485APOS 1 mft_485a-pe86.htm PE #86 FOR NEW FUNDS mft_485a-pe86.htm


 
As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on April 26, 2013.

1933 Act File No. 33-65572
1940 Act File No. 811-7852

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C.  20549
FORM N-1A

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933  X
Pre-Effective Amendment No. ___
Post-Effective Amendment No.   86
and

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940 X
Amendment No.   87

USAA MUTUAL FUNDS TRUST
(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Charter)

9800 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio, TX  78288
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)     (Zip Code)

Registrant’s Telephone Number, including Area Code (210) 498-0226

Adym Rygmyr, Secretary
USAA MUTUAL FUNDS TRUST
9800 Fredericksburg Road
San Antonio, TX  78288-0227      
(Name and Address of Agent for Service)

 
It is proposed that this filing will become effective under Rule 485

___    immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)
_ __          on (date) pursuant to paragraph (b)
___    60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
_ _      on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
___    75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)
_X__       on (July 12, 2013) pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)

If appropriate, check the following box:

_____  This post-effective amendment designates a new effective date for a previously filed post-effective amendment.

Exhibit Index page 193                              Page 1  of 287
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Part A
The Prospectus for the
Target Retirement 2060 Fund

is included herein

 
 

 

[USAA EAGLE LOGO (R)]

 


PROSPECTUS
USAA TARGET RETIREMENT 2060 FUND
JULY 12, 2013

 

As with other mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved of these Fund’s shares or determined whether this prospectus is accurate or complete. Anyone who tells you otherwise is committing a crime.

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Investment Objective
 
1
Fees and Expenses
 
1
Principal Investment Strategy
 
2
Principal Risks
 
2
Performance
 
4
Investment Adviser
 
5
Portfolio Manager(s)
 
5
Purchase and Sale of Shares
 
5
Tax Information
 
5
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
   
Other Financial Intermediaries
 
6
Investment Objective
 
7
Principal Investment Strategy
 
7
Risks
 
9
Portfolio Holdings
 
16
Fund Management
 
16
Portfolio Manager(s)
 
17
Description of Underlying Funds
 
17
Purchases
 
20
Redemptions
 
23
Exchanges
 
24
Other Important Information
   
About Purchases, Redemptions, and Exchanges
25
Shareholder Information
 
31
Financial Highlights
 
35

 
 

 

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
 
The USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund (the Fund) provides capital appreciation and current income consistent with its current investment allocation.
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
 
The tables below describe the estimated fees and expenses that you may pay, directly and indirectly, to invest in the Fund. The annual fund operating expenses are based on estimated expenses for the current fiscal year.

Shareholder Fees
 
 
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
None
 
 
 
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
 
 
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Management Fee
0.00%
 
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
None
 
Other Expenses
0.28%
 
Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses
0.83%(a)
 
Total Annual Operating Expenses
1.11%
 
Reimbursement from Adviser
(0.18%)
 
Total Annual Operating Expenses After Reimbursement
0.93%(b)
 
 
 
(a) Acquired fund fees and expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
(b) The Adviser has agreed, through May 1, 2014, to make payments or waive manage-ment, administration, and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund so that the total annual operating expenses (exclusive of commission recapture, expense offset arrangements, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) do not exceed an annual rate of 0.10% of the Fund’s average net assets. This reimbursement arrangement may not be changed or terminated during this time period without approval of the Fund’s Board of Trustees and may be changed or terminated by the Adviser at any time after May 1, 2014.

 
 

1 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 
Example
 
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in this Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, you would pay the following expenses on a $10,000 investment, assuming (1) a 5% annual return, (2) the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, (3) you redeem all of your shares at the end of the periods shown, and (4) the expense limitation arrangement for the Fund is not continued.

 
1 Year
3 Years
 
$
112
      $
350
 
Portfolio Turnover
 
The Fund pays transaction costs, including commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes where shares of the Fund are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY
 
The Fund invests in a selection of USAA mutual funds (underlying USAA Funds) in a manner consistent with its current asset allocation as depicted in the lifestyle transition path . The Fund reserves the right to change its target date asset allocation as well as the lifestyle transition path at any time. However, at its target date, the Fund's asset allocation will consist of approximately 30% equity and 70% fixed income. The Fund's target asset allocation will not change after the target date has been reached without approval from the Fund’s Board of Trustees.
 
 
PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
 
Any investment involves risk, and there is no assurance that the Fund’s objective will be achieved. The Fund is actively managed and the invest-ment techniques and risk analyses used by the Fund’s manager(s) may not produce the desired results. As you consider an investment in the
 
 

Prospectus | 2
 
Fund, you also should take into account your tolerance for the daily fluctuations of the financial markets and whether you can afford to leave your money in the investment for long periods of time to ride out down periods. As with other mutual funds, losing money is a risk of investing in this Fund.
 
The risks of the Fund directly correspond to the risks of the underlying USAA Funds in which the Fund invests. By investing in the underlying USAA Funds, the Fund has exposure to the risk of many different areas of the market. The degree to which the risks described below apply to the Fund varies according to the Fund’s asset allocation. For instance, the more the Fund is allocated to stock funds, the greater the expected risk associated with equity securities. The Fund also is subject to asset allocation risk (i.e., the risk that allocations will not produce intended results) and to management risk (i.e., the risk that the selection of underlying USAA Funds will not produce intended results).
 
In managing a Fund that invests in underlying USAA Funds, the Adviser may be subject to potential conflicts of interest in allocating the Fund’s assets among the various underlying USAA Funds because the fees payable to it by some of the underlying USAA Funds are higher than the fees payable by other underlying USAA Funds and because the Adviser also is responsible for managing and administering the underlying USAA Funds.
 
The Fund may invest in underlying USAA Funds that invest in equity securities, which are subject to stock market risk. Stock prices in general may decline over short or even extended periods, regardless of the success or failure of a company’s operations. Equity securities tend to be more volatile than bonds. In addition, to the degree an underlying USAA Fund invests in foreign securities, there is a possibility that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities will decrease because of unique risks, such as currency exchange-rate fluctuations; foreign market illiquidity; emerging market risk; increased price volatility; uncertain political conditions; exchange control regulations; foreign ownership limits; different accounting, reporting, and disclosure requirements; difficulties in obtaining legal judgments; and foreign withholding taxes.
 
The Fund may invest in underlying USAA Funds that invest in bonds. There is a risk that the market value of those bonds will fluctuate because of changes in interest rates, changes in supply and demand for fixed-income securities, or other market factors. Bond prices are linked to the prevailing market interest rates. In general, when interest rates

3 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
rise, bond prices fall and when interest rates fall, bond prices rise. The price volatility of a bond also depends on its maturity. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond, the greater is its sensitivity to interest rates. To compensate investors for this higher interest rate risk, bonds with longer maturities generally offer higher yields than bonds with shorter maturities.
 
Credit risk is the possibility that a borrower of a fixed-income instrument cannot make timely dividend, interest, and principal payments on its securities or that negative perceptions of the issuer’s ability to make such payments will cause the price of that security to decline. The Fund accepts some credit risk as a recognized means to enhance an investor’s return. All securities varying from the highest quality to very speculative have some degree of credit risk. Securities rated below investment grade, also known as junk bonds, generally entail greater economic, credit, and liquidity risk than investment-grade securities. Their prices may be more volatile, especially during economic downturns and financial setbacks or liquidity events.
 
The Fund may change the allocation of its portfolio holdings on a frequent basis, which may result in high portfolio turnover. As a result, it also has less flexibility in the timing of purchases and sales of securities than it would otherwise. The Fund may have a higher proportion of capital gains and a potentially lower return than a fund that does not have a reallocation policy.
 
An investment in this Fund is not a deposit of USAA Federal Savings Bank, or any other bank, and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.
 
PERFORMANCE
 
 
Performance history for the Fund will be available in the prospectus after the Fund has been in operation for one full calendar year. For the most current price and total return information for this Fund, log on to usaa.com or call (800) 531-USAA (8722).
 

Prospectus | 4
 
INVESTMENT ADVISER
 
 
USAA Asset Management Company (AMCO)
 
PORTFOLIO MANAGER(S)
 
 
John P. Toohey, CFA, Vice President of Equity Investments, has co-managed the Fund since its inception in July 2013.
 
Wasif A. Latif, Vice President of Equity Investments, has co-managed the Fund since its inception in July 2013.
 
PURCHASE AND SALE OF SHARES
 
 
You may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund on any business day through our website at usaa.com or mobile.usaa.com; by mail at P.O. Box 659453, San Antonio, Texas 78288-9825; by telephone (800) 531-USAA (8722); by fax to (800) 292-8177. You also may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund through USAA Brokerage Services and certain other financial intermediaries.
 
Minimum initial purchase: $1,000 or $500 with a $50 monthly systematic investment.
 
Minimum subsequent investment: $50
 
TAX INFORMATION
 
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed to you as ordinary income or long-term capital gains, unless you invest through an Individual Retirement Account (IRA), 401(k) plan, or other tax-deferred account.

5 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 

 

PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
 
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for certain servicing and administrative functions. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales-person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


Prospectus | 6

USAA Asset Management Company (AMCO) manages this Fund. For easier reading, AMCOmay be referred to as “we” or “us” throughout the prospectus.
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
 
n What is the Fund’s investment objective?
 
 
The Fund seeks to provide capital appreciation and current income consistent with its current investment allocation. The Fund’s Board of Trustees (the Board) may change this investment objective without shareholder approval.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY
 
 
n What is the Fund’s principal investment strategy?
 
The Fund invests in a selection of USAA mutual funds (underlying USAA Funds) according to an asset allocation strategy designed for investors planning to start withdrawing funds for retirement in or within a few years of year 2060. The Fund’s investment program assumes funds will start being withdrawn for retirement purposes at age 65. The Fund’s allocation will change over time in accordance with the lifestyle transition path included herein. The Fund does not provide guaranteed income for retirement.
 
The Fund attempts to achieve its objective by investing in a diversified portfolio allocated to long-term asset classes consistent with the current asset allocation depicted in the lifestyle transition path. However, at its target date, the Fund's asset allocation will consist of approximately 30% equity and 70% fixed income will not change after the target date has been reached without Board approval.
 
Lifestyle Transition
 
Over time, the target asset class allocation will change according to a predetermined “lifestyle transition.” The lifestyle transition represents the shifting of asset classes over time as the Fund’s neutral target asset mix becomes more conservative. This lifestyle transition reflects the need for reduced investment risks and lower volatility as retirement approaches. The allocations reflected in the Fund’s lifestyle transition

7 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
chart are referred to as “neutral” allocations because they do not reflect tactical decisions by us to overweight or underweight a particular asset class based on its market outlook. However, we reserve the right to modify the target asset allocation strategy and also to change the underlying USAA Funds’ allocations for the Fund from time to time should market conditions and other circumstances warrant a change.
 
To ensure the Fund maintains its target lifestyle transition, new money invested in the Fund will be allocated to the underlying USAA Funds in accordance with the weightings at that time, which may be different than the long-term target asset class allocation, depending on the Fund’s lifestyle transition over time or its overweight and underweight tactical positions. In addition, the Fund’s portfolio will be rebalanced on a regular basis taking into account the following factors: the Fund’s allocation among the asset classes, investment style, market capitalization, transaction costs, and global diversification.
 
For the Fund’s stated retirement date, allocations to stocks are relatively high so that investors may benefit from their long-term growth potential while allocations to fixed-income securities are relatively low. We use this approach generally to help investors accumulate the assets needed during their retirement years. As time elapses and an investor’s retirement date approaches, the Fund’s neutral allocations to stocks will decrease in favor of fixed-income securities.
 

Prospectus | 8
 
[Glidepath chart]


Target Retirement 2060 Fund
       
 
Years until Target
Equity & Alternative
Fixed Income
                                                                                  Cash
2013
47
97
1
2
2014
46
96
2
2
2015
45
95
3
2
2016
44
94
4
2
2017
43
93
5
2
2018
42
92
6
2
2019
41
91
7
2
2020
40
90
8
2
2021
39
89
9
2
2022
38
88
10
2
2023
37
87
11
2
2024
36
86
12
2
2025
35
85
13
2
2026
34
84
14
2
2027
33
83
15
2
2028
32
82
16
2
2029
31
81
17
2
2030
30
80
18
2
2031
29
79
19
2
2032
28
78
20
2
2033
27
77
21
2
2034
26
76
22
2
2035
25
75
23
2
2036
24
74
24
2
2037
23
73
25
2
2038
22
72
26
2
2039
21
71
27
2
2040
20
70
28
2
2041
19
68
30
2
2042
18
66
32
2
2043
17
64
34
2
2044
16
62
36
2
2045
15
60
38
2
2046
14
58
40
2
2047
13
56
42
2
2048
12
54
44
2
2049
11
52
46
2
2050
10
50
48
2
2051
9
48
50
2
2052
8
46
52
2
2053
7
44
53
3
2054
6
42
54
4
2055
5
40
55
5
2056
4
38
56
6
2057
3
36
57
7
2058
2
34
58
8
2059
1
32
59
9
2060
0
30
60
10


RISKS
 
 
The risks of the Fund correspond directly to the risks of the underlying USAA Funds in which it invests. By investing in the underlying USAA Funds, the Fund has exposure to the risk of many different areas of the market. The degree to which the risks described below apply to the Fund varies according to the Fund’s asset allocation. The Fund also is subject to asset allocation risk (i.e., the risk that allocations will not produce intended results) and to management risk (i.e., the risk that the selection of underlying USAA Funds will not produce intended results).
 
By investing in the underlying USAA Funds, the Fund has exposure to the following risks:
 
Affiliated Fund Risk: In managing a Fund that invests in underlying USAA Funds, the Adviser may be subject to potential conflicts of interest in allocating the Fund’s assets among the various underlying USAA Funds because the fees payable to it by some of the underlying USAA Funds are higher than the fees payable by other underlying
 

9 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
USAA Funds and because the Adviser also is responsible for managing and administering the underlying USAA Funds.
 
 
Derivatives Risk: Risks associated with derivatives include the risk that the derivative is not well-correlated with the security, index, or currency to which it relates; the risk that derivatives used for risk management may not have the intended effects and may result in losses or missed opportunities; the risk that a fund will be unable to sell the derivative because of an illiquid secondary market; the risk that a counterparty is unwilling or unable to meet its obligation; the risk of interest rate movements; and the risk that the derivatives transaction could expose a fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase a fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses. There is no guarantee that derivatives activities will be employed or that they will work, and their use could cause lower returns or even losses to a fund.
 
Management Risk: Management risk is the possibility that the investment techniques and risk analyses used by a fund’s manager will not produce the desired results. There is no guarantee that the investment techniques and risk analyses used by a fund’s manager will produce the desired results. Market Illiquidity Risk: Market illiquidity is the risk of investing in the types of securities whose market is generally less liquid than the market for higher-quality securities. The market for lower-quality issues is generally less liquid than the market for higher-quality issues. Therefore, large purchases or sales could cause sudden and significant price changes in these securities. Many lower-quality issues do not trade frequently; however, when they do trade, the price may be substantially higher or lower than expected.
 
Nondiversification Risk: A fund is nondiversified if it invests a greater percentage of its assets in a single issuer, such as a single stock, bond, or equity security. Because a relatively high percentage of the total assets of the underlying USAA Precious Metals and Minerals Fund may be invested in the securities of a single issuer or a limited number of issuers, the securities of this fund may be more sensitive to changes in the market value of a single issuer or a limited number of issuers. Such a focused investment strategy may increase the volatility of the fund’s invest-ment results, because the fund may be more susceptible to risks associated with a single issuer or economic, political, or regulatory event than a diversified fund.
 

Prospectus | 10
 
Reallocation Risk: The Fund may change the allocation of its portfolio holdings on a frequent basis, which may result in high portfolio turnover. In purchasing and selling securities in order to reallocate the portfolio, the Fund will pay more in brokerage commissions than it would without a reallocation policy. The Fund may have a higher proportion of capital gains and a potentially lower return than a fund that does not have a reallocation policy.
 
Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs) Investment Risk: Investing in both equity and debt securities of REITs may subject a fund to many of the same risks associated with the direct ownership of real estate. There is a risk that a Fund’s investments in real estate securities and REITs will decrease because of a decline in real estate values. Addi-tionally, REITs are dependent upon the capabilities of the REIT manager(s), have limited diversification, and could be significantly impacted by changes in tax laws. Moreover, by investing in debt securities of REITs, a fund is also subject to credit risk.
 
Tactical Allocation Risk: The Fund has a targeted risk tolerance and a corresponding asset allocation target; however, mere asset allocation and volatility are not the sole determination of risk. Your manager will tactically allocate away from the target allocation as market conditions and the perceived risks warrant.
 
To the extent the Fund has exposure to equity securities through investment in the underlying USAA Funds, it is subject to the following risks:
 
Dividend Payout Risk: The possibility that a number of the companies in which a fund invests will reduce or eliminate the dividend on the securities held by the fund is referred to as dividend payout risk. Should many portfolio companies reduce or eliminate their dividend payments, the ability of a fund to produce investment income to shareholders will be adversely affected.
 
Foreign Investing Risk: Foreign investing risk is the possibility that the value of a fund’s investments in foreign securities will decrease because of unique risks, such as currency-exchange rate fluctuations; foreign market illiquidity; increased price volatility; exchange control regulations; foreign ownership limits; different accounting, reporting, and disclosure requirements; difficulties in obtaining legal judgments; and foreign withholding taxes. Foreign investing may result in a fund experiencing more rapid and extreme changes in value than a fund that
 

11 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies. Two risks that require significant examination on foreign investing are:
 
v
Emerging Markets Risk: investments in countries that are in the early stages of their industrial development involve exposure to economic structures that generally are less diverse and mature than those in the United States and to political systems that may be less stable.
 
 
v
Political Risk: political risk includes a greater potential for coups d’etat, revolts, and expropriation by governmental organizations.
 
Over-the-Counter (OTC) Risk: OTC transactions involve risk in addition to those incurred by transactions in securities traded on exchanges. OTC-listed companies may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources. Many OTC stocks trade less frequently and in smaller volume than exchange-listed stocks. The values of these stocks may be more volatile than exchange-listed stocks, and a fund may experience difficulty in purchasing or selling these securities at a fair price.
 
Precious Metals and Minerals Securities Investment Risk: Because of commodity price volatility and the increased impact such volatility has on the profitability of precious metals and minerals companies, there are additional risks involved in investing in precious metals and minerals securities. However, since the market action of such securities has tended to move independently of the broader financial markets, the addition of precious metals and minerals securities to your portfolio may help to reduce overall fluctuations in portfolio value.
 
Small-Cap Company Risk: Small-cap company risk is the greater risk of investing in smaller, less well-known companies, as opposed to investing in established companies with proven track records. Small-cap companies may be more vulnerable than larger companies to adverse business or economic developments. Small-cap companies also may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources. Securities of such companies may be less liquid and more volatile than securities of larger companies or the market averages in general and, therefore, may involve greater risk than investing in the securities of larger companies. In addition, small-cap companies may not be well known to the investing public, may not have institutional ownership, and may have only cyclical, static, or moderate growth prospects.
 
Stock Market Risk: Stock market risk is the possibility that the value of a fund’s investments in equity securities will decline over short or even
 

Prospectus | 12
extended periods, regardless of the success or failure of a company’s operations. Stock markets tend to run in cycles, with periods when stock prices generally go up and periods when stock prices generally go down. Equity securities tend to be more volatile than bonds. However, domestic and international stock markets also can move up and down rapidly or unpredictably due to factors affecting securities markets generally, particular investments, or individual companies. Market turmoil may be reflected in perceptions of economic uncertainty, price volatility in the equity and debt markets, and fluctuating trading liquidity. In response, governments may adopt a variety of fiscal and monetary policy changes, including but not limited to, direct capital infusions into companies, new monetary programs, and lower interest rates. An unexpected or quick reversal of these policies could increase volatility in the equity and debt markets. Market conditions and economic risks could have a significant effect on domestic and international economies, and could add significantly to the risks of increased volatility for the Fund and the inability to attain a Fund ’s investment objective.
 
To the extent the Fund has exposure to fixed-income securities through investment in the underlying USAA Funds, it is subject to the following risks:
 
Credit Risk:
 
Credit risk is the possibility that a borrower cannot make timely dividend, interest, and principal payments on its securities or that negative perceptions of the issuer’s ability to make such payments will cause the price of that security to decline. The fixed-income securities held in a fund’s portfolio may be subject to credit risk.
 
To the extent a fund invests in government securities, credit risk will be limited. When evaluating potential investments for a fund, our analysts also assess credit risk and its impact on the fund’s portfolio. Nevertheless, even investment-grade securities are typically subject to some credit risk. Securities in the lowest-rated investment-grade category have speculative characteristics. Changes in economic conditions or other circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capability to make principal and interest payments on these securities than is the case for higher-rated securities. In addition, the ratings of securities are estimates by the rating agencies of the credit quality of the securities. The ratings may not take into account every risk related to whether interest or principal will be repaid on a timely basis.
 

13 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 
If a fund purchases asset-backed or mortgage-backed securities that are “subordinated” to other interests in the same pool of assets, the fund as a holder of those securities may only receive payments after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. In addition, changes in the values of the properties backing the loans, as well as changes in interest rates, may have a greater effect on the delinquency, foreclosure, bankruptcy, and loss experience of the loans in the pool than on loans originated in a more traditional manner. In addition, instability in the markets for such securities may affect the liquidity of such securities, which means that a fund may be unable to sell such securities at an advantageous time and price. As a result, the value of such securities may decrease and a fund may incur greater losses on the sale of such securities than under more stable market conditions. Furthermore, instability and illiquidity in the market for lower-rated asset-backed or mortgage-backed securities may affect the overall market for such securities, thereby impacting the liquidity and value of higher-rated securities.
 
Many issuers of high-yield securities have characteristics (including, but not limited to, high levels of debt, an untested business plan, significant competitive and technological challenges, legal, and political risks), which cast doubt on their ability to honor their financial obligations. They may be unable to pay dividends, interest when due, or return all the principal amount of their debt obligations at maturity.
 
Interest Rate Risk: As a mutual fund generally investing in income-producing securities, a fund is subject to the risk that the market value of the securities will fluctuate because of rising interest rates. The prices of income-producing securities are linked to the prevailing market interest, changes in supply and demand for investment securities, or other market factors. In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of income-producing securities fall and when interest rates fall, the prices of income-producing securities rise. The price volatility of an income-producing security also depends on its maturity. Generally, the longer the maturity of the income-producing security, the greater is its sensitivity to interest rates. To compensate investors for this higher risk, securities with longer maturities generally offer higher yields than securities with shorter maturities.
 
v
If interest rates increase, the yield of a fund may increase and the market value of the fund’s securities will likely decline, adversely affecting the fund’s net asset value (NAV) and total return.
 

Prospectus | 14
 
v
If interest rates decrease, the yield of a fund may decrease and the market value of the fund’s securities may increase, which would likely increase the fund’s NAV and total return.
 
Prepayment Risk: There is the risk that prepayments of mortgage-backed securities in a fund’s portfolio will require reinvestment at lower interest rates, resulting in less interest income to the fund. As a mutual fund investing in mortgage-backed securities, a fund is subject to prepayment risk for these securities. Mortgagors may generally pay off mortgages without penalty before the due date. When mortgaged property is sold, which can occur at any time for a variety of reasons, the old mortgage is usually prepaid. Also, when mortgage interest rates fall far enough to make refinancing attractive, prepayments tend to accelerate. Prepayments require reinvestment of the principal at the then-current level of interest rates, which are often at a lower level than when the mortgages were originally issued. Reinvestment at lower rates tends to reduce the interest payments received by a fund and, therefore, the size of the net investment income dividend payments available to shareholders. If reinvestment occurs at a higher level of interest rates, the opposite effect is true.
 
U.S. Government-Sponsored Enterprises (GSEs) Risk: While mortgage-backed securities and other securities issued by certain GSEs, such as the Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae), are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, securities issued by other GSEs, are supported only by the right of the GSE (including Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae) to borrow from the U.S. Treasury, the discretionary authority of the U.S. government to purchase the GSEs’ obligations, or only by the credit of the issuing agency, instrumentality, or corporation, and are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. In September of 2008, the U.S. Treasury placed the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (FHLMC) and the Federal National Mortgage Association (FNMA) under conservatorship and appointed the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) to manage their daily operations. In addition, the U.S. Treasury entered into purchase agreements with FNMA and FHLMC to provide them with capital in exchange for senior preferred stock. While these arrangements are intended to ensure that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac can continue to meet their obligations, it is possible that actions by the U.S. Treasury, FHFA or others could adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investments in securities issued by the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
 

15 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund

 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
This prospectus doesn’t tell you about every policy or risk of investing in the Fund. For additional information about the Fund’s investment policies and the types of securities in which the Fund’s assets may be invested, you may want to request a copy of the statement of additional information (SAI) (the back cover tells you how to do this).
 
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS
 
 
The Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio securities are available in the Fund’s SAI, which is available upon request.
 
FUND MANAGEMENT
 
AMCO serves as the manager of this Fund. We are an affiliate of United Services Automobile Association (USAA), a large, diversified financial services institution. Our mailing address is P.O. Box 659453, San Antonio, Texas 78265-9825. We had approximately $xx billion in total assets under management as of May 31, 2013.
 
We provide investment management services to the Fund pursuant to an Advisory Agreement. Under this agreement, we are responsible for managing the business and affairs of the Fund, subject to the authority of and supervision by the Board. A discussion regarding the basis of the Board's approval of the Fund’s Advisory Agreements will be available in the Fund’s semiannual report to shareholders for the period ended June 30.
 
We have agreed, through May 1, 2014, to make payments or waive management, administration, and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund so that the total annual operating expenses (exclusive of commission recapture, expense offset arrangements, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) do not exceed an annual rate of 0.10% of the Fund’s average net assets. This reimbursement arrangement may not be changed or terminated during this time period without approval of the Fund’s Board and may be changed or terminated by us at any time after May 1, 2014. If the Fund’s total annual operating expense ratio is lower than 0.10%, the Fund will operate at that lower expense ratio.
 

Prospectus | 16
 
In addition to providing investment management services, we also provide administration and servicing to the Fund. Our affiliate, USAA Shareholder Account Services (SAS), provides transfer agency services to the Fund. The Fund or the Fund’s transfer agent may enter into agreements with third parties (Servicing Agents) to pay such Servicing Agents for certain administrative and servicing functions. USAA Investment Management Company acts as the Fund's distributor.
 
PORTFOLIO MANAGER(S)
 
 
John P. Toohey and Wasif A. Latif, as the asset allocation and co-managers of the Fund, have day-to-day management responsibility for the Fund and work with an investment strategy committee in developing and executing the Fund’s investment program.
 
Mr. Toohey, CFA, is Vice President of Equity Investments and joined USAA in February 2009. He has co-managed the Fund since its inception. He has 15 years of investment management experience. Prior to joining USAA, Mr. Toohey was a managing director at AIG Investments from December 2000 to January 2009, where he was responsible for the investments supporting AIG’s pension plans worldwide. He also was co-portfolio manager for four lifestyle and asset allocation funds, oversaw the equity index fund business, and served as a senior member of the external client asset allocation team. Education: B.A., mathematics, Williams College. He holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation.
 
Mr. Latif is Vice President of Equity Investments and has co-managed the Fund since its inception. Mr. Latif has 15 years of investment management experience and has worked for us seven years. Education: B.S. in finance, University of Indianapolis; M.B.A., University of Illinois at Chicago.
 
The SAI provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ compensation, other accounts managed, and ownership of Fund securities.
 
MANAGEMENT OF THE UNDERLYING FUNDS
 
 
AMCO serves as investment manager to all of the underlying USAA Funds and, in conjunction with each underlying USAA Fund’s subadviser(s), is responsible for the selection and management of the underlying USAA Funds’ portfolio investments.
 

17 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 
DESCRIPTION OF UNDERLYING FUNDS
 
 
The investments of the Fund are concentrated in the underlying USAA Funds. Although the underlying USAA Funds are categorized generally as equity, fixed income, and other alternatives, many of these Funds may invest in a mix of securities of domestic and foreign issuers, investment-grade and high-yield bonds, and other securities. Therefore, the Fund's investment performance is directly related to the investment performance of these underlying USAA Funds.
 
Each of the underlying USAA Funds may temporarily depart from its normal investment policies in response to extraordinary market, economic, political, or other conditions. In doing so, the underlying USAA Fund may succeed in avoiding losses, but may otherwise fail to achieve its investment objective, which in turn may prevent the Fund from achieving its investment objective.
 
The following table gives a brief description of the objective and principal investment strategy of the underlying USAA Funds. Additional investment practices are described in more detail under the Investment Policies in the SAI and in each underlying USAA Fund’s prospectus.

USAA Equity Funds
Objective/Strategy
Aggressive Growth Fund
capital appreciation/primarily invests in equity securities of large companies selected for growth potential
Emerging Markets Fund
capital appreciation/80% in equity securities of emerging market companies
Growth Fund
long-term growth of capital/invests in a diversified portfolio of equity securities selected for their growth potential
Income Stock Fund
current income with prospect of increasing dividend income and
 
 

Prospectus | 18
 
 
  potential for capital appreciation/80% in common stocks with at least 65% normally invested in companies that pay dividends
International Fund
capital appreciation/80% in equity securities of foreign companies (including emerging market companies)
Small Cap Stock Fund
long-term growth of capital/80% in equity securities of companies with small market capitalizations
S&P 500 Index Fund
an index fund that seeks to match, before fees and expenses, the S&P 500 Index performance/80% in common stocks of companies composing the S&P 500 Index
Value Fund
long-term growth of capital/primarily invests in equity securities of companies considered to be undervalued

USAA Fixed Income Funds
Objective/Strategy
High Income Fund
attractive total return primarily through high current income and secondarily through capital appreciation/primarily invests in high-yield securities
Income Fund
maximum current income without undue risk to principal/primarily invest in U.S. dollar-denominated debt securities that have been selected for their high yields relative to the risk involved
 

19 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 
 
Intermediate-Term Bond Fund
high current income without undue risk to principal/80% in debt securities with a dollar weighted average portfolio maturity between three to 10 years
Short-Term Bond Fund
high current income consistent with preservation of principal/80% in investment-grade debt securities with a dollar weighted average portfolio maturity of three years or less
USAA Alternative Funds
Objective/Strategy
Precious Metals and Minerals Fund
long-term capital appreciation and protect the purchasing power of your capital against inflation/80% in equity securities of domestic and foreign companies principally engaged in the exploration, mining, or processing of gold and other precious metals and minerals
Real Return Fund
total return that exceeds the rate of inflation over an economic cycle/principally invests in a portfolio of investments that the adviser believes will have a total return that exceeds the rate of inflation over an economic cycle
 
PURCHASES
 
 
You may purchase shares directly from the Fund or through certain financial intermediaries as described below.
 
OPENING AN ACCOUNT WITH THE FUND
 
You may open an account with us and purchase shares as described below. If opening by mail, you should return a complete, signed application to open your initial account. However, after you open your

Prospectus | 20
initial account with us, you will not need to fill out another application to invest in another fund of the USAA family of funds unless the registration is different or we need further information to verify your identity.
 
As required by federal law, we must obtain certain information from you prior to opening an account. If we are unable to verify your identity, we may refuse to open your account, or we may open your account and take certain actions without prior notice to you, including restricting account transactions pending verification of your identity.
 
If we subsequently are unable to verify your identity, we may close your account and return to you the value of your shares at the next calculated net asset value (NAV). We prohibit opening accounts for, including but not limited to, foreign financial institutions, shell banks, correspondent accounts for foreign shell banks, and correspondent accounts for foreign financial institutions. A “foreign shell bank” is a foreign bank without a physical presence in any country. A “correspondent account” is an account established for a foreign bank to receive deposits from, or to make payments or other disbursements on behalf of, the foreign bank, or to handle other financial transactions related to such foreign bank.
 
TAXPAYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER
 
Each shareholder named on the account must provide a Social Security number or other taxpayer identification number to avoid possible tax withholding required by the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Code). See the section on Taxes for additional tax information.
 
EFFECTIVE DATE OF PURCHASE
 
When you make a purchase, your purchase price will be the NAV per share next determined after we or the financial intermediary receive your request in proper form (e.g., complete, signed application and payment). The Fund’s NAV is determined as of the close of the regular trading session (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) each day it is open for trading. If we or the financial intermediary receive your purchase request and payment in proper form prior to that time, your purchase price will be the NAV per share determined for that day. If we or the financial intermediary receive your purchase request or payment in property form after that time, the purchase price will be the NAV per share calculated as of the close of the next regular trading session of the NYSE.
 

21 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 
The Fund or the Fund's transfer agent may enter into agreements with third parties (Servicing Agents), which may hold Fund Shares in omnibus accounts for their customers, under which the Servicing Agents are authorized to receive orders for shares of the Fund on the Fund’s behalf. Under these arrangements, the Fund will be deemed to have received an order when an authorized Servicing Agent receives the order. Accordingly, customer orders will be priced at the Fund’s NAV next computed after they are received by an authorized Servicing Agent even though the orders may be transmitted to the Fund by the Servicing Agent after the time the Fund calculates its NAV.
 
PAYMENT
 
If you plan to purchase shares of the Fund with a check, money order, traveler’s check, or other similar instrument, the instrument must be written in U.S. dollars and drawn on a U.S. bank. We do not accept the following foreign instruments: checks, money orders, traveler’s checks, or other similar instruments. In addition, we do not accept cash or coins. If you plan to purchase shares through a financial intermediary, please check with that financial intermediary regarding acceptable forms of payment.
 
PURCHASING SHARES
 
You may open an account and purchase shares of the Fund on the Internet, by telephone, or by mail.
 
 
Shares of the Fund also are available through USAA Brokerage Services and certain financial intermediaries, as described below.
 
 
To purchase shares of the Fund through your USAA brokerage account, please contact USAA Brokerage Services directly. These shares will become part of your USAA brokerage account and will be subject to USAA Brokerage Services' applicable policies and procedures. Additional fees also may apply.
 
If shares of the Fund are purchased through a retirement account or an investment professional (i.e., financial intermediary), the policies and procedures on these purchases may differ from those discussed in this prospectus and may vary. Additional fees also may apply to your investment in the Fund, including a transaction fee, if you buy or sell shares of the Fund through a broker or other investment professional. For more information on these fees, check with your investment professional.
 

Prospectus | 22

MINIMUM INITIAL PURCHASE
 
$1,000 or $500 with a $50 monthly systematic investment.

ADDITIONAL PURCHASES
 
$50 minimum per transaction, per account. Employees of USAA and its affiliated companies may open an account through payroll deduction for as little as $25 per pay period with a $500 initial investment.
 
REDEMPTIONS
 
 
For federal income tax purposes, a redemption is a taxable event unless you hold shares of the Fund in a tax-deferred account or are a tax-exempt investor; as such, you may realize a capital gain or loss. Such capital gains or losses are based on the difference between your basis in the redeemed shares and the proceeds you receive upon their redemption. See Taxes for information regarding basis election and reporting.
 
The Fund may elect to suspend the redemption of shares or postpone the date of payment in limited circumstances (e.g., if the NYSEis closed or when permitted by order of the SEC).
 
REDEEMING SHARES
 
You may redeem Fund shares by Internet, by telephone, by mail, , or through your financial intermediary on any day the NAV per share is calculated. Fund Share redemptions will receive a redemption price of the NAV per share next determined after we receive your request in proper form. If we receive your redemption request in proper form prior to the close of the NYSE's regular trading session (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time), your redemption price will be the NAV per share determined for that day. If we receive the redemption request after that time, the redemption price will be the NAV per share calculated as of the close of the next regular trading session of the NYSE.
 
Telephone redemption privileges are established automatically when you complete your application. The Fund has undertaken certain authentication procedures regarding telephone transactions and will employ reasonable procedures to confirm that instructions communicated by telephone are genuine. Before any discussion regarding your account, we will obtain certain information from you to verify your identity. Additionally, your telephone calls may be recorded
 

23 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
or monitored, and confirmations of account transactions are sent to the address of record or by electronic delivery to your designated e-mail address.
 
If shares of the Fund are held through USAA, we will send your money within seven days after the effective date of redemption. However, payment for redemption of shares purchased by electronic funds transfer (EFT) or check will be sent after the EFT or check has cleared, which could take up to seven days from the purchase date.
 
If shares of the Fund are held in your USAA brokerage account, please contact USAA Brokerage Services regarding redemption policies. These shares are part of your USAA brokerage account, and any redemption request received in good order prior to the close of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) will receive the NAV per share determined for that day, subject to USAA Brokerage Services’ applicable policies and procedures.
 
If shares of the Fund are held through a retirement account or an investment professional (i.e., financial intermediary), the policies and procedures on these redemptions may differ from those discussed in this prospectus and may vary. Additional fees also may apply to your investment in the Fund, including a transaction fee, if you buy or sell shares of the Fund through a broker or other investment professional. For more information on these fees, check with your investment professional.
 
EXCHANGES
 
 
For federal income tax purposes, an exchange between funds is a taxable event unless you hold shares of the Fund in a tax-deferred account or are a tax-exempt investor; as such, you may realize a capital gain or loss. Such capital gains or losses are based on the difference between your basis in the exchanged shares and the price of the shares when they are exchanged. See Taxes for information regarding basis election and reporting.
 
EXCHANGE PRIVILEGE
 
The exchange privilege is automatic when you complete your application. You may exchange shares among funds in the USAA family of funds, provided the shares to be acquired are offered in your state of residence. The Fund, however, reserves the right to terminate or change the terms of an exchange offer.
 

Prospectus | 24
 
Exchanges made through the USAA self-service telephone system and the Internet require an Electronic Services Agreement (ESA) and EFT Buy/Sell authorization on file. After we receive the exchange orders, the Fund’s transfer agent will simultaneously process exchange redemptions and purchases at the share prices next determined pur-suant to the procedures set forth herein. See section on Effective Date of Purchase for additional information. The investment minimums applicable to share purchases also apply to exchanges.
 
If shares of the Fund are held in your USAA brokerage account, please contact USAA Brokerage Services regarding exchange policies. These shares will become part of your USAA brokerage account, and any exchange request received in good order prior to the close of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) will receive the NAV per share determined for that day, subject to USAA Brokerage Services’ applicable policies and procedures.
 
If shares of the Fund are held through a retirement account or an investment professional (i.e., financial intermediary), the policies and procedures on an exchange may differ from those discussed in this prospectus and may vary. Additional fees also may apply to your investment in the Fund, including a transaction fee, if you buy, sell, or exchange shares of the Fund through a broker or other investment professional. For more information on these fees, check with your investment professional.
 
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT PURCHASES, REDEMPTIONS, AND EXCHANGES
 
 
CONTACTING USAA
 
The following features may be available to you to purchase, redeem, and exchange shares of the Fund if you hold your shares in a USAA mutual fund account with us.
 
Internet Access – usaa.com
 
 
n
Log on to usaa.com and select “register now” or call (800) 759-8722. Once you have established Internet access to your account, you will be able to access account information and make most account transactions. This includes opening and funding a new mutual fund account; making purchases, exchanges, and redemptions; reviewing account activity; checking balances; and more.
 

25 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 
 
Mobile Access – mobile.usaa.com
 
 
n
Review account information and make most account transactions.
 
USAA Self-Service Telephone System (800) 531-USAA (8722)
 
 
n
Access account information and make most account transactions. This service is available with an ESA and EFT Buy/Sell authorization on file.
 
Telephone
 
 
n
Call toll free (800) 531-USAA (8722) Monday – Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Central time and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central time to speak with a member service representative.
 
Fax
 
 
n
Send a signed fax with your written redemption instructions to (800) 292-8177. In certain instances we may require a signature from all owners associated with an account.
 
Mail
 
 
n
If you would like to open an account or request a redemption by mail, send your application and check or written instructions to:
 
Regular Mail:
USAA Investment Management Company
P.O. Box 659453
San Antonio, TX 78265-9825
 
Registered or Express Mail:
USAA Investment Management Company
9800 Fredericksburg Road
San Antonio, TX 78240
 
Bank Wire
 
 
n
To add to your account or request a redemption by bank wire, visit us at usaa.com or call (800) 531-USAA (8722) for instructions. This helps to ensure that your account will be credited or debited promptly and correctly.
 
 

Prospectus | 26
 
Electronic Funds Transfer

 
n
Additional purchases on a regular basis may be deducted electronically from a bank account, paycheck, income-producing investment, or USAA money market fund account. Sign up for these services when opening an account or log on to usaa.com or call (800) 531-USAA (8722) to add them.
 
DISTRIBUTION FEES
 
The Fund may apply a distribution fee to all full IRA distributions, except for those due to death, disability, divorce, or transfer to other USAA lines of business. Partial IRA distributions are not charged a distribution fee.
 
EXCESSIVE SHORT-TERM TRADING
 
The USAA Funds generally are not intended as short-term investment vehicles (except for the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund). Some investors try to profit by using excessive short-term trading practices involving mutual fund shares, frequently referred to as “market timing.”
 
Excessive short-term trading activity can disrupt the efficient management of a fund and raise its transaction costs by forcing portfolio managers to first buy and then sell portfolio securities in response to a large investment or redemption by short-term traders. While there is no assurance that the USAA Funds can deter all excessive and short-term trading, the Board has adopted the following policies (except for the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund). These policies are designed to deter disruptive, excessive short-term trading without needlessly penalizing bona fide investors.
 
To deter such trading activities, the USAA Funds’ policies and procedures include:
 
n
Each fund reserves the right to reject any purchase order, including an exchange, that it regards as disruptive to the efficient management of the particular fund.
 
n
Each fund may use a fair value pricing service or other model to assist in establishing the current value of foreign securities held by any of the USAA Funds. Fair value pricing is used to adjust for stale pricing that may occur between the close of certain foreign
 
 

27 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 
 
 
exchanges or markets and the time the USAA Funds calculate their NAV. Using fair value pricing is intended to deter those trying to take advantage of time-zone differences in the valuation of foreign securities and to prevent dilution to long-term investors. Fair value pricing of a foreign security can result in the USAA Funds’ using a price that is higher or lower than the closing price of a foreign security for purposes of calculating a fund’s NAV.
 
THE USAA FUNDS’ RIGHT TO REJECT PURCHASE AND EXCHANGE ORDERS AND LIMIT TRADING IN ACCOUNTS
 
The USAA Funds’ main safeguard against excessive short-term trading is their right to reject purchase or exchange orders if in the best interest of the affected fund. In exercising this discretion to reject purchase and exchange orders, the USAA Funds deem that certain excessive short-term trading activities are not in the best interest of the fund because such activities can hamper the efficient management of the fund. Generally, persons who engage in an “in and out” (or ”out and in”) transaction within a 30-day period will violate the USAA Funds’ policy if they engage in another “in and out” (or “out and in”) transaction in the same fund within 90 days. The USAA Funds also reserve the right to restrict future purchases or exchanges if an investor is classified as engaged in other patterns of excessive short-term trading, including after one large disruptive purchase and redemption or exchange. Finally, the USAA Funds reserve the right to reject any other purchase or exchange order in other situations that do not involve excessive short-term trading activities if in the best interest of a fund.
 
The following transactions are exempt from the excessive short-term trading activity policies described above:
 
n
Transactions in the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund;
 
n
Purchases and sales pursuant to automatic investment or withdrawal plans;
 
n
Purchases and sales made through USAA Managed Portfolios -UMPTM, USAA 529 College Savings PlanTM, USAA Federal Savings Bank Trust Department, or other designated USAA managed investment accounts;
 
n
Purchases and sales of the Institutional Shares by the Target Retirement Funds, Cornerstone Conservative Fund, and/or Cornerstone Equity Fund; and
 
 

Prospectus | 28
 
 
n
Other transactions that are not motivated by short-term trading considerations if they are approved by transfer agent management personnel and are not disruptive to a fund.
 
If a person is classified as having engaged in excessive short-term trading, the remedy will depend upon the trading activities of the investor in the account and related accounts and its disruptive effect, and can include warnings to cease such activity and/or restrictions or termination of trading privileges in a particular fund or all funds in the USAA Funds.
 
The USAA Funds rely on the transfer agent to review trading activity for excessive short-term trading. There can be no assurance, however, that its monitoring activities will successfully detect or prevent all excessive short-term trading. The USAA Funds or the transfer agent may exclude transactions below a certain dollar amount from monitoring and may change that dollar amount from time to time.
 
The USAA Funds seek to apply these policies and procedures uniformly to all investors; however, some investors purchase shares of the USAA Fund through financial intermediaries that establish omnibus accounts to invest in the USAA Funds for their clients and submit net orders to purchase or redeem shares after combining their client orders. The USAA Funds subject to the short-term trading policies generally treat these omnibus accounts as an individual investor and will apply the short-term trading policies to the net purchases and sales submitted by the omnibus account unless the USAA Funds or their transfer agent have entered into an agreement requiring the omnibus account to submit the underlying trading information for their clients upon our request and/or monitoring for excessive trading. For those omnibus accounts for which we have entered into agreements to monitor excessive trading or provide underlying trade information, the financial intermediary or USAA Funds will review net activity in these omnibus accounts for activity that indicates potential excessive short-term trading activity. If we detect suspicious trading activity at the omnibus account level, we will request underlying trading information and review the underlying trading activity to identify individual accounts engaged in excessive short-term trading activity. We will instruct the omnibus account to restrict, limit, or terminate trading privileges in a particular fund for individual accounts identified as engaging in excessive short-term trading through these omnibus accounts.
 
We also may rely on the financial intermediary to review for and identify underlying trading activity for individual accounts engaged in
 

29 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
excessive short-term trading activity, and to restrict, limit, or terminate trading privileges if the financial intermediary’s policies are determined by us to be at least as stringent as the USAA Funds’ policy. For shares of the Fund purchased through financial intermediaries there may be additional or more restrictive policies. You may wish to contact your financial intermediary to determine the policies applicable to your account.
 
Because of the increased costs to review underlying trading information, the USAA Funds will not enter into agreements with every financial intermediary that operates an omnibus account. The USAA Funds or their transfer agent could decide to enter into such contracts with financial intermediaries for all funds or particular funds and can terminate such agreements at any time.
 
OTHER FUND RIGHTS
 
The Fund reserves the right to:
 
n
Reject or restrict purchase or exchange orders when in the best interest of the Fund;
 
n
Limit or discontinue the offering of shares of the Fund without notice to the shareholders;
 
n
Calculate the NAV per share and accept purchase, exchange, and redemption orders on a business day that the NYSE is closed;
 
n
Require a signature guarantee for transactions or changes in account information in those instances where the appropriateness of a signature authorization is in question (the SAI contains information on acceptable guarantors);
 
n
Redeem an account with less than $250, with certain limitations; and
 
n
Restrict or liquidate an account when necessary or appropriate to comply with federal law.



Prospectus | 30
 
SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
 
 
SHARE PRICE CALCULATION
 
The price at which you purchase and redeem shares of the Fund is equal to the NAV per share determined on the effective date of the purchase or redemption. The NAV per share is calculated by adding the value of the Fund’s assets (i.e., the value of its investment in the Fund and other assets), deducting liabilities, and dividing by the number of shares outstanding. Shares of the Fund may be purchased and sold at the NAV per share without a sales charge. The Fund’s NAV per share is calculated as of the close of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) each day that the NYSE is open for regular trading. The NYSE is closed on most national holidays and Good Friday.
 
The Fund’s NAV is calculated based upon the NAVs of the underlying USAA Funds in which the Fund invests, which are calculated on the same day and time as the NAV of the Fund. The assets of each underlying USAA Fund are valued generally by using available market quotations or at fair value as determined in good faith by or under the direction of the underlying Fund’s Board. The prospectus for the underlying USAA Funds explains the circumstances under which those funds will use fair value pricing and the effects of doing so.
 
DIVIDENDS AND OTHER DISTRIBUTIONS
 
The Fund pays net investment income dividends annually. Ordinarily, any net realized capital gain are distributed in December of each year. The Fund may make additional distributions to shareholders when considered appropriate or necessary. For example, the Fund could make an additional distribution to avoid the imposition of any federal income or excise tax.
 
We will automatically reinvest all income dividends and capital gain distributions in additional shares of the Fund unless you request to receive the distributions by way of electronic funds transfer. The share price will be the NAV of those shares computed on the ex-distribution date. Any distribution made by the Fund will reduce the NAV per share by the amount of the distribution on the ex-distribution date. You should consider carefully the effects of purchasing shares of the Fund shortly before any distribution. Some or all distributions are subject to taxes. We will invest in your account any dividend or other distribution
 

31 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
payment returned to us by your financial institution at the current NAV per share.
 
TAXES
 
The following tax information is quite general and refers to the federal income tax law in effect as of the date of this prospectus.
 
n Treatment of the Fund
 
The Fund, which is treated as a separate corporation for federal tax purposes, intends to qualify for treatment as a “regulated investment company” under the Code (RIC). By doing so, it (but not its shareholders) will be relieved of federal income tax on the part of its investment company taxable income (consisting generally of net investment income, the excess, if any, of net short-term capital gain over net long-term capital loss (“net short-term gain”), and net gains and losses from certain foreign currency transactions, if any, all determined without regard to any deduction for dividends paid) and net capital gain (i.e., the excess of net long-term capital gain over net short-term capital loss) that it distributes to its shareholders.
 
n Shareholder Taxation
 
Distributions that shareholders receive from the Fund are subject to federal income tax and may be subject to state and/or local taxes. Dividends and distributions of net short-term capital gain are taxable to you as ordinary income, whether received in cash or reinvested in additional shares of the Fund. A portion of the Fund’s dividends may qualify for the 70% dividends-received deduction available to corporations and for the lower maximum federal income tax rates applicable to "qualified dividend income" of individuals and certain other non-corporate shareholders who satisfy certain holding period and other restrictions with respect to their shares held in a Fund -- a maximum of 15% for a single shareholder with taxable income not exceeding $400,000 ($450,000 for married shareholders filing jointly) and 20% for those non-corporate shareholders with taxable income exceeding those respective amounts.
 
Regardless of the length of time you have held shares of the Fund, distributions of net capital gain that the Fund realizes are taxable to you as long-term capital gains, whether received in cash or reinvested in additional shares of the Fund. Those distributions to individuals and certain other non-corporate shareholders will qualify for the maximum 15% and 20% federal income tax rates described above.
 

Prospectus | 32
 
You may realize a capital gain or loss for federal income tax purposes on a redemption or an exchange, which is treated like a redemption ofof shares of the Fund. Your gain or loss is based on the difference between your basis in the redeemed or exchanged shares and the redemption proceeds , or the NAV of the shares of the fund in which you exchange, you receive. Any capital gain an individual or certain other non-corporate shareholder recognizes on a redemption or exchange of his or her shares of the Fund that have been held for more than one year will qualify for the 15% and 20% maximum tax rates mentioned above. In addition, beginning in 2013 an individual shareholder is subject to a 3.8% federal tax on the lesser of (1) the individual's "net investment income," which generally includes distributions a Fund pays and net gains realized on the redemption or exchange of shares of the Fund, or (2) the excess of his or her "modified adjusted gross income" over $200,000 (or $250,000 if married and filing jointly). This tax is in addition to any other taxes due on that income. A similar tax will apply to estates and trusts. You should consult your tax adviser regarding the effect, if any, this provision may have on your investment in shares of a Fund.
 
Your basis in shares of the Fund (Covered Shares) will be determined in accordance with the Fund's default method, which is average basis, unless you affirmatively elect in writing (which may be electronic) to use a different acceptable basis determination method, such as a specific identification method. The basis determination method you elect (or the default method) may not be changed with respect to a redemption of Covered Shares after the settlement date of the redemption. You should consult with your tax adviser to determine the best Internal Revenue Service (IRS)-accepted basis determination method.
 
n Withholding
 
Federal law requires the Fund to withhold (referred to as “backup withholding”) and remit to the U.S. Treasury 28% of (1) taxable dividends, capital gain distributions, and proceeds of redemptions, regardless of the extent to which gain or loss may be realized, otherwise payable to any non-corporate shareholder who fails to furnish the Fund with a correct taxpayer identification number and (2) those dividends and distributions otherwise payable to any such shareholder who:
 
 n Underreports dividend or interest income, or
 

33 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund
 
 
 n Fails to certify that he or she is not subject to backup withholding.
 
Backup withholding is not an additional tax, and any amounts so withheld may be credited against a shareholder's federal income tax liability or refunded. To avoid this withholding requirement, you must certify on your application or on a separate IRS Form W-9 supplied by the Fund’s transfer agent that your taxpayer identification number is correct and you currently are not subject to backup withholding.
 
n Reporting
 
The Fund will report information to you annually concerning the tax status of dividends and other distributions for federal income tax purposes. In addition, the Fund (or its administrative agent) must report to the IRS and furnish to its shareholders the basis information for Covered Shares and indicate whether they had a short-term (one year or less) or long-term (more than one year) holding period. You should consult with your tax adviser to determine the best IRS-accepted basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how the basis reporting law applies to you.
 
MAILINGS
 
n Householding
 
Through our ongoing efforts to help reduce Fund expenses, each household will receive a single copy of the Fund’s most recent financial reports and prospectus. You will receive the single copy if you or a family member owns shares of the Fund in more than one account. For many of you, this eliminates duplicate copies and saves paper and postage costs for the Fund. However, if you would like to receive individual copies, please contact us, and we will begin your individual delivery within 30 days of your request.
 
n Electronic Delivery
 
Log on to usaa.com and sign up to receive your statements, confirmations, financial reports, and prospectuses electronically instead of through the mail.
 

Prospectus | 34

 
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
This section would ordinarily include the Fund’s financial highlights table, which is intended to help you understand the Fund’s financial performance for the periods of operations. Because the Fund commenced operations on or following the date of this prospectus, no financial highlights are shown.
 
 

35 | USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund


NOTES




Prospectus | 36

9800 Fredericksburg Road
San Antonio, Texas 78288
 

 

 
SAVE PAPER AND FUND COSTS
Under My Profile on usaa.com
Select Manage Preferences
Set your Document Preferences to USAA documents online
 
 
 
If you would like more information about the Fund, you may
call (800) 531-USAA (8722) to request a free copy of the
Fund’s statement of additional information (SAI), annual or
semiannual reports (once available), or to ask other questions about
the Fund. The SAI has been filed with the SEC and is incorporated
by reference to and legally a part of this prospectus. In the
Fund’s annual report, you will find a discussion of the market
conditions and investment strategies that significantly
affected the Fund’s performance during the last fiscal year.
The Fund’s annual and semiannual reports (once available) also
may be
viewed, free of charge, on usaa.com. A complete description
of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure
of the Fund’s portfolio securities is available in the Fund’s SAI.
The SAI is not available on usaa.com because of
cost considerations and lack of investor demand.

To view these documents, along with other related documents,
you may visit the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website
(www.sec.gov) or the Commission’s Public Reference Room in
Washington, DC. Information on the operation of the Public
Reference Room may be obtained by calling (202) 551-8090.
Additionally, copies of this information may be obtained,
after payment of a duplicating fee, by electronic request
at the following e-mail address: publicinfo@sec.gov or by
writing the Public Reference Section of the Commission,
Washington, DC 20549- 1520.
 
[USAA EAGLE LOGO (R)] We know what it means to serve. ® [10% graphic ]


 
xxxxx-0713 Investment Company Act File No. 811-7852 ©2013, USAA. All rights reserved.


 
 

 
 
 
  Part A
The Prospectus for the
Flexible Income Fund Shares, Institutional Shares, and Adviser Shares
is included herein
 
 

 

[USAA EAGLE LOGO (R)]


PROSPECTUS
USAA FLEXIBLE INCOME FUND SHARES
USAA FLEXIBLE INCOME FUND INSTITUTIONAL SHARES
USAA FLEXIBLE INCOME FUND ADVISER SHARES
JULY 12, 2013


The Fund is comprised of multiple classes of shares. As with other mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved of this Fund’s shares or determined whether this prospectus is accurate or complete. Anyone who tells you otherwise is committing a crime.

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Investment Objective
1
Fees and Expenses
1
Principal Investment Strategy
2
Principal Risks
2
Performance
5
Investment Adviser
5
Portfolio Manager(s)
5
Purchase and Sale of Shares
5
Tax Information
6
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
 
Other Financial Intermediaries
6
Investment Objective
7
Principal Investment Strategy
7
Risks
 
14
Portfolio Holdings
19
Fund Management
19
Portfolio Manager(s)
21
Purchases
 
21
Redemptions
25
Converting Shares
 
Exchanges
 
28
Other Important Information
 
About Purchases, Redemptions, and Exchanges
29
Multiple Class Information
35
Shareholder Information
37
Financial Highlights
43

 
 

 

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
The USAA Flexible Income Fund’s (the Fund) seeks total return through a combination of income and capital appreciation.
 
FEES AND EXPENSES
 
The tables below describe the estimated fees and expenses that you may pay, directly and indirectly, to invest in the Fund. The annual fund operating expenses are based on estimated expenses for the current fiscal year.
 
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
 
Fund Shares
Inst. Shares
Adviser Shares
 
Redemption Fee (on shares held less than 60 days)
None
None
1.00%
 
 
     
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
 
Fund Shares
Inst. Shares
Adviser Shares
 
Management Fee
0.50%
0.50%
0.50%
 
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
None
None
0.25%
 
Other Expenses
0.64%
0.44%
1.65%
 
Total Annual Operating Expenses
1.14%
0.94%
2.40%
 
Reimbursement from Adviser
(0.14%)(a)
(0.14%) (a)
(1.15%)(a)
 
Total Annual Operating Expenses After Reimbursement
1.00%
0.80%
1.25%
(a) The Adviser has agreed, through May 1, 2014, to make payments or waive manage-ment, administration, and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund so that the total annual operating expenses (exclusive of commission recapture, expense offset arrange-ments, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) do not exceed an annual rate of 1.00%, 0.80%, and 1.25% of the average net assets of the Fund's Fund Shares, Institutional Shares, and Adviser Shares, respectively. This reimbursement arrangement may not be changed or terminated during this time period without approval of the Fund’s Board of Trustees and may be changed or terminated by the Adviser at any time after May 1, 2014.
 
1 | USAA Flexible Income Fund

 
Example
 
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in this Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, you would pay the following expenses on a $10,000 investment, assuming (1) a 5% annual return, (2) the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same, (3) you redeem all of your shares at the end of the periods shown, and (4) the expense limitation arrangement for the Fund Shares, Institutional Shares, and Adviser Shares is not continued.

 
1 Year
 
3 Years
Fund Shares
$
116
 
$
362
Institutional Shares
$
96
 
$
300
Adviser Shares
$
243
 
$
748
 
Portfolio Turnover
 
The Fund pays transaction costs, including commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes where shares of the Fund are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY
 
Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest in income-producing securities that carry the most attractive opportunity for total return, regardless of maturity or credit rating. In addition to investment-grade U.S. bonds, the Fund also may invest to a significant extent in high-yield bonds, bank loans, non-dollar-denominated bonds, preferred stocks, and common stocks.
 
PRINCIPAL RISKS
 
Any investment involves risk, and there is no assurance that the Fund’s objective will be achieved. The Fund is actively managed and the invest-ment techniques and risk analyses used by the Fund’s manager(s) may
 
 
 

Prospectus | 2
 
not produce the desired results. As you consider an investment in the Fund, you also should take into account your tolerance for the daily fluctuations of the financial markets and whether you can afford to leave your money in the investment for long periods of time to ride out down periods. As with other mutual funds, losing money is a risk of investing in this Fund.
 
The fixed-income securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to credit risk, which is the possibility that an issuer of a fixed-income instrument will fail to make timely dividend, interest, and principal payments on its securities or that negative perceptions of the issuer’s ability to make such payments will cause the price of that security to decline. The Fund accepts some credit risk as a recognized means to enhance an investor’s return. All securities varying from the highest quality to very speculative have some degree of credit risk.
 
The Fund is subject to the risk that the market value of the bonds in its portfolio will fluctuate because of changes in interest rates, adverse changes in the supply and demand of debt securities, or other factors. The prices of income-producing securities are linked to the prevailing market interest rates. In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of income-producing securities fall; and when interest rates fall, the prices of income producing securities rise. The price volatility of an income-producing security also depends on its maturity. Generally, the longer the maturity of a bond, the greater is its sensitivity to interest rates.
 
To compensate investors for this higher interest rate risk, bonds with longer maturities generally offer higher yields than bonds with shorter maturities.
 
The equity securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to stock market risk. A company's stock price in general may decline over short or even extended periods, regardless of the success or failure of a company’s operations. Equity securities tend to be more volatile than bonds. In addition, to the degree the Fund invests in foreign securities, there is a possibility that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities will decrease because of unique risks, such as currency exchange-rate fluctuations; foreign market illiquidity; emerging market risk; increased price volatility; uncertain political conditions; exchange control regulations; foreign ownership limits; different accounting, reporting, and disclosure requirements; difficulties in obtaining legal judgments; and foreign withholding taxes.
 
 
3| USAA Flexible Income Fund

 
The Fund may invest in futures and options and other types of derivatives. Risks associated with derivatives include the risk that the derivative is not well-correlated with the security, index, exchange-traded fund (ETF), or currency to which it relates; the risk that derivatives used for risk management may not have the intended effects and may result in losses or missed opportunities; the risk that the Fund will be unable to sell the derivative because of an illiquid secondary market; the risk that a counterparty is unwilling or unable to meet its obligation; the risk of interest rate movements; and the risk that the derivatives transaction could expose the Fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the Fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses. There is no guarantee that derivatives activities will be employed or that they will work, and their use could reduce potential returns or even cause losses to the Fund.
 
 
The Fund is subject to legislative risk, which is the risk that new govern-ment policies may affect mortgages and other securities in the future in ways we cannot anticipate and that such policies will have an adverse impact on the value of the securities and the Fund’s net asset value.
 
The risk of investing in the types of securities whose market is generally less liquid than the market for higher-quality securities is referred to as market illiquidity. The market for lower-quality issues is generally less liquid than the market for higher-quality issues. Therefore, large purchases or sales could cause sudden and significant price changes in these securities. Many lower-quality issues do not trade frequently; however, when they do trade, the price may be substantially higher or lower than expected.
 
Mortgage-backed securities pay regularly scheduled payments of principal along with interest payments. In addition, mortgagors generally have the option of paying off their mortgages without penalty at any time. For example, when a mortgaged property is sold, the old mortgage is usually prepaid. Also, when mortgage interest rates fall, the mortgagor may refinance the mortgage and prepay the old mortgage. A home owner’s default on the mortgage also may cause a prepayment of the mortgage. This unpredictability of the mortgage’s cash flow is called prepayment risk. For the investor, prepayment risk usually means that principal is received at the least opportune time. For example, when interest rates fall, home owners will find it advantageous to refinance their mortgages and prepay principal. In this case, the investor is forced to reinvest the principal at the current, lower rates. On the other hand, when interest rates rise, home owners will
 
 

Prospectus | 4
 
generally not refinance their mortgages and prepayments will fall. This causes the average life of the mortgage to extend and be more sensitive to interest rates, which is sometimes called extension risk. In addition, the amount of principal the investor has to invest in these higher interest rates is reduced.
An investment in this Fund is not a deposit of USAA Federal Savings Bank, or any other bank, and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.
 
PERFORMANCE
 
Performance history for the Fund will be available in the prospectus after the Fund has been in operation for one full calendar year. For the most current price, total return, and yield information for this Fund, log on to usaa.com or call (800) 531-USAA (8722).
 
INVESTMENT ADVISER
 
USAA Asset Management Company (AMCO)
 
PORTFOLIO MANAGER(S)
 
Arnold J. Espe, CFA, Vice President of Mutual Fund Portfolios, has managed the Fund since its inception.
 
PURCHASE AND SALE OF SHARES
 
Fund Shares:
You may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund on any business day through our website at usaa.com or mobile.usaa.com; by mail at P.O. Box 659453, San Antonio, Texas 78288-9825; by telephone (800) 531-USAA (8722); by fax to (800) 292-8177; or through a third-party intermediary. You also may purchase or redeem shares of the Fund through USAA Brokerage Services and certain other financial intermediaries.
 

|5 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 

 

Minimum initial purchase: $3,000
Minimum subsequent investment: $50
 
Institutional Shares:
The Institutional Shares are not offered for sale directly to the general public. The minimum initial purchase is $1 million; however, the Fund reserves the right to waive or lower purchase minimums of the Institutional Shares in certain circumstances.
 
Adviser Shares:
Shares are available for investment through financial intermediaries. Your ability to purchase, exchange, redeem, and transfer shares will be affected by the policies of the financial intermediary through which you do business. The minimum initial purchase is $3,000; however, financial intermediaries may require their clients to meet different investment minimums.
 
TAX INFORMATION
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or long-term capital gains, unless you invest through an Individual Retirement Account (IRA), 401(k) plan, or other tax-deferred account.
 
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for certain servicing and administrative functions. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales-person to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
 
 

Prospectus | 6
 
USAA Asset Management Company (AMCO) manages this Fund. For easier reading, AMCOmay be referred to as “we” or “us” throughout the prospectus.
 
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
 
n What is the Fund’s investment objective?
 
The Fund seeks total return through a combination of income and capital appreciation. The Fund’s Board of Trustees (the Board) may change this investment objective without shareholder approval.
 
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY
 
n What is the Fund’s principal investment strategy?
 
Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest in income-producing securities that carry the most attractive opportunity for total return, regardless of maturity or credit rating. In addition to investment-grade U.S. bonds, the Fund also may invest to a significant extent in high-yield bonds, bank loans, non-dollar-denominated bonds, preferred stocks, and common stocks.
 
n In what types of securities may the Fund invest?
 
The Fund will invest in a variety of securities and instruments and use a variety of investment techniques in pursuing its objective. Some of these securities and techniques may include:
 
Bonds – A debt instrument representing the contractual obligation of an issuer to pay interest at a stated rate on specific dates and to repay principal (the bond’s face value) on a specified date. Bonds may be issued in a variety of forms and by different types of issuers, such as:
 
§
Corporate debt securities – Bonds and other debt instruments issued by corporations and similar entities.
§
Obligations of U.S., state, and local governments, their agencies and instrumentalities – In general, the debt obligations (some of which, but not all, are supported by the taxing power of the government) of certain governmental entities.
 
|7 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 

 
§
Mortgage- and asset-backed securities – Generally, securities representing a pool of mortgages or other expected stream of payments, such as credit card receivables or automobile loans, which are packaged together and sold to investors who are then entitled to the payments of interest and principal. Types of mortgage-backed securities in which the Fund may invest include, but are not limited to, collateralized mortgage obligations (CMO), commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS), and interest-only CMBS.
 
Convertible Securities – Bonds, preferred stocks, and other securities that pay interest or dividends and offer the buyer the ability to convert the security into common stock. The value of convertible securities depends partially on interest rate changes, the credit quality of the issuer, and the price of the underlying common stock.
 
Defaulted Securities – Generally includes securities (including bonds or preferred stock) issued by issuers that are unable to make their interest rate payments and/or repay their principal.
 
Equity Securities – Generally includes common stock (which represents an ownership interest in a corporation), preferred stock, trust or limited partnership interests, rights and warrants to subscribe to or purchase such securities, sponsored or unsponsored American depositary receipts (ADRs), European depositary receives (EDRs), global depositary receipts (GDRs), and convertible securities. They may or may not pay dividends or carry voting rights.
 
Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs) – Open-end investment com-panies that typically track a market index or specific sectors of the stock or bond markets. ETFs trade on exchanges throughout the day.
 
Eurodollar and Yankee Obligations – Eurodollar obligations are dollar-denominated instruments that have been issued outside the U.S. capital markets by foreign corporations and financial institutions and by foreign branches of U.S. corporations and financial institutions. Yankee obligations are dollar-denominated
 
 

Prospectus | 8
instruments that have been issued by foreign issuers in the U.S. capital markets.
 
Loan Interests and Direct Debt Instruments – Interests in amounts owed by a corporate, governmental, or other borrower to lenders or lending syndicates (in the case of loans and loan participations), to suppliers of goods or services (in the case of trade claims or other receivables), or to other parties. Purchasers of loans and other forms of direct indebtedness depend primarily upon the creditworthiness of the borrower for payment of interest and repayment of principal.
 
Leveraged Loans – Generally includes adjustable-rate bank loans made to companies rated below investment-grade. The interest rates typically are reset periodically based upon the fluctuations of a base interest rate and a “spread” above that base interest rate that represents a risk premium to the lending banks and/or other participating investors.
 
Non-Dollar Denominated Foreign Securities – Securities (including debt and equity securities) issued in foreign markets.
 
Periodic Auction Reset Bonds – Bonds whose interest rates are reset periodically through an auction mechanism. Periodic auction reset bonds, generally are subject to less interest rate risk than long-term fixed-rate debt instruments because the interest rate will be periodically reset in a market auction.
 
Preferred Stocks – An equity security of a company with a specified dividend that may or may not fluctuate. Preferred stocks rank after bonds and before common stocks in claims on income for dividend payments and on assets should the company be liquidated.
 
Repurchase Agreements – A transaction in which a security is purchased with a simultaneous commitment to sell it back to the seller at an agreed upon price on an agreed upon date, the resale price of which reflects the purchase price plus an agreed upon market rate of interest.
 
 
Synthetic Securities – A security created by combining an intermediate or long-term municipal bond with a right to sell the instrument back to the remarketer or liquidity provider for repurchase on short notice.
 
9 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 

 
Trade Claims –A legal claim against a company in bankruptcy by a debt holder (such as, vendors, suppliers, etc.) of the company. Trade claim holders can sell it to investors, often at a discount. Investors may see to acquire a trade claim in order to realize increased value if the company successfully reorganizes in bankruptcy.
 
Certain bond and money market instruments, such as CMO, CMBS, interest-only CMBS, periodic auction reset bonds, loan interests and direct debt instruments, Eurodollar and Yankee obligations, and synthetic securities are subject to special risks that are described in the statement of additional information (SAI).
 
The Fund also can use various techniques to increase or decrease its exposure to changing security prices, interest rates, commodity prices, or other factors that affect security values. These methods may involve:
 
Derivatives Transactions
 
§
Options – There are two basic types of options: “puts” and “calls.” A call option on a security, for example, gives the purchaser of the option the right to buy, and the writer (or seller) the obligation to sell, the underlying asset at the exercise price during the option period. Conversely, a put option on a security gives the purchaser the right to sell, and the writer the obligation to buy, the underlying asset at the exercise price during the option period. In general, a purchased put increases in value as the value of the underlying security falls and a purchased call increases in value as the value of the underlying security rises.
§
Futures Contracts – Contracts to buy or sell an underlying asset or group of assets, such as a currency, interest rate, or an index of securities, at a future time at a specified price. The purchase of a futures contract on a security or an index of securities normally enables a buyer to participate in the market movement of the underlying asset or index after paying a transaction charge and posting margin in an amount equal to a small percentage of the value of the underlying asset or index.
 
Currency Exchange Contracts – Contracts between two counter-parties to exchange one currency for another on a future date at a specified exchange rate.
 
 

Prospectus | 10
Swap Agreements – Arrangements with counterparties with respect to interest rates, currency rates or indices, wherein the Fund and the counterparty agree to exchange the returns earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or indices.
 
Credit Default Swap Agreements – A swap agreement involving a debt obligation. If the Fund is a seller of a credit default swap contract, the Fund would be required to pay the par (or other agreed upon) value of a referenced debt obligation to the counterparty in the event of a default by a third party, such as a U.S. or foreign corporate issuer, on the debt obligation. In return, the Fund would receive from the counterparty a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract provided that no event of default has occurred. If no default occurs, the Fund would keep the stream of payments and would have no payment obligations.
 
Indexed Securities – Instruments whose prices are indexed to the prices of other securities, securities indices, commodities indices, currencies, precious metals or other commodities, or other financial indicators.
 
Selling Securities Short – Selling securities with the intention of subsequently repurchasing them at a lower price. In the event of an interim price decline, the Fund will profit, since the cost of repurchase will be less than the proceeds received upon the initial (short) sale. Conversely, the Fund will incur a loss in the event that the price of a shorted instrument should rise prior to repurchase.
 
n What is the credit quality of the debt securities?
 
The Fund has no limits on the credit quality and maturity of its invest-ments and may invest in investment-grade securities and below-investment-grade securities, which are sometimes referred to as high-yield or “junk” bonds.
 
n
What is a credit rating?
 
A credit rating is an evaluation reflecting the possibility that an issuer will default on a security. Rating agencies such as Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (Moody's), Standard & Poor’s Rating Services (S&P), Fitch Ratings, Inc. (Fitch), and Dominion Bond Rating Service Limited (Dominion) analyze the financial strength of an issuer, whether the issuer is a corporation or government body. The highest ratings are assigned to those issuers perceived to have the least credit risk. For
 
 
 
11 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 

 
 
example, S&P ratings range from AAA (highly unlikely to default) to D (in default). If a security is not rated by the above-mentioned agencies, we may make a determination that the security is of equivalent investment quality to a comparable security and will assign an equivalent rating.
 
n What are considered investment-grade securities?
 
Investment-grade securities include securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies and instrumentalities, as well as securities rated or subject to a guarantee that is rated within the categories listed by at least one of the following Nationally Recognized Statistical Rating Organizations (NRSROs) approved by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC). Below are investment-grade ratings for four of the current NRSRO rating agencies:
 
Rating Agency
Long-Term
Debt Securities
Short-Term
Debt Securities
Moody’s
At least Baa3
At least Prime–3 or MIG 3/VMIG 3
S&P
At least BBB –
At least A–3 or SP–2
Fitch
At least BBB –
At least F3
Dominion
At least BBB low
At least R–2 low
 
n What are considered high-yield securities?
 
We consider high-yield securities to include a broad range of securities that produce high current income. They are sometimes referred to as “junk” bonds because they are believed to represent a greater risk of default than more creditworthy “investment-grade” securities. These “non-investment-grade” or “high-yield” securities are considered speculative and are subject to significant credit risk because they are believed to represent a greater risk of default than more creditworthy investment-grade securities.
 
High-yield securities may be issued by corporations, governmental bodies, and other issuers. These issuers might be small or obscure, just getting started, or even large, well-known leveraged entities. They generally have less interest rate risk and higher credit risk than the higher-quality securities. At the same time, the volatility of below-investment-grade securities historically has been notably less than
 

Prospectus | 12
that of the equity market as a whole. The market on which below-investment-grade securities is traded also may be less liquid than the market for investment-grade securities. They are typically more vulnerable to financial setbacks and recession than more creditworthy issuers and may be unable to make timely dividend, interest, and principal payments if economic conditions weaken.
 
The financial crisis in the U.S. and global economies over the past several years has resulted, and may continue to result, in an unusually high degree of volatility in the financial markets, both domestic and foreign, and in the net asset values of many mutual funds, including the Fund. In addition, global economies and financial markets are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the possibilities that conditions in one country might adversely impact issuers in a different country. Because the situation is widespread and largely unpre-cedented, it may be unusually difficult to identify both risks and opportunities using past models of the interplay of market forces, or to predict the duration of these market conditions. The severity or duration of these conditions also may be affected by policy changes made by governments or quasi-governmental organizations. These conditions could negatively impact the value of the Fund’s investments.
 
You will find a complete description of the above debt ratings in the Fund’s SAI.
 
n
May the Fund’s assets be invested in foreign securities?
 
Yes. We may invest up to 40% of the Fund’s assets in foreign non dollar-denominated securities traded outside the United States. We also may invest the Fund’s assets, without limitation, in dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers. These foreign holdings may include securities issued in emerging markets as well as securities issued in established markets.
 
n Will the Fund’s assets be invested in illiquid securities?
 
The Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in illiquid securities, which generally are securities that the Fund cannot expect to sell or dispose of in the ordinary course of business within seven days at approximately the value ascribed to such securities.

13 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 

 

n
How are the decisions to buy and sell securities made?
 
We search for securities that represent an attractive value given current market conditions. We recognize value by simultaneously analyzing the risks and rewards of ownership among the securities available in the market. In general, we focus on securities that offer high income. We also will explore opportunities for capital appreciation.
 
We will sell a security if it no longer represents value due to an increase in risk, an increase in price, or a combination of the two. We also will sell a security if we find a more compelling value in the market.
 
TEMPORARY DEFENSIVE STRATEGY
 
The Fund may, from time to time, take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with the Fund’s principal investment strategies in attempting to respond to adverse market, economic, political, or other conditions. The effect of taking such a temporary defensive position is that the Fund may not achieve its investment objective.
 
RISKS
 
Credit Risk: The debt securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to credit risk, which is the possibility that an issuer of a fixed-income instrument will fail to make timely dividend, interest, and principal payments on its securities or that negative market perceptions of the issuer’s ability to make such payments will cause the price of that security to decline. Many issuers of high-yield securities have characteristics (including, but not limited to, high levels of debt, an untested business plan, significant competitive and technological challenges, legal, and political risks), which cast doubt on their ability to honor their financial obligations. They may be unable to pay dividends, interest when due, or return all of the principal amount of their debt obligations at maturity.
 
When evaluating potential investments for the Fund, our analysts assess credit risk and its impact on the Fund’s portfolio. In addition, the public rating agencies may provide estimates of the credit quality of the securities. The ratings may not take into account every risk that dividends, interest, or principal will be repaid on a timely basis.
 
Derivatives Risk: Risks associated with derivatives include the risk that the derivative is not well-correlated with the security, index, or currency to which it relates; the risk that derivatives used for risk
 

Prospectus | 14
 
management may not have the intended effects and may result in losses or missed opportunities; the risk that the Fund will be unable to sell the derivative because of an illiquid secondary market; the risk that a counterparty is unwilling or unable to meet its obligation; the risk of interest rate movements; and the risk that the derivatives transaction could expose the Fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the Fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses. There is no guarantee that derivatives activities will be employed or that they will work, and their use could lower returns or even losses to the Fund.
 
ETF Risk: ETFs, as investment companies, incur their own management and other fees and expenses, such as trustees’ fees, operating expenses, registration fees, and marketing expenses, a proportionate share of which would be indirectly borne by the Fund. As a result, an investment by the Fund in an ETF could cause the Fund’s operating expenses to be higher and, in turn, performance to be lower than if it were to invest directly in the securities underlying the ETF. In addition, the Fund will be exposed indirectly to all of the risk of securities held by the ETFs.
 
Foreign Investing Risk: There is the possibility that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities will decrease because of unique risks, such as currency exchange-rate fluctuations; foreign market illiquidity; emerging market risk; increased price volatility; uncertain political conditions; exchange control regulations; foreign ownership limits; different accounting, reporting, and disclosure requirements; difficulties in obtaining legal judgments; and foreign withholding taxes. Foreign investing may result in the Fund experi-encing more rapid and extreme changes in value than a fund that invests exclusively in securities of U.S. companies. Two risks that require significant examination on foreign investing are:
 
v
Emerging Markets Risk: Investments in countries that are in the early stages of their industrial development involve exposure to economic structures that generally are less diverse and mature than those in the United States and to political systems that may be less stable.
v
Political Risk: Political risk includes a greater potential for coups d’etat, revolts, and expropriation by governmental organizations.
 
U.S. Government Sponsored Enterprises (GSEs) Risk: While mortgage-backed securities and other securities issued by certain
 
15 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 

 
 
GSEs, such as Ginnie Mae, are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, securities issued by other GSEs are supported only by the right of the GSE (including Freddie Mac and Fannie Mae) to borrow from the U.S. Treasury, the discretionary authority of the U.S. government to purchase the GSEs’ obligations, or only by the credit of the issuing agency, instrumentality, or corporation, and are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. In September of 2008, the U.S. Treasury placed the Freddie Mac and the Fannie Mae under conservatorship and appointed the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) as their regulator. In addition, the U.S. Treasury entered into purchase agreements with Freddie Mac and the Fannie Mae to provide them with capital in exchange for senior preferred stock. While these arrangements are intended to ensure that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac can continue to meet their obligations, it is possible that actions by the U.S. Treasury, FHFA, or others could adversely impact the value of the Fund’s investments in securities issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac.
 
Interest Rate Risk: As a mutual fund generally investing in income-producing securities, the Fund is subject to the risk that the market value of the securities will fluctuate because of changes in interest rates. The prices of income-producing securities are linked to the prevailing market interest rates. In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of income-producing securities fall, and when interest rates fall, the prices of income-producing securities rise. The price volatility of an income-producing security also depends on its maturity. Generally, the longer the maturity, the greater is its sensitivity to interest rates. To compensate investors for this higher risk, securities with longer maturities generally offer higher yields than securities with shorter maturities.
 
v
If interest rates increase, the yield of the Fund may increase and the market value of the Fund’s securities may decline, adversely affecting the Fund’s net asset value (NAV) and total return.
 
v
If interest rates decrease, the yield of the Fund may decrease and the market value of the Fund’s securities may increase, which may increase the Fund’s NAV and total return.
 
Legislative Risk: Legislative risk is the risk that new government policies may affect the value of the investments held by the Fund in ways we cannot anticipate and that such policies will have an adverse impact on the value of the securities and the Fund’s NAV.
 

Prospectus | 16
Liquidity Risk: Certain securities held by the Fund may be difficult (or impossible) to sell at the time and at the price the Fund would like due to a variety of factors, including general market conditions, the perceived financial strength of the issuer, or specific restrictions on resale of the securities. Consequently, the Fund may have to hold these securities longer than it would like and may forgo other investment opportunities. It also is possible that the Fund could lose money or be prevented from earning capital gains if it cannot sell a security at the time and price that is most beneficial to the Fund. Lack of liquidity may impact valuation of such securities and the Fund’s NAV adversely, especially during times of financial distress. In addition, the Fund may not be able to raise cash when needed or may be forced to sell other investments to raise cash, which could impact the Fund’s performance negatively. Infrequent trading of securities also may lead to an increase in their price volatility. Liquidity is a general investment risk that potentially could impact any security, but funds that invest in privately placed securities, certain small-company securities, high-yield bonds, mortgage-backed or asset-backed securities, foreign or emerging market securities, derivatives, or other structured investments, which have all experienced periods of illiquidity, generally are subject to greater liquidity risk than funds that do not invest in these types of securities.
 
Market Risk: There is the possibility that the value of the Fund’s investments will decline regardless of the success or failure of a company’s operations. A company’s stock and bond prices in general may decline over short or even extended periods, regardless of the success or failure of a company’s operations. Markets tend to run in cycles, with periods when prices generally go up and periods when prices generally go down. However, domestic and international stock markets also can move up and down rapidly or unpredictably due to factors affecting securities markets generally, particular investments, or individual companies. Market turmoil may result from perceptions of economic uncertainty, price volatility in the equity and debt markets, and fluctuating trading liquidity. In response, governments may adopt a variety of fiscal and monetary policy changes, including but not limited to, direct capital infusions into companies, new monetary programs, and lower interest rates. An unexpected or quick reversal of these policies could increase volatility in the equity and debt markets. Market conditions and economic risks could have a significant effect on domestic and international economies, and could add significantly to
 
17 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 

 
 
the risks of increased volatility for the Fund and the inability to attain the Fund’s investment objective. Equity securities tend to be more volatile than bonds.
 
Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk: Mortgage-backed securities differ from conventional debt securities because principal is paid back over the life of the security rather than at maturity. The Fund may receive unscheduled prepayments of principal before the security’s maturity date due to voluntary prepayments, refinancings, or foreclosures on the underlying mortgage loans. To the Fund this means a loss of anticipated interest and a portion of its principal investment represented by any premium the Fund may have paid. Mortgage prepayments generally increase when interest rates fall. Mortgage-backed securities also are subject to extension risk, which is when rising interest rates can cause mortgage-backed security’s average maturity to lengthen unexpectedly due to a drop in mortgage prepayments. This will increase mortgage-backed security’s sensitivity to rising interest rates and its potential for price declines.
 
If the Fund purchases mortgage-backed or asset-backed securities that are “subordinated” to other interests in the same mortgage pool, the Fund may receive payments only after the pool’s obligations to other investors have been satisfied. For example, an unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may limit substantially the pool’s ability to make payments of principal or interest to the Fund as a holder of such subordinated securities, reducing the values of those securities or in some cases rendering them worthless. Certain mortgage-backed securities may include securities backed by pools of mortgage loans made to “subprime” borrowers or borrowers with blemished credit histories; the risk of defaults is generally higher in the case of mortgage pools that include such subprime mortgages. To date, the Fund has not purchased such subprime mortgages but has the capability to do so. The underwriting standards for subprime loans are more flexible than the standards generally used by banks for borrowers with non-blemished credit histories with regard to the borrowers’ credit standing and repayment ability. Borrowers who qualify generally have impaired credit histories, which may include a record of major derogatory credit items such as outstanding judgments or prior bankruptcies. They may not have the documentation required to qualify for a standard mortgage loan. As a result, the mortgage loans in the mortgage pool are likely to experience rates of delinquency, foreclosure, and bankruptcy that are higher, and that may be substantially higher, than those experienced by mortgage loans
 

Prospectus | 18
 
underwritten in a more traditional manner. In addition, changes in the values of the mortgaged properties, as well as changes in interest rates, may have a greater effect on the delinquency, foreclosure, bankruptcy, and loss experience of the mortgage loans in the mortgage pool than on mortgage loans originated in a more traditional manner. Moreover, instability in the markets for mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities, as well as the perceived financial strength of the issuer and specific restrictions on resale of the securities, may affect the liquidity of such securities, which means that it may be difficult (or impossible) to sell such securities at an advantageous time and price. As a result, the value of such securities may decrease and the Fund may have to hold these securities longer than it would like, forgo other investment opportunities, or incur greater losses on the sale of such securities than under more stable market conditions. Furthermore, instability and illiquidity in the market for lower-rated mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities may affect the overall market for such securities, thereby impacting the liquidity and value of higher-rated securities. This lack of liquidity may affect the Fund’s NAV and total return adversely during the time the Fund holds these securities.
 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
 
 
This prospectus doesn’t tell you about every policy or risk of investing in the Fund. For additional information about the Fund’s investment policies and the types of securities in which the Fund’s assets may be invested, you may want to request a copy of the SAI (the back cover tells you how to do this).
 
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS
 
The Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio securities are available in the Fund’s SAI, which is available upon request.
 
FUND MANAGEMENT
 
AMCO serves as the manager of this Fund. We are an affiliate of United Services Automobile Association (USAA), a large, diversified financial services institution. Our mailing address is P.O. Box 659453, San Antonio, Texas 78265-9825. We had approximately $xx billion in total assets under management as of May 31, 2013.
 
19 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 

 
We provide investment management services to the Fund pursuant to an Advisory Agreement. Under this agreement, we are responsible for managing the business and affairs of the Fund, subject to the authority of and supervision by the Fund’s Board of Trustees (the Board). A discussion regarding the basis of the Board's approval of the Fund’s Advisory Agreements will be available in the Fund’s semiannual report to shareholders for the period ended June 30.
 
For our services, the Fund pays us an investment management fee, which is accrued daily and paid monthly, equal to an annualized rate of one-half of one percent (0.50%) of the Fund’s average net assets.
 
We have agreed, through May 1, 2014, to make payments or waive management, administration, and other fees to limit the expenses of the Fund so that the total annual operating expenses (exclusive of commission recapture, expense offset arrangements, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) do not exceed an annual rate of 1.00%, 0.80%, and 1.25% of the average net assets of the Fund’s Fund Shares, Institutional Shares, and Adviser Shares, respectively. This reimbursement arrangement may not be changed or terminated during this time period without approval of the Fund’s Board and may be changed or terminated by us at any time after May 1, 2014. If the total annual operating expense ratio of the Fund Shares, Institutional Shares, and Adviser Shares is lower than 1.00%, 0.80%, and 1.25%, respectively, the Fund Shares, Institutional Shares, and Adviser Shares will operate at that lower expense ratio.
 
The Fund is authorized, although we have no present intention of utilizing such authority, to use a “manager-of-managers” structure. We could select (with approval of the Fund’s Board and without shareholder approval) one or more subadvisers to manage the actual day-to-day investment of the Fund’s assets. We would monitor each subadviser’s performance through quantitative and qualitative analysis and periodically report to the Fund’s Board as to whether each subadviser’s agreement should be renewed, terminated, or modified. We also would be responsible for allocating assets to the subadvisers. The allocation for each subadviser could range from 0% to 100% of the Fund’s assets, and we could change the allocations without shareholder approval.
 
In addition to providing investment management services, we also provide administration and servicing to the Fund. Our affiliate, USAA Shareholder Account Services (SAS), provides transfer agency services
 
 

Prospectus | 20
 
to the Fund. The Fund or the Fund’s transfer agent may enter into agreements with third parties (Servicing Agents) to pay such Servicing Agents for certain administrative and servicing functions. USAA Investment Management Company acts as the Fund's distributor.
 
PORTFOLIO MANAGER(S)
 
Arnold J. Espe, CFA, Vice President of Mutual Fund Portfolios, has managed the Fund since its inception. Mr. Espe has 29 years of investment management experience and has worked for us for 13 years. Education: B.S., Willamette University; M.B.A., University of Oregon. He holds the CFA designation and is a member of the CFA Institute and the CFA Society of San Antonio.
 
The SAI provides additional information about the portfolio manager's compensation, other accounts managed, and ownership of Fund securities.
 
PURCHASES
 
You may purchase shares directly from the Fund or through certain financial intermediaries as described below.
 
OPENING AN ACCOUNT WITH THE FUND
 
You may open an account with us and purchase shares as described below. If opening by mail, you should return a complete, signed application to open your initial account. However, after you open your initial account with us, you will not need to fill out another application to invest in another fund of the USAA family of funds unless the registration is different or we need further information to verify your identity.
 
As required by federal law, we must obtain certain information from you prior to opening an account with us. If we are unable to verify your identity, we may refuse to open your account, or we may open your account and take certain actions without prior notice to you, including restricting account transactions pending verification of your identity. If we subsequently are unable to verify your identity, we may close your account and return to you the value of your shares at the next calculated net asset value (NAV). We prohibit opening accounts for, including but not limited to, foreign financial institutions, shell banks,
 
 
21 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
 
correspondent accounts for foreign shell banks, and correspondent accounts for foreign financial institutions. A “foreign shell bank” is a foreign bank without a physical presence in any country. A “corres-pondent account” is an account established for a foreign bank to receive deposits from, or to make payments or other disbursements on behalf of, the foreign bank, or to handle other financial transactions related to such foreign bank.
 
TAXPAYER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER
 
Each shareholder named on an account with us must provide a Social Security number or other taxpayer identification number to avoid possible tax withholding required by the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Code). See the section on Taxes for additional tax information.
 
EFFECTIVE DATE OF PURCHASE
 
When you make a purchase, your purchase price will be the NAV per share next determined after we or the financial intermediary receive your request in proper form (e.g., complete, signed application and payment). The Fund’s NAV for each share class is determined as of the close of the regular trading session (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) each day it is open for trading. If we or the financial intermediary receive your purchase request in proper form prior to that time, your purchase price will be the NAV per share determined for that day. If we or the financial intermediary receive your purchase request in proper form after that time, the purchase price will be the NAV per share calculated as of the close of the next regular trading session of the NYSE.
 
The Fund or the Fund's transfer agent may enter into agreements with Servicing Agents, which may hold Fund Shares, Institutional Shares, or Adviser Shares in omnibus accounts for their customers, under which the Servicing Agents are authorized to receive orders for shares of the Fund on the Fund’s behalf. Under these arrangements, the Fund will be deemed to have received an order when an authorized Servicing Agent receives the order. Accordingly, customer orders will be priced at the Fund’s NAV next computed after they are received by an authorized Servicing Agent even though the orders may be transmitted to the Fund by the Servicing Agent after the time the Fund calculates its NAV.
 
 

Prospectus | 22

PAYMENT
 
If you plan to purchase shares from us with a check, money order, traveler’s check, or other similar instrument, the instrument must be written in U.S. dollars and drawn on a U.S. bank. We do not accept the following foreign instruments: checks, money orders, traveler’s checks, or other similar instruments. In addition, we do not accept cash or coins. If you plan to purchase shares through a financial intermediary, please check with that financial intermediary regarding acceptable forms of payment.
 
PURCHASING SHARES
 
Fund Shares:
The Fund Shares are a separate share class of the Fund and are not a separate mutual fund. You may open an account with us and purchase Fund Shares on the Internet, by telephone, by mail, or through a third-party intermediary. Fund Shares also are available through USAA Brokerage Services and certain financial intermediaries, as described below.
 
To purchase Fund Shares through your USAA brokerage account, please contact USAA Brokerage Services directly. These shares will become part of your USAA brokerage account and will be subject to the USAA Brokerage Services’ applicable policies and procedures. Additional fees also may apply.
If Fund Shares are purchased through a retirement account or an investment professional (e.g., financial intermediary), the policies and procedures on these purchases may differ from those discussed in this prospectus and may vary. Additional fees also may apply to your investment in the Fund, including a transaction fee, if you buy or sell shares of the Fund through a broker or other investment professional. For more information on these fees, check with your investment professional.
 
Institutional Shares:
The Institutional Shares are a separate share class of the Fund and are not a separate mutual fund. The Institutional Shares are available for investment through a USAA discretionary managed account program, and certain advisory programs sponsored by financial intermediaries, such as brokerage firms, investment advisors, financial planners, third-party administrators, and insurance companies,
 
 
23 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
 
Institutional Shares also are available to institutional investors, which include retirement plans, endowments, foundations, and bank trusts, for purchase by a USAA Fund participating in a fund-of-funds investment strategy as well as other persons or legal entities that the Fund may approve from time to time.
 
Adviser Shares:
The Adviser Shares are a separate share class of the Fund and are not a separate mutual fund. The Adviser Shares are available for investment through financial intermediaries, including banks, broker-dealers, insurance companies, investment advisers, plan sponsors, and financial professionals that provide various administrative and distribution services.
 
Your ability to purchase, exchange, redeem, and transfer shares will be affected by the policies of the financial intermediary through which you do business. Some policy differences may include: minimum investment requirements, exchange policies, fund choices, cutoff time for invest-ments, and trading restrictions.
 
In addition, your financial intermediary may charge a transaction or other fee for the purchase or sale of Adviser Shares. Those charges are retained by the financial intermediary and are not shared with us. Please contact your financial intermediary or plan sponsor for a complete description of its policies.
Copies of the Fund's annual report, semiannual report, and statement of additional information are available from your financial intermediary or plan sponsor.
 
MINIMUM INITIAL PURCHASE
 
Fund Shares:
$3,000. However, the Fund reserves the right to waive or lower purchase minimums of Fund Shares in certain circumstances.
 
Institutional Shares:
$1 million. However the Fund reserves the right to waive or lower purchase minimums of Institutional Shares in certain circumstances.
 
Adviser Shares:
$3,000. Financial intermediaries may require their clients to meet different investment minimums.
 

Prospectus | 24
ADDITIONAL PURCHASES
 
Fund Shares:
$50 minimum per transaction, per account. Employees of USAA and its affiliated companies may open an account through payroll deduction for as little as $25 per pay period with a $3,000 initial investment.
 
Institutional Shares:
There is no subsequent purchase minimum for the investment in the Institutional Shares of the Fund through any applicable discretionary managed account or similar investment program and/or certain other USAA affiliated product.
 
Adviser Shares:
There is no subsequent purchase minimum for financial intermediaries or employer-sponsored retirement plans, but financial intermediaries, including but not limited to banks, broker-dealers, insurance companies, investment advisers, plan sponsors, and financial professionals that provide various administrative and distribution services, may require their clients to meet different subsequent purchase requirements. Contact your financial intermediary for trade deadlines and the applicable procedures for purchasing, selling, or exchanging  your shares as well as initial and subsequent investment minimums.
 
REDEMPTIONS
 
REDEMPTION PRIVILEGE
 
For federal income tax purposes, a redemption is a taxable event unless you hold shares of the Fund in a tax-deferred account or are a tax-exempt investor; as such, you may realize a capital gain or loss. Such capital gains or losses are based on the difference between your basis in the redeemed shares and the proceeds you receive upon their redemption. See Taxes for information regarding basis election and reporting.
 
The Fund may elect to suspend the redemption of shares or postpone the date of payment in limited circumstances (e.g., if the NYSEis closed or when permitted by order of the SEC).

25 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 

REDEEMING SHARES
 
Fund Shares:
If you have any account with us, you may redeem Fund Shares by Internet, by telephone, by mail, or through your financial intermediary on any day the NAV per share is calculated. Fund Share redemptions will receive a redemption price of the NAV per share next determined after we receive your request in proper form. If we receive your redemption request in proper form prior to the close of the NYSE's regular trading session (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time), your redemption price will be the NAV per share determined for that day.
 
If we receive the redemption request after that time, the redemption price will be the NAV per share calculated as of the close of the next regular trading session of the NYSE.
 
Telephone redemption privileges are established automatically when you complete your application. The Fund has undertaken certain authentication procedures regarding telephone transactions and will employ reasonable procedures to confirm that instructions communicated by telephone are genuine. Before any discussion regarding your account, we will obtain certain information from you to verify your identity. Additionally, your telephone calls may be recorded or monitored, and confirmations of account transactions are sent to the address of record or by electronic delivery to your designated e-mail address.
 
If Fund Shares are held through USAA, we will send your money within seven days after the effective date of redemption. However, payment for redemption of shares purchased by electronic funds transfer (EFT) or check will be sent after the EFT or check has cleared, which could take up to seven days from the purchase date.
 
If Fund Shares are held in your USAA brokerage account, please contact USAA Brokerage Services regarding redemption policies. These shares are part of your USAA brokerage account, and any redemption request received in good order prior to the close of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) will receive the NAV per share determined for that day, subject to the USAA Brokerage Services’ applicable policies and procedures.
 
If Fund Shares are held in your account with another financial intermediary, please contact your financial intermediary regarding redemption policies. Generally, any redemption request you place with your financial intermediary in good order prior to the close of the
 

Prospectus | 26
 
NYSE (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) will receive the NAV per share determined for that day, subject to the financial intermediary's applicable policies and procedures.
 
Institutional Shares:
 
Redemptions of Institutional Shares will receive a redemption price of the NAV per share next determined after we receive the request in proper form. If we receive the redemption request in proper form prior to the close of the NYSE's regular trading session (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time), the redemption price will be the NAV per share deter-mined for that day. If we receive the redemption request after that time, the redemption price will be the NAV per share calculated as of the close of the next regular trading session of the NYSE. We will send your money within seven days after the effective date of redemption.
 
Adviser Shares:
 
Check with your financial intermediary for its policies on redemptions. Shares purchased through a financial intermediary should be redeemed through the financial intermediary. Normally, the Fund transmits pro-ceeds to intermediaries for redemption orders received in proper form on the next business day after receipt. Under certain circumstances and when deemed to be in the Fund’s best interests, proceeds may not be sent to intermediaries for up to seven days after receipt of the redemption order.
 
CONVERTING SHARES
 
CONVERTING FROM INSTITUTIONAL SHARES INTO FUND SHARES
 
If you no longer meet the eligibility requirements to invest in Institutional Shares of the Fund (e.g., you terminate participation in a USAA discretionary managed account program), we may convert your Institutional Shares of the Fund into Fund Shares. We will notify you before any such conversion into Fund Shares occurs.
 
CONVERTING FROM ADVISER SHARES INTO FUND SHARES
 
If you hold Adviser Shares of the Fund through an account maintained with another financial institution and subsequently transfer your shares into an account established with the Fund’s transfer agent or into your USAA brokerage account, we may convert your Adviser Shares of the Fund into Fund Shares.
 
27 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
PRICING
 
When a conversion occurs, you receive shares of one class of a fund for shares of another class of the same fund. At the time of conversion, the dollar value of the “new” shares you receive equals the dollar value of the “old” shares that were converted. In other words, the conversion has no effect on the value of your investment in the fund at the time of the conversion. However, the number of shares you own after the con-version may be greater than or less than the number of shares you owned before the conversion, depending on the NAVs of the two share classes. A conversion between share classes of the same fund is a nontaxable event.
 
EXCHANGES
 
EXCHANGE PRIVILEGE
 
For federal income tax purposes, an exchange between funds is a taxable event unless you hold shares of the Fund in a tax-deferred account or are a tax-exempt investor; as such, you may realize a capital gain or loss. Such capital gains or losses are based on the difference between your basis in the exchanged shares and the price of the shares when they are exchanged. See Taxes for information regarding basis election and reporting.
 
The exchange privilege is automatic when you complete your application with us. You may exchange shares among funds in the USAA family of funds, provided the shares to be acquired are offered in your state of residence. The Fund, however, reserves the right to terminate or change the terms of an exchange offer.
 
Exchanges made through the USAA self-service telephone system and on usaa.com require an Electronic Services Agreement (ESA) and EFT Buy/Sell authorization on file. After we receive the exchange orders, the Fund’s transfer agent will simultaneously process exchange redemptions and purchases at the share prices next determined pursuant to the procedures set forth herein. See section on Effective Date of Purchase for additional information. The investment minimums applicable to share purchases also apply to exchanges.
 
If shares of the Fund are held in your USAA brokerage account, please contact USAA Brokerage Services regarding exchange policies. These shares are part of your USAA brokerage account, and any exchange
 

Prospectus | 28
 
request received in good order prior to the close of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) will receive the NAV per share determined for that day, subject to the USAA Brokerage Services’ applicable policies and procedures.
 
If shares of the Fund are held through a retirement account or an investment professional (i.e., financial intermediary), the policies and procedures on an exchange may differ from those discussed in this prospectus and may vary. Additional fees also may apply to your investment in the Fund, including a transaction fee, if you buy, sell, or exchange shares of the Fund through a broker or other investment professional. For more information on these fees, check with your investment professional.
 
OTHER IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT PURCHASES, REDEMPTIONS, AND EXCHANGES
 
CONTACTING USAA
 
The following features may be available to you to purchase, redeem, and exchange Fund Shares you hold in a USAA mutual fund account with us.
 
Internet Access – usaa.com
 
n
Log on to usaa.com and select “register now” or call (800) 759-8722. Once you have established Internet access to your account, you will be able to access account information and make most account transactions. This includes opening and funding a new mutual fund account; making purchases, exchanges, and redemptions; reviewing account activity; checking balances; and more.
 
 
 
Mobile Access – mobile.usaa.com
 
n
Review account information and make most account transactions.
 
 
29 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
USAA Self-Service Telephone System (800) 531-USAA (8722)
 
n
Access account information and make most account transactions. This service is available with an ESA and EFT Buy/Sell authorization on file.
 
Telephone
 
n
Call toll free (800) 531-USAA (8722) Monday – Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Central time and Saturday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Central time to speak with a member service representative.
 
 
Fax
 
n
Send a signed fax with your written redemption instructions to (800) 292-8177. In certain instances we may require a signature from all owners associated with an account.
 
Mail
 
n
If you would like to open an account or request a redemption by mail, send your application and check or written instructions to:
 
Regular Mail:
USAA Investment Management Company
P.O. Box 659453
San Antonio, TX 78265-9825
 
Registered or Express Mail:
USAA Investment Management Company
9800 Fredericksburg Road
San Antonio, TX 78240
 
Bank Wire
 
n
To add to your account or request a redemption by bank wire, visit us at usaa.com or call (800) 531-USAA (8722) for instructions. This helps to ensure that your account will be credited or debited promptly and correctly.
 
Electronic Funds Transfer
 
n
Additional purchases on a regular basis may be deducted electronically from a bank account, paycheck, income-producing investment, or USAA money market fund account. Sign up for these services when opening an account or log on to usaa.com or call (800) 531-USAA (8722) to add them.
 

Prospectus | 30
DISTRIBUTION FEES
 
The Fund may apply a distribution fee to all full IRA distributions, except for those due to death, disability, divorce, or transfer to other USAA lines of business. Partial IRA distributions are not charged a distribution fee.
 
REDEMPTION FEES
 
The Fund may charge a 1.00% fee on Adviser Shares redeemed before they have been held for more than 60 days. The fee applies if you redeem Adviser Shares by selling or by exchanging to another fund. Shares you have held the longest will be redeemed first. The redemp-tion fee may be waived in certain circumstances, including in situations involving hardship, mandatory or systematic actions, and in other circumstances as further described in the Fund's SAI.
 
Unlike sales charges or a load paid to a broker or a fund management company, the redemption fee is paid directly to the Fund to offset the costs of buying and selling securities. The redemption fee is designed to ensure that short-term investors pay their share of the Fund's transaction costs and that long-term investors do not subsidize the activities of short-term traders.
 
EXCESSIVE SHORT-TERM TRADING
 
The USAA Funds generally are not intended as short-term investment vehicles (except for the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund). Some investors try to profit by using excessive short-term trading practices involving mutual fund shares, frequently referred to as “market timing.”
 
Excessive short-term trading activity can disrupt the efficient manage-ment of a fund and raise its transaction costs by forcing portfolio managers to first buy and then sell portfolio securities in response to a large investment or redemption by short-term traders. While there is no assurance that the USAA Funds can deter all excessive and short-term trading, the Board of the USAA Funds has adopted the following policies (except for the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund). These policies are designed to deter disruptive, excessive short-term trading without needlessly penalizing bona fide investors.
 
 
31 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 
 

 
To deter such trading activities, the USAA Funds’ policies and procedures include:
 
n
Each fund reserves the right to reject any purchase order, including an exchange, that it regards as disruptive to the efficient management of the particular fund.
 
n
Each fund may use a fair value pricing service or other model to assist in establishing the current value of foreign securities held by any of the USAA Funds. Fair value pricing is used to adjust for stale pricing that may occur between the close of certain foreign exchanges or markets and the time the USAA Funds calculate their NAV. Using fair value pricing is intended to deter those trying to take advantage of time-zone differences in the valuation of foreign securities and to prevent dilution to long-term investors. Fair value pricing of a foreign security can result in the USAA Funds’ using a price that is higher or lower than the closing price of a foreign security for purposes of calculating a fund’s NAV.
 
THE USAA FUNDS’ RIGHT TO REJECT PURCHASE AND EXCHANGE ORDERS AND LIMIT TRADING IN ACCOUNTS
 
The USAA Funds’ main safeguard against excessive short-term trading is their right to reject purchase or exchange orders if in the best interest of the affected fund. In exercising this discretion to reject purchase and exchange orders, the USAA Funds deem that certain excessive short-term trading activities are not in the best interest of the fund because such activities can hamper the efficient management of the fund. Generally, persons who engage in an “in and out” (or ”out and in”) transaction within a 30-day period will violate the USAA Funds’ policy if they engage in another “in and out” (or “out and in”) transaction in the same fund within 90 days. The USAA Funds also reserve the right to restrict future purchases or exchanges if an investor is classified as engaged in other patterns of excessive short-term trading, including after one large disruptive purchase and redemption or exchange. Finally, the USAA Funds reserve the right to reject any other purchase or exchange order in other situations that do not involve excessive short-term trading activities if in the best interest of a fund.
 
The following transactions are exempt from the excessive short-term trading activity policies described above:
 
n
Transactions in the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund;
 

Prospectus | 32
n
Purchases and sales pursuant to automatic investment or withdrawal plans;
 
n
Purchases and sales made through USAA Managed Portfolios - UMPTM, USAA 529 College Savings PlanTM, USAA Federal Savings Bank Trust Department, or other designated USAA managed investment accounts;
 
n
Purchases and sales of the Institutional Shares by the Target Retirement Funds, Cornerstone Conservative Fund, and/or USAA Cornerstone Equity Fund; and
 
n
Other transactions that are not motivated by short-term trading considerations if they are approved by transfer agent management personnel and are not disruptive to a fund.
 
If a person is classified as having engaged in excessive short-term trading, the remedy will depend upon the trading activities of the investor in the account and related accounts and its disruptive effect, and can include warnings to cease such activity and/or restrictions or termination of trading privileges in a particular fund or all funds in the USAA Funds.
 
The USAA Funds rely on the transfer agent to review trading activity for excessive short-term trading. There can be no assurance, however, that its monitoring activities will successfully detect or prevent all excessive short-term trading. The USAA Funds or the transfer agent may exclude transactions below a certain dollar amount from monitoring and may change that dollar amount from time to time.
 
The USAA Funds seek to apply these policies and procedures uniformly to all investors; however, some investors purchase shares of USAA Funds through financial intermediaries that establish omnibus accounts to invest in the USAA Funds for their clients and submit net orders to purchase or redeem shares after combining their client orders. The USAA Funds subject to the short-term trading policies generally treat these omnibus accounts as an individual investor and will apply the short-term trading policies to the net purchases and sales submitted by the omnibus account unless the USAA Funds or their transfer agent have entered into an agreement requiring the omnibus account to submit the underlying trading information for their clients upon our request and/or monitoring for excessive trading. For those omnibus accounts for which we have entered into agreements to monitor
 
 
33 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
 
excessive trading or provide underlying trade information, the financial intermediary or USAA Funds will review net activity in these omnibus accounts for activity that indicates potential excessive short-term trading activity. If we detect suspicious trading activity at the omnibus account level, we will request underlying trading information and review the underlying trading activity to identify individual accounts engaged in excessive short-term trading activity. We will instruct the omnibus account to restrict, limit, or terminate trading privileges in a particular fund for individual accounts identified as engaging in excessive short-term trading through these omnibus accounts.
 
We also may rely on the financial intermediary to review for and identify underlying trading activity for individual accounts engaged in excessive short-term trading activity, and to restrict, limit, or terminate trading privileges if the financial intermediary’s policies are determined by us to be at least as stringent as the USAA Funds’ policy. For shares of the Fund purchased through financial intermediaries there may be additional or more restrictive policies. You may wish to contact your financial intermediary to determine the policies applicable to your account.
 
Because of the increased costs to review underlying trading information, the USAA Funds will not enter into agreements with every financial intermediary that operates an omnibus account. The USAA Funds or their transfer agent could decide to enter into such contracts with financial intermediaries for all funds or particular funds and can terminate such agreements at any time.
 
OTHER FUND RIGHTS
 
The Fund reserves the right to:
 
n
Reject or restrict purchase or exchange orders when in the best interest of the Fund;
 
n
Limit or discontinue the offering of shares of the Fund without notice to the shareholders;
 
n
Calculate the NAV per share and accept purchase, exchange, and redemption orders on a business day that the NYSE is closed;
 
n
Require a signature guarantee for transactions or changes in account information in those instances where the appropriateness of a signature authorization is in question (the SAI contains information on acceptable guarantors);
 

Prospectus | 34
n
Redeem an account with less than $250, with certain limitations; and
 
n
Restrict or liquidate an account when necessary or appropriate to comply with federal law.
 
MULTIPLE CLASS INFORMATION
 
The Fund is composed of multiple classes of shares. Each class shares the Fund's investment objective and investment portfolio. The classes have different fees, expenses and/or minimum investment require-ments. The difference in the fee structures between the classes is primarily the result of their separate arrangements for shareholder and distribution services and performance fee arrangements. It is not the result of any difference in base advisory or custodial fee rate schedules or other expenses related to the management of the Fund’s assets, which do not vary by class.
 
Except as described below, the share classes have identical voting, dividend, liquidation and other rights, preferences, terms, and conditions. The primary differences between the classes are (a) each class may be subject to different expenses specific to that class; (b) each class has a different identifying designation or name; (c) each class has exclusive voting rights with respect to matters solely affecting that class; and (d) each class may have different purchase, exchange, and redemption privileges.
 
SERVICE, DISTRIBUTION, AND ADMINISTRATIVE FEES
 
Investment Company Act Rule 12b-1 permits mutual funds that adopt a written plan to pay certain expenses associated with the distribution of their shares out of fund assets. The Adviser Shares offered by this prospectus are subject to a 12b-1 plan. Under the plan, the Adviser Shares pay annual fees of 0.25% of the Fund’s average daily net assets attributable to the Adviser Shares to the distributor for distribution and individual shareholder services, including past distribution services. The distributor pays all or a portion of such fees to financial intermediaries that make the Adviser Shares available for investment by their customers. Because these fees may be used to pay for services that are not related to prospective sales of the Fund, the Adviser Shares may continue to make payments under the plan even if the Fund terminates the sale of Adviser Shares to investors. Because these fees are paid out
 
 
35 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
 
of the Fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment in the Adviser Shares and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges. For additional information about the plan and its terms, see Multiple Class Information in the SAI.
 
ADDITIONAL PAYMENTS TO FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES
 
Certain financial intermediaries perform recordkeeping and administrative services for their clients with respect to their investments in the Fund that would otherwise be performed by the Fund’s transfer agent. In some circumstances, we will pay such service providers a fee for performing those services. Also, we and the Fund’s distributor may make payments to intermediaries for various additional services, other expenses and/or the financial intermediaries’ distribution of a Fund. Such payments may be made for one or more of the following: (1) distribution, which may include expenses incurred by financial intermediaries for their sales activities with respect to a Fund, such as preparing, printing, and distributing sales literature and advertising materials and compensating registered representatives or other employees of such financial intermediaries for their sales activities, as well as the opportunity for a Fund to be made available by such financial intermediaries; (2) shareholder services, such as providing individual and custom investment advisory services to clients of the financial intermediaries; and (3) marketing and promotional services, including business planning assistance, educating personnel about a Fund, and sponsorship of sales meetings, which may include covering costs of providing speakers. The distributor may sponsor seminars and conferences designed to educate financial intermediaries about a Fund and may cover the expenses associated with attendance at such meetings, including travel costs. These payments and activities are intended to educate financial intermediaries about a Fund and help defray the costs associated with offering a Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the financial intermediary to recommend a Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information. The amount of any payments described by this paragraph is determined by us or the distributor, and all such amounts are paid out of the available assets of the advisor and distributor and do not affect the total expense ratio of a Fund.
 

Prospectus | 36

SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION
 
SHARE PRICE CALCULATION
 
The price at which you purchase and redeem shares of the Fund is equal to the NAV per share determined on the effective date of the purchase or redemption. The NAV per share is calculated by adding the value of the Fund’s assets (i.e., the value of its investment in the Fund and other assets), deducting liabilities, and dividing by the number of shares outstanding. Shares of the Fund may be purchased and sold at the NAV per share without a sales charge. The Fund’s NAV per share is calculated as of the close of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. Eastern time) each day that the NYSE is open for regular trading. The NYSE is closed on most national holidays and Good Friday.
 
VALUATION OF SECURITIES
 
Equity securities, including ETFs, except as otherwise noted, traded primarily on domestic securities exchanges or the Nasdaq over-the-counter markets are valued at the last sales price or official closing price on the exchange or primary market on which they trade. Equity securities traded primarily on foreign securities exchanges or markets are valued at the last quoted sales price, or the most recently deter-mined official closing price calculated according to local market convention, available at the time the Fund is valued. If no last sale or official closing price is reported or available, the average of the bid and asked prices generally is used.
 
Securities trading in various foreign markets may take place on days when the NYSE is closed. Further, when the NYSE is open, the foreign markets may be closed. Therefore, the calculation of the Fund’s NAV may not take place at the same time the prices of certain foreign securities held by the Fund are determined. In most cases, events affecting the values of foreign securities that occur between the time of their last quoted sales or official closing prices and the close of normal trading on the NYSE on a day the Fund’s NAV is calculated will not be reflected in the value of the Fund’s foreign securities. However, we and the subadviser(s), if applicable, will monitor for events that would materially affect the value of the Fund’s foreign securities. The subadviser(s) agree to notify us of significant events identified that would materially affect the value of the Fund’s foreign securities. If we determine that a particular event would materially affect the value of
 
 
37 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
 
the Fund’s foreign securities, then we, under valuation procedures approved by the Fund’s Board, will consider such available information that we deem relevant to determine a fair value for the affected foreign securities. In addition, the Fund may use information from an external vendor or other sources to adjust the foreign market closing prices of foreign equity securities to reflect what the Fund believes to be the fair value of the securities as of the close of the NYSE. Fair valuation of affected foreign equity securities may occur frequently based on an assessment that events which occur on a fairly regular basis (such as U.S. market movements) are significant.
 
Debt securities purchased with original or remaining maturities of 60 days or less may be valued at amortized cost, which approximates market value.
 
Investments in open-end investment companies, hedge, or other funds, other than ETFs, are valued at their NAV at the end of each business day.
 
Repurchase agreements are valued at cost, which approximates market value.
 
Futures are valued based upon the last sales price at the close of market on the principal exchange on which they are traded.
 
Options are valued by a pricing service at the National Best Bid/Offer (NBBO) composite price, which is derived from the best available bid and ask prices in all participating options exchanges determined to most closely reflect market value of the options at the time of compu-tation of the Fund’s NAV.
Securities for which market quotations are not readily available or are considered unreliable, or whose values have been materially affected by events occurring after the close of their primary markets but before the pricing of the Fund, are valued in good faith at fair value, using methods determined by us under valuation procedures approved by the Fund’s Board. The effect of fair value pricing is that securities may not be priced on the basis of quotations from the primary market in which they are traded, and the actual price realized from the sale of a security may differ materially from the fair value price. Valuing these securities at fair value is intended to cause the Fund’s NAV to be more reliable than it otherwise would be.
 
Fair value methods used by the Fund include, but are not limited to, obtaining market quotations from secondary pricing services, broker-
 

Prospectus | 38
 
dealers, or widely used quotation systems. General factors considered in determining the fair value of securities include fundamental analytical data, the nature and duration of any restrictions on disposition of the securities, and an evaluation of the forces that influenced the market in which the securities are purchased and sold.
 
For additional information on how securities are valued, see Valuation of Securities in the Fund’s SAI.
 
DIVIDENDS AND OTHER DISTRIBUTIONS
 
The Fund pays net investment income dividends monthly. Ordinarily, any net realized capital gains are distributed in December of each year. The Fund may make additional distributions to shareholders when considered appropriate or necessary. For example, the Fund could make an additional distribution to avoid the imposition of federal income or excise tax.
 
The Fund will automatically reinvest all dividends and other distributions in additional shares of the Fund unless you request to receive these distributions by way of electronic funds transfer. The share price for a reinvestment will be the NAV of those shares computed on the ex-distribution date. Any distribution made by the Fund will reduce the NAV per share by the amount of the distribution on the ex-distribution date. You should consider carefully the effects of purchasing shares of the Fund shortly before any distribution. Some or all distributions may be subject to income taxes. The Fund will invest in your account, at the current NAV per share, any distribution payment returned to the Fund by your financial institution.
 
TAXES
 
The following tax information is quite general and refers to the federal income tax law in effect as of the date of this prospectus.
 
n Treatment of the Fund
 
The Fund, which is treated as a separate corporation for federal tax purposes, intends to qualify for treatment as a “regulated investment company” under the Code (RIC). By doing so, it (but not its shareholders) will be relieved of federal income tax on the part of its investment company taxable income (consisting generally of net investment income, the excess, if any, of net short-term capital gain over net long-term capital loss (“net short-term gain”), and net gains and losses from certain foreign
 
 
39 | USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
 
currency transactions, if any, all determined without regard to any deduction for dividends paid) and net capital gain (i.e., the excess of net long-term capital gain over net short-term capital loss) that it distributes to its shareholders.
 
n Foreign Taxes
 
Dividends and interest the Fund receives, and gains it realizes, on foreign securities may be subject to income, withholding, or other taxes foreign countries and U.S. possessions impose (foreign taxes) that would reduce the yield and/or total return on its investments. Tax conventions between certain countries and the United States may reduce or eliminate foreign taxes; however, many foreign countries do not impose taxes on capital gains in respect of investments by foreign investors.
 
If more than 50% of the value of the Fund’s total assets at the close of any taxable year consists of securities of foreign corporations, the Fund may file an election with the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) (the Foreign Election) that would permit you to take a credit (or a deduction) for foreign taxes paid by the Fund. If the Foreign Election is made, you would include in your gross income both dividends you received from the Fund and the amount of your proportionate share of those foreign taxes. As a shareholder of the Fund, you would be entitled to treat your share of the foreign taxes paid as a credit against your federal income tax, subject to the limitations set forth in the Code with respect to the foreign tax credit generally. Alternatively, you could, if it were to your advantage, treat the foreign taxes paid by the Fund as an itemized deduction in computing your taxable income rather than as a tax credit. It is anticipated that the Fund will make the Foreign Election, in which event it will report to you shortly after each taxable year your share of the foreign taxes it paid and its foreign-source income.
 
n Shareholder Taxation
 
Distributions that shareholders receive from the Fund are subject to federal income tax and may be subject to state and/or local taxes. Dividends and distributions of net short-term capital gain are taxable to you as ordinary income, whether received in cash or reinvested in additional shares of the Fund. A portion of the Fund’s dividends may qualify for the 70% dividends-received deduction available to corporations and for the lower maximum federal income tax rates applicable to "qualified dividend income" of individuals and certain other non-corporate shareholders who satisfy certain holding period
 

Prospectus | 40
 
and other restrictions with respect to their shares held in the Fund --a maximum of 15% for a single shareholder with taxable income not exceeding $400,000 ($450,000 for married shareholders filing jointly) and 20% for those non-corporate shareholders with taxable income exceeding those respective amounts.
Regardless of the length of time you have held shares of the Fund, distributions of net capital gain that the Fund realizes are taxable to you as long-term capital gains, whether received in cash or reinvested in additional shares of the Fund. Those distributions to individuals and certain other non-corporate shareholders will qualify for the maximum 15% and 20% federal income tax rates described above.
 
You may realize a capital gain or loss for federal income tax purposes on a redemption or an exchange, which is treated like a redemption of shares if the Fund. Your gain or loss is based on the difference between your basis in the redeemed or exchange shares and the redemption proceeds, or the NAV of the shares of the fund in which you exchange, you receive. Any capital gain an individual or certain other non-corporate shareholder recognizes on a redemption or exchange of his or her shares of the Fund that have been held for more than one year will qualify for the 15% and 20% maximum tax rates mentioned above. In addition, beginning in 2013 an individual shareholder is subject to a 3.8% federal tax on the lesser of (1) the individual's "net investment income," which generally includes distributions the Fund pays and net gains realized on the redemption or exchange of shares of the Fund, or (2) the excess of his or her "modified adjusted gross income" over $200,000 (or $250,000 if married and filing jointly). This tax is in addition to any other taxes due on that income. A similar tax will apply to estates and trusts. You should consult your tax adviser regarding the effect, if any, this provision may have on your investment in shares of the Fund.
 
Your basis in shares of the Fund (Covered Shares) will be determined in accordance with the Fund's default method, which is average basis, unless you affirmatively elect in writing (which may be electronic) to use a different acceptable basis determination method, such as a specific identification method. The basis determination method you elect (or the default method) may not be changed with respect to a redemption of Covered Shares after the settlement date of the redemption. You should consult with your tax adviser to determine the best IRS-accepted basis determination method.
 
41| USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 
n Withholding
 
Federal law requires the Fund to withhold (referred to as “backup withholding”) and remit to the U.S. Treasury 28% of (1) taxable dividends, capital gain distributions, and proceeds of redemptions, regardless of the extent to which gain or loss may be realized, otherwise payable to any non-corporate shareholder who fails to furnish the Fund with a correct taxpayer identification number and (2) those dividends and distributions otherwise payable to any such shareholder who:
 
n Underreports dividend or interest income, or
 
 
n Fails to certify that he or she is not subject to backup withholding.
 
Backup withholding is not an additional tax, and any amounts so withheld may be credited against a shareholder's federal income tax liability or refunded. To avoid this withholding requirement, you must certify on your application or on a separate IRS Form W-9 supplied by the Fund’s transfer agent that your taxpayer identification number is correct and you currently are not subject to backup withholding.
 
 
n Reporting
 
The Fund will report information to you annually concerning the tax status of dividends and other distributions for federal income tax purposes. In addition, the Fund (or its administrative agent) must report to the IRS and furnish to its shareholders the basis information for Covered Shares and indicate whether they had a short-term (one year or less) or long-term (more than one year) holding period. Fund shareholders should consult with their tax adviser to determine the best IRS-accepted basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how the basis reporting law applies to them.
 
MAILINGS
 
n Householding
 
Through our ongoing efforts to help reduce Fund expenses, each household will receive a single copy of the Fund’s most recent financial reports and prospectus. You will receive the single copy if you or a family member owns shares of the Fund in more than one account. For many of you, this eliminates duplicate copies and saves paper and postage costs for the Fund. However, if you would like to receive
 

Prospectus | 42
 
 
individual copies, please contact us, and we will begin your individual delivery within 30 days of your request.
 
n Electronic Delivery
 
Log on to usaa.com and sign up to receive your statements, confirmations, financial reports, and prospectuses electronically instead of through the mail.
 
 
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS
 
This section would ordinarily include the Fund’s financial highlights table, which is intended to help you understand the Fund’s financial performance for the periods of operations. Because the Fund commenced operations on or following the date of this prospectus,
no financial highlights are shown.

43| USAA Flexible Income Fund
 
 

 


NOTES


 

Prospectus | 44

9800 Fredericksburg Road
San Antonio, Texas 78288
 
 
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If you would like more information about the Fund, you may
call (800) 531-USAA (8722) to request a free copy of the
Fund’s statement of additional information (SAI), annual or
semiannual reports (once available), or to ask other questions about
the
Fund. The SAI has been filed with the SEC and is incorporated
by reference to and legally a part of this prospectus. In the
Fund’s annual report, you will find a discussion of the market
conditions and investment strategies that significantly
affected the Fund’s performance during the last fiscal year.
The Fund’s annual and semiannual reports (once available) also
may be
viewed, free of charge, on usaa.com. A complete description
of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure
of the Fund’s portfolio securities is available in the Fund’s SAI.
The SAI is not available on usaa.com because of cost
considerations and lack of investor demand.

To view these documents, along with other related documents,
you may visit the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website
(www.sec.gov) or the Commission’s Public Reference Room in
Washington, DC. Information on the operation of the Public
Reference Room may be obtained by calling (202) 551-8090.
Additionally, copies of this information may be obtained,
after payment of a duplicating fee, by electronic request
at the following e-mail address: publicinfo@sec.gov or by
writing the Public Reference Section of the Commission,
Washington, DC 20549- 1520.
 
 
[USAA EAGLE LOGO (R)] We know what it means to serve. ®                                                                                                                   [10% graphic ]


xxxxx-0713                                                                           Investment Company Act File No. 811-7852                                                        ©2013, USAA. All rights reserved.
 
 
 

 

Part B
Statement of Additional Information for the
Target Retirement 2060 Fund

is included herein

 
 

 
 

[USAA EAGLE LOGO (R)]
USAA MUTUAL FUNDS TRUST
STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
JULY 12, 2013
 
USAA Target Retirement 2060 Fund (UXXXX)
 

USAA MUTUAL FUNDS TRUST (the Trust) is an open-end management investment company offering shares of fifty-two no-load mutual funds, one of which is described in this Statement of Additional Information (SAI): the Target Retirement 2060 Fund (the Fund). The Fund is classified as diversified.
You may obtain a free copy of the prospectus dated July 12, 2013, for the Target Retirement 2060 Fund by writing to USAA Mutual Funds Trust, 9800 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio, TX 78288, or by calling toll free 800-531-USAA (8722). The prospectus provides the basic information you should know before investing in the Fund. This SAI is not a prospectus and contains information in addition to and more detailed than that set forth in the Fund’s prospectus. It is intended to provide you with additional information regarding the activities and operations of the Trust and the Fund, and should be read in conjunction with the Fund’s prospectus.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
2 Valuation of Securities
3 Conditions of Purchase and Redemption
3 Additional Information Regarding Redemption of Shares
5 Investment Plans
6 Investment Policies
19 Investment Restrictions
20 Portfolio Transactions and Brokerage Commissions
21 Fund History and Description of Shares
22 Tax Considerations
25 Trustees and Officers of the Trust
30 Investment Adviser
32 Portfolio Manager Disclosure
33 Proxy Voting Policies and Procedures
34 Portfolio Holdings Disclosure
35 General Information
35 Appendix A – Long-Term and Short-Term Debt Ratings
 
1

 
VALUATION OF SECURITIES
Shares of the Fund are offered on a continuing, best-efforts basis through USAA Asset Management Company (AMCO or the Manager). The offering price for shares of the Fund is equal to the current net asset value (NAV) per share. The NAV per share of the Fund is calculated by adding the value of all its portfolio securities and other assets, deducting its liabilities, and dividing by the number of shares outstanding.
 
The Fund’s NAV per share is calculated each day, Monday through Friday, except days on which the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) is closed. The NYSE is currently scheduled to be closed on New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving, and Christmas, and on the preceding Friday or subsequent Monday when one of these holidays falls on a Saturday or Sunday, respectively. The Fund reserves the right to calculate the NAV per share on a business day that the NYSE is closed.
The value of securities of the Fund is determined by one or more of the following methods:
 
Portfolio securities, including exchange-traded funds (ETFs), except as otherwise noted, traded primarily on a domestic securities exchange or the over-the-counter markets are valued at the last sales price or official closing price on the exchange or primary market on which they trade. Portfolio securities traded primarily on foreign securities exchanges or markets are valued at the last quoted sales price, or the most recently determined official closing price calculated according to local market convention, available at the time a Fund is valued. If no last sale or official closing price is reported or available, the average of the bid and asked prices generally is used.
 
Securities trading in various foreign markets may take place on days when the NYSE is closed. Further, when the NYSE is open, the foreign markets may be closed. Therefore, the calculation of a Fund’s NAV may not take place at the same time the price of certain foreign securities held by a Fund is determined. In most cases, events affecting the values of foreign securities that occur between the time of their last quoted sales or official closing prices are determined and the close of normal trading on the NYSE on a day a Fund’s NAV is calculated will not be reflected in the value of a Fund’s foreign securities. However, the Manager and, if applicable, the Subadvisers will monitor for events that would materially affect the value of a Fund’s foreign securities. The Subadvisers have agreed to notify the Manager of significant events they identify that may materially affect the value of a Fund’s foreign securities. If the Manager determines that a particular event would materially affect the value of a Fund’s foreign securities, then the Manager, under valuation procedures approved by the Fund’s Board of Trustees (Board), will consider such available information that it deems relevant to determine a fair value for the affected foreign securities. In addition, a Fund may use information from an external vendor or other sources to adjust the foreign market closing prices of foreign equity securities to reflect what the Fund believes to be the fair value of the securities as of the close of the NYSE. Fair valuation of affected foreign equity securities may occur frequently based on an assessment that events which occur on a fairly regular basis (such as U.S. market movements) are significant.
 
Debt securities with maturities greater than 60 days are valued each business day by a pricing service (the Service) approved by the Board. The Service uses an evaluated mean between quoted bid and asked prices or the last sales price to price securities when, in the Service’s judgment, these prices are readily available and are representative of the securities’ market values. For many securities, such prices are not readily available. The Service generally prices those securities based on methods which include consideration of yields or prices of securities of comparable quality, coupon, maturity and type, indications as to values from dealers in securities, and general market conditions. Debt securities with original or remaining maturities of 60 days or less may be stated at amortized cost, which approximates market value. Repurchase agreements are valued at cost.
 
Investments in open-end investment companies, hedge, or other funds, other than ETFs, are valued at their NAV at the end of each business day. Futures contracts are valued at the last quoted sales price at the close of market on the principal exchange on which they are traded, or in the absence of any transactions that day, the values are based upon the last sale on the prior trading date if it is within the spread between the closing bid and asked price closest to the last reported sale price. Option contracts are valued by a pricing service at the National Best Bid/Offer (NBBO) composite price, which is derived from the best available bid and ask prices in all participating options exchanges determined to most closely reflect market value of the options at the time of computation of the Fund’s NAV.
 
Securities for which market quotations are not readily available or are considered unreliable, or whose values have been materially affected by events occurring after the close of their primary markets but before the pricing of a Fund, are valued in good faith by the Manager at fair value using valuation procedures approved by the Board of Trustees. The effect of fair value pricing is that securities may not be priced on the basis of quotations from the primary market in which they are traded and the actual price realized from the sale of a security may differ materially from the fair value price. Valuing these securities at fair value is intended to cause a Fund’s NAV to be more reliable than it otherwise would be.
 
Fair value methods used by the Manager include, but are not limited to, obtaining market quotations from secondary pricing services, broker-dealers, or widely used quotation systems. General factors considered in determining the fair value of securities include
 
 
 
2

 
 
fundamental analytical data, the nature and duration of any restrictions on disposition of the securities, and an evaluation of the forces that influenced the market in which the securities are purchased and sold.
 
CONDITIONS OF PURCHASE AND REDEMPTION
Nonpayment
 
If any order to purchase shares is canceled due to nonpayment or if the Trust does not receive good funds either by check or electronic funds transfer, USAA Shareholder Account Services (Transfer Agent) will treat the cancellation as a redemption of shares purchased, and you may be responsible for any resulting loss incurred by the Fund or the Manager. If you are a shareholder, the Transfer Agent can redeem shares from any of your account(s) as reimbursement for all losses. In addition, you may be prohibited or restricted from making future purchases in any of the USAA family of funds. A $29 fee is charged for all returned items, including checks and electronic funds transfers.
 
Transfer of Shares
 
You may transfer Fund shares to another person by sending written instructions to the Transfer Agent. The account must be clearly identified, and you must include the number of shares to be transferred and the signatures of all registered owners. You also need to send written instructions signed by all registered owners and supporting documents to change an account registration due to events such as marriage or death. If a new account needs to be established, you must complete and return an application to the Transfer Agent.
 
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION REGARDING REDEMPTION OF SHARES
 
The value of your investment at the time of redemption of your shares may be more or less than the cost at purchase, depending on the value of the securities held in your Fund’s portfolio. Requests for redemption that are subject to any special conditions or that specify an effective date other than as provided herein cannot be accepted. A gain or loss for tax purposes may be realized on the redemption of shares of a Fund, depending upon the price when redeemed.
 
Shares of a Fund may be offered to other USAA Funds that are structured as funds-of-funds, institutional investors, financial intermediaries, and other large investors (e.g., managed account programs offered by affiliated and unaffiliated investment advisers). These investors may from time to time own or control a significant percentage of a Fund’s shares. Accordingly, each Fund is subject to the potential for large-scale inflows and outflows from the Fund as a result of purchases and redemptions by large investors in the Fund. These inflows and outflows may be frequent and could increase a Fund’s expense ratio, transaction costs, and taxable distributions, which could negatively affect a Fund’s performance and could cause shareholders to be subject to higher taxes with respect to their investments in the Fund. These inflows and outflows also could limit the Manager's and a subadviser's ability to manage investments of a Fund in an efficient manner, which could adversely impact the Fund's performance and its ability to meet its investment objective. For example, after a large inflow, a Fund may hold a higher level of cash than it might hold under normal circumstances while the Manager or a subadviser seeks appropriate investment opportunities for the Fund. In addition, large inflows and outflows may limit the ability of a Fund to meet redemption requests and pay redemption proceeds within the time period stated in its prospectus because of unusual market conditions, an unusually high volume of redemption requests, or other reasons, and could cause a Fund to purchase or sell securities when it would not normally do so, which would be particularly disadvantageous for a Fund if it needs to sell securities at a time of volatility in the markets, when values could be falling.
 
The Board may cause the redemption of an account with a balance of less than $250, provided that (1) the value of the account has been reduced, for reasons other than market action, below the minimum initial investment in such Fund at the time the account was established, (2) the account has remained below the minimum level for six months, and (3) 30 days’ prior written notice of the proposed redemption has been sent to you. The Trust, subject to approval of the Board, anticipates closing certain small accounts yearly. Shares will be redeemed at the NAV on the date fixed for redemption. Prompt payment will be made directly to your bank account on file or if none, by mail to your known last address.
 
The Trust reserves the right to suspend the right of redemption or postpone the date of payment (1) for any periods during which the NYSE is closed, (2) when trading in the markets the Trust normally utilizes is restricted, or an emergency exists as determined by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) so that disposal of the Trust’s investments or determination of its NAV is not reasonably practicable, or (3) for such other periods as the SEC by order may permit for protection of the Trust’s shareholders.
 
For the mutual protection of the investor and the Funds, the Trust may require a signature guarantee. If required, each signature on the account registration must be guaranteed. Signature guarantees are acceptable from FDIC member banks, brokers, dealers, municipal securities dealers, municipal securities brokers, government securities dealers, government securities brokers, credit unions, national securities exchanges, registered securities associations, clearing agencies, and savings associations. A signature guarantee for active duty military personnel stationed abroad may be provided by an officer of the United States Embassy or Consulate, a staff officer of the Judge Advocate General, or an individual’s commanding officer.
 
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Excessive Short-Term Trading
 
The USAA Funds generally are not intended as short-term investment vehicles (except for the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund). Some investors try to profit by using excessive short-term trading practices involving mutual fund shares, frequently referred to as “market timing.”
 
Excessive short-term trading activity can disrupt the efficient management of a fund and raise its transaction costs by forcing portfolio managers to first buy and then sell portfolio securities in response to a large investment by short-term traders. While there is no assurance that the USAA Funds can deter all excessive and short-term trading, the Board of Trustees of the USAA Funds has adopted the following policies (except for the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund). These policies are designed to deter disruptive, excessive short-term trading without needlessly penalizing bona fide investors.
 
To deter such trading activities, the USAA Funds’ policies and procedures include:
 
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Each fund reserves the right to reject any purchase order, including an exchange, that it regards as disruptive to the efficient management of the particular fund.
 
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Each fund may use a fair value pricing service or other model to assist in establishing the current value of foreign securities held by any of the USAA Funds. Fair value pricing is used to adjust for stale pricing, which may occur between the close of certain foreign exchanges or markets and the time the USAA Funds calculate their NAV. Using fair value pricing is intended to deter those trying to take advantage of time-zone differences in the valuation of foreign securities and to prevent dilution to long-term investors. Fair value pricing of a foreign security can result in the USAA Funds using a price that is higher or lower than the closing price of a foreign security for purposes of calculating a fund’s NAV.
 
Funds’ Right to Reject Purchase and Exchange Orders and Limit Trading in Accounts
 
The USAA Funds’ main safeguard against excessive short-term trading is their right to reject purchase or exchange orders if in the best interest of the affected fund. In exercising this discretion to reject purchase and exchange orders, the USAA Funds deem that certain excessive short-term trading activities are not in the best interest of the fund because such activities can hamper the efficient management of a fund. Generally, persons who engage in an “in and out” (or “out and in”) transaction within a 30-day period will violate the USAA Funds’ policy if they engage in another “in and out” (or “out and in”) transaction in the same fund within 90 days. The USAA Funds also reserve the right to restrict future purchases or exchanges if an investor is classified as engaged in other patterns of excessive short-term trading, including after one large disruptive purchase and redemption or exchange. Finally, the USAA Funds reserve the right to reject any other purchase or exchange order in other situations that do not involve excessive short-term trading activities if in the best interest of the fund.
 
The following transactions are exempt from the excessive short-term trading activity policies described above:
 
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Transactions in the money market funds, Short-Term Bond Fund, Ultra Short-Term Bond Fund, and Tax Exempt Short-Term Fund;
 
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Purchases and sales pursuant to automatic investment or withdrawal plans;
 
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Purchases and sales made through USAA Managed Portfolios -- UMPTM, USAA 529 College Savings PlanTM, USAA Federal Savings Bank Trust Department, or other designated USAA managed investment accounts;
 
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Purchases and sales of the USAA Institutional Shares by the Target Retirement Funds, Cornerstone Conservative Fund, and/or Cornerstone Equity Fund; and
 
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Other transactions that are not motivated by short-term trading considerations if they are approved by Transfer Agent management personnel and are not disruptive to the fund.
 
If a person is classified as having engaged in excessive short-term trading, the remedy will depend upon the trading activities of the investor in the account and related accounts and its disruptive effect, and can include warnings to cease such activity and/or restrictions or termination of trading privileges in a particular fund or all USAA Funds.
 
The USAA Funds rely on the Transfer Agent to review trading activity for excessive short-term trading. There can be no assurance, however, that its monitoring activities will successfully detect or prevent all excessive short-term trading. The USAA Funds or the Transfer Agent may exclude transactions below a certain dollar amount from monitoring and may change that dollar amount from time to time.
 
The USAA Funds seek to apply these policies and procedures uniformly to all investors; however, some investors purchase shares of USAA Funds through financial intermediaries that establish omnibus accounts to invest in the USAA Funds for their clients and submit net orders to purchase or redeem shares after combining their client orders. The USAA Funds subject to short-term trading policies generally treat each omnibus account as an individual investor and will apply the short-term trading policies to the net purchases and sales submitted by the omnibus account unless the funds or their transfer agent has entered into an agreement requiring the omnibus account to submit the underlying trading information for their clients upon our request and/or monitor for excessive
 
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trading. For those omnibus accounts for which we have entered into agreements to monitor excessive trading or provide underlying trade information, the financial intermediary or USAA Funds will review net activity in these omnibus accounts for activity that indicates potential excessive short-term trading activity. If we detect suspicious trading activity at the omnibus account level, we will request underlying trading information and review the underlying trading activity to identify individual accounts engaged in excessive short-term trading activity. We will instruct the omnibus account to restrict, limit, or terminate trading privileges in a particular fund for individual accounts identified as engaging in excessive short-term trading through these omnibus accounts.
 
We also may rely on the financial intermediary to review for and identify underlying trading activity for individual accounts engaged in excessive short-term trading activity, and to restrict, limit, or terminate trading privileges if the intermediary’s policies are determined by us to be at least as stringent as the USAA Funds’ policy. For shares purchased through financial intermediaries, there may be additional or more restrictive policies. You may wish to contact your financial intermediary to determine the policies applicable to your account.
 
Because of the increased costs to review underlying trading information, the USAA Funds will not enter into agreements with every financial intermediary that operates an omnibus account. The USAA Funds or their transfer agent could decide to enter into such contracts with financial intermediaries for all funds or particular funds, and can terminate such agreements at any time.
INVESTMENT PLANS
 
Automatic Purchase of Shares
 
InvesTronic® – The regular purchase of additional shares through electronic funds transfer from a checking or savings account. You may invest as little as $50 per month.
 
Direct Purchase Service – The periodic purchase of shares through electronic funds transfer from a non-governmental employer, an income-producing investment, or an account with a participating financial institution.
 
Direct Deposit Program – The monthly transfer of certain federal benefits to directly purchase shares of a USAA mutual fund. Eligible federal benefits include: Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Veterans Compensation and Pension, Civil Service Retirement Annuity, and Civil Service Survivor Annuity.
 
Government Allotment – The transfer of military pay by the U.S. Government Finance Center for the purchase of USAA mutual fund shares.
 
Automatic Transfer Plan – The periodic transfer of funds from a USAA money market fund to purchase shares in another non-money market USAA mutual fund. There is a minimum investment required for this program of $5,000 in the money market fund, with a monthly transaction minimum of $50.
 
Buy/Sell Service – The intermittent purchase or redemption of shares through electronic funds transfer to or from a checking or savings account. You may initiate a “buy” or “sell” whenever you choose.
 
Directed Dividends – If you own shares in more than one of the Funds in the USAA family of funds, you may direct that dividends and/or capital gain distributions earned in one fund be used to purchase shares automatically in another fund.
 
Participation in these systematic purchase plans allows you to engage in dollar-cost averaging.
 
Systematic Withdrawal Plan
 
If you own shares in a single investment account (accounts in different Funds cannot be aggregated for this purpose) you may request that enough shares to produce a fixed amount of money be liquidated from the account monthly, quarterly, or annually. The amount of each withdrawal must be at least $50. Using the electronic funds transfer service, you may choose to have withdrawals electronically deposited at your bank or other financial institution. You may also elect to have checks made payable to an entity unaffiliated with United Services Automobile Association (USAA). You also may elect to have such withdrawals invested in another USAA Fund.
 
This plan may be initiated on usaa.com or by completing a Systematic Withdrawal Plan application, which may be requested from the Manager. You may terminate participation in the plan at any time. You are not charged for withdrawals under the Systematic Withdrawal Plan. The Trust will not bear any expenses in administering the plan beyond the regular transfer agent and custodian costs of issuing and redeeming shares. The Manager will bear any additional expenses of administering the plan.
 
Withdrawals will be made by redeeming full and fractional shares on the date you select at the time the plan is established. Withdrawal payments made under this plan may exceed dividends and other distributions and, to this extent, will involve the use of principal and could reduce the dollar value of your investment and eventually exhaust the account. Reinvesting dividends and other distributions helps replenish the account. Because share values and net investment income can fluctuate, you should not expect withdrawals to be offset by rising income or share value gains. Withdrawals that exceed the value in your account will be processed for the amount available and the plan will be canceled.
 
Each redemption of shares of the Fund may result in a gain or loss, which must be reported on your income tax return. Therefore, you should keep an accurate record of any gain or loss on each withdrawal.
 
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Tax-Deferred Retirement Plans
 
Federal tax on current income may be deferred if you qualify for certain types of retirement programs. For your convenience, the Manager offers 403(b)(7) accounts and various forms of individual retirement accounts (IRAs). You may make investments in one or any combination of the portfolios described in the prospectuses of USAA Mutual Funds Trust (excluding our tax-exempt funds).
 
Retirement plan applications for the IRA and 403(b)(7) programs should be sent directly to USAA Shareholder Account Services, P.O. Box 659453, San Antonio, TX 78265-9825. USAA Federal Savings Bank serves as Custodian of these tax-deferred retirement accounts under the programs made available by the Manager. Applications received electronically by the Manager for these retirement accounts will be forwarded to the Custodian for acceptance.
 
An administrative fee of $20 is deducted from the money sent to you after closing an account. Exceptions to the fee are: partial distributions, total transfer within USAA, and distributions due to disability or death. This charge is subject to change as provided in the various agreements. There may be additional charges, as mutually agreed upon between you and the Custodian, for further services requested of the Custodian.
 
Each employer or individual establishing a tax-deferred retirement account is advised to consult with a tax adviser before establishing the account. You may obtain detailed information about the accounts from the Manager.
 
INVESTMENT POLICIES
 
The sections captioned Investment Objective and Principal Investment Strategy in the Fund’s prospectus describe the investment objective(s) and the investment policies applicable to the Fund. There can, of course, be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective(s). The Fund’s objective(s) is not a fundamental policy and may be changed upon notice to, but without the approval of, the Fund’s shareholders. If there is a change in the investment objective of the Fund, the Fund’s shareholders should consider whether the Fund remains an appropriate investment in light of then-current needs.
The following provides more detailed information about the types of instruments in which the underlying USAA funds may invest and strategies that may be used in pursuit of the underlying USAA funds’ investment objectives. Each underlying USAA fund may not buy all of these instruments or use all of these techniques unless it believes that doing so will help the underlying USAA fund achieve its goal. Unless described as a principal investment policy in an underlying USAA fund’s prospectus, these represent the non-principal investment policies of the underlying funds.
 
Temporary Defensive Policy
 
The Fund and each underlying Fund may on a temporary basis because of market, economic, political, or other conditions, invest up to 100% of its assets in investment-grade, short-term debt instruments. Such securities may consist of obligations of the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities, and repurchase agreements secured by such instruments; certificates of deposit of domestic banks having capital, surplus, and undivided profits in excess of $100 million; banker’s acceptances of similar banks; commercial paper and other corporate debt obligations.
 
Section 4(2) Commercial Paper and Rule 144A Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest in commercial paper issued in reliance on the “private placement” exemption from registration afforded by Section 4(2) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (1933 Act) (Section 4(2) Commercial Paper). Section 4(2) Commercial Paper is restricted as to disposition under the federal securities laws; therefore, any resale of Section 4(2) Commercial Paper must be effected in a transaction exempt from registration under the 1933 Act. Section 4(2) Commercial Paper is normally resold to other investors through or with the assistance of the issuer or investment dealers who make a market in Section 4(2) Commercial Paper, thus providing liquidity.
 
An underlying Fund may purchase restricted securities eligible for resale to “qualified institutional buyers” pursuant to Rule 144A under the 1933 Act (Rule 144A Securities). Rule 144A provides a non-exclusive safe harbor from the registration requirements of the 1933 Act for resales of certain securities to institutional investors.
 
Municipal Lease Obligations
 
An underlying Fund may invest in municipal lease obligations, installment purchase contract obligations, and certificates of participation in such obligations (collectively, lease obligations). A lease obligation does not constitute a general obligation of the municipality for which the municipality’s taxing power is pledged, although the lease obligation is ordinarily backed by the municipality’s covenant to budget for the payments due under the lease obligation.
 
Certain lease obligations contain “non-appropriation” clauses, which provide that the municipality has no obligation to make lease obligation payments in future years unless money is appropriated for such purpose on a yearly basis. Although “non-appropriation” lease obligations are secured by the leased property, disposition of the property in the event of foreclosure might prove difficult. In evaluating a potential investment in such a lease obligation, the Manager or the applicable Subadviser will consider: (1) the credit quality of the obligor; (2) whether the underlying property is essential to a governmental function; and (3) whether the lease obligation
 
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contains covenants prohibiting the obligor from substituting similar property if the obligor fails to make appropriations for the lease obligation.
 
Liquidity Determinations
 
The Board has adopted guidelines pursuant to which municipal lease obligations, Section 4(2) Commercial Paper, Rule 144A Securities, certain restricted debt securities that are subject to put or demand features exercisable within seven days (Demand Feature Securities) and other securities (whether registered or not) that may be considered illiquid before or after purchase due to issuer bankruptcy, delisting, thin or no trading, SEC guidance or similar factors (other securities) may be determined to be liquid for purposes of complying with SEC limitations applicable to each Fund’s investments in illiquid securities. In determining the liquidity of municipal lease obligations, Section 4(2) Commercial Paper, Rule 144A Securities, and other securities, the Manager or the applicable Subadviser will, pursuant to the Board Adopted Liquidity Procedures, among other things, consider the following factors established by the Board of Trustees: (1) the frequency of trades and quotes for the security, (2) the number of dealers willing to purchase or sell the security and the number of other potential purchasers, (3) the willingness of dealers to undertake to make a market in the security, and (4) the nature of the security and the nature of the marketplace trades, including the time needed to dispose of the security, the method of soliciting offers, and the mechanics of transfer. Additional factors considered by the Manager or the applicable Subadviser in determining the liquidity of a municipal lease obligation are: (1) whether the lease obligation is of a size that will be attractive to institutional investors, (2) whether the lease obligation contains a non-appropriation clause and the likelihood that the obligor will fail to make an appropriation therefor, and (3) such other factors as the Manager or the applicable Subadviser may determine to be relevant to such determination. In determining the liquidity of Demand Feature Securities, the Manager or the applicable Subadviser will evaluate the credit quality of the party (the Put Provider) issuing (or unconditionally guaranteeing performance on) the put or demand feature of the Demand Feature Securities. In evaluating the credit quality of the Put Provider, the Manager or the applicable Subadviser will consider all factors that it deems indicative of the capacity of the Put Provider to meet its obligations under the Demand Feature Securities based upon a review of the Put Provider’s outstanding debt and financial statements and general economic conditions.
 
Certain foreign securities (including Eurodollar obligations) may be eligible for resale pursuant to Rule 144A in the United States and may also trade without restriction in one or more foreign markets. Such securities may be determined to be liquid based upon these foreign markets without regard to their eligibility for resale pursuant to Rule 144A. In such cases, these securities will not be treated as Rule 144A Securities for purposes of the liquidity guidelines established by the Board of Trustees.
 
Calculation of Dollar-Weighted Average Portfolio Maturity
Dollar-weighted average portfolio maturity is derived by multiplying the value of each debt instrument by the number of days remaining to its maturity, adding these calculations, and then dividing the total by the value of the Fund’s debt instruments. An obligation’s maturity is typically determined on a stated final maturity basis, although there are some exceptions to this rule.
 
With respect to obligations held by the Fund, if it is probable that the issuer of an instrument will take advantage of a maturity-shortening device, such as a call, refunding, or redemption provision, the date on which the instrument will probably be called, refunded, or redeemed may be considered to be its maturity date. Also, the maturities of mortgage-backed securities, some asset-backed securities, and securities subject to sinking fund arrangements are determined on a weighted average life basis, which is the average time for principal to be repaid. For mortgage-backed and some asset-backed securities, this average time is calculated by assuming prepayment rates of the underlying loans. These prepayment rates can vary depending upon the level and volatility of interest rates. This, in turn, can affect the weighted average life of the security. The weighted average lives of these securities will be shorter than their stated final maturities. In addition, for purposes of the Fund’s investment policies, an instrument will be treated as having a maturity earlier than its stated maturity date if the instrument has technical features such as puts or demand features that, in the judgment of the Manager or the applicable Subadviser, will result in the instrument’s being valued in the market as though it has the earlier maturity.
 
Finally, for purposes of calculating the dollar-weighted average portfolio maturity of the Fund, the maturity of a debt instrument with a periodic interest reset date will be deemed to be the next reset date, rather than the remaining stated maturity of the instrument if, in the judgment of the Manager or applicable Subadviser, the periodic interest reset features will result in the instrument’s being valued in the market as though it has the earlier maturity.
 
Eurodollar and Yankee Obligations
 
An underlying Fund may invest in Eurodollar and Yankee obligations. Eurodollar obligations are dollar-denominated instruments that have been issued outside the U.S. capital markets by foreign corporations and financial institutions and by foreign branches of U.S. corporations and financial institutions. Yankee obligations are dollar-denominated instruments that have been issued by foreign issuers in the U.S. capital markets.
 
Eurodollar and Yankee obligations are subject to the same risks that pertain to domestic issues, notably credit risk, market risk, and liquidity risk. Additionally, Eurodollar (and to a limited extent, Yankee) obligations are subject to certain sovereign risks. One such risk is the possibility that a sovereign country might prevent capital, in the form of dollars, from leaving the country. Other risks include: adverse political and economic developments; the extent and quality of government regulation of financial markets and
 
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institutions; the imposition of foreign withholding taxes; and expropriation or nationalization of foreign issuers. However, Eurodollar and Yankee obligations will undergo the same type of credit analysis as domestic issues in which the Fund invests, and will have at least the same financial strength as the domestic issuers approved for the Fund.
 
Master Demand Notes
 
An underlying Fund may invest in Master demand notes, which are obligations that permit the investment of fluctuating amounts by the Fund, or an underlying Fund, at varying rates of interest using direct arrangements between the Fund, or an underlying Fund, or an underlying Fund , as lender, and the borrower. These notes permit daily changes in the amounts borrowed. The Fund, or an underlying Fund, has the right to increase the amount under the note at any time up to the full amount provided by the note agreement, or to decrease the amount, and the borrower may repay up to the full amount of the note without penalty. Frequently, such obligations are secured by letters of credit or other credit support arrangements provided by banks. Because master demand notes are direct lending arrangements between the lender and borrower, these instruments generally will not be traded, and there generally is no secondary market for these notes, although they are redeemable (and immediately repayable by the borrower) at face value, plus accrued interest, at any time. We will invest a Fund’s, or an underlying Fund's, assets in master demand notes only if the Board or its delegate has determined that they are of credit quality comparable to the debt securities in which the Fund, or an underlying Fund, generally may invest.
 
Periodic Auction Reset Bonds
 
An underlying Fund may invest in periodic auction reset bonds, which are bonds whose interest rates are reset periodically through an auction mechanism. For purposes of calculating the portfolio weighted average maturity of the Fund, the maturity of periodic auction reset bonds will be deemed to be the next interest reset date, rather than the remaining stated maturity of the instrument.
 
Periodic auction reset bonds, similar to short-term debt instruments, are generally subject to less interest rate risk than long-term fixed rate debt instruments because the interest rate will be periodically reset in a market auction. Periodic auction reset bonds with a long remaining stated maturity (i.e., ten years or more), however, could have greater market risk than fixed short-term debt instruments, arising from the possibility of auction failure or insufficient demand at an auction, resulting in failure to reset the interest rate to a market rate that would support fair value that approximates par value and in greater price volatility of such instruments compared to fixed short-term bonds.
 
Synthetic Instruments
 
An underlying Fund may invest in tender option bonds, bond receipts, and similar synthetic municipal instruments. A synthetic instrument is a security created by combining an intermediate or long-term municipal bond with a right to sell the instrument back to the remarketer or liquidity provider for repurchase on short notice. This right to sell is commonly referred to as a tender option. Usually, the tender option is backed by a conditional guarantee or letter of credit from a bank or other financial institution. Under its terms, the guarantee may expire if the municipality defaults on payments of interest or principal on the underlying bond, if the credit rating of the municipality is downgraded, or if interest on the underlying bond loses its tax-exempt status. Synthetic instruments involve structural risks that could adversely affect the value of the instrument or could result in a Fund holding an instrument for a longer period of time than originally anticipated. For example, because of the structure of a synthetic instrument, there is a risk that the instrument will lose its tax-exempt treatment or that the Fund will not be able to exercise its tender option.
 
Put Bonds
 
An underlying Fund may invest in put bonds, which are securities (including securities with variable interest rates) that may be redeemed or sold back (put) to the issuer of the security or a third party prior to stated maturity. Such securities will normally trade as if maturity is the earlier put date, even though stated maturity is longer. Under an underlying Fund’s portfolio allocation procedure, maturity for put bonds is deemed to be the date on which the put becomes exercisable.
 
Lending of Securities
 
An underlying Fund may lend its securities in accordance with a lending policy that has been authorized by the Trust’s Board of Trustees and implemented by the Manager. Securities may be loaned only to qualified broker-dealers or other institutional investors that have been determined to be creditworthy by the Manager. When borrowing securities from an underlying Fund, the borrower will be required to maintain cash collateral with the Trust in amount at least equal to the fair value of the borrowed securities. During the term of each loan, an underlying Fund will be entitled to receive payments from the borrower equal to all interest and dividends paid on the securities during the term of the loan by the issuer of the securities. In addition, an underlying Fund will invest the cash received as collateral in high-quality short-term instruments such as obligations of the U.S. government or of its agencies or instrumentalities or in repurchase agreements or shares of money market mutual funds, thereby earning additional income. Risks to a Fund in securities-lending transactions are that the borrower may not provide additional collateral when required or return the securities when due, and that the value of the short-term instruments will be less than the amount of cash collateral required to be returned to the borrower.
 
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No loan of securities will be made if, as a result, the aggregate of such loans would exceed 33 1/3% of the value of a Fund’s total assets. A Fund may terminate a loan at any time.
 
Brady Bonds and Emerging Markets Debt
 
An underlying Fund may invest in Brady Bonds, which are securities created through a restructuring plan introduced by former U.S. Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady. The Brady Plan made provisions whereby existing commercial bank loans to both public and private entities in selected developing countries are exchanged for Brady Bonds. These bonds may be denominated in other currencies, but are usually denominated in U.S. dollars. Brady Bonds are actively traded in over-the-counter markets. As the markets for these securities have from time to time been subject to disruption, the Manager and applicable Subadviser will monitor, on a continuous basis, the liquidity of Brady Bonds held in a Fund’s portfolio.
 
Convertible Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest in convertible securities, which are bonds, preferred stocks, and other securities that pay interest or dividends and offer the buyer the ability to convert the security into common stock. The value of convertible securities depends partially on interest rate changes and the credit quality of the issuer. Because a convertible security affords an investor the opportunity, through its conversion feature, to participate in the capital appreciation of the underlying common stock, the value of convertible securities also depends on the price of the underlying common stock.
 
Foreign Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest its assets in foreign securities purchased in either foreign (non-dollar denominated) or U.S. markets, including American depositary receipts (ADRs), European depositary receipts (EDRs), and global depositary receipts (GDRs). Investing in foreign securities poses unique risks: currency exchange rate fluctuations; foreign market illiquidity; increased price volatility; exchange control regulations; foreign ownership limits; different accounting, reporting, and disclosure requirements; political or social instability, including policies of foreign governments which may affect their respective equity markets; foreign taxation requirements including withholding taxes; and difficulties in obtaining legal judgments. In the past, equity and debt instruments of foreign markets have been more volatile than equity and debt instruments of U.S. securities markets.
Any such investments will be made in compliance with U.S. and foreign currency restrictions, tax laws, and laws limiting the amount and types of foreign investments. Pursuit of the Funds’ investment objectives will involve currencies of the United States and of foreign countries. Consequently, changes in exchange rates, currency convertibility, and repatriation requirements may favorably or adversely affect a Fund.
 
Forward Currency Contracts
 
An underlying Fund may enter into forward currency contracts in order to protect against uncertainty in the level of future foreign exchange rates. A forward contract involves an agreement to purchase or sell a specific currency at a specified future date or over a specified time period at a price set at the time of the contract. These contracts are usually traded directly between currency traders (usually large commercial banks) and their customers. A forward contract generally has no deposit requirements, and no commissions are charged.
An underlying Fund may enter into forward currency contracts under two circumstances. First, when a Fund enters into a contract for the purchase or sale of a security denominated in a foreign currency, it may desire to “lock in” the U.S. dollar price of the security until settlement. By entering into such a contract, a Fund will be able to protect itself against a possible loss resulting from an adverse change in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and the foreign currency from the date the security is purchased or sold to the date on which payment is made or received. Second, when management of a Fund believes that the currency of a specific country may deteriorate relative to the U.S. dollar, it may enter into a forward contract to sell that currency. An underlying Fund may not hedge with respect to a particular currency for an amount greater than the aggregate market value (determined at the time of making any sale of forward currency) of the securities held in its portfolio denominated or quoted in, or bearing a substantial correlation to, such currency.
The use of forward contracts involves certain risks. The precise matching of contract amounts and the value of securities involved generally will not be possible since the future value of such securities in currencies more than likely will change between the date the contract is entered into and the date it matures. The projection of short-term currency market movements is extremely difficult and successful execution of a short-term hedging strategy is uncertain. Under normal circumstances, consideration of the prospect for currency parities will be incorporated into the longer term investment strategies. The Manager or the applicable Subadviser believes it is important, however, to have the flexibility to enter into such contracts when it determines it is in the best interest of the Funds to do so. It is impossible to forecast what the market value of portfolio securities will be at the expiration of a contract. Accordingly, it may be necessary for a Fund to purchase additional currency (and bear the expense of such purchase) if the market value of the security is less than the amount of currency a Fund is obligated to deliver, and if a decision is made to sell the security and make delivery of the currency. Conversely, it may be necessary to sell some of the foreign currency received on the sale of the portfolio security if its market value exceeds the amount of currency a Fund is obligated to deliver. A Fund is not required to enter into such transactions and will not do so unless deemed appropriate by the Manager or the applicable Subadviser.
 
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Although an underlying Fund values its assets each business day in terms of U.S. dollars, it does not intend to convert its foreign currencies into U.S. dollars on a daily basis. It will do so from time to time, and shareholders should be aware of currency conversion costs. Although foreign exchange dealers do not charge a fee for conversion, they do realize a profit based on the difference (spread) between the prices at which they are buying and selling various currencies. Thus, a dealer may offer to sell a foreign currency to a Fund at one rate, while offering a lesser rate of exchange should a Fund desire to resell that currency to the dealer.
 
Equity Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest in equity securities listed on any domestic or foreign securities exchange or traded in the over-the-counter market as well as certain restricted or unlisted securities. As used herein, “equity securities” are defined as common stock, preferred stock, trust or limited partnership interests, rights and warrants to subscribe to or purchase such securities, sponsored or unsponsored ADRs, EDRs, GDRs, and convertible securities, consisting of debt securities or preferred stock that may be converted into common stock or that carry the right to purchase common stock. Common stocks, the most familiar type, represent an equity (ownership) interest in a corporation. They may or may not pay dividends or carry voting rights. Common stock occupies the most junior position in a company’s capital structure. Although equity securities have a history of long-term growth in value, their prices fluctuate based on changes in a company’s financial condition and on overall market and economic conditions. Smaller companies are especially sensitive to these factors.
 
Illiquid Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest up to 15% of its net assets in securities that are illiquid. Illiquid securities are generally those securities that a fund cannot expect to sell or dispose of in the ordinary course of business within seven days or less at approximately the value ascribed to such securities.
 
Adjustable-Rate Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest in adjustable-rate securities. The interest rate on an adjustable-rate security fluctuates periodically. Generally, the security’s yield is based on a U.S. dollar-based interest-rate benchmark such as the Federal Funds Rate, the 90-day Treasury bill rate, or the London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR). The yields on these securities are reset on a periodic basis (for example, daily, weekly, or quarterly) or upon a change in the benchmark interest rate. The yields are closely correlated to changes in money market interest rates.
 
Variable-Rate and Floating-Rate Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest in variable-rate and floating-rate securities, which bear interest at rates that are adjusted periodically to market rates. These interest rate adjustments can both raise and lower the income generated by such securities. These changes will have the same effect on the income earned by a Fund depending on the proportion of such securities held. Because the interest rates of variable-rate and floating-rate securities are periodically adjusted to reflect current market rates, the market value of the variable-rate and floating-rate securities is less affected by changes in prevailing interest rates than the market value of securities with fixed interest rates. The market value of variable-rate and floating-rate securities usually tends toward par (100% of face value) at interest rate adjustment time.
 
Variable-Rate Demand Notes
 
An underlying Fund may invest in securities that provide the right to sell the securities at face value on either that day or within the rate-reset period. The interest rate is adjusted at a stipulated daily, weekly, monthly, quarterly, or other specified time interval to a rate that reflects current market conditions. The effective maturity for these instruments is deemed to be less than 397 days in accordance with detailed regulatory requirements. These interest rate adjustments can both raise and lower the income generated by such securities. These changes will have the same effect on the income earned by the Fund depending on the proportion of such securities held.
 
When-Issued and Delayed-Delivery Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest in debt securities offered on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis; that is, delivery of and payment for the securities take place after the date of the commitment to purchase, normally within 45 days. The payment obligation and the interest rate that will be received on the securities are each fixed at the time the buyer enters into the commitment. An underlying Fund may sell these securities before the settlement date if it is deemed advisable.
 
Debt securities purchased on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis are subject to changes in value in the same way as other debt securities held in the Fund’s portfolios are; that is, both generally experience appreciation when interest rates decline and depreciation when interest rates rise. The value of such securities will also be affected by the public’s perception of the creditworthiness of the issuer and anticipated changes in the level of interest rates. Purchasing securities on a when-issued or delayed-delivery basis involves a risk that the yields available in the market when the delivery takes place may actually be higher than those obtained in the transaction itself. To ensure that the Fund will be able to meet its obligation to pay for when-issued or delayed-delivery securities at the time of settlement, the Fund will segregate cash or liquid securities at least equal to the amount of the when-issued or delayed-delivery
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commitments. The segregated securities are valued at market, and any necessary adjustments are made to keep the value of the cash and/or segregated securities at least equal to the amount of such commitments by the Fund.
 
On the settlement date of the when-issued or delayed-delivery securities, the Fund will meet its obligations from then available cash, sale of segregated securities, sale of other securities, or from sale of the when-issued or delayed-delivery securities themselves (which may have a value greater or less than the Trust’s payment obligations). Sale of securities to meet such obligations carries with it a greater potential for the realization of capital gains.
 
Separate Trading of Registered Interest and Principal of Securities (STRIPS)
 
An underlying Fund may invest in STRIPS, which are U.S. Treasury securities that allow the investor to hold and trade the individual interest and principal components of eligible Treasury notes and bonds as separate securities. STRIPS can only be purchased and held through financial institutions and government securities brokers and dealers. These securities are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government.
 
Treasury Inflation-Protected Securities (TIPS)
 
An underlying Fund may invest in TIPS, which are U.S. Treasury securities that have been designed to provide a real rate of return after being adjusted over time to reflect the impact of inflation. Their principal value periodically adjusts to the rate of inflation. They trade at prevailing real, or after inflation, interest rates. The U.S. Treasury guarantees repayment of at least the face value of these securities in the event of sustained deflation or a drop in prices.
 
Investments in Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs)
 
An underlying Fund may invest a portion of its assets in equity securities of REITs and it may be subject to certain risks associated with direct investments in real estate. In addition, some of the underlying Funds may invest a portion of their assets in the debt and preferred securities of REITs and, therefore, may be subject to certain other risks, such as credit risk, associated with investment in these securities. REITs may be affected by changes in the value of their underlying properties and by defaults by borrowers or tenants. Furthermore, REITs are dependent upon the specialized management skills of their managers and may have limited geographic diversification, thereby subjecting them to risks inherent in financing a limited number of projects. REITs depend generally on their ability to generate cash flow to make distributions to shareholders, and certain REITs have self-liquidation provisions by which mortgages held may be paid in full and distributions of capital returns may be made at any time.
 
Preferred Stocks
 
An underlying Fund may invest in preferred stocks. Preferred stocks represent a class of capital stock. Generally, preferred stock has a specified dividend and ranks after bonds and before common stocks in its claim on income for dividend payments and on assets should the company be liquidated. Preferred stockholders do not ordinarilly enjoy any of the voting rights of common stockholders. Most preferred stock is cumulative, meaning that if dividends are passed (not paid for any reason), they accumulate and must be paid before common dividends. Typically, a preferred stock pays a fixed dividend that does not fluctuate, although the company does not have to pay this dividend if it lacks the financial ability to do so. . However, an adjustable-rate preferred stock pays a dividend that is adjustable, usually quarterly, based on changes in the Treasury bill rate or other money market rates. A convertible preferred stock is exchangeable for a given number of common shares and thus tends to be more volatile than nonconvertible preferred, which behaves more like a fixed-income bond.The main benefit to owning preferred stock is that the investor has a greater claim on the company’s assets than common stockholders. Preferred stockholders always receive their dividends first and, in the event the company goes bankrupt, preferred stockholders are paid off before common stockholders. The Funds may purchase preferred stock where the issuer has omitted, or is in danger of omitting, payment of its dividend. Such investments would be made primarily for their capital appreciation potential.
 
Repurchase Agreements
 
An underlying Fund may invest in repurchase agreements, which are collateralized by underlying securities. A repurchase agreement is a transaction in which a security is purchased with a simultaneous commitment to sell it back to the seller (a commercial bank or recognized securities dealer) at an agreed upon price on an agreed upon date, usually not more than seven days from the date of purchase. The resale price reflects the purchase price plus an agreed upon market rate of interest, which is unrelated to the coupon rate or maturity of the purchased security. The Fund maintains custody of the underlying securities prior to their repurchase, either through its regular custodian or through a special “tri-party” custodian that maintains separate accounts for both the Fund and its counterparty. Thus, the obligation of the counterparty to pay the repurchase price on the date agreed to or upon demand is, in effect, secured by the underlying securities. In these transactions, the securities purchased by the Fund will be those in which it is authorized to invest and have a total value equal to or in excess of the amount of the repurchase obligation. If the seller defaults and the value of the underlying security declines, the Fund may incur a loss and may incur expenses in selling the collateral. If the seller seeks relief under the bankruptcy laws, the disposition of the collateral may be delayed or limited. An underlying Fund will invest in repurchase agreement transactions with parties whose creditworthiness has been reviewed and found satisfactory by the Manager.
 
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Securities of Other Investment Companies
 
An underlying Fund may invest in securities issued by other investment companies that invest in eligible quality, short-term debt securities and seek to maintain a $1 NAV per share, i.e., “money market” funds. In addition, an underlying Fund may invest in securities issued by other non-money market investment companies (including exchange-traded funds) that invest in the types of securities in which the fund itself is permitted to invest. As a shareholder of another investment company, a fund would bear, along with other shareholders, its pro rata portion of the other investment company’s expenses, including advisory fees. These expenses would be in addition to the advisory and other expenses that a fund bears in connection with its own operations. An underlying Fund may invest in securities issued by other investment companies subject to statutory limitations prescribed by the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder. An underlying Fund may rely on certain SEC exemptive orders that permit funds meeting various conditions to invest in an ETF in amounts exceeding limits set forth in the 1940 Act that would otherwise be applicable.
 
Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs)
 
An underlying Fund may invest in ETFs, which are, with a few exceptions, open-end investment companies that trade throughout the day. Almost all ETFs trade on the American Stock Exchange or other exchanges. More specifically, ETFs typically track a market index or specific sectors of the stock or bond markets. Because they trade like a stock, they offer trading flexibility desired by both individuals and institutions. Like any security that trades on an exchange, the value of the underlying securities is the major factor in determining an ETF’s price. However, ETFs do not necessarily trade at the net asset values of their underlying securities. The price of an ETF is determined by supply and demand.
 
Mortgage-Backed Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest in, mortgage-backed securities, which include, but are not limited to, securities issued by the Government National Mortgage Association (Ginnie Mae or GNMA), the Federal National Mortgage Associations (Fannie Mae), and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (Freddie Mac). These securities represent ownership in a pool of mortgage loans. They differ from conventional bonds in that principal is paid back to the investor as payments are made on the underlying mortgages in the pool. Accordingly, a fund receives monthly scheduled payments of principal and interest along with any unscheduled principal prepayments on the underlying mortgages. Because these scheduled and unscheduled principal payments must be reinvested at prevailing interest rates, mortgage-backed securities do not provide an effective means of locking in long-term interest rates for the investor. Like other fixed income securities, when interest rates rise, the value of a mortgage-backed security with prepayment features will generally decline. In addition, when interest rates are declining, the value of mortgage-backed securities with prepayment features may not increase as much as other fixed income securities. The weighted average life of such securities is likely to be substantially shorter than the stated final maturity as a result of scheduled principal payments and unscheduled principal prepayments. Ginnie Mae is a government-owned corporation that is an agency of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. It guarantees, with the full faith and credit of the United States, full and timely payment of all monthly principal and interest on its mortgage-backed securities. Until recently, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were government-sponsored corporations owned entirely by private stockholders. Both issue mortgage-related securities that contain guarantees as to timely payment of interest and principal but that are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government. The value of the companies’ securities fell sharply in 2008 due to concerns that the firms did not have sufficient capital to offset losses. The U.S. Treasury has historically had the authority to purchase obligations of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In addition, in 2008, due to capitalization concerns, Congress provided the U.S. Treasury with additional authority to lend Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac emergency funds and to purchase the companies’ stock, as described below. In September 2008, the U.S. Treasury and the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) announced that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac had been placed in conservatorship.
 
Since 2009, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have received significant capital support through U.S. Treasury preferred stock purchases and Federal Reserve purchases of their mortgage backed securities. While the Federal Reserve’s purchases have terminated, the U.S. Treasury announced in December 2009 that it would continue its support for the entities’ capital as necessary to prevent a negative net worth through at least 2012. While the U.S. Treasury is committed to offset negative equity at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac through its preferred stock purchases through 2012, FHFA has made projections for those purchases through 2015, predicting that cumulative U.S. Treasury draws (including dividends) at the end of 2015 could range from $191 billion to $209 billion. Nonetheless, no assurance can be given that the Federal Reserve, U.S. Treasury, or FHFA initiatives will ensure that Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac will remain successful in meeting their obligations with respect to the debt and mortgage-backed securities they issue beyond that date. In addition, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac also are the subject of several continuing class action lawsuits and investigations by federal regulators over certain accounting, disclosure or corporate governance matters, which (along with any resulting financial restatements) may adversely affect the guaranteeing entities. Importantly, the future of the entities is in serious question as the U.S. Government reportedly is considering multiple options, ranging from nationalization, privatization, consolidation, or abolishment of the entities.
 
An underlying Fund also may invest in mortgage-backed securities that include collateralized mortgage obligations (CMOs), commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBSs), stripped mortgage-backed securities (SBMSs), interest only commercial mortgage-backed securities (CMBS IOs), and mortgage dollar rolls.
 
CMOs are obligations fully collateralized by a portfolio of mortgages or mortgage-related securities. CMOs are divided into pieces (tranches) with varying maturities. The cash flow from the underlying mortgages is used to pay off each tranche separately. CMOs are
 
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designed to provide investors with more predictable maturities than regular mortgage securities but such maturities can be difficult to predict because of the effect of prepayments. Failure to accurately predict prepayments can adversely affect a Fund’s return on these investments. CMOs may also be less marketable than other securities.
 
CMBSs include securities that reflect an interest in, and are secured by, mortgage loans on commercial real property, such as industrial and warehouse properties, office buildings, retail space and shopping malls, apartments, hotels and motels, nursing homes, hospitals and senior living centers. Many of the risks of investing in commercial mortgage-backed securities reflect the risks of investing in the real estate securing the underlying mortgage loans. These risks reflect the effects of local and other economic conditions on real estate markets, the ability of tenants to make loan payments, and the ability of a property to attract and retain tenants. In addition, commercial properties, particularly industrial and warehouse properties, are subject to environmental risks and the burdens and costs of compliance with environmental laws and regulations. CMBSs may be less liquid and exhibit greater price volatility than other types of mortgage-backed securities.
 
SMBSs are derivative multi-class mortgage securities. SMBSs may be issued by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. government, or by private originators of, or investors in, mortgage loans, including savings and loan associations, mortgage banks, commercial banks, investment banks, and special purpose entities of the foregoing. SMBSs are usually structured with two classes that receive different proportions of the interest and principal distributions on a pool of mortgage assets. A common type of SMBS will have one class receiving some of the interest and most of the principal from the mortgage assets, while the other class will receive most of the interest and the remainder of the principal. In the most extreme case, one class will receive all of the interest (the interest only “IO” class), while the other class will receive all the principal (the principal-only or “PO” class). The yield to maturity on an IO class is extremely sensitive to the rate of principal payments (including prepayments) on the related underlying mortgage assets, and a rapid rate of principal payments may have a material adverse effect on a Fund’s yield to maturity from these securities. If the underlying mortgage assets experience greater than anticipated prepayments of principal, a Fund may fail to recoup some or all of its initial investment in these securities even if the security is in one of the highest rating categories. Although SMBSs are purchased and sold by institutional investors through several investment banking firms acting as brokers or dealers, established trading markets for these types of securities are not as developed and, accordingly, these securities may be deemed “illiquid” and subject to a Fund's limitations on investment in illiquid securities.
 
CMBS IOs are similar to the SMBSs described above, but are contrasted by being backed by loans that have various forms of prepayment protection, which include lock-out provisions, yield maintenance provisions, and prepayment penalties. Therefore, they generally have less prepayment risk than SMBSs, and are also less sensitive to interest rate changes. CMBS IOs are subject to recessionary default-related prepayments that may have a negative impact on yield.
 
In mortgage dollar roll transactions, a Fund sells mortgage-backed securities for delivery in the current month and simultaneously contracts to purchase substantially similar securities on a specified future date. While a Fund would forego principal and interest paid on the mortgage-backed securities during the roll period, the Fund would be compensated by the difference between the current sales price and the lower price for the future purchase as well as by any interest earned on the proceeds of the initial sale. At the time a Fund enters into a mortgage dollar roll, it designates on its books and records cash or liquid securities to secure its obligation for the forward commitment to buy mortgage-backed securities. Mortgage dollar roll transactions may be considered a borrowing by an underlying Fund. The mortgage dollar rolls entered into by a fund may be used as arbitrage transactions in which the Fund will maintain an offsetting position in investment grade debt obligations or repurchase agreements that mature on or before the settlement date on the related mortgage dollar roll. Because a Fund will receive interest on the securities or repurchase agreements in which it invests the transaction proceeds, such transactions may involve leverage.
 
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
An underlying Fund may invest in a zero coupon bond, which is a security that is sold at a deep discount from its face value (“original issue discount”), makes no periodic interest payments, and is redeemed at face value when it matures. The lump sum payment at maturity increases the price volatility of the zero coupon bond to changes in interest rates when compared to a bond that distributes a semiannual coupon payment. In calculating its income, a Fund accrues the daily amortization of the original issue discount.
 
Inverse Floating Rate Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in municipal securities whose coupons vary inversely with changes in short-term tax-exempt interest rates and thus are considered leveraged investments in underlying municipal bonds (or securities with similar economic characteristics). In creating such a security, a municipality issues a certain amount of debt and pays a fixed interest rate. A portion of the debt is issued as variable rate short-term obligations, the interest rate of which is reset at short intervals, typically seven days or less. The other portion of the debt is issued as inverse floating rate obligations, the interest rate of which is calculated based on the difference between a multiple of (approximately two times) the interest paid by the issuer and the interest paid on the short-term obligation. These securities present special risks for two reasons: (1) if short-term interest rates rise (fall), the income a Fund earns on the inverse floating rate security will fall (rise); and (2) if long-term interest rates rise (fall) the value of the inverse floating rate security will fall (rise) more than the value of the underlying bond because of the leveraged nature of the investment. The Fund will seek to buy these securities at attractive values and yields that more than compensate the Fund for the securities price volatility.
 
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Derivatives
 
An underlying Fund may buy and sell certain types of derivatives, such as options, futures contracts, options on futures contracts, and swaps (each as described below) under circumstances in which such instruments are expected by the Manager or the applicable Subadviser to aid in achieving the Fund’s investment objective. The Fund may also purchase instruments with characteristics of both futures and securities (e.g., debt instruments with interest and principal payments determined by reference to the value of a commodity or a currency at a future time) and which, therefore, possess the risks of both futures and securities investments.
 
Derivatives, such as options, futures contracts, options on futures contracts, and swaps enable the Fund to take both “short” positions (positions which anticipate a decline in the market value of a particular asset or index) and “long” positions (positions which anticipate an increase in the market value of a particular asset or index). The Fund may also use strategies which involve simultaneous short and long positions in response to specific market conditions, such as where the Manager or the applicable Subadviser anticipates unusually high or low market volatility.
 
The Manager or the applicable Subadviser may enter into derivative positions for the Fund for either hedging or non-hedging purposes. The term hedging is applied to defensive strategies designed to protect the Fund from an expected decline in the market value of an asset or group of assets that the Fund owns (in the case of a short hedge) or to protect the Fund from an expected rise in the market value of an asset or group of assets which it intends to acquire in the future (in the case of a long or “anticipatory” hedge). Non-hedging strategies include strategies designed to produce incremental income (such as the option writing strategy described below) or “speculative” strategies, which are undertaken to equitize the cash or cash equivalent portion of the Fund’s portfolio or to profit from (i) an expected decline in the market value of an asset or group of assets which the Fund does not own or (ii) expected increases in the market value of an asset which it does not plan to acquire. Information about specific types of instruments is provided below.
 
Futures Contracts
 
An underlying Fund may use futures contracts to implement its investment strategy. Futures contracts are publicly traded contracts to buy or sell an underlying asset or group of assets, such as a currency, interest rate, or an index of securities, at a future time at a specified price. A contract to buy establishes a long position while a contract to sell establishes a short position.
 
The purchase of a futures contract on a security or an index of securities normally enables a buyer to participate in the market movement of the underlying asset or index after paying a transaction charge and posting margin in an amount equal to a small percentage of the value of the underlying asset or index. The Fund will initially be required to deposit with the Trust’s custodian or the futures commission merchant effecting the futures transaction an amount of “initial margin” in cash or securities, as permitted under applicable regulatory policies.
 
Initial margin in futures transactions is different from margin in securities transactions in that the former does not involve the borrowing of funds by the customer to finance the transaction. Rather, the initial margin is like a performance bond or good faith deposit on the contract. Subsequent payments (called “maintenance or variation margin”) to and from the broker will be made on a daily basis as the price of the underlying asset fluctuates. This process is known as “marking to market.” For example, when the Fund has taken a long position in a futures contract and the value of the underlying asset has risen, that position will have increased in value and the Fund will receive from the broker a maintenance margin payment equal to the increase in value of the underlying asset. Conversely, when the Fund has taken a long position in a futures contract and the value of the underlying instrument has declined, the position would be less valuable, and the Fund would be required to make a maintenance margin payment to the broker.
 
At any time prior to expiration of the futures contract, the Fund may elect to close the position by taking an opposite position that will terminate the Fund’s position in the futures contract. A final determination of maintenance margin is then made, additional cash is required to be paid by or released to the Fund, and the Fund realizes a loss or a gain. While futures contracts with respect to securities do provide for the delivery and acceptance of such securities, such delivery and acceptance are seldom made.
 
Cover
 
Transactions using certain derivative instruments, other than purchased options, expose the Fund to an obligation to another party. The Fund will not enter into any such transactions unless it owns either (1) an offsetting (“covered”) position in securities, currencies or other options, futures contracts or forward contracts, or (2) cash or liquid assets with a value, marked-to-market daily, sufficient to cover its potential obligations to the extent not covered as provided in (1) above. The Fund will comply with SEC guidelines regarding cover for these instruments and will, if the guidelines so require, designate cash or liquid securities in the prescribed amount as determined daily.
 
Assets used as cover or held in an account cannot be sold while the position in the corresponding derivative instrument is open, unless they are replaced with other appropriate assets. As a result, the commitment of a large portion of the Fund’s assets to cover in accounts could impede portfolio management or the Fund’s ability to meet redemption requests or other current obligations.
 
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Options on Securities, Securities Indexes or Corresponding Exchange-Traded Fund, and Options on Futures Contracts
 
An underlying Fund may purchase and sell options on securities or securities indexes or corresponding exchange-traded fund and options on futures contracts to implement its investment strategy. There are two basic types of options: “puts” and “calls.” Each type of option can be used to establish either a long or a short position, depending upon whether a Fund is the purchaser or a writer of the option. A call option on a security, for example, gives the purchaser of the option the right to buy, and the writer the obligation to sell, the underlying asset at the exercise price during the option period. Conversely, a put option on a security gives the purchaser the right to sell, and the writer the obligation to buy, the underlying asset at the exercise price during the option period.
 
Purchased options have limited risk equal to the amount of the premium paid for the option. Such options afford the opportunity for gain corresponding to the increase or decrease in the value of the optioned asset. In general, a purchased put increases in value as the value of the underlying security falls and a purchased call increases in value as the value of the underlying security rises.
 
The principal reason to write options is to generate extra income (the premium paid by the buyer). Written options have varying degrees of risk. An uncovered written call option theoretically carries unlimited risk, as the market price of the underlying asset could rise far above the exercise price before its expiration. This risk is tempered when the call option is covered, that is, when the option writer owns the underlying asset. In this case, the writer runs the risk of the lost opportunity to participate in the appreciation in value of the asset rather than the risk of an out-of-pocket loss. A written put option has defined risk, that is, the difference between the agreed-upon price that a Fund must pay to the buyer upon exercise of the put and the value, which could be zero, of the asset at the time of exercise.
 
The obligation of the writer of an option continues until the writer effects a closing purchase transaction, the option expires, or until the option is exercised. To secure its obligation to deliver the underlying asset in the case of a call option, or to pay for the underlying asset in the case of a put option, a covered writer is required to deposit in escrow the underlying security or other assets in accordance with the rules of the applicable clearing corporation and exchanges.
 
Among the options that the Fund may purchase or sell are options on an index or corresponding exchange-traded fund. In general, options on an index are similar to options on the securities themselves except that delivery requirements are different. For example, a put option on an index does not give the holder the right to make actual delivery of a basket of securities but instead gives the holder the right to receive an amount of cash upon exercise of the option if the value of the underlying index has fallen below the exercise price. The amount of cash received will be equal to the difference between the closing price of the index and the exercise price of the option expressed in dollars times a specified multiple. As with options on equity securities, or futures contracts, the Fund may offset its position in index options prior to expiration by entering into a closing transaction on an exchange or it may let the option expire unexercised.
 
A securities index or corresponding exchange-traded fund assigns relative values to the securities included in the index or corresponding exchange-traded fund and the index or corresponding exchange-traded fund options are based on a broad market index or corresponding exchange-traded fund. In connection with the use of such options, the Fund may cover its position by identifying assets having a value equal to the aggregate face value of the option position taken.
 
Indexed Securities are instruments whose prices are indexed to the prices of other securities, securities indices, commodities indices, currencies, precious metals or other commodities, or other financial indicators. Indexed securities typically, but not always, are debt securities or deposits whose value at maturity or coupon rate is determined by reference to a specific instrument or statistic. Inflation-protected securities, for example, can be indexed to a measure of inflation, such as the Consumer Price Index (CPI). Commodity-indexed securities, for example, can be indexed to a commodities index such as the Dow Jones-UBS Commodity Index Total Return.
 
The performance of indexed securities depends to a great extent on the performance of the security, currency, commodity, or other instrument or measure to which they are indexed, and also may be influenced by interest rate changes in the United States and abroad. Indexed securities may be more volatile than the underlying instruments or measures. Indexed securities are also subject to the credit risks associated with the issuer of the security, and their values may decline substantially if the issuer’s creditworthiness deteriorates. Recent issuers of indexed securities have included banks, corporations, the U.S. Treasury, and certain other U.S. government agencies. In calculating a Fund’s dividends, index-based adjustments may be considered income.
 
Limitations and Risks of Options and Futures Activity
 
As noted above, an underlying Fund may engage in both hedging and non-hedging strategies. Although effective hedging can generally capture the bulk of a desired risk adjustment, no hedge is completely effective. A Fund’s ability to hedge effectively through transactions in futures and options depends on the degree to which price movements in the hedged asset correlate with price movements of the futures and options.
 
Non-hedging strategies typically involve special risks. The profitability of a Fund’s non-hedging strategies will depend on the ability of the Manager or the applicable Subadviser to analyze both the applicable derivatives market and the market for the underlying asset or group of assets. Derivatives markets are often more volatile than corresponding securities markets and a relatively small change in the price of the underlying asset or group of assets can have a magnified effect upon the price of a related derivative instrument.
 
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Derivatives markets also are often less liquid than the market for the underlying asset or group of assets. Some positions in futures and options may be closed out only on an exchange that provides a secondary market. There can be no assurance that a liquid secondary market will exist for any particular futures contract or option at any specific time. Thus, it may not be possible to close such an option or futures position prior to maturity. The inability to close options and futures positions also could have an adverse impact on a fund’s ability to effectively carry out its derivative strategies and might, in some cases, require the fund to deposit cash to meet applicable margin requirements.
 
Under certain circumstances, futures exchanges may establish daily limits on the amount that the price of a futures contract or an option on a futures contract can vary from the previous day’s settlement price; once that limit is reached, no trades may be made that day at a price beyond the limit. Daily price limits do not limit potential losses because prices could move to the daily limit for several consecutive days with little or no trading, thereby preventing liquidation of unfavorable positions.
 
If a Fund were unable to liquidate a futures contract or an option on a futures position due to the absence of a liquid secondary market or the imposition of price limits, it could incur substantial losses. The Fund would continue to be subject to market risk with respect to the position. In addition, except in the case of purchased options, the fund would continue to be required to make daily variation margin payments and might be required to maintain the position being hedged by the future or option or to maintain cash or securities in a segregated account.
 
Historically, advisers of registered investment companies trading commodity interests (such as futures contracts, options on futures contracts, and swaps), including the Fund and the underlying Funds, have been excluded from regulation as Commodity Pool Operators (CPOs) pursuant to Commodities Future Trading Commission (CFTC) Regulation 4.5. In February 2012, the CFTC announced substantial amendments to the permissible exclusions, and to the conditions for reliance on the permissible exclusions, from registration as a CPO. To qualify for an exclusion under these amendments to CFTC Regulation 4.5, if a fund uses commodity interests (such as futures contracts, options on futures contracts, and swaps) other than for bona fide hedging purposes (as defined by the CFTC), the aggregate initial margin and premiums required to establish these positions, determined at the time the most recent position was established, may not exceed 5% of the fund’s NAV (after taking into account unrealized profits and unrealized losses on any such positions and excluding the amount by which options that are “in-the-money” at the time of purchase are “in-the-money”) or, alternatively, the aggregate net notional value of those positions, determined at the time the most recent position was established, may not exceed 100% of the fund’s NAV (after taking into account unrealized profits and unrealized losses on any such positions). In addition, to qualify for an exclusion, a fund must satisfy a marketing test, which requires, among other things, that a fund not hold itself out as a vehicle for trading commodity interests. The amendments to CFTC Regulation 4.5 became effective on April 24, 2012.
 
The Manager currently claims an exclusion (under CFTC Regulation 4.5) from registration as a CPO with respect to the Fund and the underlying Funds and, in its management of each Fund, intends to comply with one of the two alternative trading limitations described above and the marketing limitation. Complying with the trading limitations may restrict the Manager’s ability to use derivatives as part of each Fund’s investment strategies. Although the Manager expects to be able to execute the Fund’s and the underlying Fund’s investment strategies within the limitations, each Fund’s performance could be adversely affected. New rules may limit the availability of certain derivatives, may make the use of derivatives by portfolios more costly, and may otherwise adversely impact the performance and value of derivatives.
 
Swap Arrangements
 
An underlying Fund may enter into various forms of swap arrangements with counterparties with respect to interest rates, currency rates or indices, including purchase of caps, floors and collars as described below. In an interest rate swap the Fund could agree for a specified period to pay a bank or investment banker the floating rate of interest on a so-called notional principal amount (i.e., an assumed figure selected by the parties for this purpose) in exchange for agreement by the bank or investment banker to pay the Fund a fixed rate of interest on the notional principal amount. In a currency swap the Fund would agree with the other party to exchange cash flows based on the relative differences in values of a notional amount of two (or more) currencies; in an index swap, the Fund would agree to exchange cash flows on a notional amount based on changes in the values of the selected indices. The purchase of a cap entitles the purchaser to receive payments from the seller on a notional amount to the extent that the selected index exceeds an agreed upon interest rate or amount whereas the purchase of a floor entitles the purchaser to receive such payments to the extent the selected index falls below an agreed upon interest rate or amount. A collar combines buying a cap and selling a floor.
 
An underlying Fund may enter into credit protection swap arrangements involving the sale by the Fund of a put option on a debt security which is exercisable by the buyer upon certain events, such as a default by the referenced creditor on the underlying debt or a bankruptcy event of the creditor.
Most swaps entered into by an underlying Fund will be on a net basis. For example, in an interest rate swap, amounts generated by application of the fixed rate and floating rate to the notional principal amount would first offset one another, with the Fund either receiving or paying the difference between such amounts. In order to be in a position to meet any obligations resulting from swaps, the Fund will set up a segregated custodial account to hold liquid assets, including cash. For swaps entered into on a net basis, assets will be segregated having an NAV equal to any excess of the Fund’s accrued obligations over the accrued obligations of the other party; for swaps on other than a net basis, assets will be segregated having a value equal to the total amount of the Fund’s obligations. Collateral is treated as illiquid.
 
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These arrangements will be made primarily for hedging purposes, to preserve the return on an investment or on a portion of the underlying Fund’s portfolio. However, an underlying Fund may, as noted above, enter into such arrangements for income purposes to the extent permitted by applicable law. In entering into a swap arrangement, an underlying Fund is dependent upon the creditworthiness and good faith of the counterparty. An underlying Fund will attempt to reduce the risk of nonperformance by the counterparty by dealing only with established, reputable institutions. The swap market is still relatively new and emerging; positions in swap contracts are generally illiquid and are not readily transferable to another counterparty. The use of interest rate swaps is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. If the Manager or the applicable Subadviser is incorrect in its forecasts of market values, interest rates, and other applicable factors, the investment performance of the Fund would diminish compared with what it would have been if these investment techniques were not used. Moreover, even if the Manager or the applicable Subadviser is correct in its forecasts, there is a risk that the swap position may correlate imperfectly with the price of the asset or liability being hedged.
 
An underlying Fund may enter into credit default swap (CDSs) contracts for investment purposes. If the Fund is a seller of a CDS contract, the Fund would be required to pay the par (or other agreed upon) value of a referenced debt obligation to the counterparty in the event of a default by a third party, such as a U.S. or foreign corporate issuer, on the debt obligation. In return, the Fund would receive from the counterparty a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract provided that no event of default has occurred. If no default occurs, the Fund would keep the stream of payments and would have no payment obligations. As the seller, the Fund would be subject to investment exposure on the notional amount of the swap in that the Fund would have to pay the buyer the full par (or other agreed upon) value of the referenced debt obligation even though such obligation went into default. As seller, the Fund is not required to remain in the CDS contract until default or maturity and could terminate the contract and incur a realized gain or loss.
 
An underlying Fund also may purchase CDS contracts in order to hedge against the risk of default of debt securities it holds, in which case the Fund would function as the counterparty referenced above. This would involve the risk that the swap may expire worthless and would only generate income in the event of an actual default by the issuer of the underlying obligation (as opposed to a credit downgrade or other indication of financial instability). It would also involve credit risk; the seller may fail to satisfy its payment obligations to the Fund in the event of a default. As buyer, the Fund is not required to remain in the CDS contract until default or maturity and could terminate the contract and incur a realized gain or loss.
 
Over the past year, the SEC and the CFTC have developed and finalized rules under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act to create a new, comprehensive regulatory framework for swaps transactions, and are expected to continue to develop and finalize additional rules through 2013. Under the new regulations, certain swaps transactions will be required to be executed on a regulated trading platform and cleared through a derivatives clearing organization. Additionally, the new regulations will impose other requirements on the parties entering into swaps transactions, including requirements relating to posting margin, and reporting and documenting swaps transactions. A Fund engaging in swaps transactions may incur additional expense as a result of these new regulatory requirements. Trust management is continuing to monitor the finalization and implementation of the new regulations and to assess their impact on the Funds.
 
Asset-Backed Securities
 
An underlying Fund may invest in asset-backed securities (ABS). ABS represent a participation in, or are secured by and payable from, a stream of payments generated by particular assets, such as credit card, motor vehicle, or trade receivables. They may be pass-through certificates, which have characteristics very similar to mortgage-backed securities, discussed above. With respect to the underlying Funds, such pass-through certificates may include equipment trust certificates (ETC) secured by specific equipment, such as airplanes and railroad cars. ETC securities may also be enhanced by letters of credit. An ABS may also be in the form of asset-backed commercial paper, which is issued by a special purpose entity, organized solely to issue the commercial paper and to purchase interests in the assets. The credit quality of these securities depends primarily upon the quality of the underlying assets and the level of credit support and enhancement provided.
 
On occasion, the pool of assets may also include a swap obligation, which is used to change the cash flows on the underlying assets. As an example, a swap may be used to allow floating-rate assets to back a fixed-rate obligation. Credit quality depends primarily on the quality of the underlying assets, the level of credit support, if any, provided by the structure or by a third-party insurance wrap, and the credit quality of the swap counterparty, if any.
 
The weighted average life of such securities is likely to be substantially shorter than their stated final maturity as a result of scheduled principal payments and unscheduled principal prepayments.
 
Loan Interests and Direct Debt Instruments (bank loans)
 
An underlying Fund may invest in loan interests and direct debt instruments, which are interests in amounts owed by a corporate, governmental, or other borrower to lenders or lending syndicates (in the case of loans and loan participations), to suppliers of goods or services (in the case of trade claims or other receivables), or to other parties. These investments involve a risk of loss in case of the default, insolvency, or bankruptcy of the borrower.
 
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Purchasers of loans and other forms of direct indebtedness depend primarily upon the creditworthiness of the borrower for payment of interest and repayment of principal. If scheduled interest or principal payments are not made, or are not made in a timely manner, the value of the instrument may be adversely affected. Loans that are fully secured provide more protections than unsecured loans in the event of failure to make scheduled interest or principal payments. However, there is no assurance that the liquidation of collateral from a secured loan would satisfy the borrower’s obligation, or that the collateral could be liquidated. Indebtedness of borrowers whose creditworthiness is poor involves substantially greater risks and may be highly speculative. Borrowers that are in bankruptcy or restructuring may never pay off their indebtedness, or may pay only a small fraction of the amount owed. Direct indebtedness of developing countries also involves a risk that the governmental entities responsible for the repayment of the debt may be unable, or unwilling, to pay interest and repay principal when due.
 
Investments in loans through direct assignment of a financial institution’s interests with respect to a loan may involve additional risks, such as a loan foreclosure, and costs and liabilities associated with owning and disposing of the collateral. In addition, it is possible that a purchaser could be held liable as a co-lender. Direct debt instruments may also involve a risk of insolvency of the lending bank or other intermediary.
 
A loan is often administered by a bank or other financial institution that acts as agent for all holders. The agent administers the terms of the loan, as specified in the loan agreement. Unless the purchaser has direct recourse against the borrower, the purchaser may have to rely on the agent to apply appropriate credit remedies against a borrower under the terms of the loan or other indebtedness. If assets held by the agent for the benefit of a purchaser were determined to be subject to the claims of the agent’s general creditors, the purchaser might incur certain costs and delays in realizing payment on the loan or loan participation and could suffer a loss of principal or interest.
 
Direct indebtedness may include letters of credit, revolving credit facilities, or other standby financing commitments that obligate purchasers to make additional cash payments on demand. These commitments may have the effect of requiring a purchaser to increase its investment in a borrower at a time when it would not otherwise have done so, even if the borrower’s condition makes it unlikely that the amount will ever be repaid.
 
For purposes of Fund investment limitations, an underlying Fund generally will treat the borrower as the “issuer” of indebtedness held by the Fund. In the case of loan participations where a bank or other lending institution serves as financial intermediary between a fund and the borrower, if the participation does not shift to the Fund the direct debtor-creditor relationship with the borrower, SEC interpretations require the Fund, in some circumstances, to treat both the lending bank or other lending institution and the borrower as “issuers” for purposes of the Fund’s investment policies. Treating a financial intermediary as an issuer of indebtedness may restrict a Fund’s ability to invest in indebtedness related to a single financial intermediary, or a group of intermediaries engaged in the same industry, even if the underlying borrowers represent many different companies and industries.
 
Recent Market Conditions
 
The financial crisis in the U.S. and global economies over the past several years has resulted, and may continue to result, in an unusually high degree of volatility in the financial markets, both domestic and foreign, and in the net asset values of many mutual funds, including each Fund. In addition, global economies and financial markets are becoming increasingly interconnected, which increases the possibilities that conditions in one country might adversely impact issuers in a different country. Because the situation is widespread and largely unprecedented, it may be unusually difficult to identify both risks and opportunities using past models of the interplay of market forces, or to predict the duration of these market conditions. The severity or duration of these conditions also may be affected by policy changes made by governments or quasi-governmental organizations. These conditions could negatively impact the value of a Fund’s investments.
 
The situation in the financial markets has resulted in calls for increased regulation. In particular, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) has initiated a revision of the U.S. financial regulatory framework and covers a broad range of topics, including (among many others) a reorganization of federal financial regulators; new rules for derivatives trading; and the registration and additional regulation of hedge and private equity fund managers. The regulators that have been charged with the responsibility for implementing the Dodd- Frank Act (e.g., the SEC and the CFTC) are reviewing generally and have proposed regulations or guidelines on the use of derivatives by market participants, including mutual funds. It is not clear whether final guidelines for such use will be published, or when these rules will become final. Instruments in which a Fund may invest, or the issuers of such instruments, may be negatively affected by the new legislation and regulation in ways that are unforeseeable. Most of the implementing regulations have not yet been finalized. Accordingly, the ultimate impact of the Dodd-Frank Act is not yet certain.
 
The U.S. federal government and certain foreign central banks have taken a variety of unprecedented actions to stimulate the economy and calm the financial markets. The ultimate effect of these efforts is not yet known. In the future, the U.S. federal government or other governments may take actions that affect the regulation of the instruments in which a Fund invests, the markets in which they trade, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that are unforeseen. Changes in government policies may exacerbate the market’s difficulties and withdrawal of this support, or other policy changes by governments or central banks, could negatively affect the value and liquidity of a Fund’s investments and cause it to lose money.
 
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Borrowing
 
The Funds may borrow money from a bank or another person to the extent permitted under the 1940 Act. Such borrowings may be utilized for a variety of purposes, including (i) for temporary or emergency purposes, (ii) in anticipation of or in response to adverse market conditions, (iii) for cash management purposes, and (iv) for investment purposes. Borrowed money will cost a Fund interest expense and/or other fees. The costs of borrowing may reduce a Fund’s return. To the extent that a Fund has outstanding borrowings, it will be leveraged. Leveraging generally exaggerates the effect on NAV of any increase or decrease in the market value of a Fund’s securities. All borrowings are limited to an amount not exceeding 33 1/3% of a Fund’s total assets (including the amount borrowed) less liabilities (other than borrowings). Any borrowings that exceed this amount will be reduced within three days (excluding Sundays and holidays) to the extent necessary to comply with the 33 1/3% limitation even if it is not advantageous to sell securities at that time.
 
Senior Securities
 
Pursuant to the investment restrictions that have been adopted by the Trust for each Fund, each Fund may not issue senior securities, except as permitted under the 1940 Act. “Senior securities” are defined as any bond, debenture, note, or similar obligation or instrument constituting a security and evidencing indebtedness, and any Fund obligations that have a priority over the Fund’s shares with respect to the payment of dividends or the distribution of Fund assets. The 1940 Act prohibits a Fund from issuing senior securities except that the Fund may borrow money in amounts of up to one-third of the Fund’s total assets from banks for any purpose. Under the 1940 Act, a Fund is required to maintain continuous asset coverage (that is, total assets including borrowings, less liabilities exclusive of borrowings) of 300% of the amount borrowed. If the 300% asset coverage should decline as a result of market fluctuations or for other reasons, a Fund may be required to sell some of its portfolio holdings within three days (excluding Sundays and holidays) to reduce the debt and restore the 300% asset coverage, even though it may be disadvantageous from an investment standpoint to sell securities at that time. In addition, each Fund also may borrow up to 5% of the Fund’s total assets from banks or other lenders for temporary purposes, and these borrowings are not considered senior securities. The issuance of senior securities by a Fund can increase the speculative character of the Fund’s outstanding shares through leveraging. Leveraging of a Fund’s portfolio through the issuance of senior securities magnifies the potential for gain or loss on monies, because even though the Fund’s net assets remain the same, the total risk to investors is increased to the extent of the Fund’s gross assets.
 
INVESTMENT RESTRICTIONS
 
The following investment restrictions have been adopted by the Trust for the Fund. These restrictions may not be changed in any material way without approval by the lesser of (1) 67% or more of the voting securities present at a meeting of the Fund if more than 50% of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund are present or represented by proxy or (2) more than 50% of the Fund’s outstanding voting securities.
 
The Fund:
 
 
(1)
may not borrow money, except to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder and any applicable relief.
 
 
(2)
may not purchase the securities of any issuer (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities) if, as a result, more than 25% of the Fund’s total assets would be invested in the securities of companies whose principal business activities are in the same industry.
 
 
(3)
may not issue senior securities, except as permitted under the 1940 Act.
 
 
(4)
may not underwrite securities of other issuers, except to the extent that it may be deemed to act as a statutory underwriter in the distribution of any restricted securities or not readily marketable securities.
 
 
(5)
may make loans only as permitted under the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder, and any applicable exemptive relief.
 
 
(6)
may not purchase or sell commodities or commodity contracts unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments issued by persons that purchase or sell commodities or commodities contracts; but this shall not prevent the Fund from purchasing, selling, and entering into financial futures contracts (including futures contracts on indices of securities, interest rates, and currencies), options on financial futures contracts (including futures contracts on indices of securities, interest rates, and currencies), warrants, swaps, forward contracts, foreign currency spot and forward contracts, or other derivative instruments that are not related to physical commodities.
 
 
(7)
may not purchase or sell real estate unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments, except that the Fund may invest in securities or other instruments backed by real estate or securities of companies that deal in real estate or are engaged in the real estate business.
 
With respect to the Fund’s concentration policies as described above, the Manager may determine “industry” by using various recognized industry classification services including, but not limited to industry classifications established by Standard & Poor’s Ratings Services (S&P), Bloomberg L.P., and Frank Russell Company, with certain modifications. The Manager and Subadvisers also
 
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may include additional industries as separate classifications, to the extent applicable. Because the Manager has determined that certain categories within, or in addition to, those set forth by S&P have unique investment characteristics, additional industries may be included as industry classifications. The Manager classifies municipal obligations by projects with similar characteristics, such as toll road revenue bonds, housing revenue bonds, or higher education revenue bonds. The Fund’s concentration policies do not apply to securities of other investment companies.
 
PORTFOLIO TRANSACTIONS AND BROKERAGE COMMISSIONS
 
The Manager or the applicable Subadviser, subject to the general control of the Trust’s Board, places all orders for the purchase and sale of Fund securities. In executing portfolio transactions and selecting brokers and dealers, it is the Trust’s policy to seek the best overall terms available. The Manager or the applicable Subadviser shall consider such factors as it deems relevant, including the breadth of the market in the security, the financial condition and execution capability of the broker or dealer, and the reasonableness of the commission, if any, for the specific transaction or on a continuing basis. Securities purchased or sold in the over-the-counter market will be executed through principal market makers, except when, in the opinion of the Manager or the applicable Subadviser, better prices and execution are available elsewhere. In addition, the Manager or the applicable Subadviser may effect certain “riskless principal” transactions through certain dealers in over-the-counter markets under which mark-ups or mark-downs (which in this context may be deemed the equivalent of commissions) are paid on such transactions.
 
The Fund will have no obligation to deal with any particular broker or group of brokers in the execution of portfolio transactions. The Fund contemplates that, consistent with obtaining the best overall terms available, brokerage transactions may be effected through USAA Brokerage Services, an affiliated discount brokerage service of the Manager and through affiliated brokers of the applicable Subadviser. The Trust’s Board has adopted procedures in conformity with the requirements of Rule 17e-1 under the 1940 Act designed to ensure that all brokerage commissions paid to USAA Brokerage Services or any broker affiliated directly or indirectly with the Fund, the Manager, or the applicable Subadvisers are reasonable and fair. The Trust’s Board has authorized the Manager or the applicable Subadviser for the Fund to effect portfolio transactions for the Fund on any exchange of which the Manager or such Subadviser (or any entity or person associated with the Manager or the Subadviser) is a member and to retain compensation in connection with such transactions. Any such transactions will be effected and related compensation paid only in accordance with applicable SEC regulations.
 
The Trust’s Board has approved procedures in conformity with the requirements of Rule 10f-3 under the 1940 Act whereby the Fund may purchase securities that are offered in underwritings in which an affiliate of the Manager and/or a Subadviser participates. These procedures prohibit the Fund from directly or indirectly benefiting an affiliate of the Manager and/or a Subadviser in connection with such underwritings. In addition, for underwritings where the Manager and/or Subadviser affiliate participates as a principal underwriter, certain restrictions may apply that could, among other things, limit the amount of securities that the Fund could purchase in the underwritings.
 
In the allocation of brokerage business used to purchase securities for the Fund, preference may be given to those broker-dealers who provide research and brokerage services to the Manager or the applicable Subadviser as long as there is no sacrifice in obtaining the best overall terms available. Payment for such services may also be generated through fixed price public offering underwriting concessions from purchases of new issue fixed-income securities. Such research and brokerage services may include, for example: advice concerning the value of securities; the advisability of investing in, purchasing, or selling securities, and the availability of securities or the purchasers or sellers of securities; analyses and reports concerning issuers, industries, securities, economic factors and trends, portfolio strategy, and performance of accounts; and various functions incidental to effecting securities transactions, such as clearance and settlement. These research services may also include access to research on third party databases, such as historical data on companies, financial statements, earnings history and estimates, and corporate releases; real-time quotes and financial news; research on specific fixed income securities; research on international market news and securities; and rating services on companies and industries. Thus, the Manager or the applicable Subadviser may be able to supplement its own information and to consider the views and information of other research organizations in arriving at its investment decisions. If such information is received and it is in fact useful to the Manager or the applicable Subadviser, it may tend to reduce the Manager’s or the applicable Subadviser’s costs.
 
In return for such services, the Fund may pay to a broker a “higher commission” (as such term may be interpreted by the SEC) than may be charged by other brokers, provided that the Manager or the applicable Subadviser determines in good faith that such commission is reasonable in relation to the value of the brokerage and research services provided by such broker, viewed in terms of either that particular transaction or of the overall responsibility of the Manager or the applicable Subadviser to the Fund and its other clients. The receipt of research from broker-dealers that execute transactions on behalf of the Trust may be useful to the Manager or the applicable Subadviser in rendering investment management services to other clients (including affiliates of the Manager); and conversely, such research provided by broker-dealers who have executed transaction orders on behalf of other clients may be useful to the Manager or the applicable Subadviser in carrying out its obligations to the Trust. While such research is available to and may be used by the Manager or the applicable Subadviser in providing investment advice to all its clients (including affiliates of the Manager), not all of such research may be used by the Manager or the applicable Subadviser for the benefit of the Trust. Such research
 
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and services will be in addition to and not in lieu of research and services provided by the Manager or the applicable Subadviser, and the expenses of the Manager or the applicable Subadviser will not necessarily be reduced by the receipt of such supplemental research. See The Trust’s Manager.
 
The Manager or the applicable Subadviser continuously reviews the performance of the broker-dealers with which it places orders for transactions. A periodic evaluation is made of brokerage transaction costs and services. In evaluating the performance of brokers and dealers, the Manager or the applicable Subadviser considers whether the broker-dealer has generally provided the Manager or the applicable Subadviser with the best overall terms available, which includes obtaining the best available price and most favorable execution.
 
To the extent permitted by applicable law, and in all instances subject to the Fund’s policies regarding best execution, the Manager or the applicable Subadvisers may allocate brokerage transactions to broker-dealers that have entered into commission recapture arrangements in which the broker-dealer allocates a portion of the commissions paid by the Fund toward the reduction of that Fund’s expenses. The Manager or the applicable Subadviser may use step-out trades where the executing broker-dealer agrees to step-out a portion of a larger trade to the commission recapture broker-dealer to facilitate the commission recapture arrangement.
 
Securities of the same issuer may be purchased, held, or sold at the same time by the Trust for the Fund or other accounts or companies for which the Manager or the applicable Subadviser acts as the investment adviser (including affiliates of the Manager or the applicable Subadviser). On occasions when the Manager or the applicable Subadviser deems the purchase or sale of a security to be in the best interest of the Trust, as well as the Manager or the applicable Subadviser’s other clients, the Manager or the applicable Subadviser, to the extent permitted by applicable laws and regulations, may aggregate such securities to be sold or purchased for the Trust with those to be sold or purchased for other customers in order to obtain best execution and lower brokerage commissions, if any. In such event, allocation of the securities so purchased or sold, as well as the expenses incurred in the transaction, will be made by the Manager or the applicable Subadviser in the manner it considers to be most equitable and consistent with its fiduciary obligations to all such customers, including the Trust. In some instances, this procedure may affect the price and size of the position obtainable for the Trust.
 
The Trust pays no brokerage commissions as such for debt securities. The market for such securities is typically a “dealer” market in which investment dealers buy and sell the securities for their own accounts, rather than for customers, and the price may reflect a dealer’s mark-up or mark-down. In addition, some securities may be purchased directly from issuers.
 
Portfolio Turnover Rates
 
The rate of portfolio turnover of the Fund will not be a limiting factor when the Manager deems changes in the Fund’s portfolio appropriate in view of its investment objective(s). Ordinarily, the Fund will not purchase or sell securities solely to achieve short-term trading profits, although the Fund may sell portfolio securities without regard to the length of time held if consistent with the Fund’s investment objective(s).
 
The portfolio turnover rate is computed by dividing the dollar amount of securities purchased or sold (whichever is smaller) by the average value of securities owned during the year. Options transactions whose maturities or expiration dates at the time of acquisition were one year or less and short-term investments such as, but not limited to, commercial paper and short-term U.S. government securities are not considered when computing the portfolio turnover rate.
 
FUND HISTORY AND DESCRIPTION OF SHARES
 
The Trust, formerly known as USAA State Tax-Free Trust, is an open-end management investment company established as a statutory trust under the laws of the state of Delaware pursuant to a Master Trust Agreement dated June 21, 1993, as amended. The Trust is authorized to issue shares of beneficial interest in separate portfolios. Fifty-two such portfolios have been established, one of which is described in this SAI. Under the Master Trust Agreement, the Board is authorized to create new portfolios in addition to those already existing without shareholder approval.
 
The Fund is a series of the Trust and is diversified. The Trust began offering shares of the Fund in July 2013. The Fund’s assets and all income, earnings, profits, and proceeds thereof, subject only to the rights of creditors, are specifically allocated to the Fund. They constitute the underlying assets of the Fund, are required to be segregated on the books of account, and are to be charged with the expenses of the Fund. Any general expenses of the Trust not readily identifiable as belonging to the Fund are allocated on the basis of the Fund’s relative net assets during the fiscal year or in such other manner as the Trustees determines to be fair and equitable. Each share of the Fund represents an equal proportionate interest in the Fund with every other share and is entitled to dividends and other distributions out of the net income and capital gains belonging to the Fund when declared by the Board. Upon liquidation of the Fund, shareholders are entitled to share pro rata in the net assets belonging to the Fund available for distribution.
 
Under the Trust’s Master Trust Agreement, no annual or regular meeting of shareholders is required. Thus, there will ordinarily be no shareholder meeting unless otherwise required by the 1940 Act. Under certain circumstances, however, shareholders may apply to the Trustees for shareholder information in order to obtain signatures to request a shareholder meeting. The Trust may fill vacancies on
 
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the Board or appoint new Trustees if the result is that at least two-thirds of the Trustees have still been elected by shareholders. Moreover, pursuant to the Master Trust Agreement, any Trustee may be removed by the vote of two-thirds of the outstanding Trust shares and holders of 10% or more of the outstanding shares of the Trust can require Trustees to call a meeting of shareholders for the purpose of voting on the removal of one or more Trustees. The Trust will assist in communicating to other shareholders about the meeting. On any matter submitted to the shareholders, the holder of the Fund share is entitled to one vote per share (with proportionate voting for fractional shares) regardless of the relative NAVs of the Fund’s shares. However, on matters affecting an individual Fund, a separate vote of the shareholders of that Fund is required. Shareholders of the Fund are not entitled to vote on any matter that does not affect the Fund but which requires a separate vote of another Fund.
 
Shares do not have cumulative voting rights, which means that holders of more than 50% of the shares voting for the election of Trustees can elect 100% of the Trust’s Board, and the holders of less than 50% of the shares voting for the election of Trustees will not be able to elect any person as a Trustee.
 
Shareholders of a particular Fund might have the power to elect all of the Trustees of the Trust because that Fund has a majority of the total outstanding shares of the Trust. When issued, the Fund’s shares are fully paid and nonassessable, have no pre-emptive or subscription rights, and are fully transferable. There are no conversion rights.
 
TAX CONSIDERATIONS
 
Taxation of the Fund
 
The Fund, which is treated as a separate corporation for federal tax purposes, intends to continue to qualify each taxable year for treatment as a regulated investment company (RIC) under Subchapter M of Chapter 1 of Subtitle A of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the Code). Accordingly, the Fund will not be liable for federal income tax on its taxable net investment income and net capital gains (net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses) that it distributes to its shareholders.
 
To qualify for treatment as a RIC, the Fund must, among other things, (1) derive at least 90% of its gross income each taxable year from interest, dividends, payments with respect to securities loans, gains from the sale or other disposition of stock, securities or foreign currencies, and other income (including gains from options, futures, or forward contracts) derived with respect to its business of investing in such stock, securities, or currencies (90% test); (2) distribute at least 90% of the sum of its investment company taxable income, which includes net investment income (consisting generally of net investment income, the excess, if any, of net short-term capital gains over net long-term capital loss, and net gains and losses from certain foreign currency transactions) (distribution requirement); and (3) satisfy certain diversification requirements at the close of each quarter of the Fund’s taxable year.
 
The Code imposes a nondeductible 4% excise tax on a RIC that fails to distribute during each calendar year an amount at least equal to the sum of (1) 98% of its ordinary income for the calendar year, (2) 98.2% of its capital gain net income for the twelve-month period ending on October 31 of that year, and (3) any prior income and gains not distributed. Each Fund intends to continue to make distributions necessary to avoid imposition of the excise tax.
 
The risk that the tax treatment of swap agreements and other derivative instruments, such as commodity-linked derivative instruments, including commodity index-linked notes, swap agreements, commodity options, futures, and options on futures, may be affected by future regulatory or legislative changes that could affect whether income (earned directly or indirectly) from such investments is “qualifying income” under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code, or otherwise affect the character, timing and/or amount of the Fund’s taxable income or gains and distributions. The use of hedging strategies, such as writing (selling) and purchasing options and futures contracts and entering into forward currency contracts, involves complex rules that will determine for income tax purposes the amount, character, and timing of recognition of the gains and losses a Fund realizes in connection therewith. Gain from the disposition of foreign currencies (except certain gains that may be excluded by future regulations), and gains from options, futures and forward currency contracts a Fund derives with respect to its business of investing in securities or foreign currencies, will be treated as qualifying income under the 90% test.A Fund will invest its assets primarily in shares of underlying USAA funds, as well as cash and money market instruments. Accordingly, a Fund’s income will consist of distributions from the underlying USAA funds and net gains realized from the disposition of shares of those funds. If an underlying USAA fund qualifies for treatment as a RIC -- each has done so for its past taxable years and intends to continue to do so for its current and future taxable years -- (1) dividends paid to a Fund from the underlying USAA fund’s investment company taxable income (which may include net gains from certain foreign currency transactions) will be taxable to the Fund as ordinary income to the extent of the underlying USAA fund’s earnings and profits and (2) distributions paid to a Fund from the underlying USAA fund’s net capital gain will be taxable to the Fund as long-term capital gains, regardless of how long the Fund has held the underlying USAA fund’s shares. (As noted in the Funds’ prospectus, a Fund will be able to avoid having to pay entity-level income tax on these distributions by distributing the amount thereof to its shareholders.) If a Fund purchases shares of an underlying USAA fund within 30 days before or after redeeming other shares of that fund at a loss (whether pursuant to a rebalancing of the Fund’s portfolio or otherwise), all or a part of the loss will not be deductible by the Fund and instead will increase its basis in the newly purchased shares.
 
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A Fund may invest in certain futures and “nonequity” options (i.e., certain listed options, such as those on a “broad-based” securities index) and certain foreign currency options and forward currency contracts with respect to which it makes a particular election that will be subject to section 1256 of the Code (collectively section 1256 contracts). Any section 1256 contracts a Fund holds at the end of its taxable year generally must be “marked-to-market” (that is, treated as having been sold at that time for their fair market value) for federal income tax purposes, with the result that unrealized gains or losses will be treated as though they were realized. Sixty percent of any net gain or loss recognized on these deemed sales, and 60% of any net realized gain or loss from any actual sales of section 1256 contracts, will be treated as long-term capital gain or loss, and the balance will be treated as short-term capital gain or loss. These rules may operate to increase the amount that a Fund must distribute to satisfy the distribution requirement (i.e., with respect to the portion treated as short-term capital gain), which will be taxable to its shareholders as ordinary income, and to increase the net capital gain a Fund recognizes, without in either case increasing the cash available to it.
 
Section 988 of the Code also may apply to forward currency contracts and options on foreign currencies. Under that section, each foreign currency gain or loss generally is computed separately and treated as ordinary income or loss. These gains or losses will increase or decrease the amount of a Fund’s investment company taxable income to be distributed to its shareholders as ordinary income, rather than affecting the amount of its net capital gain. In the case of overlap between sections 1256 and 988, special provisions determine the character and timing of any income, gain, or loss.
 
Code section 1092 (dealing with straddles) also may affect the taxation of certain options, futures, and forward currency contracts in which a Fund may invest. That section defines a “straddle” as offsetting positions with respect to actively traded personal property; for these purposes, options, futures, and forward contracts are positions in personal property. Under that section, any loss from the disposition of a position in a straddle generally may be deducted only to the extent the loss exceeds the unrealized gain on the offsetting position(s) of the straddle. In addition, these rules may postpone the recognition of loss that otherwise would be recognized under the mark-to-market rules discussed above. The regulations under section 1092 also provide certain “wash sale” rules, which apply to transactions where a position is sold at a loss and a new offsetting position is acquired within a prescribed period, and “short sale” rules applicable to straddles. If a Fund makes certain elections, the amount, character, and timing of recognition of gains and losses from the affected straddle positions would be determined under rules that vary according to the elections made. Because only a few of the regulations implementing the straddle rules have been promulgated, the tax consequences to a Fund of straddle transactions are not entirely clear.
 
Certain Funds may invest in the stock of “passive foreign investment companies” (PFICs). A PFIC is any foreign corporation (with certain exceptions) that, in general, meets either of the following tests: (1) at least 75% of its gross income for the taxable year is passive or (2) an average of at least 50% of its assets produce, or are held for the production of, passive income. Under certain circumstances, a Fund will be subject to federal income tax on a portion of any “excess distribution” it receives on the stock of a PFIC or of any gain on its disposition of that stock (collectively, PFIC income), plus interest thereon, even if the Fund distributes the PFIC income as a dividend to its shareholders. The balance of the PFIC income will be included in the Fund’s investment company taxable income and, accordingly, will not be taxable to it to the extent it distributes that income to its shareholders. Fund distributions thereof will not be eligible for the reduced maximum federal income tax rate on individuals’ and certain other non-corporate taxpayers “qualified dividend income” described in a Fund’s prospectus. If a Fund invests in a PFIC and elects to treat the PFIC as a “qualified electing fund” (QEF), then in lieu of the foregoing tax and interest obligation, the Fund would be required to include in income each taxable year its pro rata share of the QEF’s annual ordinary earnings and net capital gain -- which the Fund likely would have to distribute to satisfy the distribution requirement and avoid imposition of the 4% excise tax mentioned above -- even if the QEF did not distribute those earnings and gain to the Fund. In most instances it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to make this election because some of the information required to make this election may not be easily obtainable.
 
Each Fund may elect to “mark to market” any stock in a PFIC it owns at the end of its taxable year, in which event it would be required to distribute to its shareholders any resulting gains in accordance with the distribution requirement. “Marking-to-market,” in this context, means including in gross income each taxable year (and treating as ordinary income) the excess, if any, of the fair market value of the stock over a Fund’s adjusted basis therein (including mark-to-market gain for each prior year for which an election was in effect) as of the end of that year. Pursuant to the election, a Fund also would be allowed to deduct (as an ordinary, not a capital, loss) the excess, if any, of its adjusted basis in PFIC stock over the fair market value thereof as of the taxable year-end, but only to the extent of any net mark-to-market gains with respect to that stock the Fund included in income for prior taxable years under the election. A Fund’s adjusted basis in each PFIC’s stock subject to the election would be adjusted to reflect the amounts of income included and deductions taken thereunder.
 
Investors should note that a Fund’s determination whether a foreign corporation is a PFIC is a fact-intensive determination that is based on various facts and circumstances and thus is subject to change, and the principles and methodology used in determining whether a foreign corporation is a PFIC are subject to interpretation. It is possible that a Fund could invest in a foreign corporation that becomes, or is determined to be, a PFIC after the Fund invests therein. It is anticipated that any taxes on a Fund with respect to investments in PFICs would be insignificant.
 
23

 
Original Issue Discount; Market Discount
 
Certain debt securities acquired by a Fund may be treated as having been issued with original issue discount. Generally, the amount of the original issue discount is treated as interest income and is included in taxable income (and required to be distributed by the Fund) over the term of the debt security, even though payment of that amount is not received until a later time, usually when the debt security matures. If a Fund purchases a debt security on a secondary market at a price lower than its stated redemption price, the excess of the stated redemption price over the purchase price is “market discount.” Generally, any gain realized on the disposition of, and any partial payment of principal on, a debt security having market discount is treated as ordinary income to the extent the gain, or principal payment, does not exceed the “accrued market discount” on the debt security. Market discount generally accrues in equal daily installments.
 
Taxation of the Shareholders
 
Distributions are generally included in a shareholder’s gross income for the taxable year in which they are received. However, distributions the Fund declares in October, November, or December, which are payable to shareholders of record in such a month will be deemed to have been received on December 31, if the Fund pays the distributions during the following January. If a shareholder receives a distribution taxable as long-term capital gain with respect to shares and redeems or exchanges the shares before he or she has held them for more than six months, any loss on the redemption or exchange that is less than or equal to the amount of the distribution will be treated as long-term capital loss.
 
If a Fund's distributions exceed current and accumulated earnings and profits, all or a portion of the distributions made in the taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. Distributions in excess of the Fund's minimum distribution requirements, but not in excess of the Fund's earnings and profits, will be taxable to shareholders and will not constitute nontaxable returns of capital. The Fund's capital loss carryforwards, if any, carried from taxable years beginning before 2011 do not reduce current earnings and profits, even if such carryforwards offset current year realized gains. A return of capital distribution generally will not be taxable but will reduce the sharehlder's cost basis and result in a higher capital gain or lower capital loss when those shares of which the distribution was received are sold.
 
If the Fund engages in securities lending, the borrower generally will be obligated to pay the Fund an amount equal to (“in lieu of”) any dividend paid on the loaned securities during the loan term. Even if the dividend otherwise would be eligible for the 15% maximum federal income tax rate on “qualified dividend income” received by individuals through the end of 2012, such “in lieu of” payments, when distributed to the Fund’s shareholders, will not be treated as “qualified dividend income” and instead will be taxed at the shareholders’ marginal federal income tax rates.
 
Any gain or loss a shareholder realizes on the redemption or other disposition of shares of a Fund, or on receipt of a distribution in complete liquidation of the Fund, generally will be a capital gain or loss, which will be long-term or short-term, generally depending upon the shareholder’s holding period for the shares. Any such gain a non-corporate shareholder recognizes on a redemption or exchange of Fund shares that he or she has held for more than one year will qualify for the 15% maximum federal income tax rate mentioned in each Fund’s prospectus. Any loss realized on a sale or exchange will be disallowed to the extent the shares disposed of are replaced (including shares acquired pursuant to a dividend reinvestment plan) within a period of 61 days beginning 30 days before and ending 30 days after disposition of the shares. In such a case, the basis of the shares acquired will be adjusted to reflect the disallowed loss. Any loss a shareholder realizes on a disposition of shares held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any distributions of net capital gain the shareholder received with respect to such shares. Additionally, any account maintenance fee deducted from a shareholder’s account will be treated as taxable income even though not received by the shareholder.
 
Each Fund (or its administrative agent) must report to the IRS and furnish to Fund shareholders the basis information for Fund shares purchased on or after January 1, 2012 (Covered Shares), and redeemed thereafter. In addition to the previous requirement to report the gross proceeds from the redemption of Fund shares, each Fund also is required to report the basis information for Covered Shares and indicate whether they had a short-term (one year or less) or long-term (more than one year) holding period. A shareholder’s basis in Covered Shares will be determined in accordance with each Fund’s default method, which is average basis, unless the shareholder affirmatively elects in writing (which may be electronic) to use a different acceptable basis determination method, such as a specific identification method. The basis determination method a Fund shareholder elects (or the default method) for each redemption of Covered Shares may not be changed after the settlement date of the redemption. Fund shareholders should consult with their tax advisers to determine the best IRS-accepted basis determination method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how the basis reporting law applies to them. The previous requirement to report only the gross proceeds from the redemption of Fund shares will continue to apply to all non-Covered Shares sold after December 31, 2011.
 
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TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS OF THE TRUST
 
The Board consists of five Trustees who supervise the business affairs of the Trust. The Board is responsible for the general oversight of the Funds’ business and for assuring that the Fund is managed in the best interests of the Fund’s respective shareholders. The Board periodically reviews the Fund’s investment performance as well as the quality of other services provided to the Fund and their shareholders by the Fund’s service providers, including AMCO and its affiliates.
 
Board Leadership Structure
 
The Board is comprised of a super-majority ( 80% or more) of Trustees who are not “interested persons” (as defined under the 1940 Act) of the Funds (the Independent Trustees). In addition, the Chairman of the Board is an Independent Trustee. The Chairman presides at meetings of the Trustees, and may call meetings of the Board and any Board committee whenever he deems it necessary. The Chairman participates in the preparation of the agenda for meetings of the Board and the identification of information to be presented to the Board with respect to matters to be acted upon by the Board. The Chairman also acts as a liaison with the Funds’ management, officers, and other Trustees generally between meetings. The Chairman may perform such other functions as may be requested by the Board from time to time. Except for any duties specified in this SAI or pursuant to the Trust’s Master Trust Agreement or By-laws, or as assigned by the Board, the designation of a Trustee as Chairman does not impose on that Trustee any duties, obligations or liability that are greater than the duties, obligations or liability imposed on any other Trustee, generally. The Board has designated a number of standing committees as further described below, each of which has a Chairman. The Board also may designate working groups or ad hoc committees as it deems appropriate.
 
The Board believes that this leadership structure is appropriate because it allows the Board to exercise informed and independent judgment over matters under its purview, and it allocates areas of responsibility among committees or working groups of Trustees and the full Board in a manner that enhances effective oversight. The Board considers leadership by an Independent Trustee as Chairman to be integral to promoting effective independent oversight of the Funds’ operations and meaningful representation of the shareholders’ interests, given the number of Funds offered by the Trust and the amount of assets that these Funds represent. The Board also believes that having a super-majority of Independent Trustees is appropriate and in the best interest of the Funds’ shareholders. Nevertheless, the Board also believes that having an interested person serve on the Board brings corporate and financial viewpoints that are, in the Board’s view, important elements in its decision-making process. In addition, the Board believes that an Interested Trustee provides the Board with the Manager’s perspective in managing and sponsoring the Funds. The leadership structure of the Board may be changed, at any time and in the discretion of the Board, including in response to changes in circumstances or the characteristics of the Trust.
 
Board Oversight of Risk Management
 
As registered investment companies, the Funds are subject to a variety of risks, including investment risks (such as, among others, market risk, credit risk and interest rate risk), financial risks (such as, among others, settlement risk, liquidity risk and valuation risk), compliance risks, and operational risks. The Trustees play an active role, as a full board and at the committee level, in overseeing risk management for the Funds. The Trustees delegate the day-to-day risk management of the Funds to various groups, including but not limited to, portfolio management, risk management, compliance, legal, fund accounting, and various committees discussed herein. These groups provide the Trustees with regular reports regarding investment, valuation, liquidity, and compliance, as well as the risks associated with each. The Trustees also oversee risk management for the Funds through regular interactions with the Funds’ external auditors and periodic presentations from USAA Operational Risk Management.
 
The Board also participates in the Funds’ risk oversight, in part, through the Funds’ compliance program, which covers the following broad areas of compliance: portfolio management, trading practices, code of ethics and protection of non-public information, accuracy of disclosures, safeguarding of fund assets, recordkeeping, marketing, fees, privacy, anti-money laundering, business continuity, valuation and pricing of funds shares, processing of fund shares, affiliated transactions, fund governance and market timing. The program seeks to identify and assess risk through various methods, including through regular interdisciplinary communications between compliance professionals, operational risk management and business personnel who participate on a daily basis in risk management on behalf of the Funds. The Funds’ chief compliance officer provides an annual compliance report and other compliance related briefings to the Board in writing and in person.
 
AMCO seeks to identify for the Board the risks that it believes may affect the Funds and develops processes and controls regarding such risks. However, risk management is a complex and dynamic undertaking and it is not always possible to comprehensively identify and/or mitigate all such risks at all times since risks are at times impacted by external events. In discharging its oversight responsibilities, the Board considers risk management issues throughout the year with the assistance of its various committees as described below. Each committee presents reports to the Board after its meeting, which may prompt further discussion of issues concerning the oversight of the Funds’ risk management. The Board as a whole also reviews written reports or presentations on a variety of risk issues as needed and may discuss particular risks that are not addressed in the committee process.
 
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Among other committees, the Board has established an Audit Committee, which is composed solely of Independent Trustees and which oversees management of financial risks and controls. The Audit Committee serves as the channel of communication between the independent auditors of the Funds and the Board with respect to financial statements and financial reporting processes, systems of internal control, and the audit process. Although the Audit Committee is responsible for overseeing the management of financial risks, the Board is regularly informed of these risks through committee reports.
 
Trustee Qualifications
 
The Board believes that all of the Trustees bring to the Board a wealth of executive leadership experience derived from their service as executives, board members, and leaders of diverse companies, academic institutions, and community and other organizations. The Board also believes that the different perspectives, viewpoints, professional experience, education, and individual qualities of each Trustee represent a diversity of experiences and a variety of complementary skills. In determining whether an individual is qualified to serve as a Trustee of the Funds, the Board considers a wide variety of information about the Trustee, and multiple factors contribute to the Board's decision. However, there are no specific required qualifications for Board membership. Each Trustee is determined to have the experience, skills, and attributes necessary to serve the Funds and their shareholders because each Trustee demonstrates an exceptional ability to consider complex business and financial matters, evaluate the relative importance and priority of issues, make decisions, and contribute effectively to the deliberations of the Board. The Board also considers the individual experience of each Trustee and determines that the Trustee’s professional experience, education, and background contribute to the diversity of perspectives on the Board. The business experience and objective thinking of the Trustees are considered invaluable assets for AMCO management and, ultimately, the Funds’ shareholders.
 
Set forth below are the Independent Trustees, the Interested Trustee, officers, and each of their respective offices and principal occupations during the last five years, length of time served, and information relating to any other directorships held, and the specific roles and experience of each Board member that factor into the determination that the Trustee should serve on the Board.
 
Name, Address*
and Date of Birth
Position(s) Held with Funds
Term of Office**
and Length of Time Served
Principal Occupation(s) During the Past 5 Years and Other Directorships Held and Experience
Number of Funds Overseen or to Be Overseen by Trustee**
Independent Trustees
Robert L. Mason, Ph.D.
(July 1946)
Trustee and Chairman
Trustee since January 1997 and Chair since January 2012
Institute Analyst, Southwest Research Institute (3/02-present), which focuses in the fields of technological research. Dr. Mason brings to the Board particular experience with information technology matters, statistical analysis, and human resources as well as over 15 years’ experience as a Board member of the USAA family of funds.
52
Barbara B. Ostdiek Ph.D.
(March 1964)
Trustee
Trustee since January 2008
Academic Director, El Paso Corporation Finance Center at Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business at Rice University (7/02-present); Associate Professor of Finance at Jesse H. Jones Graduate School of Business at Rice University (7/01-present). Dr. Ostdiek brings to the Board particular experience with financial investment management, education, and research as well as over four years’ experience as a Board member of the USAA family of funds.
52
 
26

 
Michael F. Reimherr
(August 1945)
Trustee
Trustee since January 2000
President of Reimherr Business Consulting (5/95-present), which performs business valuations of large companies to include the development of annual business plans, budgets, and internal financial reporting. Mr. Reimherr brings to the Board particular experience with organizational development, budgeting, finance, and capital markets as well as over 12 years’ experience as a Board member of the USAA family of funds.
52
Paul L. McNamara
(July 1948)
Trustee
Trustee since January 2012
Director, Cantor Opportunistic Alternatives Fund, LLC (3/10-present), which is a closed-end fund of funds managed by Cantor Fitzgerald Investment Advisor L.P. Mr. McNamara retired from Lord Abbett & Co. LLC as an Executive Member on 9/30/09, a position he held since 10/02. He has been employed at Lord Abbett since 1996. Mr. McNamara brings to the Board extensive experience with the financial services industry and, in particular, institutional and retail mutual fund markets, including experience with mutual fund marketing, distribution, and risk management, as well as overall experience with compliance and corporate governance issues. Mr. McNamara also has experience serving as a fund director. Paul L. McNamara is no relation to Daniel S. McNamara.
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* The address for each Independent Trustee is USAA Asset Management Company, P.O. Box 659430, San Antonio, Texas 78265-9430.
 
** Under the Trust’s organizational documents, each Trustee serves as a Trustee of the Trust during the lifetime of the Trust and until its termination except as such Trustee sooner dies, resigns, retires, or is removed. However, pursuant to a policy adopted by the Board, each elected or appointed Independent Trustee may serve as a Trustee until the Trustee either reaches age 72 or has served 20 years, and the Interested Trustee may serve as a Trustee until the Trustee either reaches age 65 or has served 20 years. The Board may change or grant exceptions from this policy at any time without shareholder approval. A Trustee may resign or be removed by a vote of the other Trustees or the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of the Trust at any time. Further, the Board currently has an internal policy under which, all members of the Board shall be presented to shareholders for election or reelection, as the case may be, at least once every five (5) years; however, this policy may be changed by the Board at any time. Vacancies on the Board can be filled by the action of a majority of the Trustees, provided that as a result at least two-thirds of the Trustees have been elected by the shareholders.
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Trustees and officers of the Trust who are employees of the Manager or affiliated companies are considered “interested persons” under the 1940 Act.
 
Name, Address* and Date of Birth
Position(s) with Fund
Term of Office and Length of Time Served
Principal Occupation(s) Held During the Past Five Years
Total Number of USAA Funds Overseen by Officer
Interested Trustee
Daniel S. McNamara
(June 1966)
Trustee, President, and Vice Chairman
December 2009, Trustee, President, and Vice Chairman since January 2012
President of Financial Advice & Solutions Group, USAA (02/13-present);President and Director of AMCO (01/12-present); President and Director, USAA Investment Management Company (IMCO) and USAA Shareholder Account Services (SAS) (10/09-01/12); Senior Vice President of USAA Financial Planning Services Insurance Agency, Inc. (FPS) (04/11-present); President and Director of USAA Financial Advisors, Inc. (FAI) and FPS (10/09-04/11); President, Banc of America Investment Advisors (9/07-9/09); Managing Director Planning and Financial Products Group, Bank of America (09/01-09/09). Mr. McNamara brings to the Board extensive experience in the financial services industry, including experience as an officer of the Trust.
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Interested Officers
R. Matthew Freund
(July 1963)
Vice President
April 2010
Senior Vice President, Investment Portfolio Management, AMCO (01/12-present); Senior Vice President, Investment Portfolio Management, IMCO (02/10-12/11); Vice President, Fixed Income Investments, IMCO (02/04-2/10). Mr. Freund also serves as a director of SAS.
52
John P. Toohey (March 1968)
Vice President
June 2009
Vice President, Equity Investments, AMCO (01/12-present); Vice President, Equity Investments, IMCO (02/09-12/11); Managing Director, AIG Investments, (12/03-1/09).
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Adym Rygmyr
(February 1969)
Secretary
April 2012
Director, USAA IMCO (08/12-present); Vice President, Financial Advice & Solutions Group General Counsel, USAA (03/12-present); Managing Director and General Counsel, TIAA-CREF (04/04-03/12). Mr. Rygmyr also holds the officer positions of Vice President and Secretary, IMCO, AMCO, and SAS.
52
James G. Whetzel (February 1978)
Assistant Secretary
April 2010
Executive Director Securities Attorney, Financial Advice & Solutions Group General Counsel, USAA (10/12-present); Attorney, Financial Advice & Solutions Group General Counsel, USAA (11/08-10/12); Reed Smith,
52
 
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      LLP, Associate (08/05-11/08). Mr. Whetzel also serves as Assistant Secretary of AMCO and SAS.  
Roberto Galindo, Jr.
(November 1960)
Treasurer
February 2008
Assistant Vice President, Portfolio Accounting/Financial Administration, USAA (12/02-present); Assistant Treasurer, USAA family of funds (07/00-02/08).
52
William A. Smith (June 1948)
Assistant Treasurer
February 2009
Vice President, Senior Financial Officer and Treasurer, AMCO, FAI, FPS, SAS and USAA Life (02/09- present); Vice President, Senior Financial Officer, USAA (02/07-present).
52
Stephanie Higby (July 1974)
Chief Compliance Officer
February 2013
Executive Director, Institutional Asset Management Compliance, USAA (04/13-present); Director, Compliance for Institutional Asset Management Compliance, AMCO (03/12-04/13); Compliance Director for USAA Mutual Funds Compliance, IMCO (06/06-02/12).
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* The address of the Interested Trustee and each officer is USAA Asset Management Company, P.O. Box 659430, San Antonio, Texas 78265-9430.
 
Committees of the Board
 
The Board of Trustees typically conducts regular meetings five or six times a year to review the operations of the Funds in the USAA family of funds. A portion of these meetings is devoted to various committee meetings of the Board, which focus on particular matters. In addition, the Board may hold special meetings by telephone or in person to discuss specific matters that may require action prior to the next regular meeting. The Board has four committees: an Executive Committee, an Audit Committee, a Pricing and Investment Committee, and a Corporate Governance Committee. The duties of these four Committees and their present membership are as follows:
 
Executive Committee: Between the meetings of the Board and while the Board is not in session, the Executive Committee of the Board has all the powers and may exercise all the duties of the Board in the management of the business of the Trust which may be delegated to it by the Board. Trustees D. McNamara and Mason are members of the Executive Committee.
 
Audit Committee: The Audit Committee of the Board reviews the financial information and the independent auditor’s reports and undertakes certain studies and analyses as directed by the Board. Trustees Mason, P. McNamara, Ostdiek, and Reimherr are members of the Audit Committee.
 
Pricing and Investment Committee: The Pricing and Investment Committee of the Board acts upon various investment-related issues and other matters which have been delegated to it by the Board. Trustees D. McNamara, Mason, P. McNamara, Ostdiek, and Reimherr are members of the Pricing and Investment Committee.
 
Corporate Governance Committee: The Corporate Governance Committee of the Board maintains oversight of the organization, performance, and effectiveness of the Board and independent Trustees. Trustees Reimherr, Mason, P. McNamara, and Ostdiek are members of the Corporate Governance Committee.
 
In addition to the previously listed Trustees and/or officers of the Trust who also serve as Directors and/or officers of the Manager, the following individual is an executive officer of the Manager: Brooks Englehardt, President. There are no family relationships among the Trustees, officers, and managerial level employees of the Trust.
 
The following table sets forth information describing the compensation of the current Trustees of the Trust for their services as Trustees for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012.

 
 
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Name of Trustee
Aggregate Compensation from
Fund Listed in this SAI
Total Compensation from the
USAA Family of Funds(b)
Interested Trustee
 
 
Daniel S. McNamara
None(a)
None(a)
 
 
 
Independent Trustee
 
 
Robert L. Mason, Ph.D.
None
$123,050
Barbara B. Ostdiek, Ph.D.
None
$107,850
Michael F. Reimherr
None
$109,450
Paul L. McNamara
None
$101,450
 
 
 
(a) Daniel S. McNamara is affiliated with the Trust’s investment adviser, AMCO, and, accordingly, receives no remuneration from the Trust or any other fund of the USAA Fund Complex.
(b) At December 31, 2012, the Fund Complex consisted of one registered investment company offering 50 individual funds.
 
No compensation is paid by any fund to any Trustee who is a director, officer, or employee of AMCO or its affiliates or of any Subadviser or its affiliates. No pension or retirement benefits are accrued as part of Trust expenses. The Trust reimburses certain expenses of the Trustees who are not affiliated with the Manager. As of the December 31, 2012, the officers and Trustees of the Trust as a group owned beneficially or of record less than 1% of the outstanding shares of the Trust.
 
INVESTMENT ADVISER
 
As described in the Fund’s prospectus, AMCO is the investment adviser for the Fund. AMCO, organized in August 2011, is a wholly owned indirect subsidiary of United Services Automobile Association (USAA), a large, diversified financial services institution.
 
In addition to managing the Trust’s assets, AMCO advises and manages the investments of USAA and its affiliated companies. As of the date of this SAI, total assets under management by AMCO were approximately $xxx billion, of which approximately $xx billion were in mutual fund portfolios.
 
Advisory Agreement
 
The Manager provides investment management and advisory services to the Fund pursuant to an Advisory Agreement dated July 31, 2008 (Advisory Agreement). Under this Advisory Agreement, the Manager provides an investment program, carries out the investment policies and manages the portfolio assets for the Fund. The Manager is authorized, subject to the control of the Board of the Trust, to determine the selection, amount, and time to buy or sell securities for the Fund. In addition, the Manager manages certain portfolio assets for certain of the Fund, as described in the prospectuses. The Advisory Agreement authorizes the Manager to retain one or more Subadvisers for the management of all or a portion of a Fund’s investment portfolio. Under the Advisory Agreement, the Manager is responsible for monitoring the services furnished pursuant to the Subadvisory Agreements and making recommendations to the Board with respect to the retention or replacement of Subadvisers and renewal of Subadvisory Agreements.
 
The Manager does not receive any management fee from the Fund for providing services pursuant to the Advisory Agreement. The Manager compensates all personnel, officers, and Trustees of the Trust if such persons are also employees of the Manager or its affiliates.
 
Except for the services and facilities provided by the Manager, the Fund is responsible for paying all other expenses incurred in their operations. Expenses for which the Fund are responsible include taxes (if any); brokerage commissions on portfolio transactions (if any); expenses of issuance and redemption of shares; charges of transfer agents, custodians, and dividend disbursing agents; costs of preparing and distributing proxy material; audit and legal expenses; certain expenses of registering and qualifying shares for sale; fees of Trustees who are not interested (not affiliated) persons of the Manager; costs of printing and mailing the prospectus, SAI, and periodic reports to existing shareholders; and any other charges or fees not specifically enumerated. The Manager pays the cost of printing and mailing copies of the prospectus, the SAI, and reports to prospective shareholders.
 
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The Advisory Agreement will remain in effect until July 30, 2014, and will continue in effect from year to year thereafter for the Fund as long as its is approved at least annually by a vote of the outstanding voting securities of such Fund (as defined by the 1940 Act) or by the Board (on behalf of such Fund) including a majority of the Independent Trustees, at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on such approval. The Agreement may be terminated at any time by either the Trust or the Manager on 60 days’ written notice. Each agreement will automatically terminate in the event of its assignment (as defined by the 1940 Act).
 
Administration and Servicing Agreement
 
Under an Administration and Servicing Agreement effective July 31, 2008, AMCO is obligated on a continuous basis to provide such administrative services as the Board of the Trust reasonably deems necessary for the proper administration of the Fund. AMCO will generally assist in all aspects of the Funds’ operations; supply and maintain office facilities, statistical and research data, data processing services, clerical, accounting, bookkeeping and recordkeeping services (including without limitation the maintenance of such books and records as are required under the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder, except as maintained by other agents), internal auditing, executive and administrative services, and stationery and office supplies; prepare and file tax returns; supply financial information and supporting data for reports to and filings with the SEC and various state Blue Sky authorities; supply supporting documentation for meetings of the Board; provide and maintain an appropriate fidelity bond; process and coordinate purchases and redemptions and coordinate and implement wire transfers in connection therewith; execute orders under any offer of exchange involving concurrent purchases and redemptions of shares of one or more funds in the USAA family of funds; respond to shareholder inquiries; assist in processing shareholder proxy statements, reports, prospectuses, and other shareholder communications; furnish statements and confirmations of all account activity; respond to shareholder complaints and other correspondence; and negotiate arrangements with, and supervise and coordinate the activities of, agents and others to supply services. For these services under the Administration and Servicing Agreement, the Trust currently pays no fees to AMCO with respect to the Fund. We may also delegate one or more of our responsibilities to others at our expense.
 
In addition to the services provided under the Fund’s Administration and Servicing Agreement, the Manager also provides certain compliance and legal services for the benefit of the Fund.
 
Codes of Ethics
 
The Fund and the Manager have adopted an Investment Code of Ethics pursuant to Rule 17j-1 under the 1940 Act, which may permit personnel covered by the rule to invest in securities, including securities that may be purchased or held by a Fund, but prohibits fraudulent, deceptive, or manipulative conduct in connection with that personal investing. The Trust’s Board reviews the administration of the Code of Ethics at least annually and receives certifications from the Manager regarding compliance with the Code of Ethics.
 
While the officers and employees of the Manager, as well as those of the Funds, may engage in personal securities transactions, there are certain restrictions in the procedures in the Investment Code of Ethics adopted by the Manager and the Funds. The Code of Ethics is designed to ensure that the shareholders’ interests come before the individuals who manage their Funds. The Code of Ethics requires the portfolio manager and other employees with access to information about the purchase or sale of securities by a Fund to abide by the Code of Ethics requirements before executing permitted personal trades.
 
A copy of the Investment Code of Ethics has been filed with the SEC and is available for public review.
 
Underwriter
 
The Trust has an agreement with USAA Investment Management Company (IMCO) 9800 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio, TX 78288, for exclusive underwriting and distribution of the Fund’s shares on a continuing best efforts basis. This agreement provides that IMCO will receive no fee or other compensation for such distribution services.
 
Transfer Agent
 
USAA Shareholder Account Services (the Transfer Agent), 9800 Fredericksburg Road, San Antonio, Texas 78288, performs transfer agent services for the Trust under a Transfer Agency Agreement. Services include maintenance of shareholder account records, handling of communications with shareholders, distribution of Fund dividends, and production of reports with respect to account activity for shareholders and the Trust. For its services under the Transfer Agency Agreement, the Transfer Agent receives an annual fixed fee of $25.50 per shareholder account from the Fund.
 
In addition to these fees, the Transfer Agent also is entitled to reimbursement from the Trust for all reasonable out-of-pocket expenses, charges and other disbursements incurred by it in connection with the performance of services under the Transfer Agency Agreement, including but not limited to: (1) the cost of any and all forms, statements, labels, envelopes, checks, tax forms, and other printed materials which is required by the Transfer Agent to perform its duties; (2) delivery charges, including postage incurred in delivering materials to, and receiving them from, the Trust and shareholders; (3) communication charges; (4) maintenance of shareholder records (including charges for retention and imaging); (5) tax reporting systems; (6) counsel fees; and (7) cash and asset management services. Also, the Transfer Agent is authorized to enter into third party service agreements in which the Trust will pay
 
 
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no more than the amount that would be charged to the Trust directly for each series, on accounts as applicable if all the accounts had been maintained by the Transfer Agent. Fees paid under the Transfer Agency Agreement are subject to change at any time.
 
The fee paid to the Transfer Agent includes processing of all transactions and correspondence. Fees are billed on a monthly basis at the rate of one-twelfth of the annual fee. In addition, certain entities may receive payments directly or indirectly from the Transfer Agent, AMCO, or their affiliates for providing shareholder services to their clients who hold Fund shares.
 
PORTFOLIO MANAGER DISCLOSURE
 
The following table sets forth other accounts for which the Fund’s portfolio managers were primarily responsible for the day-to-day portfolio management as of the fiscal year ended December 31, 2012, unless otherwise specified.
 
 
Number of Other Accounts Managed
and Assets by Account Type
Number of Accounts and Assets for Which
Advisory Fee is Performance-Based
Name of
Portfolio Manager
Registered Investment Companies
Other Pooled Investment Vehicles
Other Accounts
Registered Investment Companies
Other Pooled Investment Vehicles
Other Accounts
Wasif Latif
-
-
-
-
-
-
 
-
 
 
-
 
 
John Toohey
-
-
-
-
-
-
 
-
 
 
-
 
 
 
Conflicts of Interest: These portfolio managers provide portfolio management services only to investment companies in the USAA retail fund family and do not manage any private accounts or unregistered mutual funds. Portfolio managers make investment decisions for the funds they manage based on the fund’s investment objective, permissible investments, cash flow and other relevant investment considerations that they consider applicable to that portfolio. Therefore, portfolio managers could purchase or sell securities for one portfolio and not another portfolio, or can take similar action for two portfolios at different times, even if the portfolios have the same investment objective and permissible investments.
 
Potential conflicts of interest may arise when allocating and/or aggregating trades for funds with a performance fee and those without a performance fee. AMCO often will aggregate multiple orders for the same security for different mutual funds into one single order. To address these potential conflicts of interest, AMCO has adopted detailed procedures regarding the allocation of client orders, and such transactions must be allocated to funds in a fair and equitable manner.
 
The performance of each Fund also is periodically reviewed by AMCO’s Investment Strategy Committee (ISC), and portfolio managers’ have the opportunity to explain the reasons underlying a Fund’s performance. The ISC and the Trust’s Board also routinely review and compare the performance of the Funds with the performance of other funds with the same investment objectives and permissible investments.
 
As discussed above, AMCO has policies and procedures designed to seek to minimize potential conflicts of interest arising from portfolio managers advising multiple funds. The mutual funds compliance department monitors a variety of areas to ensure compliance with the USAA Funds Compliance Program written procedures, including monitoring each Fund’s compliance with its investment restrictions and guidelines, and monitoring and periodically reviewing or testing transactions made on behalf of multiple funds to seek to ensure compliance with the USAA Funds Compliance Program written policies and procedures.
 
Compensation: AMCO’s compensation structure includes a base salary, a short-term bonus, holiday bonus, and long-term bonus components. The portfolio managers are officers of AMCO and their base salaries are determined by the salary ranges for their official positions, which are influenced by market and competitive considerations. The base salary is fixed but can change each year as a result of the portfolio manager’s annual evaluation, interim evaluation, or if the portfolio manager is promoted.
   
Each portfolio manager also is eligible to receive a bonus payment based on the performance of the Fund(s) managed by the portfolio manager compared to each Fund’s comparative ranking against all funds within the appropriate Lipper category, for money market funds within the appropriate iMoneyNet, Inc. category, for some equity funds within the appropriate index category. Portfolio managers will receive bonus payments under this plan only if the Funds they manage are at or above the 55th percentile compared to their industry peers, and the bonus payment increases as the Fund’s relative ranking in its peer universe rises over a one- or up to a three-year measurement period. In determining the bonus payment of a portfolio manager who manages more than one Fund, AMCO considers the relative performance of each Fund in proportion to the total assets managed by the portfolio manager.
   
Oversight of the portfolio manager’s compensation is provided by a committee structure and by the governing document – the Variable Pay Plan (VPP). The VPP is administered by the VPP Committee. The VPP Committee includes representatives from management, corporate finance, legal, and human resources. Additional oversight is provided by the ISC, through review of new investments and periodic presentations by portfolio management.
   
The Association’s philosophical position is to measure performance both on an enterprise and individual basis. As such, Portfolio Managers, similar to other USAA executives, are also measured against USAA’s enterprise performance.
 
Subject to USAA Board of Directors’ approval, portfolio managers and all other employees may be provided a holiday bonus equivalent to two weeks’ salary. The Board reviews and determines whether or not to approve the holiday bonus at the November meeting.
 
Portfolio managers are eligible to receive up to two times of their assigned enterprise target based on the attainment of the corporate performance metrics, including portfolio managers in the enterprise program reinforces collective accountability for enterprise goals and reinforces focus on the Association’s mission.
   
In addition, portfolio managers are eligible to receive bonuses under the enterprise’s Long-Term Bonus Plan (LTBP). The LTBP measures performance over a three-year period. Initial awards (following year one of three-year performance period) can range from 0% to 200% of target based on attainment of the performance metrics, and will be subject to adjustments based on subsequent performance in years two and three of the three-year performance period (downside risk of up to 30% reduction of balances).
 
Oversight regarding achievement of USAA’s enterprise results are provided by USAA’s Board of Directors.


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Portfolio Ownership: As of the date of this SAI, no portfolio managers beneficially own any shares of the Fund.
 
PROXY VOTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES
 
The Trust’s Board has delegated to the Manager authority to vote on proposals presented to shareholders of portfolio securities held by the Fund. The Manager generally will vote on proposals presented to shareholders of portfolio securities held by the Fund. However, the Manager reserves the right not to vote on such proposals where it determines that the cost of exercising voting rights on behalf of the Fund exceeds the benefit of exercising such voting rights. In addition, the Manager generally will not vote on proposals presented to shareholders with respect to foreign securities that are on loan under the Fund’s securities lending program. In this connection, the Manager has determined that the potential return from lending such securities generally is more advantageous to the Fund than recalling such securities from the borrower to exercise voting rights with respect thereto. In addition, the Manager generally will not vote on proposals presented to shareholders with respect to foreign securities that are subject to share blocking where the foreign company prevents the sale of shares for a certain period of time around the shareholder meeting. For companies in countries with share blocking periods, the disadvantage of being unable to sell the stock regardless of changing conditions typically outweighs the advantages of voting at the shareholder meeting. The Manager has retained Institutional Shareholder Services, Inc. (ISS) formerly RiskMetrics Group to receive proxy statements, provide voting recommendations, vote shares according to our instructions, and to keep records of our votes on behalf of the Funds. ISS has developed a set of criteria for evaluating and making recommendations on proxy voting issues (for example, elections of boards of Trustees or mergers and reorganizations). These criteria and general voting recommendations are set forth in the ISS U.S. Proxy Voting Guidelines and ISS International Proxy Voting Guidelines (the ISS Guidelines), as customized by the Manager with respect to certain matters. The Manager retains the authority to determine the final vote for securities held by the Funds.
 
To avoid any improper influence on the Manager’s voting decisions, the Manager generally will follow the voting recommendations of ISS, except as briefly described below. Before any voting deadline, ISS will provide the Manager’s Head of Equity Investments (or his or her delegate) with a summary of the proposal and a recommendation based on the ISS Guidelines. In evaluating ISS’s recommendations, the Manager may consider information from many sources, including the Funds’ portfolio manager, the Manager’s Investment Strategy Committee, the management of a company presenting a proposal, shareholder groups, and other sources. The Manager believes that the recommendation of management should be given weight in determining how to vote on a particular proposal. The Manager’s Head of Equity Investments will then review ISS’s recommendations, and if he or she determines that it would be in the Funds’ best interests to vote the shares contrary to ISS’s recommendation, he or she must determine, based on reasonable inquiry, whether any material conflict of interest exists between the Funds, on the one hand, and the Manager, the Funds’ principal underwriter, or any person who is an affiliated person of the Funds, the Manager, or the Funds’ principal underwriter, on the other. If a material conflict of interest is determined to exist, the Head of Equity Investments may vote contrary to ISS’s recommendation only if the proposed voting recommendation of the Head of Equity Investments is reviewed by the Manager’s Investment Strategy Committee, which will determine how to vote the particular proxy. With respect to any such proxy votes, the information prepared by the Manager’s Investment Strategy Committee regarding any material conflict of interest identified will be summarized and presented to the Fund's Board at the next regularly scheduled meeting of the Board. The Manager’s Investment Strategy Committee also may establish certain proxy voting procedures for votes on certain matters that will override any ISS recommendation.
 
Copies of the Manager’s proxy voting policies and procedures are available without charge (i) by calling (800) 531-USAA (8722); (ii) at usaa.com; and (iii) on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov. Information regarding how each Fund voted proxies relating to portfolio securities during the most recent 12-month period ended June 30, is available (i) without charge at usaa.com; and (ii) on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov.
 
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS DISCLOSURE
 
The Trust’s Board has adopted a policy on selective disclosure of portfolio holdings. The Trust’s policy is to protect the confidentiality of the Fund’s portfolio holdings and prevent the selective disclosure of material non-public information about the identity of such holdings. To prevent the selective disclosure of portfolio holdings of the Fund, the general policy of the Fund is to not disclose any portfolio holdings of the Fund, other than the portfolio holdings filed with the SEC on Form N-CSR (i.e., annual and semiannual reports) and Form N-Q (i.e., quarterly portfolio holdings reports), and any portfolio holdings made available on usaa.com. This general policy shall not apply, however, in the following instances:
 
§
Where the person to whom the disclosure is made owes a fiduciary or other duty of trust or confidence to the Funds (e.g., auditors, attorneys, and Access Persons under the Funds’ Code of Ethics);
33

§
Where the person has a valid reason to have access to the portfolio holdings information and has agreed not to disclose or misuse the information (e.g., custodians, accounting agents, securities lending agents, subadvisers, rating agencies, mutual fund evaluation services, such as Lipper, Inc. and proxy voting agents);
 
§
As disclosed in this SAI; and
 
§
As required by law or a regulatory body.
 
If portfolio holdings are released pursuant to an ongoing arrangement with any party that owes a fiduciary or other duty of trust or confidence to the Fund or has a valid reason to have access to the portfolio holdings information and has agreed not to disclose or misuse the information, the Fund must have a legitimate business purpose for doing so, and neither the Fund, nor the Manager or its affiliates, may receive any compensation in connection with an arrangement to make available information about the Fund’s portfolio holdings. If the applicable conditions set forth above are satisfied, a Fund may distribute portfolio holdings to mutual fund evaluation services such as Lipper and broker-dealers that may be used by the Fund, for the purpose of efficient trading and receipt of relevant research. In providing this information to broker-dealers, reasonable precautions are taken to avoid any potential misuse of the disclosed information.
 
The Fund also may disclose any and all portfolio information to its service providers and others who generally need access to such information in the performance of their contractual duties and responsibilities and are subject to duties of confidentiality, including a duty not to trade on non-public information, imposed by law and/or agreement. The Fund may provide portfolio holdings information to the following affiliates, subadvisers, vendors, broker-dealers and service providers: (1) certain affiliated entities with common systems access; (2) subadvisers to series of the Trust; (3) master fund advisers; (4) custodians and tax service providers (e.g., J.P. Morgan Chase, J.P. Morgan Securities, State Street Bank and Trust, State Street Global Markets and Northern Trust); (5) securities lending agents (e.g., Citibank); (6) proxy voting and class action filing agents (ISS); (7) trade analytic consultants (e.g., Elkins McSherry); (8) financial statement service providers (e.g., RR Donnelley); (9) certain mutual fund evaluation service providers (e.g., Lipper, Inc., Morningstar, Factset, Bloomberg); (10) pricing vendors (e.g., S&P, JJ Kenney, Thompson Financial/Reuters, ValueLine, Yield Book and IDC) and (11) platform vendors, (e.g., Charles River and Sungard (Dataware Solutions) as well as certain other individuals that owe the Trust a duty of trust and confidence including fund counsel, internal audit, independent auditors, identified NRSROs and executing broker dealers.
 
Any person or entity that does not have a previously approved ongoing arrangement to receive non-public portfolio holdings information and seeks a Fund’s portfolio holdings information that (i) has not been filed with the SEC, or (ii) is not available on usaa.com, must submit its request in writing to the Fund’s Chief Compliance Officer (CCO), or USAA Securities Counsel, or their designee(s), who will make a determination whether disclosure of such portfolio holdings may be made and whether the relevant Fund needs to make any related disclosure in its SAI. A report will be made to each Fund’s Board of Trustees at each quarterly meeting about (i) any determinations made by the CCO or USAA Securities Counsel, pursuant to the procedures set forth in this paragraph, and (ii) any violations of the portfolio holdings policy.
 
The Fund intends to post its annual and semiannual reports, and quarterly schedules of portfolio holdings on usaa.com after these reports are filed with the SEC (which typically occurs approximately 60 days after the end of each fiscal quarter). In addition, each Fund intends to post its top 10 holdings on usaa.com 15 days following the end of each month, and the Money Market Fund will post information related to its portfolio holdings on usaa.com five business days at the end of each month and will keep such information on the website for six months thereafter.
 
Approximately 60 days after the end of each fiscal quarter, the Fund’s portfolio holdings will be delivered to certain independent evaluation and reporting services such as Bloomberg, S&P, and Morningstar.
 
For the last month of each quarter, after the Fund’s top 10 holdings are made available on usaa.com, this information will be delivered to certain independent evaluation and reporting services such as Lipper, S&P, Thomson Financial and Value Line.
 
In order to address potential conflicts of interest between the interests of a Fund’s shareholders, on the one hand, and the interests of the Fund’s investment adviser, principal underwriter, or certain affiliated persons, on the other, the Fund has adopted the policies described above (i) prohibiting the receipt of compensation in connection with an arrangement to make available information about the Fund’s portfolio holdings and (ii) requiring certain requests for non-public portfolio holdings information to be approved by the CCO or USAA Securities Counsel, and then reported to the Fund’s Board, including the Independent Trustees.
 
GENERAL INFORMATION
 
Custodian and Accounting A