10-Q 1 luv-6302015x10q.htm 2ND QUARTER 2015 FORM 10-Q LUV-6.30.2015-10Q


UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)
þ
QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the quarterly period ended June 30, 2015
 
or
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from ________ to ________
Commission File No. 1-7259
 
 
Southwest Airlines Co.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
TEXAS
74-1563240
(State or other jurisdiction of
(IRS Employer
incorporation or organization)
Identification No.)
P.O. Box 36611
 
Dallas, Texas
75235-1611
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
Registrant's telephone number, including area code:  (214) 792-4000

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes þ  No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes þ  No ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer þ
Accelerated filer ¨
Non-accelerated filer ¨ (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).Yes ¨ No þ

Number of shares of Common Stock outstanding as of the close of business on July 29, 2015: 659,355,545




TABLE OF CONTENTS TO FORM 10-Q





2



SOUTHWEST AIRLINES CO.
FORM 10-Q
PART I – FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Item 1. Financial Statements
Southwest Airlines Co.
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet
(in millions)
(unaudited)
 
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
ASSETS
 
 
 
Current assets:
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
1,772

 
$
1,282

Short-term investments
1,360

 
1,706

Accounts and other receivables
462

 
365

Inventories of parts and supplies, at cost
326

 
342

Deferred income taxes
421

 
477

Prepaid expenses and other current assets
255

 
232

Total current assets
4,596

 
4,404

 
 
 
 
Property and equipment, at cost:
 

 
 

Flight equipment
19,148

 
18,473

Ground property and equipment
2,972

 
2,853

Deposits on flight equipment purchase contracts
658

 
566

Assets constructed for others
745

 
621

 
23,523

 
22,513

Less allowance for depreciation and amortization
8,663

 
8,221

 
14,860

 
14,292

Goodwill
970

 
970

Other assets
649

 
534

 
$
21,075

 
$
20,200

 
 
 
 
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY
 

 
 

Current liabilities:
 

 
 

Accounts payable
$
1,134

 
$
1,203

Accrued liabilities
1,651

 
1,565

Air traffic liability
3,815

 
2,897

Current maturities of long-term debt
276

 
258

Total current liabilities
6,876

 
5,923

 
 
 
 
Long-term debt less current maturities
2,411

 
2,434

Deferred income taxes
3,290

 
3,259

Construction obligation
632

 
554

Other noncurrent liabilities
708

 
1,255

Stockholders' equity:
 

 
 

Common stock
808

 
808

Capital in excess of par value
1,319

 
1,315

Retained earnings
8,387

 
7,416

Accumulated other comprehensive loss
(664
)
 
(738
)
Treasury stock, at cost
(2,692
)
 
(2,026
)
Total stockholders' equity
7,158

 
6,775

 
$
21,075

 
$
20,200

See accompanying notes.

3



Southwest Airlines Co.
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income
(in millions, except per share amounts)
(unaudited)

 
Three months ended June 30,
 
Six months ended June 30,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
OPERATING REVENUES:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Passenger
$
4,852

 
$
4,752

 
$
9,030

 
$
8,685

Freight
46

 
44

 
90

 
84

Other
213

 
215

 
405

 
409

Total operating revenues
5,111

 
5,011

 
9,525

 
9,178

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OPERATING EXPENSES:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Salaries, wages, and benefits
1,607

 
1,406

 
3,026

 
2,680

Fuel and oil
1,005

 
1,425

 
1,882

 
2,739

Maintenance materials and repairs
240

 
236

 
469

 
486

Aircraft rentals
59

 
75

 
119

 
156

Landing fees and other rentals
299

 
295

 
584

 
560

Depreciation and amortization
250

 
228

 
494

 
449

Acquisition and integration
3

 
38

 
26

 
56

Other operating expenses
563

 
533

 
1,060

 
1,061

Total operating expenses
4,026

 
4,236

 
7,660

 
8,187

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OPERATING INCOME
1,085

 
775

 
1,865

 
991

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
OTHER EXPENSES (INCOME):
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Interest expense
29

 
34

 
62

 
66

Capitalized interest
(7
)
 
(6
)
 
(14
)
 
(12
)
Interest income
(2
)
 
(2
)
 
(3
)
 
(3
)
Other (gains) losses, net
88

 
3

 
121

 
(50
)
Total other expenses (income)
108

 
29

 
166

 
1

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES
977

 
746

 
1,699

 
990

PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES
369

 
281

 
638

 
373

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NET INCOME
$
608

 
$
465

 
$
1,061

 
$
617

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NET INCOME PER SHARE, BASIC
$
0.91

 
$
0.67

 
$
1.58

 
$
0.89

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NET INCOME PER SHARE, DILUTED
$
0.90

 
$
0.67

 
$
1.57

 
$
0.88

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
$
686

 
$
588

 
$
1,135

 
$
731

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
WEIGHTED AVERAGE SHARES OUTSTANDING
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Basic
665

 
690

 
670

 
694

Diluted
673

 
698

 
678

 
703

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash dividends declared per common share
$
.075

 
$
.060

 
$
.135

 
$
.100

See accompanying notes.

4



Southwest Airlines Co.
Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows
(in millions)
(unaudited)
 
Three months ended
 
Six months ended
 
June 30,
 
June 30,
 
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
CASH FLOWS FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net income
$
608

 
$
465

 
$
1,061

 
$
617

Adjustments to reconcile net income to cash provided by (used in) operating activities:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Depreciation and amortization
250

 
228

 
494

 
449

Unrealized/realized (gain) loss on fuel derivative instruments
74

 
(7
)
 
85

 
(67
)
Deferred income taxes
23

 
(11
)
 
43

 
81

Changes in certain assets and liabilities:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Accounts and other receivables
41

 
10

 
(90
)
 
(61
)
Other assets
(7
)
 
(21
)
 
6

 
(14
)
Accounts payable and accrued liabilities
(134
)
 
424

 
43

 
448

Air traffic liability
201

 
153

 
918

 
914

Cash collateral received from (provided to) derivative counterparties
(377
)
 
95

 
(394
)
 
106

Other, net
(52
)
 
2

 
(87
)
 
(15
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
627

 
1,338

 
2,079

 
2,458

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CASH FLOWS FROM INVESTING ACTIVITIES:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Capital expenditures
(428
)
 
(481
)
 
(1,001
)
 
(876
)
Assets constructed for others
(22
)
 
(19
)
 
(44
)
 
(31
)
Purchases of short-term investments
(562
)
 
(1,159
)
 
(877
)
 
(1,929
)
Proceeds from sales of short-term and other investments
614

 
803

 
1,223

 
1,622

Other, net
(9
)
 
(1
)
 
(9
)
 
(1
)
Net cash used in investing activities
(407
)
 
(857
)
 
(708
)
 
(1,215
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CASH FLOWS FROM FINANCING ACTIVITIES:
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Proceeds from Employee stock plans
8

 
25

 
21

 
73

Proceeds from termination of interest rate derivative instruments

 

 
12

 

   Reimbursement for assets constructed for others
3

 

 
5

 

Payments of long-term debt and capital lease obligations
(40
)
 
(73
)
 
(92
)
 
(119
)
Payments of cash dividends
(50
)
 
(42
)
 
(131
)
 
(97
)
Repayment of construction obligation
(3
)
 
(2
)
 
(5
)
 
(5
)
Repurchase of common stock
(380
)
 
(240
)
 
(680
)
 
(555
)
Other, net
(11
)
 
(8
)
 
(11
)
 
(13
)
Net cash used in financing activities
(473
)
 
(340
)
 
(881
)
 
(716
)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
NET CHANGE IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
(253
)
 
141

 
490

 
527

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT BEGINNING OF PERIOD
2,025

 
1,741

 
1,282

 
1,355

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS AT END OF PERIOD
$
1,772

 
$
1,882

 
$
1,772

 
$
1,882

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CASH PAYMENTS FOR:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest, net of amount capitalized
$
21

 
$
33

 
$
53

 
$
67

Income taxes
$
455

 
$
12

 
$
566

 
$
12

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
SUPPLEMENTAL DISCLOSURE OF NONCASH TRANSACTIONS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Assets constructed for others
$
37

 
$
19

 
$
80

 
$
31

See accompanying notes.

5



Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)

1.    BASIS OF PRESENTATION

Southwest Airlines Co. (the “Company”) operates Southwest Airlines, a major domestic airline. The unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements include accounts of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiaries, which include AirTran Holdings, LLC, the parent company of AirTran Airways, Inc. (“AirTran Airways”). On May 2, 2011 (the “acquisition date”), the Company acquired all of the outstanding equity of AirTran Holdings, Inc. (“AirTran Holdings”), the former parent company of AirTran Airways. Throughout this Form 10-Q, the Company makes reference to AirTran, which is meant to be inclusive of the following: (i) for periods prior to the acquisition date, AirTran Holdings and its subsidiaries, including, among others, AirTran Airways; and (ii) for periods on and after the acquisition date, AirTran Holdings, LLC, the successor to AirTran Holdings, and its subsidiaries, including among others, AirTran Airways. AirTran's final passenger service was on December 28, 2014. Although the vast majority of integration costs were incurred in periods prior to 2015, the Company continues to incur costs associated with the integration of AirTran, and those costs are included in Acquisition and integration costs in the accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income.

The accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements of the Company and its subsidiaries have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 10 of Regulation S-X. Accordingly, they do not include all of the information and footnotes required by generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“GAAP”) for complete financial statements. The unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for the interim periods ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 include all adjustments which are, in the opinion of management, necessary for a fair presentation of the results for the interim periods. This includes all normal and recurring adjustments and elimination of significant intercompany transactions. Financial results for the Company and airlines in general can be seasonal in nature. In many years, the Company's revenues, as well as its operating income and net income, have been better in its second and third fiscal quarters than in its first and fourth fiscal quarters. Air travel is also significantly impacted by general economic conditions, the amount of disposable income available to consumers, unemployment levels, corporate travel budgets, and other factors beyond the Company's control. These and other factors, such as the price of jet fuel in some periods, the nature of the Company's fuel hedging program, the periodic volatility of commodities used by the Company for hedging jet fuel, and the requirements related to hedge accounting, have created, and may continue to create, significant volatility in the Company's financial results. See Note 3 for further information on fuel and the Company's hedging program. Operating results for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015, are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for future quarters or for the year ended December 31, 2015. For further information, refer to the Consolidated Financial Statements and footnotes thereto included in the Southwest Airlines Co. Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2014.

During fourth quarter 2014, the Company increased the amount of spoilage recorded associated with frequent flyer points sold to business partners as a result of continued monitoring of Rapid Rewards Member ("Member") redemption activity and behavior under its Rapid Rewards program. Based on a sufficient amount of historical data and Member attributes observed since the new program was launched in 2011, the Company developed a predictive statistical model to analyze the amount of spoilage expected. In estimating spoilage, the Company takes into account the Member’s past behavior, as well as several factors that are expected to be indicative of the likelihood of future point redemption. These factors include, but are not limited to, tenure with program, points accrued in the program, and whether or not the Customer has a co-branded credit card. This change in estimate, which was recorded on a prospective basis, effective October 1, 2014, increased Passenger revenues by approximately $41 million for the three months ended June 30, 2015 and $85 million for the six months ended June 30, 2015. After consideration of profitsharing and taxes, the impact of this change to net income was an increase of $22 million, or $0.03 per Basic and Diluted share, for the three months ended June 30, 2015, and $45 million, or $0.07 per Basic and Diluted share, for the six months ended June 30, 2015. The current spoilage rate will also be applied in third quarter 2015; however, the precise revenue impact will not be determinable until the actual number of point redemptions for the period is known. The Company will continue to

6

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


monitor all factors that influence spoilage and Member behavior in order to determine its best estimate of expected spoilage.

Certain prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current presentation. In the Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows for the three and six months ended June 30, 2014, the Company has reclassified $19 million and $31 million, respectively, from Capital expenditures to Assets constructed for others. See Note 7 for further information.

2.    ACCOUNTING CHANGES AND NEW ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

On February 18, 2015, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") and the International Accounting Standards Board issued a final standard that amends the current consolidation guidance. The standard amends both the variable interest entity and voting interest entity consolidation models. The standard is effective for public reporting entities in fiscal periods beginning after December 15, 2015, and early adoption is permitted. Once adopted, the Company will need to assess the potential for entity consolidation under a new consolidation model; however, the Company does not believe this will result in changes to its previous consolidation conclusions. The Company is continuing to evaluate the new guidance and plans to provide additional information about its impact and adoption date of the new standard in the future.

On May 28, 2014, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update ("ASU") No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers. Following the FASB's finalization of a one year deferral of this standard, the ASU is now effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning on or after December 15, 2017, with early adoption permitted for fiscal years, and interim periods within those years, beginning on or after December 15, 2016. As discussed in Note 10, the material modification of the Company's co-branded credit card agreement during third quarter 2015 will require the use of the relative fair value approach for accounting for Rapid Reward point sales, thereby eliminating the use of the residual method of accounting in allocating funds from the sale of frequent flyer points to business partners. Subsequent to this change, the Company believes the most significant impact of this ASU on its accounting will be the elimination of the incremental cost method for frequent flyer accounting, which will require the Company to re-value its liability earned by Customers associated with flight points with a relative fair value approach. The Company is continuing to evaluate the new guidance and plans to provide additional information about its expected financial impact at a future date.

3.    FINANCIAL DERIVATIVE INSTRUMENTS

Fuel contracts
Airline operators are inherently dependent upon energy to operate and, therefore, are impacted by changes in jet fuel prices. Furthermore, jet fuel and oil typically represent one of the largest operating expenses for airlines. The Company endeavors to acquire jet fuel at the lowest possible cost and to reduce volatility in operating expenses through its fuel hedging program. Although the Company may periodically enter into jet fuel derivatives for short-term timeframes, because jet fuel is not widely traded on an organized futures exchange, there are limited opportunities to hedge directly in jet fuel for time horizons longer than approximately 24 months into the future. However, the Company has found that financial derivative instruments in other commodities, such as West Texas Intermediate (“WTI”) crude oil, Brent crude oil, and refined products, such as heating oil and unleaded gasoline, can be useful in decreasing its exposure to jet fuel price volatility. The Company does not purchase or hold any financial derivative instruments for trading or speculative purposes.

The Company has used financial derivative instruments for both short-term and long-term time frames and primarily uses a mixture of purchased call options, collar structures (which include both a purchased call option and a sold put option), call spreads (which include a purchased call option and a sold call option), put spreads (which include a purchased put option and a sold put option), and fixed price swap agreements in its portfolio. Although the use of collar structures and swap agreements can reduce the overall cost of hedging, these instruments carry more risk than purchased call options in that the Company could end up in a liability position when the collar structure or swap agreement settles.

7

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


With the use of purchased call options and call spreads, the Company cannot be in a liability position at settlement, but does not have coverage once market prices fall below the strike price of the purchased call option.

The Company evaluates its hedge volumes strictly from an “economic” standpoint and thus does not consider whether the hedges have qualified or will qualify for hedge accounting. The Company defines its “economic” hedge as the net volume of fuel derivative contracts held, including the impact of positions that have been offset through sold positions, regardless of whether those contracts qualify for hedge accounting. The level at which the Company is economically hedged for a particular period is also dependent on current market prices for that period, as well as the types of derivative instruments held and the strike prices of those instruments. For example, the Company may enter into “out-of-the-money” option contracts (including catastrophic protection), which may not generate intrinsic gains at settlement if market prices do not rise above the option strike price. Therefore, even though the Company may have an “economic” hedge in place for a particular period, that hedge may not produce any hedging gains and may even produce hedging losses depending on market prices, the types of instruments held, and the strike prices of those instruments.

For the three months ended June 30, 2015, the Company had no active "economic" hedge in place for its estimated fuel consumption. However, in periods prior to second quarter, the Company did have hedges in place that were subsequently offset. See the below tables for further information on amounts that had been carried in Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) ("AOCI") related to those prior hedges that were reclassified into earnings during second quarter 2015 upon consumption of the fuel to which those hedges related. As of June 30, 2015, the Company had fuel derivative instruments in place to provide coverage for up to 89 percent of its remaining 2015 estimated fuel consumption, depending on where market prices settle. The following table provides information about the Company’s volume of fuel hedging for the years 2015 through 2018 on an “economic” basis considering current market prices:

 
 
Fuel hedged as of
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2015
 
Derivative underlying commodity type as of
Period (by year)
 
(gallons in millions)
 
June 30, 2015
Remainder of 2015
 
843

(a)
Brent crude oil, Heating oil, and Gulf Coast jet fuel
2016
 
1,672

(a)
Brent crude oil, Heating oil, and Gulf Coast jet fuel
2017
 
790

(a)
WTI crude and Brent crude oil
2018
 

(b)
 
(a) Due to the types of derivatives utilized by the Company and different price levels of those contracts, these volumes represent the maximum economic net hedge in place and may vary significantly as market prices fluctuate.
(b) In response to the precipitous decline in oil and jet fuel prices during the second half of 2014, the Company took action to offset its 2018 fuel derivative portfolio and remains effectively unhedged for 2018 at current price levels. While the Company still holds derivative contracts as of June 30, 2015, that will settle during 2018, the losses associated with those contracts are locked in.
Upon proper qualification, the Company accounts for its fuel derivative instruments as cash flow hedges. Generally, utilizing hedge accounting, all periodic changes in fair value of the derivatives designated as hedges that are considered to be effective are recorded in AOCI until the underlying jet fuel is consumed. See Note 4. The Company’s results are subject to the possibility that periodic changes will not be effective, as defined, or that the derivatives will no longer qualify for hedge accounting. Ineffectiveness results when the change in the fair value of the derivative instrument exceeds the change in the value of the Company’s expected future cash outlay to purchase and consume jet fuel. To the extent that the periodic changes in the fair value of the derivatives are ineffective, the ineffective portion is recorded to Other (gains) losses, net, in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income. Likewise, if a hedge ceases to qualify for hedge accounting, any change in the fair value of derivative instruments since the last reporting period is recorded to Other (gains) losses, net, in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income in the period of the change; however, any amounts previously recorded to AOCI would remain there until such time as the original forecasted transaction occurs, at which time these amounts would be reclassified to Fuel and oil expense. When the Company has sold derivative positions in order to effectively “close” or offset a derivative already held as part of its fuel derivative instrument portfolio, any subsequent changes in fair value of those positions are marked to market through earnings. Likewise, any changes in fair value of those positions that were offset

8

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


by entering into the sold positions and were de-designated as hedges, are concurrently marked to market through earnings. However, any changes in value related to hedges that were deferred as part of AOCI while designated as a hedge would remain until the originally forecasted transaction occurs. In a situation where it becomes probable that a fuel hedged forecasted transaction will not occur, any gains and/or losses that have been recorded to AOCI would be required to be immediately reclassified into earnings. The Company did not have any such situations occur during 2014, or during the six months ended June 30, 2015.

In some situations, an entire commodity type used in hedging may cease to qualify for special hedge accounting treatment. As an example, previously, the Company's routine statistical analysis performed to determine which commodities qualified for special hedge accounting treatment on a prospective basis dictated that WTI crude oil based derivatives no longer qualify for hedge accounting. This was primarily due to the fact that the correlation between WTI crude oil prices and jet fuel prices during recent periods had not been as strong as in the past, and therefore the Company could no longer demonstrate that derivatives based on WTI crude oil prices would result in effective hedges on a prospective basis. As such, the changes in fair value of all of the Company's derivatives based in WTI are recorded directly to Other (gains) losses. The change in fair value of the Company's WTI derivative contracts for the three months ended June 30, 2015, was an increase of $7 million, which resulted in a gain in Other (gains) losses, net, in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income. The change in fair value of the Company's WTI derivative contracts for the six months ended June 30, 2015, was a decrease of $4 million, which resulted in a loss in Other (gains) losses, net, in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income. Any amounts previously recorded to AOCI will remain there until such time as the original forecasted transaction occurs in accordance with hedge accounting requirements. The Company will continue to evaluate whether it can qualify for hedge accounting for WTI derivative contracts in future periods.

All cash flows associated with purchasing and selling fuel derivatives are classified as Other operating cash flows in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows. The following table presents the location of all assets and liabilities associated with the Company’s derivative instruments within the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet:

 
 
 
 
Asset derivatives
 
Liability derivatives
 
 
Balance Sheet
 
Fair value at
 
Fair value at
 
Fair value at
 
Fair value at
(in millions)
 
location
 
6/30/2015
 
12/31/2014
 
6/30/2015
 
12/31/2014
Derivatives designated as hedges*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fuel derivative contracts (gross)
 
Accrued liabilities
 
$
29

 
$

 
$
145

 
$

Fuel derivative contracts (gross)
 
Other noncurrent liabilities
 
38

 

 
381

 
643

Interest rate derivative contracts
 
Other assets
 
1

 
13

 

 

Interest rate derivative contracts
 
Other noncurrent liabilities
 

 

 
54

 
61

Total derivatives designated as hedges
 
$
68

 
$
13

 
$
580

 
$
704

Derivatives not designated as hedges*
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fuel derivative contracts (gross)
 
Accrued liabilities
 
$
408

 
$
1,190

 
$
811

 
$
1,432

Fuel derivative contracts (gross)
 
Other noncurrent liabilities
 
151

 
157

 
317

 
273

Total derivatives not designated as hedges
 
 
 
$
559

 
$
1,347

 
$
1,128

 
$
1,705

Total derivatives
 
 
 
$
627

 
$
1,360

 
$
1,708

 
$
2,409

* Represents the position of each trade before consideration of offsetting positions with each counterparty and does not include the impact of cash collateral deposits provided to or received from counterparties. See discussion of credit risk and collateral following in this Note.


9

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


In addition, the Company had the following amounts associated with fuel derivative instruments and hedging activities in its unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet:

 
 
Balance Sheet
 
June 30,
 
December 31,
(in millions)
 
location
 
2015
 
2014
Cash collateral deposits provided to counterparties for fuel
  contracts - current
 
Offset against Accrued liabilities
 
$
202

 
$
68

Cash collateral deposits provided to counterparties for fuel
contracts - noncurrent
 
Offset against Other noncurrent liabilities
 
458

 
198

Due to third parties for fuel contracts
 
Accounts payable
 

 
16

 
All of the Company's fuel derivative instruments and interest rate swaps are subject to agreements that follow the netting guidance in the applicable accounting standards for derivatives and hedging. The types of derivative instruments the Company has determined are subject to netting requirements in the accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet are those in which the Company pays or receives cash for transactions with the same counterparty and in the same currency via one net payment or receipt. For cash collateral held by the Company or provided to counterparties, the Company nets such amounts against the fair value of the Company's derivative portfolio by each counterparty. The Company has elected to utilize netting for both its fuel derivative instruments and interest rate swap agreements and also classifies such amounts as either current or noncurrent, based on the net fair value position with each of the Company's counterparties in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.

The Company's application of its netting policy associated with cash collateral differs depending on whether its derivative instruments are in a net asset position or a net liability position. If its fuel derivative instruments are in a net asset position with a counterparty, cash collateral amounts held are first netted against current outstanding derivative amounts associated with that counterparty until that balance is zero, and then any remainder is applied against the fair value of noncurrent outstanding derivative instruments. If the Company's fuel derivative instruments are in a net liability position with the counterparty, cash collateral amounts provided are first netted against noncurrent outstanding derivative amounts associated with that counterparty until that balance is zero, and then any remainder is applied against the fair value of current outstanding derivative instruments.

The Company has the following recognized financial assets and financial liabilities resulting from those transactions that meet the scope of the disclosure requirements as necessitated by applicable accounting guidance for balance sheet offsetting:
Offsetting of derivative assets
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
(i)
 
(ii)
 
(iii) = (i) + (ii)
 
(i)
 
(ii)
 
(iii) = (i) + (ii)
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Description
 
Balance Sheet location
 
Gross amounts of recognized assets
 
Gross amounts offset in the Balance Sheet
 
Net amounts of assets presented in the Balance Sheet (a)
 
Gross amounts of recognized assets
 
Gross amounts offset in the Balance Sheet
 
Net amounts of assets presented in the Balance Sheet (a)
Fuel derivative contracts
 
Accrued liabilities
 
$
639

 
$
(639
)
 
$

 
$
1,258

 
$
(1,258
)
 
$

Fuel derivative contracts
 
Other noncurrent liabilities
 
$
647

 
$
(647
)
 
$

 
$
355

 
$
(355
)
 
$

Interest rate derivative contracts
 
Other assets
 
$
1

 
$

 
$
1

 
$
13

 
$

 
$
13



10

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


Offsetting of derivative liabilities
(in millions)
 
 
 
 
(i)
 
(ii)
 
(iii) = (i) + (ii)
 
(i)
 
(ii)
 
(iii) = (i) + (ii)
 
 
 
 
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Description
 
Balance Sheet location
 
Gross amounts of recognized liabilities
 
Gross amounts offset in the Balance Sheet
 
Net amounts of liabilities presented in the Balance Sheet (a)
 
Gross amounts of recognized liabilities
 
Gross amounts offset in the Balance Sheet
 
Net amounts of liabilities presented in the Balance Sheet (a)
Fuel derivative contracts
 
Accrued liabilities
 
$
956

 
$
(639
)
 
$
317

 
$
1,432

 
$
(1,258
)
 
$
174

Fuel derivative contracts
 
Other noncurrent liabilities
 
$
698

 
$
(647
)
 
$
51

 
$
916

 
$
(355
)
 
$
561

Interest rate derivative contracts
 
Other noncurrent liabilities
 
$
54

 
$

 
$
54

 
$
61

 
$

 
$
61

(a) The net amounts of derivative assets and liabilities are reconciled to the individual line item amounts presented in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet in Note 5.


11

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


The following tables present the impact of derivative instruments and their location within the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014:

Derivatives in cash flow hedging relationships
 
(Gain) loss recognized in AOCI on derivatives (effective portion)
 
(Gain) loss reclassified from AOCI into income (effective portion) (a)
 
(Gain) loss recognized in income on derivatives (ineffective portion) (b)
 
Three months ended
 
Three months ended
 
Three months ended
 
June 30,
 
June 30,
 
June 30,
(in millions)
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
Fuel derivative contracts
$
(33
)
*
$
(122
)
*
$
41

*
$
(1
)
*
$
(2
)
 
$
(28
)
Interest rate derivatives
(1
)
*
3

*
3

*
3

*
(1
)
 

Total
$
(34
)
 
$
(119
)
 
$
44

 
$
2

 
$
(3
)
 
$
(28
)
*Net of tax
(a) Amounts related to fuel derivative contracts and interest rate derivatives are included in Fuel and oil and Interest expense, respectively.
(b) Amounts are included in Other (gains) losses, net.

Derivatives in cash flow hedging relationships
 
(Gain) loss recognized in AOCI on derivatives (effective portion)
 
(Gain) loss reclassified from AOCI into income (effective portion)(a)
 
(Gain) loss recognized in income on derivatives (ineffective portion)(b)
 
Six months ended
 
Six months ended
 
Six months ended
 
June 30,
 
June 30,
 
June 30,
(in millions)
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
 
2015
 
2014
Fuel derivative contracts
$
16

*
$
(110
)
*
$
87

*
$
(1
)
*
$
(15
)
 
$
(41
)
Interest rate derivatives
3

*
5

*
6

*
7

*
(2
)
 
(1
)
Total
$
19

 
$
(105
)
 
$
93

 
$
6

 
$
(17
)
 
$
(42
)
*Net of tax
(a) Amounts related to fuel derivative contracts and interest rate derivatives are included in Fuel and oil and Interest expense, respectively.
(b) Amounts are included in Other (gains) losses, net.

Derivatives not in cash flow hedging relationships
 
(Gain) loss
 
 
 
recognized in income on
 
 
 
derivatives
 
 
 
Three months ended
 
Location of (gain) loss
 
June 30,
 
recognized in income
(in millions)
2015
 
2014
 
on derivatives
Fuel derivative contracts
$
71

 
$
16

 
Other (gains) losses, net


12

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


Derivatives not in cash flow hedging relationships
 
(Gain) loss
 
 
 
recognized in income on
 
 
 
derivatives
 
 
 
Six months ended
 
Location of (gain) loss
 
June 30,
 
recognized in income
(in millions)
2015
 
2014
 
on derivatives
Fuel derivative contracts
$
91

 
$
(40
)
 
Other (gains) losses, net

The Company also recorded expense associated with premiums paid for fuel derivative contracts that settled/expired during the three months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 of $22 million and $17 million, respectively, and the six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014 of $48 million and $34 million, respectively. These amounts are excluded from the Company’s measurement of effectiveness for related hedges and are included as a component of Other (gains) losses, net, in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income.

The fair values of the derivative instruments, depending on the type of instrument, were determined by the use of present value methods or option value models with assumptions about commodity prices based on those observed in underlying markets or provided by third parties. Included in the Company’s cumulative net unrealized losses from fuel hedges as of June 30, 2015, recorded in AOCI, were approximately $323 million in unrealized losses, net of taxes, which are expected to be realized in earnings during the twelve months subsequent to June 30, 2015.

Interest rate swaps
The Company is party to certain interest rate swap agreements that are accounted for as either fair value hedges or cash flow hedges, as defined in the applicable accounting guidance for derivative instruments and hedging. Two of the Company's interest rate swap agreements qualify for the “shortcut” method of accounting for hedges, which dictates that the hedges are assumed to be perfectly effective, and, thus, there is no ineffectiveness to be recorded in earnings. For the Company’s interest rate swap agreements that do not qualify for the "shortcut" method of accounting, ineffectiveness is required to be measured at each reporting period. The ineffectiveness associated with all of the Company’s, including AirTran’s, interest rate hedges for all periods presented was not material.

In February 2015, the Company terminated the fixed-to-floating interest rate swap agreements related to its $300 million 5.75% unsecured notes due 2016. The effect of this termination is such that the interest associated with the debt prospectively reverts back to its original fixed rate. As a result of the approximate $12 million gain realized on this transaction, which will be amortized over the remaining term of the corresponding unsecured notes, and based on projected interest rates at the date of termination, the Company does not believe its future interest expense associated with these unsecured notes will significantly differ from the expense it would have recorded had the unsecured notes remained at floating rates.

Credit risk and collateral
Credit exposure related to fuel derivative instruments is represented by the fair value of contracts that are an asset to the Company at the reporting date. At such times, these outstanding instruments expose the Company to credit loss in the event of nonperformance by the counterparties to the agreements. However, the Company has not experienced any significant credit loss as a result of counterparty nonperformance in the past. To manage credit risk, the Company selects and periodically reviews counterparties based on credit ratings, limits its exposure with respect to each counterparty, and monitors the market position of the fuel hedging program and its relative market position with each counterparty. At June 30, 2015, the Company had agreements with all of its active counterparties containing early termination rights and/or bilateral collateral provisions whereby security is required if market risk exposure exceeds a specified threshold amount based on the counterparty credit rating. The Company also had agreements with counterparties in which cash deposits, letters of credit, and/or pledged aircraft are required to be posted as collateral whenever the net fair value of derivatives associated with those counterparties exceeds specific thresholds. The

13

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


following table provides the fair values of fuel derivatives, amounts posted as collateral, and applicable collateral posting threshold amounts as of June 30, 2015, at which such postings are triggered:

 
Counterparty (CP)
 
 
(in millions)
A
 
B
 
C
 
D
 
E
 
F
 
Other (a)
 
Total
Fair value of fuel derivatives
$
(536
)
 
$
(112
)
 
$
(104
)
 
$
(178
)
 
$
(32
)
 
$
(45
)
 
$
(21
)
 
$
(1,028
)
Cash collateral held (by) CP
(469
)
 
(71
)
 
(8
)
 
(112
)
 

 

 

 
(660
)
Aircraft collateral pledged to CP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Letters of credit (LC)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Option to substitute LC for aircraft
<(400)(h)
 
(100) to (500)(d)
 
N/A
 
(150) to (550)(d)
 
N/A
 
N/A
 
 
 
 
Option to substitute LC for cash
N/A
 
>(500)
 
(100) to (150)(e)
 
(75) to (150) or >(550)(d)
 
N/A
 
(g)
 
 
 
 
If credit rating is investment
grade, fair value of fuel
derivative level at which:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash is provided to CP
(50) to (200) or >(600)
 
(50) to (100) or >(500)
 
>(95)
 
(75) to (150) or >(550)
 
>(65)
 
>(50)
 
 
 
 
Cash is received from CP
>50
 
>150
 
>175(c)
 
>200
 
>30
 
>50
 
 
 
 
Aircraft or cash can be pledged to
  CP as collateral
(200) to (600)(f)
 
(100) to (500)(d)
 
N/A
 
(150) to (550)(d)
 
N/A
 
N/A
 
 
 
 
If credit rating is non-investment
grade, fair value of fuel derivative level at which:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash is provided to CP
(0) to (200) or >(600)
 
(0) to (100) or >(500)
 
(b)
 
(0) to (150) or >(550)
 
(b)
 
(b)
 
 
 
 
Cash is received from CP
(b)
 
(b)
 
(b)
 
(b)
 
(b)
 
(b)
 
 
 
 
Aircraft or cash can be pledged to
  CP as collateral
(200) to (600)
 
(100) to (500)
 
N/A
 
(150) to (550)
 
N/A
 
N/A
 
 
 
 
(a) Individual counterparties with fair value of fuel derivatives <$10 million.
(b) Cash collateral is provided at 100 percent of fair value of fuel derivative contracts.
(c) Thresholds may vary based on changes in credit ratings within investment grade.
(d) The Company has the option of providing cash, letters of credit, or pledging aircraft as collateral.
(e) The Company has the option of providing cash or letters of credit as collateral.
(f) The Company has the option of providing cash or pledging aircraft as collateral.
(g) The Company has the option to substitute letters of credit for 100 percent of cash collateral requirement.
(h) The Company has the option of providing letters of credit in addition to aircraft collateral if the appraised value of the aircraft does not meet the collateral requirements.


14

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


4.    COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

Comprehensive income includes changes in the fair value of certain financial derivative instruments that qualify for hedge accounting, unrealized gains and losses on certain investments, and actuarial gains/losses arising from the Company’s postretirement benefit obligation. The differences between Net income and Comprehensive income for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015 and 2014, were as follows:

 
Three months ended June 30,
(in millions)
2015
 
2014
NET INCOME
$
608

 
$
465

Unrealized gain on fuel derivative instruments, net of
  deferred taxes of $44 and $72
74

 
121

Unrealized gain on interest rate derivative instruments, net of
  deferred taxes of $2 and $-
4

 

Other, net of deferred taxes of $- and $1

 
2

Total other comprehensive income
$
78

 
$
123

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
$
686

 
$
588


 
Six months ended June 30,
(in millions)
2015
 
2014
NET INCOME
$
1,061

 
$
617

Unrealized gain on fuel derivative instruments, net of
  deferred taxes of $43 and $64
71

 
109

Unrealized gain on interest rate derivative instruments, net of
  deferred taxes of $2 and $1
3

 
2

Other, net of deferred taxes of $- and $3

 
3

Total other comprehensive income
$
74

 
$
114

COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
$
1,135

 
$
731


A rollforward of the amounts included in AOCI, net of taxes, is shown below for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015:
(in millions)
Fuel derivatives
 
Interest rate derivatives
 
Defined benefit plan items
 
Other
 
Deferred tax
 
Accumulated other
comprehensive income (loss)
Balance at March 31, 2015
$
(1,181
)
 
$
(46
)
 
$
41

 
$
8

 
$
436

 
$
(742
)
Changes in fair value
53

 
1

 

 

 
(20
)
 
34

Reclassification to earnings
65

 
5

 

 

 
(26
)
 
44

Balance at June 30, 2015
$
(1,063
)
 
$
(40
)
 
$
41

 
$
8

 
$
390

 
$
(664
)

(in millions)
Fuel derivatives
 
Interest rate derivatives
 
Defined benefit plan items
 
Other
 
Deferred tax
 
Accumulated other
comprehensive income (loss)
Balance at December 31, 2014
$
(1,177
)
 
$
(45
)
 
$
41

 
$
8

 
$
435

 
$
(738
)
Changes in fair value
(24
)
 
(5
)
 

 

 
10

 
(19
)
Reclassification to earnings
138

 
10

 

 

 
(55
)
 
93

Balance at June 30, 2015
$
(1,063
)
 
$
(40
)
 
$
41

 
$
8

 
$
390

 
$
(664
)


15

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


The following tables illustrate the significant amounts reclassified out of each component of AOCI for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015:

Three months ended June 30, 2015
(in millions)
 
Amounts reclassified from AOCI
 
Affected line item in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income
AOCI components
 
 
Unrealized gain on fuel derivative instruments
 
$
65

 
Fuel and oil expense
 
 
24

 
Less: Tax Expense
 
 
$
41

 
Net of tax
Unrealized gain on interest rate derivative instruments
 
$
5

 
Interest expense
 
 
2

 
Less: Tax Expense
 
 
$
3

 
Net of tax
 
 
 
 
 
Total reclassifications for the period
 
$
44

 
Net of tax

Six months ended June 30, 2015
(in millions)
 
Amounts reclassified from AOCI
 
Affected line item in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income
AOCI components
 
 
Unrealized gain on fuel derivative instruments
 
$
138

 
Fuel and oil expense
 
 
51

 
Less: Tax Expense
 
 
$
87

 
Net of tax
Unrealized gain on interest rate derivative instruments
 
$
10

 
Interest expense
 
 
4

 
Less: Tax Expense
 
 
$
6

 
Net of tax
 
 
 
 
 
Total reclassifications for the period
 
$
93

 
Net of tax

5.    SUPPLEMENTAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Other assets (in millions)
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Derivative contracts
$
1

 
$
13

Intangible assets (a)
474

 
363

Non-current investments
40

 
35

Other
134

 
123

Other assets
$
649

 
$
534

(a) Intangible assets primarily consist of acquired leasehold rights to certain airport owned gates at Chicago’s Midway International Airport, takeoff and landing slots (a “slot” is the right of an air carrier, pursuant to regulations of the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”), to operate a takeoff or landing at a specific time at certain airports) at certain domestic slot-controlled airports, and certain intangible assets recognized from the AirTran acquisition. The increase in Intangible assets during 2015 was primarily due to the acquisition of two additional airport gate rights at Dallas Love Field, which were subleased from United Airlines. The purchase price paid for these airport gate rights was included as a component of Capital expenditures in the accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows.

16

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


Accounts payable (in millions)
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Accounts payable trade
$
170

 
$
123

Salaries payable
168

 
160

Excise and other tax withholdings payable
234

 
163

Aircraft maintenance payable
163

 
314

Fuel payable
68

 
85

Other payables
331

 
358

Accounts payable
$
1,134

 
$
1,203


Accrued liabilities (in millions)
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Profitsharing and savings plans
$
319

 
$
374

Aircraft and other lease related obligations
93

 
159

Vacation pay
302

 
292

Health
71

 
84

Derivative contracts
317

 
174

Workers compensation
170

 
165

Property and income taxes
121

 
81

Other
258

 
236

Accrued liabilities
$
1,651

 
$
1,565


Other noncurrent liabilities (in millions)
June 30, 2015
 
December 31, 2014
Postretirement obligation
$
176

 
$
169

Non-current lease-related obligations
174

 
193

Other deferred compensation
172

 
174

Deferred gains from sale and leaseback of aircraft
48

 
53

Derivative contracts
105

 
622

Other
33

 
44

Other noncurrent liabilities
$
708

 
$
1,255


For further details on fuel derivative and interest rate derivative contracts, see Note 3.

Other Operating Expenses
Other operating expenses consist of distribution costs, advertising expenses, personnel expenses, professional fees, and other operating costs, none of which individually exceed 10 percent of Operating expenses.

6.    LEASES

On July 9, 2012, the Company signed an agreement with Delta Air Lines, Inc. and Boeing Capital Corp. to lease or sublease all 88 of AirTran's Boeing 717-200 aircraft (“B717s”) to Delta at agreed-upon lease rates. The first converted B717 was delivered to Delta in September 2013, and as of June 30, 2015, the Company had delivered a total of 71 B717s to Delta. As the Company has previously disclosed, all B717s remaining at the Company were grounded on December 28, 2014. A portion of the B717 fleet that will not be delivered to Delta until the second half of 2015 has been placed in storage until each aircraft is ready to be converted. A total of 76 of the B717s are on operating lease, ten are owned, and two are on capital lease.

The Company has paid and will continue to pay the majority of the costs to convert the aircraft to the Delta livery and perform certain maintenance checks prior to the delivery of each aircraft. The agreement to pay these conversion and maintenance costs for the leased aircraft is a “lease incentive” under applicable accounting guidance. The sublease

17

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


terms for the 76 B717s on operating lease and the two B717s on capital lease coincide with the Company's remaining lease terms for these aircraft from the original lessor, which range from approximately three to nine years. The leasing of the ten B717s owned by the Company is subject to certain conditions, and the lease terms are for up to seven years, after which Delta has the option to purchase the aircraft at the then-prevailing market value. The Company accounts for the lease and sublease transactions with Delta as operating leases, sales type leases, and direct financing leases. The ten owned B717s will be accounted for as sales type leases, the two B717s classified by the Company as capital leases will be accounted for as direct financing leases, and the remaining 76 subleases will be accounted for as operating leases. With respect to the 71 B717s delivered to Delta as of June 30, 2015, the Company had 68 operating leases, one sales type lease, and two direct financing leases. There are no contingent payments and no significant residual value conditions associated with the transaction.

The accounting for this transaction is based on the guidance provided for lease transactions. For the components of this transaction finalized in third quarter 2012 and with respect to which the lease inception has been deemed to occur, the Company recorded a charge of approximately $137 million during third quarter 2012. The charge represented the remaining estimated cost, at the scheduled date of delivery of each B717 to Delta (including the conversion, maintenance, and other contractual costs to be incurred), of the Company's lease of the 76 B717s that are accounted for as operating leases, net of the future sublease income from Delta and the remaining unfavorable aircraft lease liability established as of the acquisition date. The charges recorded by the Company for this transaction were included as a component of Acquisition and integration costs in the Company's unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Comprehensive Income and were included as a component of Other, net in Cash flows from operating activities in the Company's unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows, and the corresponding liability for this transaction is included as a component of Current liabilities in the Company's unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. A rollforward of the Company's B717 lease/sublease liability for 2015 and 2014 is shown below:

(in millions)
 
B717 lease/sublease liability
Balance at December 31, 2013
 
$
122

Lease/sublease accretion
 
5

Lease/sublease expense adjustment
 
22

Lease/sublease payments, net (a)
 
(86
)
Balance at December 31, 2014
 
$
63

Lease/sublease accretion
 
1

Lease/sublease expense adjustment
 
4

Lease/sublease payments, net (a)
 
(39
)
Balance at June 30, 2015
 
$
29

(a) Includes lease conversion cost payments

7.    COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport
In December 2013, the Company entered into an agreement with Broward County, Florida, which owns and operates Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, to oversee and manage the design and construction of the airport's Terminal 1 Modernization Project at a cost not to exceed $295 million. In addition to significant improvements to the existing Terminal 1, the project includes the design and construction of a new five-gate Concourse A with an international processing facility. Funding for the project will come directly from Broward County sources, but will flow through the Company in its capacity as manager of the project. Major construction on the project is expected to begin in third quarter 2015. The Company believes that due to its agreed upon role in overseeing and managing the project, it will be considered the owner of the project for accounting purposes. As such, during construction the Company records expenditures as Assets constructed for others in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet, along with a corresponding outflow within Assets constructed for others in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows, and an increase to Construction obligation (with a corresponding cash inflow from Financing activities in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows) as reimbursements are received from Broward

18

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


County.
Houston William P. Hobby Airport
The Company entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (“MOA”) with the City of Houston (“City”), effective June 2012, to expand the existing Houston Hobby airport facility. As provided in the MOA, the Company and the City have entered into an Airport Use and Lease Agreement (“Lease”) to control the execution of this expansion and the financial terms thereof. Per the MOA and Lease, this project provides for a new five-gate international terminal with international passenger processing facilities, expansion of the existing security checkpoint, and upgrades to the Southwest Airlines ticket counter area. The project is estimated to cost $156 million, and the Company has agreed to provide the funding for, as well as management over, the project. In return, the capital cost portion of the rent the Company pays for the international facility will be waived from the initial occupancy until the expiration of the Lease. However, after completion of the project, the City has the option to buy out the Company's investment at the then-unamortized cost of the facility. This purchase would trigger payment of the previously waived capital cost component of rents owed the City. Additionally, some portion of the project is expected to qualify for rental credits that would be utilized upon completion of the facility against the Company’s lease payments at the airport. Construction began during third quarter 2013 and is estimated to be completed during fourth quarter 2015.

As a result of its significant involvement in the Houston Hobby project, the Company has evaluated its ongoing accounting requirements in consideration of accounting guidance provided for lessees involved in asset construction, and has determined that it is the owner of the facility for accounting purposes during the construction period. As such, during construction, the Company records expenditures as Assets constructed for others in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet, along with a corresponding outflow within Assets constructed for others, in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows. As of June 30, 2015, the Company had recorded construction costs related to Houston Hobby of $106 million.

Los Angeles International Airport
In March 2013, the Company executed a lease agreement with Los Angeles World Airports (“LAWA”), which owns and operates Los Angeles International Airport. Under the lease agreement, which was amended in June 2014, the Company is overseeing and managing the design, development, financing, construction and commissioning of the airport's Terminal 1 Modernization Project (the “Project”) at a cost not to exceed $526 million. The Project is being funded primarily using the Regional Airports Improvement Corporation ("RAIC"), which is a quasi-governmental special purpose entity that acts as a conduit borrower under a syndicated credit facility provided by a group of lenders. Loans made under the credit facility are being used to fund the development of the Project, and the outstanding loans will be repaid with the proceeds of LAWA’s payments to purchase completed Project phases. The Company has guaranteed the obligations of the RAIC under the credit facility. Construction on the Project began during 2014. The Company believes that due to its agreed upon role in overseeing and managing the Project, it is considered the owner of the Project for accounting purposes. LAWA will reimburse the Company for the non-proprietary renovations, while the Company will not be reimbursed for proprietary renovations. As a result, all of the costs incurred to fund the Project are included within Assets constructed for others and all amounts that have been or will be reimbursed will be included within Construction obligation on the accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. As of June 30, 2015, the Company had recorded construction costs related to the Project of $110 million, which were classified and included in Assets constructed for others and as Construction obligation in the accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.
Dallas Love Field
During 2008, the City of Dallas approved the Love Field Modernization Program (“LFMP”), a project to reconstruct Dallas Love Field with modern, convenient air travel facilities. Pursuant to a Program Development Agreement with the City of Dallas and the Love Field Airport Modernization Corporation (or “LFAMC,” a Texas non-profit “local government corporation” established by the City of Dallas to act on the City of Dallas' behalf to facilitate the development of the LFMP), the Company managed this project. Major construction commenced during 2010, and the project was effectively completed by December 31, 2014. The project consists of the complete replacement of gate facilities with a new 20-gate facility, including infrastructure, systems and equipment, aircraft parking apron, fueling system, roadways and terminal curbside, baggage handling systems, passenger loading bridges and support systems, and other supporting

19

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


infrastructure. New ticketing and check-in areas opened during fourth quarter 2012, 12 new gates and new concessions opened in 2013, and the remaining gates opened during October 2014.

Although the City of Dallas has received commitments from various sources that are helping to fund portions of the LFMP project, including the FAA, the Transportation Security Administration, and the City of Dallas' Aviation Fund, the majority of the funds used are from the issuance of bonds. During fourth quarter 2010, $310 million of such bonds were issued by the LFAMC, and the Company has guaranteed principal and interest payments on the bonds. An additional tranche of such bonds totaling $146 million was issued during second quarter 2012, and the Company has guaranteed the principal and interest payments on these bonds as well. The Company currently expects that as a result of the funding commitments from the above mentioned sources and the bonds that have been issued thus far, no further bond issuances and related guarantees from the Company will be required to complete the LFMP project.

In conjunction with the Company's significant presence at Dallas Love Field and other factors, the Company agreed to manage the LFMP project. Based on these facts, the Company has evaluated its ongoing accounting requirements in consideration of accounting guidance provided for lessees involved in asset construction. The Company has recorded and will continue to record an asset and corresponding obligation for the cost of the LFMP project as the construction of the facility occurs. As of June 30, 2015, the Company had recorded LFMP gross construction costs, including capitalized interest, of $521 million within Assets constructed for others and had recorded a net liability of $515 million within Construction obligation in its unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. Upon completion of different phases of the LFMP project, the Company has placed the associated assets in service and has begun depreciating the assets over their estimated useful lives. In addition, upon the effective completion of construction, the Company noted the project assets did not meet the qualifications for sale and leaseback accounting due to the Company's continuing involvement with the facility, as defined; therefore, for financial reporting purposes, these assets will remain on the Company's books until the bonds issued by the City of Dallas are repaid. The corresponding LFMP liabilities will be reduced primarily through the Company's airport rental payments to the City of Dallas as the construction costs of the project are passed through to the Company via recurring airport rates and charges. These payments are reflected as Repayment of construction obligation in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statement of Cash Flows.

Contingencies
The Company is from time to time subject to various legal proceedings and claims arising in the ordinary course of business, including, but not limited to, examinations by the IRS. The Company's management does not expect that the outcome in any of its currently ongoing legal proceedings or the outcome of any adjustments presented by the IRS, individually or collectively, will have a material adverse effect on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, or cash flow.


8.    FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

Accounting standards pertaining to fair value measurements establish a three-tier fair value hierarchy, which prioritizes the inputs used in measuring fair value. These tiers include: Level 1, defined as observable inputs such as quoted prices in active markets; Level 2, defined as inputs other than quoted prices in active markets that are either directly or indirectly observable; and Level 3, defined as unobservable inputs in which little or no market data exists, therefore requiring an entity to develop its own assumptions.

As of June 30, 2015, the Company held certain items that are required to be measured at fair value on a recurring basis. These included cash equivalents, short-term investments (primarily treasury bills and certificates of deposit), certain noncurrent investments, interest rate derivative contracts, fuel derivative contracts, and available-for-sale securities. The majority of the Company’s short-term investments consist of instruments classified as Level 1. However, the Company has certificates of deposit and Eurodollar time deposits that are classified as Level 2, due to the fact that the fair value for these instruments is determined utilizing observable inputs in non-active markets. Noncurrent investments consist of certain auction rate securities, primarily those collateralized by student loan portfolios, which are guaranteed

20

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


by the U.S. Government. Other available-for-sale securities primarily consist of investments associated with the Company’s excess benefit plan.

The Company’s fuel and interest rate derivative instruments consist of over-the-counter contracts, which are not traded on a public exchange. Fuel derivative instruments include swaps, as well as different types of option contracts, whereas interest rate derivatives consist solely of swap agreements. See Note 3 for further information on the Company’s derivative instruments and hedging activities. The fair values of swap contracts are determined based on inputs that are readily available in public markets or can be derived from information available in publicly quoted markets. Therefore, the Company has categorized these swap contracts as Level 2. The Company’s Treasury Department, which reports to the Chief Financial Officer, determines the value of option contracts utilizing an option pricing model based on inputs that are either readily available in public markets, can be derived from information available in publicly quoted markets, or are provided by financial institutions that trade these contracts. The option pricing model used by the Company is an industry standard model for valuing options and is the same model used by the broker/dealer community (i.e., the Company’s counterparties). The inputs to this option pricing model are the option strike price, underlying price, risk free rate of interest, time to expiration, and volatility. Because certain inputs used to determine the fair value of option contracts are unobservable (principally implied volatility), the Company has categorized these option contracts as Level 3. Volatility information is obtained from external sources, but is analyzed by the Company for reasonableness and compared to similar information received from other external sources. The fair value of option contracts considers both the intrinsic value and any remaining time value associated with those derivatives that have not yet settled. The Company also considers counterparty credit risk and its own credit risk in its determination of all estimated fair values. To validate the reasonableness of the Company’s option pricing model, on a monthly basis, the Company compares its option valuations to third party valuations. If any significant differences were to be noted, they would be researched in order to determine the reason. However, historically, no significant differences have been noted. The Company has consistently applied these valuation techniques in all periods presented and believes it has obtained the most accurate information available for the types of derivative contracts it holds.

Included in Other available-for-sale securities are the Company’s investments associated with its excess benefit plan which consist of investment funds for which market prices are readily available. This plan is a non-qualified deferred compensation plan designed to hold Employee contributions in excess of limits established by Section 415 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Payments under this plan are made based on the participant’s distribution election and plan balance. Assets related to the funded portion of the deferred compensation plan are held in a rabbi trust, and the Company remains liable to these participants for the unfunded portion of the plan. The Company records changes in the fair value of the asset in the Company’s earnings.

All of the Company’s auction rate security instruments, totaling $27 million (net) at June 30, 2015, are classified as available-for-sale securities and are reflected at their estimated fair value in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet. The Company’s Treasury Department determines the estimated fair values of these securities utilizing a discounted cash flow analysis. The Company has performed, and routinely updates, a valuation for each of its auction rate security instruments, considering, among other items, the collateralization underlying the security investments, the expected future cash flows, including the final maturity, associated with the securities, estimates of the next time the security is expected to have a successful auction or return to full par value, forecasted reset rates based on the LIBOR or the issuer’s net loan rate, and a counterparty credit spread. To validate the reasonableness of the Company’s discounted cash flow analyses, the Company compares its valuations to third party valuations on a quarterly basis.


21

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


The following tables present the Company’s assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis at June 30, 2015, and December 31, 2014:

 
 
 
 
Fair value measurements at reporting date using:
 
 
 
 
Quoted prices in
active markets
for identical assets
 
Significant
other observable
inputs
 
Significant
unobservable
inputs
Description
 
June 30, 2015
 
(Level 1)
 
(Level 2)
 
(Level 3)
Assets
 
(in millions)
Cash equivalents
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash equivalents (a)
 
$
1,565

 
$
1,565

 
$

 
$

Commercial paper
 
125

 

 
125

 

Certificates of deposit
 
8

 

 
8

 

Eurodollar time deposits
 
74

 

 
74

 

Short-term investments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Treasury bills
 
1,150

 
1,150

 

 

Certificates of deposit
 
210

 

 
210

 

Noncurrent investments (b)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Auction rate securities
 
27

 

 

 
27

Interest rate derivatives
 
1

 

 
1

 

Fuel derivatives:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Swap contracts (c)
 
294

 

 
294

 

Option contracts (c)
 
332

 

 

 
332

Other available-for-sale securities
 
67

 
67

 

 

Total assets
 
$
3,853

 
$
2,782

 
$
712

 
$
359

Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fuel derivatives:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Swap contracts (c)
 
$
(267
)
 
$

 
$
(267
)
 
$

Option contracts (c)
 
(1,387
)
 

 

 
(1,387
)
Interest rate derivatives
 
(54
)
 

 
(54
)
 

Total liabilities
 
$
(1,708
)
 
$

 
$
(321
)
 
$
(1,387
)
(a) Cash equivalents are primarily composed of money market investments.
(b) Noncurrent investments are included in Other assets in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.
(c) In the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet amounts are presented as a net liability.


22

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


 
 
 
 
Fair value measurements at reporting date using:
 
 
 
 
Quoted prices in
active markets
for identical assets
 
Significant
other observable
inputs
 
Significant
unobservable
inputs
Description
 
December 31, 2014
 
(Level 1)
 
(Level 2)
 
(Level 3)
Assets
 
(in millions)
Cash equivalents
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash equivalents (a)
 
$
1,110

 
$
1,110

 
$

 
$

Commercial paper
 
70

 

 
70

 

Certificates of deposit
 
4

 

 
4

 

Eurodollar time deposits
 
98

 

 
98

 

Short-term investments:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Treasury bills
 
1,450

 
1,450

 

 

Certificates of deposit
 
256

 

 
256

 

Noncurrent investments (b)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Auction rate securities
 
27

 

 

 
27

Interest rate derivatives
 
13

 

 
13

 

Fuel derivatives:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Swap contracts (c)
 
455

 

 
455

 

Option contracts (c)
 
892

 

 

 
892

Other available-for-sale securities
 
68

 
63

 

 
5

Total assets
 
$
4,443

 
$
2,623

 
$
896

 
$
924

Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fuel derivatives:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Swap contracts (c)
 
$
(365
)
 
$

 
$
(365
)
 
$

Option contracts (c)
 
(1,983
)
 

 

 
(1,983
)
Interest rate derivatives
 
(61
)
 

 
(61
)
 

Total liabilities
 
$
(2,409
)
 
$

 
$
(426
)
 
$
(1,983
)
(a) Cash equivalents are primarily composed of money market investments.
(b) Noncurrent investments are included in Other assets in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.
(c) In the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet amounts are presented as a net liability.


23

Southwest Airlines Co.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
(unaudited)


The Company had no transfers of assets or liabilities between any of the above levels during the six months ended June 30, 2015, or the year ended December 31, 2014. The following tables present the Company’s activity for items measured at fair value on a recurring basis using significant unobservable inputs (Level 3) for the three and six months ended June 30, 2015:

 
Fair value measurements using significant
unobservable inputs (Level 3)
 
Fuel
 
Auction rate
 
Other
 
 
(in millions)
derivatives
 
securities
 
securities
 
Total
Balance at March 31, 2015
$
(1,245
)
 
$
27

 
$

 
$
(1,218
)
Total gains (realized or unrealized)
 

 
 

 
 

 
 

Included in earnings
85

 

 

 
85

Included in other comprehensive income
50

 

 

 
50

Purchases
182

(a)

 

 
182

Sales
(127
)
(a)

 

 
(127
)
Balance at June 30, 2015
$
(1,055
)
 
$
27

(b)
$

 
$
(1,028
)
The amount of total gains for the period
  included in earnings attributable to the
  change in unrealized gains or losses relating
  to assets still held at June 30, 2015
$
85

 
$

 
$

 
$
85

(a) The purchase and sale of fuel derivatives are recorded gross based on the structure of the derivative instrument and
whether a contract with multiple derivatives is purchased as a single instrument or separate instruments.
(b) Included in Other assets in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheet.

 
Fair value measurements using significant
unobservable inputs (Level 3)
 
Fuel
 
Auction rate
 
Other
 
 
(in millions)
derivatives
 
securities
 
securities
 
Total
Balance at December 31, 2014
$
(1,091
)
 
$
27

 
$
5

 
$
(1,059
)
Total losses (realized or unrealized)
 
 
 

 
 

 
 

Included in earnings
(8
)
 

 
(1
)
 
(9
)
Included in other comprehensive income
(29
)
 

 

 
(29
)
Purchases
244

(a)

 

 
244

Sales
(171
)
(a)

 
(4
)
 
(175
)
Balance at June 30, 2015
$
(1,055
)
 
$
27

(b)
$

 
$
(1,028
)
The amount of total losses for the period
  included in earnings attributable to the
  change in unrealized gains or losses relating
  to assets still held at June 30, 2015
$
(8
)
 
$