Manufacturing from March 2018 to January 2020. Prior to joining Teleflex, Mr. Winters held various senior management and operational roles with the DePuy Synthes division of Johnson & Johnson, a healthcare company, from August 2005 to February 2018. Most recently, Mr. Winters served as Vice President of Global Manufacturing for Global Joint Reconstruction for DePuy Synthes from February 2015 to February 2018. Prior to that, Mr. Winters served as Plant Manager for the DePuy Synthes Ireland Manufacturing Operation.
Our officers are elected annually by our board of directors. Each officer serves at the discretion of the board.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
In addition to the other information set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, you should carefully consider the following factors which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows or stock price. The risks below are not the only risks we face. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial may also adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations or stock price.
Risks Relating to our Business and Operations
We face strong competition. Our failure to successfully develop and market new products could adversely affect our business.
The medical device industry is highly competitive. We compete with many domestic and foreign medical device companies ranging from small start-up enterprises that might sell only a single or limited number of competitive products or compete only in a specific market segment, to companies that are larger and more established than us, have a broad range of competitive products, participate in numerous markets and have access to significantly greater financial and marketing resources than we do.
In addition, the medical device industry is characterized by extensive product research and development and rapid technological advances. The future success of our business will depend, in part, on our ability to design and manufacture new competitive products and enhance existing products. Our product development efforts may require us to make substantial investments. There can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully develop new products, enhance existing products or achieve market acceptance of our products, due to, among other things, our inability to:
identify viable new products;
maintain sufficient liquidity to fund our investments in research and development and product acquisitions;
obtain adequate intellectual property protection;
gain market acceptance of new products; or
successfully obtain regulatory approvals.
In addition, our competitors currently may be developing, or may develop in the future, products that provide better features, clinical outcomes or economic value than those that we currently offer or subsequently develop. Our failure to successfully develop and market new products or enhance existing products could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected by public health epidemics, including the ongoing COVID-19 global health pandemic.
We are subject to risks associated with public health threats, including the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted economic activity and markets around the world and has negatively impacted our operations, financial performance and cash flows. Because the severity, magnitude, and duration of the COVID-19 pandemic and its economic consequences are uncertain, rapidly changing and difficult to predict, the pandemic’s impact on our operations and financial performance, as well as its impact on our ability to execute our
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business strategies and initiatives successfully, remains uncertain and difficult to predict. Further, the ultimate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our operations and financial performance depends on many factors that are not within our control, including, but not limited, to: governmental, business and individuals’ actions that have been and continue to be taken in response to the pandemic (including restrictions on travel, transport and workforce pressures, and deferrals or postponements of elective procedures); the impact of the pandemic and actions taken in response on global and regional economies, travel and economic activity; the availability of federal, state, local or non-U.S. funding programs; general economic uncertainty in key global markets and financial market volatility; global economic conditions and levels of economic growth; and the timing and pace of recovery when the COVID-19 pandemic subsides, which could be impacted by a number of factors, including limited provider capacity to perform procedures using our products that were deferred as a result of the pandemic.
The COVID-19 pandemic has subjected, and is expected to continue to subject, our operations, financial performance and financial condition to a number of risks, including, but not limited to those discussed below:
It has resulted, and we expect it will continue to result, in lower revenues in certain of our product categories, including our interventional urology (which revenues are primarily concentrated in our Americas segment), surgical, interventional, anesthesia and OEM product categories, in which we sell products largely utilized in elective procedures, which have been significantly reduced or suspended due to the pandemic.
It has resulted in higher revenues in our respiratory and vascular access product categories. However, we are unable to predict how long this increased demand will last or how significant it will be.
It has caused and may continue to cause disruptions in the manufacture of our products. We currently rely on our 35 manufacturing sites, with major manufacturing operations located in the Czech Republic, Germany, Malaysia, Mexico and the U.S., to manufacture our products. The COVID-19 pandemic, and/or the governmental or regulatory actions taken in response to COVID-19 pandemic, may interfere with our ability, or that of our employees or suppliers to perform our and their respective responsibilities and obligations relative to the conduct of our business and create a risk to our ability to manufacture our products in a timely manner, or at all. We have experienced and expect to continue to experience inefficiencies in our manufacturing operations due to government-mandated and self-imposed restrictions placed on facilities in certain locations primarily in North America and Asia. Additionally, we have experienced and continue to experience a higher than normal level of absenteeism across our global manufacturing sites. In an effort to increase the wider availability of needed medical device products, we may elect to, or the government may require us to, allocate manufacturing capacity (for example, pursuant to the U.S. Defense Production Act) in a way that adversely affects our regular operations and financial results, results in differential treatment of customers and/or adversely affects our customer relationships and reputation.
While we have not experienced significant payment defaults by, or identified other significant collectability concerns with, our customers to date, we may be adversely impacted by delays in payments of outstanding receivables if our customers experience financial difficulties or are unable to borrow money to fund their operations, which may adversely impact their ability to pay for our products on a timely basis, if at all.
The COVID-19 pandemic, including related illness, border closures, travel restrictions, quarantines, lockdowns or other workforce disruptions, could disrupt our suppliers or our suppliers’ suppliers and/or the distribution of our products, whether through our direct sales force or our distributors. These disruptions, or our failure to respond to them, could increase manufacturing or distribution costs or cause delays in delivering, or an inability to deliver, products to our customers.
The COVID-19 pandemic has increased volatility and pricing in the capital markets, and volatility is likely to continue. We might not be able to continue to access preferred sources of liquidity when we would like, and our borrowing costs could increase.
These and other impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, or other pandemics or epidemics, could have the effect of heightening many of the other risks described herein. We might not be able to predict or respond to all impacts on a timely basis to prevent near- or long-term adverse impacts to our results. However, these effects could have an adverse impact on our liquidity, capital resources, operations and business and those of the third parties on which we rely, and such impact could be material.
Our customers depend on third party coverage and reimbursements, and the failure of healthcare programs to provide sufficient coverage and reimbursement for our medical products could adversely affect us.
The ability of our customers to obtain coverage and reimbursement for our products is important to our business. Demand for many of our existing and new medical products is, and will continue to be, affected by the
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extent to which government healthcare programs and private health insurers reimburse our customers for patients’ medical expenses in the countries where we do business. Even when we develop or acquire a promising new product, demand for the product may be limited unless reimbursement approval is obtained from private and government third party payors. Internationally, healthcare reimbursement systems vary significantly. In some countries, medical centers are constrained by fixed budgets, regardless of the volume and nature of patient treatment. Other countries require application for, and approval of, government or third party reimbursement. Without both favorable coverage determinations by, and the financial support of, government and third party insurers, the market for many of our medical products would be adversely affected. In this regard, we cannot be sure that third party payors will maintain the current level of coverage and reimbursement to our customers for use of our existing products. Adverse coverage determinations, including reductions in the amount of reimbursement, could harm our business by discouraging customers’ selection of, and reducing the prices they are willing to pay for, our products.
In addition, as a result of their purchasing power, third party payors have implemented and are continuing to implement cost cutting measures such as seeking discounts, price reductions or other incentives from medical products suppliers and imposing limitations on coverage and reimbursement for medical technologies and procedures. These trends could compel us to reduce prices for our products and could cause a decrease in the size of the market or a potential increase in competition that could negatively affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
We are subject to extensive government regulation, which may require us to incur significant expenses to ensure compliance. Our failure to comply with those regulations could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
Our products are medical devices and are subject to extensive regulation in the U.S. by the FDA and by comparable government agencies in other countries. The regulations govern, among other things, the development, design, clinical testing, premarket clearance and approval, manufacturing, labeling, importing and exporting and sale and marketing of many of our products. Moreover, these regulations are subject to future change.
In the U.S., before we can market a new medical device, or a new use of, or claim for, or significant modification to, an existing product, we generally must first receive either 510(k) clearance or de novo authorization or approval of a premarket approval application, or PMA, from the FDA. Similarly, most major markets for medical devices outside the U.S. also require clearance, approval, authorization or compliance with certain standards before a product can be commercially marketed. In the EU, the EU MDR will, when it enters into full force in May 2021, include significant additional pre- and post-market requirements. The process of obtaining regulatory clearances and approvals to market a medical device, particularly from the FDA and certain foreign government authorities, can be costly and time consuming, and clearances and approvals might not be granted for new products on a timely basis, if at all. In addition, once a device has been cleared or approved, a new clearance or approval may be required before the device may be modified or its labeling changed. Furthermore, the FDA or a foreign government authority may make its review and clearance or approval process more rigorous, which could require us to generate additional clinical or other data, and expend more time and effort, in obtaining future product clearances or approvals. The regulatory clearance and approval process may result in, among other things, delayed realization of product revenues, substantial additional costs or limitations on indicated uses of products, any one of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Even after a product has received marketing approval or clearance, such product approval or clearance can be withdrawn or limited due to unforeseen problems with the device or issues relating to its application, or the FDA or a foreign government authority may change the classification of a product, which could require additional clinical studies and new marketing submissions.
Failure to comply with applicable regulations could lead to adverse effects on our business, which could include:
partial suspension or total shutdown of manufacturing;
product shortages;
delays in product manufacturing;
warning or untitled letters;
fines or civil penalties;
delays in or restrictions on obtaining new regulatory clearances or approvals;
withdrawal or suspension of required clearances, approvals or licenses;
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product seizures or recalls;
injunctions;
criminal prosecution;
advisories or other field actions;
operating restrictions; and
prohibitions against exporting of products to, or importing products from, countries outside the U.S.
We could be required to expend significant financial and human resources to remediate failures to comply with applicable regulations and quality assurance guidelines. In addition, civil and criminal penalties, including exclusion under Medicaid or Medicare, could result from certain regulatory violations. Any one or more of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Medical devices are cleared or approved for one or more specific intended uses and performance claims must be adequately substantiated. Promoting a device for a use outside of the cleared or approved intended use or population, that is, an off-label use, or making false, misleading or unsubstantiated claims could result in government enforcement action.
Furthermore, our facilities are subject to periodic inspection by the FDA and other federal, state and foreign government authorities, which require manufacturers of medical devices to adhere to certain regulations, including the FDA’s Quality System Regulation ("QSR"), which requires, among other things, periodic audits, design controls, quality control testing and documentation procedures, as well as complaint evaluations and investigation. In addition, any facilities assembling kits that include drug components and are registered as drug repackaging establishments are also subject to current good manufacturing practices requirements for drugs. The FDA also requires the reporting of certain adverse events and product malfunctions and requires the reporting of certain recalls or other field safety corrective actions for medical devices. Issues identified through such inspections and reports may result in FDA enforcement action through any of the actions discussed above. Moreover, issues identified through such inspections and reports may require significant resources to resolve.
We are subject to healthcare fraud and abuse laws, regulation and enforcement; our failure to comply with those laws could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.
We are subject to healthcare fraud and abuse regulation and enforcement by the federal government and the governments of those states and foreign countries in which we conduct our business. The laws that may affect our ability to operate include:
the federal healthcare anti-kickback statute, which, among other things, prohibits persons from knowingly and willfully offering or paying remuneration, one purpose of which is to induce either the referral of an individual for, or the purchase, order or recommendation of, any good or service for which payment may be made under federal healthcare programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, or soliciting payment for such referrals, purchases, orders and recommendations;
federal false claims laws which, among other things, prohibit individuals or entities from knowingly presenting, or causing to be presented, false or fraudulent claims for payment from the federal government, including Medicare, Medicaid or other third-party payors;
the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”), which prohibits schemes to defraud any healthcare benefit program and false statements relating to healthcare matters; and
state law equivalents of each of the above federal laws, such as anti-kickback and false claims laws which may apply to items or services reimbursed by any third-party payor, including commercial insurers.
If our operations are found to be in violation of any of these laws or any other government regulations, we may be subject to penalties, including civil and criminal penalties, damages, fines, the curtailment or restructuring of our operations, the exclusion from participation in federal and state healthcare programs and imprisonment of personnel, any of which could adversely affect our ability to operate our business and our financial results. The risk of our being found to have violated these laws is increased by the fact that many of them have not been fully interpreted by the regulatory authorities or the courts, and their provisions are open to a variety of interpretations.
Further, the Affordable Care Act imposed annual reporting and disclosure requirements on device manufacturers for any “transfer of value” made or distributed to physicians or teaching hospitals. Effective January 2022, we will also be required to collect and report information on payments or transfers of value to physician assistants, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, certified registered nurse anesthetists and certified nurse-
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midwives. The reported information is made publicly available in a searchable format. In addition, device manufacturers are required to report and disclose any investment interests held by physicians and their immediate family members during the preceding calendar year. Failure to submit required information may result in civil monetary penalties for each payment, transfer of value or ownership or investment interests not reported in an annual submission, up to an aggregate of $150,000 per year (and up to an aggregate of $1 million per year for “knowing failures”).
In addition, there has been a recent trend of increased federal and state regulation of payments made to healthcare providers. Some states, such as California, Connecticut, Nevada and Massachusetts, mandate implementation of compliance programs that include the tracking and reporting of gifts, compensation for consulting and other services, and other remuneration to healthcare providers. The shifting commercial compliance environment and the need to build and maintain robust and expandable systems to comply with the different compliance and/or reporting requirements among a number of jurisdictions increases the possibility that we may inadvertently violate one or more of the requirements, resulting in increased compliance costs that could adversely impact our results of operations.
We may not be successful in achieving expected operating efficiencies and sustaining or improving operating expense reductions, and may experience business disruptions associated with restructuring, facility consolidations, realignment, cost reduction and other strategic initiatives.
Over the past several years we have implemented a number of restructuring, realignment and cost reduction initiatives, including facility consolidations, organizational realignments and reductions in our workforce, and we may engage in similar efforts in the future. While we have realized some efficiencies from these initiatives, we may not realize the benefits of these or future initiatives to the extent we anticipated. Further, such benefits may be realized later than expected, and the ongoing difficulties in implementing these measures may be greater than anticipated, which could cause us to incur additional costs or result in business disruptions. In addition, if these measures are not successful or sustainable, we may be compelled to undertake additional restructuring, realignment and cost reduction efforts, which could result in significant additional charges. Moreover, if our restructuring, realignment and cost reduction efforts prove ineffective, our ability to achieve our strategic and business plan goals may be adversely affected.
In addition, as part of our efforts to increase operating efficiencies, we have implemented a number of initiatives over the past several years to consolidate our enterprise resource planning, or ERP, systems. Most recently, we upgraded the ERP system used by our EMEA segment to our global ERP system in 2019. To date, we have not experienced any significant disruptions to our business or operations in connection with these initiatives. However, as we continue our efforts to further consolidate our ERP systems, we could experience business disruptions, which could adversely affect customer relationships and divert the attention of management away from daily operations. In addition, any delays in the implementation of these initiatives could cause us to incur additional unexpected costs. Should we experience such difficulties, our business, cash flows and results of operations could be adversely affected.
Disruptions in sterilization of our products or regulatory initiatives further restricting the use of ethylene oxide in sterilization facilities could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.
Many of our products require sterilization prior to sale. A common method for sterilizing medical products involves the use of ethylene oxide, which is listed as a hazardous air pollutant under the Clean Air Act, as amended, and emissions of which are regulated by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ("EPA") and other regulatory authorities. One of our contract sterilizers, Sterigenics U.S., LLC, uses ethylene oxide in its sterilization process, including at its facilities in Smyrna, Cobb County, Georgia and Santa Teresa, New Mexico, which have sterilized some of our vascular, surgical, intermittent catheter and OEM products. During the fourth quarter of the year ended December 31, 2019, operations at the Smyrna facility were suspended by state and local officials due to issues associated with the facility's use of ethylene oxide in its sterilization operations, but have since reopened. In December 2020, the New Mexico Attorney General initiated legal proceedings involving the Santa Teresa facility, alleging that its operations have resulted in impermissible ethylene oxide emissions. While both plants are currently operating normally, should their operations be suspended or adversely affected, our ability to provide affected products to our customers could be impaired if we are unable to utilize alternate facilities and sources for sterilization services.
In addition, on October 10, 2019, the attorneys general of 15 states and the District of Columbia sent a letter to the EPA urging that the EPA promptly propose and finalize stricter standards for ethylene oxide emissions. Among
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other things, the attorneys general stated that the current EPA standard for ethylene oxide fails to adequately protect workers and communities, and that the use of ethylene oxide, particularly in the medical device sterilization industry, must be reduced. We are unable to predict the manner in which the EPA will respond to the letter. Any additional regulatory restrictions on the emission of ethylene oxide by sterilization facilities might impair our ability to provide sufficient quantities of sterilized products to our customers and compel us to seek sterilization alternatives that do not entail the use of ethylene oxide. We cannot assure that we would be able to identify such alternatives.
In the event we were to experience any further disruptions in our ability to sterilize our products, whether due to capacity constraints or regulatory or other impediments (including, among other things, regulatory initiatives directed generally to sterilization facilities that utilize ethylene oxide), or we are unable to transition to alternative facilities in a timely or cost effective manner, we could experience a material adverse impact with respect to our results of operations and financial condition.
A significant portion of our U.S. revenues is derived from sales to distributors, and “destocking” activity by these distributors can adversely affect our revenues and results of operations.
A significant portion of our revenues in the U.S. is derived from sales to distributors, which, in turn, sell our products to hospitals and other health care institutions. From time to time, these distributors may decide to reduce their levels of inventory with regard to certain of our products, a practice we refer to as “destocking.” A distributor's decision to reduce inventory levels with respect to our products may be based on a number of factors, such as distributor expectations regarding demand for a particular product, distributor buying decisions (including decisions to purchase competing products), changes in distributor policies regarding the maintenance of inventory levels, economic conditions and other factors. For example, during the third quarter of 2016, we experienced a decline in purchases by our U.S. distributors that adversely affected our revenues and results of operations. We believe the reduction resulted from the distributors' expectations of a less severe 2016-2017 flu season, which resulted in reduced levels of purchasing with respect to certain of our products that are used for treatment of hospitalized patients suffering from the flu. Following such instances of reduced purchases, distributors may revert to previous purchasing levels; nevertheless, we cannot assure that distributors will, in fact, increase purchases of our products in this manner. A decline in the level of product purchases by our U.S. distributors in the future could have a material adverse effect on our revenues and results of operations during a reporting period, and an extended decline in such product purchases could have a longer term material adverse effect.
We may incur material losses and costs as a result of product liability and warranty claims, as well as product recalls, any of which may adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. Furthermore, our reputation as a medical device company may be damaged if one or more of our products are, or are alleged to be, defective.
Our businesses expose us to potential product liability risks related to the design, manufacture and marketing of our products. In particular, our medical device products are often used in surgical and intensive care settings for procedures involving seriously ill patients. In addition, many of our products are designed to be implanted in the human body for varying periods of time. Product defects or inadequate disclosure of product-related risks with respect to products we manufacture or sell could result in patient injury or death. Product liability and warranty claims often involve very large or indeterminate amounts, including punitive damages. The magnitude of potential losses from product liability lawsuits may remain unknown for substantial periods of time, and the related legal defense costs may be significant. We could experience material warranty or product liability losses in the future and incur significant costs to defend these claims.
In addition, if any of our products are, or are alleged to be, defective, we may voluntarily conduct, or be required by regulatory authorities to conduct, a recall of that product. In the event of a recall, we may lose sales and be exposed to individual or class-action litigation claims. Moreover, negative publicity regarding a quality or safety issue, whether accurate or inaccurate, could harm our reputation, decrease demand for our products, lead to product withdrawals or impair our ability to successfully launch and market our products in the future. Product liability, warranty and recall costs may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
Volatility in domestic and global financial markets could adversely impact our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.
We are subject to risks arising from adverse changes in general domestic and global economic conditions. The economic slowdown and disruption of credit markets that occurred several years ago led to recessionary conditions and depressed levels of consumer and commercial spending, resulting in reductions, delays or cancellations of
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purchases of our products and services. We cannot predict the duration or extent of any economic recovery or the extent to which our customers will return to more typical spending behaviors. The continuation in a number of markets of weak economic growth, constricted credit, public sector austerity measures in response to public budget deficits and foreign currency volatility, particularly with respect to the euro, could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity.
Although we maintain allowances for doubtful accounts to cover the estimated losses which may occur when customers cannot make their required payments, we cannot assure that the loss rate will not increase in the future given the volatility in the worldwide economy. If our allowance for doubtful accounts is insufficient to address receivables we ultimately determine are uncollectible, we would be required to incur additional charges, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations. Moreover, our inability to collect outstanding receivables could adversely affect our financial condition and cash flow from operations.
In addition, adverse economic and financial market conditions may result in future impairment charges with respect to our goodwill and other intangible assets, which would not directly affect our liquidity but could have a material adverse effect on our reported financial results.
Our strategic initiatives, including acquisitions, may not produce the intended growth in revenue and operating income, which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results.
Our strategic initiatives include making significant investments designed to achieve revenue growth and to enable us to meet or exceed margin improvement targets. If we do not achieve the expected benefits from these investments or otherwise fail to execute on our strategic initiatives, we may not achieve the growth improvement we are targeting and our results of operations may be adversely affected.
In addition, as part of our strategy for growth, we have made, and may continue to make, acquisitions and divestitures and enter into strategic alliances such as joint ventures and joint development agreements. However, we may not be able to identify suitable acquisition candidates, complete acquisitions or integrate acquisitions successfully, and our joint ventures or strategic alliances may not prove to be successful. In this regard, acquisitions involve numerous risks, including difficulties in the integration of acquired operations, technologies, services and products and the diversion of management’s attention from other business concerns. Moreover, the products and technologies that we acquire may not be successful or may require us to devote significantly greater development, marketing and other resources, as well as significantly greater investments, than we anticipated. We could also experience negative effects on our results of operations and financial condition from acquisition-related charges, amortization of intangible assets, asset impairment charges and other matters that could arise in connection with the acquisition of a company or business, including matters related to internal control over financial reporting and regulatory compliance, as well as the short-term effects of increased costs on results of operations.  Although our management will endeavor to evaluate the risks inherent in any particular transaction, there can be no assurance that we will identify all such risks or the magnitude of the risks. In addition, prior acquisitions have resulted, and future acquisitions could result, in the incurrence of substantial additional indebtedness and expenditures. Future acquisitions may also result in potentially dilutive issuances of equity securities. There can be no assurance that difficulties encountered in connection with acquisitions will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
In connection with certain of our completed acquisitions, we have agreed to pay consideration that is contingent upon the achievement of specified objectives, such as receipt of regulatory approval, commercialization of a product or achievement of sales targets. As of the acquisition date, we record a contingent liability representing the estimated fair value of the contingent consideration we expect to pay. On a quarterly basis, we reassess these obligations and, in the event our estimate of the fair value of the contingent consideration changes, we record increases or decreases in the fair value as an adjustment to operating earnings, which could have a material impact on our results of operations. As of December 31, 2020, we accrued $36.6 million of contingent consideration, most of which related to our acquisition of Essential Medical. In addition, actual payments may differ materially from the amount of the contingent liability , which could have a material impact on our results of operations, cash flows and liquidity. For information regarding assumptions related to our contingent consideration liabilities, see “Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” under Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. For additional information regarding our acquisitions, see Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
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Health care reform may have a material adverse effect on our industry and our business.
Political, economic and regulatory developments have effected fundamental changes in the healthcare industry. The Affordable Care Act substantially changed the way health care is financed by both government and private insurers. It also encourages improvements in the quality of health care products and services and significantly impacts the U.S. pharmaceutical and medical device industries. Among other things, the Affordable Care Act:
established a new Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute to oversee, identify priorities in and conduct comparative clinical effectiveness research;
implemented payment system reforms, including a national pilot program to encourage hospitals, physicians and other providers to improve the coordination, quality and efficiency of certain health care services through bundled payment models; and
created an independent payment advisory board that will submit recommendations to reduce Medicare spending if projected Medicare spending exceeds a specified growth rate.
We cannot predict at this time the full impact of the Affordable Care Act or other healthcare reform measures that may be adopted in the future on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. In this regard, several legislative initiatives to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act were proposed, but not adopted in 2017. However, U.S. tax legislation adopted in December 2017 and commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act ("TCJA") eliminated the individual mandate under the Affordable Care Act, which has resulted in increased uncertainty regarding insurance premium prices for participants in insurance exchanges under the act, and may have other effects. Moreover, on December 14, 2018, the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Texas ruled that the individual mandate provision of the Affordable Care Act is unconstitutional and the remainder of the act is invalid, although the Court stayed its ruling pending appeal. The nature and effect of any modification or repeal of, or legislative substitution for, the Affordable Care Act, or any court decision regarding the act's validity, is uncertain, and we cannot predict the effect that any of these events would have on the longer-term viability of the act, or on our financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
We are subject to risks associated with our non-U.S. operations.
We have significant manufacturing and distribution facilities, research and development facilities, sales personnel and customer support operations in a number of countries outside the U.S., including Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Ireland, Malaysia and Mexico. In addition, a significant portion of our non-U.S. revenues are derived from sales to third party distributors. As of December 31, 2020, approximately 70% of our full-time employees were employed in countries outside of the U.S., and approximately 50% of our net property, plant and equipment was located outside the U.S. In addition, for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018, 38%, 38% and 41%, respectively, of our net revenues (based on the Teleflex entity generating the sale) were derived from operations outside the U.S.
Our international operations are subject to risks inherent in doing business outside the U.S., including:
exchange controls, currency restrictions and fluctuations in currency values;
trade protection measures, tariffs and other duties, especially in light of trade disputes between the U.S. and several foreign countries, including China;
potentially costly and burdensome import or export requirements;
laws and business practices that favor local companies;
changes in foreign medical reimbursement policies and procedures;
subsidies or increased access to capital for firms that currently are or may emerge as competitors in countries in which we have operations;
substantial non-U.S. tax liabilities, including potentially negative consequences resulting from changes in tax laws;
restrictions and taxes related to the repatriation of non-U.S. earnings;
differing labor regulations;
additional U.S. and foreign government controls or regulations;
the impact of the United Kingdom's departure from the European Union, commonly referred to as "Brexit";
public health epidemics;
difficulties in the protection of intellectual property; and
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unsettled political and economic conditions and possible terrorist attacks against American interests.
In addition, the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”) prohibits companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments to non-U.S. officials for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Similar anti-bribery laws are in effect in several foreign jurisdictions. The FCPA also imposes accounting standards and requirements on publicly traded U.S. corporations and their foreign affiliates, which, among other things, are intended to prevent the diversion of corporate funds to the payment of bribes and other improper payments to government officials, and to prevent the establishment of “off the books” slush funds from which such improper payments can be made. Because of the predominance of government-sponsored health care systems around the world, many of our customer relationships outside of the U.S. are with government entities and are therefore subject to such anti-bribery laws. Our policies mandate compliance with these anti-bribery laws. However, we operate in many parts of the world that have experienced government corruption to some degree.  Despite meaningful measures that we undertake to facilitate lawful conduct, which include training and compliance programs and internal control policies and procedures, we may not always prevent reckless or criminal acts by our employees, distributors or other agents. In addition, we may be exposed to liability due to pre-acquisition conduct of employees, distributors or other agents of businesses or operations we acquire. Violations of anti-bribery laws, or allegations of such violations, could disrupt our operations, involve significant management distraction and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. We also could be subject to severe penalties and other adverse consequences, including criminal and civil penalties, disgorgement, substantial expenditures related to further enhancements to our procedures, policies and controls, personnel changes and other remedial actions, as well as harm to our reputation.
Furthermore, we are subject to the export controls and economic embargo rules and regulations of the U.S., including the Export Administration Regulations and trade sanctions against embargoed countries, which are administered by the Office of Foreign Assets Control within the Department of the Treasury, as well as other laws and regulations administered by the Department of Commerce. These regulations limit our ability to market, sell, distribute or otherwise transfer our products or technology to prohibited countries or persons. While we train our employees and contractually obligate our distributors to comply with these regulations, we cannot assure that a violation will not occur, whether knowingly or inadvertently. Failure to comply with these rules and regulations may result in substantial civil and criminal penalties, including fines and the disgorgement of profits, the imposition of a court-appointed monitor, the denial of export privileges and debarment from participation in U.S. government contracts, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our international operations or on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
Foreign currency exchange rate, commodity price and interest rate fluctuations may adversely affect our results.
We are exposed to a variety of market risks, including the effects of changes in foreign currency exchange rates, commodity prices and interest rates. Products manufactured in, and sold into, foreign markets represent a significant portion of our operations. Our consolidated financial statements reflect translation of financial statements denominated in non-U.S. currencies to U.S. dollars, our reporting currency, as well as the foreign currency exchange gains and losses resulting from the remeasurement of assets and liabilities and from transactions denominated in currencies other than the primary currency of the country in which the entity operates, which we refer to as "non-functional currencies." A strengthening or weakening of the U.S. dollar in relation to the foreign currencies of the countries in which we sell or manufacture our products, such as the euro, will affect our U.S. dollar-reported revenue and income. Although we have entered into forward contracts with several major financial institutions to hedge a portion of our monetary assets and liabilities and projected cash flows denominated in non-functional currencies in order to reduce the effects of currency rate fluctuations, changes in the relative values of currencies may, in some instances, have a significant effect on our results of operations.
Many of our products have significant plastic resin content. We also use quantities of other commodities, such as aluminum and steel. Increases in the prices of these commodities could increase the costs of our products and services. We may not be able to pass on these costs to our customers, particularly with respect to those products we sell under group purchase agreements, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows.
Increases in interest rates may adversely affect the financial health of our customers and suppliers, thereby adversely affecting their ability to buy our products and supply the components or raw materials we need. In addition, our borrowing costs have been adversely affected by recent interest rate increases, and could be further affected if interest rates continue to increase. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
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Fluctuations in our effective tax rate and changes to tax laws may adversely affect us.
As a global company, we are subject to taxation in numerous countries, states and other jurisdictions. Our effective tax rate is derived from a combination of applicable tax rates in the various countries, states and other jurisdictions in which we operate. In preparing our financial statements, we estimate the amount of tax that will become payable in each of these jurisdictions. Our effective tax rate may, however, differ from the estimated amount due to numerous factors, including a change in the mix of our profitability from country to country and changes in tax laws. Any of these factors could cause us to experience an effective tax rate significantly different from previous periods or our current expectations, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
An interruption in our manufacturing or distribution operations or our supply of raw materials may adversely affect our business.
Many of our key products are manufactured at or distributed from single locations, and the availability of alternate facilities is limited. If operations at one or more of our facilities is suspended due to natural disasters or other events, we may not be able to timely manufacture or distribute one or more of our products at previous levels or at all. Furthermore, our ability to establish replacement facilities or to substitute suppliers may be delayed due to regulations and requirements of the FDA and other regulatory authorities regarding the manufacture of our products. In addition, in the event of delays or cancellations in shipments of raw materials by our suppliers, we may not be able to timely manufacture or supply the affected products at previous levels or at all. The manufacture of our products is highly exacting and complex, due in part to strict regulatory requirements. Problems in the manufacturing process, including equipment malfunction, failure to follow specific protocols and procedures, defective raw materials and environmental factors, could lead to delays in product releases, product shortages, unanticipated costs, lost revenues and damage to our reputation. A failure to identify and address manufacturing problems prior to the release of products to our customers may also result in quality or safety issues.  A reduction or interruption in manufacturing or distribution, or our inability to secure suitable alternative sources of raw materials or components, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
Our ability to attract, train, develop and retain key employees is important to our success.
Our success depends, in part, on our ability to continue to retain key personnel, including our executive officers and other members of our senior management team. Our success also depends, in part, on our ability to attract, train, develop and retain other key employees, including research and development, sales, marketing and operations personnel. We may experience difficulties in retaining executives and other employees due to many factors, including:
the intense competition for skilled personnel in our industry;
fluctuations in global economic and industry conditions;
changes in our organizational structure;
our restructuring initiatives;
competitors’ hiring practices; and
the effectiveness of our compensation programs.
Our inability to attract, train, develop and retain such personnel could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
Our failure to maintain strong relationships with physicians and other health care professionals could adversely affect us.
We depend on our ability to maintain strong working relationships with physicians and other healthcare professionals in connection with research and development for some of our products. We rely on these professionals to provide us with considerable knowledge and advice regarding the development and use of these products. Physicians assist us as researchers, product consultants, inventors and public speakers. If we fail to maintain our working relationships with physicians and, as a result, no longer have the benefit of their knowledge and advice, our products may not be developed in a manner that is responsive to the needs and expectations of the professionals who use and support our products, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
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Our technology is important to our success, and our failure to protect our intellectual property rights could put us at a competitive disadvantage.
We rely on the patent, trademark, copyright and trade secret laws of the U.S. and other countries to protect our proprietary rights. Although we own numerous U.S. and foreign patents and have submitted numerous patent applications, we cannot be assured that any pending patent applications will issue, or that any patents, issued or pending, will provide us with any competitive advantage or will not be challenged, invalidated or circumvented by third parties. In addition, we rely on confidentiality and non-disclosure agreements with employees and take other measures to protect our know-how and trade secrets. The steps we have taken may not prevent unauthorized use of our technology by competitors or other persons who may copy or otherwise obtain and use these products or technology, particularly in foreign countries where the laws may not protect our proprietary rights to the same extent as in the U.S. We cannot assure that current and former employees, contractors and other parties will not breach their confidentiality agreements with us, misappropriate proprietary information, copy or otherwise obtain and use our information and proprietary technology without authorization or otherwise infringe on our intellectual property rights. Our inability to protect our proprietary technology could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. Moreover, there can be no assurance that others will not independently develop know-how and trade secrets comparable to ours or develop better technology than our own, which could reduce or eliminate any competitive advantage we have developed.
Our products or processes may infringe the intellectual property rights of others, which may cause us to pay unexpected litigation costs or damages or prevent us from selling our products.
We cannot be certain that our products do not and will not infringe issued patents or other intellectual property rights of third parties. We may be subject to legal proceedings and claims in the ordinary course of our business, including claims of alleged infringement of the intellectual property rights of third parties. Any such claims, whether or not meritorious, could result in litigation and divert the efforts of our personnel. If we are found liable for infringement, we may be compelled to enter into licensing agreements (which may not be available on acceptable terms or at all) or to pay damages or cease making or selling certain products. We may need to redesign some of our products or processes to avoid future infringement liability. Any of the foregoing events could be detrimental to our business.
Other pending and future litigation may involve significant costs and adversely affect our business.
We are party to various lawsuits and claims arising in the normal course of business involving, among other things, contracts, intellectual property, import and export regulations, and employment and environmental matters. The defense of these lawsuits may divert our management’s attention, and may involve significant legal expenses. In addition, we may be required to pay damage awards or settlements, or become subject to injunctions or other equitable remedies, that could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. While we do not believe that any litigation in which we are currently engaged would have such an adverse effect, the outcome of litigation, including regulatory matters, is often difficult to predict, and we cannot assure that the outcome of pending or future litigation will not have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows.
Disruption of critical information systems or material breaches in the security of our systems may adversely affect our business and customer relationships.
We rely on information technology systems to process, transmit, and store electronic information in our day-to-day operations. We also rely on our technology infrastructure, among other functions, to enable us to interact with customers and suppliers, fulfill orders, generate invoices, collect and make payments, ship products, provide support to customers, fulfill contractual obligations and otherwise perform business functions. Our internal information technology systems, as well as those systems maintained by third-party providers, may be subjected to computer viruses or other malicious codes, unauthorized access attempts, and cyber-attacks, any of which could result in data leaks or otherwise compromise our confidential or proprietary information and disrupt our operations. Cyber-attacks are becoming more sophisticated and frequent, and in some cases have caused significant harm. Although we have taken numerous measures to protect our information systems and enhance data security, we cannot assure that these measures will prevent security breaches that could have a significant impact on our business, reputation and financial results. If we fail to monitor, maintain or protect our information technology systems and data integrity effectively or fail to anticipate, plan for or manage significant disruptions to these systems, we could, among other things, lose customers, have difficulty preventing fraud, have disputes with customers, physicians and other health care professionals, be subject to regulatory sanctions or penalties, incur
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expenses, lose revenues or suffer other adverse consequences. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.
Regulations related to conflict minerals have caused us to incur additional costs and may adversely affect our business.
In 2012, the SEC promulgated rules under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act regarding disclosure of the use of tin, tantalum, tungsten and gold, known as "conflict minerals," included in components of products either manufactured by public companies or for which public companies have contracted to manufacture. These rules require that we undertake due diligence efforts to determine whether such minerals originated from the Democratic Republic of Congo (the “DRC”) or an adjoining country and, if so, whether such minerals helped finance armed conflict in the DRC or an adjoining country. In accordance with applicable regulations, we have filed conflict minerals reports annually, beginning in 2014. As discussed in these reports, we have determined that certain of our products contain the specified minerals, and we have undertaken, and continue to undertake, efforts to identify where such minerals originated. We have incurred, and expect to continue to incur, costs associated with complying with these disclosure requirements, including costs related to determining the sources of the specified minerals used in our products. These rules could adversely affect the sourcing, supply and pricing of materials used in our products. Our customers may require that our products be free of conflict minerals, and our revenues and margins may be adversely affected if we are unable to provide assurances to our customers that our products are “DRC conflict free” (generally, the product does not contain conflict minerals originating in the DRC or an adjoining country that directly or indirectly finance or benefit specified armed groups) due to, among other things, our inability to procure conflict free minerals at a reasonable price, or at all. Moreover, we may be adversely affected if we are unable to pass through any increased costs associated with meeting customer demands that we provide products that are DRC conflict free. We also may face reputational challenges if our due diligence efforts do not enable us to verify the origins of all conflict minerals or to determine that any conflict minerals used in products we manufacture or in products manufactured by others for us are DRC conflict-free.
Our operations expose us to the risk of material environmental and health and safety liabilities.
We are subject to numerous foreign, federal, state and local environmental protection and health and safety laws governing, among other things:
the generation, storage, use and transportation of hazardous materials;
emissions or discharges of substances into the environment; and
the health and safety of our employees.
These laws and regulations are complex, change frequently and have tended to become more stringent over time. We cannot provide assurance that our costs of complying with current or future environmental protection and health and safety laws, or our liabilities arising from past or future releases of, or exposures to, hazardous substances, which may include claims for personal injury or cleanup, will not exceed our estimates or will not adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.
Our workforce covered by collective bargaining and similar agreements could cause interruptions in our provision of products and services.
As of December 31, 2020, approximately 8% of our employees in the U.S. and in other countries were covered by union contracts or collective bargaining arrangements. It is likely that a portion of our workforce will remain covered by collective bargaining and similar agreements for the foreseeable future. Strikes or work stoppages could occur that would adversely impact our relationships with our customers and our ability to conduct our business.
Risks Relating to our Financing Arrangements
Our substantial indebtedness could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.
As of December 31, 2020, we had total consolidated indebtedness of $2.5 billion.
Our substantial level of indebtedness increases the risk that we may be unable to generate cash sufficient to satisfy our debt obligations. It could also have significant effects on our business. For example, it could:
increase our vulnerability to general adverse economic and industry conditions;
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require us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to payments on our indebtedness, thereby reducing the availability of our cash flow to fund capital expenditures, research and development efforts and other general corporate expenditures;
limit our ability to borrow additional funds for general corporate purposes;
limit our flexibility in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we operate;
restrict us from pursuing business opportunities; and
place us at a disadvantage compared to competitors that have less indebtedness.
If we do not generate sufficient cash flow from operations or if future borrowings are not available to us in an amount sufficient to pay our indebtedness when due or to fund our other liquidity needs, we may be forced to:
refinance all or a portion of our indebtedness;
sell assets;
reduce or delay capital expenditures; or
seek to raise additional capital.
We may not be able to effect any of these actions on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Our ability to refinance our indebtedness will depend on our financial condition at the time, the restrictions in the instruments governing our outstanding indebtedness and other factors, including market conditions.
Our inability to generate sufficient cash flow to satisfy our debt service obligations, or to refinance or restructure our obligations on commercially reasonable terms or at all, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our debt agreements impose restrictions on our business, which could prevent us from pursuing business opportunities and taking other desirable corporate actions, and may adversely affect our ability to respond to changes in our business and manage our operations.
Our senior credit agreement and the indentures governing our 4.875% senior notes due 2026 (the "2026 Notes") and our 4.625% senior notes due 2027 (the "2027 Notes" and, together with the 2026 Notes, the "Senior Notes") contain covenants that, among other things, impose significant restrictions on our business. The restrictions that these covenants place on us and our restricted subsidiaries collectively include limitations on our and their ability to, among other things:
incur additional indebtedness or issue preferred stock or otherwise disqualified stock;
create liens;
pay dividends, make investments or make other restricted payments;
sell assets;
merge, consolidate, sell or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of our assets; and
enter into transactions with our affiliates.
In addition, our senior credit agreement also contains financial covenants, including covenants requiring maintenance of a consolidated leverage ratio, a secured leverage ratio and a consolidated interest coverage ratio, calculated in accordance with the terms of the senior credit agreement. A breach of any covenants under any one or more of our debt agreements could result in a default, which if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of all of our debt. In addition, any debt agreements we enter into in the future may further limit our ability to enter into certain types of transactions.
Under our cross-currency swap agreements, a meaningful decline in the U.S. dollar to euro exchange rate could have a material adverse effect on our cash flows.
In 2018 and 2019, we entered into cross-currency swap agreements with several financial institutions to hedge against the effect of variability in the U.S. dollar to euro exchange rate. The swap agreements require an exchange of the notional amounts between us and the counterparties upon expiration or earlier termination of the agreements. If, at the expiration or earlier termination of the swap agreements, the U.S. dollar to euro exchange rate has declined from the rate in effect on the execution date, we are required to pay the counterparties an amount equal to the excess of the U.S. dollar value over the euro principal amount (we and the counterparties have agreed to a net settlement with regard to the exchange of the notional amounts at the date of expiration or earlier termination of the
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agreements). In the event of a significant decline in the U.S. dollar to euro exchange rate, our payment obligations to the counterparties could have a material adverse effect on our cash flows. In this regard, if, at the expiration or earlier termination of our swap agreements, the U.S. dollar to euro exchange rate has declined by 10% from the rate in effect at the inception of our agreements, we would be required to pay approximately $75 million to the counterparties in respect of the notional settlement. To the extent we enter into additional cross-currency swap agreements, a decline in the relevant exchange rates could further adversely affect our cash flows.
Risks Relating to Ownership of our Common Stock
We may issue additional shares of our common stock or instruments convertible into our common stock, which could cause the price of our common stock to decline.
We are not restricted from issuing additional shares of our common stock or other instruments convertible into our common stock. As of December 31, 2020, we had outstanding approximately 46.7 million shares of our common stock, options to purchase 1.2 million shares of our common stock (of which approximately 0.9 million were vested as of that date), restricted stock units covering 0.2 million shares of our common stock (which are expected to vest over the next three years), performance stock units covering a maximum of 64,562 shares of our common stock (which may vest in early 2021, depending on our performance with regard to specified financial measures and market performance of our common stock compared to designated public companies) and 1,391 shares of our common stock to be distributed from our deferred compensation plan. As of December 31, 2020, 3.2 million shares of our common stock were reserved for issuance upon the exercise of stock options. We cannot predict the size of future issuances or the effect, if any, that they may have on the market price for our common stock.
If we issue additional shares of our common stock or instruments convertible into our common stock, such issuances may materially and adversely affect the price of our common stock. Furthermore, our issuance of shares upon the exercise of some or all of the outstanding stock options, as well as the vesting of restricted stock units and some or all of the performance stock units will dilute the ownership interests of existing stockholders, and the subsequent sale in the public market of such shares of our common stock could adversely affect prevailing market prices of our common stock.
We may not pay dividends on our common stock in the future.
Holders of our common stock are entitled to receive dividends only as our board of directors may declare out of funds legally available for such payments. The declaration and payment of future dividends to holders of our common stock will be at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend upon many factors, including our financial condition, earnings, requirements under covenants in our debt instruments, legal requirements and other factors as our board of directors deems relevant. We cannot assure that our cash dividend will not be reduced, or eliminated, in the future.
Certain provisions of our corporate governing documents, Delaware law and our senior notes could discourage, delay, or prevent a merger or acquisition.
Provisions of our certificate of incorporation and bylaws could impede a merger, takeover or other business combination involving us or discourage a potential acquirer from making a tender offer for our common stock. For example, our certificate of incorporation authorizes our board of directors to determine the number of shares in a series, the consideration, dividend rights, liquidation preferences, terms of redemption, conversion or exchange rights and voting rights, if any, of unissued series of preferred stock, without any vote or action by our stockholders. Thus, our board of directors can authorize and issue shares of preferred stock with voting or conversion rights that could adversely affect the voting or other rights of holders of our common stock. We are also subject to Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law, which imposes restrictions on mergers and other business combinations between us and any holder of 15% or more of our common stock. These provisions could have the effect of delaying or deterring a third party from acquiring us even if an acquisition might be in the best interest of our stockholders, and accordingly could reduce the market price of our common stock.
Certain provisions in the indentures governing the Senior Notes could make it more difficult or more expensive for a third party to acquire us. If an acquisition event constitutes a “change of control,” as defined in the indentures governing the Senior Notes, holders of such notes will have the right to require us to purchase their notes in cash (in the case of the 2027 Notes, the right will apply only if the change in control is coupled with a ratings downgrade). Our obligations under the Senior Notes could increase the cost of acquiring us or otherwise discourage a third party from acquiring us or removing incumbent management, and accordingly could cause a reduction in the market price of our common stock.
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ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
Not applicable.
ITEM 2.    PROPERTIES
We own or lease approximately 90 properties consisting of plants, engineering and research centers, distribution warehouses, offices and other facilities. We believe that the properties are maintained in good operating condition and are suitable for their intended use. In general, our facilities meet current operating requirements for the activities currently conducted within the facilities.
Our major facilities (those with 50,000 or greater square feet) at December 31, 2020 are as follows:
LocationSquare
Footage
Owned or
Leased
Olive Branch, MS627,000Leased
Kamunting, Malaysia286,000Owned
Nuevo Laredo, Mexico277,000Leased
Asheboro, NC204,000Owned
Tecate, Mexico172,000Owned
Morrisville, NC162,000Leased
Chihuahua, Mexico153,000Owned
Maple Grove, MN129,000Owned
Zdar Nad Sazauou, Czech Republic108,000Owned
Trenton, GA102,000Owned
Chihuahua, Mexico100,000Leased
Hradec Kralove, Czech Republic92,000Owned
Chelmsford, MA91,000Leased
Kulim, Malaysia90,000Owned
Kernen, Germany86,000Leased
Arlington Heights, IL86,000Leased
Wayne, PA84,000Leased
Jaffrey, NH81,000Owned
Kamunting, Malaysia77,000Leased
Pleasanton, CA76,000Leased
Chihuahua, Mexico63,000Owned
Reading, PA63,000Leased
Limerick, Ireland59,000Owned
Mansfield, MA57,000Leased
Plymouth, MA55,000Leased
Bad Liebenzell, Germany53,000Leased
Operations in each of our business segments are conducted at locations both in and outside of the U.S. Of the facilities listed above, with the exception of Jaffrey, NH, Mansfield, MA, Trenton, GA, and Limerick, Ireland, which are used solely for the OEM segment, our facilities generally serve more than one business segment and are often used for multiple purposes, such as administrative/sales, manufacturing and warehousing/distribution.
In addition to the properties listed above, we own or lease approximately 700,000 square feet of additional warehousing, manufacturing and office space worldwide.

ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
We are party to various lawsuits and claims arising in the normal course of business. These lawsuits and claims include actions involving product liability and product warranty, intellectual property, contracts, employment and environmental matters. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, we accrued liabilities of $0.3 million and $0.4 million respectively, in connection with these matters, representing our best estimate of the cost within the range of
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estimated possible loss that will be incurred to resolve these matters. Based on information currently available, advice of counsel, established reserves and other resources, we do not believe that any such actions are likely to be, individually or in the aggregate, material to our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. However, in the event of unexpected further developments, it is possible that the ultimate resolution of these matters, or other similar matters, if unfavorable, may be materially adverse to our business, financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. See Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.

ITEM 4.    MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.
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PART II

ITEM 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “TFX.” As of February 23, 2021, we had 413 holders of record of our common stock. A substantially greater number of holders of our common stock are beneficial owners whose shares are held by brokers and other financial institutions for the accounts of beneficial owners.
Stock Performance Graph
The following graph provides a comparison of five year cumulative total stockholder returns of Teleflex common stock, the Standard & Poor’s (S&P) 500 Stock Index and the S&P 500 Healthcare Equipment & Supply Index. The annual changes for the five-year period shown on the graph are based on the assumption that $100 had been invested in Teleflex common stock and each index on December 31, 2015 and that all dividends were reinvested.
tfx-20201231_g3.jpg
MARKET PERFORMANCE
Company / Index201520162017201820192020
Teleflex Incorporated100124192201294322
S&P 500 Index100112136130171203
S&P 500 Healthcare Equipment & Supply Index
100106139159206245

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ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
2020(1)
2019(1)
2018(1)
2017(1)
2016(1)
 (Dollars in thousands, except per share)
Statement of Income Data:
Net revenues$2,537,156 $2,595,362 $2,448,383 $2,146,303 $1,868,027 
Income from continuing operations before interest, loss on extinguishment of debt and taxes
$423,068 $427,254 $321,704 $372,279 $319,453 
Income from continuing operations
$335,801 $461,981 $196,432 $155,263 $237,651 
Amounts attributable to common shareholders for income from continuing operations
$335,801 $461,981 $196,432 $155,263 $237,187 
Per Share Data:
Income from continuing operations — basic
$7.22 $10.00 $4.30 $3.45 $5.47 
Income from continuing operations — diluted
$7.10 $9.81 $4.20 $3.33 $4.98 
Cash dividends
$1.36 $1.36 $1.36 $1.36 $1.36 
Balance Sheet Data:
Total assets
$7,152,559 $6,309,820 $6,277,991 $6,181,492 $3,891,213 
Long-term borrowings
$2,377,888 $1,858,943 $2,072,200 $2,162,927 $850,252 
Shareholders’ equity
$3,336,457 $2,979,320 $2,539,978 $2,430,531 $2,137,517 
Statement of Cash Flows Data:
Net cash provided by operating activities from continuing operations
$437,143 $437,068 $435,086 $426,301 $410,590 
Net cash used in investing activities from continuing operations
$(837,783)$(73,481)$(196,394)$(1,832,855)$(56,974)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities from continuing operations
$455,163 $(418,836)$(206,433)$1,141,259 $(118,692)
Certain financial information is presented on a rounded basis, which may cause minor differences.
(1) Amounts include the impact of businesses acquired and disposed of during the period, commencing on the respective acquisition or disposition dates. See Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information related to the acquisitions and dispositions for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018.
 

ITEM 7.     MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Overview
We are a global provider of medical technology products focused on enhancing clinical benefits, improving patient and provider safety and reducing total procedural costs. We primarily design, develop, manufacture and supply medical devices used by hospitals and healthcare providers for common diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in critical care and surgical applications. Approximately 95% of our net revenues come from single-use medical devices. We market and sell our products worldwide through a combination of our direct sales force and distributors. Because our products are used in numerous markets and for a variety of procedures, we are not dependent upon any one end-market or procedure. We are focused on achieving consistent, sustainable and profitable growth by increasing our market share and improving our operating efficiencies.
We evaluate our portfolio of products and businesses on an ongoing basis to ensure alignment with our overall objectives. Based on our evaluation, we may identify opportunities to expand our margins through strategic divestitures of existing businesses and product lines that do not meet our objectives. In addition, we may seek to optimize utilization of our facilities through restructuring initiatives designed to further reduce our cost base and enhance our competitive position. Finally, we may continue to explore opportunities to expand the size of our business and improve our margins through a combination of acquisitions and distributor to direct sales conversions, which generally involve our elimination of a distributor from the sales channel, either by acquiring the distributor or terminating the distributor relationship (in some instances, particularly in Asia, the conversions involve our acquisition or termination of a master distributor and the continued sale of our products through sub-distributors). Our distributor to direct sales conversions are designed to facilitate improved product pricing and more direct access to the end users of our products within the sales channel.
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On February 18, 2020, we acquired IWG High Performance Conductors, Inc. (HPC), a privately-held original equipment manufacturer of minimally invasive medical products and high performance conductors, for an initial cash purchase price of $260.0 million. The acquisition, which complements our OEM product portfolio, was financed using borrowings under our revolving credit facility.
On December 28, 2020, we acquired Z-Medica, LLC ("Z-Medica"), a privately held medical device company that manufactures and sells hemostatic (hemorrhage control) products, marketed under the QuikClot, Combat Gauze and QuickClot Control+ brand names. The acquisition included an initial cash purchase price of $500.0 million with the potential to make an additional payment of up to $25 million upon the achievement of certain commercial milestones. The Z-Medica acquisition, which complements our anesthesia product portfolio, was financed using borrowings under our revolving credit facility.
COVID-19 pandemic and related economic factors
We continue to experience the effects of the global pandemic caused by the COVID-19 novel strain of coronavirus. Among other things, the response to the COVID-19 pandemic has had the effect of reducing the number of elective procedures being carried out, which has impacted and continues to impact some of our product categories, including our interventional urology, surgical, interventional, anesthesia and OEM products, which have experienced and continue to experience decreased demand. We have also experienced and continue to experience increased demand for products used in the treatment of patients with COVID-19, which are mostly concentrated in our respiratory and vascular access product categories. For the year ended December 31, 2020, each of our segments were negatively impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic due to the reduction in elective procedures and, to a lesser extent, as a result of government-mandated and self-imposed shut-downs in several countries, which were implemented to protect individuals and control the spread of COVID-19. The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting other elements of our operations, as well as our employees, contractors, suppliers, customers, freight transport providers and other business partners. To date, we have not experienced significant disruptions in the global supply chain for our products that are in high demand, but, in some cases, delivery times have lengthened, resulting in backorders for some of our products.
In addition, there have been and continues to be impacts on our cost structure resulting from measures that we and other businesses are taking or will take, in accordance with governmental requirements and otherwise, to protect our employees and business partners. We continue to assess the impact on our business (including our employees, customers and suppliers) of travel restrictions, border closures and quarantines as they affect our various sites, including our 35 global manufacturing sites. In most jurisdictions, our manufacturing and distribution sites remain open because we are considered an essential business. However, we have experienced temporary or partial work stoppages in some manufacturing sites in North America and Asia. During the year ended December 31, 2020, we experienced, and we continue to experience, inefficiencies in our manufacturing operations due to government-mandated and self-imposed restrictions placed on and safety measures implemented at our facilities globally. From an operating expense perspective, we have experienced and continue to experience net decreases in selling, general and administrative expenses as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic due to cost mitigation efforts implemented to control discretionary spending including selling, marketing and travel and entertainment related costs and lower performance related employee-benefit costs.
We have yet to return to the revenue growth levels that we achieved prior to the onset of the pandemic. In addition, the degree of improvement has varied by product category and by region. It is uncertain whether this trend will continue or if we will again experience a decrease in the number of elective procedures performed as the COVID-19 pandemic evolves, particularly if the virus becomes more prevalent as we progress through the winter season in the Northern Hemisphere or if new strains of the virus continue to emerge. Overall, we believe that the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to negatively affect our revenues and operations, at least over the near-term. Because of the dynamic nature of the crisis, such as recent regional COVID-19 outbreaks that are impacting the recovery, we cannot accurately predict the extent or duration of the impacts of the pandemic.
The COVID-19 pandemic has also had an adverse impact on macroeconomic conditions across the countries and regions in which we operate. As a result, various forms of policy interventions from local governments have been enacted to attempt to initiate an economic recovery. While there generally has been some improvement in economic conditions in the later part of 2020, the degree of improvement has been uneven among our regional markets, and the uncertain economic trends after the COVID-19 pandemic, constricted credit, public sector austerity measures in response to public budget deficits could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and our liquidity.
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In addition to the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic, we continue to monitor trade and tariff activity, inflation, and exchange rate volatility that could impact our financial position, results of operations or liquidity. In regards to tariff activity, we have been subject to an ongoing investigation by the Chinese authorities related to a technical error regarding our country of origin designation for certain products we imported into China. The error would have resulted in increased tariff payments in late 2018 through 2020. We have accrued the estimated increase in tariffs as well as related interest expense for the periods in question. In addition to the tariffs and related interest, the Chinese authorities may impose a penalty for the unpaid tariffs. We believe the range of penalties is between 30% and 200% of the related unpaid tariff or between $3.0 million and $20.3 million. We do not have a best estimate of the penalties that may be assessed at this time. Accordingly, as prescribed by GAAP, we have recorded $3.0 million as low end of the range described above.
Government investigation
In June 2020, we began producing documents and information in response to a Civil Investigative Demand (a “CID”) received in March 2020 by one of our subsidiaries, NeoTract, from the U.S. Department of Justice through the United States Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of Georgia (collectively, the “DOJ”). The CID relates to the DOJ’s investigation of a single NeoTract customer, requires the production of documents and information pertaining to communications with, and certain rebate programs offered to, that customer and pertains to communications and activities occurring both prior to our acquisition of NeoTract in October 2017 and thereafter. In July 2020, the DOJ advised us that it had opened an investigation under the civil False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C. §3729, with respect to NeoTract’s operations broadly in addition to the customer investigation.
We maintain policies and procedures to promote compliance with the Anti-Kickback Statute, False Claims Acts and other applicable laws and regulations and intend to provide information sought by the government. We cannot at this time reasonably predict, however, the ultimate scope or outcome of this matter, including whether an investigation may raise other compliance issues of interest, including those beyond the scope described above or how any such issues might be resolved. We also cannot at this time reasonably estimate any potential liabilities or penalty, if any, that may arise from this matter, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

Results of Operations
As used in this discussion, "new products" are products for which commercial sales have commenced within the past 36 months, and “existing products” are products for which commercial sales commenced more than 36 months ago. Discussion of results of operations items that reference the effect of one or more acquired businesses (except as noted below with respect to acquired distributors) generally reflects the impact of the acquisitions within the first 12 months following the date of the acquisition. In addition to increases and decreases in the per unit selling prices of our products to our customers, our discussion of the impact of product price increases and decreases also reflects the impact on the pricing of our products resulting from any elimination of distributors, either through acquisition or termination of the distributor, from the sales channel. All dollar amounts in tables are presented in millions unless otherwise noted.
For the year ended December 31, 2020, intangible asset amortization expense of $84.4 million is included within costs of good sold. For the year ended December 31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, we reclassified intangible asset amortization expense of $82.6 million and $81.6 million, respectively, from selling, general and administrative expenses to cost of goods sold for comparability. Certain financial information is presented on a rounded basis, which may cause minor differences.
For a discussion of our results of operations comparison for 2019 and 2018, refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019 filed on February 21, 2020.
Comparison of 2020 and 2019
Revenues
202020192018
Net Revenues$2,537.2 $2,595.4 $2,448.4 
Net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased by $58.2 million,or 2.2%,compared to the prior year, which was primarily attributable to a $108.2 million net decrease in sales volumes of existing products, largely caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, partially offset by net revenues of $27.1 million generated by the HPC acquisition and to a lesser extent an increase in sales of new products.
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Gross profit
 202020192018
Gross profit
$1,324.9 $1,409.0 $1,302.8 
Percentage of revenues
52.2 %54.3 %53.2 %
For the year ended December 31, 2020, gross margin decreased 210 basis points, or 3.9%, compared to the prior year period primarily due to lower sales volumes and higher manufacturing costs, both caused largely by the COVID-19 pandemic, and unfavorable fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.
Selling, general and administrative
 202020192018
Selling, general and administrative
$743.6 $851.8 $797.1 
Percentage of revenues
29.3 %32.8 %32.6 %
Selling, general and administrative expenses decreased $108.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to the prior year. The decrease was primarily attributable to a $92.1 million benefit from reductions in the estimated fair value of our contingent consideration liabilities, which largely related to revenue-based milestone payments, due to adverse financial projections resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. The decrease was also attributable to lower selling and marketing expenses and performance related employee-benefit costs resulting from the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Research and development
 202020192018
Research and development
$119.7 $113.9 $106.2 
Percentage of revenues
4.7 %4.4 %4.3 %
Research and development expenses increased $5.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared to the prior year, which was primarily attributable to European Union Medical Device Regulation ("EU MDR") related costs, partially offset by lower project spend within certain of our product portfolios.
Restructuring and impairment charges
2020 Workforce reduction plan
During the second quarter of 2020, we committed to a workforce reduction (the "2020 Workforce reduction plan") designed to improve profitability and reduce cost primarily by streamlining certain sales and marketing functions in our EMEA segment and certain manufacturing operations in our OEM segment. The workforce reduction was initiated to further align the business with our high growth strategic objectives. The plan was substantially completed by the end of 2020 and we expect future restructuring charges associated with the program, if any, to be nominal. We will achieve annual pre-tax savings of $12 million as a result of this program.
Anticipated charges and pre-tax savings related to restructuring programs and other similar cost savings initiatives
We have ongoing restructuring programs primarily related to the consolidation of our manufacturing operations (referred to as our 2019, 2018 and 2014 Footprint realignment plans). We also have similar ongoing activities to relocate certain manufacturing operations within our OEM segment (the "OEM initiative") that do not meet the criteria for a restructuring program under applicable accounting guidance; nevertheless, the activities should result in cost savings (we expect only minimal costs to be incurred in connection with the OEM initiative). With respect to our currently ongoing restructuring programs and the OEM initiative, the table below summarizes charges incurred or estimated to be incurred and estimated annual pre-tax savings to be realized as follows: (1) with respect to charges (a) the estimated total charges that will have been incurred once the restructuring programs and OEM initiative are completed; (b) the charges incurred through December 31, 2020; and (c) the estimated charges to be incurred from January 1, 2021 through the last anticipated completion date of the restructuring programs and OEM initiative, and (2) with respect to estimated annual pre-tax savings (a) the estimated total annual pre-tax savings to be realized once the restructuring programs and OEM initiative are completed; (b) the estimated annual pre-tax savings realized based on the progress of the restructuring programs and OEM initiative through December 31, 2020; and (c) the estimated additional annual pre-tax savings to be realized from January 1, 2021 through the last anticipated completion date of the restructuring programs and the OEM initiative.
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Estimated charges and pre-tax savings are subject to change based on, among other things, the nature and timing of restructuring activities and similar activities, changes in the scope of restructuring programs and the OEM initiative, unanticipated expenditures and other developments, the effect of additional acquisitions or dispositions and other factors that were not reflected in the assumptions made by management in previously estimating restructuring and restructuring related charges and estimated pre-tax savings. Moreover, estimated pre-tax savings constituting efficiencies with respect to increased costs that otherwise would have resulted from business acquisitions involve, among other things, assumptions regarding the cost structure and integration of businesses that previously were not administered by our management, which are subject to a particularly high degree of risk and uncertainty. It is likely that estimates of charges and pre-tax savings will change from time to time, and the table below may reflect changes from amounts previously estimated. In addition, the table below reflects the estimated charges and pre-tax savings related to our ongoing programs in addition to our 2020 workforce reduction plan. Additional details, including estimated charges expected to be incurred in connection with our restructuring programs and the anticipated completion dates, are described in Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Pre-tax savings may be realized during, and subsequent to, the completion of the restructuring programs. Pre-tax savings can also be affected by increases or decreases in sales volumes generated by the businesses impacted by the consolidation of manufacturing operations; such variations in revenues can increase or decrease pre-tax savings generated by the consolidation of manufacturing operations. For example, an increase in sales volumes generated by the impacted businesses, although likely to increase manufacturing costs, may generate additional savings with respect to costs that otherwise would have been incurred if the manufacturing operations were not consolidated.
Restructuring programs and other similar cost saving initiatives
Estimated TotalActual results through
December 31, 2020
Estimated Remaining
Restructuring charges $95 - $109$89$6 - $20
Restructuring charges- 2020 Workforce reduction plan9 9
Restructuring related charges (1)
116 - 1427442 - 68
Total charges $220 - $260$172$48 - $88
OEM initiative annual pre-tax savings (2)
$6 - $7$2$4 - $5
Pre-tax savings- 2020 Workforce reduction plan (3)
1239
Pre-tax savings- ongoing restructuring plans (4)
68 - 783236 - 46
Total annual pre-tax savings$86 - $97$37$49 - $60
(1)Represents charges that are directly related to restructuring programs and principally constitute costs to transfer manufacturing operations to existing lower-cost locations, project management costs and accelerated depreciation, as well as a charge that is expected to be imposed by a taxing authority as a result of our exit from facilities in the authority's jurisdiction. Most of these charges (other than the tax charge) are expected to be recognized as cost of goods sold.
(2)We expect the OEM initiative will be completed by the end of 2027.
(3)Most of the pre-tax savings are expected to result in reductions to selling, general and administrative expenses.
(4)Substantially all of the pre-tax savings are expected to result in reductions to cost of goods sold.
The following discussion provides additional details with respect to our ongoing significant restructuring programs:
2019 Footprint realignment plan
In February 2019, we initiated a restructuring plan primarily involving the relocation of certain manufacturing operations to existing lower-cost locations and related workforce reductions (the “2019 Footprint realignment plan"). These actions are expected to be substantially completed by the end of 2022.
In 2020, we refined the estimated ranges for the restructuring and restructuring related charges in consideration of the progress made to date as well as the actions remaining. The refinements resulted in a decrease to the high end of our estimated ranges compared to our prior estimates and we now estimate that we will incur charges totaling $56 million to $63 million under the plan, of which we estimate that $50 million to $57 million of these charges will result in future cash outlays. We also expect a decrease in the total capital expenditures compared to
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prior estimates and we now expect to incur $28 million to $33 million in total capital expenditures under the plan, most of which we expect to be incurred by the end of 2021.
In 2020, we identified additional cost reduction measures and accelerated certain components of the plan that led to an increase in our estimated annual plan related savings as well as the recognition of savings related to the plan during the year. We now expect to achieve annual pre-tax savings of $15 million to $17 million once the plan is fully implemented.
2018 Footprint realignment plan
In May 2018, we initiated a restructuring plan involving the relocation of certain European manufacturing operations to existing lower-cost locations, the outsourcing of certain European distribution operations and related workforce reductions. During the second quarter 2020 we took advantage of an opportunity to accelerate certain components of this plan and we now expect to be substantially completed by the end of 2022.
We estimate that we will incur total charges in connection with the 2018 Footprint realignment plan of $103 million to $133 million, of which, we estimate that $99 million to $127 million of these charges will result in future cash outlays. Additionally, we expect to incur $19 million to $23 million in total capital expenditures under the plan.
We began realizing plan-related savings in 2018 and expect to achieve annual pre-tax savings of $25 million to $30 million once the plan is fully implemented.
2014 Footprint realignment plan
In April 2014, we initiated a restructuring plan (the "2014 Footprint realignment plan") involving the consolidation of operations and a related reduction in workforce at certain facilities, and the relocation of manufacturing operations from certain higher-cost locations to existing lower-cost locations.
During 2020, we extended our timeline of certain development and qualification activities which resulted in a one year delay in the anticipated period of substantial completion, so we now expect the plan will be substantially completed by the end of 2022. The shift in timing, along with other changes to the plan, also resulted in an increase in the estimated total charges, primarily restructuring related charges, and related cash outlays in addition to a decrease in the estimated total capital expenditures compared to prior estimates. We adjusted the corresponding ranges in consideration of these changes in estimates and we now estimate that we will incur total charges of $52 million to $55 million, which we expect will result in cash outlays of $42 million to $46 million, and total capital expenditures of $26 million to $27 million under the plan.
In 2020, we also identified additional cost reduction measures as the plan progressed and, as a result, we increased our estimate of annual plan-related savings. We now estimate that we will achieve annual pre-tax savings of $28 million to $31 million once the plan is fully implemented.
The following table provides information regarding restructuring charges we have incurred with respect to each of our restructuring programs, as well as impairment charges, for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019, and 2018. The restructuring charges listed in the table primarily consist of termination benefits.
 202020192018
2020 Workforce reduction plan$8.8 $— $— 
2019 Footprint realignment plan1.5 13.8 — 
2018 Footprint realignment plan6.0 (0.9)55.0 
2014 Footprint realignment plan0.6 0.3 0.8 
Other restructuring programs0.2 2.0 4.3 
Impairment charges (1)
21.4 7.0 19.1 
Total$38.5 $22.2 $79.2 
(1)Impairment charges recognized in 2020 related primarily to our decision to abandon intellectual property and other assets related to the Percuvance percutaneous surgical system product line. Impairment charges recognized in 2019 and 2018 related to our decision to abandon certain intellectual property and other assets associated with products that were eliminated from our interventional product portfolio.
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Interest expense 
202020192018
Interest expense
$66.5 $80.3 $103.0 
Average interest rate on debt during the year
2.51 %3.47 %4.25 %
The decrease in interest expense for the year ended December 31, 2020 compared to the prior year was primarily due to a lower average interest rate resulting from decreases in interest rates associated with our variable interest rate debt instruments partially offset by increases in average debt outstanding.
Loss on extinguishment of debt 
202020192018
Loss on extinguishment of debt
$— $8.8 $— 
On November 15, 2019, we prepaid the $250 million aggregate outstanding principal amount under our 2024 Notes. In addition to our prepayment of principal, we paid to the holders of the 2024 Notes a $6.5 million prepayment make-whole amount plus accrued and unpaid interest. We recorded the prepayment make-whole amount and a $2.3 million write-off of unamortized debt issuance costs as a loss on extinguishment of debt.
Gain on sale of assets
 202020192018
Gain on sale of assets
$— $6.1 $1.4 
During the year ended December 31, 2019, we recognized a gain related to the sale of two buildings and our vein catheter reprocessing business.
Taxes on income from continuing operations 
 202020192018
Effective income tax rate
6.1 %(35.9)%10.6 %
We generate substantial earnings from our non-U.S. operations. A number of the non-U.S. jurisdictions in which we file tax returns historically have had tax rates that are lower than the U.S. statutory tax rate; as a result, our consolidated effective income tax rate for 2020 and earlier years has been substantially below the U.S. statutory tax rate. The principal non-U.S. jurisdictions in which the tax rate in 2020 and earlier years was lower than the U.S. statutory tax rate and from which we derive substantial earnings included Ireland, Bermuda, and Singapore.
The effective income tax rate for 2020 was 6.1% compared to (35.9)% for 2019. Taxes on income from continuing operations in 2020 reflects non-taxable contingent consideration adjustments, recognized in connection with a decrease in the fair value of our contingent consideration liabilities. The effective income tax rate for 2019 reflects a tax benefit of $129 million resulting from a non-U.S. legal entity restructuring that eliminated the requirement to provide for withholding taxes on the future repatriation of certain non-permanently reinvested earnings. Additionally the effective tax rates for both 2020 and 2019 reflect a net excess tax benefit related to share-based compensation and a tax benefit relating to the revaluation of state deferred tax assets and liabilities due to business integrations and other changes. See Note 15 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.

Segment Results
Segment Net Revenues
 Year Ended December 31% Increase/(Decrease)
 2020201920182020 vs 20192019 vs 2018
Americas$1,465.0 $1,492.3 $1,351.7 (1.8)10.4 
EMEA584.9 588.1 603.8 (0.5)(2.6)
Asia267.0 294.3 286.9 (9.3)2.6 
OEM220.3 220.7 206.0 (0.2)7.2 
Segment Net Revenues$2,537.2 $2,595.4 $2,448.4 (2.2)6.0 
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Segment Operating Profit
 Year Ended December 31,% Increase/(Decrease)
 2020201920182020 vs 20192019 vs 2018
Americas$401.4 $319.9 $255.8 25.5 25.1 
EMEA81.3 94.4 106.1 (13.8)(11.0)
Asia51.2 73.1 78.1 (29.9)(6.5)
OEM44.9 58.0 50.3 (22.7)15.3 
Segment Operating Profit (1)
$578.8 $545.4 $490.3 6.1 11.2 
(1)See Note 18 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a reconciliation of segment operating profit to our consolidated income from continuing operations before interest, loss on extinguishment of debt and taxes.
Americas
Americas net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased $27.3 million, or 1.8%, compared to the prior year, which was primarily attributable to a $33.7 net decrease in sales volumes of existing products, largely caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, partially offset by a $7.7 million increase in sales of new products.
Americas operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2020 increased $81.5 million, or 25.5%, compared to the prior year, which was primarily attributable to a benefit from a reduction in the estimated fair value of our contingent consideration liabilities, which largely relate to revenue-based milestone payments, due to adverse financial projections resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. The increase in operating profit was partially offset by a decrease in gross profit resulting from lower sales caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.
EMEA
EMEA net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased $3.2 million, or 0.5%, compared to the prior year, which was primarily attributable to a $10.3 million net decrease in sales volumes of existing products caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, partially offset by favorable fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates of $6.3 million.
EMEA operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased $13.1 million, or 13.8%, compared to the prior year, which was primarily attributable to a decrease in gross profit resulting from lower sales and higher manufacturing costs, both caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, and an increase in research and development expenses. The decreases in operating profit were partially offset by lower selling, general and administrative expenses.
Asia
Asia net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased $27.3 million, or 9.3%, compared to the prior year. The decrease was primarily attributable to a $36.3 million net decrease in sales volumes of existing products, caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, partially offset by an increase in sales of new products.
Asia operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased $21.9 million, or 29.9%, compared to the prior year, which was primarily attributable to a decrease in gross profit resulting from lower sales caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and unfavorable fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, partially offset by lower selling, general and administrative expenses.
OEM
OEM net revenues for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased $0.4 million, or 0.2% compared to the prior year which was primarily attributable to a $27.8 million net decrease in sales volumes of existing products caused by the COVID-19 pandemic largely offset by net revenues of $27.1 million generated by the HPC acquisition.
OEM operating profit for the year ended December 31, 2020 decreased $13.1 million, or 22.7%, compared to the prior year, which was primarily attributable to a decrease in gross profit resulting from lower sales caused by the COVID-19 pandemic and higher manufacturing costs, partially offset by gross profit generated by the HPC acquisition.

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Liquidity and Capital Resources
We assess our liquidity in terms of our ability to generate cash to fund our operating, investing and financing activities. Our principal source of liquidity is our cash flows provided by operating activities. Our cash flows provided by operating activities are reduced by cash used to, among other things, fulfill contractual obligations for minimum lease payments under noncancellable operating leases, which often extend beyond one year; the weighted average remaining lease term of our operating lease portfolio is 6.7 years years. Our cash flows provided by operating activities are also reduced by cash used for unconditional legally binding commitments to purchase goods or services (i.e. purchase obligations), which primarily related to inventory expected to be purchased within one year. Our net cash provided by operating activities was significantly in excess of amounts paid pursuant to these contractual obligations for the years ended December 31, 2020, 2019 and 2018.
In addition to operating cash flows, other significant factors that affect our overall management of liquidity include contractual obligations such as scheduled principal and interest payments with respect to outstanding indebtedness, tax on deemed repatriation of non-U.S. earnings, which will be paid annually over the next 5 years, and annual pension funding. We may also be obligated to make payments for contingent consideration due to past acquisitions, the timing and amount of which may be uncertain, and the magnitude of which can vary from year to year. Other significant factors that affect our liquidity include certain actions controlled by management such as capital expenditures, acquisitions, dividends and incremental pension and post-retirement benefit payments. See Note 12, Note 15 and Note 16 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.
Our contractual obligations at December 31, 2020 were as follows:
Payments due by period
TotalLess than
1 year
1-3
years
3-5
years
More than
5 years
Total borrowings$2,498.0 $100.5 $78.8 $918.7 $1,400.0 
Interest obligations (1)
483.0 83.3 164.0 132.3 103.4 
Operating lease obligations126.0 26.2 41.8 21.9 36.1 
Minimum purchase obligations (2)
233.8 220.0 12.6 1.2 — 
Tax on deemed repatriation of foreign earnings (3)
116.7 12.3 35.3 69.1 — 
Other postretirement benefits36,812.0 4,844.3 8,985.4 7,562.2 15,420.1 
Total contractual obligations$40,269.5 $5,286.6 $9,317.9 $8,705.4 $16,959.6 
(1)Interest payments on floating rate debt are based on the interest rate in effect on December 31, 2020.
(2)Purchase and other obligations are defined as unconditional commitments to purchase goods or services that are legally binding and that specify all significant terms, including: quantities to be purchased; price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction. The amounts include commitments for inventory purchases and capital expenditures (which, at the time we entered into the commitments, did not exceed our projected requirements in the normal course of business) and penalties due upon cancellation of cancellable agreements; the amounts exclude operating lease obligations, which are addressed elsewhere in the table.
(3)As permitted by the TCJA, we have elected to pay the tax in annual installments over eight years.
We believe our cash flow from operations, available cash and cash equivalents and borrowings under our revolving credit facility (which is provided for under the Credit Agreement) and accounts receivable securitization facility will enable us to fund our operating requirements, capital expenditures and debt obligations for the next 12 months and the foreseeable future.
Of our $375.9 million of cash and cash equivalents at December 31, 2020, $310.4 million was held at non-U.S. subsidiaries. We manage our worldwide cash requirements by monitoring the funds available among our subsidiaries and determining the extent to which we can access those funds on a cost effective basis.
We have entered into cross-currency swap agreements with different financial institution counterparties to hedge against the effect of variability in the U.S. dollar to euro exchange rate. Under the terms of the cross-currency swap agreements, we notionally exchanged in the aggregate $750 million for €653.1 million. The swap agreements, which begin to expire in October 2023, are designated as net investment hedges and require an exchange of the notional amounts upon expiration or the earlier termination of the agreements. We and the counterparties have agreed to effect the exchange through a net settlement. As a result, we may be required to pay (or be entitled to receive) an amount equal to the difference, on the expiration or earlier termination dates, between the U.S. dollar
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equivalent of the €653.1 million notional amount and the $750 million notional amount. If, at the expiration or earlier termination of the swap agreements, the U.S. dollar to euro exchange rate has increased or declined by 10% from the rate in effect at the inception of these agreements, we would receive from or be required to pay to the counterparties an aggregate of approximately $75.0 million in respect of the notional settlement. As of December 31, 2020, we had $20.1 in current assets and $34.1 million in long term liabilities related to the fair value of our cross-currency swap agreements. The swap agreements entail risk that the counterparties will not fulfill their obligations under the agreements. However, we believe the risk is reduced because we have entered into separate agreements with different counterparties, all of which are large, well-established financial institutions.
We may at any time, from time to time, repurchase our outstanding debt securities in open market purchases, via tender offers or in privately negotiated transactions, exchange transactions or otherwise, at such price or prices as we deem appropriate. Such purchases or exchanges, if any, will depend on prevailing market conditions, our liquidity requirements, contractual restrictions and other factors and may be commenced or suspended at any time.
Summarized Financial Information – Obligor Group
The 2026 Notes and 2027 Notes (collectively, the "Senior Notes") are issued by Teleflex Incorporated (the “Parent Company”), and payment of the Parent Company's obligations under the Senior Notes is guaranteed, jointly and severally, by an enumerated group of the Parent Company’s subsidiaries (each, a “Guarantor Subsidiary” and collectively, the “Guarantor Subsidiaries”). The guarantees are full and unconditional, subject to certain customary release provisions. Each Guarantor Subsidiary is directly or indirectly 100% owned by the Parent Company. Summarized financial information for the Parent and Guarantor Subsidiaries (collectively, the “Obligor Group”) as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020 as follows:
Year Ended December 31, 2020
Obligor GroupIntercompanyObligor Group (excluding intercompany)
Net revenue$1,734.7 $167.7 $1,567.0 
Cost of goods sold935.4 366.5 568.9 
Gross profit799.3 (198.8)998.1 
Income from continuing operations270.7 (80.5)351.2 
Net income270.2 (80.5)350.7 

December 31, 2020
Obligor GroupIntercompanyObligor Group (excluding intercompany)
Total current assets$785.5 $49.1 $736.4 
Total assets5,321.1 1,491.4 3,829.7 
Total current liabilities792.0 542.3 249.7 
Total liabilities4,166.3 850.5 3,315.8 
The same accounting policies as described in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements included in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020 are used by the Parent Company and each of its subsidiaries in connection with the summarized financial information presented above. The Intercompany column in the table above represents transactions between and among the Obligor Group and non-guarantor subsidiaries (i.e. those subsidiaries of the Parent Company that have not guaranteed payment of the Senior Notes). Obligor investments in non-guarantor subsidiaries and any related activity are excluded from the financial information presented above. The summarized financial information presented above for the Obligor Group as of and for the year ended December 31, 2020 gives effect to the 2028 Notes issued in a private offering in May 2020.
See "Financing Arrangements" below as well as Note 10 and Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for further information related to our borrowings and financial instruments.

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Cash Flows
The following table provides a summary of our cash flows for the periods presented:
Year Ended December 31,
202020192018
Cash flows from continuing operations provided by (used in):
Operating activities
$437.1 $437.1 $435.1 
Investing activities
(837.8)(73.5)(196.4)
Financing activities
455.2 (418.8)(206.4)
Cash flows (used in) provided by discontinued operations
(0.7)2.5 2.3 
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents
21.0 (3.4)(11.0)
Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
$74.8 $(56.1)$23.6 
Cash Flow from Operating Activities
Net cash provided by operating activities from continuing operations was $437.1 million during 2020 and 2019. In 2020, the cash flows from operations reflect an increase in contingent consideration payments and tax payments that were partially offset by favorable changes in other working capital. The favorable changes in working capital were driven mainly by higher accounts receivable collections.
Cash Flow from Investing Activities
Net cash used in investing activities from continuing operations was $837.8 million during 2020, which included $767.8 million in net payments for acquired businesses, primarily Z-Medica and HPC, capital expenditures of $90.7 million and net interest proceeds on swaps designated as net investment hedges of $19.3 million.
Cash Flow from Financing Activities
Net cash provided by financing activities from continuing operations was $455.2 million during 2020, which reflected a net increase in borrowings of $575.0 million primarily resulting from the issuance of $500 million of 4.25% Senior Notes due 2028 (the "2028 Notes") and additional borrowings totaling $75.0 million under our revolving credit facility and securitization program. Net cash provided by financing activities for the year ended December 31, 2020 also reflects contingent consideration payments of $67.2 million and dividend payments of $63.2 million.
For a discussion of our cash flow comparison for 2019 and 2018, refer to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019.
Free Cash Flow
Free cash flow is a non-GAAP financial measure and is calculated by subtracting capital expenditures from cash provided by operating activities from continuing operations. This financial measure is used in addition to and in conjunction with results presented in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S., or GAAP, and should not be considered a substitute for net cash provided by operating activities from continuing operations, the most comparable GAAP financial measure. Management believes that free cash flow is a useful measure to investors because it facilitates an assessment of funds available to satisfy current and future obligations, pay dividends and fund acquisitions. We also use this financial measure for internal managerial purposes and to evaluate period-to-period comparisons. Free cash flow is not a measure of cash available for discretionary expenditures since we have certain non-discretionary obligations, such as debt service, that are not deducted from the measure. We strongly encourage investors to review our financial statements and publicly-filed reports in their entirety and not to rely on any single financial measure. The following is a reconciliation of free cash flow to the most comparable GAAP measure.
 202020192018
Net cash provided by operating activities from continuing operations
$437.1 $437.1 $435.1 
Less: Capital expenditures
90.7 102.7 80.8 
Free cash flow
$346.4 $334.4 $354.3 
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Financing Arrangements
 
The following table provides our net debt to total capital ratio:
20202019
Net debt includes:
Current borrowings$100.5 $50.0 
Long-term borrowings2,377.9 1,858.9 
Unamortized debt issuance costs19.6 14.1 
Total debt2,498.0 1,923.0 
Less: Cash and cash equivalents375.9 301.1 
Net debt2,122.1 1,621.9 
Total capital includes:  
Net debt2,122.1 1,621.9 
Shareholders’ equity3,336.5 2,979.3 
Total capital$5,458.6 $4,601.2 
Percent of net debt to total capital38.9 %35.2 %
Fixed rate debt comprised 56.0% and 46.8% of total debt at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The increase in fixed rate borrowings as a percentage of total borrowings as of December 31, 2020 compared to the prior year was driven by the issuance of the 2028 Notes.
Senior credit facility
On April 5, 2019, we entered into a second amended and restated credit agreement (the "Credit Agreement"), which provides for a $1.0 billion revolving credit facility and a $700 million term loan facility, each of which matures on April 5, 2024. The Credit Agreement replaces a previous credit agreement under which we were provided a $1.0 billion credit facility and a $750 million term loan facility, due 2022 (the “prior term loan”). The $700 million term loan facility under the Credit Agreement principally was applied against the remaining $675 million principal balance of the prior term loan.
At our option, loans under the Credit Agreement will bear interest at a rate equal to adjusted LIBOR plus an applicable margin ranging from 1.25% to 2.00% or at an alternate base rate, which is defined as the highest of (i) the “Prime Rate” in the U.S. last quoted by The Wall Street Journal, (ii) 0.50% above the greater of the federal funds rate and the rate comprised of both overnight federal funds and overnight eurodollar borrowings and (iii) 1.00% above adjusted LIBOR for a one month interest period, plus in each case an applicable margin ranging from 0.125% to 1.00%, in each case subject to adjustments based on our consolidated total net leverage ratio (generally, Consolidated Total Funded Indebtedness (which is net of “Qualified Cash”), as defined in the Credit Agreement, on the date of determination to Consolidated EBITDA, as defined in the Credit Agreement, for the four most recent fiscal quarters ending on or preceding the date of determination). Overdue loans will bear interest at the rate otherwise applicable to such loans plus 2.00%.
At December 31, 2020, we had $350.0 million in borrowings outstanding and $1.9 million in outstanding standby letters of credit under our $1.0 billion revolving credit facility.
The Credit Agreement contains covenants that, among other things and subject to certain exceptions, place limitations on our ability, and the ability of our subsidiaries, to incur additional indebtedness; create additional liens; enter into a merger, consolidation or amalgamation or other defined "fundamental changes," dispose of certain assets, make certain investments or acquisitions, pay dividends, or make other restricted payments, enter into swap agreements or enter into transactions with our affiliates. Additionally, the Credit Agreement contains financial covenants that, subject to specified exceptions, require us to maintain a consolidated total net leverage ratio of not more than 4.50 to 1.00 and a consolidated interest coverage ratio (generally, Consolidated EBITDA for the four most recent fiscal quarters ending on or preceding the date of determination to Consolidated Interest Expense, as defined in the Credit Agreement, paid in cash for such period) of not less than 3.50 to 1.00. As of December 31, 2020, we were in compliance with the covenants in the Credit Agreement.
See Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding the Credit Agreement.
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2026, 2027 and 2028 Senior Notes
As of December 31, 2020, the outstanding principal amount of our 2026 Notes, 2027 Notes and 2028 Notes was $400 million, $500 million and $500 million, respectively. The indenture governing the 2026 Notes contain covenants that, among other things and subject to certain exceptions, limit or restrict our ability, and the ability of our subsidiaries, to incur additional debt or issue preferred stock or other disqualified stock, create liens, merge, consolidate, or dispose of certain assets pay dividends, make investments or make other restricted payments, or enter into transactions with our affiliates. The indenture governing the 2027 Notes contains covenants that, among other things and subject to certain exceptions, limit or restrict our ability, and the ability of our subsidiaries, to create liens; consolidate, merge or dispose of certain assets; and enter into sale leaseback transactions. The 2028 Notes contain covenants that, among other things, will restrict our ability and the ability of our subsidiaries to create certain liens, enter into sale lease back transactions, and merge, consolidate, sell or otherwise dispose of all or substantially all of our assets.The obligations under the Senior Notes are fully and unconditionally guaranteed, jointly and severally, by each of our existing and future 100% owned domestic subsidiaries that are a guarantor or other obligor under the Credit Agreement and by certain of our other 100% owned domestic subsidiaries. As of December 31, 2020, we were in compliance with all of the terms of our Senior Notes.
Accounts receivable securitization
We have an accounts receivable securitization facility under which we sell an undivided interest in domestic accounts receivable for consideration of up to a maximum amount of commercial paper conduit. In March 2020, we amended our accounts receivable securitization facility to increase the maximum available capacity from $50 million to $75 million. As of December 31, 2020, and 2019 we borrowed the maximum amount available at the time of $75.0 million and $50 million, respectively, under this facility. This facility is utilized to provide increased flexibility in funding short term working capital requirements. The agreement governing the accounts receivable securitization facility contains certain covenants and termination events. An occurrence of an event of default or a termination event under this facility may give rise to the right of our counterparty to terminate this facility. As of December 31, 2020, we were in compliance with the covenants and none of the termination events had occurred.
For additional information regarding our indebtedness, see Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
 
The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ materially from the amounts derived from those estimates and assumptions. 
We have identified the following as critical accounting estimates, which are defined as those that are reflective of significant judgments and uncertainties, are the most pervasive and important to the presentation of our financial condition and results of operations and could potentially result in materially different results under different assumptions and conditions. The following discussion should be considered in conjunction with the description of our accounting policies in Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Allowance for Credit Losses
In the ordinary course of business, we grant non-interest bearing trade credit to our customers on normal credit terms.  In an effort to reduce our credit risk, we (i) establish credit limits for all of our customer relationships, (ii) perform ongoing credit evaluations of our customers’ financial condition, (iii) monitor the payment history and aging of our customers’ receivables, and (iv) monitor open orders against an individual customer’s outstanding receivable balance.
An allowance for credit losses is maintained for trade accounts receivable based on the expected collectability of accounts receivable, after considering our historical collection experience, the length of time an account is outstanding, the financial position of the customer, information provided by credit rating services in addition to new requirements under the accounting guidance, effective January 1, 2020, that includes the consideration of events or circumstances indicating historic collection rates may not be indicative of future collectability, for example, potential customer liquidity concerns resulting from COVID-19, that may impact the collectability of our receivables as well as our estimate of credit losses expected to be incurred over the life of our receivables. Our allowance for credit losses
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was $12.9 million and $9.1 million at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, which constituted 3.0% and 2.1% of gross trade accounts receivable at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. The current portion of the allowance for credit losses, which was $8.1 million and $5.3 million as of December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, was recognized as a reduction of accounts receivable, net.
Although we maintain allowance for credit losses to cover the estimated losses which may occur when customers cannot make their required payments, we cannot be assured that the allowances will be sufficient to cover future losses given the volatility in the worldwide economy and the possibility that other, unanticipated events may adversely affect collectability of the accounts. If our allowance for credit losses is insufficient to address receivables we ultimately determine are uncollectible, we would be required to incur additional charges, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations.  Moreover, our inability to collect outstanding receivables could adversely affect our financial condition and cash flow from operations.
Distributor Rebates
We offer rebates to certain distributors and record a reserve with respect to the estimated amount of the rebates as a reduction of revenues at the time of sale. In estimating rebates, we consider the lag time between the point of sale and the payment of the distributor’s rebate claim, distributor-specific trend analyses, contractual commitments, including stated rebate rates, historical experience and other relevant information. When necessary, we adjust the reserves, with a corresponding adjustment to revenue, to reflect differences between estimated and actual experience. Historical adjustments to recorded reserves have not been significant and we do not expect significant revisions to the estimated rebates in the future. The reserve for estimated rebates was $28.5 million and $21.6 million at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. We expect to pay amounts subject to the reserve as of December 31, 2020 within 90 days subsequent to year-end.
Inventory Utilization
Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Factors utilized in the determination of estimated net realizable value and whether a reserve is required include (i) current sales data and historical return rates, (ii) estimates of future demand, (iii) competitive pricing pressures, (iv) new product introductions, (v) product expiration dates, and (vi) component and packaging obsolescence.
We review the net realizable value of inventory each reporting period and adjusted as necessary.  We regularly compare inventory quantities on hand against historical usage or forecasts related to specific items in order to evaluate obsolescence and excessive quantities. In assessing historical usage, we also qualitatively assess business trends to evaluate the reasonableness of using historical information in estimating future usage.
Long-Lived Assets
We assess the remaining useful life and recoverability of long-lived assets whenever events or circumstances indicate the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable. For example, such an assessment may be initiated if, as a result of a change in expectations, we believe it is more likely than not that the asset will be sold or disposed of significantly before the end of its useful life or if an adverse change occurs in the business employing the asset. Significant judgments in this area involve determining whether such events or circumstances have occurred and determining the appropriate asset group requiring evaluation. The recoverability evaluation is based on various analyses, including undiscounted cash flow projections, which involve significant management judgment. Any impairment loss, if indicated, equals the amount by which the carrying amount of the asset exceeds the estimated fair value of the asset.
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets
Intangible assets include indefinite-lived assets (such as goodwill, certain trade names and in-process research and development ("IPR&D")), as well as finite-lived intangibles (such as trade names that do not have indefinite lives, customer relationships, intellectual property, distribution rights and non-competition agreements) and are, generally, obtained through acquisition. Intangible assets acquired in a business combination are measured at fair value and we allocate any excess purchase price over the fair value of the net tangible and intangible assets acquired in a business combination to goodwill. Considerable management judgment is necessary in making the assumptions used in the estimated fair value of intangible assets acquired in a business combination.
The costs of finite-lived intangibles are amortized to expense over their estimated useful life. Determining the useful life of an intangible asset requires considerable judgment as different types of intangible assets typically will
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have different useful lives. Goodwill and other indefinite-lived intangible assets are not amortized; we test these assets annually for impairment during the fourth quarter, using the first day of the quarter as the measurement date, or earlier upon the occurrence of certain events or substantive changes in circumstances that indicate an impairment may have occurred. Such conditions may include an economic downturn in a geographic market or a change in the assessment of future operations.
Goodwill
Goodwill impairment assessments are performed at a reporting unit level. For purposes of this assessment, a reporting unit is an operating segment, or a business one level below that operating segment. No impairment was recorded as a result of the annual goodwill impairment testing performed during the fourth quarter of 2020.
In applying the goodwill impairment test, we may assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value. Qualitative factors may include, but are not limited to, macroeconomic conditions, industry conditions, the competitive environment, changes in the market for our products and services, regulatory and political developments, and entity specific factors such as strategies and financial performance. If, after completing the qualitative assessment, we determine it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value, we proceed to a two-step quantitative impairment test, described below test, described below. Alternatively, we may test goodwill for impairment through the two-step quantitative impairment test without conducting the qualitative analysis.
The first step of the two-step impairment test is to compare the fair value of a reporting unit to the carrying value. In performing the first step, we calculate the fair value of the reporting unit using equal weighting of two methods; one which estimates the discounted cash flows of the reporting unit based on projected earnings in the future (the Income Approach) and one which is based on sales of similar businesses to those of the reporting unit in actual transactions (the Market Approach).  If the fair value of the reporting unit exceeds the carrying value, there is no impairment. If the reporting unit carrying value exceeds the fair value, we recognize an impairment loss based on the amount by which the carrying value of goodwill exceeds its implied fair value, which we determine in the second step of the two-step test. The implied fair value of goodwill is determined by deducting the fair value of a reporting unit's identifiable assets and liabilities from the fair value of the reporting unit as a whole, as if that reporting unit had just been acquired and the fair value of the individual assets acquired and liabilities assumed were being determined initially.
The more significant judgments and assumptions in determining fair value using in the Income Approach include (1) the amount and timing of expected future cash flows, which are based primarily on our estimates of future sales, operating income, industry trends and the regulatory environment of the individual reporting units, (2) the expected long-term growth rates for each of our reporting units, which approximate the expected long-term growth rate of the global economy and of the medical device industry, and (3) discount rates that are used to discount future cash flows to their present values, which are based on an assessment of the risk inherent in the future cash flows of the respective reporting units along with various market based inputs. The more significant judgments and assumptions used in the Market Approach include (1) determination of appropriate revenue and EBITDA multiples used to estimate a reporting unit’s fair value and (2) the selection of appropriate comparable companies to be used for purposes of determining those multiples. There were no changes to the underlying methods used in 2020 as compared to the valuations of our reporting units in the past several years.
Our expected future growth rates estimated for purposes of the goodwill impairment test are based on our estimates of future sales, operating income and cash flow and are consistent with our internal budgets and business plans, which reflect a modest amount of core revenue growth coupled with the successful launch of new products each year; the effect of these growth indicators more than offset volume losses from products that are expected to reach the end of their life cycle. Changes in assumptions underlying the Income Approach could cause a reporting unit's carrying value to exceed its fair value. While we believe our assumed growth rates of sales and cash flows are reasonable, the possibility remains that the revenue growth of a reporting unit may not be as high as expected, and, as a result, the estimated fair value of that reporting unit may decline. In this regard, if our strategy and new products are not successful and we do not achieve anticipated core revenue growth in the future with respect to a reporting unit, the goodwill in the reporting unit may become impaired and, in such case, we may incur material impairment charges. Moreover, changes in revenue and EBITDA multiples in actual transactions from those historically present could result in an assessment that a reporting unit’s carrying value exceeds its fair value, in which case we also may incur material impairment charges.
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Other Intangible Assets
 
Intangible assets are assets acquired that lack physical substance and that meet the specified criteria for recognition apart from goodwill. Management tests indefinite-lived intangible assets for impairment annually, and more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that an impairment may have occurred. Similar to the goodwill impairment test process, we may assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of an indefinite-lived intangible asset is less than its carrying value. If, after completing the qualitative assessment, we determine it is more likely than not that the fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible asset is greater than its carrying amount, the asset is not impaired. If we conclude it is more likely than not that the fair value of the indefinite-lived intangible asset is less than the carrying value, we then proceed to a quantitative impairment test, which consists of a comparison of the fair value of the intangible asset to its carrying amount. Alternatively, we may elect to forgo the qualitative analysis and test the indefinite-lived intangible asset for impairment through the quantitative impairment test.
In connection with intangible assets acquired in a business combination and quantitative impairment tests, we determine the estimated fair value using various methods under the Income Approach. The more significant judgements and assumptions used in the valuation of intangible assets may include revenue growth rates, royalty rate, discount rate, attrition rate, and EBITDA margin. Each of these factors and assumptions can significantly impact the value of the intangible asset.
During the year ended December 31, 2020 we recognized impairment charges of $21.4 million related primarily to our decision to abandon intellectual property and other assets related to the Percuvance percutaneous surgical system product line. See "Restructuring and impairment charges" within "Result of Operations" above as well as Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information on these charges.
Share-based Compensation
 
We estimate the fair value of share-based awards on the date of grant and recognize as expense the value of the portion of the award that is ultimately expected to vest over the requisite service periods. Share-based compensation expense related to stock options is measured using a Black-Scholes option pricing model that takes into account subjective and complex assumptions with respect to expected life of options, volatility, risk-free interest rate and expected dividend yield. The expected life of options granted represents the period of time that options are expected to be outstanding, which is derived from the vesting period of the award, as well as historical exercise behavior. Expected volatility is based on a blend of historical volatility and implied volatility derived from publicly traded options to purchase our common stock, which we believe is more reflective of market conditions and a better indicator of expected volatility than solely using historical volatility. The risk-free interest rate is the implied yield currently available on U.S. Treasury zero-coupon issues with a remaining term equal to the expected life of the option. Share-based compensation expense related to non-vested restricted stock units is measured based on the market price of the underlying stock on the grant date discounted for the risk free interest rate and the present value of expected dividends over the vesting period. Share based compensation expense for 2020 and 2019 was $20.7 million and $26.9 million, respectively.
Contingent Consideration Liabilities
 
In connection with an acquisition, we may be required to pay future consideration that is contingent upon the achievement of specified objectives, such as receipt of regulatory approval, commercialization of a product or achievement of sales targets. As of the acquisition date, we record a contingent liability representing the estimated fair value of the contingent consideration we expect to pay. We determined the fair value of the contingent consideration liabilities using a Monte Carlo valuation approach, which simulates future revenues during the earn out-period using management's best estimates and other probability-weighted discounted cash flow analysis. Significant judgment is required in determining the assumptions used to calculate the fair value of the contingent consideration. Increases in projected revenues and probabilities of payment may result in significantly higher fair value measurements; decreases in these items may have the opposite effect. Increases in discount rates in the periods prior to payment may result in significantly lower fair value measurements; decreases may have the opposite effect. See Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information.
We remeasure our contingent consideration liabilities each reporting period and recognize the change in the liabilities' fair value within selling, general and administrative expenses in our consolidated statement of income. As
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of December 31, 2020 and 2019, we accrued $36.6 million and $219.9 million of contingent consideration, respectively.
Income Taxes
Our annual provision for income taxes and determination of the deferred tax assets and liabilities require management to assess uncertainties, make judgments regarding outcomes and utilize estimates. The difficulties inherent in such assessments, judgments and estimates are particularly challenging because we conduct a broad range of operations around the world, subjecting us to complex tax regulations in numerous international jurisdictions. As a result, we are at times subject to tax audits, disputes with tax authorities and potential litigation, the outcome of which is uncertain. In connection with its estimates of our tax assets and liabilities, management must, among other things, make judgments about the outcome of these uncertain matters.
Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured and recorded using currently enacted tax rates that are expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their tax bases are recovered or settled. The likelihood of a material change in our expected realization of these assets is dependent on future taxable income, our ability to use foreign tax credit carryforwards and carrybacks, final U.S. and non-U.S. tax settlements, changes in tax law, and the effectiveness of our tax planning strategies in the various relevant jurisdictions. While management believes that its judgments and interpretations regarding income taxes are appropriate, significant differences in actual experience may require future adjustments to our tax assets and liabilities, which could be material.  
In assessing the realizability of our deferred tax assets, we evaluate positive and negative evidence and use judgments regarding past and future events, including results of operations and available tax planning strategies that could be implemented to realize the deferred tax assets. Based on this assessment, we determine when it is more likely than not that all or some portion of our deferred tax assets may not be realized, in which case we apply a valuation allowance to offset the amount of such deferred tax assets.  To the extent facts and circumstances change in the future, adjustments to the valuation allowances may be required. The valuation allowance for deferred tax assets of $155.0 million and $119.2 million at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, relates principally to the uncertainty of the utilization of tax loss and credit carryforwards in various jurisdictions.
Significant judgment is required in determining income tax provisions and in evaluating tax positions. We establish additional provisions for income taxes when, despite the belief that tax positions are supportable, there remain certain positions that do not meet the minimum probability threshold, which is a tax position that is more likely than not to be sustained upon examination by the applicable taxing authority. In the normal course of business, we are examined by various federal, state and non-U.S. tax authorities. We regularly assess the potential outcomes of these examinations and any future examinations for the current or prior years in determining the adequacy of our provision for income taxes. We adjust the income tax provision, the current tax liability and deferred taxes in any period in which we become aware of facts that necessitate an adjustment. We are currently under examination in Ireland and Germany. The ultimate outcome of this examination could result in increases or decreases to our recorded tax liabilities, which would affect our financial results. See Note 15 to the consolidated financial statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding our uncertain tax positions.

New Accounting Standards
 
See Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a discussion of recently issued accounting standards, including estimated effects, if any, of the adoption of those standards on our consolidated financial statements.

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ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
We are exposed to certain financial risks, specifically fluctuations in market interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates and, to a lesser extent, commodity prices. We address these risks through a risk management program that includes the use of derivative financial instruments. We do not enter into derivative instruments for trading or speculative purposes. We manage our exposure to counterparty risk on derivative instruments by entering into contracts with a diversified group of major financial institutions and by actively monitoring outstanding positions.
We also are exposed to changes in the market trading price of our common stock as it influences the valuation of stock options and their effect on earnings.
Interest Rate Risk
We are exposed to changes in interest rates as a result of our borrowing activities and our cash balances. The table below provides information regarding the interest rates by year of maturity for our fixed and variable rate debt obligations. Variable interest rates on December 31, 2020 were determined using a base rate of the one-month LIBOR rate plus the applicable spread.
Year of Maturity  
20212022202320242025ThereafterTotal
Fixed rate debt$— $— $— $— $— $1,400.0 $1,400.0 
Average interest rate— %— %— %— %— %4.563 %4.563 %
Variable rate debt$100.5 $35.0 $43.8 $918.7 $— $— $1,098.0 
Average interest rate1.346