10-K 1 cof-12312017x10k.htm 10-K Document
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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
____________________________________
FORM 10-K
____________________________________
ý ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017
OR
 ¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from              to             
Commission File No. 1-13300
____________________________________
CAPITAL ONE FINANCIAL CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) 
____________________________________
Delaware
 
54-1719854
(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
1680 Capital One Drive,
McLean, Virginia
 
22102
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (703) 720-1000
____________________________________
Securities registered pursuant to section 12(b) of the act:
Title of Each Class
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock (par value $.01 per share)
New York Stock Exchange
Warrants (expiring November 14, 2018)
New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares, Each Representing a 1/40th Interest in a Share of Fixed Rate Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series B
New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares, Each Representing a 1/40th Interest in a Share of Fixed Rate Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series C
New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares, Each Representing a 1/40th Interest in a Share of Fixed Rate Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series D
New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares, Each Representing a 1/40th Interest in a Share of Fixed Rate Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series F
New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares, Each Representing a 1/40th Interest in a Share of Fixed Rate Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series G
New York Stock Exchange
Depositary Shares, Each Representing a 1/40th Interest in a Share of Fixed Rate Non-Cumulative Perpetual Preferred Stock, Series H
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the act: None
____________________________________
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý No ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes ¨ No ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes ý No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes  ý No ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company. or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
 
ý
  
Accelerated filer
 
¨
Non-accelerated filer
 
¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
  
Smaller reporting company
 
¨
 
 
 
 
Emerging growth company
 
¨
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a Shell Company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes ¨ No ý
The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of the close of business on June 30, 2017 was approximately $39.2 billion. As of January 31, 2018, there were 486,287,085 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
1.
Portions of the Proxy Statement for the annual meeting of stockholders to be held on May 3, 2018, are incorporated by reference into Part III.
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
Page
PART I
Item 1.
Business
 
 
 
 
Supervision and Regulation
 
 
 
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2.
Properties
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
 
 
 
PART II
Item 5.
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Item 6.
Summary of Selected Financial Data
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”)
 
Executive Summary and Business Outlook
 
 
 
 
Business Segment Financial Performance
 
 
Accounting Changes and Developments
 
Capital Management
 
Risk Management
 
Credit Risk Profile
 
Liquidity Risk Profile
 
Market Risk Profile
 
 
Glossary and Acronyms
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
Item 8.
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


 
 
Note 1—Summary of Significant Accounting Policies
 
Note 2—Business Developments and Discontinued Operations
 
Note 3—Investment Securities
 
Note 4—Loans
 
Note 5—Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses and Reserve for Unfunded Lending Commitments
 
Note 6—Variable Interest Entities and Securitizations
 
Note 7—Goodwill and Intangible Assets
 
Note 8—Premises, Equipment and Lease Commitments
 
Note 9—Deposits and Borrowings
 
Note 10—Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities
 
Note 11—Stockholders’ Equity
 
Note 12—Regulatory and Capital Adequacy
 
Note 13—Earnings Per Common Share
 
Note 14—Stock-Based Compensation Plans
 
Note 15—Employee Benefit Plans
 
Note 16—Income Taxes
 
Note 17—Fair Value Measurement
 
Note 18—Business Segments
 
Note 19—Commitments, Contingencies, Guarantees and Others
 
Note 20—Capital One Financial Corporation (Parent Company Only)
 
Note 21—Related Party Transactions
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
Item 9B.
Other Information
 
 
 
PART III
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Item 14.
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
 
 
 
PART IV
Item 15.
Exhibits, Financial Statements Schedules
Item 16.
Form 10-K Summary
 
 
 
SIGNATURES

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


INDEX OF MD&A AND SUPPLEMENTAL TABLES
MD&A Tables:
Page
1
Average Balances, Net Interest Income and Net Interest Margin
2
Rate/Volume Analysis of Net Interest Income
3
Non-Interest Income
4
Non-Interest Expense
5
Investment Securities
6
Non-Agency Investment Securities Credit Ratings
7
Loans Held for Investment
8
Business Segment Results
9
Credit Card Business Results
9.1
Domestic Card Business Results
10
Consumer Banking Business Results
11
Commercial Banking Business Results
12
Other Category Results
13
Capital Ratios under Basel III
14
Regulatory Capital Reconciliations between Basel III Transition to Fully Phased-in
15
Preferred Stock Dividends Paid Per Share
16
Loans Held for Investment Portfolio Composition
17
Commercial Loans by Industry
18
Home Loans—Risk Profile by Lien Priority
19
20
Credit Score Distribution
21
30+ Day Delinquencies
22
Aging and Geography of 30+ Day Delinquent Loans
23
90+ Day Delinquent Loans Accruing Interest
24
Nonperforming Loans and Other Nonperforming Assets
25
Net Charge-Offs (Recoveries)
26
Troubled Debt Restructurings
27
Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses and Reserve for Unfunded Lending Commitments Activity
28
Allowance Coverage Ratios
29
Liquidity Reserves
30
Deposits Composition and Average Deposits Interest Rates
31
Maturities of Large-Denomination Domestic Time Deposits—$100,000 or More
32
Long-Term Funding
33
Senior Unsecured Long-Term Debt Credit Ratings
34
35
Interest Rate Sensitivity Analysis
 
 
 
 
A
Loans Held for Investment Portfolio Composition
B
C
D
E
F
Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Measures and Calculation of Regulatory Capital Measures
G
Selected Quarterly Financial Information

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


PART I
Item 1. Business
OVERVIEW
General
Capital One Financial Corporation, a Delaware corporation established in 1994 and headquartered in McLean, Virginia, is a diversified financial services holding company with banking and non-banking subsidiaries. Capital One Financial Corporation and its subsidiaries (the “Company” or “Capital One”) offer a broad array of financial products and services to consumers, small businesses and commercial clients through branches, the internet and other distribution channels.
As of December 31, 2017, our principal subsidiaries included:
Capital One Bank (USA), National Association (“COBNA”), which offers credit and debit card products, other lending products and deposit products; and
Capital One, National Association (“CONA”), which offers a broad spectrum of banking products and financial services to consumers, small businesses and commercial clients.
The Company is hereafter collectively referred to as “we,” “us” or “our.” COBNA and CONA are collectively referred to as the “Banks.” References to “this Report” or our “2017 Form 10-K” or “2017 Annual Report” are to our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017. All references to 2017, 2016, 2015, 2014 and 2013, refer to our fiscal years ended, or the dates, as the context requires, December 31, 2017, December 31, 2016, December 31, 2015, December 31, 2014 and December 31, 2013, respectively. Certain business terms used in this document are defined in the “MD&A—Glossary and Acronyms” and should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements included in this Report.
As one of the nation’s ten largest banks based on deposits as of December 31, 2017, we service banking customer accounts through the internet and mobile banking, as well as through Cafés, ATMs and branch locations primarily across New York, Louisiana, Texas, Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey and the District of Columbia. We also operate the largest online direct bank in the United States (“U.S.”) by deposits. In addition to bank lending, treasury management and depository services, we offer credit and debit card products, auto loans and other consumer lending products in markets across the United States. We were the third largest issuer of Visa® (“Visa”) and MasterCard® (“MasterCard”) credit cards in the U.S. based on the outstanding balance of credit card loans as of December 31, 2017.
We also offer products outside of the U.S. principally through Capital One (Europe) plc (“COEP”), an indirect subsidiary of COBNA organized and located in the United Kingdom (“U.K.”), and through a branch of COBNA in Canada. Both COEP and our branch of COBNA in Canada have the authority to provide credit card loans.
Business Developments
We regularly explore and evaluate opportunities to acquire financial services and financial assets, including credit card and other loan portfolios, and enter into strategic partnerships as part of our growth strategy. We also explore opportunities to acquire digital companies and related assets to improve our information technology infrastructure and to deliver on our digital strategy. In addition, we regularly consider the potential disposition of certain of our assets, branches, partnership agreements or lines of business. We may issue equity or debt, including public offerings, to fund our acquisitions.
On November 7, 2017, we announced our decision to cease new originations of residential mortgage and home equity loan products within our Consumer Banking business. We continue to service our existing home loan portfolio.
On September 25, 2017, we completed the acquisition from Synovus Bank of credit card assets and related liabilities of World’s Foremost Bank, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Cabela’s Incorporated (“Cabela’s acquisition”). The Cabela’s acquisition added approximately $5.7 billion to our domestic credit card loans held for investment portfolio as of the acquisition date. See “Note 2—Business Developments and Discontinued Operations” for additional details.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


On December 1, 2015, we completed the acquisition of the Healthcare Financial Services business of General Electric Capital Corporation (“HFS acquisition”). Including post-closing purchase price adjustments, we recorded approximately $9.2 billion in assets, including $8.2 billion of loans.
Additional Information
Our common stock trades on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol “COF” and is included in the Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”) 100 Index. We maintain a website at www.capitalone.com. Documents available under Corporate Governance in the Investor Relations section of our website include:
our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics for the Corporation;
our Corporate Governance Guidelines; and
charters for the Audit, Compensation, Governance and Nominating, and Risk Committees of the Board of Directors.
These documents also are available in print to any stockholder who requests a copy. We intend to disclose future amendments to certain provisions of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics, and waivers of our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics granted to executive officers and directors, on the website within four business days following the date of the amendment or waiver.
In addition, we make available free of charge through our website our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports as soon as reasonably practicable after electronically filing or furnishing such material to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”).
OPERATIONS AND BUSINESS SEGMENTS
Our consolidated total net revenues are derived primarily from lending to consumer and commercial customers net of funding costs associated with deposits, short-term borrowings and long-term debt. We also earn non-interest income which primarily consists of interchange income net of reward expenses, and service charges and other customer-related fees. Our expenses primarily consist of the provision for credit losses, operating expenses, marketing expenses and income taxes.
Our principal operations are organized for management reporting purposes into three primary business segments, which are defined primarily based on the products and services provided or the type of customer served: Credit Card, Consumer Banking and Commercial Banking. The operations of acquired businesses have been integrated into our existing business segments. Certain activities that are not part of a segment, such as management of our corporate investment portfolio, asset/liability management by our centralized Corporate Treasury group and residual tax expense or benefit to arrive at the consolidated effective tax rate that is not assessed to our primary business segments, are included in the Other category.
Credit Card: Consists of our domestic consumer and small business card lending, and international card businesses in Canada and the United Kingdom.
Consumer Banking: Consists of our branch-based lending and deposit gathering activities for consumers and small businesses, national deposit gathering, national auto lending and our consumer home loan portfolio and associated servicing activities.
Commercial Banking: Consists of our lending, deposit gathering, capital markets and treasury management services to commercial real estate and commercial and industrial customers. Our commercial and industrial customers typically include companies with annual revenues between $20 million and $2 billion.
Customer usage and payment patterns, credit quality, levels of marketing expense and operating efficiency all affect our profitability. In our Credit Card business, we experience fluctuations in purchase volume and the level of outstanding loan receivables due to seasonal variances in consumer spending and payment patterns which, for example, are highest around the winter holiday season. No individual quarter in 2017, 2016 or 2015 accounted for more than 30% of our total revenues in any of these fiscal years. Net charge-off rates in our Credit Card and Consumer Banking businesses also have historically exhibited seasonal patterns and generally tend to be the highest in the first and fourth quarters of the year.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


For additional information on our business segments, including the financial performance of each business, see “Part II—Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”)—Executive Summary and Business Outlook,” “MD&A—Business Segment Financial Performance” and “Note 18—Business Segments” of this Report.
COMPETITION
Each of our business segments operates in a highly competitive environment, and we face competition in all aspects of our business from numerous bank and non-bank providers of financial services.
Our Credit Card business competes with international, national, regional and local issuers of Visa and MasterCard credit cards, as well as with American Express®, Discover Card®, private-label card brands, and, to a certain extent, issuers of debit cards. In general, customers are attracted to credit card issuers largely on the basis of price, credit limit, reward programs and other product features.
Our Consumer Banking and Commercial Banking businesses compete with national, state and direct banks for deposits, commercial and auto loans, as well as with savings and loan associations and credit unions for loans and deposits. Our competitors also include automotive finance companies, commercial mortgage banking companies and other financial services providers that provide loans, deposits, and other similar services and products. In addition, we compete against non-depository institutions that are able to offer these products and services. Securities firms and insurance companies that elect to become financial holding companies may acquire banks and other financial institutions. Combinations of this type could significantly change the competitive environment in which we conduct business. The financial services industry is also likely to become more competitive as further technological advances enable more companies to provide financial services. These technological advances may diminish the importance of depository institutions and other financial intermediaries in the transfer of funds between parties. In addition, competition among direct banks is intense because online banking provides customers the ability to rapidly deposit and withdraw funds and open and close accounts in favor of products and services offered by competitors.
Our businesses generally compete on the basis of the quality and range of their products and services, transaction execution, innovation and price. Competition varies based on the types of clients, customers, industries and geographies served. Our ability to compete depends, in part, on our ability to attract and retain our associates and on our reputation. Our decision to cease new originations of residential mortgage and home equity loan products within our Consumer Banking business was informed, in part, by the competitive landscape for those products. That decision notwithstanding, we believe that we are able to compete effectively in our current markets. There can be no assurance, however, that our ability to market products and services successfully or to obtain adequate returns on our products and services will not be impacted by the nature of the competition that now exists or may later develop, or by the broader economic environment. For a discussion of the risks related to our competitive environment, please refer to “Part I—Item 1A. Risk Factors.”
SUPERVISION AND REGULATION
General
Capital One Financial Corporation is a bank holding company (“BHC”) and a financial holding company (“FHC”) under the Bank Holding Company Act of 1956, as amended (“BHC Act”), and is subject to the requirements of the BHC Act, including approval requirements for investments in or acquisitions of banking organizations, capital adequacy standards and limitations on nonbanking activities. As a BHC and FHC, we are subject to supervision, examination and regulation by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (“Federal Reserve”). Permissible activities for a BHC include those activities that are so closely related to banking as to be a proper incident thereto. In addition, an FHC is permitted to engage in activities considered to be financial in nature (including, for example, securities underwriting and dealing and merchant banking activities), incidental to financial activities or, if the Federal Reserve determines that they pose no risk to the safety or soundness of depository institutions or the financial system in general, activities complementary to financial activities.
To become and remain eligible for financial holding company status, a BHC and its subsidiary depository institutions must meet certain criteria, including capital, management and Community Reinvestment Act (“CRA”) requirements. Failure to meet such criteria could result, depending on which requirements were not met, in the Company facing restrictions on new financial activities or acquisitions or being required to discontinue existing activities that are not generally permissible for BHCs.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


The Banks are national associations chartered under the laws of the United States, the deposits of which are insured by the Deposit Insurance Fund (“DIF”) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) up to applicable limits. The Banks are subject to comprehensive regulation and periodic examination by the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (“OCC”), the FDIC and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (“CFPB”).
We are also registered as a financial institution holding company under the law of the Commonwealth of Virginia and, as such, we are subject to periodic examination by the Virginia Bureau of Financial Institutions. We also face regulation in the international jurisdictions in which we conduct business (see below under “Regulation of Businesses by Authorities Outside the United States”).
Regulation of Business Activities
The business activities of the Company and Banks are also subject to regulation and supervision under various laws and regulations.
Regulations of Consumer Lending Activities
The activities of the Banks as consumer lenders are subject to regulation under various federal laws, including, for example, the Truth in Lending Act (“TILA”), the Equal Credit Opportunity Act, the Fair Credit Reporting Act, the CRA, the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act and the Military Lending Act, as well as under various state laws. We are also subject to the Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act, which amended the TILA, and which imposes a number of restrictions on credit card practices impacting rates and fees, requires that a consumer’s ability to pay be taken into account before issuing credit or increasing credit limits, and imposes revised disclosures required for open-end credit.
Depending on the underlying issue and applicable law, regulators may be authorized to impose penalties for violations of these statutes and, in certain cases, to order banks to compensate customers. Borrowers may also have a private right of action for certain violations. Federal bankruptcy and state debtor relief and collection laws may also affect the ability of a bank, including the Banks, to collect outstanding balances owed by borrowers.
Mortgage Lending
The CFPB has issued several rules pursuant to the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (“Dodd-Frank Act”) that provide additional disclosure requirements and substantive limitations on our mortgage lending activities. Although we announced our decision to cease new originations of residential mortgage and home equity loan products within our Consumer Banking business, these rules could still impact pending mortgage loan applications and our servicing activities.
Debit Interchange Fees
The Dodd-Frank Act requires that the amount of any interchange fee received by a debit card issuer with respect to debit card transactions be reasonable and proportional to the cost incurred by the issuer with respect to the transaction. Final rules adopted by the Federal Reserve to implement these requirements limit interchange fees per debit card transaction to $0.21 plus five basis points of the transaction amount and provide for an additional $0.01 fraud prevention adjustment to the interchange fee for issuers that meet certain fraud prevention requirements.
Bank Secrecy Act and USA PATRIOT Act of 2001
The Bank Secrecy Act and the USA PATRIOT Act of 2001 (“Patriot Act”) require financial institutions, among other things, to implement a risk-based program reasonably designed to prevent money laundering and to combat the financing of terrorism, including through suspicious activity and currency transaction reporting, compliance, record-keeping and customer due diligence.
In May 2016, the United States Department of the Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network issued a final rule making customer due diligence a required, stand-alone part of the anti-money laundering programs financial institutions must maintain under the Bank Secrecy Act. For these purposes, the term “customer due diligence” refers to customer identification and verification, beneficial ownership identification and verification, understanding the nature and purpose of customer relationships to develop a customer risk profile, ongoing monitoring for reporting suspicious transactions and, on a risk-adjusted basis, maintaining and updating customer information. The rule became effective on July 11, 2016 and requires full compliance by May 11, 2018 for Capital One and all other covered financial institutions.
The Patriot Act also contains financial transparency laws and provides enhanced information collection tools and enforcement mechanisms to the United States government, including due diligence and record-keeping requirements for private banking and correspondent accounts; standards for verifying customer identification at account opening; rules to produce certain records upon

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


request of a regulator or law enforcement agency; and rules to promote cooperation among financial institutions, regulators and law enforcement agencies in identifying parties that may be involved in terrorism, money laundering and other crimes.
Funding
Under the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991 (“FDICIA”), as discussed in “MD&A—Liquidity Risk Profile,” only well-capitalized and adequately capitalized institutions may accept brokered deposits. Adequately capitalized institutions, however, must obtain a waiver from the FDIC before accepting brokered deposits, and such institutions may not pay rates that significantly exceed the rates paid on deposits of similar maturity obtained from the institution’s normal market area or, for deposits obtained from outside the institution’s normal market area, the national rate on deposits of comparable maturity. The FDIC is authorized to terminate a bank’s deposit insurance upon a finding by the FDIC that the bank’s financial condition is unsafe or unsound or that the institution has engaged in unsafe or unsound practices or has violated any applicable rule, regulation, order or condition enacted or imposed by the bank’s regulatory agency. The termination of deposit insurance would likely have a material adverse effect on a bank’s liquidity and earnings.
Nonbank Activities
Certain of our nonbank subsidiaries are subject to supervision and regulation by various other federal and state authorities. Capital One Securities, Inc. and Capital One Investing, LLC are registered broker-dealers regulated by the SEC and the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority. Our broker-dealer subsidiaries are subject, among other things, to net capital rules designed to measure the general financial condition and liquidity of a broker-dealer. Under these rules, broker-dealers are required to maintain the minimum net capital deemed necessary to meet their continuing commitments to customers and others, and to keep a substantial portion of their assets in relatively liquid form. These rules also limit the ability of a broker-dealer to transfer capital to its parent companies and other affiliates. Broker-dealers are also subject to regulations covering their business operations, including sales and trading practices, public offerings, publication of research reports, use and safekeeping of client funds and securities, capital structure, record-keeping and the conduct of directors, officers and employees.
Capital One Asset Management, LLC and Capital One Advisors, LLC are SEC-registered investment advisers regulated under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. Capital One Asset Management, LLC, whose sole client is CONA, provides investment advice to CONA’s private banking customers, including trusts, high net worth individuals, institutions, foundations, endowments and other organizations.
Capital One Agency LLC is a licensed insurance agency that provides both personal and business insurance services to retail and commercial clients. It is regulated by state insurance regulatory agencies in the states in which it operates.
Derivatives Activities
The Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) and the SEC have jointly issued final rules further defining the Dodd-Frank Act’s “swap dealer” definitions. Based on these rules, no Capital One entity is currently required to register with the CFTC or SEC as a swap dealer. The Dodd-Frank Act also requires all swap market participants to keep certain swap transaction records and report pertinent information to swap data repositories on a real-time and on-going basis. Further, each swap, group, category, type or class of swap that the CFTC or SEC determines must be cleared through a derivatives clearinghouse (unless the swap is eligible for a clearing exemption) must also be executed on a designated contract market (“DCM”), exchange or swap execution facility (“SEF”), unless no DCM, exchange or SEF has made the swap available for trading.
Volcker Rule
We and each of our subsidiaries, including the Banks, are subject to the “Volcker Rule,” a provision of the Dodd-Frank Act that contains prohibitions on proprietary trading and certain investments in, and relationships with, covered funds (hedge funds, private equity funds and similar funds), subject to certain exemptions, in each case as the applicable terms are defined in the Volcker Rule and the implementing regulations. The implementing regulations also require that we, as a banking entity with $50 billion or more in total assets, establish and maintain an enhanced compliance program designed to ensure that we comply with the requirements of the regulations.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Capital and Liquidity Regulation
The Company and the Banks are subject to capital adequacy guidelines adopted by the Federal Reserve and OCC. For a further discussion of the capital adequacy guidelines, see “MD&A—Capital Management,” “MD&A—Liquidity Risk Profile” and “Note 12—Regulatory and Capital Adequacy.”
Basel III and United States Capital Rules
In December 2010, the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (“Basel Committee”) published a framework for additional capital and liquidity requirements (“Basel III”), which included detailed capital ratios and buffers, subject to transition periods. The Federal Reserve, OCC and FDIC (collectively, the “Federal Banking Agencies”) issued a final rule that implemented Basel III and certain Dodd-Frank Act and other capital provisions and updated the prompt corrective action (“PCA”) framework to reflect the new regulatory capital minimums (“Basel III Capital Rule”). The Basel III Capital Rule increased the minimum capital that we and other institutions are required to hold. The Basel III Capital Rule includes the “Basel III Standardized Approach” and the “Basel III Advanced Approaches.”
The Basel III Advanced Approaches are mandatory for institutions with total consolidated assets of $250 billion or more or total consolidated on-balance-sheet foreign exposure of $10 billion or more. We became subject to the predecessor of these rules at the end of 2012. Prior to full implementation of the Basel III Advanced Approaches, however, a covered organization must complete a qualification period, known as the parallel run, during which it must demonstrate that it meets the requirements of the rule to the satisfaction of its primary United States banking regulator. We entered parallel run on January 1, 2015. A parallel run must last at least four quarters, but in practice United States banks have taken considerably longer to complete parallel runs.
Notwithstanding the Basel III Advanced Approaches, the Basel III Capital Rule also established a capital floor so that organizations subject to the Basel III Advanced Approaches may not hold less capital than would be required using the Basel III Standardized Approach capital calculations.
The Basel III Capital Rule revised the definition of regulatory capital, established a new common equity Tier 1 capital requirement, set higher minimum capital ratio requirements, introduced a new capital conservation buffer of 2.5%, introduced a new countercyclical capital buffer (currently set at 0.0%) and updated the PCA framework. Compliance with certain aspects of the Basel III Capital Rule went into effect for Capital One as of January 1, 2014, and other provisions have gone or will go into effect according to various start dates and phase-in periods. As of January 1, 2014, the minimum risk-based and leverage capital requirements for Advanced Approaches banking organizations included a common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of at least 4.0%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of at least 5.5%, a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 8.0% and a Tier 1 leverage capital ratio of at least 4.0%. On January 1, 2015, the minimum risk-based capital ratio requirements increased to 4.5% for the common equity Tier 1 capital ratio and to 6.0% for the Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio, and the minimum requirements for the total risk-based capital ratio and Tier 1 leverage capital ratio remained the same. Both the capital conservation buffer and the countercyclical capital buffer are being phased-in over a transition period of four years that commenced on January 1, 2016. On January 1, 2014, we began to use the Basel III Capital Rule, with transition provisions, to calculate our regulatory capital, including for purposes of calculating our regulatory capital ratios. On January 1, 2015, we began to use the Basel III Standardized Approach for calculating our risk-weighted assets in our regulatory capital ratios.
The Basel III Capital Rule also introduced a new supplementary leverage ratio for all Advanced Approaches banking organizations with a minimum requirement of 3.0%. The supplementary leverage ratio compares Tier 1 capital to total leverage exposure, which includes all on-balance sheet assets and certain off-balance sheet exposures, including derivatives and unused commitments. Given that we are in our Basel III Advanced Approaches parallel run, we calculate the ratio based on Tier 1 capital under the Standardized Approach. The minimum requirement for the supplementary leverage ratio became effective on January 1, 2018. As an Advanced Approaches banking organization, however, we were required to calculate and publicly disclose our supplementary leverage ratio beginning in the first quarter of 2015. For further information, see “MD&A—Capital Management.”
Global systemically important banks (“G-SIBs”) that are based in the United States are subject to an additional common equity Tier 1 capital requirement (“G-SIB Surcharge”). United States BHCs with total consolidated assets of $250 billion or more or total consolidated on-balance-sheet foreign exposure of $10 billion or more are required to determine annually whether they are considered to be a G-SIB for purposes of the G-SIB Surcharge. We are not a G-SIB based on the most recent available data and thus we are not subject to a G-SIB Surcharge.
In October 2017, the Federal Banking Agencies proposed certain limited changes to the Basel III Capital Rule. There is uncertainty regarding how any of the proposed changes may impact the Basel III Standardized Approach and the Basel III Advanced Approaches.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Additionally, in December 2017, the Basel Committee finalized certain modifications to the international Basel III capital standards, which would require rulemaking in the United States prior to becoming effective for United States banking organizations. There is uncertainty around which of those changes may be adopted in the United States and how those changes may impact the U.S. capital framework.
Market Risk Rule
The “Market Risk Rule” supplements both the Basel III Standardized Approach and the Basel III Advanced Approaches by requiring institutions subject to the Market Risk Rule to adjust their risk-based capital ratios to reflect the market risk in their trading portfolios. The Market Risk Rule generally applies to institutions with aggregate trading assets and liabilities equal to the lesser of:
10% or more of total assets; or
$1 billion or more.
As of December 31, 2017, the Company and CONA are subject to the Market Risk Rule. See “MD&A—Market Risk Profile” below for additional information.
Basel III and United States Liquidity Rules
The Basel Committee has published a liquidity framework, which includes two standards for liquidity risk supervision, each subject to observation periods and transitional arrangements. One standard, the liquidity coverage ratio (“LCR”), seeks to promote short-term resilience by requiring organizations to hold sufficient high-quality liquid assets to survive a stress scenario lasting for 30 days. The other standard, the net stable funding ratio (“NSFR”), seeks to promote longer-term resilience by requiring sufficient stable funding over a one-year period based on the liquidity characteristics of its assets and activities.
As implemented in the United States, the LCR Rule applies to institutions with total consolidated assets of $250 billion or more or total consolidated on-balance sheet foreign exposure of $10 billion or more, and their respective consolidated subsidiary depository institutions with $10 billion or more in total consolidated assets. As a result, the Company and the Banks are subject to the LCR Rule. The rule requires the Company and each of the Banks to hold an amount of eligible high-quality, liquid assets that equals or exceeds 100% of their respective projected net cash outflows over a 30-day period, each as calculated in accordance with the LCR Rule. The LCR Rule requires us to calculate the LCR daily as of July 1, 2016. Each company subject to the LCR Rule is required to make quarterly public disclosures of its LCR and certain related quantitative liquidity metrics, along with a qualitative discussion of its LCR. The Company is required to comply with these disclosure requirements beginning April 1, 2018.
In April 2016, the Federal Banking Agencies issued an interagency notice of proposed rulemaking regarding the U.S. implementation of the Basel III NSFR (the “Proposed NSFR”), which would apply to the same institutions subject to the LCR Rule. The Proposed NSFR would require us to maintain a sufficient amount of stable funding in relation to our assets, derivatives exposures and commitments over a one-year horizon period. While the Proposed NSFR is generally consistent with the Basel NSFR standard, it is more stringent in certain areas. The financial and operational impact on us of a final NSFR rule remains uncertain until a final rule is published. There is uncertainty regarding the timing and form of any final rule implementing the NSFR in the United States.
In general, U.S. implementation of the above capital and liquidity rules has increased capital and liquidity requirements for us. We will continue to monitor regulators’ implementation of the new capital and liquidity rules and assess the potential impact to us.
FDICIA and Prompt Corrective Action
The FDICIA requires Federal Banking Agencies to take “prompt corrective action” for banks that do not meet minimum capital requirements. The FDICIA establishes five capital ratio levels: well capitalized; adequately capitalized; undercapitalized; significantly undercapitalized; and critically undercapitalized. The three undercapitalized categories are based upon the amount by which a bank falls below the ratios applicable to an adequately capitalized institution. The capital categories are determined solely for purposes of applying the FDICIA’s PCA provisions, and such capital categories may not constitute an accurate representation of the Banks’ overall financial condition or prospects.

 
 
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As noted above, the Basel III Capital Rule updated the PCA framework to reflect new, higher regulatory capital minimums. For an insured depository institution to be well capitalized, it must maintain a total risk-based capital ratio of 10% or more; a Tier 1 capital ratio of 8% or more; a common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 6.5% or more; and a leverage ratio of 5% or more. An adequately capitalized depository institution must maintain a total risk-based capital ratio of 8% or more; a Tier 1 capital ratio of 6% or more; a common equity Tier 1 capital ratio of 4.5% or more; a leverage ratio of 4% or more; and, for Basel III Advanced Approaches institutions, a supplementary leverage ratio, which incorporates a broader set of exposures as noted above, of 3% or more. The revised PCA requirements became effective on January 1, 2015, other than the supplementary leverage ratio, which became effective on January 1, 2018.
Under applicable regulations for 2014, before the PCA requirements became effective, an insured depository institution was considered to be well capitalized if it maintained a total risk-based capital ratio of at least 10%, a Tier 1 risk-based capital ratio of at least 6%, a Tier 1 leverage capital ratio of at least 5% and was not subject to any supervisory agreement, order or directive to meet and maintain a specific capital level for any capital measure. The PCA provisions also authorize the Federal Banking Agencies to reclassify a bank’s capital category or take other action against banks that are determined to be in an unsafe or unsound condition or to have engaged in unsafe or unsound banking practices.
As an additional means to identify problems in the financial management of depository institutions, the FDICIA required the Federal Banking Agencies to establish certain non-capital safety and soundness standards. The standards relate generally to operations and management, asset quality, interest rate exposure and executive compensation. The Federal Banking Agencies are authorized to take action against institutions that fail to meet such standards.
Enhanced Prudential Standards and Other Requirements Under the Dodd-Frank Act
As a BHC with total consolidated assets of $50 billion or more (a “covered company”), we are subject under the Dodd-Frank Act to certain enhanced prudential standards, including requirements that may be recommended by the Financial Stability Oversight Council (“FSOC”) and implemented by the Federal Reserve and other regulators. As a result, we are subject to more stringent standards and requirements than those applicable to smaller institutions. The FSOC may also issue recommendations to the Federal Reserve or other primary financial regulatory agencies to apply new or enhanced standards to certain financial activities or practices.
The Federal Reserve and FDIC have issued rules requiring covered companies to implement resolution planning for orderly resolution in the event the Company faces material financial distress or failure. The FDIC issued similar rules regarding resolution planning applicable to the Banks. In addition, the OCC issued final guidelines in September 2016 that require the Banks to develop recovery plans detailing the actions they would take to remain a going concern when they experience considerable financial or operational stress, but have not deteriorated to the point that resolution is imminent.
The Federal Reserve established a rule that implements the requirement in the Dodd-Frank Act that the Federal Reserve conduct annual stress tests on the capacity of our capital to absorb losses as a result of adverse economic conditions. The stress test rule also implements the requirement that we conduct our own semiannual stress tests and requires us to publish the results of the stress tests on our website or other public forum. The OCC adopted a similar stress test rule to implement the requirement that each of the Banks conduct annual stress tests.
The Federal Reserve has finalized other rules implementing certain other aspects of the enhanced prudential standards under the Dodd-Frank Act, which were applicable to us beginning on January 1, 2015 (“Enhanced Standards Rule”). Under the Enhanced Standards Rule, we must meet liquidity risk management standards, conduct internal liquidity stress tests, and maintain a 30-day buffer of highly liquid assets, in each case, consistent with the requirements of the rule. These requirements are in addition to the LCR, discussed above in “Basel III and United States Liquidity Rules.” The Enhanced Standards Rule also requires that we comply with, and hold capital commensurate with, the requirements of, any regulations adopted by the Federal Reserve relating to capital planning and stress tests. Stress testing and capital planning regulations are discussed further below under “Dividends, Stock Repurchases and Transfers of Funds.” The Enhanced Standards Rule also requires that we establish and maintain an enterprise-wide risk management framework that includes a risk committee and a chief risk officer.
Although not a requirement of the Dodd-Frank Act, the OCC established regulatory guidelines (“Heightened Standards Guidelines”) that apply heightened standards for risk management to large institutions subject to its supervision, including the Banks. The Heightened Standards Guidelines establish standards for the development and implementation by the Banks of a risk governance framework.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Investment in the Company and the Banks
Certain acquisitions of our capital stock may be subject to regulatory approval or notice under federal or state law. Investors are responsible for ensuring that they do not, directly or indirectly, acquire shares of our capital stock in excess of the amount that can be acquired without regulatory approval, including under the BHC Act and the Change in Bank Control Act (“CIBC Act”).
Federal law and regulations prohibit any person or company from acquiring control of the Company or the Banks without, in most cases, prior written approval of the Federal Reserve or the OCC, as applicable. Control exists if, among other things, a person or company acquires more than 25% of any class of our voting stock or otherwise has a controlling influence over us. For a publicly traded BHC like us, a rebuttable presumption of control arises under the CIBC Act if a person or company acquires more than 10% of any class of our voting stock.
Additionally, COBNA and CONA are “banks” within the meaning of Chapter 13 of Title 6.1 of the Code of Virginia governing the acquisition of interests in Virginia financial institutions (“Financial Institution Holding Company Act”). The Financial Institution Holding Company Act prohibits any person or entity from acquiring, or making any public offer to acquire, control of a Virginia financial institution or its holding company without making application to, and receiving prior approval from, the Virginia Bureau of Financial Institutions.
Dividends, Stock Repurchases and Transfers of Funds
Under the Federal Reserve’s capital planning rules applicable to large BHCs including us (commonly referred to as Comprehensive Capital Analysis and Review or “CCAR”), a BHC with total consolidated assets of $50 billion or more must submit a capital plan to the Federal Reserve on an annual basis that contains a description of all planned capital actions, including dividends or stock repurchases, over a nine-quarter planning horizon beginning with the fourth quarter of the calendar year prior to the submission of the capital plan (“CCAR cycle”). A covered BHC may take the proposed capital actions if the Federal Reserve does not object to the plan.
Dodd-Frank Act stress testing, described above in “Enhanced Prudential Standards and Other Requirements under the Dodd-Frank Act,” is a complementary exercise to CCAR. It is a forward-looking exercise conducted by the Federal Reserve and covered financial companies to help assess whether a company has sufficient capital to absorb losses and support operations during adverse economic conditions. The supervisory stress test, after incorporating a firm’s planned capital actions, is used for quantitative assessment in CCAR.
As part of its evaluation of a large BHC’s capital plan, the Federal Reserve will consider how comprehensive the plan is, the reasonableness of the assumptions, analysis and methodologies used therein to assess capital adequacy and the ability of the BHC to maintain capital above each minimum regulatory capital ratio on a pro forma basis under expected and stressful conditions throughout a planning horizon of at least nine quarters. The annual CCAR cycle measures our capital levels under the Basel III Standardized Approach, with appropriate phase-in provisions applicable to Capital One. The Federal Reserve has indefinitely delayed incorporation of the Basel III Advanced Approaches into the capital planning and stress testing process. The Company must file its capital plan and stress testing results with the Federal Reserve by April 5, 2018, using data as of the end of the prior calendar year. The Federal Reserve is expected to provide its objection or non-objection to that capital plan the following June. The Federal Reserve’s objection or non-objection applies to planned capital actions from the third quarter of the year the capital plan is submitted through the end of the second quarter of the following year. The Company, along with other BHCs subject to the supplementary leverage ratio, must incorporate an estimate of its supplementary leverage ratio into its capital plan and stress tests.
For annual company-run stress tests, a covered BHC is required to disclose the results within 15 calendar days after the Federal Reserve discloses the results of the BHC’s supervisory stress test, unless that time period is extended by the Federal Reserve. For the mid-cycle company-run stress test, a BHC must disclose the results within 30 calendar days after the BHC submits the results of the test to the Federal Reserve, unless that time period is extended by the Federal Reserve.
The current capital planning and stress testing rules place supervisory focus on quarterly capital issuances and distributions by establishing a cumulative net distribution requirement. With certain limited exceptions, to the extent a BHC does not issue the amount of a given class of regulatory capital instrument that it projected in its capital plan, as measured on an aggregate basis beginning in the third quarter of the planning horizon, the BHC must reduce its capital distributions.

 
 
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In January 2017, the Federal Reserve issued revisions to its capital planning and stress testing rules for the 2017 cycle. Among the provisions applicable to the Company, the revisions decrease the amount of capital a company subject to the quantitative requirements of CCAR can distribute to shareholders outside of an approved capital plan without seeking prior approval from the Federal Reserve (known as the “de minimis exception”). Beginning April 1, 2017, if a company does not receive an objection to its capital plan, it may distribute up to 0.25% of its Tier 1 capital above the distributions in its capital plan, a reduction from the 1% of Tier 1 capital permitted previously. The revisions also impose a “blackout period,” starting with the 2017 CCAR exercise, during the second calendar quarter on the ability of a firm subject to CCAR to submit prior notice of its intention to rely on the aforementioned de minimis exception or to submit a request for prior approval for a capital distribution that is not reflected in the firm’s capital plan for which it has received a non-objection from the Federal Reserve.
Historically, dividends from the Company’s direct and indirect subsidiaries have represented a major source of the funds we have used to pay dividends on our stock, make payments on corporate debt securities and meet our other obligations. There are various federal law limitations on the extent to which the Banks can finance or otherwise supply funds to us through dividends and loans. These limitations include minimum regulatory capital requirements, federal banking law requirements concerning the payment of dividends out of net profits or surplus, provisions of Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation W governing transactions between an insured depository institution and its affiliates, as well as general federal regulatory oversight to prevent unsafe or unsound practices. In general, federal and applicable state banking laws prohibit insured depository institutions, such as the Banks, from making dividend distributions without first obtaining regulatory approval if such distributions are not paid out of available earnings or would cause the institution to fail to meet applicable capital adequacy standards.
Deposit Insurance Assessments
Each of CONA and COBNA, as an insured depository institution, is a member of the DIF maintained by the FDIC. Through the DIF, the FDIC insures the deposits of insured depository institutions up to prescribed limits for each depositor. The FDIC sets a Designated Reserve Ratio (“DRR”) for the DIF. To maintain the DIF, member institutions may be assessed an insurance premium, and the FDIC may take action to increase insurance premiums if the DRR falls below its required level.
The Dodd-Frank Act reformed the management of the DIF in several ways. It raised the minimum DRR to 1.35% (from the former minimum of 1.15%); removed the upper limit on the DRR; required that the reserve ratio reach 1.35% by September 30, 2020; required the FDIC, when setting deposit insurance assessments, to offset the effect on small insured depository institutions of meeting the increased reserve ratio; and eliminated the requirement that the FDIC pay dividends from the DIF when the reserve ratio reached certain levels. The FDIC has set the DRR at 2% and, in lieu of dividends, has established progressively lower assessment rate schedules as the reserve ratio meets certain trigger levels. The Dodd-Frank Act also required the FDIC to change the deposit insurance assessment base from deposits to average total consolidated assets minus average tangible equity.
On March 15, 2016, the FDIC issued a final rule implementing Section 334(e) of the Dodd-Frank Act, which requires the FDIC to offset the effect on community banks of increasing the DIF reserve ratio from 1.15% to 1.35%. The rule imposes a new quarterly deposit insurance surcharge assessment, with an annual rate of 4.5 basis points, on insured depository institutions with assets of $10 billion or more, including the Banks. On August 30, 2016, the FDIC provided notice that the DIF Reserve Ratio exceeded the 1.15% threshold level, which triggered two changes in the deposit insurance assessments of the Banks. First, the initial assessment rates for all insured depository institutions, including the Banks, declined. Second, the surcharge assessment was applied. The FDIC has estimated that the reserve ratio will reach 1.35% in 2018; however, under the final rule, if the reserve ratio does not reach 1.35% by December 31, 2018, the FDIC will impose a one-time shortfall assessment on March 31, 2019 on depository institutions subject to the surcharge, including the Banks.
Source of Strength and Liability for Commonly Controlled Institutions
Under regulations issued by the Federal Reserve, a BHC must serve as a source of financial and managerial strength to its subsidiary banks (the so-called “source of strength doctrine”). The Dodd-Frank Act codified this doctrine.
Under the “cross-guarantee” provision of the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery and Enforcement Act of 1989 (“FIRREA”), insured depository institutions such as the Banks may be liable to the FDIC with respect to any loss incurred, or reasonably anticipated to be incurred, by the FDIC in connection with the default of, or FDIC assistance to, any commonly controlled insured depository institution. The Banks are commonly controlled within the meaning of the FIRREA cross-guarantee provision.

 
 
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FDIC Orderly Liquidation Authority
The Dodd-Frank Act provides the FDIC with liquidation authority that may be used to liquidate nonbank financial companies and BHCs if the Treasury Secretary, in consultation with the President and based on the recommendation of the Federal Reserve and another federal agency, determines that doing so is necessary, among other criteria, to mitigate serious adverse effects on United States financial stability. Upon such a determination, the FDIC would be appointed receiver and must liquidate the company in a way that mitigates significant risks to financial stability and minimizes moral hazard. The costs of a liquidation of a financial company would be borne by shareholders and unsecured creditors and then, if necessary, by risk-based assessments on large financial companies. The FDIC has issued rules implementing certain provisions of its liquidation authority and may issue additional rules in the future.
Regulation of Businesses by Authorities Outside the United States
COBNA is subject to regulation in foreign jurisdictions where it operates, currently in the United Kingdom and Canada.
United Kingdom
In the United Kingdom, COBNA operates through COEP, which was established in 2000 and is an authorized payment institution regulated by the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) under the Payment Services Regulations 2009 and the Financial Services and Markets Act 2000. COEP’s indirect parent, Capital One Global Corporation, is wholly-owned by COBNA and is subject to regulation by the Federal Reserve as an “agreement corporation” under the Federal Reserve’s Regulation K.
Regulatory focus on Payment Protection Insurance (“PPI”) complaint handling has continued and PPI continues to be a key driver of consumer complaints to the Financial Ombudsman Service (“FOS”). In March 2017, following a period of extensive consultation, FCA announced that new rules in relation to PPI complaint handling would come into force on August 29, 2017. The new rules introduced: a 2-year deadline for PPI complaints to be brought against firms under the FCA complaint handling rules; rules setting out how firms should handle unfair relationship complaints about the non-disclosure of commission on the sale of PPI (following the court decision in Plevin v. Paragon Personal Finance (“Plevin Complaints”)); a requirement that by November 29, 2017 firms write to previously rejected PPI complainants that fall within the unfair relationship timelines to tell them of their right to raise a Plevin Complaint; and an FCA led, multi-channel communications campaign to raise customer awareness of the deadline and new complaint handling rules. The new rules are now in force and COEP is handling complaints under the new rules. A number of claims management firms and law firms are threatening to pursue Plevin Complaints via the courts, rather than as complaints, to try and secure a higher level of redress.
The FCA’s Credit Card Market Study continued throughout 2017 and will run into early 2018 before the FCA publishes final remedies and rules, with implementation expected to begin by the end of the second quarter of 2018 and through the course of the year.
On January 13, 2018, the new Payment Services Regulations 2017 (so called “PSD2” or “PSRs”) came into force following a 2-year implementation period after PSD2 became law in the European Union (“EU”) in January 2016. The new legislation replaces the previous Payment Services Regulations in its entirety; however, the principal effect of PSD2 is to improve consumer protection against fraud, possible abuses and payment incidents through enhanced security requirements through new Regulated Technical Standards on secure authentication, promote competition/innovation through new players and the development of innovative mobile and internet payments in Europe, and require COEP to adopt specific procedures for responding to Payments Services complaints. In particular, PSD2 requires banks and financial service providers to open up their systems to Payment Initiation Services (“PISPs”) (software bridges between a merchant website and online banking platform or payer’s bank) and Account Information Services (“AISPs”) (online services to provide consolidated information on one or more payment account, or account aggregation services).
The new data protection Regulation (so called “General Data Protection Regulation” or “GDPR”) on the protection of individuals’ personal data will come into force on May 25, 2018. GDPR brings heightened scrutiny of data processing activities and higher fines and sanctions for non-compliance with data protection legislation. In addition, the GDPR widens the territorial scope of EU privacy rules to organizations located outside the EU if they offer goods or services to or monitor EU citizen behaviors and introduces new compliance obligations, including financial penalties for noncompliance. The U.K. and the organizations in the U.K. are working to implement GDPR’s requirements with a view for the country to obtain “Adequacy” status from the EU, reflecting a view that the U.K. protects personal data at a substantially equivalent level to the EU. Adequacy status would allow the free movement of data between the European Economic Area and the U.K. after Brexit, as defined below.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Following a public referendum in mid-2016, the U.K. will leave the EU (“Brexit”). The U.K.’s negotiation with the EU on the terms of its departure and the U.K.’s subsequent relationship with the EU will continue throughout 2018 with no final decisions being made on any terms of the negotiation until all elements of it have been concluded. It is widely expected that the U.K. will enter into a transitional relationship with the EU after leaving the EU (scheduled currently for March 2019) during which time all current regulations and laws would remain applicable.
Canada
In Canada, COBNA operates as an authorized foreign bank pursuant to the Bank Act (Canada) (“Bank Act”) and is permitted to conduct its credit card business in Canada through its Canadian branch, Capital One Bank (Canada Branch) (“Capital One Canada”). The primary regulator of Capital One Canada is the Office of the Superintendent of Financial Institutions Canada. Other regulators include the Financial Consumer Agency of Canada, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada, and the Financial Transactions and Reports Analysis Centre of Canada. Capital One Canada is subject to regulation under various Canadian federal laws, including the Bank Act and its regulations, the Proceeds of Crime (Money Laundering) and Terrorist Financing Act and the Personal Information Protection and Electronic Documents Act.
In April 2015, a voluntary agreement to reduce interchange fees among the Canadian federal government, MasterCard Canada and Visa Canada came into effect. The agreement contains a commitment to reduce interchange fees for consumer credit cards to an average of 1.5% and will remain in effect for 5 years. Although the Canadian federal government acknowledges independent audit findings that Visa and MasterCard have met their commitments to reduce interchange fees pursuant to the 5-year agreement terminating in 2020, the government is currently conducting a further assessment of interchange fees.
EMPLOYEES
A central part of our philosophy is to attract and retain highly capable staff. We had approximately 49,300 employees, whom we refer to as “associates,” as of December 31, 2017. None of our associates are covered under a collective bargaining agreement, and management considers our associate relations to be satisfactory.
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
Technology/Systems
We leverage information and technology to achieve our business objectives and to develop and deliver products and services that satisfy our customers’ needs. A key part of our strategic focus is the development and use of efficient, flexible computer and operational systems, such as cloud technology, to support complex marketing and account management strategies, the servicing of our customers, and the development of new and diversified products. We believe that the continued development and integration of these systems is an important part of our efforts to reduce costs, improve quality and provide faster, more flexible technology services. Consequently, we continuously review capabilities and develop or acquire systems, processes and competencies to meet our unique business requirements.
As part of our continuous efforts to review and improve our technologies, we may either develop such capabilities internally or rely on third-party outsourcers who have the ability to deliver technology that is of higher quality, lower cost, or both. We continue to rely on third-party outsourcers to help us deliver systems and operational infrastructure. These relationships include (but are not limited to): Amazon Web Services, Inc. (“AWS”) for our cloud infrastructure, Total System Services, Inc. (“TSYS”) for processing services for our North American and U.K. portfolios of consumer, commercial and small business credit card accounts, Fidelity Information Services (“FIS”) for certain of our banking systems and International Business Machines Corporation (“IBM”) for mainframe managed services.
We safeguard our information and technology to reduce risk, implement backup and recovery systems, and generally require the same of our third-party service providers. We take measures that mitigate against known attacks and use internal and external resources to scan for vulnerabilities in platforms, systems, and applications necessary for delivering Capital One products and services.
Intellectual Property
As part of our overall and ongoing strategy to protect and enhance our intellectual property, we rely on a variety of protections, including copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, patents and certain restrictions on disclosure, solicitation and competition. We also undertake other measures to control access to, or distribution of, our other proprietary information. Despite these precautions, it may be possible for a third party to copy or otherwise obtain and use certain intellectual property or proprietary information without authorization. Our precautions may not prevent misappropriation or infringement of our intellectual property or proprietary information. In addition, our competitors and other third parties also file patent applications for innovations that are used in our industry. The ability of our competitors and other third parties to obtain such patents may adversely affect our ability to compete. Conversely, our ability to obtain such patents may increase our competitive advantage and/or preserve our freedom to operate certain technologies via cross-licenses or other arrangements with third parties. There can be no assurance that we will be successful in such efforts, or that the ability of our competitors to obtain such patents may not adversely impact our financial results.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
From time to time, we have made and will make forward-looking statements, including those that discuss, among other things, strategies, goals, outlook or other non-historical matters; projections, revenues, income, returns, expenses, capital measures, accruals for claims in litigation and for other claims against us; earnings per share or other financial measures for us; future financial and operating results; our plans, objectives, expectations and intentions; and the assumptions that underlie these matters.
To the extent that any such information is forward-looking, it is intended to fit within the safe harbor for forward-looking information provided by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995.
Numerous factors could cause our actual results to differ materially from those described in such forward-looking statements, including, among other things:
general economic and business conditions in the U.S., the U.K., Canada or our local markets, including conditions affecting employment levels, interest rates, collateral values, consumer income, credit worthiness and confidence, spending and savings that may affect consumer bankruptcies, defaults, charge-offs and deposit activity;
an increase or decrease in credit losses, including increases due to a worsening of general economic conditions in the credit environment, and the impact of inaccurate estimates or inadequate reserves;
compliance with financial, legal, regulatory, tax or accounting changes or actions, including the impacts of the Tax Act, the Dodd-Frank Act, and other regulations governing bank capital and liquidity standards;
developments, changes or actions relating to any litigation, governmental investigation or regulatory enforcement action or matter involving us;
the inability to sustain revenue and earnings growth;
increases or decreases in interest rates;
our ability to access the capital markets at attractive rates and terms to capitalize and fund our operations and future growth;
increases or decreases in our aggregate loan balances or the number of customers and the growth rate and composition thereof, including increases or decreases resulting from factors such as shifting product mix, amount of actual marketing expenses we incur and attrition of loan balances;
the amount and rate of deposit growth;
our ability to execute on our strategic and operational plans;
our response to competitive pressures;
changes in retail distribution strategies and channels, including the emergence of new technologies and product delivery systems;
the success of our marketing efforts in attracting and retaining customers;
changes in the reputation of, or expectations regarding, the financial services industry or us with respect to practices, products or financial condition;
any significant disruption in our operations or in the technology platforms on which we rely, including cybersecurity, business continuity and related operational risks, as well as other security failures or breaches of our systems or those of our customers, partners, service providers or other third parties;
our ability to maintain a compliance and technology infrastructure suitable for the nature of our business;
our ability to develop and adapt to rapid changes in digital technology to address the needs of our customers and comply with applicable regulatory standards, including our increasing reliance on third party infrastructure and compliance with data protection and privacy standards;

 
 
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the effectiveness of our risk management strategies;
our ability to control costs, including the amount of, and rate of growth in, our expenses as our business develops or changes or as it expands into new market areas;
the extensive use, reliability and accuracy of the models and data we rely on in our business;
our ability to recruit and retain talented and experienced personnel;
the impact from, and our ability to respond to, natural disasters and other catastrophic events, including hurricanes Harvey and Irma;
changes in the labor and employment markets;
fraud or misconduct by our customers, employees, business partners or third parties;
merchants’ increasing focus on the fees charged by credit card networks; and
other risk factors identified from time to time in our public disclosures, including in the reports that we file with the SEC.
Forward-looking statements often use words such as “will,” “anticipate,” “target,” “expect,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “goal,” “believe” or other words of similar meaning. Any forward-looking statements made by us or on our behalf speak only as of the date they are made or as of the date indicated, and we do not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements as a result of new information, future events or otherwise. For additional information on factors that could materially influence forward-looking statements included in this Report, see the risk factors set forth under “Part I—Item 1A. Risk Factors” in this report. You should carefully consider the factors discussed above, and in our Risk Factors or other disclosure, in evaluating these forward-looking statements.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Item 1A. Risk Factors
This section highlights specific risks that could affect our business. Although we have tried to discuss all material risks of which we are aware at the time this Report has been filed, other risks may prove to be important in the future, including those that are not currently ascertainable. In addition to the factors discussed elsewhere in this Report, other factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our forward-looking statements include:
General Economic and Market Risks
Changes And Instability In The Macroeconomic Environment May Adversely Affect Our Industry, Business, Results Of Operations And Financial Condition.
We offer a broad array of financial products and services to consumers, small businesses and commercial clients. We market our credit card products on a national basis throughout the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom and offer banking and other services in many regions within the United States. A prolonged period of economic volatility, slow growth, or a significant deterioration in economic conditions, in the United States or one of these countries could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations as customers default on their loans or maintain lower deposit levels or, in the case of credit card accounts, carry lower balances and reduce credit card purchase activity.
Some of the risks we may face in connection with adverse changes and instability in macroeconomic environment include the following:
Payment patterns may change, causing increases in delinquencies and default rates, which could have a negative impact on our results of operations. In addition, changes in consumer confidence levels and behavior, including decreased consumer spending, lower demand for credit and a shift in consumer payment behavior towards avoiding late fees, finance charges and other fees, could have a negative impact on our results of operations.
Increases in bankruptcies could cause increases in our charge-off rates, which could have a negative impact on our results of operations.
Our ability to recover debt that we have previously charged-off may be limited, which could have a negative impact on our results of operations.
The process and models we use to estimate our allowance for loan and lease losses may become less reliable if volatile economic conditions, changes in the competitive environment, significant changes in customer behavior or other unexpected variations in key inputs and assumptions cause actual losses to diverge from the projections of our models. As a result, our estimates for credit losses may become increasingly subject to management’s judgment and high levels of volatility over short periods of time, which could negatively impact our results of operations. See “There Are Risks Resulting From The Extensive Use Of Models and Data In Our Business.
Risks associated with financial market instability and volatility could cause a material adverse effect on our liquidity and our funding costs. For example, increases in interest rates and our credit spreads could negatively impact our results of operations.
Our ability to borrow from other financial institutions or to engage in funding transactions on favorable terms or at all could be adversely affected by disruptions in the capital markets or other events, including actions by rating agencies and deteriorating investor expectations, which could limit our access to funding.
While interest rates have risen from historic lows set in 2016, both shorter-term and longer-term interest rates remain below long-term historical averages and the yield curve has been relatively flat compared to past periods. A flat yield curve combined with low interest rates generally leads to lower revenue and reduced margins because it tends to limit our ability to increase the spread between asset yields and funding costs. Sustained periods of time with a flat yield curve coupled with low interest rates could have a material adverse effect on our earnings and our net interest margin.


 
 
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Regulatory Risk
Compliance With New And Existing Laws, Regulations And Regulatory Expectations May Increase Our Costs, Reduce Our Revenue, Limit Our Ability To Pursue Business Opportunities And Increase Compliance Challenges.
Legislation and regulation with respect to the financial services industry has increased in recent years, and we expect that oversight of our business may continue to expand in scope and complexity. A wide array of banking and consumer lending laws apply to almost every aspect of our business. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations could result in financial, structural and operational penalties, including significant fines and criminal sanctions, and could result in negative publicity or damage to our reputation with regulators or the public. In addition, establishing systems and processes to achieve compliance with these laws and regulations may increase our costs and limit our ability to pursue certain business opportunities.
We are subject to heightened regulatory oversight by the federal banking regulators to ensure that we build systems and processes that are commensurate with the nature of our business and that meet the heightened risk management and enhanced prudential standards issued by our regulators. For example, over the last several years, state and federal regulators have focused on compliance with the Bank Secrecy Act and anti-money laundering laws, data integrity and security, use of service providers, fair lending and other consumer protection issues. In July 2015, Capital One entered into a consent order with the OCC to address concerns about our anti-money laundering (“AML”) program (“AML Program”). Although we are making substantial progress in taking the steps and making the improvements required by the OCC consent order, we expect heightened oversight of our AML Program will continue for the foreseeable future.
The Dodd-Frank Act, other regulatory reforms and implementing regulations have increased our need to develop, monitor and maintain compliance processes and infrastructure and to otherwise enhance our risk management throughout all aspects of our business. The cumulative impact of these changes also includes higher expectations for the amount of capital and liquidity we must maintain, as discussed in more detail below under the heading “We May Not Be Able To Maintain Adequate Capital Or Liquidity Levels, Which Could Have A Negative Impact On Our Financial Results And Our Ability To Return Capital To Our Shareholders,” and higher operational costs, which may further increase as regulators continue to implement such reforms. United States government agencies charged with adopting and interpreting laws, rules and regulations, including under the Dodd-Frank Act, may do so in an unforeseen manner, including in ways that potentially expand the impact of such laws, rules or regulations on us more than initially contemplated or currently anticipated. Both Congress and the regulators continue to review the laws and regulations that could have impacts beyond those initially contemplated or currently anticipated.
We have a large number of customer accounts in our credit card and auto lending businesses and we have made the strategic choice to originate and service subprime credit cards and auto loans which typically have higher delinquencies and charge-offs than prime customers. Accordingly, we have significant involvement with credit bureau reporting and the collection and recovery of delinquent and charged-off debt, primarily through customer communications, the filing of litigation against customers in default, the periodic sale of charged-off debt and vehicle repossession. The banking industry is subject to enhanced legal and regulatory scrutiny regarding credit bureau reporting and debt collection practices from regulators, courts and legislators. Any future changes to our business practices in these areas, including our debt collection practices, whether mandated by regulators, courts, legislators or otherwise, or any legal liabilities resulting from our business practices, including our debt collection practices, could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition.
The legislative and regulatory environment is beyond our control, may change rapidly and unpredictably and may negatively influence our revenue, costs, earnings, growth, liquidity and capital levels. In addition, some rules and regulations may be subject to litigation or other challenges that delay or modify their implementation and impact on us. For example, the Tax Act has resulted in material impacts to our results of operations due to changes to the valuation of our deferred tax assets, the valuation of other tax assets, and tax expense, and may affect customer behavior and our ability to forecast our effective tax rate. Many aspects of the Tax Act are unclear and may not be clarified for some time. As a result, we have not yet been able to determine the full impact of the new laws on our business, operating results and financial condition. For example, in the United Kingdom and Europe, continued regulatory uncertainty or changes arising from Brexit negotiations could adversely affect our U.K. operations.
Certain laws and regulations, and any interpretations and applications with respect thereto, may benefit consumers, borrowers and depositors, but not shareholders. Our success depends on our ability to maintain compliance with both existing and new laws and regulations. For a description of the material laws and regulations to which we are subject, please refer to “Part I—Item 1. Business—Supervision and Regulation.”

 
 
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Credit Risk
We May Experience Increased Delinquencies, Credit Losses, Inaccurate Estimates And Inadequate Reserves.
Like other lenders, we face the risk that our customers will not repay their loans. A customer’s ability and willingness to repay us can be negatively impacted by increases in their payment obligations to other lenders, whether as a result of higher debt levels or rising interest rates, or by restricted availability of credit generally. We may fail to quickly identify customers that are likely to default on their payment obligations and reduce our exposure by closing credit lines and restricting authorizations, which could adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations. Our ability to manage credit risk also may be adversely affected by legal or regulatory changes (such as restrictions on collections, bankruptcy laws, minimum payment regulations and re-age guidance), competitors' actions and consumer behavior, as well as inadequate collections staffing, techniques and models.
Rising losses or leading indicators of rising losses (such as higher delinquencies, higher rates of non-performing loans, higher bankruptcy rates, lower collateral values or elevated unemployment rates) may require us to increase our allowance for loan and lease losses, which may degrade our profitability if we are unable to raise revenue or reduce costs to compensate for higher losses. In particular, we face the following risks in this area:
Missed Payments: Our customers may miss payments. Loan charge-offs (including from bankruptcies) are generally preceded by missed payments or other indications of worsening financial condition for our customers. Customers are more likely to miss payments during an economic downturn or prolonged periods of slow economic growth. In addition, we face the risk that consumer and commercial customer behavior may change (for example, an increase in the unwillingness or inability of customers to repay debt, which may be heightened by increasing interest rates or levels of consumer debt generally), causing a long-term rise in delinquencies and charge-offs.
Estimates of Inherent Losses: The credit quality of our portfolio can have a significant impact on our earnings. We allow for and reserve against credit risks based on our assessment of credit losses inherent in our loan portfolios. This process, which is critical to our financial results and condition, requires complex judgments, including forecasts of economic conditions. We may underestimate our inherent losses and fail to hold an allowance for loan and lease losses sufficient to account for these losses. Incorrect assumptions could lead to material underestimations of inherent losses and inadequate allowance for loan and lease losses. In cases where we modify a loan, if the modifications do not perform as anticipated we may be required to build additional allowance on these loans. The build or release of allowances impacts our current financial results.
Underwriting: Our ability to accurately assess the creditworthiness of our customers may diminish, which could result in an increase in our credit losses and a deterioration of our returns. See “Our Risk Management Strategies May Not Be Fully Effective In Mitigating Our Risk Exposures In All Market Environments Or Against All Types Of Risk.”
Business Mix: We engage in a diverse mix of businesses with a broad range of potential credit exposure. Our business mix could change in ways that could adversely affect the credit quality of our portfolio. Because we originate a relatively greater proportion of consumer loans in our loan portfolio compared to other large bank peers and originate both prime and subprime credit card accounts and auto loans, we may experience higher delinquencies and a greater number of accounts charging off compared to other large bank peers, which could result in increased credit losses, operating costs and regulatory scrutiny.
Charge-off Recognition / Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses: We account for the allowance for loan and lease losses according to accounting and regulatory guidelines and rules, including Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) standards and the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (“FFIEC”) Account Management Guidance. In June 2016, the FASB issued revised guidance for impairments on financial instruments. The guidance, which becomes effective on January 1, 2020, with early adoption permitted no earlier than January 1, 2019, requires use of a current expected credit loss (“CECL”) model that is based on expected rather than incurred losses. Adoption of the CECL model could require changes in our account management or allowance for loan and lease losses practices, and may cause our allowance for loan and lease losses and credit losses to change materially.
Industry Developments: Our charge-off and delinquency rates may be negatively impacted by industry developments, including new regulations applicable to our industry.

 
 
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Collateral: The collateral we have on secured loans could be insufficient to compensate us for loan losses. When customers default on their secured loans, we attempt to recover collateral where permissible and appropriate. However, the value of the collateral may not be sufficient to compensate us for the amount of the unpaid loan, and we may be unsuccessful in recovering the remaining balance from our customers. Decreases in real estate values adversely affect the collateral value for our commercial lending activities, while the auto business is similarly exposed to collateral risks arising from the auction markets that determine used car prices. Therefore, the recovery of such property could be insufficient to compensate us for the value of these loans. Borrowers may be less likely to continue making payments on loans if the value of the property used as collateral for the loan is less than what the borrower owes, even if the borrower is still financially able to make the payments. Trends in home prices are a driver of credit costs in our home loan business as they impact both the probability of default and the loss severity of defaults. Additionally, the potential volatility in the number of defaulted and modified loans from changes in home prices can create material impacts on the servicing costs of the business, fluctuations in credit marks and profitability in acquired portfolios and volatility in mortgage servicing rights valuations. Although home prices have generally appreciated recently, the slow economic recovery, shifts in monetary policy and potentially diminishing demands from investors could threaten or limit the recovery. In our auto business, if vehicle prices experience declines, we could be adversely affected. For example, business and economic conditions that negatively affect household incomes, housing prices, and consumer behavior related to our businesses could decrease (i) the demand for new and used vehicles and (ii) the value of the collateral underlying our portfolio of auto loans, which could cause the number of consumers who become delinquent or default on their loans to increase.
Geographic and Industry Concentration: Although our consumer lending is geographically diversified, approximately 30% of our commercial loan portfolio is concentrated in the tri-state area of New York, New Jersey and Connecticut. The regional economic conditions in the tri-state area affect the demand for our commercial products and services as well as the ability of our customers to repay their commercial loans and the value of the collateral securing these loans. An economic downturn or prolonged period of slow economic growth in, or a catastrophic event that disproportionately affects, the tri-state area could have a material adverse effect on the performance of our commercial loan portfolio and our results of operations. In addition, our Commercial Banking strategy includes an industry-specific focus. If any of the industries that we focus on experience changes, we may experience increased credit losses and our results of operations could be adversely impacted. For example, as of December 31, 2017, energy-related loan balances represented approximately 4% of our total commercial loan portfolio. This amount is comprised of loans to commercial entities in the energy industry, such as exploration and production, oil field services, and pipeline transportation of gas and crude oil, as well as loans to entities in industries that are indirectly impacted by energy prices, such as petroleum wholesalers, oil and gas equipment manufacturing, air transportation, and petroleum bulk stations and terminals. In recent years, oil prices have fluctuated significantly, which has impacted many of the borrowers in this portfolio and the value of the collateral securing our loans to these borrowers. A prolonged period of declining oil prices could impair their ability to service loans outstanding to them and/or reduce demand for loans. If energy-related industries or any of the other industries that we focus on experience adverse changes, we may experience increased credit losses and our results of operations could be adversely impacted.
Capital and Liquidity Risk
We May Not Be Able To Maintain Adequate Capital Or Liquidity Levels, Which Could Have A Negative Impact On Our Financial Results And Our Ability To Return Capital To Our Shareholders.
As a result of the Dodd-Frank Act and the United States implementation of international accords, financial institutions are subject to new and increased capital and liquidity requirements, and we expect further changes to these regulations. Although United States regulators have finalized regulations for many of these requirements, continued uncertainty remains as to the form additional new requirements will take or how and when they will apply to us. As a result, it is possible that we could be required to increase our capital and/or liquidity levels above the levels assumed in our current financial plans. These new requirements could have a negative impact on our ability to lend, grow deposit balances or make acquisitions and limit our ability to make most capital distributions. Higher capital levels also lower our return on equity.
In addition, as described further above in “Part I—Item 1. Business—Supervision and Regulation,” for regulatory capital purposes we entered parallel run on January 1, 2015. We will become subject to the Basel III Advanced Approaches framework for purposes of determining our regulatory capital requirements once we receive regulatory approval to do so, although the exact timing of when such approval may be granted is uncertain. Although we have current estimates of risk-weighted asset calculations under that framework, there remains uncertainty around future regulatory interpretations of certain aspects of those calculations. Moreover, the so-called Collins Amendment to the Dodd-Frank Act, as implemented in the Basel III Capital Rule, establishes a capital floor so that organizations subject to the Basel III Advanced Approaches may not hold less capital than would be required using the

 
 
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Basel III Standardized Approach capital calculations. Additionally, in December 2017 the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision finalized certain modifications to the international Basel III capital standards which, if implemented by the United States federal banking agencies, could alter regulatory capital requirements. Therefore, we cannot assure you that our current estimates will be correct, and we may need to hold significantly more regulatory capital in the future than we currently estimate to maintain a given capital ratio.
In April 2016, the United States federal banking agencies proposed a rule regarding the United States implementation of the net stable funding ratio (“Proposed NSFR”). See “Part I—Item 1. Business—Supervision and Regulation” for further details regarding the Proposed NSFR. The financial and operational impact on us of a final NSFR rule remains uncertain until a final rule is published, and there is uncertainty as to the combined impact of the existing Liquidity Coverage Ratio and any final NSFR on how we manage our business. See “Note 12—Regulatory and Capital Adequacy” and “Part I—Item 1. Business—Supervision and Regulation—Dividends, Stock Repurchases and Transfers of Funds” for additional information regarding recent developments in capital and liquidity requirements.
We consider various factors in the management of capital, including the impact of stress on our capital levels, as determined by both our internal modeling and the Federal Reserve’s modeling of our capital position in supervisory stress tests and CCAR. There can be significant differences between our modeling and the Federal Reserve’s estimates for a given scenario and between the capital needs suggested by our internal bank holding company scenarios relative to the supervisory scenarios. Therefore, although our estimated capital levels under stress disclosed as part of the CCAR or DFAST processes may suggest that we have substantial capacity to return capital to shareholders and remain well capitalized under stress, the Federal Reserve’s modeling, our own modeling of another scenario or other factors related to our capital management process may result in a materially lower capacity to return capital to shareholders than that indicated by the projections released in the CCAR or DFAST processes. This in turn could lead to restrictions on our ability to pay dividends and engage in share repurchase transactions. See “Part I—Item 1. Business—Supervision and Regulation” for additional information.
Operational Risk
We Face Risks Related To Our Operational, Technological And Organizational Infrastructure.
Our ability to retain and attract new customers depends on our ability to build or acquire necessary operational, technological and organizational infrastructure or adapt to technological advances involving such infrastructure, which can be a challenge due to the fast pace of digital transformation and advances. We are embedding technology, data and software development deeply into our business model and how we work.
Similar to other large corporations, we are exposed to operational risk that can manifest itself in many ways, such as errors related to failed or inadequate processes, inaccurate models, faulty or disabled computer systems, fraud by employees or persons outside of our company and exposure to external events. In addition, we are heavily dependent on the security, capability and continuous availability of the technology systems that we use to manage our internal financial and other systems, interface with our customers and develop and implement effective marketing campaigns.
In addition, our businesses are dependent on our ability to process, record and monitor a large number of complex transactions. If any of our financial, accounting or other data processing systems fail or have other significant shortcomings, our business and reputation could be materially adversely affected. We may also be subject to disruptions of our operating systems arising from events that are wholly or partially beyond our control, which may include, for example, computer viruses or electrical or telecommunications outages, design flaws in foundational components or platforms, availability and quality of vulnerability patches from key vendors, cyber-attacks, including Distributed Denial of Service (“DDOS”) attacks discussed below, natural disasters, other damage to property or physical assets or events arising from local or larger scale politics, including terrorist acts. Any of these occurrences could diminish our ability to operate our businesses, service customer accounts and protect customers’ information, or result in potential liability to customers, reputational damage, regulatory intervention and customers’ loss of confidence in our businesses, any of which could result in a material adverse effect.
We also rely on the business infrastructure and systems of third parties with which we do business and to whom we outsource the maintenance and development of operational and technological functionality. For example, we have migrated a number of, and intend to migrate substantially all, of our core systems and customer-facing applications to third-party cloud infrastructure platforms such as Amazon Web Services, Inc. If we do not execute the transition or administer these new environments in a well-managed, secure and effective manner, we may experience unplanned service disruption or unforeseen costs which may harm our business and operating results. We must successfully develop and maintain information, financial reporting, data-protection and other

 
 
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controls adapted to our reliance on new platforms and providers. In addition, our cloud infrastructure providers, or other service providers, could experience system breakdowns or failures, outages, downtime, cyber-attacks, adverse changes to financial condition, bankruptcy or other adverse conditions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and reputation. Thus, the substantial amount of our infrastructure that we outsource to “the cloud” or to other third parties may increase our risk exposure.
Our ability to develop and deliver new products that meet the needs of our existing customers and attract new ones and to run our business in compliance with applicable laws and regulations depends on the functionality and reliability of our operational and technology systems. Any disruptions, failures or inaccuracies of our operational and technology systems and models, including those associated with improvements or modifications to such systems and models, could cause us to be unable to market and manage our products and services, manage our risk, meet our regulatory obligations or report our financial results in a timely and accurate manner, all of which could have a negative impact on our results of operations. In addition, our ongoing investments in infrastructure, which are necessary to maintain a competitive business, integrate acquisitions and establish scalable operations, may increase our expenses. As our business develops, changes or expands, additional expenses can arise as a result of a reevaluation of business strategies, management of outsourced services, asset purchases or other acquisitions, structural reorganization, compliance with new laws or regulations or the integration of newly acquired businesses. If we are unable to successfully manage our expenses, our financial results will be negatively affected.
We Could Incur Increased Costs, Reductions In Revenue And Suffer Reputational Damage And Business Disruptions In The Event Of The Theft, Loss Or Misuse Of Information, Including As A Result Of A Cyber-Attack.
Our products and services involve the gathering, management, processing, storage and transmission of sensitive and confidential information regarding our customers and their accounts, our employees and other third parties with which we do business. Our ability to provide such products and services, many of which are web-based, depends upon the management and safeguarding of information, software, methodologies and business secrets. To provide these products and services to, as well as communicate with, our customers, we rely on information systems and infrastructure, including digital technologies, computer and email systems, software, networks and other web-based technologies, that we and third-party service providers operate. We also have arrangements in place with third parties through which we share and receive information about their customers who are or may become our customers.
Like other financial services firms, technologies, systems, networks and devices of Capital One or our customers, employees, service providers or other third parties with whom we interact continue to be the subject of attempted unauthorized access, mishandling or misuse of information, denial-of-service attacks, computer viruses, website defacement, hacking, malware, ransomware, phishing or other forms of social engineering, and other forms of cyber-attacks designed to obtain confidential information, destroy data, disrupt or degrade service, sabotage systems or cause other damage, and other events. These threats may derive from human error, fraud or malice on the part of our employees, insiders or third parties or may result from accidental technological failure. Any of these parties may also attempt to fraudulently induce employees, customers or other third-party users of our systems to disclose sensitive information in order to gain access to our data or that of our customers or third parties with whom we interact. Further, cyber and information security risks for large financial institutions like us have generally increased in recent years in part because of the proliferation of new technologies, the use of the Internet and telecommunications technologies to conduct financial transactions and the increased sophistication and activities of organized crime, perpetrators of fraud, hackers, terrorists, activists, formal and informal instrumentalities of foreign governments and other external parties. In addition, to access our products and services, our customers may use computers, smartphones, tablet PCs and other mobile devices that are beyond our security control systems.
As a financial institution, we are subject to and examined for compliance with an array of data protection laws, regulations and guidance, as well as to our own internal privacy and information security policies and programs. However, because the methods and techniques employed by perpetrators of fraud and others to attack, disable, degrade or sabotage platforms, systems and applications change frequently, are increasingly sophisticated and often are not fully recognized or understood until after they have occurred, and some techniques could occur and persist for an extended period of time before being detected, we and our third-party service providers and partners may be unable to anticipate or identify certain attack methods in order to implement effective preventative measures or mitigate or remediate the damages caused in a timely manner. We may also be unable to hire and develop talent capable of detecting, mitigating or remediating these risks. Although we believe we have a robust suite of authentication and layered information security controls, including our cyber threat analytics, data encryption and tokenization technologies, anti-malware defenses and vulnerability management program, any one or combination of these controls could fail to detect, mitigate or remediate these risks in a timely manner. We may face an increasing number of attempted cyber-attacks as we expand our

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


mobile- and other internet-based products and services, as well as our usage of mobile and cloud technologies and as we provide more of these services to a greater number of retail clients.
A disruption or breach, including as a result of a cyber-attack, or media reports of perceived security vulnerabilities at Capital One or at third-party service providers, could result in significant legal and financial exposure, regulatory intervention, remediation costs, card reissuance, supervisory liability, damage to our reputation or loss of confidence in the security of our systems, products and services that could adversely affect our business. We and other U.S. financial services providers continue to be targeted with evolving and adaptive cybersecurity threats from sophisticated third parties. Although we have not experienced any material losses relating to cyber incidents, there can be no assurance that unauthorized access or cyber incidents will not occur or that we will not suffer such losses in the future. Unauthorized access or cyber incidents could occur more frequently and on a more significant scale. If future attacks like these are successful or if customers are unable to access their accounts online for other reasons, it could adversely impact our ability to service customer accounts or loans, complete financial transactions for our customers or otherwise operate any of our businesses or services. In addition, a breach or attack affecting one of our third-party service providers or partners could harm our business even if we do not control the service that is attacked.
In addition, the increasing prevalence and the evolution of cyber-attacks and other efforts to breach or disrupt our systems or those of our partners, retailers or other market participants has led, and will likely continue to lead, to increased costs to us with respect to preventing, mitigating and remediating these risks, as well as any related attempted fraud. We may be required to expend significant additional resources to continue to modify or strengthen our protective security measures, investigate and remediate any vulnerabilities of our information systems and infrastructure or invest in new technology designed to mitigate security risks. For example, various retailers have continued to be victims of cyber-attacks in which customer data, including debit and credit card information, was obtained. In these situations, we incur a variety of costs, including those associated with replacing the compromised cards and remediating fraudulent transaction activity. Further, successful cyber-attacks at other large financial institutions or other market participants, whether or not we are impacted, could lead to a general loss of customer confidence in financial institutions that could negatively affect us, including harming the market perception of the effectiveness of our security measures or the financial system in general which could result in reduced use of our financial products. Though we have insurance against some cyber-risks and attacks, it may not be sufficient to offset the impact of a material loss event.
Our Exposure To Potential Data Protection and Privacy Incidents, And Our Required Compliance With Regulations Related To These Areas, May Increase Our Costs, Reduce Our Revenue And Limit Our Ability To Pursue Business Opportunities.
If our information systems or infrastructure or those of our customers, partners, service providers or other market participants experience a significant disruption or breach, it could lead, depending on the nature of the disruption or breach, to the unauthorized access to and release, gathering, monitoring, misuse, loss or destruction of personal or confidential data about our customers, employees or other third parties in our possession. Any party that obtains this personal or confidential data through a breach or disruption may use this information for ransom, to be paid by us or a third-party, as part of a fraudulent activity that is part of a broader criminal activity, or for other illicit purposes. Further, such disruption or breach could also result in unauthorized access to our proprietary information, intellectual property, software, methodologies and business secrets and in unauthorized transactions in Capital One accounts or unauthorized access to personal or confidential information maintained by those entities. For example, there has been a significant proliferation of consumer information available on the Internet resulting from breaches of third-party entities, including personal information, log-in credentials and authentication data. While Capital One was not directly involved in these third-party breach events, the stolen information can create a vulnerability for our customers if their Capital One log-in credentials are the same as or similar to the credentials that have been compromised on other sites. This vulnerability could include the risk of unauthorized account access, data loss and fraud. The use of automation software, or “bots,” can increase the velocity and efficacy of these types of attacks. A data protection incident, or media reports of perceived security vulnerabilities at Capital One or at third-party service providers, could result in significant legal and financial exposure, regulatory intervention, remediation costs, card reissuance, supervisory liability, damage to our reputation or loss of confidence in the security of our systems, products and services that could adversely affect our business.
We regularly move data across national borders to conduct our operations, and consequently are subject to a variety of continuously evolving and developing laws and regulations in the United States and abroad regarding privacy, data protection, and data security, including those related to the collection, storage, handling, use, disclosure, transfer, and security of personal data. Significant uncertainty exists as privacy and data protection laws may be interpreted and applied differently from country to country and may create inconsistent or conflicting requirements. For example, the GDPR, which becomes effective in May 2018, extends the scope of the EU data protection law to all companies processing data of EU residents, regardless of the company’s location. The law requires companies to meet new requirements regarding the handling of personal data, including new rights such as the “portability” of personal data. Our efforts to comply with GDPR and other privacy and data protection laws may entail substantial expenses,

 
 
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may divert resources from other initiatives and projects, and could limit the services we are able to offer. Furthermore, enforcement actions and investigations by regulatory authorities related to data security incidents and privacy violations continue to increase. The enactment of more restrictive laws, rules, regulations, or future enforcement actions or investigations could impact us through increased costs or restrictions on our business, and noncompliance could result in regulatory penalties and significant legal liability.
Legal Risk
Our Businesses Are Subject To The Risk Of Increased Litigation, Government Investigations And Regulatory Enforcement.
Our businesses are subject to increased litigation, government investigations and other regulatory enforcement risks as a result of a number of factors and from various sources, including the highly regulated nature of the financial services industry, the focus of state and federal prosecutors on banks and the financial services industry, the structure of the credit card industry and business practices in the mortgage business. Given the inherent uncertainties involved in litigation, government investigations and regulatory enforcement decisions, and the very large or indeterminate damages sought in some matters asserted against us, there can be significant uncertainty as to the ultimate liability we may incur from these kinds of matters. The finding, or even the assertion, of substantial legal liability against us could have a material adverse effect on our business and financial condition and could cause significant reputational harm to us, which could seriously harm our business.
In addition, financial institutions, including us, have faced significant regulatory scrutiny over the past several years, which has increasingly led to public enforcement actions. We and our subsidiaries are subject to comprehensive regulation and periodic examination by the Federal Reserve, the SEC, OCC, FDIC and CFPB. We have been subject to enforcement actions by many of these and other regulators and may continue to be involved in such actions, including governmental inquiries, investigations and enforcement proceedings, including by the Department of Justice and state Attorneys General. We expect that regulators and governmental enforcement bodies will continue taking formal enforcement actions against financial institutions in addition to addressing supervisory concerns through non-public supervisory actions or findings, which could involve restrictions on our activities, among other limitations that could adversely affect our business. In addition, a violation of law or regulation by another financial institution is likely to give rise to an investigation by regulators and other governmental agencies of the same or similar practices by us. For example, various regulatory and governmental agencies initiated an industry-wide supervisory initiative regarding sales practices and sales incentive compensation structures following a public enforcement action at another financial institution. In addition, a single event may give rise to numerous and overlapping investigations and proceedings. These and other initiatives from governmental authorities and officials may subject us to further judgments, settlements, fines or penalties, or cause us to restructure our operations and activities or to cease offering certain products or services, all of which could harm our reputation or lead to higher operational costs. Litigation, government investigations and other regulatory actions could involve restrictions on our activities, generally subject us to significant fines, increased expenses, restrictions on our activities and damage to our reputation and our brand, and could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Other Business Risks
We Face Intense Competition In All Of Our Markets.
We operate in a highly competitive environment, whether in making loans, attracting deposits or in the global payments industry, and we expect competitive conditions to continue to intensify with respect to most of our products. We compete on the basis of the rates we pay on deposits and the rates and other terms we charge on the loans we originate or purchase, as well as the quality and range of our customer service, products, innovation and experience. This increasingly competitive environment is primarily a result of changes in technology, product delivery systems and regulation, as well as the emergence of new or significantly larger financial service providers, all of which may affect our customers’ expectations and demands.
Some of our competitors, including new and emerging competitors in the digital and mobile payments space and other financial technology providers, are not subject to the same regulatory requirements or legislative scrutiny to which we are subject, which also could place us at a competitive disadvantage, in particular in the development of new technology platforms or the ability to rapidly innovate. We compete with many forms of payments offered by both bank and non-bank providers, including a variety of new and evolving alternative payment mechanisms, systems and products, such as aggregators and web-based and wireless payment platforms or technologies, digital currencies, prepaid systems and payment services targeting users of social networks and online gaming (including, for example, those offering payment through mobile phone accounts). If we are unable to continue to keep pace with innovation, our business and results of operations could be adversely affected.
Some of our competitors are substantially larger than we are, which may give those competitors advantages, including a more diversified product and customer base, the ability to reach out to more customers and potential customers, operational efficiencies,

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


broad-based local distribution capabilities, lower-cost funding and larger existing branch networks. Many of our competitors are also focusing on cross-selling their products and developing new products or technologies, which could affect our ability to maintain or grow existing customer relationships or require us to offer lower interest rates or fees on our lending products or higher interest rates on deposits. Price competition for loans might result in origination of fewer loans or earning less on our loans.
As of December 31, 2017, we operate the largest online direct bank in the U.S. by deposits. While direct banking represents a significant opportunity to attract new customers that value greater and more flexible access to banking services at reduced costs, we face strong competition in the direct banking market. Aggressive pricing throughout the industry may adversely affect the retention of existing balances and the cost-efficient acquisition of new deposit funds and may affect our growth and profitability. In addition, the effects of a competitive environment may be exacerbated by the flexibility of direct banking and the increasing financial and technological sophistication of our customer base. Customers could also close their online accounts or reduce balances or deposits in favor of products and services offered by competitors for other reasons. These shifts, which could be rapid, could result from general dissatisfaction with our products or services, including concerns over pricing, online security or our reputation.
In our credit card business, competition for rewards customers may result in higher rewards expenses, or we may fail to attract new customers or retain existing rewards customers due to increasing competition for these consumers. We have expanded our credit card partnership business over the past several years with the additions of a number of credit card partnerships. The market for key business partners, especially in the credit card business, is very competitive, and we may not be able to grow or maintain these partner relationships. We face the risk that we could lose partner relationships, even after we have invested significant resources, time and expense into acquiring and developing the relationships. The loss of any of our key business partners could have a negative impact on our results of operations, including lower returns, excess operating expense and excess funding capacity.
Some of our competitors have developed, or may develop, substantially greater financial and other resources than we have, may offer richer value propositions or a wider range of programs and services than we offer or may use more effective advertising, marketing or cross-selling strategies to acquire and retain more customers, capture a greater share of spending and borrowings, attain and develop more attractive cobrand card programs and maintain greater merchant acceptance than we have. We may not be able to compete effectively against these threats or respond or adapt to changes in consumer spending habits as effectively as our competitors.
In such a competitive environment, we may lose entire accounts or may lose account balances to competing firms, or we may find it more costly to maintain our existing customer base. Customer attrition from any or all of our lending products, together with any lowering of interest rates or fees that we might implement to retain customers, could reduce our revenues and therefore our earnings. Similarly, unexpected customer attrition from our deposit products, in addition to an increase in rates or services that we may offer to retain deposits, may increase our expenses and therefore reduce our earnings.
Our Business, Financial Condition And Results Of Operations May Be Adversely Affected By Merchants’ Increasing Focus On The Fees Charged By Credit Card Networks And By Regulation And Legislation Impacting Such Fees.
Credit card interchange fees are generally one of the largest components of the costs that merchants pay in connection with the acceptance of credit cards and are a meaningful source of revenue for our credit card businesses. Interchange fees are the subject of significant and intense global legal, regulatory and legislative focus, and the resulting decisions, regulations and legislation may have a material adverse impact on our overall business, financial condition and results of operations.
Regulators and legislative bodies in a number of countries are seeking to reduce credit card interchange fees through legislation, competition-related regulatory proceedings, central bank regulation and or litigation. Interchange reimbursement rates in the United States are set by credit card networks such as MasterCard and Visa. In some jurisdictions, such as Canada and certain countries in the European Union, interchange fees and related practices are subject to regulatory activity that have limited the ability of certain networks to establish default rates, including in some cases imposing caps on permissible interchange fees. We have already experienced these impacts in our international credit card portfolio. Legislators and regulators around the world are aware of each other’s approaches to the regulation of the payments industry. Consequently, a development in one country, state or region may influence regulatory approaches in another, such as our primary market, the United States.
In addition to this regulatory activity, merchants are also seeking avenues to reduce interchange fees. During the past few years, merchants and their trade groups have filed numerous lawsuits against Visa, MasterCard, American Express and their card-issuing banks, claiming that their practices toward merchants, including interchange and similar fees, violate federal antitrust laws. In 2005, a number of entities filed antitrust lawsuits against MasterCard and Visa and several member banks, including our subsidiaries and us, alleging among other things, that the defendants conspired to fix the level of interchange fees. In December 2013, the U.S.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


District Court for the Eastern District of New York granted final approval of the proposed class settlement. The settlement provided, among other things, that merchants would be entitled to join together to negotiate lower interchange fees. The settlement was appealed to the Second Circuit Court of Appeals, which rejected the settlement in June 2016; this litigation remains ongoing. See “Note 19—Commitments, Contingencies, Guarantees and Others” for further details.
Some major retailers may have sufficient bargaining power to independently negotiate lower interchange fees with MasterCard and Visa, which could, in turn, result in lower interchange fees for us when our cardholders undertake purchase transactions with these retailers. In 2016, some of the largest merchants individually negotiated lower interchange rates with MasterCard and/or Visa. These and other merchants also continue to lobby aggressively for caps and restrictions on interchange fees and there can be no assurance that their efforts will not be successful or that they will not in the future bring legal proceedings against us or other credit card and debit card issuers and networks.
Beyond pursuing litigation, legislation and regulation, merchants may also promote forms of payment with lower fees, such as ACH-based payments, or seek to impose surcharges at the point of sale for use of credit or debit cards. New payment systems, particularly mobile-based payment technologies, could also gain widespread adoption and lead to issuer transaction fees or the displacement of credit card accounts as a payment method.
The heightened focus by merchants and regulatory and legislative bodies on the fees charged by credit and debit card networks, and the ability of certain merchants to successfully negotiate discounts to interchange fees with MasterCard and Visa or develop alternative payment systems could result in a reduction of interchange fees. Any resulting loss in income to us could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
If We Are Not Able To Invest Successfully In And Introduce Digital And Other Technological Developments Across All Our Businesses, Our Financial Performance May Suffer.
Our industry is subject to rapid and significant technological changes and our ability to meet our customers’ needs and expectations is key to our ability to grow revenue and earnings. We expect digital technologies to have a significant impact on banking over time. Consumers increasingly expect robust digital experiences from their financial services providers. The ability for customers to access their accounts and conduct financial transactions using digital technology, including mobile applications, is an increasingly important aspect of the financial services industry and it impacts our ability to deliver products and services to our customers. To that end, financial institutions are rapidly introducing new digital and other technology-driven products and services, which aim to offer a better customer experience and to reduce costs. We continue to invest in digital technology designed to attract new customers, facilitate the ability of existing customers to conduct financial transactions and enhance the customer experience related to our products and services.
Our continued success depends, in part, upon our ability to address the needs of our customers by using digital technology to provide products and services that efficiently meet their expectations in a cost-effective manner. The development and launch of new digital products and services depends in large part on our capacity to invest in and build the technology platforms that can enable them. We continue to actively invest in such technology platforms, however, we may fail to implement the correct technology, or may fail to do so in a timely manner as discussed in more detail above under the headings “We Face Intense Competition In All Of Our Markets and “We Face Risks Related To Our Operational, Technological And Organizational Infrastructure.
Some of our competitors are substantially larger than we are, which may allow those competitors to invest more money into their technology infrastructure and digital innovation than we do. In addition, we face intense competition from smaller companies which experience lower cost structures and different regulatory requirements and scrutiny than we do, and which may allow them to innovate more rapidly than we can. See “We Face Intense Competition In All Of Our Markets.” Further, our success depends on our ability to attract and retain strong digital and technology leaders, engineers and other talent, and competition for such talent is intense. If we are unable to attract and retain digital and technology talent, our ability to offer digital products and services and build the necessary technology infrastructure could be negatively affected, which could negatively impact our business and financial results. A failure to maintain or enhance our competitive position with respect to digital products and services, whether because we fail to anticipate customer expectations or because our technological developments fail to perform as desired or are not implemented in a timely or successful manner, could negatively impact our business and financial results.
We May Fail To Realize All Of The Anticipated Benefits Of Our Mergers, Acquisitions And Strategic Partnerships.
We have engaged in merger and acquisition activity and entered into strategic partnerships over the past several years and may continue to engage in such activity in the future. We continue to evaluate and anticipate engaging in, among other merger and acquisition activity, additional strategic partnerships and selected acquisitions of financial institutions and other financial assets,

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


including credit card and other loan portfolios. There can be no assurance that we will be able to identify and secure future acquisition targets on terms and conditions that are acceptable to us, or successfully complete proposed mergers, acquisitions and strategic partnerships, which could impair our growth.
Any merger, acquisition or strategic partnership we undertake entails certain risks, which may materially and adversely affect our results of operations. If we experience greater than anticipated costs to integrate acquired businesses into our existing operations, or are not able to achieve the anticipated benefits of any merger, acquisition or strategic partnership, including cost savings and other synergies, our business could be negatively affected. In addition, it is possible that the ongoing integration processes could result in the loss of key employees, errors or delays in systems implementation, the disruption of our ongoing businesses or inconsistencies in standards, controls, procedures and policies that adversely affect our ability to maintain relationships with partners, clients, customers, depositors and employees or to achieve the anticipated benefits of any merger, acquisition or strategic partnership. Integration efforts also may divert management attention and resources. These integration matters may have an adverse effect on us during any transition period.
In addition, we may face the following risks in connection with any merger, acquisition or strategic partnership:
New Businesses and Geographic or Other Markets: Our merger, acquisition or strategic partnership activity may involve our entry into new businesses and new geographic areas or other markets which present risks resulting from our relative inexperience in these new businesses or markets. These new businesses or markets may change the overall character of our consolidated portfolio of businesses and could react differently to economic and other external factors. We face the risk that we will not be successful in these new businesses or in these new markets.
Identification and Assessment of Merger and Acquisition Targets and Deployment of Acquired Assets: We cannot assure you that we will identify or acquire suitable financial assets or institutions to supplement our organic growth through acquisitions or strategic partnerships. In addition, we may incorrectly assess the asset quality and value of the particular assets or institutions we acquire. Further, our ability to achieve the anticipated benefits of any merger, acquisition or strategic partnership will depend on our ability to assess the asset quality and value of the particular assets or institutions we partner with, merge with or acquire. We may be unable to profitably deploy any assets we acquire.
Accuracy of Assumptions: In connection with any merger, acquisition or strategic partnership, we may make certain assumptions relating to the proposed merger, acquisition or strategic partnership that may be, or may prove to be, inaccurate, including as a result of the failure to realize the expected benefits of any merger, acquisition or strategic partnership. The inaccuracy of any assumptions we may make could result in unanticipated consequences that could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition.
Target-specific Risk: Assets and companies that we acquire, or companies that we enter into strategic partnerships with, will have their own risks that are specific to a particular asset or company. These risks include, but are not limited to, particular or specific regulatory, accounting, operational, reputational and industry risks, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations or financial condition. Indemnification rights, if any, may be insufficient to compensate us for any losses or damages resulting from such risks. In addition to regulatory approvals discussed above, certain of our merger, acquisition or partnership activity may require third-party consents in order for us to fully realize the anticipated benefits of any such transaction.
Conditions to Regulatory Approval: Certain acquisitions may not be consummated without obtaining approvals from one or more of our regulators. We cannot be certain when or if, or on what terms and conditions, any required regulatory approvals will be granted. Consequently, we might be required to sell portions of acquired assets as a condition to receiving regulatory approval or we may not obtain regulatory approval for a proposed acquisition on acceptable terms or at all, in which case we would not be able to complete the acquisition despite the time and expenses invested in pursuing it.
Reputational Risk And Social Factors May Impact Our Results And Damage Our Brand.
Our ability to originate and maintain accounts is highly dependent upon the perceptions of consumer and commercial borrowers and deposit holders and other external perceptions of our business and compliance practices or our financial health. In addition, our brand has historically been, and we expect it to continue to be, very important to us. Maintaining and enhancing our brand will depend largely on our ability to continue to provide high-quality products and services. Adverse perceptions regarding our reputation in the consumer, commercial and funding markets could lead to difficulties in generating and maintaining accounts as well as in financing them. In particular, negative public perceptions regarding our reputation could lead to decreases in the levels of deposits that consumer and commercial customers and potential customers choose to maintain with us or significantly increase

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


the costs of attracting and retaining customers. In addition, negative perceptions regarding certain industries or clients could also prompt us to cease business activities associated with those industries or clients.
Negative public opinion or damage to our brand could also result from actual or alleged conduct in any number of activities or circumstances, including lending practices, regulatory compliance, security breaches (including the use and protection of customer information), corporate governance, and sales and marketing, and from actions taken by regulators or other persons in response to such conduct. Such conduct could fall short of our customers’ and the public’s heightened expectations of companies of our size with rigorous data, privacy and compliance practices, and could further harm our reputation. In addition, third parties with whom we have important relationships may take actions over which we have limited control that could negatively impact perceptions about us or the financial services industry. The proliferation of social media may increase the likelihood that negative public opinion from any of the events discussed above will impact our reputation and business.
In addition, a variety of social factors may cause changes in borrowing activity, including credit card use, payment patterns and the rate of defaults by accountholders and borrowers domestically and internationally. These social factors include changes in consumer confidence levels, the public’s perception regarding the banking industry and consumer debt, including credit card use, and changing attitudes about the stigma of bankruptcy. If consumers develop or maintain negative attitudes about incurring debt, or if consumption trends decline or if we fail to maintain and enhance our brand, or we incur significant expenses in this effort, our business and financial results could be materially and negatively affected.
If We Are Not Able To Protect Our Intellectual Property, Our Revenue And Profitability Could Be Negatively Affected.
We rely on a variety of measures to protect and enhance our intellectual property, including copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets, patents and certain restrictions on disclosure, solicitation and competition. We also undertake other measures to control access to and distribution of our other proprietary information. These measures may not prevent misappropriation of our proprietary information or infringement of our intellectual property rights and a resulting loss of competitive advantage. In addition, our competitors or other third parties may file patent applications for innovations that are used in our industry or allege that our systems, processes or technologies infringe on their intellectual property rights. If our competitors or other third parties are successful in obtaining such patents or prevail in intellectual property-related litigation against us, we could lose significant revenues, incur significant license, royalty or technology development expenses, or pay significant damages.
There Are Risks Resulting From The Extensive Use Of Models and Data In Our Business.
We rely on quantitative models, and our ability to manage data and our ability to aggregate data in an accurate and timely manner, to assess and manage our various risk exposures and to estimate certain financial values. Models may be used in such processes as determining the pricing of various products, grading loans and extending credit, measuring interest rate and other market risks, predicting losses, assessing capital adequacy and calculating economic and regulatory capital levels, as well as to estimate the value of financial instruments and balance sheet items. Our risk reporting and management, including business decisions based on information incorporating models, depend on the effectiveness of our models and our policies, programs, processes and practices governing how data is acquired, validated, stored, protected, processed and analyzed. Any issues with the quality or effectiveness of our data aggregation and validation procedures, as well as the quality and integrity of data inputs, could result in ineffective risk management practices or inaccurate risk reporting. For example, models based on historical data sets might not be accurate predictors of future outcomes and their ability to appropriately predict future outcomes may degrade over time. While we continuously update our policies, programs, processes and practices, many of our data management and aggregation processes are manual and subject to human error or system failure. Failure to manage data effectively and to aggregate data in an accurate and timely manner may limit our ability to manage current and emerging risk, to produce accurate financial, regulatory and operational reporting as well as to manage changing business needs. If our risk management framework proves ineffective, we could suffer unexpected losses which could materially adversely affect our results of operation or financial condition. Also, information we provide to the public or to our regulators based on poorly designed or implemented models could be inaccurate or misleading. Some of the decisions that our regulators make, including those related to capital distribution to our shareholders, could be affected adversely due to the perception that the quality of the models used to generate the relevant information is insufficient.
Our Risk Management Strategies May Not Be Fully Effective In Mitigating Our Risk Exposures In All Market Environments Or Against All Types Of Risk.
Management of risk, including market, credit, liquidity, compliance and strategic risks, requires, among other things, policies and procedures to properly record and verify a large number of transactions and events. See “MD&A—Risk Management” for further details. We have devoted significant resources to developing our risk management policies and procedures and expect to continue

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


to do so in the future. Nonetheless, our risk management strategies may not be fully effective in identifying and mitigating our risk exposure in all market environments or against all types of risk, including risks that are unidentified or unanticipated, even if our models for assessing risk are properly designed and implemented.
Some of our methods of managing risk are based upon our use of observed historical market behavior and management’s judgment. These methods may not accurately predict future exposures, which could be significantly greater than the historical measures indicate. For example, market conditions during the financial crisis involved unprecedented dislocations and highlight the limitations inherent in using historical information to manage risk. In addition, credit risk is inherent in the financial services business and results from, among other things, extending credit to customers. Our ability to assess the creditworthiness of our customers may be impaired if the models and approaches we use to select, manage and underwrite our consumer and commercial customers become less predictive of future charge-offs (due, for example, to rapid changes in the economy, including the unemployment rate).
While we employ a broad and diversified set of risk monitoring and risk mitigation techniques, those techniques and the judgments that accompany their application cannot anticipate every economic and financial outcome or the timing of such outcomes. For example, our ability to implement our risk management strategies may be hindered by adverse changes in the volatility or liquidity conditions in certain markets and as a result, may limit our ability to distribute such risks (for instance, when we seek to syndicate exposure in bridge financing transactions we have underwritten). We may, therefore, incur losses in the course of our risk management or investing activities.
Changes In Consumer Behavior And Their Adoption of Digital Technology May Change Retail Distribution Strategies And May Adversely Impact Our Investments In Our Bank Premises And Equipment And Other Retail Distribution Assets, Lead To Increased Expenditures And Expose Us To Additional Risk.
We have significant investments in bank premises and equipment for our branch network and other branch banking assets including our banking centers, parcels of land held for the development of future banking centers and our retail work force. Advances in technology such as digital and mobile banking, in-branch self-service technologies, proximity or remote payment technologies, as well as progressively changing customer preferences for these other methods of banking, could decrease the value of our branch network or other retail distribution assets. As a result, we may need to further change our retail distribution strategy and close, sell and/or renovate additional branches or parcels of land held for development and restructure or reduce our remaining branches and work force. These actions could lead to losses on these assets or could adversely impact the carrying value of other long-lived assets, reduce our revenues, increase our expenditures, dilute our brand and/or reduce customer demand for our products and services.
Further, to the extent that we change our retail distribution strategy and as a result expand into new business areas, we may face more competitors with more experience in the new business areas and more established relationships with relevant customers, regulators and industry participants, which could adversely affect our ability to compete. Our competitors may also be subject to less burdensome regulations. See “We Face Intense Competition In All Our Markets.”
Fluctuations In Market Interest Rates Or Volatility In The Capital Markets Could Adversely Affect Our Income And Expense, The Value Of Assets And Obligations, Our Regulatory Capital, Cost Of Capital Or Our Liquidity.
Like other financial institutions, our business may be sensitive to market interest rate movement and the performance of the capital markets. Disruptions, uncertainty or volatility across the capital markets could negatively impact market liquidity and limit our access to funding required to operate and grow our business. In addition, changes in interest rates or in valuations in the debt or equity markets could directly impact us. For example, we borrow money from other institutions and depositors, which we use to make loans to customers and invest in debt securities and other earning assets. We earn interest on these loans and assets and pay interest on the money we borrow from institutions and depositors. The interest rates that we pay on the securities we have issued are also influenced by, among other things, applicable credit ratings from recognized rating agencies. A downgrade to any of these credit ratings could affect our ability to access the capital markets, increase our borrowing costs and have a negative impact on our results of operations. Increased charge-offs, rising London Interbank Offering Rate (“LIBOR”) and other events may cause our securitization transactions to amortize earlier than scheduled, which could accelerate our need for additional funding from other sources. Fluctuations in interest rates, including changes in the relationship between short-term rates and long-term rates and in the relationship between our funding basis rate and our lending basis rate, may have negative impacts on our net interest income and therefore our earnings.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


In addition, interest rate fluctuations and competitor responses to those changes may affect the rate of customer prepayments for mortgage, auto and other term loans and may affect the balances customers carry on their credit cards. Although recent increases in interest rates may reduce prepayment risk, debt service requirements for some of our borrowers will increase, which may adversely affect those borrowers’ ability to pay as contractually obligated. This could result in additional delinquencies or charge-offs and negatively impact our results of operations. These changes can reduce the overall yield on our earning asset portfolio. Changes in interest rates and competitor responses to these changes may also impact customer decisions to maintain balances in the deposit accounts they have with us. An inability to attract or maintain deposits could materially affect our ability to fund our business and our liquidity position. Many other financial institutions have increased their reliance on deposit funding and, as such, we expect continued competition in the deposit markets. We cannot predict how this competition will affect our costs. If we are required to offer higher interest rates to attract or maintain deposits, our funding costs will be adversely impacted. Changes in valuations in the debt and equity markets could have a negative impact on the assets we hold in our investment portfolio. Such market changes could also have a negative impact on the valuation of assets for which we provide servicing. Finally, the Basel III Capital Rule requires that most amounts reported in Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income (“AOCI”), including unrealized gains and losses on securities designated as available for sale, be included in our regulatory capital calculations. Changes in interest rates or market valuations that result in unrealized losses on components of AOCI could therefore impact our regulatory capital ratios negatively.
As a result of recent regulatory and other legal proceedings, actions by regulators or law enforcement agencies may result in changes to the manner in which LIBOR is determined or the establishment of alternative reference rates for floating rate debt. Uncertainty as to the nature of potential changes, alternative reference rates or other reforms may adversely affect the trading market for LIBOR-based securities. In addition, any changes in the method pursuant to which LIBOR is determined may result in a sudden or prolonged increase or decrease in LIBOR. If that were to occur, the level of interest payments and the value of LIBOR-indexed debt may be affected. Uncertainty as to the extent and manner of future changes may adversely affect the current trading market for LIBOR based securities.
We assess our interest rate risk by estimating the effect on our earnings under various scenarios that differ based on assumptions about the direction and the magnitude of interest rate changes. We take risk mitigation actions based on those assessments. We face the risk that changes in interest rates could materially reduce our net interest income and our earnings, especially if actual conditions turn out to be materially different than those we assumed. See “MD&A—Market Risk Profile” for additional information.
Our Business Could Be Negatively Affected If We Are Unable To Attract, Retain And Motivate Skilled Senior Leaders.
Our success depends, in large part, on our ability to retain key senior leaders, and competition for such senior leaders is intense. The executive compensation provisions of the Dodd-Frank Act and the regulations issued thereunder, and any further legislation, regulation or regulatory guidance restricting executive compensation, may limit the types of compensation arrangements that we may enter into with our most senior leaders and could have a negative impact on our ability to attract, retain and motivate such leaders in support of our long-term strategy. These laws and regulations may not apply in the same manner to all financial institutions, and we therefore may face more restrictions than other institutions and companies with which we compete for talent. These laws and regulations may also hinder our ability to compete for talent with other industries. If we are unable to retain talented senior leadership, our business could be negatively affected.
We Face Risks From Unpredictable Catastrophic Events.
Despite the business contingency plans we have in place, there can be no assurance that such plans will fully mitigate all potential business continuity risks to us. The impact from natural disasters and other catastrophic events may have a negative effect on our business and infrastructure, including our information technology systems and those of third-parties that we rely on. Our ability to conduct business may be adversely affected by a disruption in the infrastructure that supports our business and the communities where we are located, which are concentrated in the Northern Virginia and New York metropolitan areas, as well as Richmond, Virginia and Plano, Texas. This may include a disruption involving physical site access, cyber incidents, terrorist activities, disease pandemics, catastrophic events, natural disasters, extreme weather events, electrical outage, environmental hazard, computer servers, communications or other services we use, our employees or third parties with whom we conduct business. In addition, if a natural disaster or other catastrophic event occurs in certain regions where our business and customers are concentrated, such as the mid-Atlantic, New York or Texas metropolitan areas, we could be disproportionately impacted as compared to our competitors. The impact of such events and other catastrophes on the overall economy may also adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

 
 
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We Face Risks From The Use Of Or Changes To Assumptions Or Estimates In Our Financial Statements.
Pursuant to generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S. (“U.S. GAAP”), we are required to use certain assumptions and estimates in preparing our financial statements, including determining our allowance for loan and lease losses, the fair value of certain assets and liabilities, and asset impairment, among other items. In December 2017, Congress passed and the President signed into law the Tax Act, that made significant changes to the U.S. federal tax laws. Many aspects of the new legislation are unclear and may not be clarified for some time. As a result, we have relied on reasonable estimates and provisional accounting entries in our accounting for income taxes. The ultimate impact of the Tax Act may differ from our estimates due to changes in the interpretations and assumptions, as well as additional regulatory guidance that may be issued. In addition, the FASB, the SEC and other regulatory bodies may change the financial accounting and reporting standards, including those related to assumptions and estimates we use to prepare our financial statements, in ways that we cannot predict and that could impact our financial statements. For example, in June 2016, the FASB issued revised guidance for impairments on financial instruments. The guidance, which becomes effective on January 1, 2020 with early adoption permitted no earlier than January 1, 2019, requires use of a CECL model that is based on expected rather than incurred losses. We are currently assessing the potential impact of this guidance, which may be material to our accounting for credit losses on financial instruments. If actual results differ from the assumptions or estimates underlying our financial statements or if financial accounting and reporting standards are changed, we may experience unexpected material losses. For a discussion of our use of estimates in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements, see “MD&A—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” and “Note 1—Summary of Significant Accounting Policies.”
Limitations On Our Ability To Receive Dividends From Our Subsidiaries Could Affect Our Liquidity And Ability To Pay Dividends And Repurchase Common Stock.
We are a separate and distinct legal entity from our subsidiaries, including the Banks. Dividends to us from our direct and indirect subsidiaries, including the Banks, have represented a major source of funds for us to pay dividends on our common and preferred stock, repurchase common stock, make payments on corporate debt securities and meet other obligations. There are various federal law limitations on the extent to which the Banks can finance or otherwise supply funds to us through dividends and loans. These limitations include minimum regulatory capital requirements, federal banking law requirements concerning the payment of dividends out of net profits or surplus, Sections 23A and 23B of the Federal Reserve Act and Regulation W governing transactions between an insured depository institution and its affiliates, as well as general federal regulatory oversight to prevent unsafe or unsound practices. If our subsidiaries’ earnings are not sufficient to make dividend payments to us while maintaining adequate capital levels, our liquidity may be affected and we may not be able to make dividend payments to our common or preferred stockholders, repurchase our common stock, make payments on outstanding corporate debt securities or meet other obligations, each and any of which could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations, financial position or perception of financial health.
The Soundness Of Other Financial Institutions And Other Third Parties Could Adversely Affect Us.
Our ability to engage in routine funding and other transactions could be adversely affected by the stability and actions of other financial services institutions. Financial services institutions are interrelated as a result of trading, clearing, servicing, counterparty and other relationships. We have exposure to an increasing number of financial institutions and counterparties. These counterparties include institutions that may be exposed to various risks over which we have little or no control, including European or U.S. sovereign debt that is currently or may become in the future subject to significant price pressure, rating agency downgrade or default risk.
In addition, we routinely execute transactions with counterparties in the financial services industry, including brokers and dealers, commercial banks, investment banks, mutual and hedge funds and other institutional clients, resulting in a significant credit concentration with respect to the financial services industry overall. As a result, defaults by, or even rumors or questions about, one or more financial services institutions, or the financial services industry generally, have led to market-wide liquidity problems and could lead to losses or defaults by us or by other institutions.
Likewise, adverse developments affecting the overall strength and soundness of our competitors, the financial services industry as a whole and the general economic climate or sovereign debt could have a negative impact on perceptions about the strength and soundness of our business even if we are not subject to the same adverse developments. In addition, adverse developments with respect to third parties with whom we have important relationships also could negatively impact perceptions about us. These perceptions about us could cause our business to be negatively affected and exacerbate the other risks that we face.

 
 
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Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Item 2. Properties
Our corporate and banking real estate portfolio consists of approximately 14.7 million square feet of owned or leased office and retail space, used to support our business. Of this overall portfolio, approximately 11.2 million square feet of space is dedicated for various corporate office uses and approximately 3.5 million square feet of space is for bank branches and related offices.
Our 11.2 million square feet of corporate office space consists of approximately 6.4 million square feet of leased space and 4.8 million square feet of owned space. Our headquarters is located in McLean, Virginia, and is included in our corporate office space. We maintain corporate office space primarily in Virginia, Illinois, Texas, New York, Delaware, Louisiana and Maryland.
Our 3.5 million square feet of bank branch, Café and office space consists of approximately 1.9 million square feet of leased space and 1.6 million square feet of owned space, including branch locations primarily across New York, Louisiana, Texas, Maryland, Virginia, New Jersey and the District of Columbia. See “Note 8—Premises, Equipment and Lease Commitments” for information about our premises.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
The information required by Item 103 of Regulation S-K is included in “Note 19—Commitments, Contingencies, Guarantees and Others.”
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.

 
 
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PART II
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Market Information
Our common stock is listed on the NYSE and is traded under the symbol “COF.” As of January 31, 2018, there were 10,982 holders of record of our common stock. The table below presents the high and low closing trade prices of our common stock as reported by the NYSE and cash dividends per common share declared by us during each quarter indicated.    
 
 
Trade Price
 
Cash
Dividends
For the Quarter Ended
 
High
 
Low
 
December 31, 2017
 
$
100.50

 
$
84.59

 
$
0.40

September 30, 2017
 
87.94

 
78.21

 
0.40

June 30, 2017
 
85.80

 
76.92

 
0.40

March 31, 2017
 
96.12

 
82.13

 
0.40

December 31, 2016
 
90.62

 
71.07

 
0.40

September 30, 2016
 
72.50

 
60.86

 
0.40

June 30, 2016
 
75.96

 
58.15

 
0.40

March 31, 2016
 
71.03

 
58.66

 
0.40

Dividend Restrictions
For information regarding our ability to pay dividends, see the discussion under “Part I—Item 1. Business—Supervision and Regulation—Dividends, Stock Repurchases and Transfers of Funds,” “MD&A—Capital Management—Dividend Policy and Stock Purchases” and “Note 12—Regulatory and Capital Adequacy.”
Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
Information relating to compensation plans under which our equity securities are authorized for issuance is presented in this Report under “Part III—Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters.”



 
 
35
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Common Stock Performance Graph
The following graph shows the cumulative total stockholder return on our common stock compared to an overall stock market index, the S&P Composite 500 Stock Index (“S&P 500 Index”), and a published industry index, the S&P Financial Composite Index (“S&P Financial Index”), over the five-year period commencing December 31, 2012 and ending December 31, 2017. The stock performance graph assumes that $100 was invested in our common stock and each index and that all dividends were reinvested. The stock price performance on the graph below is not necessarily indicative of future performance.
cof-0331201_chartx41238a04.jpg
 
 
December 31,
 
 
2012
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
 
2016
 
2017
Capital One
 
$
100.00

 
$
134.18

 
$
146.88

 
$
130.86

 
$
161.94

 
$
188.35

S&P 500 Index
 
100.00

 
129.60

 
144.36

 
143.31

 
156.98

 
187.47

S&P Financial Index
 
100.00

 
133.21

 
150.66

 
145.42

 
174.71

 
209.70


 
 
36
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities
We did not have any sales of unregistered equity securities in 2017.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The following table presents information related to repurchases of shares of our common stock for each calendar month in the fourth quarter of 2017. During this period, there were no repurchases of common stock under the 2017 Stock Repurchase Program. Commission costs are excluded from the amounts presented below.
 
 
Number
of Shares
Purchased(1)
 
Average
Price Paid
per Share
 
Number of
Shares Purchased as
Part of Publicly
Announced Plans
 
Maximum
Amount That May
Yet be Purchased
Under the Plan
or Program
(in millions)
October
 

 

 

 
$
1,834

November
 
35,254

 
$
92.10

 

 
1,834

December(2)
 

 

 

 
1,000

Total
 
35,254

 
$
92.10

 

 
 
__________
(1) 
Shares withheld in November 2017 were to cover taxes on restricted stock awards whose restrictions have lapsed.
(2) 
In December 2017, the Board of Directors reduced the authorized repurchases of our common stock to up to $1.0 billion for the remaining 2017 CCAR period, which ends June 30, 2018.

 
 
37
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Item 6. Summary of Selected Financial Data
The following table presents selected consolidated financial data and performance metrics for the five-year period ended December 31, 2017. Certain prior period amounts have been recast to conform to the current period presentation. We prepare our consolidated financial statements based on U.S. GAAP. This data should be reviewed in conjunction with our audited consolidated financial statements and related notes and with the MD&A included in this Report. The historical financial information presented may not be indicative of our future performance.
Five-Year Summary of Selected Financial Data
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
Change
(Dollars in millions, except per share data and as noted)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2017 vs. 2016
 
2016 vs. 2015
Income statement
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income
 
$
25,222

 
$
22,891

 
$
20,459

 
$
19,397

 
$
19,898

 
10
 %
 
12
 %
Interest expense
 
2,762

 
2,018

 
1,625

 
1,579

 
1,792

 
37

 
24

Net interest income
 
22,460

 
20,873

 
18,834

 
17,818

 
18,106

 
8

 
11

Non-interest income
 
4,777

 
4,628

 
4,579

 
4,472

 
4,278

 
3

 
1

Total net revenue
 
27,237

 
25,501

 
23,413

 
22,290

 
22,384

 
7

 
9

Provision for credit losses
 
7,551

 
6,459

 
4,536

 
3,541

 
3,453

 
17

 
42

Non-interest expense:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Marketing
 
1,670

 
1,811

 
1,744

 
1,561

 
1,373

 
(8
)
 
4

Operating expenses
 
12,524

 
11,747

 
11,252

 
10,619

 
10,980

 
7

 
4

Total non-interest expense
 
14,194

 
13,558

 
12,996

 
12,180

 
12,353

 
5

 
4

Income from continuing operations before income taxes
 
5,492

 
5,484

 
5,881

 
6,569

 
6,578

 

 
(7
)
Income tax provision
 
3,375

 
1,714

 
1,869

 
2,146

 
2,224

 
97

 
(8
)
Income from continuing operations, net of tax
 
2,117

 
3,770

 
4,012

 
4,423

 
4,354

 
(44
)
 
(6
)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax
 
(135
)
 
(19
)
 
38

 
5

 
(233
)
 
**

 
**

Net income
 
1,982

 
3,751

 
4,050

 
4,428

 
4,121

 
(47
)
 
(7
)
Dividends and undistributed earnings allocated to participating securities
 
(13
)
 
(24
)
 
(20
)
 
(18
)
 
(17
)
 
(46
)
 
20

Preferred stock dividends
 
(265
)
 
(214
)
 
(158
)
 
(67
)
 
(53
)
 
24

 
35

Net income available to common stockholders
 
$
1,704

 
$
3,513

 
$
3,872

 
$
4,343

 
$
4,051

 
(51
)
 
(9
)
Common share statistics
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 

Basic earnings per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income from continuing operations
 
$
3.80

 
$
7.00

 
$
7.08

 
$
7.70

 
$
7.39

 
(46
)%
 
(1
)%
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
 
(0.28
)
 
(0.04
)
 
0.07

 
0.01

 
(0.40
)
 
**

 
**

Net income per basic common share
 
$
3.52

 
$
6.96

 
$
7.15

 
$
7.71

 
$
6.99

 
(49
)
 
(3
)
Diluted earnings per common share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


Net income from continuing operations
 
$
3.76

 
$
6.93

 
$
7.00

 
$
7.58

 
$
7.28

 
(46
)
 
(1
)
Income (loss) from discontinued operations
 
(0.27
)
 
(0.04
)
 
0.07

 
0.01

 
(0.39
)
 
**

 
**

Net income per diluted common share
 
$
3.49

 
$
6.89

 
$
7.07

 
$
7.59

 
$
6.89

 
(49
)
 
(3
)
Common shares outstanding (period-end, in millions)
 
485.5

 
480.2

 
527.3

 
553.4

 
572.7

 
1

 
(9
)
Dividends declared per common share
 
$
1.60

 
$
1.60

 
$
1.50

 
$
1.20

 
$
0.95

 

 
7

Tangible book value per common share (period-end)(1)
 
60.28

 
57.76

 
53.65

 
50.32

 
43.64

 
4

 
8

Common dividend payout ratio(2)
 
45.45
%
 
22.99
%
 
20.98
%
 
15.56
%
 
13.59
%
 
22

 
2

Stock price per common share at period end
 
$
99.58

 
$
87.24

 
$
72.18

 
$
82.55

 
$
76.61

 
14

 
21

Book value per common share at period end
 
100.37

 
98.95

 
89.67

 
81.41

 
72.69

 
1

 
10

Total market capitalization at period end
 
48,346

 
41,893

 
38,061

 
45,683

 
43,875

 
15

 
10

Balance sheet (average balances)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loans held for investment
 
$
245,565

 
$
233,272

 
$
210,745

 
$
197,925

 
$
192,614

 
5
 %
 
11
 %
Interest-earning assets
 
322,330

 
307,796

 
282,581

 
267,174

 
266,423

 
5

 
9

Total assets
 
354,924

 
339,974

 
313,474

 
297,659

 
296,200

 
4

 
8

Interest-bearing deposits
 
213,949

 
198,304

 
185,677

 
181,036

 
187,700

 
8

 
7

Total deposits
 
239,882

 
223,714

 
210,989

 
205,675

 
209,045

 
7

 
6

Borrowings
 
53,659

 
56,878

 
45,420

 
38,882

 
37,807

 
(6
)
 
25

Common equity
 
45,170

 
45,162

 
45,072

 
43,055

 
40,629

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity
 
49,530

 
48,753

 
47,713

 
44,268

 
41,482

 
2

 
2


 
 
38
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
Change
(Dollars in millions, except per share data and as noted)
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2017 vs. 2016
 
2016 vs. 2015
Selected performance metrics
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Purchase volume(3)
 
$
336,440

 
$
307,138

 
$
271,167

 
$
224,750

 
$
201,074

 
10
 %
 
13
 %
Total net revenue margin(4)
 
8.45
%
 
8.29
%
 
8.29
%
 
8.34
%
 
8.40
%
 
16
bps
 

Net interest margin(5)
 
6.97

 
6.78

 
6.66

 
6.67

 
6.80

 
19

 
12
bps
Return on average assets
 
0.60

 
1.11

 
1.28

 
1.49

 
1.47

 
(51
)
 
(17
)
Return on average tangible assets(6)
 
0.62

 
1.16

 
1.35

 
1.57

 
1.55

 
(54
)
 
(19
)
Return on average common equity(7)
 
4.07

 
7.82

 
8.51

 
10.08

 
10.54

 
(4
)%
 
(1
)%
Return on average tangible common equity (“TCE”)(8)
 
6.16

 
11.93

 
12.87

 
15.79

 
17.35

 
(6
)
 
(1
)
Equity-to-assets ratio(9)
 
13.96

 
14.34

 
15.22

 
14.87

 
14.00

 
(38
)bps
 
(88
)bps
Non-interest expense as a percentage of average loans held for investment
 
5.78

 
5.81

 
6.17

 
6.15

 
6.41

 
(3
)
 
(36
)
Efficiency ratio(10)
 
52.11

 
53.17

 
55.51

 
54.64

 
55.19

 
(106
)
 
(234
)
Effective income tax rate from continuing operations
 
61.5

 
31.3

 
31.8

 
32.7

 
33.8

 
30
 %
 
(1
)%
Net charge-offs
 
$
6,562

 
$
5,062

 
$
3,695

 
$
3,414

 
$
3,934

 
30

 
37

Net charge-off rate(11)
 
2.67
%
 
2.17
%
 
1.75
%
 
1.72
%
 
2.04
%
 
50
bps
 
42
bps
 
 
December 31,
 
Change
(Dollars in millions, except as noted)

2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2017 vs. 2016
 
2016 vs. 2015
Balance sheet (period-end)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loans held for investment
 
$
254,473

 
$
245,586

 
$
229,851

 
$
208,316

 
$
197,199

 
4
 %
 
7
 %
Interest-earning assets
 
334,124

 
321,807

 
302,007

 
277,849

 
265,170

 
4

 
7

Total assets
 
365,693

 
357,033

 
334,048

 
308,167

 
296,064

 
2

 
7

Interest-bearing deposits
 
217,298

 
211,266

 
191,874

 
180,467

 
181,880

 
3

 
10

Total deposits
 
243,702

 
236,768

 
217,721

 
205,548

 
204,523

 
3

 
9

Borrowings
 
60,281

 
60,460

 
59,115

 
48,457

 
40,654

 

 
2

Common equity
 
44,370

 
43,154

 
43,990

 
43,231

 
40,779

 
3

 
(2
)
Total stockholders’ equity
 
48,730

 
47,514

 
47,284

 
45,053

 
41,632

 
3

 

Credit quality metrics
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
Allowance for loan and lease losses
 
$
7,502

 
$
6,503

 
$
5,130

 
$
4,383

 
$
4,315

 
15
 %
 
27
 %
Allowance as a percentage of loans held for investment (“allowance coverage ratio”)
 
2.95
%
 
2.65
%
 
2.23
%
 
2.10
%
 
2.19
%
 
30
bps
 
42
bps
30+ day performing delinquency rate
 
3.23

 
2.93

 
2.69

 
2.62

 
2.63

 
30

 
24

30+ day delinquency rate
 
3.48

 
3.27

 
3.00

 
2.91

 
2.96

 
21

 
27

Capital ratios
 
 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
Common equity Tier 1 capital(12)
 
10.3
%
 
10.1
%
 
11.1
%
 
12.5
%
 
N/A

 
20
bps
 
(100
)bps
Tier 1 common ratio
 
N/A

 
N/A

 
N/A

 
N/A

 
12.2
%
 
**

 
**

Tier 1 capital(12)
 
11.8

 
11.6

 
12.4

 
13.2

 
12.6

 
20

 
(80
)
Total capital(12)
 
14.4

 
14.3

 
14.6

 
15.1

 
14.7

 
10

 
(30
)
Tier 1 leverage(12)
 
9.9

 
9.9

 
10.6

 
10.8

 
10.1

 

 
(70
)
Tangible common equity(13)
 
8.3

 
8.1

 
8.9

 
9.5

 
8.9

 
20

 
(80
)
Supplementary leverage(12)
 
8.4

 
8.6

 
9.2

 
N/A

 
N/A

 
(20
)
 
(60
)
Other
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 
Employees (period end, in thousands)
 
49.3

 
47.3

 
45.4

 
46.0

 
45.4

 
4
 %
 
4
 %
__________
(1) 
Tangible book value per common share is a non-GAAP measure calculated based on tangible common equity divided by common shares outstanding. See “MD&A—Table F —Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Measures and Calculation of Regulatory Capital Measures” for additional information on non-GAAP measures.
(2) 
Common dividend payout ratio is calculated based on dividends per common share for the period divided by basic earnings per common share for the period.
(3) 
Purchase volume consists of purchase transactions, net of returns, for the period for loans both classified as held for investment and held for sale in our Credit Card business, and excludes cash advance and balance transfer transactions.
(4) 
Total net revenue margin is calculated based on total net revenue for the period divided by average interest-earning assets for the period.
(5) 
Net interest margin is calculated based on net interest income for the period divided by average interest-earning assets for the period.

 
 
39
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


(6) 
Return on average tangible assets is a non-GAAP measure calculated based on income from continuing operations, net of tax, for the period divided by average tangible assets for the period. See “MD&A—Table F—Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Measures and Calculation of Regulatory Capital Measures” for additional information on non-GAAP measures.
(7) 
Return on average common equity is calculated based on (i) income from continuing operations, net of tax; (ii) less dividends and undistributed earnings allocated to participating securities; (iii) less preferred stock dividends, for the period, divided by average common equity. Our calculation of return on average common equity may not be comparable to similarly-titled measures reported by other companies.
(8) 
Return on average tangible common equity is a non-GAAP measure calculated based on (i) income from continuing operations, net of tax; (ii) less dividends and undistributed earnings allocated to participating securities; (iii) less preferred stock dividends, for the period, divided by average TCE. Our calculation of return on average TCE may not be comparable to similarly-titled measures reported by other companies. See “MD&A—Table F—Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Measures and Calculation of Regulatory Capital Measures” for additional information on non-GAAP measures.
(9) 
Equity-to-assets ratio is calculated based on average stockholders’ equity for the period divided by average total assets for the period.
(10) 
Efficiency ratio is calculated based on non-interest expense for the period divided by total net revenue for the period.
(11) 
Net charge-off rate is calculated by dividing net charge-offs by average loans held for investment for the period for each loan category.
(12) 
Beginning on January 1, 2014, we calculate our regulatory capital under Basel III Standardized Approach subject to transition provisions. Prior to January 1, 2014, we calculated regulatory capital measures under Basel I. See “MD&A—Capital Management” and “MD&A—Table F—Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Measures and Calculation of Regulatory Capital Measures” for additional information, including the calculation of each of these ratios.
(13) 
Tangible common equity ratio is a non-GAAP measure calculated based on TCE divided by tangible assets. See “MD&A—Table F—Reconciliation of Non-GAAP Measures and Calculation of Regulatory Capital Measures” for the calculation of this measure and reconciliation to the comparative U.S. GAAP measure.
**
Change is not meaningful.

 
 
40
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)



Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”)

This discussion contains forward-looking statements that are based upon management’s current expectations and are subject to significant uncertainties and changes in circumstances. Please review “Part I—Item 1. BusinessForward-Looking Statements” for more information on the forward-looking statements in this 2017 Annual Report on Form 10-K (“this Report”). Our actual results may differ materially from those included in these forward-looking statements due to a variety of factors including, but not limited to, those described in “Part I—Item 1A. Risk Factors” in this Report. Unless otherwise specified, references to notes to our consolidated financial statements refer to the notes to our consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2017 included in this Report.
 
Management monitors a variety of key indicators to evaluate our business results and financial condition. The following MD&A is intended to provide the reader with an understanding of our results of operations, financial condition and liquidity by focusing on changes from year to year in certain key measures used by management to evaluate performance, such as profitability, growth and credit quality metrics. MD&A is provided as a supplement to, and should be read in conjunction with, our audited consolidated financial statements as of and for the year ended December 31, 2017 and accompanying notes. MD&A is organized in the following sections:
•   Executive Summary and Business Outlook
 
•   Capital Management
•   Consolidated Results of Operations
 
•   Risk Management
•   Consolidated Balance Sheets Analysis
 
•   Credit Risk Profile
•   Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
•   Liquidity Risk Profile
•   Business Segment Financial Performance
 
•   Market Risk Profile
•   Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates
 
•   Supplemental Tables
•   Accounting Changes and Developments
 
•   Glossary and Acronyms
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY AND BUSINESS OUTLOOK
Financial Highlights
We reported net income of $2.0 billion ($3.49 per diluted common share) on total net revenue of $27.2 billion for 2017. In comparison, we reported net income of $3.8 billion ($6.89 per diluted common share) on total net revenue of $25.5 billion for 2016, and $4.1 billion ($7.07 per diluted common share) on total net revenue of $23.4 billion for 2015.
Our net income of $2.0 billion for 2017 includes charges totaling $1.8 billion related to the enactment of the Tax Act in the fourth quarter of 2017. See “MD&A—Income Taxes” below for additional information.
Our common equity Tier 1 capital ratio as calculated under the Basel III Standardized Approach, including transition provisions, was 10.3% and 10.1% as of December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. See “MD&A—Capital Management” below for additional information.
On June 28, 2017, we announced that our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $1.85 billion of shares of our common stock from the third quarter of 2017 through the end of the second quarter of 2018. In December 2017, the Board of Directors reduced the authorized repurchases of our common stock to up to $1.0 billion for the remaining 2017 CCAR period, which ends June 30, 2018 (“2017 Stock Repurchase Program”). See “MD&A—Capital Management—Dividend Policy and Stock Purchases” for additional information.
Below are additional highlights of our performance in 2017. These highlights are generally based on a comparison between the results of 2017 and 2016, except as otherwise noted. The changes in our financial condition and credit performance are generally based on our financial condition and credit performance as of December 31, 2017 compared to our financial condition and credit performance as of December 31, 2016. We provide a more detailed discussion of our financial performance in the sections following this “Executive Summary and Business Outlook.”

 
 
41
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Total Company Performance
Earnings: Our net income decreased by $1.8 billion to $2.0 billion in 2017 compared to 2016. The decrease was primarily driven by:
higher income tax provision due to charges associated with the estimated impacts of the Tax Act;
higher provision for credit losses primarily driven by higher charge-offs in our domestic credit card loan portfolio;
higher operating expenses as a result of (i) loan growth; (ii) continued investments in technology and infrastructure; and (iii) restructuring activities, which primarily consisted of severance and related benefits pursuant to our ongoing benefit programs, that are the result of exiting certain business activities and locations; and
higher interest expense due to the net effect of higher interest rates, as well as growth and mix changes in our interest-bearing liabilities.
These drivers were partially offset by higher interest income due to growth in our domestic credit card and auto loan portfolios, as well as higher yields as a result of higher interest rates.
Loans Held for Investment:
Period-end loans held for investment increased by $8.9 billion to $254.5 billion as of December 31, 2017 from December 31, 2016 primarily due to growth in our domestic credit card loan portfolio, largely driven by loans obtained in the Cabela’s acquisition, as well as growth in our auto loan portfolio, partially offset by run-off of our acquired home loan portfolio.
Average loans held for investment increased by $12.3 billion to $245.6 billion in 2017 compared to 2016 primarily driven by growth in our auto, domestic credit card and commercial loan portfolios, partially offset by run-off of our acquired home loan portfolio.
Net Charge-Off and Delinquency Metrics: Our net charge-off rate increased by 50 basis points to 2.67% in 2017 compared to 2016 primarily due to growth and seasoning of recent domestic credit card loan originations.
Our 30+ day delinquency rate increased by 21 basis points to 3.48% as of December 31, 2017 from December 31, 2016 primarily due to:
higher auto delinquency inventories; and
growth and seasoning of recent domestic credit card loan originations.
We provide additional information on our credit quality metrics below under “MD&A—Business Segment Financial Performance” and “MD&A —Credit Risk Profile.”
Allowance for Loan and Lease Losses: Our allowance for loan and lease losses increased by $999 million to $7.5 billion as of December 31, 2017 from December 31, 2016, and the allowance coverage ratio increased by 30 basis points to 2.95% as of December 31, 2017 from December 31, 2016. The increases were primarily driven by:
an allowance build in our domestic credit card loan portfolio primarily due to increasing losses from recent vintages and portfolio seasoning; and
an allowance build in our auto loan portfolio due to higher losses associated with growth.
These drivers were partially offset by an allowance decrease in our commercial loan portfolio primarily driven by charge-offs in our taxi medallion lending portfolio, as well as reduced exposure and improved credit risk ratings in our oil and gas portfolio.

 
 
42
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Business Outlook
We discuss below our current expectations regarding our total company performance and the performance of each of our business segments over the near-term based on market conditions, the regulatory environment and our business strategies as of the time we filed this Report. The statements contained in this section are based on our current expectations regarding our outlook for our financial results and business strategies. Our expectations take into account, and should be read in conjunction with, our expectations regarding economic trends and analysis of our business as discussed in “Part I—Item 1. Business” and “Part II—Item 7. MD&A” of this Report. Certain statements are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Actual results could differ materially from those in our forward-looking statements. Except as otherwise disclosed, forward-looking statements do not reflect:
any change in current dividend or repurchase strategies;
the effect of any acquisitions, divestitures or similar transactions that have not been previously disclosed; or
any changes in laws, regulations or regulatory interpretations, in each case after the date as of which such statements are made.
See “Part I—Item 1. Business—Forward-Looking Statements” in this Report for more information on the forward-looking statements included in this Report and “Part I—Item 1A. Risk Factors” in this Report for factors that could materially influence our results.
Total Company Expectations
We expect that our current trajectory, coupled with the Tax Act, will enable us to accelerate 2018 earnings per share growth, excluding adjusting items and assuming no substantial change in the broader economic or credit cycles.
We expect that a majority of the benefit from the Tax Act will be reflected in our earnings in the near term. Over time, we expect that marketplace dynamics will consume a portion of the benefit through increasing competition, including higher levels of marketing, lower prices and higher wages, and we expect that these market effects will increase over time.
We expect our annual effective income tax rate to be around 19% in 2018, plus or minus a reasonable margin of volatility.
We expect that marketing expense in 2018 will be higher than 2017.
While our efficiency ratio may vary in any given year, over the long term, we believe that we will be able to achieve gradual improvement in our efficiency ratio driven by growth and digital productivity gains.
We believe that our common equity Tier 1 capital ratio on a fully phased-in basis will trend toward the mid-10% range by the end of 2018.
On June 28, 2017, we announced that our Board of Directors authorized the repurchase of up to $1.85 billion of shares of our common stock from the third quarter of 2017 through the end of the second quarter of 2018 as part of the 2017 Stock Repurchase Program. In December 2017, the Board of Directors reduced the authorized repurchases of our common stock to up to $1.0 billion for the remaining 2017 CCAR period, which ends June 30, 2018. The timing and exact amount of any common stock repurchases will depend on various factors, including regulatory approval, market conditions, opportunities for growth, our capital position, the amount of retained earnings and utilizing Rule 10b5-1 programs, and may be suspended at any time. See “MD&A—Capital Management—Dividend Policy and Stock Purchases” for more information.
We continue to be in a strong position to deliver attractive growth and returns, as well as significant capital distribution, subject to regulatory approval and market conditions.
Business Segment Expectations
Credit Card: In our Domestic Card business, we expect that the upward pressure on charge-offs as new loans season and become a larger portion of our overall portfolio will continue to moderate, with a small impact in 2018. As the impact of new loan seasoning moderates, we expect that our delinquency and charge-off rate trends will be driven more by broader industry factors.
Consumer Banking: In our Consumer Banking business, we expect that the charge-off rate in our auto finance business will increase gradually and the growth we have experienced in that business will moderate.

 
 
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Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


CONSOLIDATED RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
The section below provides a comparative discussion of our consolidated financial performance for 2017 and 2016. We provide a discussion of our business segment results in the following section, “MD&A—Business Segment Financial Performance.” You should read this section together with our “MD&A—Executive Summary and Business Outlook,” where we discuss trends and other factors that we expect will affect our future results of operations.
Net Interest Income
Net interest income represents the difference between the interest income, including certain fees, earned on our interest-earning assets and the interest expense on our interest-bearing liabilities. Interest-earning assets include loans, investment securities and other interest-earning assets, while our interest-bearing liabilities include interest-bearing deposits, securitized debt obligations, senior and subordinated notes, and other borrowings. Generally, we include in interest income any past due fees on loans that we deem collectible. Our net interest margin, based on our consolidated results, represents the difference between the yield on our interest-earning assets and the cost of our interest-bearing liabilities, including the notional impact of non-interest-bearing funding. We expect net interest income and our net interest margin to fluctuate based on changes in interest rates and changes in the amount and composition of our interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities.

 
 
44
Capital One Financial Corporation (COF)


Table 1 below presents, for each major category of our interest-earning assets and interest-bearing liabilities, the average outstanding balance, interest income earned or interest expense incurred, and average yield for 2017, 2016 and 2015.
Table 1: Average Balances, Net Interest Income and Net Interest Margin
 
 
Year Ended December 31,
 
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
(Dollars in millions)
 
Average
Balance
 
Interest
Income/
Expense
 
Average Yield/
Rate
 
Average
Balance
 
Interest
Income/
Expense
 
Average Yield/
Rate
 
Average
Balance
 
Interest
Income/
Expense
(2)(3)
 
Average Yield/
Rate
Assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest-earning assets:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Loans:(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Credit card
 
$
103,468

 
$
15,735

 
15.21
%
 
$
96,596

 
$
14,173

 
14.67
%
 
$
86,923

 
$
12,387

 
14.25
%
Consumer banking
 
74,865

 
4,984

 
6.66

 
71,631

 
4,537

 
6.33

 
71,365

 
4,460

 
6.25

Commercial banking(2)
 
68,150

 
2,630

 
3.86

 
66,033