10-K 1 lgf201833110-k.htm FORM 10-K Document

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018
            
Commission File No.: 1-14880
LIONS GATE ENTERTAINMENT CORP.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
British Columbia, Canada
 
N/A
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer
 Identification No.)
 
 
 
250 Howe Street, 20th Floor
Vancouver, British Columbia V6C 3R8
 
2700 Colorado Avenue
Santa Monica, California 90404
(877) 848-3866
 
(310) 449-9200
(Address of Principal Executive Offices, Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code:
(877) 848-3866
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Class A Voting Common Shares, no par value per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Class B Non-Voting Common Shares, no par value per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
___________________________________________________________
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes þ No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. Yes o No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes þ No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes þ No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
þ
 
 
Accelerated filer
o
Non-accelerated filer
o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
Smaller reporting company
o
 
 
 
 
Emerging growth company
o
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes o No þ
The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of September 30, 2017 (the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter) was approximately $5,273,583,977, based on the closing sale price of such shares as reported on the New York Stock Exchange.
As of May 21, 2018, 81,963,808 shares of the registrant’s no par value Class A voting common shares were outstanding, and 129,432,497 shares of the registrant's no par value Class B non-voting common shares were outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
     Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement relating to its 2018 annual meeting of shareholders (the “ 2018 Proxy Statement”) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K where indicated. The 2018 Proxy Statement will be filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year to which this report relates.



 
 
 
 
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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This report includes statements that are, or may be deemed to be, “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"). These forward-looking statements can be identified by the use of forward-looking terminology, including the terms “believes,” “estimates,” “potential,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “projects,” “forecasts,” “may,” “will,” “could,” “would” or “should” or, in each case, their negative or other variations or comparable terminology. These forward-looking statements include all matters that are not historical facts. They appear in a number of places throughout this report and include statements regarding our intentions, beliefs or current expectations concerning, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, liquidity, prospects, growth, strategies and the industry in which we operate.

By their nature, forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties because they relate to events and depend on circumstances that may or may not occur in the future. We believe that these risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those discussed under Part I, Item 1A. “Risk Factors.” These factors should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read with the other cautionary statements and information in the report.

We caution you that forward-looking statements made in this report or anywhere else are not guarantees of future performance and that our actual results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate may differ materially and adversely from those made in or suggested by the forward-looking statements contained in this report as a result of various important factors, including, but not limited to: the substantial investment of capital required to produce and market films and television series, increased costs for producing and marketing feature films and television series; budget overruns; limitations imposed by our credit facilities and notes; unpredictability of the commercial success of our motion pictures and television programming; risks related to acquisition and integration of acquired businesses; the effects of dispositions of businesses or assets, including individual films or libraries; the cost of defending our intellectual property; technological changes and other trends affecting the entertainment industry; potential adverse reactions or changes to business or employee relationships; litigation relating to the acquisition of Starz; impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act; and the other risks and uncertainties discussed under Part I, Item 1.A. “Risk Factors”. In addition, even if our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity, and the development of the industry in which we operate are consistent with the forward looking statements contained in this report, those results or developments may not be indicative of results or developments in subsequent periods.

Any forward-looking statements, which we make in this report, speak only as of the date of such statement, and we undertake no obligation to update such statements. Comparisons of results for current and any prior periods are not intended to express any future trends or indications of future performance, unless expressed as such, and should only be viewed as historical data.

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains references to our trademarks and to trademarks belonging to other entities. Solely for convenience, trademarks and trade names referred to in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including logos, artwork and other visual displays, may appear without the ® or TM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that we will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, our rights or the rights of the applicable licensor to these trademarks and trade names. We do not intend our use or display of other companies’ trade names or trademarks to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, any other company.

Unless otherwise indicated or the context requires, all references to the “Company,” “Lionsgate,” “we,” “us,” and “our” refer to Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., a corporation organized under the laws of the province of British Columbia, Canada, and its direct and indirect subsidiaries.


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PART I
ITEM 1. BUSINESS.
lionsgatelogoa17.jpg
Overview

Lionsgate is a global content platform whose films, television series, digital products and linear and over-the-top platforms reach next generation audiences around the world. In addition to our filmed entertainment leadership, Lionsgate content drives a growing presence in interactive and location-based entertainment, gaming, virtual reality and other new entertainment technologies. Lionsgate's content initiatives are backed by a 16,000-title film and television library and delivered through a global licensing infrastructure.

We manage and report our operating results through three reportable business segments: Motion Pictures, Television Production and Media Networks. Financial information for our segments is set forth in Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this Annual Report.

Motion Pictures

Our Motion Pictures segment includes revenues derived from the following:

Theatrical. Theatrical revenues are derived from the domestic theatrical release of motion pictures licensed to theatrical exhibitors on a picture-by-picture basis (distributed by us directly in the United States and through a sub-distributor in Canada).

Home Entertainment. Home entertainment revenues are derived from the sale or rental of our film productions and acquired or licensed films and certain television programs (including theatrical and direct-to-video releases) on packaged media and through digital media platforms. In addition, we have revenue sharing arrangements with certain digital media platforms which generally provide that, in exchange for a nominal or no upfront sales price, we share in the rental or sales revenues generated by the platform on a title-by-title basis.

Television. Television revenues are primarily derived from the licensing of our theatrical productions and acquired films to the linear pay, basic cable and free television markets.

International. International revenues are derived from the licensing from our international subsidiaries of our productions, acquired films, our catalog product and libraries of acquired titles to international distributors, on a territory-by-territory basis. International revenues also include revenues from the direct distribution of our productions, acquired films, and our catalog product and libraries of acquired titles in the United Kingdom

Other. Other revenues are derived from, among others, our interactive ventures and games division, our global franchise management division (including location-based entertainment), the sales and licensing of music from the theatrical exhibition of our films and the television broadcast of our productions, and from the licensing of our film and television content to ancillary markets.

Television Production

Our Television Production segment includes revenues derived from the following:

Domestic Television. Domestic television revenues are derived from the licensing and syndication to domestic markets of scripted and unscripted series, television movies, mini-series and non-fiction programming.

International. International revenues are derived from the licensing and syndication to international markets of scripted and unscripted series, television movies, mini-series and non-fiction programming.

Home Entertainment. Home entertainment revenues are derived from the sale or rental of television production movies or series on packaged media and through digital media platforms.


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Other. Other revenues are derived from, among others, product integration in our television episodes and programs, the sales and licensing of music from the television broadcasts of our productions, and from the licensing of our television programs to ancillary markets.

Media Networks

Our Media Networks segment includes revenues derived from the following:

Starz Networks. Starz Networks’ revenues are derived from the distribution of our STARZ branded premium subscription video services pursuant to affiliation agreements with U.S. multichannel video programming distributors (“MVPDs”), including cable operators, satellite television providers and telecommunications companies and online video providers (collectively, “Distributors”), and on an over-the-top (“OTT”) basis.

Content and Other. Original content revenues are derived from the licensing of Starz original programming to digital media platforms, international television networks, through packaged media and other ancillary markets.

Streaming Services. Streaming services revenues are derived from the Lionsgate legacy start-up direct to consumer streaming services on subscription video-on-demand (“SVOD”) platforms.

Segment Revenue

For the year ended March 31, 2018, contributions to the Company’s consolidated revenues from its reporting segments included Motion Pictures 44.1%, Television Production 19.5% and Media Networks 37.1%.

Within the Motion Pictures segment, revenues were generated from the following:
Theatrical, 15.4%;
Home Entertainment, 42.5%;
Television, 15.3%;
International, 25.1%; and
Motion Pictures-Other, 1.7%.

Within the Television Production segment, revenues were generated from the following:
Domestic Television, 78.9%;
International, 16.8%;
Home Entertainment, 3.8%; and
Television Production-Other, 0.5%.

Within the Media Networks segment, revenues were generated from the following:
Starz Networks, 91.6%;
Content and Other, 7.9%; and
Streaming Services, 0.5%.

Corporate Strategy

We continue to grow and diversify our portfolio of content to capitalize on demand from traditional and emerging platforms throughout the world. We maintain a disciplined approach to acquisition, production and distribution of content, by balancing our financial risks against the probability of commercial success for each project. We pursue the same disciplined approach to investments in, and acquisition of, libraries and other assets complementary to our business. We believe that our strategic focus on content and creation of innovative content distribution strategies will enhance our competitive position in the industry, ensure optimal use of our capital, build a diversified foundation for future growth and generate significant long-term value for our shareholders.


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MOTION PICTURES

Motion Pictures - Theatrical

Theatrical Production

Theatrical production consists of “greenlighting” (proceeding with production) and financing motion pictures, as well as the development of screenplays, filming activities and the post-filming editing/post-production process.

We take a disciplined approach to theatrical production with the goal of producing content that can be distributed through various domestic and international platforms. We typically attempt to mitigate the financial risk associated with production by, among other things:

Negotiating co-financing development and co-production agreements (which provide for joint efforts and cost-sharing between us and one or more third-party companies);

Pre-licensing international distribution rights on a selective basis, including through international output agreements (which refers to licensing the rights to distribute a film in one or more media generally for a limited term, in one or more specific territories prior to completion of the film);

Structuring agreements that provide for participation by talent in the financial success of the motion picture in exchange for reducing guaranteed amounts that would be paid regardless of the film's success (referred to as “up-front payments”)

Utilizing governmental incentives, programs and other structures from state and foreign countries (which typically take the form of sales tax refunds, transferable tax credits, refundable tax credits, low interest loans, direct subsidies or cash rebates, calculated based on the amount of money spent in the particular jurisdiction in connection with the production).

Our approach to acquiring films for theatrical release is similar to our approach to film production. We generally seek to limit our financial exposure in acquiring films while adding films of quality and commercial viability to our release schedule and library.

Theatrical Distribution

In general, the economic life of a motion picture consists of its exploitation in theaters, on packaged media and on various digital and television platforms in territories around the world.

Theatrical distribution refers to the marketing and commercial or retail exploitation of motion pictures. We distribute motion pictures directly to movie theaters in the U.S. Generally, distributors and exhibitors will enter into agreements whereby the exhibitor retains a portion of the “gross box office receipts,” which are the admissions paid at the box office. The balance is remitted to the distributor. Concurrent with their release in the U.S., motion pictures are generally released in Canada and may also be released in one or more other foreign markets. After the initial theatrical release, distributors seek to maximize revenues by releasing movies in sequential release date windows, which may be exclusive against other non-theatrical distribution channels.

We construct release schedules taking into account moviegoer attendance patterns and competition from other studios' scheduled theatrical releases. We use either wide (generally, more than 2,000 screens nationwide) or limited initial releases, depending on the film. We believe that we generally spend significantly less on prints and advertising for a given film than other studios and design our marketing plans to cost-effectively reach a large audience.

Producing, marketing and distributing a motion picture can involve significant risks and costs, and can cause our financial results to vary depending on the timing of a motion picture’s release. For example, marketing costs are generally incurred before and throughout the theatrical release of a film and, to a lesser extent, other distribution windows, and are expensed as incurred. Therefore, we typically incur losses with respect to a particular film prior to and during the film’s theatrical exhibition, and profitability for the film may not be realized until after its theatrical release window.

We may revise the release date of a motion picture as the production schedule changes or in such a manner as we believe is likely to maximize revenues or for other business reasons. Additionally, there can be no assurance that any of the motion pictures scheduled for release will be completed, that completion will occur in accordance with the anticipated schedule or budget, or that the film will ever be released.


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Theatrical Releases

In fiscal 2018 (i.e., the twelve-month period ended March 31, 2018), we released 42 films in the U.S. across all our labels, which included the following:

Fifteen (16) films released through our Lionsgate and Summit Entertainment labels (including films developed and produced in-house, films co-developed and co-produced and films acquired from third parties);
Eight (8) films released through our Lionsgate Premiere label;
One (1) film released through Good Universe, a motion picture production and global sales company acquired in October 2017;
Five (5) films released through Pantelion Films, our joint venture with Grupo Televisa S.A.B.; and
Twelve (12) films released through our partnership with Roadside Attractions.



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Fiscal 2018
Theatrical Releases
Title
Release Date
Label/Partnership
Tyler Perry’s Acrimony
March 30, 2018
Lionsgate
Finding Your Feet
March 30, 2018
Roadside Attractions
I Can Only Imagine
March 16, 2018
Roadside Attractions
Monster Hunt 2
February 16, 2018
Lionsgate
Early Man
February 16, 2018
Summit
The Party
February 16, 2018
Roadside Attractions
La Boda De Valentina
February 9, 2018
Pantelion Films
Winchester
February 2, 2018
Lionsgate
Forever My Girl
January 19, 2018
Roadside Attractions
The Commuter
January 12, 2018
Lionsgate
Acts of Violence*
January 12, 2018
Lionsgate Premiere
El Condorito
January 12, 2018
Pantelion Films
The Disaster Artist
December 1, 2017
Good Universe/A24
Wonder
November 17, 2017
Lionsgate
Cook Off!*
November 17, 2017
Lionsgate Premiere
Last Flag Flying
November 3, 2017
Lionsgate
Jigsaw
October 27, 2017
Lionsgate
Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween
October 20, 2017
Lionsgate
Wonderstruck
October 20, 2017
Roadside Attractions
Leatherface
October 20, 2017
Lionsgate
My Little Pony: The Movie
October 6, 2017
Lionsgate
Stronger
September 22, 2017
Lionsgate/Roadside Attractions
American Assassin
September 15, 2017
Lionsgate
Rememory*
September 8, 2017
Lionsgate Premiere
Unlocked*
September 1, 2017
Lionsgate Premiere
Hazlo Como Hombre (Do It Like An Hombre)
September 1, 2017
Pantelion Films
The Hitman’s Bodyguard
August 18, 2017
Summit
The Glass Castle
August 11, 2017
Lionsgate
The Only Living Boy In New York
August 11, 2017
Roadside Attractions
First Kill*
July 21, 2017
Lionsgate Premiere
Lady Macbeth
July 14, 2017
Roadside Attractions
Inconceivable*
June 30, 2017
Lionsgate Premiere
The Big Sick
June 23, 2017
Lionsgate
All Eyez on Me
June 16, 2017
Summit
Beatriz at Dinner
June 9, 2017
Roadside Attractions
3 Idiotas
June 2, 2017
Pantelion Films
Black Butterfly*
May 26, 2017
Lionsgate Premiere
The Wedding Plan
May 12, 2017
Roadside Attractions
The Wall (2017)
May 12, 2017
Roadside Attractions
How To Be A Latin Lover
April 28, 2017
Pantelion Films
Tommy’s Honour
April 14, 2017
Roadside Attractions
Aftermath*
April 7, 2017
Lionsgate Premiere

* Released “day & date” (a release strategy in which select titles are released on video-on-demand (“VOD”) and other digital formats on the same day as the title is theatrically released).

From time to time, we also release films through our CodeBlack Films label, our Grindstone Entertainment Group label and though Studio L, our newest label featuring films from our digital content business.

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Over the last 16 years, Lionsgate and affiliated companies have distributed films that have earned 124 Academy Award® nominations and 30 wins, as well as numerous Globe Awards®, Producers Guild Awards®, Screen Actors Guild Awards®, Directors Guild Awards®, BAFTA Awards and Independent Spirit Awards nominations and wins.

Motion Pictures - Home Entertainment

Our U.S. home entertainment distribution operation exploits our film and television content library of approximately 16,000 motion picture titles and television episodes and programs, consisting of titles from, among others, Lionsgate, our subsidiaries, affiliates and joint ventures (such as Starz, Summit Entertainment, Anchor Bay Entertainment, Artisan Entertainment, CodeBlack Films, Grindstone Entertainment Group, Modern Entertainment, Trimark, Pantelion Films and Roadside Attractions), as well as titles from third parties such as A24, A&E, Amazon Studios, AMC, CBS Films, Entertainment Studios, Marvel, Miramax, Saban Entertainment, StudioCanal, The Orchard, and Tyler Perry Studios.

Home entertainment revenue consists of packaged media and digital revenue.

Packaged Media

Packaged media distribution involves the marketing, promotion and sale and/or lease of DVDs/Blu-ray discs to wholesalers and retailers who then sell or rent the DVDs/Blu-ray discs to consumers for private viewing. Fulfillment of physical distribution services are substantially licensed to Twentieth Century Fox Home Entertainment.

We distribute or sell content directly to retailers such as Wal-Mart, Best Buy, Target, Amazon, Costco and others who buy large volumes of our DVDs/Blu-ray discs to sell directly to consumers. Sales to Wal-Mart accounted for approximately 43% of net home entertainment packaged media revenue in fiscal 2018. We also directly distribute content to the rental market through Redbox, Netflix and others.

Of these titles, certain are released through our subsidiary, Grindstone Entertainment Group, which acquires and/or produces titles as finished pictures and as “pre-buys” based on script, cast and genres, and creates targeted key art, marketing materials and release plans, which are then distributed direct-to-video, VOD and through other media. In fiscal 2018, Grindstone Entertainment Group released 33 titles.

Additionally, we distribute television product including series such as American Gods, Ash vs. Evil Dead, Blue Mountain State, Casual, Counterpart, Duck Dynasty, Fear the Walking Dead, Grace and Frankie, Graves, Narcos, Knightfall, MacGyver, Into the Badlands, Mad Men, Nurse Jackie, Orange Is The New Black, Power, The Royals, The Walking Dead, Weeds, library titles such as Alf and Little House on the Prairie, certain Disney-ABC Domestic Television series, as well as premier children's brands including our Alpha and Omega franchise, Saban Brand’s Power Rangers, Aardman’s Shaun the Sheep library, LeapFrog Entertainment's LeapFrog, MGA Entertainment's LalaLoopsy and Bratz, American Greetings' Care Bears, and our catalog of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles and Marvel Animated Features.

Our year included the following:

In fiscal 2018, four (4) of our theatrical releases debuted at number one on DVD/Blu-ray - La La Land, Power Rangers (which held onto the number one spot for two (2) consecutive weeks), Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween, and Wonder (which held onto the number one spot for two (2) consecutive weeks).

In fiscal 2018, we shipped approximately 65 million DVD/Blu-ray finished units.

In calendar 2017, we had an approximate 11% market share for home entertainment, making us the number five (5) studio in market share overall.

In calendar 2017, we a maintained a box office-to-home entertainment conversion rate of 18% above the industry average, leading all major studios. Box office-to-home entertainment conversion rate is calculated as the ratio of the total of both first cycle DVD release revenues and total digital platform revenues for a theatrical release compared to the total North American box-office revenues from such theatrical release.


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Digital Media

Digital media distribution involves delivering content (including certain titles not distributed theatrically or on packaged media) by electronic means directly to consumers in-home and on mobile devices. The key distribution methods today include transactional distribution (such as pay-per-view (“PPV”), electronic-sell-through (“EST”) and transactional video-on-demand (“TVOD”)), non-transactional video-on-demand distribution (such as SVOD, advertiser-supported video-on-demand (“AVOD”) and free video-on-demand (“FVOD”)), as well as distribution through various linear pay, basic cable and free television platforms.

Digital transactional platforms and networks to which we distribute our content include, among others, iTunes, Amazon, Wal-Mart's Vudu, Google Play, Microsoft's Xbox, Sony's PlayStation Network and Valve Corporation’s Steam platform. Digital SVOD services to which we license our content include, among others, Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime. AVOD services to which we license or content include, among others, Roku, Tubi TV, Pluto and YouTube. We also directly distribute digital transactional content to MVPDs including cable operators (such as Comcast and Charter), satellite television providers (such as DIRECTV and DISH Network) and telecommunications companies (such as Verizon).

Linear networks to which we distribute our content include, among others, pay television networks such as Starz, EPIX, HBO and Showtime, and basic cable networks such as USA Network, FX, Turner Entertainment Networks, BET, Pop, A&E, SyFy, Lifetime, MTV, Bravo, Comedy Central, Paramount Network, Audience Network, Spike, AMC Networks, Freeform, Reelz, Nickelodeon, El Rey, HD Net, Bounce, Telemundo and UniMás.

Our year included the following:

In fiscal 2018, seven (7) our titles reached the number one ranking on the iTunes’ movie charts, which included La La Land, John Wick: Chapter 2, The Big Sick, Wind River, Hitman’s Bodyguard, American Assassin, and Wonder.

In fiscal 2018, five (5) titles we distribute debuted at the number one ranking on the Rentrak On-Demand charts, which included La La Land, John Wick: Chapter 2, Hitman’s Bodyguard, Tyler Perry’s Boo 2! A Madea Halloween and Wonder.

In fiscal 2018, four (4) of our other titles reached the number two ranking on the Rentrak On-Demand charts, which included Patriots Day, Saban’s Power Rangers, Wind River and American Assassin.

Motion Pictures - Television

We license our theatrical productions and acquired films to the domestic linear pay, basic cable and free television markets. For additional information regarding such distribution, see Motion Pictures-Home Entertainment-Digital Media above.

Motion Pictures - International

Our international sales operations are headquartered at our offices in London, England. The primary components of our international business are, on a territory by territory basis through third parties or directly through our international divisions:

The licensing of rights in all media of our in-house feature film product and third party acquisitions on an output basis;
The licensing of rights in all media of our in-house product and third party acquisitions on a sales basis for non-output territories;
The licensing of third party feature films on an agency basis; and
Direct distribution of theatrical and/or ancillary rights licensing.

We license rights in all media on a territory by territory basis (other than the territories where we self-distribute) of (i) our in-house Lionsgate and Summit Entertainment feature film product, and (ii) films produced by third parties such as Black Label Media, CBS Films, Gold Circle Films, Participant Media, River Road Entertainment, Thunder Road Pictures and other independent producers. Films licensed and/or released by us internationally in fiscal 2018 included such in-house productions as Sicario: Day of the Soldado, City of Lies, The Spy Who Dumped Me, A Simple Favor, Chaos Walking, Flarsky, Hotel Artemis and Anna.  Third party films for which we were engaged as exclusive sales agent and/or released by us internationally in fiscal 2018 included Belleville Cop, On the Basis of Sex, Green Book and Beirut.

Through our territory by territory sales and output arrangements, we generally cover a substantial portion of the production budget or acquisition cost of new theatrical releases which we license and distribute internationally. Our output agreements for Lionsgate and Summit feature films currently cover twelve (12) major territories including the following:


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Australia/New Zealand;
Benelux (Belgium/Netherlands/Luxembourg);
Canada;
CIS (Commonwealth of Independent States);
Eastern Europe (Bulgaria, Check Republic, Hungary, Romania and Slovak Republic) ;
France;
Italy;
Middle East;
Poland;
Scandinavia;
Singapore; and
Spain.

These output agreements generally include all rights for all media (including home entertainment and television rights). We also distribute theatrical titles in Latin America through our partnership with International Distribution Company and certain theatrical titles in China through our relationship with Hunan TV & Broadcast Intermediary Co. In all, our distribution operations cover 13 major international territories.

We also self-distribute motion pictures in the United Kingdom and Ireland through Lions Gate International UK (“Lionsgate UK”). Lionsgate UK has established a reputation in the United Kingdom as a leading producer, distributor and acquirer of commercially successful and critically acclaimed product. In fiscal 2018, Lionsgate UK released the following twenty-three (23) films theatrically:

Fiscal 2018
Theatrical Releases - Lionsgate UK
Title
Release Date
Production/ Acquisition
My Generation
March 14, 2018
Acquisition
Winchester
February 2, 2018
Acquisition
Journey’s End
February 2, 2018
Acquisition
Stronger
December 8, 2017
Production
Wonder
December 1, 2017
Production
Film Stars Don’t Die In Liverpool
November 17, 2017
Acquisition
Only The Brave
November 10, 2017
Production
Jigsaw
October 26, 2017
Production
The Princess Bride (30th Anniversary)
October 23, 2017
Re-Release
My Little Pony: The Movie
October 20, 2017
Production
The Glass Castle
 October 6, 2017
Production
Maze
September 22, 2017
Acquisition
American Assassin
September 14, 2017
Production
Limehouse Golem
September 1, 2017
Acquisition
The Hitman’s Bodyguard
August 17, 2017
Acquisition
Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets
August 2, 2017
Acquisition
All Eyez On Me
June 30, 2017
Acquisition
Churchill
June 16, 2017
Acquisition
My Name Is Lenny
June 9, 2017
Acquisition
The Last Face
May 12, 1017
Acquisition
Unlocked
May 5, 2017
Acquisition
Their Finest
April 21, 2017
Acquisition
The Autopsy of Jane Doe
March 31, 2017
Acquisition

Additionally, with an office in Mumbai, India, we spearhead all licensing to local linear and digital platforms in the territory from feature films, television series and library content under the Lionsgate and Starz brands. Lionsgate India works closely with our theatrical distribution partners to maximize box office for our films, partners with local production companies to develop

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intellectual property for theatrical release as well as distribution across other media platforms, and also generally explores investment opportunities throughout the Indian media market.

Motion Pictures - Other

Interactive Ventures and Games
 
        Our Interactive Ventures and Games division oversees our interactive business which includes multiplatform games based off our and third party intellectual property, esports, augmented and virtual reality and strategic investments in digital businesses including emerging content platforms, esports franchises and world-class game developers/publishers.
 
        Over the past few years, we have invested in interactive storytellers Telltale Games, Finnish mobile game developer/publisher Next Games, live-streaming native mobile gaming platform Mobcrush, and leading esports franchise Immortals, which includes the Los Angeles Valiant of The Overwatch League. In gaming, we currently have a slate of over thirty (30) projects in varying stages of development, production and release. Our game releases to date have included Saban’s Power Rangers: Legacy Wars, a top ranked free to play mobile game developed and published by nWay, John Wick Chronicles, an arcade style shooter game in virtual reality developed and published by Starbreeze, and an Orange Is The New Black slot machine game with International Game Technology. We also integrate our intellectual property into some of the world’s most popular games including Saw into Dead by Daylight, John Wick and Reservoir Dogs into Payday 2, and Power Rangers into Family Guy: The Quest for Stuff. Moreover, we have also positioned ourselves as a leader in the world of esports through our investments in Immortals and Mobcrush. Indeed, the Los Angeles Valiant was one of twelve (12) teams competing in the 2018 inaugural season of The Overwatch League. The league entered into several sponsorships, including Toyota and HP, as well as a streaming with Twitch. The Immortals’ Mobile Division also competes in the leagues recently announced for Supercell title Clash Royale and Tencent’s Arena of Valor.

Global Franchise Management

        Our Global Franchise Management division broadly covers all theatrical and television promotions and branded partnerships, licensed consumer products and live and location-based entertainment initiatives. Our goal is to drive incremental revenue and build consumer engagement across our entire portfolio of properties via meaningful brand extensions, a consumer products licensing business and launching live shows and location-based entertainment destinations around the world. 

Our business includes, among others, the following projects:

The La La Land live film-to-concert series, first launched at the Hollywood Bowl in May 2017, and currently on a worldwide tour in 25 major international countries;
The opening of our first Lionsgate branded theme park zone in Motiongate Dubai in October 2017;
The opening of our first permanent horror attraction in Las Vegas, The Official Saw Escape Experience, and five seasonal horror activations at various parks around the world, including the Halloween Fright Nights at the Universal parks in the United States, in support of the theatrical release of Jigsaw.
Development of Lionsgate Entertainment World, an indoor theme park in Hengqin, China;
Development of Lionsgate Movie World, our first Lionsgate branded outdoor theme park in South Korea;
Development of Lionsgate Entertainment City, our smaller indoor branded entertainment centers in high traffic locations around the world such as New York and Madrid; and
Brand partnership activations supporting our theatrical releases thought the year.  

Music

Our film and television music departments creatively oversee music for our theatrical and television slates, and certain of our SVOD and direct-to-digital productions, respectively. Our music strategy is to service the Company’s creative divisions’ music needs, while providing music for use in marketing our films and television shows. For our theatrical slate, the work of the music department includes overseeing songs, scores and soundtracks for all of our productions, co-productions and acquisitions. For our television slate, the work of the music department includes overseeing music staffing, scores and soundtracks for all of our television productions. For our SVOD and digital productions, the work of the music department includes musical oversight similar to our theatrical and television slates, and provided on an as-needed basis.  Music revenues are derived from the sales and licensing of music from our films, television, and other productions, and the theatrical exhibition of our films and the broadcast and webcast of our productions.

Ancillary Revenues


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Ancillary revenues are derived from the licensing of non-theatrical uses of our films and television content to distributors who, in turn, make such content available to airlines, hotels, schools, oil rigs, public libraries, prisons, community groups, the armed forces, ships at sea and others.

TELEVISION PRODUCTION

Our television business consists of the development, production, syndication and distribution of television programming. We principally generate revenue from the licensing and distribution of such programming to broadcast television networks, pay and basic cable networks, digital platforms and syndicators of first-run programming, which license programs on a station-by-station basis and pay in cash or via barter (i.e., trade of programming for airtime). Each of these platforms may acquire a mix of original and library programming.

After initial exhibition, we distribute programming to subsequent buyers, both domestically and internationally, including basic cable network, premium subscription services or digital platforms (known as “off-network syndicated programming”). Off-network syndicated programming can be sold in successive cycles of sales which may occur on an exclusive or non-exclusive basis. In addition, television programming is sold on home entertainment (packaged media and via digital delivery) and across all other applicable ancillary revenue streams including music publishing, touring and integration.

As with film production, we use tax credits, subsidies, and other incentive programs for television production in order to maximize our returns and ensure fiscally responsible production models.

Television Production - Domestic Television

We currently produce, syndicate and distribute nearly 90 television shows on more than 40 networks (including programming produced by Pilgrim Media Group, of which we own a majority interest).

In fiscal 2018, syndicated programming (through our wholly-owned subsidiary, Debmar-Mercury) and scripted and unscripted programming produced, co-produced or distributed by us and our affiliated entities (other than Starz) included, among others, the following:

Fiscal 2018
Lionsgate - Scripted
Title
Network
Casual
Hulu
Dear White People
Netflix
Dimension 404
Hulu
Graves
Epix
Greenleaf
Own
MacGyver
CBS
Manhunt
Discovery
Nashville
CMT
Nightcap
POP
Orange is the New Black
Netflix
The Royals
E!
Step Up
YouTube
White Famous
Showtime


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Fiscal 2018
Lionsgate - Unscripted
Title
Network
Candy Crush
CBS
Checked Inn
OWN
Flea Market Flip
HGTV
The Joel McHale Show with Joel McHale
Netflix
Mad Dog Knives
Discovery
Model Squad
E!
Music City
CMT
On the Run Eating with N.O.R.E.
Complex
Revenge Body
E!
Very Superstitious
A&E
What the Fit
YouTube
Young Guns
Go 90

Fiscal 2018
Unscripted - Pilgrim Media Group
Title
Network
American Chopper
Discovery
Bring It
Lifetime
Days That Shaped America
History
Fast & Loud
Discovery
Fast & Loud Demo Theater
Discovery
Garage Rehab
Discovery
Ghost Brothers
Destination America
The Korean Crisis
History
Love at First Flight
FYI
Mega Race
Discovery
Misfits Garage
Discovery
My Big Fat Fab Life
TLC
Street Outlaws
Discovery
Street Outlaws Memphis
Discovery
Street Outlaws New Orleans
Discovery
Switching Gears
Discovery
Ultimate Fighter
FS1
Welcome to Sweetie Pies
OWN
Wicked Tuna
Nat Geo
Wicked Tuna OB
Nat Geo
Zombie House Flippers
A&E


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Fiscal 2018
Syndication - Debmar-Mercury
Title
Network
Anger Management
Syndication
Are We There Yet
Syndication
Buzzr
Syndication
Celebrity Name Game
Syndication
Family Feud
Syndication
House of Payne
Syndication
Meet the Browns
Syndication
Tosh.O
Syndication
Wendy Williams
Syndication

Over the past 11 years, Lionsgate television programming has earned 196 Emmy ® Award nominations including 29 wins, as well as numerous Golden Globe ® Award nomination and wins.

Television Production- International

We continue to expand our television business through international sales and distribution of original Lionsgate television series, Starz original programming, third party television programming and format acquisitions via packaged media and various digital platforms. International physical (i.e., packaged media) distribution rights (outside of North America, UK and Ireland) for our television portfolio (other than digital media) are licensed to Sony Pictures Home Entertainment. Digital platforms to which we license our content around the world include, among others, iTunes, Netflix and Amazon.

Lionsgate UK also continues to build a robust television business alongside its premier film brand through in-house production/development, as well as through its various joint ventures and investments. Lionsgate UK holds interests in, and has strategic partnerships with, television and film production company Kindle Entertainment, non-scripted television production company Primal Media, television drama company Potboiler Television, and film and television production company Bonafide Films. Additionally, Lionsgate UK has enhanced its television production efforts with nearly twenty (20) projects currently being developed in-house.

In fiscal 2018, our Lionsgate UK television programming (developed in-house and through Lionsgate UK’s interest and partnerships) included the following:

Fiscal 2018
Television - Lionsgate UK
Title
Network
Partner(s)
Bigheads
ITV1
Primal Media
Damned
Channel 4
Channel 4, What Larks Productions
Motherland
BBC
BBC, Merman, Delightful
Release The Hounds
ITV2
Primal Media
The Wave
UKTV
Primal Media

Television Production-Home Entertainment

For information regarding television production home entertainment revenue, see Motion Pictures - Home Entertainment above.

Television Production- Other

Other revenues are derived from, among other sources, product integration in our television episodes and programs, the sales and licensing of music from the television broadcasts of our productions, and from the licensing of our television programs to other ancillary markets. For additional information, see Motion Pictures - Other above.


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MEDIA NETWORKS

Media Networks- Starz Networks

Starz Networks is a leading provider of premium subscription video programming to U.S. MVPDs, including cable operators (such as Comcast and Charter), satellite television providers (such as DIRECTV and DISH Network), telecommunications companies (such as AT&T and Verizon), OTT providers (such as Amazon) and on a direct-to-consumer basis.

Our Starz Networks’ flagship premium service STARZ had 23.5 million subscribers as of March 31, 2018 (not including subscribers who receive programming free as part of a promotional offer). STARZ offers original series and recently released and library movies without advertisements. Our Starz Networks’ other services, STARZ ENCORE and MOVIEPLEX, offer theatrical and independent library movies as well as original and older television series also without advertisements. Our services include 17 linear networks, on-demand and online viewing platforms, and a stand-alone direct-to-consumer service. The linear networks air over 1,000 movies per month from studio partners, including first-run content from Sony Pictures Entertainment, and have a growing line-up of successful original programming. Our Starz Networks’ services are offered by Distributors to their subscribers either at a fixed monthly price as part of a programming tier or package or on an a la carte basis, or directly to consumers via the STARZ app at www.starz.com or through our retail partners (such as Apple and Google) for a monthly fee.

The table below depicts our 17 existing linear services, the respective on-demand service, the STARZ app service and highlights some of their key attributes.
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Demographics

Our Starz Networks’ services deliver Obsessable™ original series and hit movies that appeal to a wide range of audiences, attracting both die hard and casual viewers and serving a variety of fandoms. We are focused on developing and delivering content to meet the needs of engaged viewers, including African Americans, Latino, LGBTQIA and female audiences.


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Built to serve both our traditional MVPDs as well as the OTT community, the STARZ app is a best-in-class subscription video app designed with fans in mind. In addition to targeting MVPD subscribers, the STARZ app targets audiences who are looking for an alternative to a traditional subscription package. The primary audience for the app consists of a balanced mix of individuals, who are cost-conscious, heavy consumers of video content and likely have at least one OTT subscription service. Other important segments consist of households with children and frequent travelers looking for the ability to download and watch blockbuster theatricals, STARZ original series and favorite TV and movies without an internet connection.

Affiliation agreements

Our Starz Networks’ services are distributed pursuant to affiliation agreements with Distributors (primarily MVPDs). These agreements require delivery of programming that meets certain standards. We earn revenue under these agreements either (i) based on the total number of subscribers who receive our services multiplied by rates specified in the affiliation agreements or (ii) based on amounts or rates which are not tied solely to the total number of subscribers who receive our services. Our affiliation agreements expire at various dates through 2022.

We work with Distributors to increase the number of subscribers to our Starz Networks’ services. To accomplish this, we may help fund the Distributors’ efforts to market these services or may permit Distributors to offer limited promotional periods without payment of subscriber fees. We believe these efforts enhance our relationship with Distributors, improve the awareness of our services and ultimately increase subscribers and revenue over the term of these affiliation agreements.

Distributors report the number of subscribers to our services and pay for services, generally, on a monthly basis. The agreements are generally structured to be multi-year agreements with staggered expiration dates and generally provide for annual contractual rate increases of a fixed percentage or a fixed amount, or rate increases tied to annual increases in the Consumer Price Index.

For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018, revenue earned under Starz Networks’ affiliation agreements combined with revenue earned under other Lionsgate agreements with AT&T (including DIRECTV) accounted for at least 10% of Lionsgate's revenue.

OTT service

The STARZ app is the single destination for both Distributor authenticated and direct OTT subscribers to stream or download our Starz Networks’ original series and movie content. The STARZ app:

Is available on a wide array of platforms and devices;
Includes on-demand streaming and downloadable access to our Starz Networks’ content in a single destination app;
Offers instant access to approximately 7,500 selections each month (including original series and commercial free movies);
Is available for purchase as a standalone OTT service for $8.99/month; and
Is available as an additional benefit to paying MVPD subscribers of the Starz Networks’ linear premium services.

Output and Content License Agreements

The majority of content on our Starz Networks’ services consists of movies that have been released theatrically. Starz Networks has an exclusive long-term output licensing agreement with Sony for all qualifying movies released theatrically in the U.S. by studios owned by Sony through December 31, 2021. The Sony agreement, which began in 2001, includes all titles released under the Columbia, Screen Gems, Sony Pictures Classics and TriStar labels. Starz Networks does not license movies produced by Sony Pictures Animation. Under this agreement, Starz Networks has valuable exclusive rights to air new movies on linear television services, on-demand or online during two separate windows over a period of approximately three to seven years from their initial theatrical release. Generally, except on a VOD or pay-per-view basis, no other linear service, online streaming or other video service may air or stream these recent releases during Starz Networks’ windows, and no other premium subscription service may air or stream these releases between the two windows.

Starz Networks also licenses library content comprised of older, previously released theatrical movies from many of Hollywood’s major studios. In addition to theatrical movies, Starz Networks licenses made for television movies, television series and other content from studios, production companies or other rights holders. The rights agreements for library content are of varying duration and generally permit Starz Networks’ services to exhibit these movies, series and other programming during certain window periods.


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A summary of Starz Networks’ significant output and library programming agreements (including a library agreement with Lionsgate) are as follows:

Significant output programming agreements
 
Significant library programming agreements
Studio
Term (1)
 
Studio
Term
Sony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12/2021
 
Twentieth Century Fox . . . . . . . . . .
02/2019
 
 
 
Warner Bros. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
06/2021
 
 
 
Sony Pictures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10/2021
 
 
 
Universal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
12/2021
 
 
 
Paramount . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
10/2022
 
 
 
Miramax . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
02/2023
 
 
 
MGM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
04/2025
 
 
 
The Weinstein Company . . . . . . . . .
01/2026
 
 
 
Lionsgate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
05/2028
(1) Dates based on initial theatrical release.
 
 
 
 

The Sony output agreement requires Starz Networks to pay for movies at rates calculated on a pricing grid that is based on each film’s domestic box office performance (subject to maximum amounts payable per movie and a cap on the number of movies that can be put to Starz Networks each year). The amounts Starz Networks pays for library content vary based on each specific agreement, but generally reflect an amount per movie, series or other programming commensurate with the quality (e.g., utility and perceived popularity) of the content being licensed.

Original programming

Starz Networks produces and contracts with independent production companies and our Television Production operating segment to produce original programming that appears on our Starz Networks’ services. These contractual arrangements can provide Starz Networks with:

Outright ownership of the programming, in which case we wholly-own the series and receive all distribution and other rights to the content;
An exclusive U.S. pay television license and other distribution or ancillary rights covering specific territories for specified periods of time; or
An exclusive U.S. pay television license which provides for the programming to appear only on Starz Networks’ services for specified periods of time.


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Starz Networks’ currently announced fiscal 2019 STARZ Originals line-up is as follows:

Title
America to Me (documentary series)
10
American Gods Season 2
8
Counterpart Season 2
10
Howard’s End (limited series)
4
TBD (documentary series)
6
Now Apocalypse Season 1
10
Outlander Season 4
13
Power Season 5
10
Spanish Princess
8
Sweetbitter Season 1
6
Vida Season 1
6
TBD scripted series
10
Warriors of Liberty City (documentary series)
8
Wrong Man (documentary series)
6
 
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Starz Networks fiscal 2018 STARZ Originals line-up was as follows:

Title
Number of Episodes
American Gods Season 1
8
Ash vs Evil Dead Season 3
10
Counterpart Season 1
10
Girlfriend Experience Season 2
14
Outlander Season 3
13
Power Season 4
10
Survivor’s Remorse Season 4
10
White Princess
8
 
83

Over the past several years, Starz Networks’ programming has been nominated and has won numerous Emmy ® Awards, Golden Globe ® Awards and Screen Actors Guild ® Awards.

Transmission

We uplink our programming to four non-preemptible, protected transponders on two satellites positioned in geo-synchronous orbit. These satellites feed our signals to various swaths of the Americas. We lease these transponders under long-term lease agreements. These transponder leases have termination dates in 2023. We transmit to these satellites from our uplink center in Englewood, Colorado. We have made arrangements at a third party facility to uplink our linear channels to these satellites in the event we are unable to do so from our uplink center.

Regulatory Matters

In the U.S., the Federal Communications Commission (the “FCC”) regulates broadcasters, the providers of satellite communications services and facilities for the transmission of programming services, the cable television systems and other Distributors that distribute such services, and, to some extent, the availability of the programming services themselves through its regulation of program licensing. Cable television systems in the U.S. are also regulated by municipalities or other state and local government authorities. Although cable television systems are subject to federal rate regulation on the provision of basic service, such regulation is limited to those local franchise authorities that have made an affirmative showing that there is no

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effective competition in the community. Very few franchise authorities have filed the necessary rate regulation certification. Nonetheless, other franchise conditions could place downward pressure on the fees cable television companies are willing or able to pay for programming services, and regulatory carriage requirements also could adversely affect the number of channels available to carry our networks.

Regulation of Carriage of Broadcast Stations

The Cable Television Consumer Protection and Competition Act of 1992 (“1992 Cable Act”) granted broadcasters a choice of must carry rights or retransmission consent rights. The rules adopted by the FCC generally provide for mandatory carriage by cable systems of all local full-power commercial television broadcast signals selecting must carry rights and, depending on a cable system’s channel capacity, non-commercial television broadcast signals. Such statutorily mandated carriage of broadcast stations coupled with the provisions of the Cable Communications Policy Act of 1984, which require cable television systems with 36 or more “activated” channels to reserve a percentage of such channels for commercial use by unaffiliated third parties and permit franchise authorities to require the cable operator to provide channel capacity, equipment and facilities for public, educational and government access channels, could adversely affect our networks by limiting the carriage of our services in cable systems with limited channel capacity.

Closed Captioning

The Telecommunications Act of 1996 also required the FCC to establish rules to ensure that video programming is fully accessible to the hearing impaired through closed captioning. The rules adopted by the FCC require substantial closed captioning, with only limited exemptions. In 2012, the FCC adopted regulations pursuant to the Twenty-First Century Communications and Video Accessibility Act of 2010 that require, among other things, video programming owners to send caption files for Internet protocol (“IP”) delivered video programming to video programming distributors and providers along with program files. In 2014, the FCC adopted closed captioning quality standards for captioning accuracy, synchronicity, completeness and placement and captioning best practices for programmers. In 2016, the FCC amended its closed captioning requirements to make programmers jointly responsible with distributors for captioning compliance, and to adopt certain registration, certification and complaint procedures applicable to programmers. The video programmer registration and compliance certification requirements of the amended rules have not yet become effective. As a result of these captioning requirements, our networks may incur additional costs for closed captioning.

Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (“CALM”) Act

Congress enacted the Commercial Advertisement Loudness Mitigation (“CALM”) Act in 2010. The CALM Act directs the FCC to incorporate into its rules and make mandatory a technical standard that is designed to prevent digital television commercial advertisements from being transmitted at louder volumes than the program material they accompany. The FCC’s CALM Act implementing regulations became effective in 2012. Although the FCC’s CALM Act regulations place the primary compliance responsibility on Distributors, the FCC’s “safe harbor” compliance approach, which requires programmers to issue “widely available” CALM Act compliance certifications to Distributors, effectively shifts much of that responsibility to programmers.

Copyright Regulation

We are required to obtain any necessary music performance rights from the rights holders. These rights generally are controlled by the music performance rights organizations of the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP), Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) and the Society of European Stage Authors and Composers (SESAC), each with rights to the music of various artists.

Satellites and Uplink

In general, authorization from the FCC must be obtained for the construction and operation of a communications satellite. The FCC authorizes utilization of satellite orbital slots assigned to the U.S. by the World Radio communication Conference. Such slots are finite in number, thus limiting the number of carriers that can provide satellite transponders and the number of transponders available for transmission of programming services. At present, however, there are numerous competing satellite service providers that make transponders available for video services. The FCC also regulates the earth stations uplinking to and/or downlinking from such satellites.

Program Access


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Because overlapping attributable interests continue to exist between us and entities owning cable systems, we remain subject to the FCC’s program access and antidiscrimination rules. The 1992 Cable Act and implementing regulations generally prohibit a cable operator that has an attributable interest in a satellite programmer from improperly influencing the terms and conditions of sale to unaffiliated Distributors. Further, the 1992 Cable Act requires that such affiliated programmers make their programming services available to cable operators and competing Distributors on terms and conditions that do not unfairly discriminate among Distributors. The FCC’s program licensing rules establish a damages remedy in situations where the defendant knowingly violates the regulations and a timeline for the resolution of complaints, among other things. As part of the FCC’s 2008 order approving the acquisition by Liberty Media Corporation (now known as Qurate Retail, Inc.) (“Liberty Media”) of a controlling interest in DIRECTV, the FCC imposed program access conditions on Liberty Media and its affiliated entities, which remain applicable to Starz. Under this order, as amended by the FCC’s October 5, 2012 order allowing the general restrictions on exclusive contracts to expire, we also are required to make our programming services available to all Distributors on nondiscriminatory terms and conditions.

Online Services

To the extent that our programming services are distributed through online based platforms, we must comply with various federal and state laws and regulations applicable to online communications and commerce. Congress and individual states may consider additional legislation addressing online privacy and other issues.

Proposed Changes in Regulation
    
The regulation of programming services, cable television systems, direct broadcast satellite providers, broadcast television licensees and online distributed services is subject to the political process and has been in constant flux historically. Further material changes in the law and regulatory requirements must be anticipated and there can be no assurance that our business will not be materially adversely affected by future legislation, new regulation or deregulation.

Starz Networks’ Strategy

Our Starz Networks’ mission is to be a leading global entertainment brand providing powerful and immersive experiences. To that end, our goal is to provide Distributors and subscribers with high-quality, differentiated premium video services available on multiple viewing platforms. Starz Networks focuses on the following strategic goals:

Deliver engaging, brand building, premium original programming. We believe this is the most effective path to building a differentiated STARZ brand, which resonates with our Distributors and subscribers. Targeting underserved audiences (e.g., African American, Latino, LGBTQIA, female) will continue to be a core pillar of our Starz Networks’ original programming content strategy. As a result, our subscribers will have a regular opportunity to see a new episode of a STARZ original series or a new season of an existing STARZ original series on its flagship STARZ service throughout the year.

Create compelling consumer offerings. We intend to ensure that our Starz Networks’ services are available in formats and platforms that meet the needs of our Distributors as well as subscribers. We seek to monetize the digital rights we control for our Starz Networks’ exclusive original series and those under our programming licensing agreements with Hollywood studios by licensing the digital rights to Starz Networks’ services to our traditional distributors and online video providers as well as using these rights for the STARZ app.

Expand the STARZ brand and business in new international markets. In addition to STARZ PLAY Arabia (see Joint Ventures, Partnerships and Ownership Interests below), we will continue to look for other opportunities in international markets (such as our exclusive, long term alliance with Bell Media to bring Starz to Canada) to enhance our Starz Networks' brand and ultimately grow this business.

We believe that this strategy, combined with a proven management team, positions Starz Networks for continued success. We look forward to making our Starz Networks services “must haves” for subscribers and a meaningful margin driver for our Distributors, thereby driving value for our stockholders.

Media Networks - Content and Other

Content and other revenues for our Media Networks segment are derived from the licensing of Starz original programming to digital media platforms, international television networks, through packaged media and other ancillary markets.


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Media Networks - Streaming Services

Streaming services represent revenues derived from the Lionsgate legacy start-up direct to consumer streaming service initiatives on SVOD platforms including PANTAYA and Tribeca Shortlist.

pantaya.jpg
PANTAYA, our joint venture with Hemisphere Media Group, is the first-ever premium streaming destination for world-class movies in Spanish offering the largest selection of current and classic, commercial-free blockbusters and critically acclaimed titles from Latin America and the U.S.
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Tribeca Shortlist, our joint venture with Tribeca Enterprises, is a premium SVOD service that features a high-quality collection of handpicked films that are recommended by popular actors, directors, insiders and influencers who know and love movies, including major studio releases and independent studio gems, foreign film favorites and documentaries.

JOINT VENTURES, PARTNERSHIPS AND OWNERSHIP INTERESTS

Our joint ventures, partnerships and ownership interests support our strategy of being multiplatform global industry leader in entertainment. We regularly evaluate our existing properties, libraries and other assets and businesses in order to determine whether they continue to enhance our competitive position in the industry, have the potential to generate significant long-term returns, represent an optimal use of our capital and are aligned with our goals. When appropriate, we discuss potential strategic transactions with third parties for purchase of our properties, libraries or other assets or businesses that factor into these evaluations. As a result, we may, from time to time, determine to sell individual properties, libraries or other assets or businesses or enter into additional joint ventures, strategic transactions and similar arrangements for individual properties, libraries or other assets or businesses.

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Atom Tickets. In August 2014, we acquired an interest in Atom Tickets, a first-of-its-kind mobile movie-ticketing platform.

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Celestial Tiger Entertainment. In January 2012, we formed Celestial Tiger Entertainment, a joint venture with Saban Capital Group, Inc. and Celestial Pictures, a company wholly-owned by Astro Overseas Limited. Celestial Tiger Entertainment is a leading independent media company dedicated to entertaining audiences in Asia and beyond that creates and distributes branded pay television channels and services targeted at Asian consumers.

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Elevation Sales. In 2007, Lionsgate UK acquired an interest in Elevation Sales, a film sales and distribution company in the UK.


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Globalgate Entertainment. In May 2016, we partnered with international entertainment executives Paul Presburger, William Pfeiffer and Clifford Werber to launch Globalgate Entertainment. Globalgate, who has built a consortium of international distributors, sources and curates remakes and original intellectual property and co-finances mainstream, wide-release local-language films in key international territories.


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Immortals. In January 2017, we acquired an interest in Immortals, an eSports franchise.
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Kindle Entertainment. In December 2015, Lionsgate UK acquired an interest in UK television and film production company Kindle Entertainment.
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Laugh Out Loud. In March 2016, we entered into a partnership with Kevin Hart and Hartbeat Digital to launch Laugh Out Loud, a comedy brand and multi-platform network that serves as the exclusive home for all content created by Kevin Hart.

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Next Games. In July 2014, we entered into a strategic partnership and acquired an interest in Next Games, a mobile game developer and publisher specializing in service-based games based on entertainment franchises, such as movies, television series or books.
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Pantelion Films. In September 2010, we launched Pantelion Films, a joint venture with Videocine, an affiliate of Televisa, which produces, acquires and distributes a slate of English and Spanish language feature films that target Hispanic moviegoers in the U.S.

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Pilgrim Media Group. In November 2015, we acquired an interest in Craig Piligian’s Pilgrim Media Group, which boasts an unscripted programming slate with more than 20 programs in production and over 40 projects in active development.



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Pop. Entered into in March 2013, Pop is our joint venture with CBS Corporation. The partnership combines CBS’s programming, production and marketing assets with Lionsgate’s resources in motion pictures, television and digitally delivered content.

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Potboiler Television. In December 2016, Lionsgate UK acquired an interest in Potboiler Television, a UK television drama company that develops and produces thought-provoking and entertaining films and television dramas, stories which have meaning, resonance, integrity and heart.
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Primal Media. In July 2016, Lionsgate UK acquired an interest in Primal Media, a production company that develops and produces unscripted programs in the UK, and works with Lionsgate's alternative programming team in the U.S. to produce U.S. formats for the UK market.
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Roadside Attractions. In July 2007, we acquired an interest in Roadside Attractions, an independent theatrical distribution company.
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STARZ PLAY Arabia. Launched in 2015, STARZ PLAY Arabia is a personalized OTT entertainment service that operates in 19 Middle East/North African countries. STARZ PLAY Arabia offers a deep selection of Hollywood movies and television series with English, Arabic and French language options, along with local Arabic and Bollywood content.


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Telltale Games. In February 2015, we acquired an interest in Telltale Games, an award-winning independent developer and publisher of digital entertainment.


Intellectual Property

We currently use and own or license a number of trademarks, service marks, copyrights, domain names and similar intellectual property in connection with our businesses and own registrations and applications to register them both domestically and internationally. We believe that ownership of, and/or the right to use, such trademarks, service marks, copyrights, domain names and similar intellectual property is an important factor in our businesses and that our success does depends, in part, on such ownership.

Motion picture and television piracy is extensive in many parts of the world, including South America, Asia and certain Eastern European countries, and is made easier by technological advances and the conversion of content into digital formats. This trend facilitates the creation, transmission and sharing of high quality unauthorized copies of content on packaged media and through digital formats. The proliferation of unauthorized copies of these products has had and will likely continue to have an adverse effect on our business, because these products reduce the revenue we receive from our products. Our ability to protect and enforce our intellectual property rights is subject to certain risks and from time to time, we encounter disputes over rights and obligations concerning intellectual property. We cannot provide assurance that we will prevail in any intellectual property disputes.


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Competition

Our motion picture production and distribution, television programming and syndication and premium pay television networks businesses (as well as home entertainment, global distribution and sales, interactive ventures and games and location-based entertainment business) operate in highly competitive markets. We compete with companies within the entertainment and media business and from alternative forms of leisure entertainment, such as travel, sporting events, outdoor recreation and other cultural related activities. We compete with the major studios, numerous independent motion picture and television production companies, television networks, pay television services and digital media platforms for the acquisition of literary and film properties, the services of performing artists, directors, producers and other creative and technical personnel and production financing, all of which are essential to the success of our entertainment businesses. In addition, our motion pictures compete for audience acceptance and exhibition outlets with motion pictures produced and distributed by other companies. Likewise, our television product faces significant competition from independent distributors as well as major studios. Moreover, our networks compete with other programming networks for viewing and subscribership by each distributor’s customer base. As a result, the success of any of our motion picture, television or networks business is dependent not only on the quality and acceptance of a particular film or program, but also on the quality and acceptance of other competing content released into the marketplace at or near the same time as well as on the ability to license and produce content for the networks that is adequate in quantity and quality and will generate satisfactory subscriber levels.

Given such competition, we attempt to operate with a different business model than others. We typically emphasize a lower cost structure, risk mitigation, reliance on financial partnerships and innovative financial strategies. Our cost structures are designed to utilize our flexibility and agility as well as the entrepreneurial spirit of our employees, partners and affiliates, in order to provide creative entertainment content to serve diverse audiences worldwide.

Social Responsibility and Employee Engagement

Lionshares

We are committed to acting responsibly and making a positive difference in the local and global community through Lionshares, the umbrella for our companywide commitment to our communities. Lionshares is a volunteer program that seeks to provide opportunities for employees within the Lionsgate family to partner with a diverse range of charitable organizations. The program not only enriches the Lionsgate work experience through cultural and educational outreach, but also positively interacts and invests in the local and global community. Specifically, Lionshares strives to:

Provide diverse activities intended to appeal to a broad range of interests, including: literacy, elderly visits, food banks, animal interactions, disaster relief, community relations, environmental activities, health/fitness, cancer awareness and charitable fundraising.
Partner with leading organizations with expertise in these areas.
Create an effective and influential impact through human contact.
Share time and experience, not just among Lionsgate employees, but with the greater community as well.

Employee Resource Groups

We provide our employees with an opportunity to enhance cross-cultural awareness, develop leadership skills and network across the Company’s various business units and levels with resource groups such as Lionsgate Multicultural Group, Lionsgate Pride, Lionsgate Vets and Lionsgate Women’s Empowerment Group.

Lionsgate Multicultural Group engages in third party partnerships that promote diversity, equity and inclusion within the Company and the industry, allowing for an exchange of ideas and resources that contribute to overall innovation.
Lionsgate Pride supports, develops and inspires future LGBTQ leaders within the Company and the industry.
Lionsgate Vets creates a community of veterans and their supporters working together to enhance veteran presence and engage the industry from the unique perspective of a military background.
Lionsgate Women’s Empowerment Group creates a community that improves the prominence of female leaders and empowers women at all levels within the Company and the industry.

Employees

As of May 21, 2018, we had 1,686 full-time employees in our worldwide operations, including full-time and part-time employees of our wholly-owned subsidiaries and consolidated ventures. We also utilize many consultants in the ordinary course

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of our business and hire additional employees on a project-by-project basis in connection with the production of our motion pictures and television programming.

Corporate History

We are a corporation organized under the laws of the Province of British Columbia, resulting from the merger of Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. and Beringer Gold Corp. on November 13, 1997. Beringer Gold Corp. was incorporated under the Business Corporation Act (British Columbia) on May 26, 1986 as IMI Computer Corp. Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. was incorporated under the Canada Business Corporations Act using the name 3369382 Canada Limited on April 28, 1997, amended its articles on July 3, 1997 to change its name to Lions Gate Entertainment Corp., and on September 24, 1997, continued under the Business Corporation Act (British Columbia) (“BCBCA”).

Available Information

Our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, proxy statements and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Sections 13(a) and 15(d) of the Exchange Act, are available, free of charge, on our website at investors.lionsgate.com as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). The Company's Disclosure Policy, Corporate Governance Guidelines, Standards for Director Independence, Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for Directors, Officers and Employees, Policy on Shareholder Communications, Related Person Transaction Policy, Charter of the Audit & Risk Committee, Charter of the Compensation Committee and Charter of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee and any amendments thereto are also available on the Company's website, as well as in print to any shareholder who requests them. The information posted on our website is not incorporated into this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We will disclose on our website waivers of, or amendments to, our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics that applies to our Chief Executive Officer, Chief Financial Officer, Chief Accounting Officer, or persons performing similar functions.

The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov. The public may read and copy any materials we file with the SEC at the SEC's Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS.

You should carefully consider the risks described below as well as other information included in, or incorporated by reference into this Form 10-K. The risks described below are not the only ones facing the Company. Additional risks that we are not presently aware of, or that we currently believe are immaterial, may also become important factors that affect us. All of these risks and uncertainties could adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Risks Related to Our Business

We face substantial capital requirements and financial risks.

Our business requires a substantial investment of capital. The production, acquisition and distribution of motion picture and television content requires substantial capital. A significant amount of time may elapse between our expenditure of funds and the receipt of revenues after release or distribution of such content. This may require us to fund a significant portion of our capital requirements under the Senior Credit Facilities or other financing sources. Although we reduce the risks of our production exposure through tax credit programs, government and industry programs, other studios and co-financiers and other sources, we cannot assure you that we will continue to successfully implement these arrangements or that we will not be subject to substantial financial risks relating to the production, acquisition and distribution of future motion picture and television content. In addition, if we increase (through internal growth or acquisition) our production slate or our production budgets, we may be required to increase overhead and/or make larger up-front payments to talent and, consequently, bear greater financial risks. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

The costs of producing and marketing feature films is high and may increase in the future. The costs of producing and marketing feature films generally increase each year, which may make it more difficult for our films to generate a profit. A continuation of this trend would leave us more dependent on other media, such as packaged media, digital media, television and international markets, which revenues may not be sufficient to offset an increase in the cost of motion picture production and marketing. If we cannot successfully exploit these other media, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial

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condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Budget overruns may adversely affect our business. While our business model requires that we be efficient in the production of motion picture and television content, actual production costs may exceed their budgets. The production, completion and distribution of such content can be subject to a number of uncertainties, including delays and increased expenditures due to disruptions or events beyond our control. As a result, if production incurs substantial budget overruns, we may have to seek additional financing or fund the overrun ourselves. We cannot make assurances regarding the availability of such additional financing on terms acceptable to us, or that we will recoup these costs. For instance, increased costs incurred with respect to a particular film may result in a delayed release and the postponement to a potentially less favorable date, all of which could cause a decline in box office performance, and, thus, the overall financial success of such film. Budget overruns could also prevent a picture from being completed or released. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We may incur significant write-offs if our feature films and other projects do not perform well enough to recoup costs.

We are required to amortize capitalized production costs over the expected revenue streams as we recognize revenue from the associated films or other projects. The amount of production costs that will be amortized each quarter depends on, among other things, how much future revenue we expect to receive from each project. Unamortized production costs are evaluated for impairment each reporting period on a project-by-project basis. If estimated remaining revenue is not sufficient to recover the unamortized production costs, those costs will be written down to fair value. In any given quarter, if we lower our previous forecast with respect to total anticipated revenue from any film or other project, we may be required to accelerate amortization or record impairment charges with respect to the unamortized costs, even if we previously recorded impairment charges for such film or other project. Such impairment charges could adversely impact our business, operating results and financial condition.

Changes in our business strategy, plans for growth or restructuring of our businesses may increase our costs or otherwise affect the profitability of our businesses.

As changes in our business environment occur, we may adjust our business strategies to meet these changes, which may include growing a particular area of business or restructuring a particular business or asset. In addition, external events including changing technology, changing consumer patterns, acceptance of our theatrical and television offerings and changes in macroeconomic conditions may impair the value of our assets. When these changes or events occur, we may incur costs to change our business strategy and may need to write down the value of assets. We may also make investments in existing or new businesses, including investments in international expansion of our business and in new business lines. In recent years, such investments have been made in our interactive ventures and games business, in our global franchise management business (including location-based entertainment) and investments related to direct-to-consumer offerings. Some of these investments may have short-term returns that are negative or low and the ultimate prospects of the businesses may be uncertain. In any of these events, our costs may increase, we may have significant charges associated with the write-down of assets, or returns on new investments may be lower than prior to the change in strategy, plans for growth or restructuring.

We have entered into output licensing agreements that require Starz to make substantial payments.

Starz has an output licensing agreement with Sony to acquire theatrical releases that will expire on December 31, 2021. Starz is required to pay Sony for films released at rates calculated on a pricing grid that is based on each film’s domestic box office performance (subject to maximum amounts payable per film and a cap on the number of films that can be put to Starz each year), and the amounts payable pursuant to such agreement will be substantial. We believe that the theatrical performance of the films Starz will receive under the agreements will perform at levels consistent with the performance of films Starz has received from Sony in the past. We also assume a certain number of annual releases of first run films by Sony’s studios consistent with the number Starz received in prior years. Should the films perform at higher levels across the slate of films Starz receives or the quantity of films increase, then our payment obligations would increase and would have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Our revenues and results of operations may fluctuate significantly.

Our results of operations are difficult to predict and depend on a variety of factors. Our results of operations depend significantly upon the commercial success of the motion picture, television and other content that we sell, license or distribute, which cannot be predicted with certainty. In particular, the underperformance at the box office of one or more motion pictures in any period may cause our revenue and earnings results for that period (and potentially, subsequent periods) to be less than anticipated, in some instances, to a significant extent. Accordingly, our results of operations may fluctuate significantly from period to period, and the results of any one period may not be indicative of the results for any future periods.

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Our results of operations also fluctuate due to the timing, mix, number and availability of our theatrical motion picture and home entertainment releases, as well as license periods for content. Our operating results may increase or decrease during a particular period or fiscal year due to differences in the number and/or mix of films released compared to the corresponding period in the prior fiscal year.

Low ratings for television programming produced by us may lead to the cancellation of a program and can negatively affect future license fees for the cancelled program. If we decide to no longer air programming due to low ratings or other factors, we could incur significant programming impairments, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations in a given period.

Moreover, our results of operations may be impacted by the success of all of our theatrical releases, including critically acclaimed and award winning films. We cannot assure you that we will manage the production, acquisition and distribution of all future motion pictures successfully including critically acclaimed, award winning and/or commercially popular films or that we will produce or acquire motion pictures that will receive critical acclaim or perform well commercially. Any inability to achieve such commercial success could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Our operating results also fluctuate due to our accounting practices (which are standard for the industry) which may cause us to recognize the production and marketing expenses in different periods than the recognition of related revenues, which may occur in later periods. For example, in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles and industry practice, we are required to expense film advertising costs as incurred, but are also required to recognize the revenue from any motion picture or television program over the entire revenue stream expected to be generated by the individual picture or television program. In addition, we amortize film and television programming costs using the “individual-film-forecast” method. Under this accounting method, we amortize film and television programming costs for each film or television program based on the following ratio:

Revenue earned by title in the current year-to-date period
Estimated total future revenues by title as of the beginning of the year

We regularly review, and revise when necessary, our total revenue estimates on a title-by-title basis. This review may result in a change in the rate of amortization and/or a write-down of the film or television asset to its estimated fair value. Results of operations in future years depend upon our amortization of our film and television costs. Periodic adjustments in amortization rates may significantly affect these results.

In addition, the comparability of our results may be affected by changes in accounting guidance or changes in our ownership of certain assets and businesses. Accordingly, our results of operations from year to year may not be directly comparable to prior reporting periods.

As a result of the foregoing and other factors, our results of operations may fluctuate significantly from period to period, and the results of any one period may not be indicative of the results for any future period.

We do not have long-term arrangements with many of our production or co-financing partners. We typically do not enter into long term production contracts with the creative producers of motion picture and television content that we produce, acquire or distribute. Moreover, we generally have certain derivative rights that provide us with distribution rights to, for example, prequels, sequels and remakes of certain content we produce, acquire or distribute. However, there is no guarantee that we will produce, acquire or distribute future content by any creative producer or co-financing partner, and a failure to do so could adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We rely on a few major retailers and distributors and the loss of any of those retailers or distributors could reduce our revenues and operating results. A small number of other retailers and distributors account for a material percentage of our revenues. We do not have long-term agreements with retailers. We cannot assure you that we will continue to maintain favorable relationships with our retailers and distributors or that they will not be adversely affected by economic conditions. If any of these retailers or distributors reduces or cancels a significant order or becomes bankrupt, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We depend on distributors that carry our Starz Networks’ programming, and no assurance can be given that we will be able to maintain and renew these affiliation agreements on favorable terms or at all. Starz currently distributes programming through affiliation agreements with many distributors, including AT&T, Cablevision, Charter, Comcast, Cox, DISH Network and Verizon. These agreements are scheduled to expire at various dates through 2022. The largest distributors have significant leverage in their

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relationship with certain programmers, including Starz. For the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018, revenue earned under Starz Networks’ affiliation agreements combined with revenue earned under other Lionsgate agreements with AT&T (including DIRECTV) accounted for at least 10% of Lionsgate's revenue.

The renewal negotiation process for affiliation agreements is typically lengthy. In certain cases, renewals are not agreed upon prior to the expiration of a given agreement, while the programming typically continues to be carried by the relevant distributor pursuant to the other terms and conditions in the affiliation agreement. We may be unable to obtain renewals with our current Starz Networks’ distributors on acceptable terms, if at all. We may also be unable to successfully negotiate affiliation agreements with new distributors to carry our programming. The failure to renew affiliation agreements on acceptable terms, or the failure to negotiate new affiliation agreements at all, in each case covering a material portion of multichannel television households, could result in a discontinuation of carriage, or could otherwise materially adversely affect our subscriber growth, revenue and earnings which could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

In some cases, if a distributor is acquired, the affiliation agreement of the acquiring distributor will govern following the acquisition. In those circumstances, the acquisition of a distributor that is party to affiliation agreements with us that are more favorable to us would adversely impact our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Increasing rates paid by distributors to other programmers may result in increased rates charged to their subscribers for their services, making it more costly for subscribers to purchase our STARZ and STARZ ENCORE services. The amounts paid by distributors to certain programming networks for the rights to carry broadcast networks and sports networks have increased substantially in recent years. As a result, distributors have passed on some of these increases to their subscribers. The rates that subscribers pay for programming from distributors continue to increase each year and these increases may impact our ability, as a premium subscription video provider, to increase or even maintain our subscriber levels and may adversely impact our revenue and earnings which could have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

    
We depend on distributors to market Starz’s networks and other services, the lack of which may result in reduced customer demand. At times, certain of our distributors do not allow us to participate in cooperative marketing campaigns to market Starz’s networks and services. Our inability to participate in the marketing of our networks and other services may put us at a competitive disadvantage. Also, our distributors are often focused more on marketing their bundled service offerings (video, Internet and telephone) than premium video services. If our distributors do not sign up new subscribers to our networks, we may lose subscribers which would have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Our revenues and results of operations are vulnerable to currency fluctuations. We report our revenues and results of operations in U.S. dollars, but a significant portion of our revenue is earned outside of the U.S. Our currency exposure is primarily between Canadian dollars, British pound sterling, Euros and U.S. dollars. We cannot accurately predict the impact of future exchange rate fluctuations on revenues and operating margins. Moreover, we may experience currency exposure on distribution and production revenues and expenses from foreign countries. This could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We must respond successfully to ongoing changes in the U.S. television industry and consumer viewing patterns to remain competitive.  We derive revenues and profits from our STARZ and STARZ ENCORE networks and the production and licensing of television programming to broadcast and cable networks and other premium pay television services. The U.S. television industry is continuing to evolve rapidly, with developments in technology leading to new methods for the distribution of video content and changes in when, where and how audiences consume video content. These changes pose risks to the traditional U.S. television industry including the disruption of the traditional television content distribution model by OTT services, which are increasing in number and some of which have significant and growing subscriber/user bases. Over the past few years, the number of subscribers to traditional services in the U.S. has declined each year. Developments in technology and new content delivery products and services have also led to an increasing amount of video content that is available through OTT services and consumers spending an increased amount of time viewing such content, as well as changes in consumers’ expectations regarding the availability and packaging of video content, their willingness to pay for access to such content, their perception of what quality entertainment is and how much it should cost, and the ease for a consumer to unsubscribe or switch. We are engaged in efforts to respond to and mitigate the risks from these changes, including launching the STARZ service on these OTT services and on a direct-to-consumer basis and making our STARZ OTT service available on an authenticated basis as an additional benefit to paying subscribers of our linear premium services. Growth in OTT service subscribers may be slower than the decline of service subscribers on traditions services in the U.S., and we may incur significant costs to implement our strategy and initiatives, and if we are not successful, our competitive position, businesses and results of operations could be adversely affected.


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The directional guidance we provide from time to time is subject to several factors that we may not be successful in achieving. From time to time, we provide directional guidance for certain financial periods which depends on a number of factors that we may not be successful in achieving, including, but not limited to, the timing and commercial success of content that we distribute, which cannot be accurately predicted. In particular, underperformance at the box office of one or more motion pictures in any period may cause our revenue and earnings results for that period (and potentially, subsequent periods) to be less than anticipated, in some instances significantly. Accordingly, our results of operations may fluctuate significantly from period to period, and the results of any one period may not be indicative of the results for future periods. Management prepares directional guidance on the basis of available information at such time, and believes such estimates are prepared on a reasonable basis. However, such estimates should not be relied on as necessarily indicative of our actual financial results. Our inability to achieve directional guidance could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

A significant portion of our library revenues comes from a small number of titles, a portion of which we may be limited in our ability to exploit.

We depend on a limited number of titles in any given fiscal quarter for the majority of the revenues generated by our library. In addition, many of the titles in our library are not presently distributed and generate substantially no revenue. Additionally, our rights to the titles in our library vary; in some cases, we have only the right to distribute titles in certain media and territories for a limited term. If we cannot acquire new product and the rights to popular titles through production, distribution agreements, acquisitions, mergers, joint ventures or other strategic alliances, or renew expiring rights to titles generating a significant portion of our revenue on acceptable terms, any such failure could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Failure to manage future growth may adversely affect our business.

We are subject to risks associated with possible acquisitions, business combinations, or joint ventures. From time to time, we engage in discussions and activities with respect to possible acquisitions, sale of assets, business combinations, or joint ventures intended to complement or expand our business. We may not realize the anticipated benefit from any of the transactions we pursue. Regardless of whether we consummate any such transaction, the negotiation of a potential transaction and the integration of the acquired business could require us to incur significant costs and cause diversion of management's time and resources. Any such transaction could also result in impairment of goodwill and other intangibles, development write-offs and other related expenses. Such transaction may pose challenges in the consolidation and integration of information technology, accounting systems, personnel and operations. We may also have difficulty managing the combined entity in the short term if we experience a significant loss of management personnel during the transition period after a significant acquisition. No assurance can be given that expansion or acquisition opportunities will be successful, completed on time, or that we will realize expected operating efficiencies, cost savings, revenue enhancements, synergies or other benefits. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We may seek claims against a seller for claims against us relating to any acquisition or business combination that the seller may not indemnify us for or that may exceed the seller's indemnification obligations. There may be liabilities assumed in any acquisition or business combination that we did not discover or that we underestimated in the course of performing our due diligence. Although a seller generally will have indemnification obligations to us under an acquisition or merger agreement, these obligations usually will be subject to financial limitations, such as deductibles and maximum recovery amounts, as well as time limitations. We cannot assure you that our right to indemnification from any seller will be enforceable, collectible or sufficient in amount, scope or duration to fully offset the amount of any undiscovered or underestimated liabilities that we may incur. Any such liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We may not be able to obtain additional funding to meet our requirements. Our ability to grow through acquisitions, business combinations and joint ventures, to maintain and expand our development, production and distribution of motion pictures and television content, and to fund our operating expenses depends upon our ability to obtain funds through equity financing, debt financing (including credit facilities) or the sale or syndication of some or all of our interests in certain projects or other assets or businesses. If we do not have access to such financing arrangements, and if other funds do not become available on terms acceptable to us, there could be a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Our dispositions may not aid our future growth. If we determine to sell individual properties, libraries or other assets or businesses, we will benefit from the net proceeds realized from such sales. However, our revenues may suffer in the long term due to the disposition of a revenue generating asset, or the timing of such dispositions may be poor, causing us to fail to realize the full value of the disposed asset, all of which may diminish our ability to service our indebtedness and repay our notes and our other indebtedness at maturity. Furthermore, our future growth may be inhibited if the disposed asset contributed in a significant way to the diversification of our business platform.

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Limitations on control of joint ventures may adversely impact our operations.

We hold our interests in certain businesses as a joint venture or in partnership with non-affiliated third parties. As a result of such arrangements, we may be unable to control the operations, strategies and financial decisions of such joint venture or partnership entities which could, in turn, result in limitations on our ability to implement strategies that we may favor and may limit our ability to transfer our interests. Consequently, any losses experienced by these entities could adversely impact our results of operations and the value of our investment.

Our success depends on attracting and retaining key personnel.

Our success depends upon the continued efforts, abilities and expertise of our executive teams and other key employees, including production, creative and technical personnel. Our success also depends on our ability to identify, attract, hire, train and retain such personnel. We have entered into employment agreements with top executive officers and production executives but do not currently have significant “key person” life insurance policies for any employee. Although it is standard in the industry to rely on employment agreements as a method of retaining the services of key employees, these agreements cannot assure us of the continued services of such employees. In addition, competition for the limited number of business, production and creative personnel necessary to create and distribute our entertainment content is intense and may grow in the future. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in identifying, attracting, hiring, training and retaining such personnel in the future, and our inability to do so could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Our success depends on external factors in the motion picture and television industry.

Our success depends on the commercial success of motion pictures and television programming, which is unpredictable. Generally, the popularity of our programs depends on many factors, including the critical acclaim they receive, the format of their initial release, their talent, their genre and their specific subject matter, audience reaction, the quality and acceptance of motion pictures or television content that our competitors release into the marketplace at or near the same time, critical reviews, the availability of alternative forms of entertainment and leisure activities, general economic conditions and other tangible and intangible factors, many of which we do not control and all of which may change. We cannot predict the future effects of these factors with certainty. In addition, because a performance in ancillary markets, such as home video and pay and free television, is often directly related to its box office performance or television ratings, poor box office results or poor television ratings may negatively affect future revenue streams. Our success will depend on the experience and judgment of our management to select and develop new investment and production opportunities. We cannot assure that our motion pictures and television programing will obtain favorable reviews or ratings, that our motion pictures will perform well at the box office or in ancillary markets, or that broadcasters will license the rights to broadcast any of our television programs in development or renew licenses to broadcast programs in our library. Additionally, we cannot assure that any original programming content will appeal to our distributors and subscribers. The failure to achieve any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Our business depends on the appeal of our content to distributors and subscribers, which is difficult to predict. Our business depends in part upon viewer preferences and audience acceptance of Starz’s network programming. These factors are difficult to predict and are subject to influences beyond our control, such as the quality and appeal of competing programming, general economic conditions and the availability of other entertainment activities. We may not be able to anticipate and react effectively to shifts in tastes and interests in markets. A change in viewer preferences could cause Starz’s programming to decline in popularity, which could jeopardize renewal of affiliation agreements with distributors. In addition, our competitors may have more flexible programming arrangements, as well as greater amounts of available content, distribution and capital resources and may be able to react more quickly than we can to shifts in tastes and interests.

To an increasing extent, the success of our business depends on exclusive original programming and our ability to accurately predict how audiences will respond to our original programming. Because original programming often involves a greater degree of financial commitment, as compared to acquired programming that we license from third parties, and because our branding strategies depend significantly on a relatively small number of original series, a failure to anticipate viewer preferences for such series could be especially detrimental to our business.

In addition, theatrical feature films constitute a significant portion of the programming on our STARZ and STARZ ENCORE programming networks. In general, the popularity of feature-film content on linear television is declining, due in part to the broad availability of such content through an increasing number of distribution platforms prior to our linear window. Should the popularity of feature-film programming suffer significant further declines, Starz may lose subscribership or be forced to rely more heavily on original programming, which could increase our costs.

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If Starz’s programming does not gain the level of audience acceptance we expect, or if we are unable to maintain the popularity of Starz’s programming, we may have a diminished negotiating position when dealing with distributors, which could reduce our revenue and earnings. We cannot ensure that we will be able to maintain the success of any of Starz’s current programming, or generate sufficient demand and market acceptance for Starz’s new original programming. This could materially adversely impact our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Starz’s networks’ success depends upon the availability of programming that is adequate in quantity and quality, and we may be unable to secure or maintain such programming. Starz’s networks’ success depends upon the availability of quality programming, particularly original programming and films that is suitable for its target markets. While we produce some of Starz’s original programming, we obtain most of Starz’s programming (including some of Starz’s original series, films and other acquired programming) through agreements with third parties that have produced or control the rights to such programming. These agreements expire at varying times and may be terminated by the other party if we are not in compliance with their terms.

We compete with other programming networks to secure desired programming, the competition for which has increased as the number of programming networks has increased. Other programming networks that are affiliated with programming sources such as movie or television studios or film libraries may have a competitive advantage over us in this area. In addition to other cable programming networks, we also compete for programming with national broadcast television networks, local broadcast television stations, VOD services and online based content delivery services such as Amazon, Hulu, iTunes and Netflix. Some of these competitors have exclusive contracts with motion picture studios or independent motion picture distributors or own film libraries.

We cannot assure you that we will ultimately be successful in negotiating renewals of Starz’s programming rights agreements or in negotiating adequate substitute agreements. In the event that these agreements expire or are terminated and are not replaced by programming content, including additional original programming, acceptable to Starz’s distributors and subscribers, it would have a materially adverse impact on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Global economic turmoil and regional economic conditions in the U.S. could adversely affect our business. Global economic turmoil may cause a general tightening in the credit markets, lower levels of liquidity, increases in the rates of default and bankruptcy, levels of intervention from the U.S. federal government and other foreign governments, decreased consumer confidence, overall slower economic activity and extreme volatility in credit, equity and fixed income markets. A decrease in economic activity in the U.S. or in other regions of the world in which we do business could adversely affect demand for our content, thus reducing our revenues and earnings. A decline in economic conditions could reduce performance of our theatrical, television and home entertainment releases. In addition, an increase in price levels generally could result in a shift in consumer demand away from the entertainment we offer, which could also adversely affect our revenues and, at the same time, increase our costs. For instance, lower household income and decreases in U.S. consumer discretionary spending, which is sensitive to general economic conditions, may affect cable television and other video service subscriptions, in particular with respect to digital programming packages on which our STARZ and STARZ ENCORE networks are typically carried and premium video programming packages and premium a la carte services on which our networks are typically carried. A reduction in spending may cause a decrease in subscribers to our networks, which could have a materially adverse impact on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects. Moreover, financial institution failures may cause us to incur increased expenses or make it more difficult to finance any future acquisitions, or engage in other financing activities. We cannot predict the timing or the duration of any downturn in the economy and we are not immune to the effects of general worldwide economic conditions.

We could be adversely affected by strikes or other union job actions. We are directly or indirectly dependent upon highly specialized union members who are essential to the production of motion pictures and television content. A strike by, or a lockout of, one or more of the unions that provide personnel essential to the production of motion pictures or television content could delay or halt our ongoing production activities, or could cause a delay or interruption in our release of new motion pictures and television content. A strike may result in increased costs and decreased revenue, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Business interruptions could adversely affect our operations. Our operations are vulnerable to outages and interruptions due to fire, floods, power loss, telecommunications failures and similar events beyond our control. Our headquarters are located in Southern California, which is subject to earthquakes. Although we have developed certain plans to respond in the event of a disaster, there can be no assurance that they will be effective in the event of a specific disaster. In the event of a short-term power outage, we have installed uninterrupted power source equipment designed to protect our equipment. A long-term power outage, however, could disrupt our operations. Although we currently carry business interruption insurance for potential losses (including earthquake-related losses), there can be no assurance that such insurance will be sufficient to compensate us for losses that may occur or that such insurance may continue to be available on affordable terms. Any losses or damages incurred by us could have

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a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We face substantial competition in all aspects of our business.

We are smaller and less diversified than many of our competitors. Unlike us, an independent distributor and producer, most of the major U.S. studios are part of large diversified corporate groups with a variety of other operations that can provide both the means of distributing their products and stable sources of earnings that may allow them to better offset fluctuations in the financial performance of their motion picture and television operations. The major studios also have more resources with which to compete for ideas, storylines and scripts created by third parties as well as for actors, directors and other personnel required for production. These resources may also give them an advantage in acquiring other businesses or assets, including film libraries, that we might also be interested in acquiring.

The motion picture industry is highly competitive. The number of motion pictures released by our competitors may create an oversupply of product in the market, reduce our share of box office receipts and make it more difficult for our films to succeed commercially. The limited supply of motion picture screens compounds this product oversupply problem, which may be most pronounced during peak release times such as holidays, when theater attendance is expected to be highest. As a result of changes in the theatrical exhibition industry, including reorganizations and consolidations, and major studio releases occupying more screens, the number of screens available to us when we want to release a picture may decrease. If the number of motion picture screens decreases, box office receipts, and the correlating future revenue streams, such as from home entertainment and pay and free television, of our motion pictures may also decrease. Moreover, we cannot guarantee that we can release all of our films when they are otherwise scheduled due to production or other delays, or a change in the schedule of a major studio. Any such change could adversely impact a film's financial performance. In addition, if we cannot change our schedule after such a change by a major studio because we are too close to the release date, the major studio's release and its typically larger promotion budget may adversely impact the financial performance of our film.

The home entertainment industry is highly competitive. We compete with all of the major U.S. studios which distribute their theatrical, television and titles acquired from third parties on DVDs/Blu-ray discs and other media and have marketing budgets greater than ours. We not only compete for ultimate consumer sales, but also with these parties and independent home entertainment distributors for location and shelf space placement at retailers and other distributors. The quality and quantity of titles as well as the quality of our marketing programs determines how much shelf space we are able to garner at any given time as retailers and other distributors look to maximize sales.

We also compete with U.S. studios and other distributors that may have certain competitive advantages over us to acquire the rights to sell or rent DVDs/Blu-ray discs and other media. Our ability to license and produce quality content in sufficient quantities has a direct impact on our ability to acquire shelf space at retail locations and on websites. In addition, certain of our content is obtained through agreements with other parties that have produced or own the rights to such content, while other U.S studios may produce most of the content they distribute.

Our DVDs/Blu-ray discs sales and other media sales are also impacted by myriad choices consumers have to view entertainment content, including over-the-air broadcast television, cable television networks, online services, mobile services, radio, print media, motion picture theaters and other sources of information and entertainment. The increasing availability of content from these varying media outlets may reduce our ability to sell DVDs/ Blu-ray discs and other media in the future, particularly during difficult economic conditions.

We are subject to intense competition for marketing and carriage of our Starz networks. The subscription video programming industry is highly competitive. Our STARZ and STARZ ENCORE networks compete with other programming networks and other video programming services for marketing and distribution by distributors. We face intense competition from other providers of programming networks for the right to be carried by a particular distributor and for the right to be carried by such distributor on a particular “tier” or in a particular “package” of service. Certain programming networks affiliated with broadcast networks like ABC, CBS, Fox or NBC or other programming networks affiliated with sports and certain general entertainment networks with strong viewer ratings have a competitive advantage over our networks in obtaining distribution through the “bundling” of carriage agreements for such programming networks with a distributor’s right to carry the affiliated broadcasting network. The inability of our programming networks to be carried by one or more distributors, or the inability of our programming networks to be placed on a particular tier or programming package could have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We must successfully respond to rapid technological changes and alternative forms of delivery or storage to remain competitive.

The entertainment industry continues to undergo significant developments as advances in technologies and new methods

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of product delivery and storage (including the emergence of alternative distribution platforms), and certain changes in consumer behavior driven by these developments emerge. New technologies affect the demand for our content, the manner in which our content is distributed to consumers, the sources and nature of competing content offerings and the time and manner in which consumers acquire and view our content. New technologies also may affect our ability to maintain or grow our business and may increase our capital expenditures. We and our distributors must adapt our businesses to shifting patterns of content consumption and changing consumer behavior and preferences through the adoption and exploitation of new technologies.

For instance, such changes may impact the revenue we are able to generate from traditional distribution methods by decreasing the viewership of our networks on systems of cable operators, satellite television providers and telecommunication companies, or by decreasing the number of households subscribing to services offered by those distributors. If we cannot successfully exploit these and other emerging technologies, our appeal to targeted audiences might decline which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Any continued or permanent inability to transmit Starz’s programming via satellite would result in lost revenue and could result in lost subscribers.

Our success is dependent upon our continued ability to transmit Starz’s programming to distributors from Starz’s satellite uplink facility, which transmissions are subject to FCC compliance in the U.S. Starz has entered into long-term satellite transponder leases that expire in 2023 in the U.S. for carriage of our Starz’s networks’ programming. These leases provide for the continued carriage of Starz’s programming on available replacement transponders and/or replacement satellites, as applicable, throughout the term of the leases, in the event of a failure of either the transponders and/or satellites currently carrying Starz’s programming. Although we believe that we take reasonable and customary measures to ensure continued satellite transmission capability, termination or interruption of satellite transmissions may occur and could have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Despite Starz’s efforts to secure transponder capacity with long-term satellite transponder leases, there is a risk that when these leases expire, we may not be able to secure capacity on a transponder on the same or similar terms, if at all. This may result in an inability to transmit content and could result in significant lost revenue and lost subscribers and would have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

If Starz’s technology facilities fail or their operations are disrupted, our business could be damaged.

Starz’s programming is transmitted from Starz’s uplink center in Englewood, Colorado. Starz uses this center for a variety of purposes, including signal processing, satellite uplinking, program editing, on-air promotions, creation of programming segments (i.e., interstitials) to fill short gaps between featured programs, quality control and live and recorded playback. Starz’s uplink center is equipped with backup generator power and other redundancies. However, like other facilities, this facility is subject to interruption from fire, lightning, adverse weather conditions and other natural causes. Equipment failure, employee misconduct or outside interference could also disrupt the facility’s services. Starz has made arrangements at a third-party facility to uplink Starz’s linear channels and services to Starz’s satellites in the event Starz is unable to do so from this facility. Additionally, Starz has direct fiber connectivity to certain of Starz’s distributors, which would allow continuous operation with respect to a significant segment of Starz’s subscriber base in the event of a satellite transmission interruption. Notwithstanding these precautions, any significant or prolonged interruption at Starz’s facility, and any failure by Starz’s third-party facility to perform as intended, would have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

We face risks from doing business internationally.

We distribute content outside the U.S. and derive revenues from international sources. As a result, our business is subject to certain risks inherent in international business, many of which are beyond our control. These risks may include:

laws and policies affecting trade, investment and taxes, including laws and policies relating to the repatriation of funds and withholding taxes, and changes in these laws;
anti-corruption laws and regulations such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and the U.K. Bribery Act that impose strict requirements on how we conduct our foreign operations and changes in these laws and regulations;
changes in local regulatory requirements including restrictions on content, differing cultural tastes and attitudes;
international jurisdictions where laws are less protective of intellectual property and varying attitudes towards the piracy of intellectual property;
financial instability and increased market concentration of buyers in foreign television markets, including in European pay television markets;
the instability of foreign economies and governments;

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fluctuating foreign exchange rates;
the spread of communicable diseases in such jurisdictions, which may impact business in such jurisdictions; and
war and acts of terrorism.
    
Events or developments related to these and other risks associated with international trade could adversely affect our revenues from non-U.S. sources, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Protection of electronically stored data is costly and if our data is compromised in spite of this protection, we may incur additional costs, lost opportunities and damage to our reputation.

We maintain information in digital form as necessary to conduct our business, including confidential and proprietary information, copies of films, television programs and other content and personal information regarding our employees. Data maintained in digital form is subject to the risk of intrusion, tampering and theft. We develop and maintain systems to prevent this from occurring, but it is costly and requires ongoing monitoring and updating as technologies change and efforts to overcome security measures become more sophisticated. Moreover, despite our efforts, the possibility of intrusion, tampering and theft cannot be eliminated entirely, and risks associated with each of these remain. In addition, we provide confidential information, digital content and personal information to third parties when it is necessary to pursue business objectives. While we obtain assurances that these third parties will protect this information and, where appropriate, monitor the protections employed by these third parties, there is a risk that data systems of these third parties may be compromised. If our data systems or data systems of these third parties are compromised, our ability to conduct our business may be impaired, we may lose profitable opportunities or the value of those opportunities may be diminished and we may lose revenue as a result of unlicensed use of our intellectual property. A breach of our network security or other theft or misuse of confidential and proprietary information, digital content or personal employee information could subject us to business, regulatory, litigation and reputation risk, which could have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Protecting and defending against intellectual property claims may have a material adverse effect on our business.

Our ability to compete depends, in part, upon successful protection of our intellectual property. We attempt to protect proprietary and intellectual property rights to our productions through available copyright and trademark laws and licensing and distribution arrangements with reputable international companies in specific territories and media for limited durations. Despite these precautions, existing copyright and trademark laws afford only limited practical protection in certain countries where we distribute our products. As a result, it may be possible for unauthorized third parties to copy and distribute our productions or certain portions or applications of our intended productions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Litigation may also be necessary to enforce our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets, or to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others or to defend against claims of infringement or invalidity. Any such litigation, infringement or invalidity claims could result in substantial costs and the diversion of resources and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Our more successful and popular film or television products or franchises may experience higher levels of infringing activity, particularly around key release dates. Alleged infringers have claimed and may claim that their products are permitted under fair use or similar doctrines, that they are entitled to compensatory or punitive damages because our efforts to protect our intellectual property rights are illegal or improper, and that our key trademarks or other significant intellectual property are invalid. Such claims, even if meritless, may result in adverse publicity or costly litigation. We vigorously defend our copyrights and trademarks from infringing products and activity, which can result in litigation. We may receive unfavorable preliminary or interim rulings in the course of litigation, and there can be no assurance that a favorable final outcome will be obtained in all cases. Additionally, one of the risks of the film and television production business is the possibility that others may claim that our productions and production techniques misappropriate or infringe the intellectual property rights of third parties with respect to their previously developed films and televisions series, stories, characters, other entertainment or intellectual property. Regardless of the validity or the success of the assertion of any such claims, we could incur significant costs and diversion of resources in enforcing our intellectual property rights or in defending against such claims, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Our business involves risks of liability claims for content of material, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

As a distributor of media content, we may face potential liability for defamation, invasion of privacy, negligence, copyright

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or trademark infringement (as discussed above), and other claims based on the nature and content of the materials distributed. These types of claims have been brought, sometimes successfully, against producers and distributors of media content. Any imposition of liability that is not covered by insurance or is in excess of insurance coverage could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

Piracy of films and television programs could adversely affect our business over time.

Piracy is extensive in many parts of the world and is made easier by the availability of digital copies of content and technological advances allowing conversion of films and television content into digital formats. This trend facilitates the creation, transmission and sharing of high quality unauthorized copies of motion pictures and television content. The proliferation of unauthorized copies of these products has had and will likely continue to have an adverse effect on our business, because these products reduce the revenue we receive from our products. In order to contain this problem, we may have to implement elaborate and costly security and anti-piracy measures, which could result in significant expenses and losses of revenue. We cannot assure you that even the highest levels of security and anti-piracy measures will prevent piracy.

In particular, unauthorized copying and piracy are prevalent in countries outside of the U.S., Canada and Western Europe, whose legal systems may make it difficult for us to enforce our intellectual property rights. While the U.S. government has publicly considered implementing trade sanctions against specific countries that, in its opinion, do not make appropriate efforts to prevent copyright infringements of U.S. produced motion pictures and television content, there can be no assurance that any such sanctions will be enacted or, if enacted, will be effective. In addition, if enacted, such sanctions could impact the amount of revenue that we realize from the international exploitation of our content.

Service disruptions or failures of the Company’s or our vendors’ information systems and networks as a result of computer viruses, misappropriation of data or other bad acts, natural disasters, extreme weather, accidental releases of information or other similar events, may disrupt our businesses, damage our reputation or have a negative impact on our results of operations.  

Shutdowns or service disruptions of our information systems or networks or to vendors that provide information systems, networks or other services to us pose increasing risks. Such disruptions may be caused by third-party hacking of computers and systems; dissemination of computer viruses, worms and other destructive or disruptive software; denial of service attacks and other bad acts, as well as power outages, natural disasters, extreme weather, terrorist attacks, or other similar events. Shutdowns or disruption from such events could have an adverse impact on us and our customers, including degradation or disruption of service, loss of data, release or threatened release of data publicly, misuse or threatened misuse of data, and damage to equipment and data. System redundancy may be ineffective or inadequate, and our disaster recovery planning may not be sufficient to cover everything that could happen. Significant events could result in a disruption of our operations, reduced revenues, the loss of or damage to the integrity of data used by management to make decisions and operate our business, damage to our reputation or brands or a loss of customers. We may not have adequate insurance coverage to compensate it for any losses associated with such events.

We are also subject to risks caused by the misappropriation, misuse, falsification or intentional or accidental release or loss of data maintained in our information systems and networks or of our vendors, including sensitive or confidential personnel, customer or vendor data, business information or other sensitive or confidential information (including our content). The number and sophistication of attempted and successful information security breaches have increased in recent years and, as a result, the risks associated with such an event continue to increase. We expect that outside parties will attempt to penetrate our systems and those of our vendors or fraudulently induce our employees or customers or employees of our vendors to disclose sensitive or confidential information to obtain or gain access to our data, business information or other sensitive or confidential information. If a material breach of our information systems or those of our vendors occurs, the market perception of the effectiveness of our information security measures could be harmed, we could lose customers, our revenues could be adversely affected and our reputation, brands and credibility could be damaged. In addition, if a material breach of our information systems occurs, we could be required to expend significant amounts of money and other resources to review data and systems to determine the extent of any breach, repair or replace information systems or networks or to comply with notification requirements. We also could be subject to actions by regulatory authorities and claims asserted in private litigation in the event of a breach of our information systems or our vendors.

Although we develop and maintain information security practices and systems designed to prevent these events from occurring, the development and maintenance of these systems are costly and require ongoing monitoring and updating as technologies change and tactics to overcome information security measures become more sophisticated. Despite our efforts, the possibility of these events occurring cannot be eliminated entirely. Moreover, the techniques used by parties seeking to evade the information security practices and systems to infiltrate, disrupt, or for some other hostile purpose change rapidly and often are not recognized until

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launched against some targets. Information security risks will continue to increase, and we will need to expend additional resources to protect our information systems, networks, data, business information and other sensitive or confidential information as we distribute more of our content digitally, engage in more electronic transactions directly with consumers, acquire more consumer data, including information about consumers’ viewing behavior, their credit card information and other personal data, increase the number of information technology systems used in our business operations, rely on cloud-based services and information systems and increases our use of third-party service providers to perform information technology services.

Our activities are subject to a variety of laws and regulations relating to privacy and child protection, which, if violated, could subject us to an increased risk of litigation and regulatory actions.

In addition to our company websites and applications, we use third-party applications, websites, and social media platforms to promote our projects and engage consumers, as well as monitor and collect certain information about users of our online forums. A variety of laws, rules and regulations have been adopted in recent years aimed at protecting all individuals, including children who use the internet such as the Children's Online Privacy and Protection Act of 1998 (“COPPA”). COPPA sets forth, among other things, a number of restrictions on what website operators can present to children under the age of 13 and what information can be collected from them. There are also a variety of laws and regulations governing individual privacy and the protection and use of information collected from such individuals, particularly in relation to an individual's personally identifiable information (e.g., credit card numbers). Many foreign countries have adopted similar laws governing individual privacy, including safeguards which relate to the interaction with children. If our online activities were to violate any applicable current or future laws and regulations, we could be subject to litigation and regulatory actions, including fines and other penalties.

Our Starz networks business is limited by regulatory constraints which may adversely impact our operations.

Although our Starz network business generally is not directly regulated by the FCC, under the Communications Act of 1934 and the 1992 Cable Act, there are certain FCC regulations that govern our network business. Furthermore, to the extent that regulations and laws, either presently in force or proposed, hinder or stimulate the growth of the cable television and satellite industries, our network business will be affected.

Regulations governing our network businesses are subject to the political process and have been in constant flux historically. Further material changes in the law and regulatory requirements must be anticipated. We cannot assure you that we will be able to anticipate material changes in laws or regulatory requirements or that future legislation, new regulation or deregulation will not have a materially adverse effect on our business, financial condition, operating results, liquidity and prospects.

While we believe we currently have adequate internal control over financial reporting, we are required to assess our internal control over financial reporting on an annual basis and any future adverse results from such assessment could result in a loss of investor confidence in our financial reports and have an adverse effect on our securities.

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and the accompanying rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC to implement it require us to include in our Annual Report on Form 10-K an annual report by our management regarding the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. The report includes, among other things, an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of the end of our fiscal year. This assessment must include disclosure of material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting identified by management. If our management identifies any such material weakness that cannot be remediated in a timely manner, we will be unable to assert such internal control is effective. While we believe our internal control over financial reporting is effective, the effectiveness of our internal controls in future periods is subject to the risk that our controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, and, as a result, the degree of compliance of our internal control over financial reporting with the applicable policies or procedures may deteriorate. If we are unable to conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is effective (or if our independent auditors disagree with our conclusion), we may lose investor confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, which could have an adverse effect on our securities.

We could be required to make a cash payment to Starz stockholders who demanded appraisal, and such payment could exceed the merger consideration that we would have paid to such stockholders.

In connection with the merger between us and Starz, Starz received demands for appraisal from purported holders of approximately 25.0 million shares of Starz Series A common stock.  We have not determined at this time whether any of such demands satisfy the requirements of Delaware law for perfecting appraisal rights.  As of March 31, 2018, we have not paid the merger consideration for the shares that have demanded appraisal but have recorded a liability of $869.3 million for the estimated value of the merger consideration that would have been payable to such shares, plus interest accrued at the Federal Reserve discount rate plus 5%, compounded quarterly.  Subsequently, prior to February 6, 2017, we were notified that holders of approximately 2.5

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million of such shares withdrew their demand for appraisal and have accepted the merger consideration. Since the merger closed on December 8, 2016, five petitions for appraisal have been filed in the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware. See Note 16 to our consolidated financial statements for a discussion of these proceedings. Should the pending appraisal proceedings reach a verdict, stockholders that are determined to have validly perfected their appraisal rights will be entitled to a cash payment equal to the fair value of their shares, plus interest, as determined by the court. The amounts that we may be required to pay to stockholders in connection with the pending appraisal proceedings is uncertain at this time, but could be greater than the merger consideration to which such stockholders would have been entitled had they not demanded appraisal.

Any decisions to reduce or discontinue paying cash dividends to our shareholders or repurchase our common shares pursuant to our previously announced share repurchase program could cause the market price for our common shares to decline.

Our Board of Directors assesses relevant factors when considering the declaration of a dividend on or repurchases of our common stock. Our payment of quarterly cash dividends and repurchases of our common shares pursuant to our share purchase program will be subject to, among other things, our financial position and results of operations, available cash and cash flow, capital requirements, and other factors. Any reduction or discontinuance by us of the payment of quarterly cash dividends or repurchases of our common shares pursuant to our share repurchase program could cause the market price of our common shares to decline. Moreover, in the event our payment of quarterly cash dividends or repurchases of our common shares are reduced or discontinued, our failure or inability to resume paying cash dividends or repurchasing our common shares at historical levels could result in a lower market valuation of our common shares.

Risks Related Our Indebtedness

We have incurred significant indebtedness that could adversely affect our operations and financial condition.

We currently have a substantial amount of indebtedness. As of March 31, 2018, we and our subsidiaries have corporate debt of approximately $2,520.0 million, capitalized lease obligations of approximately $50.5 million and production loan obligations of approximately $352.9 million, and the Senior Credit Facilities provide for unused commitments of $1.5 billion. On the same basis, approximately $2,050.5 million of such indebtedness is secured (including all of our capital lease obligations but excluding all of our production loan obligations).

Our high level of debt could have adverse consequences on our business, such as:

making it more difficult for us to satisfy our obligations with respect to our notes and our other debt;
limiting our ability to refinance such indebtedness or to obtain additional financing to fund future working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other general corporate requirements;
requiring a substantial portion of our cash flows to be dedicated to debt service payments instead of other purposes, thereby reducing the amount of cash flows available for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other general corporate purposes;
increasing our vulnerability to economic downturns and adverse developments in our business;
exposing us to the risk of increased interest rates as certain of our borrowings, including borrowings under the Senior Credit Facilities, are at variable rates of interest;
limiting our flexibility in planning for, and reducing our flexibility in reacting to, changes in the conditions of the financial markets and our industry;
placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared to other, less leveraged competitors;
increasing our cost of borrowing; and
restricting the way in which we conduct our business because of financial and operating covenants in the agreements governing our existing and future indebtedness and exposing us to potential events of default (if not cured or waived) under covenants contained in our debt instruments.

In addition, the Senior Credit Facilities and the indenture that govern our 5.875% Senior Notes due 2024 issued in October 2016 (the “2016 5.875% Senior Notes”) and our new 5.875% Senior Notes due 2024 issued in March 2018 (the “2018 5.875% Senior Notes”) each contain restrictive covenants limiting our ability to engage in activities that may be in our long-term best interest. Our failure to comply with those covenants could result in an event of default which, if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of all our debt.

We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to service all of our indebtedness and may be forced to take other actions to satisfy our obligations under our indebtedness, which may not be successful.

A significant portion of our cash flows from operations is expected to be dedicated to the payments of principal and

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interest obligations under the Senior Credit Facilities, the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes. Our ability to make scheduled payments on or refinance our debt obligations depends on our financial condition and operating performance, which are subject to prevailing economic and competitive conditions and to certain financial, business, legislative, regulatory and other factors beyond our control. We may not be able to maintain a level of cash flows from operating activities sufficient to permit us to pay the principal, premium, if any, and interest on our indebtedness.

If our cash flows and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt service obligations, we could face substantial liquidity problems and could be forced to reduce or delay investments and capital expenditures or to dispose of material assets or operations, seek additional debt or equity capital or restructure or refinance our indebtedness. We may not be able to effect any such alternative measures, if necessary, on commercially reasonable terms or at all and, even if successful, those alternative actions may not allow us to meet our scheduled debt service obligations. The Senior Credit Facilities, the indenture that governs the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes, and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes restrict our ability to dispose of assets and use the proceeds from those dispositions, and they also restrict our ability to raise debt or certain types of equity to be used to repay other indebtedness when it becomes due. We may not be able to consummate those dispositions or to obtain proceeds in an amount sufficient to meet any debt service obligations then due.

In addition, we conduct a substantial portion of our operations through our subsidiaries, certain of which are not guarantors of the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes or our other indebtedness. Accordingly, repayment of our indebtedness, including the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes, is dependent on the generation of cash flow by our subsidiaries and their ability to make such cash available to us, by dividend, debt repayment or otherwise. Unless they are guarantors of the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes or our other indebtedness, our subsidiaries do not have any obligation to pay amounts due on the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes or our other indebtedness or to make funds available for that purpose. Our subsidiaries may not be able to, or may not be permitted to, make distributions to enable us to make payments in respect of our indebtedness, including the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes. Each subsidiary is a distinct legal entity, and, under certain circumstances, legal and contractual restrictions may limit our ability to obtain cash from our subsidiaries. While the senior credit facilities, the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes, and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes limit the ability of our subsidiaries to incur consensual restrictions on their ability to pay dividends or make other intercompany payments to us, these limitations are subject to qualifications and exceptions. In the event that we do not receive distributions from our subsidiaries, we may be unable to make required principal and interest payments on our indebtedness.

Our inability to generate sufficient cash flows to satisfy our debt obligations, or to refinance our indebtedness on commercially reasonable terms or at all, would materially and adversely affect our financial position and results of operations.

If we cannot make scheduled payments on our debt, we will be in default and holders of the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and/or the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes could declare all outstanding principal and interest under such notes to be due and payable, the lenders under the Senior Credit Facilities could terminate their commitments to loan money, the lenders under our secured debt could foreclose against the assets securing their borrowings and we could be forced into bankruptcy or liquidation.

Despite our current level of indebtedness, we and our subsidiaries may still be able to incur substantially more debt. This could further exacerbate the risks to our financial condition described above.

We and our subsidiaries may be able to incur significant additional indebtedness in the future. Although the Senior Credit Facilities, the indenture that governs the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes, and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes contain restrictions on the incurrence of additional indebtedness, these restrictions are subject to a number of qualifications and exceptions, and the additional indebtedness incurred in compliance with these restrictions could be substantial. These restrictions also will not prevent us from incurring obligations that do not constitute indebtedness. If new debt is added to our current debt levels, the related risks that we and the guarantors now face could intensify.

The terms of the Senior Credit Facilities, the indenture that governs the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes, and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes, restrict our current and future operations, particularly our ability to respond to changes or to take certain actions.

The Senior Credit Facilities, the indenture that governs the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes, and the indenture that governs our 2018 5.875% Senior Notes, contain a number of restrictive covenants that impose significant operating and financial restrictions on us and limits our ability to engage in acts that may be in our long-term best interest, including restrictions on our ability to:

incur, assume or guarantee additional indebtedness;
issue certain disqualified stock;
pay dividends or distributions or redeem or repurchase capital stock;

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prepay, redeem or repurchase debt that is junior in right of payment to the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes;
make loans or investments;
incur liens;
restrict dividends, loans or asset transfers from our restricted subsidiaries;
sell or otherwise dispose of assets, including capital stock of subsidiaries and sale/leaseback transactions;
enter into transactions with affiliates; and
enter into new lines of business.

The indenture that governs the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes also limit the ability of Lions Gate and our guarantors to consolidate or merge with or into, or sell substantially all of our assets to, another person.

In addition, the restrictive covenants in the Senior Credit Facilities require us to maintain specified financial ratios, tested quarterly. Our ability to meet those financial ratios and tests can be affected by events beyond our control, and we may be unable to meet them.

A breach of the covenants or restrictions under the Senior Credit Facilities, the indenture that governs the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes, and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes could result in an event of default under the applicable indebtedness. Such a default may allow the creditors to accelerate the related debt and may result in the acceleration of any other debt to which a cross-acceleration or cross-default provision applies. In addition, an event of default under the Senior Credit Facilities would permit the lenders to terminate all commitments to extend further credit pursuant to the revolving facility thereunder. Furthermore, if we were unable to repay the amounts due and payable under the Senior Credit Facilities, the lenders thereof could proceed against the collateral granted to them to secure the Senior Credit Facilities. In the event our lenders or noteholders accelerate the repayment of our borrowings, we and our subsidiaries may not have sufficient assets to repay that indebtedness.

As a result of these restrictions, we may be:

limited in how we conduct our business;
unable to raise additional debt or equity financing to operate during general economic or business downturns; or
unable to compete effectively or to take advantage of new business opportunities.

These restrictions may affect our ability to grow in accordance with our strategy. In addition, our financial results, our substantial indebtedness and our credit ratings could adversely affect the availability and terms of our financing.

An increase in the ownership of our Class A voting common shares by certain shareholders could trigger a change in control under the agreements governing our indebtedness.

The agreements governing certain of our long-term indebtedness contain change in control provisions that are triggered when any of our shareholders, directly or indirectly, acquires ownership or control of in excess of a certain percentage of the total voting power of our Class A voting common shares, no par value per share (the "Class A voting shares"). 

Upon the occurrence of certain change of control events, the holders of the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes may require us to repurchase all or a portion of such 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and such 2018 5.875% Senior Notes. Dr. Mark H. Rachesky, M.D. and his affiliates, who collectively currently hold over 18% of our voting stock and 21% of our non-voting common stock, are “Permitted Holders” for purposes of the indenture that governs the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes. Accordingly, certain increases of ownership or other transactions involving Dr. Rachesky and his affiliates would not constitute a change of control under the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes (in which case holders of the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes would not have a right to have their 2016 5.875% Senior Notes or 2018 5.875% Senior Notes, as applicable, repurchased), but could constitute a change of control under the other existing or future indebtedness of us and our subsidiaries.

We may not be able to repurchase outstanding debt upon a qualifying change of control for such debt, because the we may not have sufficient funds. Further, we may be contractually restricted under the terms of the Senior Credit Facilities from repurchasing all of the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes tendered by holders upon a change in control. Our failure to repurchase the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes upon a change in control would cause a default under the indenture that governs the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the indenture that governs the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes and a cross-default under the Senior Credit Facilities.


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The Senior Credit Facilities will also provide that certain change of control events will result in an event of default that permits lenders to accelerate the maturity of borrowings thereunder and, in the case of the Senior Credit Facilities, to enforce security interests in the collateral securing such debt, thereby limiting our ability to raise cash to purchase our outstanding 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and 2018 5.875% Senior Notes, and reducing the practical benefit of the offer-to-purchase provisions to the holders of the 2016 5.875% Senior Notes and the 2018 5.875% Senior Notes. Any of our future debt agreements may contain similar provisions.

Our variable rate indebtedness subjects us to interest rate risk, which could cause our debt service obligations to increase significantly.

Borrowings under the Senior Credit Facilities are at variable rates of interest and expose us to interest rate risk. If interest rates were to increase, our debt service obligations on the variable rate indebtedness would increase even though the amount borrowed remained the same, and our net income and cash flows, including cash available for servicing our indebtedness, will correspondingly decrease.

Risk Related to Governmental Rules and Regulations

The Internal Revenue Service may not agree that we should be treated as a non-U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes and may not agree that our U.S. affiliates should not be subject to certain adverse U.S. federal income tax rules.

        Under current U.S. federal tax law, a corporation is generally considered for U.S. federal tax purposes to be a tax resident in the jurisdiction of its organization or incorporation. Because we are incorporated in Canada, we would generally be classified as a non-U.S. corporation (and, therefore, a non-U.S. tax resident) under these rules. However, Section 7874 of the Code (“Section 7874”) provides an exception to this general rule under which a non-U.S. incorporated entity may, in certain circumstances, be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes.

        Under Section 7874, if (a) the Starz stockholders own (within the meaning of Section 7874) 80% or more (by vote or value) of our post-reclassification shares after the Starz merger by reason of holding Starz common stock (the “80% ownership test,” and such ownership percentage the “Section 7874 ownership percentage”), and (b) our “expanded affiliated group” does not have “substantial business activities” in Canada when compared to the total business activities of such expanded affiliated group (the “substantial business activities test”), we will be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes. If the Section 7874 ownership percentage of the Starz stockholders in Lions Gate after the merger is less than 80% but at least 60% (the “60% ownership test”), and the substantial business activities test is not met, Starz and its U.S. affiliates (including the U.S. affiliates historically owned by us) may, in some circumstances, be subject to certain adverse U.S. federal income tax rules (which, among other things, could limit our ability to utilize certain U.S. tax attributes to offset U.S. taxable income or gain resulting from certain transactions).

        Based on the terms of the merger, the rules for determining share ownership under Section 7874 and certain factual assumptions, Starz stockholders are believed to own (within the meaning of Section 7874) less than 60% (by both vote and value) of our post-reclassification shares after the merger by reason of holding shares of Starz common stock. Therefore, under current law, it is expected that we should not be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes and that Section 7874 should otherwise not apply to us or our affiliates as a result of the merger.
       
        However, the rules under Section 7874 are relatively new and complex and there is limited guidance regarding their application. In particular, stock ownership for purposes of computing the Section 7874 ownership percentage is subject to various adjustments under the Code and the Treasury regulations promulgated thereunder, some of the relevant determinations must be made based on facts as they exist at the time of closing of the merger, and there is limited guidance regarding Section 7874 generally, including with respect to the application of the ownership tests described above and any related adjustments. As a result, the determination of the Section 7874 ownership percentage is complex and is subject to factual and legal uncertainties. Thus, there can be no assurance that the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) will agree with the position that we should not be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes or that Section 7874 does not otherwise apply as a result of the merger.

        In addition, on April 4, 2016, the U.S. Treasury Department (the “U.S. Treasury”) and the IRS issued temporary Treasury regulations under Section 7874 (the “Temporary Section 7874 Regulations”), which, among other things, require certain adjustments that generally increase, for purposes of the Section 7874 ownership tests, the percentage of the stock of a foreign acquiring corporation deemed owned (within the meaning of Section 7874) by the former shareholders of an acquired U.S. corporation by reason of holding stock in such U.S. corporation. Further on January 13, 2017, the IRS and the U.S. Treasury published new and final temporary regulations (the “New Regulations”) which finalized with some modifications the previous Temporary Section 7874 Regulations.


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        For example, these New Regulations disregard, for purposes of determining the Section 7874 ownership percentage, (a) any “non-ordinary course distributions” (within the meaning of the temporary regulations) made by the acquired U.S. corporation (such as Starz) during the 36 months preceding the acquisition, including certain dividends and share repurchases, (b) potentially any cash consideration received by the shareholders of such U.S. corporation in the acquisition to the extent such cash is, directly or indirectly, provided by the U.S. corporation, as well as (c) certain stock of the foreign acquiring corporation that was issued as consideration in a prior acquisition of another U.S. corporation (or U.S. partnership) during the 36 months preceding the signing date of a binding contract for the acquisition being tested. Taking into account the effect of these New Regulations, it is currently believed that the Section 7874 ownership percentage of the Starz stockholders in Lions Gate after the merger is less than 60%. However, these New Regulations are new and complex, there is no guidance regarding their application and some of the relevant determinations must be made based on facts as they exist at the time of the closing of the acquisition. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that the Section 7874 ownership percentage of the Starz stockholders after the merger will be less than 60% as determined under the temporary regulations, or that the IRS will not otherwise successfully assert that either the 80% ownership test or the 60% ownership test were met after the merger.

        If the 80% ownership test has been met after the merger and we were accordingly treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes under Section 7874, we would be subject to substantial additional U.S. tax liability. In addition, non-U.S. shareholders of Lions Gate would be subject to U.S. withholding tax on the gross amount of any dividends paid by us to such shareholders (subject to an exemption or reduced rate available under an applicable tax treaty). Regardless of any application of Section 7874, we are expected to be treated as a Canadian tax resident for Canadian tax purposes. Consequently, if we were to be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes under Section 7874, we could be liable for both U.S. and Canadian taxes, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

        If the 60% ownership test has been met, several adverse U.S. federal income tax rules could apply to our U.S. affiliates (including Starz and its U.S. affiliates). In particular, in such case, Section 7874 could limit the ability of such U.S. affiliates to utilize certain U.S. tax attributes (including net operating losses and certain tax credits) to offset any taxable income or gain resulting from certain transactions, including any transfers or licenses of property to a foreign related person during the 10-year period following the merger. The Temporary Section 7874 Regulations generally expand the scope of these rules. In addition, the Temporary Section 7874 Regulations (and certain related temporary regulations issued under other provisions of the Code) include new rules that would apply if the 60% ownership test has been met, which, in such situation, may limit our ability to restructure or access cash earned by certain of its non-U.S. subsidiaries, in each case, without incurring substantial U.S. tax liabilities. Moreover, in such case, Section 4985 of the Code and rules related thereto would impose an excise tax on the value of certain stock compensation held directly or indirectly by certain “disqualified individuals” at a rate currently equal to 15%.

Future potential changes to the tax laws could result in Lions Gate being treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes or in Starz and its U.S. affiliates (including the U.S. affiliates historically owned by us) being subject to certain adverse U.S. federal income tax rules.

        As discussed above, under current law, we are expected to be treated as a non-U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes and Section 7874 is not otherwise expected to apply as a result of the merger. However, changes to Section 7874, or the U.S. Treasury regulations promulgated thereunder, could affect our status as a non-U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes or could result in the application of certain adverse U.S. federal income tax rules to Starz and its U.S. affiliates (including the U.S. affiliates historically owned by us). Any such changes could have prospective or retroactive application. If we were to be treated as a U.S. corporation for federal tax purposes or if Starz and its U.S. affiliates (including the U.S. affiliates historically owned by us) were to become subject to such adverse U.S. federal income tax rules, we and our U.S. affiliates could be subject to substantially greater U.S. tax liability than currently contemplated.

        Recent legislative and other proposals have aimed to expand the scope of U.S. corporate tax residence, including in such a way as would cause us to be treated as a U.S. corporation if the management and control of Lions Gate were determined to be located primarily in the U.S. In addition, recent legislative and other proposals have aimed to expand the scope of Section 7874, or otherwise address certain perceived issues arising in connection with so-called inversion transactions. Such proposals, if made effective on or prior to the date of the closing of the merger, could cause us to be treated as a U.S. corporation for U.S. federal tax purposes, in which case, we would be subject to substantially greater U.S. tax liability than currently contemplated.

        Other recent legislative and other proposals (including most recently final Treasury regulations under Section 385 of the Code issued by the U.S. Treasury and the IRS on October 13, 2016 (the “Final Section 385 Regulations”), if enacted or finalized, could cause us and our affiliates to be subject to certain intercompany financing limitations, including with respect to their ability to deduct certain interest expense, and could cause us and our affiliates to recognize additional taxable income. Any such proposals, and any other relevant provisions that can change on a prospective or retroactive basis, could have a significant adverse effect on us and our affiliates.

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        It is presently uncertain whether any such proposals or other legislative action relating to the scope of U.S. tax residence, revamp of the corporate tax system, Section 7874 or so-called inversion transactions and inverted groups will be enacted into law.

Future changes to U.S. and non-U.S. tax laws could adversely affect us.

        The U.S. Congress, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and other government agencies in jurisdictions where we and our affiliates will conduct business have had an extended focus on issues related to the taxation of multinational corporations. One example is in the area of “base erosion and profit shifting,” including situations where payments are made between affiliates from a jurisdiction with high tax rates to a jurisdiction with lower tax rates. The Organisation of Economic Co-operation and Development in particular is contemplating changes to numerous long-standing international tax principles through its so-called BEPS project, which is focused on a number of issues, including sharing of profits between affiliated entities in different tax jurisdictions. As a result of BEPS and other similar initiatives, the tax laws in the U.S., Canada and other countries in which we and our affiliates will do business could change on a prospective or retroactive basis, and any such changes could adversely affect us.

Changes in foreign, state and local tax incentives may increase the cost of original programming content to such an extent that they are no longer feasible.

        Original programming requires substantial financial commitment, which can occasionally be offset by foreign, state or local tax incentives. However, there is a risk that the tax incentives will not remain available for the duration of a series. If tax incentives are no longer available or reduced substantially, it may result in increased costs for us to complete the production, or make the production of additional seasons more expensive. If we are unable to produce original programming content on a cost effective basis our business, financial condition and results of operations would be materially adversely affected.

Changes to the U.S. Model Income Tax Treaty could adversely affect us.

        On February 17, 2016, the U.S. Treasury released a newly revised U.S. model income tax convention (the “model”), which is the baseline text used by the U.S. Treasury to negotiate tax treaties. The new model treaty provisions were preceded by draft versions released by the U.S. Treasury on May 20, 2015 (the “May 2015 draft”) for public comment. The revisions made to the model address certain aspects of the model by modifying existing provisions and introducing entirely new provisions. Specifically, the new provisions target (a) permanent establishments subject to little or no foreign tax, (b) special tax regimes, (c) expatriated entities subject to Section 7874, (d) the anti-treaty shopping measures of the limitation on benefits article and (e) subsequent changes in treaty partners’ tax laws.

        With respect to new model provisions pertaining to expatriated entities, because it is expected that the merger will not result in the creation of an expatriated entity as defined in Section 7874, payments of interest, dividends, royalties and certain other items of income by or to Starz and/or its U.S. affiliates to or from non-U.S. persons would not be expected to be subject to such provisions (which, if applicable, could cause such payments to become subject to full withholding tax), even if applicable treaties were subsequently amended to adopt the new model provisions. In response to comments the U.S. Treasury received regarding the May 2015 draft, the new model treaty provisions pertaining to expatriated entities fix the definition of “expatriated entity” to the meaning ascribed to such term under Section 7874(a)(2)(A) as of the date the relevant bilateral treaty is signed. However, as discussed above, the rules under Section 7874 are relatively new, complex and are the subject of current and future legislative and regulatory changes. Accordingly, there can be no assurance that the IRS will agree with the position that the merger does not result in the creation of an expatriated entity (within the meaning of Section 7874) under the law as in effect at the time any applicable treaty were to be amended or that such a challenge would not be sustained by a court, or that such position would not be affected by future or regulatory action which may apply retroactively to the merger.

Our tax rate is uncertain and may vary from expectations.

        There is no assurance that we will be able to maintain any particular worldwide effective corporate tax rate because of uncertainty regarding the tax policies jurisdictions in which we and our affiliates operate. Our actual effective tax rate may vary from our expectations, and such variance may be material. Additionally, tax laws or their implementation and applicable tax authority practices in any particular jurisdiction could change in the future, possibly on a retroactive basis, and any such change could have an adverse impact on us and our affiliates.

Legislative or other governmental action in the U.S. could adversely affect our business.


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        Legislative action may be taken by the U.S. Congress that, if ultimately enacted, could limit the availability of tax benefits or deductions that we currently claim, override tax treaties upon which we rely, or otherwise increase the taxes that the U.S. imposes on our worldwide operations. Such changes could materially adversely affect our effective tax rate and/or require us to take further action, at potentially significant expense, to seek to preserve our effective tax rate. In addition, if proposals were enacted that had the effect of limiting our ability as a Canadian company to take advantage of tax treaties with the U.S., we could incur additional tax expense and/or otherwise incur business detriment.

Changes in, or interpretations of, tax rules and regulations, and changes in geographic operating results, may adversely affect our effective tax rates.

        We are subject to income taxes in the U.S. and foreign tax jurisdictions.  We also conduct business and financing activities between our entities in various jurisdictions and we are subject to complex transfer pricing regulations in the countries in which we operate.  Although uniform transfer pricing standards are emerging in many of the countries in which we operate, there is still a relatively high degree of uncertainty and inherent subjectivity in complying with these rules. Our future effective tax rates could be affected by changes in tax laws or the interpretation of tax laws, by changes in the amount of revenue or earnings that we derive from international sources in countries with high or low statutory tax rates, or by changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities. Unanticipated changes in our tax rates could affect our future results of operations.

        In addition, we may be subject to examination of our income tax returns by federal, state, and foreign tax jurisdictions. We regularly assess the likelihood of outcomes resulting from possible examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes. In making such assessments, we exercise judgment in estimating our provision for income taxes. While we believe our estimates are reasonable, we cannot assure you that final determinations from any examinations will not be materially different from those reflected in our historical income tax provisions and accruals. Any adverse outcome from any examinations may have an adverse effect on our business and operating results, which could cause the market price of our securities to decline.

        Based on our current assessment, we believe that substantially all of our deferred tax assets will be realized. There is no assurance that we will attain our future expected levels of taxable income or that a valuation allowance against new or existing deferred tax assets will not be necessary in the future.

Guidance, regulations, or technical corrections issued in connection with the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act could adversely impact our effective tax rate.

On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the "Tax Act") was signed into law, making significant changes to the taxation of U.S. business entities. The Tax Act reduced the U.S. corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21% and included numerous other provisions reflecting fundamental tax reform. The Tax Act could limit the availability of tax benefits or deductions that we currently claim or otherwise increase the taxes that the U.S. imposes on our worldwide operations. We have included the estimated impact of the new law on our financials based on management’s current knowledge and assumptions. The Internal Revenue Service and U.S. Treasury Department may, however, issue guidance, regulations, or technical corrections that could change our interpretation of the Tax Act, which could have an adverse impact on our effective tax rate.


ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS.
Not applicable.
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES.

Our corporate office is located at 250 Howe Street, 20th Floor, Vancouver, BC V6C 3R8. Our principal executive offices are located at 2700 Colorado Avenue, Santa Monica, California, 90404, where we occupy 192,584 square feet (per a lease that expires in August 2023).

In addition, we lease the following properties used by our Motion Pictures, Television Production and Media Networks segments:

280,000 square feet at 8900 Liberty Circle, Englewood, Colorado (per a lease that expires in December 2023);
93,670 square feet at 12020 Chandler Blvd., Valley Village, California (per a lease that expires in December 2020);
60,116 square feet at 1647 Stewart Street, Santa Monica, California (per a lease that expires in December 2028);
34,332 square feet at 530 Fifth Avenue, New York, New York (per a lease that expires in August 2028);
22,992 square feet at 2600 Colorado Avenue, Santa Monica, California (per a lease that expires in January 2020);

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11,907 square feet at 2401 W. Big Beaver Road, Troy, Michigan (per a lease that expires in September 2019);
11,243 square feet at 45 Mortimer Street, London, United Kingdom (per a lease that expires in July 2029);
8,794 square feet at 9777 Wilshire Blvd., Beverly Hills, California (per a lease that expires in March 2020);
1,968 square feet at 1235 Bay Street, Toronto, Ontario (per a lease that expires in December 2020);
1,645 square feet at A6 Gonti Road, Beijing, China (per a lease that expires in June 2020);
1,200 square feet at 205, Landmark Building, New Link Road, Mumbai, India (per a lease that expires in October 2020);
975 square feet at 3 Boulevard Royal, Luxembourg City, Luxembourg (per a lease that expires in May 2021); and
620 square feet at Millennium City 5, 418 Kwun Tong Road, Kwun Tong, Hong Kong (per a lease that expires in October 2019).

We believe that our current facilities are adequate to conduct our business operations for the foreseeable future. We believe that we will be able to renew these leases on similar terms upon expiration. If we cannot renew, we believe that we could find other suitable premises without any material adverse impact on our operations.
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS.

From time to time, the Company is involved in certain claims and legal proceedings arising in the normal course of business. While the resolution of these matters cannot be predicted with certainty, we do not believe, based on current knowledge, that the outcome of any currently pending legal proceedings in which the Company is currently involved will have a material adverse effect on the Company's consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flow.

For a discussion of certain claims and legal proceedings, see Note 16 - Commitments and Contingencies to our consolidated financial statements, which discussion is incorporated by reference into this Part I, Item 3, Legal Proceedings.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES.

Not Applicable.

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PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES.
Market Information
Our common shares were previously listed on the NYSE under the symbols “LGF.” Effective December 9, 2016, each then existing Lionsgate common share was converted into 0.5 shares of a newly issued class of Class A voting shares and 0.5 shares of a newly issued class of Lionsgate Class B non-voting shares, no par value per share (the "Class B non-voting shares"). Our Class A voting shares are listed on the NYSE under the symbol “LGF.A”. Our Class B non-voting shares are listed on the NYSE under the symbol “LGF.B”.
As of May 21, 2018, the closing price of our Class A voting shares on the NYSE was $23.72, and the closing price of our Class B non-voting shares on the NYSE was $22.24.
The following table presents the high and low sale prices of our common shares on the NYSE for each period, based on inter-dealer prices that do not include retail mark-ups, mark-downs or commissions, and cash dividends declared for each period:

Common shares (per share)
 
Class A (LGF.A)
Dividends Declared
Class B (LGF.B)
Dividends Declared
Year Ended March 31, 2019
High
Low
 
High
Low
 
First quarter (through May 21, 2018)
$27.02
$21.54
$25.19
$19.97
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year Ended March 31, 2018
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fourth quarter (January 1, 2018 to March 31, 2018)
$36.48
$25.34
$0.09
$34.41
$23.76
$0.09
Third quarter (October 1, 2017 to December 31, 2017)
$34.75
$27.44
$33.10
$26.66
Second quarter (July 1, 2017 to September 30, 2017)
$33.49
$26.40
$31.88
$25.51
First quarter (April 1, 2017 to June 30, 2017)
$29.25
$24.56
$27.14
$22.50
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year Ended March 31, 2017
 
 
 
 
Fourth quarter (January 1, 2017 to March 31, 2017)
$29.03
$24.27
$27.14
$22.72
Third quarter (December 9, 2016 to December 31, 2016)
$28.23
$26.09
$27.01
$24.46

 
LGF
Year ended March 31, 2017
High
Low
Dividends Declared
Third quarter (October 1, 2016 to December 8, 2016)
$26.29
$18.28
Second quarter (July 1, 2016 to September 30, 2016)
$22.30
$18.52
First quarter (April 1, 2016 to June 30, 2016)
$23.52
$19.37
$0.09

Holders
As of May 21, 2018, there were approximately 539 and 701 shareholders of record of our Class A voting shares and Class B non-voting shares, respectively.

Dividends

On February 8, 2018, our Board of Directors approved a quarterly cash dividend of nine cents ($0.09) per each of the Class A voting shares and the Class B non-voting shares payable May 1, 2018, to shareholders of record as of March 31, 2018. The amount of any future dividends, if any, that we pay to our shareholders is determined by our Board of Directors, at its discretion, and is dependent on a number of factors, including our financial position, results of operations, cash flows, capital requirements and restrictions under our credit agreements, and shall be in compliance with applicable law. We cannot guarantee the amount of dividends paid in the future, if any.

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Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans

The information required by this item is incorporated by reference to our Proxy Statement for our 2018 Annual General Meeting of Stockholders to be filed with the SEC within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018.

Taxation

The following is a general summary of certain Canadian federal income tax consequences to U.S. Holders (who, at all relevant times, deal at arm's length with the Company) of the purchase, ownership and disposition of common shares. For the purposes of this Canadian income tax discussion, a “U.S. Holder” means a holder of common shares who (1) for the purposes of the Income Tax Act (Canada) (the "ITA") is not, has not, and will not be, or deemed to be, resident in Canada at any time while he, she or it holds common shares, (2) at all relevant times is a resident of the United States under the Canada-United States Tax Convention (1980) (the “Convention”) and is eligible for benefits under the Convention, (3) is not a “foreign affiliate” as defined in the ITA of a person resident in Canada, and (4) does not and will not use or be deemed to use the common shares in carrying on a business in Canada. This summary does not apply to a U.S. Holder that is an insurer or an “authorized foreign bank” within the meaning of the ITA. Such U.S. Holders should seek tax advice from their advisors.

This summary is not intended to be, and should not be construed to be, legal or tax advice and no representation with respect to the tax consequences to any particular investor is made. The summary does not address any aspect of any provincial, state or local tax laws or the tax laws of any jurisdiction other than Canada or the tax considerations applicable to non-U.S. Holders. Accordingly, prospective investors should consult with their own tax advisors for advice with respect to the income tax consequences to them having regard to their own particular circumstances, including any consequences of an investment in common shares arising under any provincial, state or local tax laws or the tax laws of any jurisdiction other than Canada.

This summary is based upon the current provisions of the ITA, the regulations thereunder and the proposed amendments thereto publicly announced by the Department of Finance, Canada before the date hereof and our understanding of the current administrative policies and assessing practices of the Canada Revenue Agency published in writing prior to the date hereof. No assurance may be given that any proposed amendment will be enacted in the form proposed, if at all. This summary does not otherwise take into account or anticipate any changes in law, whether by legislative, governmental or judicial action.

The following summary applies only to U.S. Holders who hold their common shares as capital property. In general, common shares will be considered capital property of a holder where the holder is neither a trader nor dealer in securities, does not hold the common shares in the course of carrying on a business and is not engaged in an adventure in the nature of trade in respect thereof. This summary does not apply to a U.S. Holder that is a “financial institution” within the meaning of the mark-to-market rules contained in the ITA or to holders who have entered into a “derivative forward agreement” or a “synthetic disposition arrangement” as these terms are defined in the ITA.

Amounts in respect of common shares paid or credited or deemed to be paid or credited as, on account or in lieu of payment of, or in satisfaction of, dividends to a shareholder who is not a resident of Canada within the meaning of the ITA will generally be subject to Canadian non-resident withholding tax. Canadian withholding tax applies to dividends that are formally declared and paid by the Company and also to deemed dividends that may be triggered by a cancellation of common shares if the cancellation occurs otherwise than as a result of a simple open market transaction. For either deemed or actual dividends, withholding tax is levied at a basic rate of 25%, which may be reduced pursuant to the terms of an applicable tax treaty between Canada and the country of residence of the non-resident shareholder. Under the Convention, the rate of Canadian non-resident withholding tax on the gross amount of dividends received by a U.S. Holder, which is the beneficial owner of such dividends, is generally 15%. However, where such beneficial owner is a company that owns at least 10% of the voting shares of the company paying the dividends, the rate of such withholding is 5%. For these purposes, a company that is a resident of the United States for the purposes of the Convention and which holds an interest in an entity (other than an entity that is resident in Canada) that is fiscally transparent under the laws of the United States will be considered to own the voting shares of the Company owned by that fiscally transparent entity in proportion to the company’s ownership interest in the fiscally transparent entity.


47


In addition to the Canadian withholding tax on actual or deemed dividends, a U.S. Holder also needs to consider the potential application of Canadian income tax on capital gains. A U.S. Holder will generally not be subject to tax under the ITA in respect of any capital gain arising on a disposition of common shares (including, generally, on a purchase by the Company on the open market) unless at the time of disposition such shares constitute taxable Canadian property of the holder for purposes of the ITA and such U.S. Holder is not entitled to relief under the Convention. If the common shares are listed on a designated stock exchange (which includes the NYSE) at the time they are disposed of, they will generally not constitute taxable Canadian property of a U.S. Holder unless, at any time during the 60-month period immediately preceding the disposition of the common shares, the U.S. Holder, persons with whom he, she or it does not deal at arm's length, or the U.S. Holder together with such non-arm's length persons, owned 25% or more of the issued shares of any class or series of the capital stock of the Company and at any time during the immediately preceding 60-month period, the shares derived their value principally from one or any combination of (i) real or immovable property situated in Canada, (ii) Canadian resource properties, (iii) timber resource properties, and (iv) options in respect of, or interests in, such properties. Assuming that the common shares have never derived their value principally from any of the items listed in (i)-(iv) above, capital gains derived by a U.S. Holder from the disposition of common shares will generally not be subject to tax in Canada.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

On May 31, 2007, our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $50 million of our common shares. On each of May 29, 2008 and November 6, 2008, our Board of Directors authorized additional repurchases up to an additional $50 million of our common shares. On December 17, 2013, our Board of Directors authorized the Company to increase its stock repurchase plan to $300 million and on February 2, 2016, our Board of Directors authorized the Company to further increase its stock repurchase plan to $468 million. To date, approximately $283.2 million (or 15,729,923) of our common shares have been purchased, leaving approximately $184.7 million of authorized potential purchases. The remaining $184.7 million of our common shares may be purchased from time to time at the Company’s discretion, including quantity, timing and price thereof, and will be subject to market conditions. Such purchases will be structured as permitted by securities laws and other legal requirements. The share repurchase program has no expiration date.

No common shares were purchased by us during the year ended March 31, 2018.

Additionally, during the three months ended March 31, 2018, 48,404 Class A voting shares and 121,914 Class B non-voting shares were withheld upon the vesting of restricted share units and share issuances to satisfy minimum statutory federal, state and local tax withholding obligations.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

On June 30, 2016, the Company entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger ("Merger Agreement") with Starz and Orion Arm Acquisition Inc. a Delaware corporation and a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company (“Merger Sub”), pursuant to which Merger Sub merged with and into Starz, with Starz continuing as the surviving corporation and becoming an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of the Company.

On October 21, 2016, the Company and Lions Gate Entertainment Inc. ("LGEI") entered into a Securities Issuance and Payment Agreement (the “Securities Issuance Agreement”), pursuant to which the Company and LGEI agreed to issue to AT&T Media Holdings, Inc. (“AT&T”) $50 million in, at LGEI’s election, (a) an equal number of Class A voting shares and Class B non-voting shares, (b) cash or (c) a combination thereof, and paid in three $16.67 million annual installments, beginning on the first anniversary of the consummation of the Merger. The Class A voting shares and Class B non-voting shares will be deemed to have a value equal to the 30-day volume weighted average price of the Company’s Class A voting shares and Class B non-voting shares, respectively, as of the business day immediately prior to the applicable payment date.

The Company entered into the Securities Issuance Agreement in connection with Starz’s multi-year extensions of its affiliation agreements with both AT&T Services, Inc. and DIRECTV, LLC (the “affiliation agreements”). The Securities Issuance Agreement became effective upon the closing of the Merger on December 8, 2016 and will terminate upon certain terminations of the affiliation agreements. On December 8, 2017, the Company issued the first installment under the Securities Issuance Agreement of 266,667 Class A voting shares and 278,334 Class B non-voting shares to AT&T as a private placement in reliance on Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. The shares were registered for resale pursuant to a registration statement on Form S-3 dated February 8, 2018.

48


Stock Performance Graph

The following graph compares our cumulative total shareholder return with those of the NYSE Composite Index and the S&P Movies & Entertainment Index for the period commencing March 31, 2013 and ending March 31, 2018. All values assume that $100 was invested on March 31, 2013 in our common shares and each applicable index and all dividends were reinvested.

The comparisons shown in the graph below are based on historical data and we caution that the stock price performance shown in the graph below is not indicative of, and is not intended to forecast, the potential future performance of our common shares.

a5yrtotalreturn.jpg
 
 
3/13
 
3/14
 
3/15
 
3/16
 
12/9/16
 
3/17
 
3/18
Lions Gate Entertainment Corporation-Class A(1)
 
$100.00
 
$112.85
 
$144.39
 
$94.06
 
 
 
$114.85
 
$112.08
Lions Gate Entertainment Corporation-Class B(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
$100.00
 
$92.45
 
$91.66
NYSE Composite
 
$100.00
 
$118.47
 
$125.61
 
$120.69
 
 
 
$139.44
 
$154.78
S&P Movies & Entertainment
 
$100.00
 
$130.47
 
$158.88
 
$141.49
 
 
 
$170.73
 
$161.90
Dow Jones US Media Sector
 
$100.00
 
$127.42
 
$147.14
 
$143.90
 
 
 
$173.79
 
$163.22
________________
(1)
Immediately prior to the December 8, 2016 consummation of the Starz merger, we effected the reclassification of our capital stock, pursuant to which each existing Lionsgate common share was converted into 0.5 shares of a newly issued Class A voting shares and 0.5 shares of a newly issued Class B non-voting shares, subject to the terms and conditions of the merger agreement.

49



The graph and related information are being furnished solely to accompany this Form 10-K pursuant to Item 201(e) of Regulation S-K. They shall not be deemed “soliciting materials” or to be “filed” with the SEC (other than as provided in Item 201), nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, except to the extent that we specifically incorporate it by reference into such filing.

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA.
The consolidated financial statements for all periods presented in this Form 10-K are prepared in conformity with U.S. GAAP.
The Selected Consolidated Financial Data below includes the results of Starz from its acquisition date of December 8, 2016 onwards, and Pilgrim Media Group from its acquisition date of November 12, 2015 onwards. Due to the acquisitions of Starz and Pilgrim Media Group, the Company’s results of operations for the years ended March 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016 and financial positions as at March 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016 are not directly comparable to prior reporting periods.
 
Year Ended March 31,
 
2018
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
(Amounts in millions, except per share amounts)
Statement of Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
$
4,129.1

 
$
3,201.5

 
$
2,347.4

 
$
2,399.6

 
$
2,630.3

Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Direct operating
2,309.6

 
1,903.8

 
1,415.3

 
1,315.8

 
1,369.4

Distribution and marketing
897.6

 
806.8

 
661.8

 
591.5

 
739.5

General and administration
454.4

 
355.4

 
262.4

 
252.8

 
247.4

Depreciation and amortization
159.0

 
63.1

 
13.1

 
6.6

 
6.5

Restructuring and other
59.8

 
88.7

 
19.8

 
10.7

 
7.5

Total expenses
3,880.4

 
3,217.8

 
2,372.4

 
2,177.4

 
2,370.3

Operating income (loss)
248.7

 
(16.3
)
 
(25.0
)
 
222.2

 
260.0

Interest expense
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest expense
(137.2
)
 
(99.7
)
 
(54.9
)
 
(52.5
)
 
(66.2
)
Interest on dissenting shareholders' liability
(56.5
)
 
(15.5
)
 

 

 

Total interest expense
(193.7
)
 
(115.2
)
 
(54.9
)
 
(52.5
)
 
(66.2
)
Interest and other income
10.4

 
6.4

 
1.9

 
2.9

 
6.0

Loss on extinguishment of debt
(35.7
)
 
(40.4
)
 

 
(11.7
)
 
(39.6
)
Gain on sale of equity interest in EPIX
201.0

 

 

 

 

Gain on Starz investment

 
20.4

 

 

 

Impairment of long-term investments and other assets
(29.2
)
 

 

 

 

Equity interests income (loss)
(52.8
)
 
10.7

 
44.2

 
52.5

 
24.7

Income (loss) before income taxes
148.7

 
(134.4
)
 
(33.8
)
 
213.4

 
184.9

Income tax benefit (provision)
319.4

 
148.9

 
76.5

 
(31.6
)
 
32.9

Net income
468.1

 
14.5

 
42.7

 
181.8

 
152.0

Less: Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest
5.5

 
0.3

 
7.5

 

 

Net income attributable to Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. shareholders
$
473.6

 
$
14.8

 
$
50.2

 
$
181.8

 
$
152.0

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Per share information attributable to Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. shareholders:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic net income per common share
$
2.27

 
$
0.09

 
$
0.34

 
$
1.31

 
$
1.11

Diluted net income per common share
$
2.15

 
$
0.09

 
$
0.33

 
$
1.23

 
$
1.04

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

50


Weighted average number of common shares outstanding:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
208.4

 
165.0

 
148.5

 
139.0

 

Diluted
220.4

 
172.2

 
154.1

 
151.8

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Dividends declared per common share
$
0.09

 
$
0.09

 
$
0.34

 
$
0.26

 
$
0.10

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Balance Sheet Data (at end of period):
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
378.1

 
$
321.9

 
$
57.7

 
$
102.7

 
$
25.7

Investment in films and television programs and program rights(1)
1,945.2

 
1,991.2

 
1,457.6

 
1,381.8

 
1,274.6

Total assets
8,967.6

 
9,196.9

 
3,834.2

 
3,264.0

 
2,816.9

Total debt, net(2)
2,557.4

 
3,124.9

 
865.2

 
686.6

 
643.3

Production loans, net
352.5

 
353.3

 
690.0

 
600.5

 
418.0

Dissenting shareholders' liability(3)
869.3

 
812.9

 

 

 

Redeemable noncontrolling interests
101.8

 
93.8

 
90.5

 

 

Total Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. shareholders' equity
3,155.9

 
2,514.4

 
850.3

 
842.3

 
584.5

Total equity
3,156.9

 
2,514.4

 
850.3

 
842.3

 
584.5

_______________________
(1)
Total of investment in films and television programs and current and long-term portion of program rights.
(2)
Total debt includes corporate debt, convertible senior subordinated notes and capital lease obligations, net of unamortized discount and debt issuance costs, if applicable.
(3)
Dissenting shareholders' liability is classified as a current liability as of March 31, 2018 based on the timing of the scheduled trial set to commence in the second half of fiscal 2019 (see Note 16 to our consolidated financial statements). As of March 31, 2017, dissenting shareholders' liability was classified as a non-current liability.


51


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS.

Overview

Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. (the “Company,” “Lionsgate,” "Lions Gate," “we,” “us” or “our”) is a vertically integrated next generation global content leader with a diversified presence in motion picture production and distribution, television programming and syndication, premium pay television networks, home entertainment, global distribution and sales, interactive ventures and games and location-based entertainment. We classify our operations through three reporting segments: Motion Pictures, Television Production, and Media Networks (see further discussion below).
Starz Merger
On December 8, 2016, upon shareholder approval, pursuant to an Agreement and Plan of Merger dated June 30, 2016 ("Merger Agreement"), Lionsgate and Starz consummated a merger, under which Lionsgate acquired Starz for a combination of cash and common stock (the "Starz Merger"). See Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements for further details of the Starz Merger.
Following the Starz Merger, beginning in the quarter ended December 31, 2016, the Company reorganized its segment structure and now manages and reports its operating results through three reportable business segments: Motion Pictures, Television Production and Media Networks (Media Networks was not a reportable segment prior to the quarter ended December 31, 2016). As a result of the Starz Merger, beginning December 8, 2016, the Motion Pictures segment includes Starz's third-party distribution business. See Note 15 to our consolidated financial statements for our segment information disclosure.
Revenues
Our revenues are derived from the Motion Pictures, Television Production and Media Networks segments, as described below. Our revenues are derived from the U.S., Canada, the United Kingdom and other foreign countries. None of the non-U.S. countries individually comprised greater than 10% of total revenues for the years ended March 31, 2018, 2017 and 2016.

Motion Pictures

Our Motion Pictures segment includes revenues derived from the following:
Theatrical. Theatrical revenues are derived from the domestic theatrical release of motion pictures licensed to theatrical exhibitors on a picture-by-picture basis (distributed by us directly in the U.S. and through a sub-distributor in Canada). The revenues from Canada are reported net of distribution fees and release expenses of the Canadian sub-distributor. The financial terms that we negotiate with our theatrical exhibitors in the U.S. generally provide that we receive a percentage of the box office results and are negotiated on a picture-by-picture basis.
Home Entertainment. Home entertainment revenues are derived from the sale or rental of our film productions and acquired or licensed films and certain television programs (including theatrical and direct-to-video releases) on packaged media and through digital media platforms. In addition, we have revenue sharing arrangements with certain digital media platforms which generally provide that, in exchange for a nominal or no upfront sales price, we share in the rental or sales revenues generated by the platform on a title-by-title basis.
Television. Television revenues are primarily derived from the licensing of our theatrical productions and acquired films to the linear pay, basic cable and free television markets.
International. International revenues are derived from the licensing from our international subsidiaries of our productions, acquired films, our catalog product and libraries of acquired titles to international distributors, on a territory-by-territory basis. International revenues also include revenues from the direct distribution of our productions, acquired films, and our catalog product and libraries of acquired titles in the United Kingdom.
Other. Other revenues are derived from, among others, our interactive ventures and games division, our global franchise management and strategic partnerships division (which includes location-based entertainment), the sales and licensing of music from the theatrical exhibition of our films and the television broadcast of our productions, and from the licensing of our film and television content to ancillary markets.

52


Television Production
Our Television Production segment includes revenues derived from the following:
Domestic Television. Domestic television revenues are derived from the licensing and syndication to domestic markets of scripted and unscripted series, television movies, mini-series and non-fiction programming.
International. International revenues are derived from the licensing and syndication to international markets of scripted and unscripted series, television movies, mini-series and non-fiction programming.
Home Entertainment. Home entertainment revenues are derived from the sale or rental of television production movies or series on packaged media and through digital media platforms.
Other. Other revenues are derived from, among others, product integration in our television episodes and programs, the sales and licensing of music from the television broadcasts of our productions, and from the licensing of our television programs to ancillary markets.
Media Networks
Our Media Networks segment includes revenues derived from the following:
Starz Networks. Starz Networks’ revenues are derived from the distribution of our STARZ branded premium subscription video services pursuant to affiliation agreements with U.S. multichannel video programming distributors (“MVPDs”), including cable operators, satellite television providers and telecommunications companies, and over-the-top ("OTT") providers (collectively, “Distributors”), and on a direct-to-consumer basis. Starz Networks’ revenue is recognized in the period during which programming is provided, either: (i) based solely on the total number of subscribers who receive our services multiplied by rates specified in the affiliation agreements; (ii) based on amounts or rates specified in the affiliation agreements which are not tied solely to the total number of subscribers who receive our services, or (iii) the total number of subscribers who receive our direct-to-consumer service multiplied by the applicable retail rate.
Content and Other. Original content revenues are derived from the licensing of Starz original programming to digital media platforms, international television networks, through packaged media and other ancillary markets.
Streaming Services. Streaming services revenues are derived from the Lionsgate legacy start-up direct to consumer streaming services on subscription video-on-demand ("SVOD") platforms.
Expenses
Our primary operating expenses include direct operating expenses, distribution and marketing expenses and general and administration expenses.
Direct operating expenses include amortization of film and television production or acquisition costs, amortization of programming production or acquisition costs and programming related salaries, participation and residual expenses, provision for doubtful accounts, and foreign exchange gains and losses.
Participation costs represent contingent consideration payable based on the performance of the film or television program to parties associated with the film or television program, including producers, writers, directors or actors. Residuals represent amounts payable to various unions or “guilds” such as the Screen Actors Guild - American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, Directors Guild of America, and Writers Guild of America, based on the performance of the film or television program in certain ancillary markets or based on the individual’s (i.e., actor, director, writer) salary level in the television market.
Distribution and marketing expenses primarily include the costs of theatrical prints and advertising (“P&A”) and of DVD/Blu-ray duplication and marketing. Theatrical P&A includes the costs of the theatrical prints delivered to theatrical exhibitors and the advertising and marketing cost associated with the theatrical release of the picture. DVD/Blu-ray duplication represents the cost of the DVD/Blu-ray product and the manufacturing costs associated with creating the physical products. DVD/Blu-ray marketing costs represent the cost of advertising the product at or near the time of its release or special promotional advertising. Marketing costs for Media Networks includes advertising, consumer marketing, distributor marketing support and other marketing costs. In addition, distribution and marketing costs includes our Media Networks segment operating costs for the direct-to-consumer service, transponder expenses and maintenance and repairs.
General and administration expenses include salaries and other overhead.

53



CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES
The preparation of our financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States requires management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. The application of the following accounting policies, which are important to our financial position and results of operations, requires significant judgments and estimates on the part of management. As described more fully below, these estimates bear the risk of change due to the inherent uncertainty of the estimate. In some cases, changes in the accounting estimates are reasonably likely to occur from period to period. Accordingly, actual results could differ materially from our estimates. To the extent that there are material differences between these estimates and actual results, our financial condition or results of operations will be affected. We base our estimates on past experience and other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, and we evaluate these estimates on an ongoing basis. For a summary of all of our accounting policies, including the accounting policies discussed below, see Note 1 to our consolidated financial statements.
Accounting for Films and Television Programs and Program Rights. We capitalize costs of production and acquisition, including financing costs and production overhead, to investment in films and television programs. These costs for an individual film or television program are amortized and participation and residual costs are accrued to direct operating expenses in the proportion that current year’s revenues bear to management’s estimates of the ultimate revenue at the beginning of the current year expected to be recognized from the exploitation, exhibition or sale of such film or television program. Ultimate revenue includes estimates over a period not to exceed ten years following the date of initial release of the motion picture. For an episodic television series, the period over which ultimate revenues are estimated cannot exceed ten years following the date of delivery of the first episode, or, if still in production, five years from the date of delivery of the most recent episode, if later. For previously released film or television programs acquired as part of a library, ultimate revenue includes estimates over a period not to exceed twenty years from the date of acquisition.
Due to the inherent uncertainties involved in making such estimates of ultimate revenues and expenses, these estimates have differed in the past from actual results and are likely to differ to some extent in the future from actual results. In addition, in the normal course of our business, some films and titles are more successful or less successful than anticipated. Management regularly reviews and revises when necessary its ultimate revenue and cost estimates, which may result in a change in the rate of amortization of film costs and participations and residuals and/or write-down of all or a portion of the unamortized costs of the film or television program to its estimated fair value. Management estimates the ultimate revenue based on experience with similar titles or title genre, the general public appeal of the cast, actual performance (when available) at the box office or in markets currently being exploited, and other factors such as the quality and acceptance of motion pictures or programs that our competitors release into the marketplace at or near the same time, critical reviews, general economic conditions and other tangible and intangible factors, many of which we do not control and which may change.
An increase in the estimate of ultimate revenue will generally result in a lower amortization rate and, therefore, less film and television program amortization expense, while a decrease in the estimate of ultimate revenue will generally result in a higher amortization rate and, therefore, higher film and television program amortization expense, and also periodically results in an impairment requiring a write-down of the film cost to the title’s fair value. These write-downs are included in amortization expense within direct operating expenses in our consolidated statements of operations. Investment in films and television programs is stated at the lower of amortized cost or estimated fair value. The valuation of investment in films and television programs is reviewed on a title-by-title basis, when an event or change in circumstances indicates that the fair value of a film or television program is less than its unamortized cost. In determining the fair value of our films and television programs, we employ a discounted cash flows ("DCF") methodology with assumptions for cash flows. Key inputs employed in the DCF methodology include estimates of a film's ultimate revenue and costs as well as a discount rate. The discount rate utilized in the DCF analysis is based on our weighted average cost of capital plus a risk premium representing the risk associated with producing a particular film or television program. The fair value of any film costs associated with a film or television program that we plan to abandon is zero. As the primary determination of fair value is determined using a DCF model, the resulting fair value is considered a Level 3 measurement (as defined in Note 10 to our consolidated financial statements). Additional amortization is recorded in the amount by which the unamortized costs exceed the estimated fair value of the film or television program. Estimates of future revenue involve measurement uncertainty and it is therefore possible that reductions in the carrying value of investment in films and television programs may be required as a consequence of changes in our future revenue estimates.
Program rights for films and television programs (including original series) exhibited by the Media Networks segment are generally amortized on a title-by-title or episode-by-episode basis over the anticipated number of exhibitions or license period. We estimate the number of exhibitions based on the number of exhibitions allowed in the agreement and the expected usage of the content. Certain other program rights are amortized to expense on a straight-line basis over the respective lives of the

54


agreements. Programming rights may include rights to more than one exploitation windows under its output and library agreements. For films with multiple windows, the license fee is allocated between the windows based upon the proportionate estimated fair value of each window which generally results in the majority of the cost allocated to the first window on newer releases. Programming costs vary due to the number of airings and cost of our original series, the number of films licensed and the cost per film paid under our output and library programming agreements.
The cost of the Media Networks' segment original content is allocated between the pay television market and the ancillary revenue markets (e.g., home video, digital platforms, international television, etc.) based on the estimated relative fair values of these markets. The amount associated with the pay television market is reclassified to program rights when the program is aired and the portion attributable to the ancillary markets remains in investment in films and television programs. Costs allocated to the pay television market are amortized to expense over the anticipated number of exhibitions for each original series while costs associated with the ancillary revenue markets are amortized to expense based on the proportion that current revenue from the original series bears to its ultimate revenue. Estimates of fair value for the pay television and ancillary markets involve uncertainty as well as estimates of ultimate revenue. All the costs of programming produced by the Media Networks segment and included in investment in films and television programs and program rights, net are classified as long term. Amounts included in program rights, other than internally produced programming, that are expected to be amortized within a year from the balance sheet date are classified as short-term.

Changes in management’s estimate of the anticipated exhibitions of films and original series on our networks could result in the earlier recognition of our programming costs than anticipated. Conversely, scheduled exhibitions may not capture the appropriate usage of the program rights in current periods which would lead to the write-off of additional program rights in future periods and may have a significant impact on our future results of operations and our financial position.
Revenue Recognition. Revenue from the theatrical release of feature films is recognized at the time of exhibition based on our participation in box office receipts. Revenue from the sale of DVDs and Blu-ray discs in the retail market, net of an allowance for estimated returns and other allowances, is recognized on the later of receipt by the customer or “street date” (when it is available for sale by the customer). Under revenue sharing arrangements, including digital and EST arrangements, such as download-to-own, download-to-rent, video-on-demand, and subscription video-on-demand, revenue is recognized when we are entitled to receipts and such receipts are determinable. Revenues from television or digital licensing for fixed fees are recognized when the feature film or television program is available to the licensee for telecast. For television licenses that include separate availability “windows” during the license period, revenue is allocated to the “windows” of availability in the arrangement. Revenue from sales to international territories are recognized when access to the feature film or television program has been granted or delivery has occurred, as required under the contract, and the right to exploit the feature film or television program has commenced. For multiple media rights contracts with a fee for a single film or television program where the contract provides for media holdbacks (defined as contractual media release restrictions), the fee is allocated to the various media based on our assessment of the relative fair value of the rights to exploit each media and is recognized as each holdback is released. For multiple-title contracts with a fee, the fee is allocated on a title-by-title basis, based on our assessment of the relative fair value of each title.
Programming revenue is recognized in the period during which programming is provided, pursuant to affiliation agreements. If an affiliation agreement has expired and our programming is continuing to be aired by the Distributor, revenue is recognized based on the terms of the expired agreement or the actual payment from the distributor, whichever is less. Payments to distributors for marketing support costs for which Starz does not receive a direct benefit are recorded as a reduction of revenue.
Sales Returns Allowance. Revenues are recorded net of estimated returns and other allowances. We estimate reserves for DVD/Blu-ray returns based on previous returns experience, point-of-sale data available from certain retailers, current economic trends, and projected future sales of the title to the consumer based on the actual performance of similar titles on a title-by-title basis in each of the DVD/Blu-ray businesses. Factors affecting actual returns include, among other factors, limited retail shelf space at various times of the year, success of advertising or other sales promotions, and the near term release of competing titles. We believe that our estimates have been materially accurate in the past; however, due to the judgment involved in establishing reserves, we may have adjustments to our historical estimates in the future. Our estimate of future returns affects reported revenue and operating income. If we underestimate the impact of future returns in a particular period, then we may record less revenue in later periods when returns exceed the estimated amounts. If we overestimate the impact of future returns in a particular period, then we may record additional revenue in later periods when returns are less than estimated. An incremental change of 1% in our estimated sales returns rate (i.e., provisions for returns divided by gross sales of related product) for home entertainment products would have had an impact of approximately $6.0 million, $7.1 million and $5.4 million on our total revenue in the fiscal years ended March 31, 2018, 2017, and 2016, respectively.

55


Provisions for Accounts Receivable. We estimate provisions for accounts receivable based on historical experience and relevant facts and information regarding the collectability of the accounts receivable. In performing this evaluation, significant judgments and estimates are involved, including an analysis of specific risks on a customer-by-customer basis for our larger customers and an analysis of the length of time receivables have been past due. The financial condition of a given customer and its ability to pay may change over time or could be better or worse than anticipated and could result in an increase or decrease to our allowance for doubtful accounts, which is recorded in direct operating expenses.
Income Taxes. We are subject to federal and state income taxes in the U.S., and in several foreign jurisdictions. We record deferred tax assets related to net operating loss carryforwards and certain temporary differences, net of applicable reserves in these jurisdictions. We recognize a future tax benefit to the extent that realization of such benefit is more likely than not on a jurisdiction by jurisdiction basis; otherwise a valuation allowance is applied. In order to realize the benefit of our deferred tax assets, we will need to generate sufficient taxable income in the future in each of the jurisdictions which have these deferred tax assets. However, the assessment as to whether there will be sufficient taxable income in a jurisdiction to realize our net deferred tax assets in that jurisdiction is an estimate which could change in the future depending primarily upon the actual performance of our Company. We will be required to continually evaluate the more likely than not assessment that our net deferred tax assets will be realized, and if operating results deteriorate in a particular jurisdiction, we may need to record a valuation allowance for all or a portion of our deferred tax assets through a charge to our income tax provision. Based on our assessment in the quarter ended March 31, 2018, we recorded a valuation allowance of $68.2 million against certain U.S. and foreign deferred tax assets that may not be realized on a more likely than not basis.
On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the "Tax Act") was signed into law, making significant changes to the taxation of U.S. business entities. The Tax Act reduced the U.S. corporate income tax rate from 35% to 21%, imposed a one-time transition tax in connection with the move from a worldwide tax system to a territorial tax system, provided for accelerated deductions for certain U.S. film production costs, imposed limitations on certain tax deductions such as executive compensation in future periods, and included numerous other provisions. We are currently in the process of evaluating the full impact of the Tax Act on our financial statements and have not completed this evaluation. We have reported provisional amounts reflecting our reasonable estimates of the impact of the Tax Act. The estimated impact of the Tax Act is based on a preliminary review of the new law and is subject to revision based upon further analysis and interpretation of the Tax Act.
Our effective tax rates differ from the federal statutory rate and are affected by many factors, including the overall level of pre-tax income, mix of our pre-tax income generated across the various jurisdictions in which we operate, changes in tax laws and regulations in those jurisdictions, further interpretation and legislative guidance regarding the new Tax Act, changes in valuation allowances on our deferred tax assets, tax planning strategies available to us and other discrete items.
Goodwill. Goodwill is reviewed for impairment each fiscal year or between the annual tests if an event occurs or circumstances change that indicates it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value. We perform our annual impairment test as of January 1 in each fiscal year. We performed our last annual impairment test on our goodwill as of January 1, 2018 by comparing the fair value of each reporting unit to its carrying amount to determine if there was a potential goodwill impairment. Based on our qualitative assessments, including but not limited to, the results of our most recent quantitative impairment test, consideration of macroeconomic conditions, industry and market conditions, cash flows, and changes in our share price, we concluded that it was more likely than not that the fair value of our reporting units was greater than their carrying value.
Consolidation. We consolidate entities in which we own more than 50% of the voting common stock and control operations and also variable interest entities for which we are the primary beneficiary. Investments in nonconsolidated affiliates in which we own more than 20% of the voting common stock or otherwise exercise significant influence over operating and financial policies, but not control of the nonconsolidated affiliate, are accounted for using the equity method of accounting. Investments in nonconsolidated affiliates in which we own less than 20% of the voting common stock are accounted for using the cost method of accounting.

Business Combinations. We account for our business combinations under the acquisition method of accounting. Identifiable assets acquired, liabilities assumed and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree are recognized and measured as of the acquisition date at fair value. Goodwill is recognized to the extent by which the aggregate of the acquisition-date fair value of the consideration transferred and any noncontrolling interest in the acquiree exceeds the recognized basis of the identifiable assets acquired, net of assumed liabilities. Determining the fair value of assets acquired, liabilities assumed and noncontrolling interest requires management’s judgment and often involves the use of significant estimates and assumptions, including assumptions with respect to future cash flows, discount rates and asset lives among other items.

56


Recent Accounting Pronouncements

See Note 1 to the accompanying consolidated financial statements for a discussion of recent accounting guidance.


RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Fiscal 2018 Compared to Fiscal 2017
Consolidated Results of Operations
The following table sets forth our consolidated results of operations for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2018 and 2017. Due to the Starz Merger, fiscal 2017 includes the results of operations from Starz from the acquisition date of December 8, 2016. Revenue from Starz across all segments was $1.65 billion for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2018, as compared to $483.2 million for the period from the acquisition date of December 8, 2016 to March 31, 2017.
 
Year Ended
 
 
 
March 31,
 
Increase (Decrease)
 
2018
 
2017
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
(Amounts in millions)
Revenues
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Motion Pictures
$
1,822.1

 
$
1,920.6

 
$
(98.5
)
 
(5.1
)%
Television Production
805.3

 
837.4

 
(32.1
)
 
(3.8
)%
Media Networks
1,532.5

 
456.6

 
1,075.9

 
nm

Intersegment eliminations
(30.8
)
 
(13.1
)
 
(17.7
)
 
nm

Total revenues
4,129.1

 
3,201.5

 
927.6

 
29.0
 %
Expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Direct operating
2,309.6

 
1,903.8

 
405.8

 
21.3
 %
Distribution and marketing
897.6

 
806.8

 
90.8

 
11.3
 %
General and administration
454.4

 
355.4

 
99.0

 
27.9
 %
Depreciation and amortization
159.0

 
63.1

 
95.9

 
152.0
 %
Restructuring and other
59.8

 
88.7

 
(28.9
)
 
(32.6
)%
Total expenses
3,880.4

 
3,217.8

 
662.6

 
20.6
 %
Operating income (loss)
248.7

 
(16.3
)
 
265.0

 
nm

Interest expense
(193.7
)
 
(115.2
)
 
(78.5
)
 
68.1
 %
Interest and other income
10.4

 
6.4

 
4.0

 
62.5
 %
Loss on extinguishment of debt
(35.7
)
 
(40.4
)
 
4.7

 
(11.6
)%
Gain on sale of equity interest in EPIX
201.0

 

 
201.0

 
nm

Gain on Starz investment

 
20.4

 
(20.4
)
 
nm

Impairment of long-term investments and other assets
(29.2
)
 

 
(29.2
)
 
nm

Equity interests income (loss)
(52.8
)
 
10.7

 
(63.5
)
 
nm

Income (loss) before income taxes
148.7

 
(134.4
)
 
283.1

 
nm

Income tax benefit
319.4

 
148.9

 
170.5

 
114.5
 %
Net income
468.1

 
14.5

 
453.6

 
nm

Less: Net loss attributable to noncontrolling interest
5.5

 
0.3

 
5.2

 
nm

Net income attributable to Lions Gate Entertainment Corp. shareholders
$
473.6

 
$
14.8

 
$
458.8

 
nm

_____________________
nm - Percentage not meaningful



57


Revenues. Consolidated revenues increased in fiscal 2018, due to the inclusion of Starz revenue for the entire fiscal year, as compared to the period from the acquisition date of December 8, 2016 to March 31, 2017 in fiscal 2017, offset partially by decreases in Motion Pictures revenues and, to a lesser extent, Television Production revenues. The Media Networks and Motion Pictures revenues in fiscal 2018 include $1,525.4 million and $126.4 million, respectively, of revenues from Starz, as compared to $453.7 million and $29.5 million, respectively, in fiscal 2017 from the date of acquisition.
The decrease in Motion Pictures revenue was primarily due to decreases in theatrical and international revenue driven by our smaller theatrical slate (15 feature films released in fiscal 2018 compared to 18 in fiscal 2017). In addition, fiscal 2017 included significant theatrical and international contributions from La La Land, Now You See Me 2 and Deepwater Horizon. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in Motion Pictures home entertainment revenue, driven by a greater contribution in fiscal 2018 from the Starz third party distribution business as a result of the Starz Merger.
A significant component of revenue comes from home entertainment. The following table sets forth total home entertainment revenue for our reporting segments for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2018 and 2017:
 
Year Ended
 
 
 
 
 
March 31,
 
Increase (Decrease)
 
2018
 
2017
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
 
 
(Amounts in millions)
 
 
Home Entertainment Revenue
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Motion Pictures
$
774.0

 
$
707.7

 
$
66.3

 
9.4
 %
Television Production
30.2

 
39.9

 
(9.7
)
 
(24.3
)%
Media Networks
83.8

 
25.0

 
58.8

 
235.2
 %
 
$
888.0

 
$
772.6

 
$
115.4

 
14.9
 %

Direct Operating Expenses. Direct operating expenses by segment were as follows for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2018 and 2017:
 
Year Ended March 31,
 
 
 
2018
 
2017
 
Increase (Decrease)
 
Amount
 
% of Segment Revenues
 
Amount
 
% of Segment Revenues
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
(Amounts in millions)
 
 
Direct operating expenses
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Motion Pictures
$
977.8

 
53.7
%
 
$
976.4

 
50.8
%
 
$
1.4

 
0.1
 %
Television Production
668.5

 
83.0

 
711.9

 
85.0

 
(43.4
)
 
(6.1
)%
Media Networks
628.4

 
41.0

 
202.2

 
44.3

 
426.2

 
210.8
 %
Other
45.6

 
nm

 
18.8

 
nm

 
26.8

 
142.6
 %
Intersegment eliminations
(10.7
)
 
nm

 
(5.5
)
 
nm

 
(5.2
)
 
nm

 
$
2,309.6

 
55.9
%
 
$
1,903.8

 
59.5
%
 
$
405.8

 
21.3
 %
_______________________
nm - Percentage not meaningful.
Direct operating expenses increased in fiscal 2018, primarily due to the inclusion of Starz expenses for the entire fiscal year and a slight increase in Motion Pictures direct operating expense. These increases were offset partially by lower Television Production direct operating expenses attributable to lower Television Production revenue, and lower direct operating expenses as a percentage of Television Production revenue. See further discussion in the Segment Results of Operations section below.
Other primarily consists of the amortization of the non-cash fair value adjustments on film and television assets associated with the application of purchase accounting related to the acquisition of Starz, Pilgrim Media Group and Good Universe and to a lesser extent, share-based compensation associated with certain employees whose salaries are included in Media Networks direct operating expense.

Distribution and Marketing Expenses. Distribution and marketing expenses by segment were as follows for the fiscal years ended March 31, 2018 and 2017:

58


 
Year Ended March 31,
 
Increase (Decrease)
 
2018
 
2017
 
Amount
 
Percent
 
(Amounts in millions)