DEF 14A 1 def14a.htm DEF 14A rbcaa_Current folio_proxy

 

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

SCHEDULE 14A

 

Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of
the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Amendment No.     )

 

Filed by the Registrant  ☒

 

Filed by a Party other than the Registrant  ☐

 

Check the appropriate box:

Preliminary Proxy Statement

☐ 

Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2))

Definitive Proxy Statement

Definitive Additional Materials

Soliciting Material under §240.14a-12

 

Republic Bancorp, Inc.

(Name of Registrant as Specified In Its Charter)

 

 

(Name of Person(s) Filing Proxy Statement, if other than the Registrant)

 

Payment of Filing Fee (Check the appropriate box):

No fee required.

Fee computed on table below per Exchange Act Rules 14a-6(i)(1) and 0-11.

 

(1)

Title of each class of securities to which transaction applies:

 

 

 

 

(2)

Aggregate number of securities to which transaction applies:

 

 

 

 

(3)

Per unit price or other underlying value of transaction computed pursuant to Exchange Act Rule 0-11 (set forth the amount on which the filing fee is calculated and state how it was determined):

 

 

 

 

(4)

Proposed maximum aggregate value of transaction:

 

 

 

 

(5)

Total fee paid:

 

 

 

Fee paid previously with preliminary materials.

☐ 

Check box if any part of the fee is offset as provided by Exchange Act Rule 0-11(a)(2) and identify the filing for which the offsetting fee was paid previously. Identify the previous filing by registration statement number, or the Form or Schedule and the date of its filing.

 

(1)

Amount Previously Paid:

 

 

 

 

(2)

Form, Schedule or Registration Statement No.:

 

 

 

 

(3)

Filing Party:

 

 

 

 

(4)

Date Filed:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Picture 4

 

Notice of Annual Meeting of Shareholders

of Republic Bancorp, Inc.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

 

To our shareholders:  You are cordially invited to attend the 2018 Annual Meeting of Shareholders of Republic Bancorp, Inc.  The following are details for the meeting:

 

Date:    Thursday, April 19, 2018

Time:    9:00 A.M., EDT

Place:   Republic Bank Building, Lower Level, 9600 Brownsboro Road, Louisville, Kentucky 40241

 

Items on the agenda:

 

1.

To elect seven directors;

2.

To approve the Amended and Restated Non-Employee Director and Key Employee Deferred Compensation Plan;

3.

To approve the Employee Stock Purchase Plan;

4.

To ratify the appointment of Crowe Horwath LLP as the independent registered public accounting firm for 2018; and,

5.

To transact such other business as may properly come before the meeting.

 

 

Record date:

The close of business on February 9, 2018 is the record date for determining the shareholders entitled to notice of, and to vote at, the 2018 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.

 

Your vote is important.  Whether or not you plan to attend the Annual Meeting of Shareholders, we hope you will vote as soon as possible.  Please review the instructions with respect to each of your voting options as described in the proxy statement and the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials.

 

IF YOU PLAN TO ATTEND:  Please note that space limitations may make it necessary to limit attendance at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders.  Shareholders holding stock in brokerage accounts (“street name holders”) may be asked to produce a brokerage statement reflecting stock ownership as of the record date and provide photo identification. Cameras, recording devices or other like forms of electronic devices will not be permitted at the Annual Meeting of Shareholders.

 

 

Very truly yours,

 

Steve Trager sig

 

Steven E. Trager

 

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Louisville, Kentucky

 

March 9, 2018

 

 

Important Notice Regarding the Availability of Proxy Materials

for the Shareholder Meeting to be Held on April 19, 2018.

 

The proxy statement and annual report to shareholders are available online at www.investorvote.com/RBCAA.  

 

 


 

Republic Bancorp, Inc.

601 West Market Street

Louisville, Kentucky  40202

 

PROXY STATEMENT

 

This proxy statement is furnished in connection with the solicitation of proxies by the Board of Directors of Republic Bancorp, Inc. (the “Company” or “Republic”).  The proxies will be voted at the 2018 Annual Meeting of Shareholders (“Annual Meeting”) of Republic on April 19, 2018, and at any adjournments of the meeting.

 

This proxy statement, notice of annual meeting and form of proxy are first being mailed or made available to shareholders on or about March 9, 2018.  As used in this document, the terms “Republic,” the “Company,” “we,” and “our” refer to Republic Bancorp, Inc., a Kentucky corporation.

 

VOTING

 

Record date.  You are entitled to notice of and to vote at the Annual Meeting if you held of record shares of our Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock at the close of business on February 9, 2018.  On that date, 18,609,173 shares of Class A Common Stock and 2,242,624 shares of Class B Common Stock were issued and outstanding for purposes of the Annual Meeting. 

 

Voting rights.  Each share of Class A Common Stock is entitled to one (1) vote and each share of Class B Common Stock is entitled to ten (10) votes.  Based on the number of shares outstanding as of the record date, the shares of Class A Common Stock are entitled to an aggregate of 18,609,173 votes, and the shares of Class B Common Stock are entitled to an aggregate of 22,426,240 votes at the Annual Meeting.

 

Voting by proxy.  If you received the Notice of Internet Availability of Proxy Materials, you may follow the instructions on that notice to access the proxy materials and download the proxy and vote online via the Internet.  If you request a paper or electronic copy of the proxy materials, the proxy will be mailed or e-mailed to you along with the other proxy materials.  If you received a paper copy of this proxy statement, the proxy card is enclosed.  If a proxy card is properly executed, returned to Republic and not revoked, the shares represented by the proxy card will be voted in accordance with the instructions set forth on the proxy card.  If no instructions are given, the shares represented will be voted (i) “For” the Board of Director nominees named in this proxy statement, (ii) “For” the approval of the Amended and Restated Non-Employee Director and Key Employee Deferred Compensation Plan, (iii) “For” the approval of the Employee Stock Purchase Plan, and (iv) “For” the ratification of Crowe Horwath LLP as the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm for 2018.  For participants in the Republic Bancorp, Inc. 401(k) Retirement Plan (the “Plan”), the Plan Trustee shall vote the shares for which it has not received voting direction from the Plan participants utilizing the same voting percentages derived from the Plan participants who did direct how their shares are to be voted.  The Board of Directors at present knows of no other business to be brought before the Annual Meeting. However, persons named in the proxy, or their substitutes, will have discretionary authority to vote on any other business which may properly come before the Annual Meeting and any adjournment thereof and will vote the proxies in accordance with the recommendations of the Board of Directors.

 

You may attend the Annual Meeting even though you have executed a proxy. You may revoke your proxy at any time before it is voted by delivering written notice of revocation to the Secretary of Republic, by delivering a subsequent dated proxy, by voting by telephone or online through the Internet on a later date, or by attending the Annual Meeting and voting in person.

 

Quorum and voting requirements and counting votes.  The presence in person or by proxy of the holders of a majority in voting power of the combined voting power of the Class A Common Stock and the Class B Common Stock will constitute a quorum for the transaction of business at the Annual Meeting. Abstentions and broker non-votes will be counted as being present or represented at the Annual Meeting for the purpose of establishing a quorum. A broker non-vote occurs when a nominee holding shares for a beneficial owner is otherwise present by proxy but does not vote on a particular proposal because the nominee does not have discretionary voting power with respect to that item and has not received voting instructions from the beneficial owner.

 

2


 

The affirmative vote of a plurality of the votes duly cast is required for the election of directors.  All other matters presented at the meeting will be approved if the votes cast in favor of the proposal exceed the votes cast opposing the proposal. Abstentions and broker non-votes are not counted as votes cast on any matter to which they relate and will have no impact on the outcome of any matter.

 

SHARE OWNERSHIP

 

The following table sets forth certain information regarding the beneficial ownership of the outstanding shares of Republic as of February 9, 2018, based on information available to the Company. The Class B Common Stock is convertible into Class A Common Stock on a share-for-share basis. In the following table, information in the column headed “Class A Common Stock” does not reflect the shares of Class A Common Stock issuable upon conversion of Class B Common Stock.  Information is included for:

 

(1)

persons or entities who own more than 5% of the Class A Common Stock or Class B Common Stock outstanding;

 

(2)

directors placed in nomination;

 

(3)

the Chairman and Chief Executive Officer (“CHAIR/CEO”), the Chief Financial Officer (“CFO”) and three other Executive Officers of Republic who earned the highest total compensation payout during 2017 (collectively, with the CHAIR/CEO and CFO, the “Named Executive Officers” or “NEOs”); and,

 

(4)

all executive officers, directors and director nominees of Republic as a group.

 

Except as otherwise noted, Republic believes that each person named below has the sole power to vote and dispose of all shares shown as owned by such person.  Please note that the table provides information about the number of shares beneficially owned, as opposed to the voting power of those shares.

 

3


 

Executive officers, directors and director nominees as a group (collectively 14 persons) beneficially own 67% of the combined voting power of the Class A and Class B Common Stock which represents 52% of the total number of shares of Class A and Class B Common Stock outstanding as of February 9, 2018 as detailed below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Class A and Class B Common

 

 

 

Class A Common Stock

 

Class B Common Stock

 

Stock Combined

 

Name

    

Shares

    

Percent

    

Shares

    

Percent

    

Shares

    

Percent

 

Five Percent Shareholders:

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven E. Trager

  

8,561,857

(1)  

46.0

%  

1,797,327

(2)  

80.1

%  

10,359,184

(1)(2)

49.7

%

601 West Market Street

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louisville, Kentucky 40202

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jean S. Trager

  

8,460,793

(3)  

45.5

 

1,250,279

(4)  

55.8

 

9,711,072

(3)(4)

46.6

 

601 West Market Street

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louisville, Kentucky 40202

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A. Scott Trager

  

8,170,787

(5)  

43.9

 

1,142,300

(6)  

50.9

 

9,313,087

(5)(6)

44.7

 

601 West Market Street

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louisville, Kentucky 40202

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sheldon G. Gilman

  

7,967,392

(7)  

42.8

 

1,107,515

(8)  

49.4

 

9,074,907

(7)(8)

43.5

 

500 West Jefferson Street

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suite 2100

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louisville, Kentucky 40202

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Teebank Family

  

7,165,051

 

38.5

 

939,449

 

41.9

 

8,104,500

 

38.9

 

Limited Partnership (9)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

601 West Market Street

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louisville, Kentucky 40202

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jaytee Properties

  

750,067

 

4.0

 

168,066

 

7.5

 

918,133

 

4.4

 

Limited Partnership (9)

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

601 West Market Street

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Louisville, Kentucky 40202

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directors, Nominees and

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Named Executive Officers:

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Craig A. Greenberg

  

10,443

(10)  

*

 

 —

 

*

 

10,443

(10)  

*

 

Michael T. Rust

  

13,457

(11)  

*

 

 —

 

*

 

13,457

(11)  

*

 

R. Wayne Stratton

  

23,698

(12)  

*

 

2,063

(13)  

*

 

25,761

(12)(13)

*

 

Susan Stout Tamme

  

15,561

(14)  

*

 

 —

 

*

 

15,561

(14)  

*

 

Mark A. Vogt

 

5,778

(15)  

*

 

 —

 

*

 

5,778

(15)  

*

 

Juan M. Montano

  

11,350

(16)  

*

 

 —

 

*

 

11,350

(16)  

*

 

William R. Nelson

  

8,440

(17)  

*

 

 —

 

*

 

8,440

(17)  

*

 

Kevin D. Sipes

  

67,094

(18)  

*

 

 —

 

*

 

67,094

(18)  

*

 

A. Scott Trager

  

8,170,787

(5)  

43.9

 

1,142,300

(6)  

50.9

 

9,313,087

(5)(6)

44.7

 

Steven E. Trager

  

8,561,857

(1)  

46.0

 

1,797,327

(2)  

80.1

 

10,359,184

(1)(2)

49.7

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Directors, Nominees and All

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Executive Officers (14 persons):

  

9,065,716

(19)  

48.7

%  

1,834,175

(19)  

81.8

%  

10,899,891

(19)  

52.3

%


*      Represents less than 1% of total

 

(1)

Includes 7,165,051 shares held of record by Teebank Family Limited Partnership (“Teebank”) and 750,067 shares held of record by Jaytee Properties Limited Partnership (“Jaytee”).  With respect to Teebank and Jaytee, Steven E. Trager is (i) trustee of a trust which is co-general partner and a limited partner and (ii) co-trustee of a trust which is the other co-general partner and a limited partner of each of these limited partnerships.  Steven E. Trager shares voting authority over shares held by both Teebank and Jaytee as a member of each partnership’s voting committee.  Trusts for the benefit of, among others, Steven E. Trager’s two children and his mother, are limited partners of both Teebank and Jaytee.  Includes 7,478 shares held by Steven E. Trager’s spouse, Amy Trager.  Includes 545,675 shares held of record by the Trager Family Foundation, a charitable foundation organized under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.  Steven E. Trager shares voting and investment power over these shares with Jean S. Trager, Shelley Trager Kusman and Amy Trager.  Also includes 12,085 shares held in Republic’s 401(k) plan and 225 shares held by Trager Marital Trust, for which Steven E. Trager is trustee.

 

4


 

(2)

Includes 939,449 shares held of record by Teebank and 168,066 shares held of record by Jaytee.  With respect to Teebank and Jaytee, Steven E. Trager is (i) trustee of a trust which is co-general partner and a limited partner and (ii) co-trustee of a trust which is the other co-general partner and a limited partner of each of these limited partnerships.  Steven E. Trager shares voting authority over shares held by both Teebank and Jaytee as a member of each partnership’s voting committee.  Trusts for the benefit of, among others, Steven E. Trager’s two children and his mother, are limited partners of both Teebank and Jaytee.  Also includes 1,215 shares held in Republic’s 401(k) plan and 671,583 shares held by Trager Marital Trust, for which Steven E. Trager serves as trustee.

 

(3)

Includes 7,165,051 shares held of record by Teebank and 750,067 shares held of record by Jaytee.  With respect to Teebank and Jaytee, Jean S. Trager is (i) co-trustee of a trust which is a co-general partner and a limited partner of each of those limited partnerships and (ii) a beneficiary of certain trusts which are limited partners of each of those limited partnerships.  Includes 545,675 shares held of record by the Trager Family Foundation, a charitable foundation organized under Section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code.  Jean S. Trager shares voting and investment power over these shares with Steven E. Trager, Shelley Trager Kusman and Amy Trager.

 

(4)

Includes 939,449 shares held of record by Teebank and 168,066 shares held of record by Jaytee.  With respect to Teebank and Jaytee, Jean S. Trager is (i) co-trustee of a trust which is a co-general partner and a limited partner of each of these limited partnerships and (ii) a beneficiary of certain trusts which are limited partners of each of those limited partnerships.

 

(5)

Includes 7,165,051 shares held of record by Teebank and 750,067 shares held of record by Jaytee.  A. Scott Trager is a limited partner of both Teebank and Jaytee.  A. Scott Trager shares voting authority over shares held by both Teebank and Jaytee as a member of each partnership’s voting committee.  Includes 51,697 shares held of record by a family trust of which A. Scott Trager is a co-trustee and a beneficiary.  Also includes 35,319 shares held in Republic’s 401(k) plan.  Also includes voting rights for 3,750 restricted shares which vest in November 2018.

 

(6)

Includes 939,449 shares held of record by Teebank and 168,066 shares held of record by Jaytee.  A. Scott Trager is a limited partner of both Teebank and Jaytee.  A. Scott Trager shares voting authority over shares held by both Teebank and Jaytee as a member of each partnership’s voting committee.  Includes 4,107 shares held of record by a family trust of which A. Scott Trager is a co-trustee and a beneficiary.  Also includes 1,190 shares held in Republic’s 401(k) plan.

 

(7)

Includes 7,165,051 shares held of record by Teebank and 750,067 shares held of record by Jaytee.  Sheldon G. Gilman, as trustee of trusts, is a limited partner of both Teebank and Jaytee.  Sheldon G. Gilman shares voting authority over shares held by both Teebank and Jaytee as a member of each partnership’s voting committee.  Also includes 39,307 shares held by Sheldon G. Gilman’s spouse.

 

(8)

Includes 939,449 shares held of record by Teebank and 168,066 shares held of record by Jaytee.  Sheldon G. Gilman, as trustee of trusts, is a limited partner of both Teebank and Jaytee.  Sheldon G. Gilman shares voting authority of both Teebank and Jaytee as a member of each partnership’s voting committee.

 

(9)

Teebank and Jaytee are limited partnerships of which Jean S. Trager, A. Scott Trager, Trager Marital Trust and trusts for which each of Steven E. Trager and Sheldon G. Gilman serve as trustees, are limited partners.  Steven E. Trager is (i) trustee of a revocable trust that is a co-general partner and a limited partner of each partnership and (ii) co-trustee with Jean S. Trager of a trust which is the other general partner and a limited partner of Teebank and Jaytee.  Teebank and Jaytee each have voting committees comprised of Steven E. Trager, A. Scott Trager and Sheldon G. Gilman.  These committees direct the voting of the shares held by Teebank and Jaytee.  Teebank and Jaytee each have a total of 2 million units outstanding.  The following table provides information about the units of Teebank and Jaytee beneficially owned by directors, officers and 5% shareholders of Republic:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Number of

 

Percent of Jaytee

 

Number of

 

Percent of Teebank

 

Name

    

Jaytee Units

    

Units Outstanding

    

Teebank Units

    

Units Outstanding

 

Jean S. Trager

 

20,046

(a)  

1.0

%  

20,046

(c)  

1.0

%

Steven E. Trager

 

384,207

(b)  

19.2

%  

667,252

(d)  

33.4

%

A. Scott Trager

 

5,293

 

*

 

5,293

 

*

 

Sheldon G. Gilman, Trustee

 

44,050

 

2.2

%  

156,608

 

7.8

%


*   - Represents less than 1% of total

5


 

 

(a)

Includes 20,000 general partner units and 46 limited partner units held by the Jean S. Trager Trust, of which Jean S. Trager and Steven E. Trager are co-trustees. 

 

(b)

Includes 268,130 limited partner and 20,000 general partner units held in a revocable trust and 20,000 general partner units and 46 limited partner units held by the Jean S. Trager Trust, of which Steven E. Trager and Jean S. Trager are co-trustees.  Also includes 76,031 limited partner units held by Trager Marital Trust, of which Steven E. Trager is trustee.

 

(c)

Includes 20,000 general partner units and 46 limited partner units held by the Jean S. Trager Trust, of which Jean S. Trager and Steven E. Trager are co-trustees.

 

(d)

Includes 153,269 limited partner and 20,000 general partner units held in a revocable trust and 20,000 general partner units and 46 limited partner units held by the Jean S. Trager Trust, of which Jean S. Trager and Steven E. Trager are co-trustees.  Also includes 180,396 limited partner units held by the Trager Trust of 2012 and 293,541 limited partner units held by Trager Marital Trust, of which Steven E. Trager is trustee.

 

(10)

Includes 10,243 shares issuable to Craig A. Greenberg upon vesting in accordance with the terms of the Company’s deferred compensation plan.

 

(11)

Includes 10,274 shares issuable to Michael T. Rust upon vesting in accordance with the terms of the Company’s deferred compensation plan.

 

(12)

Includes 5,352 shares held jointly by R. Wayne Stratton with his spouse and 11,423 shares held by R. Wayne Stratton’s spouse. R. Wayne Stratton shares investment and voting power over these shares.  Also includes 6,723 shares issuable to R. Wayne Stratton upon vesting in accordance with the terms of the Company’s deferred compensation plan.

 

(13)

Includes 849 shares held jointly by R. Wayne Stratton with his spouse and 1,214 shares held by R. Wayne Stratton’s spouse.  R. Wayne Stratton shares investment and voting power over these shares.

 

(14)

Includes 6,277 shares issuable to Susan Stout Tamme upon vesting in accordance with the terms of the Company’s deferred compensation plan.

 

(15)

Includes 3,000 shares held jointly by Mark A. Vogt with his spouse.  Also includes 2,062 shares issuable to Mark A. Vogt upon vesting in accordance with the terms of the Company’s deferred compensation plan.

 

(16)

Includes 3,350 shares held in Republic’s 401(k) plan.  Also includes voting rights for 1,250 restricted shares which vest in November 2018 and 2,500 restricted shares which vest 50% in June 2019 and 50% in June 2020.

 

(17)

Includes voting rights for 1,500 restricted shares which vest in November 2018.

 

(18)

Includes 3,954 shares held in Republic’s 401(k) plan.   Also includes voting rights for 3,750 restricted shares which vest in November 2018.

 

(19)

Includes the shares as described above held by the directors, nominees and NEOs, along with an additional 144,643 shares.

 

PROPOSAL ONE: ELECTION OF DIRECTORS

 

Republic’s Board of Directors is comprised of one class of directors that are elected annually.  Each director serves a term of one (1) year until the 2019 Annual Meeting and until his or her successor is duly elected or qualified.   Republic’s Bylaws provide for not less than five (5) nor more than fifteen (15) directors. In accordance with the Company’s Bylaws, the Board of Directors has fixed the number of directors to be elected at the 2018 Annual Meeting at seven (7). The Nominating Committee and the Board of Directors have nominated for election as directors: Steven E. Trager, A. Scott Trager, Craig A. Greenberg, Michael T. Rust, R. Wayne Stratton, Susan Stout Tamme and Mark A. Vogt. Each of the nominees is a current member of the Board of Directors of the Company. 

6


 

 

Non-employee Director nominees Craig A. Greenberg, Michael T. Rust, R. Wayne Stratton, Susan Stout Tamme and Mark A. Vogt would collectively comprise a majority of the Board of Directors, and the Board has determined that each is an “independent director” as defined in Rule 5605(a)(2) of the NASDAQ listing standards. While the Company is a “controlled company” as defined under the NASDAQ rules and thus is entitled to an exemption from the majority independence rule, the Company has not elected this exemption for its 2018 election of directors, but reserves the right to claim this exemption in the future.

 

Neither the Nominating Committee nor the Board of Directors has reason to believe that any nominee for director will not be available for election or to serve following election. However, if any of the nominees should become unavailable for election, and unless authority is withheld, the holders of the proxies solicited hereby will vote for such other individual(s) as the Nominating Committee or the Board of Directors may recommend.

 

The following table details the indicated information for each nominee and incumbent director:

 

 

 

 

Director Nominees:

 

Director

Name and Principal Occupation for Past Five Years

Age

Since

 

 

 

Steven E. Trager began serving as both Chairman and CEO of Republic in 2012.  He previously served as President and CEO of Republic since 1998.  He also currently serves as Chairman and CEO of Republic Bank & Trust Company (the “Bank”).  Mr. Trager began his career with the Bank in 1988 as General Counsel.

57

1988

 

 

 

Steven E. Trager received his undergraduate degree in finance at the University of Texas at Austin.  He received his Juris Doctor degree from the University of Louisville Brandeis School of Law and engaged in the practice of law with the firm of Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs.  He has more than twenty-five years banking experience.  In 1994, he provided the leadership resulting in the complex merger and reorganization of the Republic group of multiple banks into a consolidated and more efficient banking structure.  He provided the leadership for the Company’s initial public offering.  He also has direct experience not only in banking, but also in finance, operations and retail management.  His banking experience includes his service as past chairman for the Kentucky Bankers Association and his past service as a board member of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis’ Louisville branch.  He also has leadership and directorate experience in multiple community service organizations.  Based on Steven E. Trager's experience as a Bank Board Director, his direct banking experience, his proven leadership skills, his education and legal background, his extensive community involvement, his vested interest in the long-term success of Republic as a material equity owner, and his specific experience, qualifications and attributes herein disclosed, the Board has determined that he should continue to serve as a Director.

 

 

 

 

 

A. Scott Trager has served as Director and President of Republic since 2012 and was appointed Vice Chairman in March 2017.  He previously served as Vice Chairman from 1994 to 2012.  He also currently serves as Vice Chairman of the Bank.

65

1990

 

 

 

A. Scott Trager holds a degree in Business Administration from the University of Tennessee and has spent his entire working career in various finance and banking capacities.  He has extensive leadership experience in marketing, operations and retail branch management.  He has extensive community board experience and broad-based community connections in the metropolitan Louisville area.  Based on A. Scott Trager's experience as a Bank Board Director, his direct banking experience, his proven leadership skills, his educational background, his extensive community involvement and his specific experience, qualifications and attributes herein disclosed, the Board has determined that he should continue to serve as a Director.

 

 

 

 

 

Craig A. Greenberg has served as President of 21c Museum Hotels since 2011 and also as CEO since September 2017.  He has served in various roles with the company since its founding in 2007.  Prior to 21c, Craig served as Counsel with the general legal services law firm of Frost Brown Todd LLC in Louisville, Kentucky.  He served as Director of the Bank from 2006 to 2008 and has served as a Director of Republic from 2008 to present.

44

2008

 

 

 

Craig A. Greenberg is a graduate of the University of Michigan, where he served as Student Government President.  He is a Harvard Law School cum laude graduate.  He has extensive experience in securing and deploying federal, state and local tax credits and other incentives in connection with the development of urban revitalization projects across the country.  He has direct experience in commercial finance, capital raising, transaction structuring, and the leadership of multi-million dollar developments.  He is active in local civic and charitable organizations.  Based on Craig A. Greenberg’s experience as a Bank Board director, his commercial finance and development knowledge, his educational background, including legal knowledge and skills, his extensive community involvement and his specific experience, qualifications and attributes herein disclosed, the Board has determined that he should continue to serve as a Director.

 

 

 

7


 

 

 

 

Director Nominees:

 

Director

Name and Principal Occupation for Past Five Years (continued)

Age

Since

 

 

 

Michael T. Rust has served as President of Kentucky Hospital Association (“KHA”), located in Louisville, Kentucky, since 1996. He served as a Director of the Bank from 2001 to 2007 and has served as a Director of Republic from 2007 to present.

66

2007

 

 

 

Michael T. Rust graduated from Glenville State College in West Virginia where he received his undergraduate degree in Business Administration.  He received a Master’s degree in Public Health from the University of Tennessee.  He serves as a Community Based Faculty Member at the University of Kentucky.  In his role as President of the KHA, he has extensive management and regulatory experience.  He also has extensive advocacy experience in Washington, D.C. and Frankfort, Kentucky.  He is a proven recruiter and organizer and has significant community involvement experience.  He has leadership and directorate experience in multiple community service organizations.  As a member of the Audit Committee, he is able to read and understand basic financial statements, such as a balance sheet, income statement and cash flow statement. Based on Michael T. Rust's experience as a Bank Board Director, his managerial and regulatory compliance background, his business and education background, his extensive community involvement, including governmental affairs and his specific experience, qualifications and attributes herein disclosed, the Board has determined that he should continue to serve as a Director.

 

 

 

 

 

R. Wayne Stratton is a Certified Public Accountant and a partner of the public accounting firm of Jones, Nale & Mattingly PLC located in Louisville, Kentucky.  He served as a Director of the Bank from 1994 to 1995 and has served as a Director of Republic from 1995 to present, while also serving as Republic's financial expert on the Audit Committee.

70

1995

 

 

 

R. Wayne Stratton is a graduate of the University of Cincinnati with a Bachelor of Arts degree and a major in Accounting.  He is accredited in Business Valuations by the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants and holds a Diplomat Certification in Forensic Accounting from the American College of Forensic Examiners.  As a member of the Audit Committee, he is able to read and understand basic financial statements, such as a balance sheet, income statement and cash flow statement.  He has been recognized as a top national tax accountant by Money Magazine and has received recognition and awards for his accounting expertise from multiple sources, including Who’s Who in Accounting and Finance and Who’s Who in Executives and Business.  He has extensive experience in both the preparation and review of financial statements and statements of condition of publicly traded stock corporations.  He meets NASDAQ's financial knowledge and sophistication requirements and qualifies as an "audit committee financial expert" under SEC rules.  Based on R. Wayne Stratton's experience as a Bank Board Director, his managerial and accounting background, his education and certification as a Certified Public Accountant, his business background and his specific experience, qualifications and attributes herein disclosed, the Board has determined that he should continue to serve as a Director.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Susan Stout Tamme was employed by Baptist Healthcare System, Inc. and is retired as of April 2014. In July of 2013, she was appointed as President of Baptist Health Collaborations.  She was formerly in the position of President of the Louisville Market from 2011 to 2013 and she was President and CEO of Baptist Hospital East from 1995 to 2011 and Vice President of Baptist Healthcare System, Inc.  She served as a Director of the Bank from 1999 to 2003 and has served as a Director of Republic from 2003 to present.

67

2003

 

 

 

Susan Stout Tamme received an Associate degree in nursing from Eastern Kentucky University, a Bachelor of Science degree in nursing from the University of Louisville and a Master of Science degree in Health Systems Administration, also from the University of Louisville.  She has extensive experience in administration, specifically in broad-based multi-hospital systems and is proficient in working with department heads, clinical staff and governing regulatory bodies.  She has leadership and directorate experience in multiple community service organizations and has received multiple community service awards for excellence and achievement.  Based on Susan Stout Tamme’s experience as a Bank Board Director, her managerial and administrative background, regulatory compliance experience, her extensive community involvement and her specific experience, qualifications and attributes herein disclosed, the Board has determined that she should continue to serve as a Director.

 

 

 

 

 

Mark A. Vogt received his Bachelor of Arts degree in Accounting and Business Administration from Bellarmine University in Louisville, Kentucky.  Since 2004, he has served as CEO of Galen College of Nursing, one of the nation's largest educators of nurses with campuses located in Kentucky, Texas, Florida and Ohio.  During his time with Galen, the College has grown significantly by adding nursing programs that meet the needs of the healthcare community and adult learners.

49

2016

 

 

 

Prior to joining Galen, Mark A. Vogt was Chief Operating Officer of a private equity investment group specializing in the education sector.  He served as Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Republic Bancorp, Inc. from 1995 to 2000.  He served as a Director of the Bank from 2012 to 2016 and has served as a Director of Republic since 2016.  As CFO, he provided leadership in accounting, finance, treasury, and various operational functions.  During his tenure, he was significantly involved in the Company's initial public offering and the sale and acquisition of several business units.  Previously, he was employed for five years by the public accounting firm of Deloitte & Touche LLP where he provided accounting and consulting services to a wide array of financial service clients.  In addition, he has leadership and directorate experience in a number of civic and community organizations.  Based on Mark A. Vogt's experience as a Bank Board Director, his managerial and accounting background, his education and certification as a Certified Public Accountant, his business background and his specific experience, qualifications and attributes herein disclosed, the Board has determined that he should continue to serve as a Director.

 

 

 

8


 

 

None of the persons placed in nomination currently holds or has in the past five (5) years held any directorships in any other company with a class of securities registered pursuant to Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 or subject to the requirements of Section 15(d) of such Act or any company registered as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended.

 

Republic’s directors were elected at the most recent Annual Meeting held on April 20, 2017, to a one (1) year term. The Company’s executive officers are recommended by the Chairman and CEO, Steven E. Trager, and are subsequently approved by the Compensation Committee and formally approved by the Board of Directors.  Executive officers hold office at the discretion of the Board of Directors.  All but one of the Company directors attended the 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.

 

Steven E. Trager and A. Scott Trager are cousins.

 

The Board of Directors recommends that shareholders vote “FOR” all of the proposed Board of Director nominees named in this proxy statement.

 

 

The Board of Directors and its Committees

 

The Board

 

Each director is expected to devote sufficient time, energy and attention to ensure diligent performance of his or her duties and to attend all meetings of the shareholders, the Board, and the Board committees to which they are appointed. The Board of Directors held six (6) regularly scheduled board meetings in 2017. Each of the directors attended at least 75% of the total number of meetings of the Board of Directors and the meetings held by committees on which such directors served during their respective terms of service in 2017.  Also, some selected Company directors were paid a committee fee for attending certain Bank committee meetings. Directors that are also employees of the Company or the Bank are not paid for attending board or committee meetings.

 

The Company believes it is both prudent and expedient and in the best interest of shareholders that the Chairman and CEO positions are combined and that such combination has no negative effect on the operation and direction of the Company.  The Company will continue to evaluate whether or not splitting the positions between two persons will be a viable preferred alternative in the future. This current structure, combining the positions, allows the independent directors to concentrate on the oversight of the Company without the added burden of also addressing what are normally less material day-to-day managerial concerns.  The Company does not have a lead independent director, but the independent directors meet privately following each regularly scheduled board meeting and have the authority to request to speak with any officer or other employee of the Company or the Bank.  They also have direct access to and the authority to retain, at the Company’s expense, any outside auditors, accountants or attorneys at their discretion.

 

While the Company’s Board of Directors is ultimately responsible for risk oversight, selected committees of the Company’s Board and the Bank’s Board play an important role in assisting the Company’s Board of Directors in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities.  The Company’s Board of Directors analyzes enterprise risk at its regularly scheduled board meetings and more specifically as described below through the Company’s Audit Committee, the Company’s Compensation Committee, the Bank’s Compliance and Community Reinvestment Committee, and the Bank’s IT Steering Committee.   The Company’s Board of Directors and the Bank’s Board of Directors receive regular and timely reports from management and the chairpersons of these committees, as appropriate.  More specifically, the Audit Committee regularly reviews risks associated with insurance, credit, debt, financial, accounting, legal, reputational, compliance, third-party, information technology security and other risk matters involving the Company and the Bank.  The Audit Committee is also responsible for the oversight of the Third Party Risk Management Program of the Company and the Bank.  The Third Party Risk Management Steering Committee, chaired by the Bank’s Chief Risk Management Officer, reviews and approves management’s third-party due diligence completed by the Company’s management responsible for third-party relationships with the Company and the Bank.  Reports concerning the Third Party Risk Management Program and any significant third-party arrangements are provided through the Audit Committee on a regular basis to the Company’s and the Bank’s Board of Directors.  The Company’s Audit Committee also reviews Enterprise Risk Management reports and Business Continuity Planning reports.

 

9


 

The Company’s Compensation Committee considers risks related to succession planning and approves the Company’s Succession Plan. The Compensation Committee also considers risks related to the attraction and retention of critical employees and risks relating to the Company’s incentive compensation programs and contractual employee arrangements.  In addition, the Compensation Committee reviews compensation and benefit plans affecting employees generally in addition to those applicable to NEOs.

 

The Bank’s Compliance and Community Reinvestment Committee monitors the consumer compliance and community reinvestment activities of the Bank, including compliance with all applicable laws and regulations with respect to compliance and community reinvestment, and compliance with all related orders and agreements entered into between the Bank or the Company and their respective board of directors with any regulatory supervisory agency.  The Bank’s Compliance and Community Reinvestment Committee also monitors the Bank’s Compliance Management Systems and is responsible for reviewing the Compliance Policy of the Bank annually.  This Committee also monitors and oversees the activities of the Bank’s Compliance department including Community Reinvestment Act requirements and Bank Secrecy Act requirements.  Craig A. Greenberg and Steven E. Trager, both Company directors, serve on the Bank’s Compliance and Community Reinvestment Committee. 

 

The Company’s Board and the Bank’s Board also receive regular and timely reports from the IT Steering Committee.  Management, Company directors and Bank directors serve on the IT Steering Committee.  The IT Steering Committee assists the Bank’s Board of Directors with monitoring the Bank’s IT plans, policies, and major expenditures, in addition to compliance with information security and technology risk management requirements.  Reports from the Information Security Officer about internal and external threats and cyber risks that could result in unauthorized disclosure, misuse, alteration, or destruction of data or information systems are reviewed by the Bank’s IT Steering Committee.

 

Committees of the Company’s Board of Directors

 

The Company’s Board has three (3) standing committees to facilitate and assist the Board in the execution of its responsibilities. The Board committees consist of the Audit Committee, the Compensation Committee and the Nominating Committee. In accordance with NASDAQ listing standards, the Board has determined that each of the Board committee members meets the definition of “independent director” and satisfies the NASDAQ listing standards for service on the Board committees on which each serves.  In making these determinations, the Board considered all relevant factors, including that Craig A. Greenberg was formerly associated with the firm of Frost Brown Todd LLC, a law firm that provides general and corporate legal services to both the Company and the Bank through June 30, 2017.  Mr. Greenberg had an arrangement where he received a percentage of revenues paid to the firm by certain clients previously referred to the firm by him, but not including the Company or the Bank.    Mr. Greenberg did not maintain an office at the firm, was not an equity holder in the firm, and was not salaried by the firm.   

 

Charters for each Board committee, as well as the Code of Conduct and Ethics, are available on the Company’s website at www.republicbank.com.  The information contained on Republic’s website is not incorporated by reference in, or considered to be a part of, this proxy statement.

 

The table below details current membership for each of the standing Board committees:

 

 

 

 

Audit Committee

Compensation Committee

Nominating Committee

Craig A. Greenberg

Craig A. Greenberg*

Craig A. Greenberg*

Michael T. Rust

Susan Stout Tamme

Susan Stout Tamme

R. Wayne Stratton, CPA*

Mark A. Vogt

Mark A. Vogt

 

*Denotes Committee Chairperson

 

The Audit Committee held eight (8) meetings during 2017. The Company’s Board of Directors has evaluated the credentials of and designated and appointed R. Wayne Stratton, CPA, as Chairman of the Audit Committee and as the “audit committee financial expert” as required by Section 407 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

 

The Company’s Board of Directors adopted a written charter for the Audit Committee, which sets out the functions and responsibilities of the Audit Committee.  As described in the charter, the Audit Committee, among other things, is directly responsible for the selection, oversight and compensation of the Company’s independent registered

10


 

public accounting firm.  It is also responsible for the oversight of the accounting and financial reporting processes of the Company, audits of the financial statements and pre-approval of any non-audit services of the independent registered public accounting firm. The Audit Committee is responsible for making recommendations to the Company’s Board of Directors with respect to: the review and scope of audit arrangements; the independent registered public accounting firm’s suggestions for strengthening internal accounting controls; matters of concern to the Audit Committee, the independent registered public accounting firm, or management relating to the Company’s consolidated financial statements or other results of the annual audit; the review of internal accounting procedures and controls with the Company’s financial and accounting staff; the review of the activities and recommendations of the Internal Auditor and compliance auditors; and the review of the consolidated financial statements and other financial information published by the Company. Auditors for the Company are required to report directly to the Audit Committee. The Audit Committee is required to pre-approve all audit and permitted non-audit services provided by the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm.

 

The Audit Committee has recommended, and the Board of Directors has approved and adopted, a Code of Conduct and Ethics Policy that applies to all directors, officers and employees of the Company and the Bank, including the principal executive and financial officers, the controller and the principal accounting officer. The Company intends to post amendments to, or waivers from, its Code of Conduct and Ethics Policy, if any, that apply to the principal executive and financial officers, the controller or the principal accounting officer on its website.  There were no amendments or waivers approved, granted or posted in 2017.

 

The Compensation Committee held two (2) meetings during 2017. The Compensation Committee makes recommendations to the Company’s Board of Directors as to the amount and form of NEO compensation and option awards, if any. The Compensation Committee also reviews and approves the Company’s and the Bank’s Management Succession Plan on an annual basis. The Compensation Committee, in addition to other Bank committees, reviews the Company’s incentive plans in accordance with the recommendations of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau’s Guidance issued on November 28, 2016, Bulletin 2016-03.  Neither the Compensation Committee, the Board, the Company, nor its management utilized the services of an independent compensation consultant in 2017, nor do any of them have any current arrangements with any compensation advisors or consultants. The CHAIR/CEO makes recommendations to the Compensation Committee with respect to all NEO compensation, including his own compensation.

 

The Nominating Committee held one (1) meeting in 2017. In 2018, the Nominating Committee and the Company’s Board of Directors approved the director nominees to be considered for election at the Annual Meeting.  All director nominees for 2018 served as Company directors during 2017. No candidates for director nominees for the 2018 Annual Meeting election of directors were submitted to the Nominating Committee or the Company’s Board of Directors for consideration by any non-management shareholder.

 

The Nominating Committee will consider candidates for director nominees at the 2019 Annual Meeting properly put forth by shareholders. In accordance with Republic’s bylaws, shareholders should submit such nominations, if any, to the Company’s Secretary, at 601 West Market Street, Louisville, Kentucky 40202, along with the information required in the bylaws, no later than January 19, 2019.  The Nominating Committee will consider candidates who have a strong record of community leadership in the Company’s and the Bank’s market.  Candidates should possess a strong record of achievement in both business and civic endeavors, possess strong ethics and display leadership qualities including the ability to analyze and interpret banking financial statements and regulatory requirements, the competence to evaluate endeavors of an entrepreneurial nature and be able to attract new Company banking relationships.  Board diversity as a whole is also considered, although the Company does not have a formal diversity policy.  Recommendations of the “Trager Family Members” (generally defined to include Steven E. Trager and Jean S. Trager and their descendants, and companies, partnerships or trusts in which they are majority owners or beneficiaries), as well as prior service and performance as a director, will also be strongly considered.  The Company does not pay a third-party fee to assist in identifying and evaluating director nominees, but the Company does not preclude the potential for utilizing such services, if needed, as may be determined at the discretion of the Nominating Committee.  No candidate that was recommended by a beneficial owner of more than five percent (5%) of the Company’s voting Common Stock was rejected.  The “Trager Family Members” recommended all director nominees submitted to the Nominating Committee and the Company’s Board of Directors.  No other shareholders submitted a recommendation for a director nominee for 2018.

 

11


 

All but one of the Company directors attended the 2017 Annual Meeting.  All Company directors who are also the director nominees are requested to attend and are expected to attend the 2018 Annual Meeting.

 

COMPENSATION DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS

 

The Compensation Committee, which is comprised of three independent Republic Bancorp, Inc. (“Company”) directors, is responsible for approving the compensation of the Company’s Named Executive Officers (“NEOs”) and NEO compensation policies. The Compensation Committee also recommends the appointment of the Company’s and Republic Bank & Trust Company’s (“Bank”) other Executive Officers (“EOs”).  The Compensation Committee’s determinations are routinely subsequently approved by the Company’s and the Bank’s Board of Directors without change. The Company does not separately compensate its NEOs, all of whom are EOs of the Company’s sole banking subsidiary, the Bank, and are compensated directly by the Bank for their services. Following is a list of the Company’s NEOs along with other pertinent information:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Named Executive
Officer

Age

Company Office

Bank Office

Immediate Supervising
Executive

Area of Management

Proposer of Compensation
Package (1)

Steven E. Trager (CHAIR/CEO)

57

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer

NA

Company and Bank

CHAIR/CEO

A. Scott Trager (PRES)

65

President and Vice Chairman

Vice Chairman

Chief Executive Officer

Company and Bank

CHAIR/CEO

William R. Nelson (PRES/RPG)

54

NA

President of Republic Processing Group

Chief Executive Officer

Republic Processing Group

CHAIR/CEO

Kevin D. Sipes (CFO)

46

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Chief Executive Officer

Company and Bank

CHAIR/CEO

Juan M. Montano (EVP/CMBO)

48

NA

Executive Vice President and Chief Mortgage Banking Officer

Chief Financial Officer

Core Bank, Warehouse Lending Segment and Mortgage Banking Operations

CFO

 

NA–Not Applicable

 

(1)

All NEO compensation packages are subject to the discretion of the CHAIR/CEO of the Company and approval of the Compensation Committee.

 

In deciding to generally continue with the Company’s existing executive compensation practices, the Compensation Committee has considered that holders of approximately 99% of the votes cast on an advisory basis at the Company’s 2017 Annual Meeting of Shareholders approved the compensation of the Company’s NEOs.  

 

Objectives of the Company’s Compensation Program.  The purpose of the Company’s Compensation Program is to establish and maintain suitable financial compensation and financial rewards for job performance that principally focus on the degree to which the Company’s profit objectives, as outlined in the Company’s budget, have been met or substantially met.  Other goals are assigned and attributed to certain NEOs in the primary areas of loan and deposit growth, risk management, regulatory control, loan loss control, customer service, product development and operations.

 

Gross operating profit (“GOP”) for the Company and the Bank remains the central and most important metric in evaluating and determining most NEO compensation.  GOP is defined as “income before income taxes” in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) adjusted for any extraordinary income or other non-recurring items as determined by the CHAIR/CEO.  “Total Company GOP” as used herein includes the GOP of the Republic Processing Group (“RPG”) business operations, while “Core Bank GOP” is the Company’s GOP excluding the RPG business operations.  As described below, two NEOs are evaluated based on the GOP of their individual operating units.  Base salary and bonus compensation awards are discussed in more detail below. With respect to the NEOs, the Compensation Committee approves goals other than profit objectives in order to provide incentives for the NEOs to perform in the best interests of the Company and its shareholders and also to provide additional metrics against which the NEOs’ total performance and contributions can be evaluated. 

 

12


 

The Company’s Incentive Compensation Program, described below, is flexible in design and takes into account factors beyond the control of any NEO in determining the amount of compensation to be paid to a particular NEO in any given year. If the applicable GOP or non-GOP related goals are not fully achieved, then a percentage of a potential incentive payout may be awarded based on intervening factors, such as economic factors, regulatory changes impacting profit objectives, or management decisions that may impact current profitability, normally made in return for the potential for greater long-term profitability.  Management decisions may include such things as technology upgrades, by way of example, or other similar management actions that were not evident at the time the Company’s budget was approved by the Board of Directors. 

 

Compensation Elements.  The Company’s Compensation Program has three (3) principal components: Base Salary, the Incentive Compensation Program or Incentive Bonus Program, and the Stock Incentive Program. Base Salary compensation and the Company’s Incentive Bonus Program are annual programs. The Stock Incentive Program is not typically an annual program, but stock incentives may be awarded at any time during the year to some or all of the Company’s NEOs, subject to the recommendation of the CHAIR/CEO and the approval by the Compensation Committee and the Board of Directors.

 

In addition to the three components listed above, some NEOs, based on their respective participation, may be included in the Company’s Acquisition Bonus Program. The Company’s Acquisition Bonus Program provides for a bonus payout for the achievement of profit objectives based solely on the profitability of the Company’s acquisitions, as may be applicable.  There were no awards under the Company’s Acquisition Bonus Program during 2017.

 

NEOs also participate in Company-wide employee benefit plans and typically are rewarded, as part of their base compensation, additional selected customary business-related perquisites such as, by way of examples, car allowances and country club memberships.

 

Purpose of the Company’s Compensation Elements.  The primary purpose of the Base Salary component of the Company’s Compensation Program is to provide base compensation for ordinary living expenses.  The Company wants to provide its NEOs with a base salary that supports a reasonable lifestyle that is comparable to their high and visible standing in the community, one that supports the demands from the community given that standing and their community visibility and one that also provides reasonable compensation for the performance of their duties and responsibilities directly associated with their NEO status.  As long as the Company’s financial performance is deemed acceptable in the view of the CHAIR/CEO, regardless of whether or not the Company’s GOP goals are met, annual increases to Base Salary are typically, but not always, granted in response to generally recognized cost of living factors and as a reward for acceptable performance. While the Compensation Committee considers cost of living adjustments when evaluating Base Salary, such adjustments are not automatic, but are also dependent on satisfactory earnings and other performance factors.  The Compensation Committee does not apply any particular formula or measurement in making these determinations.  The Compensation Committee used its collective judgment and considered the recommendations of the CHAIR/CEO in determining base compensation levels for 2017 and 2018. Going forward, the Compensation Committee will continue to make its determinations by using its collective judgment and by giving strong consideration to the recommendations of the CHAIR/CEO.  It will continue not to apply any particular formula or measurement regarding Base Salary, but the degree to which the Company’s GOP budget goals were attained remains a primary consideration in all compensation decisions.

 

Bonus incentive goals, in terms of both incentive to be paid and GOP profit goals, are set at the beginning of the Company’s fiscal year (except for the PRES/RPG whose goals are set at mid-fiscal year) by the Compensation Committee and are used to provide the NEOs and EOs with incentives to improve both short-term and long-term Company performance.  Stock compensation awards are also granted from time to time to provide the NEOs and EOs with incentives to maximize the Company’s GOP, as well as to provide retention incentives.  Acquisition bonus awards are granted to incentivize NEOs, EOs and other Company associates to maximize Company earnings and to implement target integration components relating to acquisitions, such as timely and accurate system conversions, in order to maximize operational efficiencies associated with acquisitions.

 

Establishment of Compensation Levels.  The Company’s compensation elements are designed to be generally competitive with similar employment opportunities or positions in similarly sized companies in the metropolitan Louisville, Kentucky area. The Compensation Committee, however, does not rely on benchmarking to determine its compensation elements; rather, the Compensation Committee gives strong consideration and has not historically deviated from the recommendations of the CHAIR/CEO, whose recommendations are based upon his individual

13


 

judgment.  The Compensation Committee annually reviews various peer data to determine if compensation levels are within reasonable ranges as compared to those benchmarks. In 2017 there were no compensation adjustments based on the various peer data reviewed. The Compensation Committee has not previously engaged a third-party executive compensation consultant and has no immediate plans to do so in the future.

 

The CHAIR/CEO makes specific executive compensation recommendations to the Compensation Committee on all NEO compensation elements, including his own. The CHAIR/CEO will recommend his own compensation, which, if reasonable in the subjective judgment of the Compensation Committee, is normally and historically accepted and approved by the Compensation Committee and ultimately the Board of Directors without modification.  The Compensation Committee or the CHAIR/CEO is authorized to make adjustments in the terms and conditions of, and the criteria included in, the Incentive Compensation Program in recognition of unusual or non-recurring events, including acquisitions and dispositions of businesses and assets affecting the Company, or the financial statements of the Company, or in response to changes in applicable laws, regulations, accounting principles, tax rates and regulations or business conditions or in view of the Compensation Committee’s or CHAIR/CEO’s assessment of the business strategy of the Company, economic and business conditions, personal performance of a particular NEO and any other circumstances deemed relevant.

 

As previously stated, the compensation of the NEOs is principally recommended by the CHAIR/CEO with consideration of the recommendations of the NEO’s immediate supervising executive.  These recommendations, if reasonable in the subjective judgment of the Compensation Committee, are also normally and typically accepted and approved by the Compensation Committee and ultimately the Board of Directors without modification.  All NEO base salary and incentive compensation is approved by the Board of Directors upon recommendation by the Compensation Committee. 

 

The Company’s Incentive Compensation Program.  The Incentive Compensation Program is designed to reward those individuals who contribute through their own performance and their influence on others to achieve and exceed the Company’s financial goals, and to a lesser extent, other goals that target performance in areas required to run a successful banking operation. The incentive bonus compensation potential for the CHAIR/CEO and the CFO is tied to the Total Company GOP.  The incentive bonus compensation potential of the PRES is tied to the Core Bank GOP.  The Total Company GOP and Core Bank GOP objectives at the “Entry Level” for 2017 were $78.1 million and $53.5 million, respectively.  The Total Company GOP and Core Bank GOP objectives at the “Maximum Level” were $84.1 million and $57.7 million, respectively.  The RPG business operation’s GOP budgeted “Entry Level” objective for the 2017 measurement period was $24.5 million, with the “Maximum Level” set at $29.5 million.  Unlike other NEOs, whose goals are based on the Company’s fiscal year of January 1 through December 31, the PRES/RPG has goals based on RPG’s seasonally based measurement period from July 1 of a given year through June 30 of the following year.  The EVP/CMBO has multiple goals, including goals related to Core Bank GOP, Mortgage Banking Revenue and Warehouse Lending GOP.

 

NEO incentive compensation is tied principally, but not exclusively, to the degree actual Total Company GOP compares to the Entry Level and Maximum Level budget goals approved by the Board of Directors.  The first level of financial performance, the “Entry Level” budget goal, typically results in a bonus award equal to 70% of the Maximum bonus potential award associated with it, as was the case in 2017.  The higher “Maximum Level” budget goal, which, if achieved, usually results in the full NEO bonus potential being awarded.  Bonus potentials for all NEOs are recommended by the CHAIR/CEO, including his own, and are subsequently routinely approved by the Compensation Committee and the Board of Directors.  No incentive compensation adjustments were made to the Incentive Compensation Program in 2017 other than for the EVP/CMBO. See “Awards Under the Company’s Bonus Incentive Compensation Program” below.

 

The amount of incentive compensation or bonus actually awarded to the NEOs is determined by the Compensation Committee and the Board of Directors.  The “Entry Level” and “Maximum Level” budget goals are designed to be a challenge to meet, particularly for the “Maximum Level” performance tier, but the budget goals and the tiers associated with those goals are not set so as to be impractical or impossible to achieve.  For 2017, the NEO budget goals were designed to provide an incentive for the NEOs to achieve performance which meets or exceeds operating budgeted financial expectations.  The Company’s budgeted goals should not be relied upon by any investor or shareholder as an indication of management’s prediction of its future financial performance.

 

14


 

In its discretion, the Company may modify its budget goals and the Compensation Committee may elect to exclude any extraordinary income or other non-recurring items from its determination as to whether or not the budget goals were, in fact, met or substantially met.  A percentage of the total bonus potential may be awarded to the NEOs even if the “Entry Level” budget goals for incentive compensation purposes are not fully achieved.

 

By written agreement with each NEO, the incentive compensation potential is subject to amendment, either upward or downward, at the discretion of the CHAIR/CEO, subject to the approval of the Compensation Committee and ultimately the Board of Directors.  With respect to the incentive compensation paid for 2017 performance, the Compensation Committee deferred to the recommendations of the CHAIR/CEO regarding non-recurring items.  There are potentially occasions when, based on the CHAIR/CEOs discretion and recommendation, NEOs may be awarded incentive compensation based on factors such as competitive information about the salaries or bonuses paid for similar positions at other local companies or awarded based on achievements other than profit.  No such incentive bonuses were awarded in 2017 other than to the EVP/CMBO.  See “Awards Under the Company’s Bonus Incentive Compensation Program” below.

 

The Compensation Committee, on the recommendation of the CHAIR/CEO, sets individual incentive bonus potentials at the end of each fiscal year to be applied to the next fiscal year, except for the PRES/RPG, whose bonus potential is typically determined in the third quarter of each calendar year. 

 

Participants in the Company’s Incentive Compensation Program described above agree that during their employment or service with Republic and for a period of two years following the date of their termination of employment of service for whatever reason, they will not (i) solicit or divert or attempt to divert from Republic or its affiliates, any customer’s business enjoyed by or specifically targeted by Republic or its affiliates at any time during their employment or service with Republic; and (ii) directly or indirectly, solicit to employ or engage, offer employment or engagement to, hire, employ or engage any employees or independent contractors of Republic or any of its affiliates.

 

The Compensation Committee also considered and determined that the Company’s Incentive Compensation Program for all employees follows reasonable best practices as outlined in the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau Guidance, Bulletin 2016-03, regarding Incentive Compensation.  Managers responsible for ensuring that risks are addressed in the bonus plans themselves were provided with information from the guidance.  As part of the approval process for incentive compensation plans, managers must:

 

a.

document monitoring of compliance with the plan. If there is no monitoring plan, the incentive or bonus plan will not be approved by the Human Resources (“HR”) Staffing Committee; 

 

b.

include definitions of terms such as “account” and “activity,” at a minimum, when those terms are used for incentive purposes; and,

 

c.

obtain review and approval of plans by the HR Staffing Committee.   The HR Staffing Committee documents review and approval of plans. 

 

The HR Staffing Committee reviews the Bank’s applicable regulatory policy statements to ensure that the bonus agreements are not in conflict with the policies.  This is the responsibility of the managers who are responsible for the policies and related products.  The Bank’s Legal Department reviews the Bank’s Mission Statement to ensure that the bonus agreements are not in conflict with the Mission Statement and are congruent with the Bank’s Strategic Plan. This is included in the Human Resources report to the Compensation Committee along with Internal Audit reports reviewed and received by the Audit Committee relative to the Company’s Incentive Compensation plans.

 

Awards Under the Company’s Base Salary Compensation Program.  Upon the recommendation of the CHAIR/CEO, the Compensation Committee approved the salaries for the NEOs for 2017 along with their respective percentage increases over the prior year as shown in the table below.  All NEO Base Salary increases for 2017, except

the PRES/RPG, were effective December 22, 2016.  The increase for the PRES/RPG was effective July 3, 2017.

 

15


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEO

    

2017 Salary

    

Approximate % Increase Over Prior Year

CHAIR/CEO

 

$

376,502

 

1.3%

PRES

 

$

372,000

 

1.3%

PRES/RPG

 

$

300,148

 

4.7%

CFO

 

$

326,730

 

4.0%

EVP/CMBO

 

$

300,000

 

5.0%

 

Upon the recommendation of the CHAIR/CEO, the Compensation Committee approved the salaries for the NEOs for 2018, along with their respective percentage increases over the prior year as shown in the table below.  All NEOs, except the PRES/RPG, who is on a different review schedule, received a Base Salary increase based on 2017 performance and other competitive factors.  All Base Salary increases, except the PRES/RPG, were effective January 15, 2018.  The annualized Base Salary for the PRES/RPG remains unchanged at $300,148 as of January 1, 2018, but the PRES/RPG will be evaluated in mid-year 2018, primarily based on the performance of the RPG business operations during the first quarter of 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

NEO

    

2018 Salary

    

Approximate % Increase Over Prior Year

CHAIR/CEO

 

$

382,500

 

1.6%

PRES

 

$

372,000

 

0.0%

PRES/RPG

 

$

300,148

 

N/A

CFO

 

$

333,700

 

2.1%

EVP/CMBO

 

$

309,000

 

3.0%

 

Awards Under the Company’s Bonus Incentive Compensation Program.  The maximum bonus incentive potential of the NEOs for 2017 is listed in the table below under the heading Incentive Payout Potential.  Actual GOP results for 2017 for the Total Company, Core Bank and RPG were $78.4 million, $56.5 million and $21.5 million, respectively.  Total Company GOP and Core Bank GOP are for the twelve months ended December 31, 2017, while the GOP for the RPG business operations is for the twelve months ended June 30, 2017.  Awards for the NEOs and related factors are outlined in the table below:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Named Executive
Officer

  

Performance
Criteria

  

Entry Level Goal

  

Maximum Level Goal

  

Incentive Payout
Potential (2)

  

Percent of 
Total Payout Potential Awarded

  

Incentive
Payout
Award

Steven E. Trager

 

Total Company GOP

 

Achieved

 

Not Achieved

 

$

185,000

 

70%

 

$

129,500

(CHAIR/CEO)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A. Scott Trager

 

Core Bank GOP

 

Achieved

 

Not Achieved

 

$

175,000

 

80%

 

$

140,000

(PRES)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William R. Nelson

 

RPG GOP

 

Achieved

 

Achieved

 

$

200,000

 

100%

 

$

200,000

(PRES/RPG)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin D. Sipes

 

Total Company GOP

 

Achieved

 

Not Achieved

 

$

125,000

 

70%

 

$

87,500

(CFO)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juan M. Montano

 

1. Core Bank GOP (1)

 

Achieved

 

Not Achieved

 

$

22,000

 

80%

 

$

17,600

(EVP/CMBO)

 

2. Warehouse Lending (1)

 

Achieved

 

Not Achieved

 

$

66,000

 

67%

 

$

44,000

 

 

3. Mortgage/Internet Lending (1)

 

Not Achieved

 

Not Achieved

 

$

44,000

 

0%

 

$

 —

 

 

4. Additional Bonus (1)

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

 

N/A

 

N/A

 

$

23,400


(1)

The EVP/CMBO had three different incentive compensation goals, with each goal comprising a portion of his overall maximum incentive compensation potential.  The first goal was achievement of Core Bank Entry and Maximum budget goals, with Entry and Maximum Level potential payouts of $15,400 and $22,000, respectively. The second goal was the Company’s Warehouse Lending segment’s achievement of certain GOP goals.  The third goal, relating to the Company’s Mortgage Lending division, was the achievement of budgeted mortgage banking revenue of $6.5 million at the Entry Level with a potential payout of $30,800 and of $8.0 million at the Maximum Level with a potential payout of $44,000.  The EVP/CMBO was awarded total non-equity incentive compensation of $61,600 for 2017, which constituted an increase over his potential stated incentive compensation achievement level; however, the level of incentive compensation awarded was below his Maximum potential incentive compensation award. The EVP/CMBO had multiple areas of responsibility including Mortgage Lending, Warehouse Lending and Correspondent Lending.  Two of the areas exceeded Entry Level budgeted expectations and contributed significantly to the Company’s overall GOP in 2017 and a significant mortgage origination system conversion was achieved in 2017.  As a result, the EVP/CMBO was awarded additional bonus compensation of $23,400 over his realized incentive compensation relative to his goal achievement.

16


 

 

(2)

Maximum bonus potentials for the NEOs remain unchanged for 2018 for the CHAIR/CEO, the PRES and the CFO.  The 2018 maximum bonus potential for the EVP/CMBO increased to $275,000 and the maximum bonus potential for the PRES/RPG increased to $240,000.  All NEOs except the PRES/RPG must remain an employee in good standing as of March 15, 2018 in order to receive any incentive compensation for 2017 performance.  The PRES/RPG must remain an employee in good standing as of August 3, 2018 to receive incentive compensation for the 2017/2018 evaluation period.

 

The Company’s Acquisition Bonus Plan.  In addition to the incentive potential described above, certain NEOs may qualify under the Company’s Acquisition Bonus Plan for an additional incentive bonus to be determined by the CHAIR/CEO and approved by the Company’s Compensation Committee relating to Company or Bank acquisitions.

 

The purpose of the Acquisition Bonus Plan is to reward the job performance of associates of the Company, including certain NEOs, who materially participate in the negotiation, consummation and transition of an acquisition or merger and contribute to the long-term profitability of the acquisitions, whether through an asset purchase, stock purchase, merger or other corporate transaction.  The Company may engage in a number of acquisitions from time to time, and each acquisition may have a specific bonus incentive program subject to the provisions of the Acquisition Bonus Plan.

 

The bonus incentive pool, with respect to each acquisition, will be in an amount not to exceed $2,000,000, the amount determined by the Company’s CHAIR/CEO within sixty (60) days of the closing of each acquisition and subject to the approval of the Compensation Committee. 

 

The determination of the amount of Acquisition Bonus Plan awards that may be paid to any individual will be based on performance criteria as determined by the Compensation Committee and may include one or more of the following criteria: (a) successful branch consolidations and core system conversions; (b) a limitation of any losses resulting from operational errors to less than a discretionary dollar amount as determined by the CHAIR/CEO; (c) operating profit (gross or net); (d) earnings including operating income, net operating income, earnings before or after taxes, earnings before or after interest, depreciation, amortization, or extraordinary or special items, or book value per share (which may exclude non-recurring items) or net earnings; (e) pre-tax income, after-tax income, pre-tax profits or after-tax profits; (f) revenue, revenue growth or rate of revenue growth; (g) return on assets (gross or net), return on investment (including cash flow return on investment), return on capital (including return on total capital or return on invested capital), or return on equity; (h) return on sales or revenues; (i) operating expenses; (j) cash flow (before or after dividends), free cash flow, cash flow return on investment (discounted or otherwise), net cash provided by operations, cash flow in excess of cost of capital or cash flow per share (before or after dividends); (k) implementation or completion of critical projects or processes; (l) operating margin or profit margin; (m) cost targets, reductions and savings, productivity and efficiencies; (n) strategic business criteria, consisting of one or more objectives based on meeting specified market penetration, geographic business expansion, customer satisfaction, employee satisfaction, human resources management, supervision of litigation and other legal matters, information technology, and goals relating to budget comparisons; (o) personal professional objectives, including any of the foregoing performance targets, the implementation of policies and plans, the negotiation of transactions, and the development of long-term business goals; (p) improvement in or attainment of expense levels or working capital levels; (q) operating portfolio metrics, or (r) any combination of, or a specified increase in, any of the foregoing.  Where applicable, the performance targets may be expressed in terms of attaining a specified level of the particular criteria or the attainment of a percentage increase or decrease in the particular criteria, all as determined by the Compensation Committee.  The performance targets may include a threshold level of performance below which no payment will be made, levels of performance at which specified payments will be made, and a maximum level of performance above which no additional payment will be made.  Each performance target shall be determined in accordance with GAAP, if applicable, and shall be subject to certification by the Compensation Committee provided that the Compensation Committee shall have the authority to adjust such targets in recognition of extraordinary items or other items that may not be infrequent or unusual but which may have inconsistent effects on performance. 

 

The Acquisition Bonus Plan is administered by the Compensation Committee.  The Compensation Committee has delegated to the CHAIR/CEO of the Company the authority, subject to such terms as the Compensation Committee shall determine, to perform such functions, including administrative functions, except that the Compensation Committee may not delegate authority to an officer or employee to grant a bonus award or otherwise make determinations with respect to the officer or employee to whom the authority is delegated. 

17


 

 

Unless otherwise specifically determined by the Compensation Committee or the CHAIR/CEO, an acquisition bonus incentive award is deemed earned and vested only with respect to a participant who remains employed at the Company and is in good standing at the time of the determination.  However, under certain special conditions, this requirement may be subject to waiver by the CHAIR/CEO.

 

There were no awards under the Acquisition Bonus Plan during 2017.

 

The Company’s Stock Incentive Plan.  The Company’s primary form of equity-based incentive compensation has historically been stock option and stock grant awards. This form of compensation was historically used by the Company due to previously favorable accounting and tax treatment. Stock option awards are also granted by the Company’s competitors and the Compensation Committee believes stock option awards have been an expectation of business executives in Republic’s marketplace.  Despite the ramifications from the adoption of the Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) ASC Topic 718, the Compensation Committee believes that stock option awards, as well as stock grants, constitute a favorable retention factor and enhance the Company’s ability to maintain the employment of its high performing executives. Additionally, Republic’s equity-based incentive agreements provide for a two (2) year prohibition, following the termination of employment of an equity-based incentive recipient, on the solicitation of any customer of the Company or the recruitment and hiring of any Company associate. The Company’s equity-based incentive agreement also has confidentiality requirements which act to protect the Company’s proprietary information. A violation of those provisions allows the Company to require a forfeiture of equity-based incentives or the profits derived from the sale of that stock if sold. All equity-based incentive agreements have a change in control provision providing for immediate vesting of any unexercised equity-based incentives.

 

Overall Company stock performance is not a component of evaluation for the purpose of NEO incentive compensation.  Republic’s stock is not actively traded and thus may be subject to market fluctuations beyond the reasonable control of management. Also, in the Compensation Committee’s view, the significant stock holdings of the CHAIR/CEO and his related interests provide material executive motivation to not only preserve but to grow shareholder value, particularly long-term shareholder value.  Therefore, stock awards have not been traditionally awarded to the CHAIR/CEO.

 

Ultimately, the Compensation Committee believes that reasonable and consistent earnings over time will translate into appropriate and favorable stock performance. The Compensation Committee’s policies are not designed to encourage Republic’s NEOs to manage the Company on a quarter to quarter time horizon or even over a one-year time period.  Investment in capital improvements, product development and new market expansion can act to reduce short-term profits while providing for a larger future, longer-term profit potential and/or provide for the long-term soundness and sustainability of the Company’s operations and, thus, its long-term profit potential.  All of these factors are taken into account by the Compensation Committee in its subjective annual evaluation process and deliberations.

 

Any equity stock incentives for NEOs are typically recommended to the Compensation Committee by the CHAIR/CEO. In choosing the date for the grant of equity stock incentives, the Compensation Committee gives no consideration to market events, as any relationship between the equity stock incentive date and the price of the Company’s stock on that date is strictly coincidental.

 

There were no awards under the Stock Incentive Plan during 2017.

 

Post-Employment Benefits.  As described under the heading “Post-Employment Compensation” elsewhere in this proxy statement, the Company has entered into Officer Compensation Continuation Agreements with each of the NEOs who served in that capacity during 2017, with the exception of the PRES/RPG and the EVP/CMBO.  As described herein, the Officer Compensation Continuation Agreements provide for the payment to an NEO terminated following a change in control equal to up to 24 months of the NEO’s base salary and benefits. The Company deems the agreements necessary for the maintenance of sound management and essential to protecting the best interests of the Company and its shareholders. The agreements are intended to encourage the NEOs to remain in the employment of the Company and to continue to perform their assigned duties without distraction in the face of potentially disruptive events that would normally surround a Company change in control.  Potential payments and benefits under these arrangements have no bearing on the Compensation Committee’s deliberations regarding all other compensation elements.  The Company has modified these agreements to conform them to changes in law under Section 409A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.

18


 

 

COMPENSATION COMMITTEE REPORT

 

The Compensation Committee of the Company has reviewed and discussed the Compensation Discussion and Analysis required by Item 402(b) of Regulation S-K with management and, based on such review and discussions, the Compensation Committee recommended to the Board of Directors that the Compensation Discussion and Analysis be included in this proxy statement.

 

Members of the Compensation Committee:

Craig A. Greenberg, Chairman

Susan Stout Tamme

Mark A. Vogt

 

DIRECTOR COMPENSATION

 

From January 1, 2017 until the regularly scheduled March 15, 2017 board meeting, non-employee directors of the Company and the Bank received fees of $2,000 for each board meeting attended and fees ranging from $375 to $750, based on the particular committee, for each committee meeting attended. For committee meetings held after the March 15, 2017 board meeting, non-employee directors of the Company and the Bank received fees of $2,000 for each board meeting attended and fees ranging from $500 to $750, based on the particular committee, for each committee meeting attended.  The Committee chairperson was paid a fee of $1,000 to $1,500 per committee meeting attended. In addition, all Company and Bank non-employee directors were awarded 200 shares of Class A Common Stock each following the March 2017 regularly scheduled board meeting.

 

On occasion, brief, typically single-issue telephonic meetings are held for which there is no compensation.  Non-employee directors have the option of allocating their fees into a Director Deferred Compensation Plan.  Amounts deferred in the Director Deferred Compensation Plan are deemed to be invested in Class A Common Stock.  Cash dividend equivalents with respect to deferred amounts are accumulated and converted into stock equivalents on a quarterly basis.  Compensation paid or deferred to directors of Republic during 2017 for services as a director of Republic were as follows:

 

2017 DIRECTOR SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a)

 

(b)

 

(c)

 

(d)

 

(e)

 

(f)

 

(g)

 

(h)

 

 

  

Fees
Earned
or Paid in
Cash (2)

  

Stock
Awards

  

Option
Awards

  

Non-Equity Incentive Plan
Compensation

  

Change in Pension Value and Non-Qualified Deferred
Compensation
Earnings

  

All Other
Compensation

  

Total

 

Name (1)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

Craig A. Greenberg

 

17,100

 

6,820

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

23,920

 

Michael T. Rust

 

17,250

 

6,820

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

24,070

 

R. Wayne Stratton

 

24,875

 

6,820

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

31,695

 

Susan Stout Tamme

 

14,325

 

6,820

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

21,145

 

Mark A. Vogt

 

12,950

 

6,820

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

19,770

 


(1)

Steven E. Trager and A. Scott Trager, who served as directors in 2017, are not included in this table as they received no additional compensation for their services as directors.  The compensation received by these individuals is included in the "Summary Compensation Table."

 

(2)

Of these fees, the directors deferred the entire amount of their fees earned, except for R. Wayne Stratton who was paid $12,438 in cash with the balance being deferred.

 

19


 

CERTAIN INFORMATION AS TO MANAGEMENT

 

The following table contains information concerning the compensation received by Republic’s CHAIR/CEO, its CFO and its other three most highly compensated EOs for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017:

 

2017 SUMMARY COMPENSATION TABLE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a)

 

(b)

 

(c)

 

(d)

 

(e)

 

(f)

 

(g)

 

(h)

 

(i)

 

(j)

 

Name and Principal

  

 

  

Salary

  

Bonus

  

Stock
Awards (1)

  

Option
Awards (1)

  

Non-Equity
Incentive Plan
Compensation (2)

  

Change in
Pension
Value and
Non-Qualified
Deferred
Compensation
Earnings

  

All Other
Compensation (3)

  

Total

 

Position

 

Year

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Steven E. Trager,

 

2017

 

376,502

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

129,500

 

 —

 

39,523

 

545,525

 

Chairman, CEO

 

2016

 

371,502

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

92,500

 

 —

 

40,716

 

504,718

 

 

 

2015

 

368,502

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

92,500

 

 —

 

37,331

 

498,333

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A. Scott Trager,

 

2017

 

372,000

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

140,000

 

 —

 

38,101

 

550,101

 

Vice Chairman and President

 

2016

 

367,000

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

87,500

 

 —

 

39,459

 

493,959

 

 

 

2015

 

364,000

 

—  

 

 —

 

134,585

 

87,500

 

 —

 

35,858

 

621,943

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

William R. Nelson,

 

2017

 

286,241

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

200,000

 

 —

 

13,190

 

499,431

 

President of RPG

 

2016

 

285,041

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

175,000

 

 —

 

14,614

 

474,655

 

 

 

2015

 

277,887

 

 —

 

 —

 

134,585

 

52,500

 

 —

 

11,302

 

476,274

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kevin D. Sipes,

 

2017

 

326,730

 

 —

 

 —

 

 —

 

87,500

 

 —

 

23,648

 

437,878

 

EVP, CFO

 

2016

 

314,150

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

62,500

 

 —

 

25,072

 

401,722

 

 

 

2015

 

305,000

 

 —

 

 —

 

134,585

 

62,500

 

 —

 

21,760

 

523,845

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Juan M. Montano

 

2017

 

300,000

 

23,400

 

 —

 

 —

 

61,600

 

 —

 

13,190

 

398,190

 

EVP/CMBO

 

2016

 

285,000

 

 —

 

 —

 

 

85,000

 

 —

 

14,614

 

384,614

 

 

 

2015

 

250,000

 

 —

 

62,975

 

260,535

 

80,000

 

 —

 

11,302

 

664,812

 


(1)

Amounts shown represent the aggregate grant date fair values computed in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 718. For a discussion of the assumptions used in determining these values, see Note 17 to our 2017 financial statements.

 

(2)

The amounts in column (g) reflect incentive compensation earned during the year and paid on the Company’s following March incentive payout date for achievement of Company and Bank goals, except for the PRES/RPG whose incentive compensation was paid in the year listed. 

 

(3)

For 2017, the amounts in column (i) include the following:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

401(k) Matching
Contributions

  

Life Insurance
Policies

  

Club
Memberships

  

Auto Allowance or
Personal Use of
Company Owned
Vehicles

  

Total

Name

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

 

($)

Steven E. Trager

 

12,488

 

1,560

 

15,875

 

9,600

 

39,523

A. Scott Trager

 

12,488

 

1,560

 

14,453

 

9,600

 

38,101

William R. Nelson

 

12,488

 

702

 

 —

 

 —

 

13,190

Kevin D. Sipes

 

12,488

 

1,560

 

 —

 

9,600

 

23,648

Juan M. Montano

 

12,488

 

702

 

 —

 

 —

 

13,190

 

20


 

2017 PAY RATIO DISCLOSURE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a)

 

(b)

 

(c)

 

(d)

 

(e)

 

(f)

 

(g)

 

(h)

 

(i)

 

(j)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Change in Pension

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value and

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-Qualified

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-Equity

 

Deferred

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Stock

 

Option

 

Incentive Plan

 

Compensation

 

All Other

 

 

Name and Principal

 

 

 

Salary