10-Q 1 d30108_10q.htm 10-Q HTML



UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-Q

(Mark One)

x Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

for the quarterly period ended January 31, 2013

OR

o Transition report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

for the transition period from to

Commission file number: 0-23255

COPART, INC.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

                 
  Delaware           94-2867490  
  (State or other jurisdiction           (I.R.S. Employer  
  of incorporation or organization)           Identification No.)  

14185 Dallas Parkway, Dallas, Texas 75254
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

(972) 391-5000

Registrant's telephone number, including area code

N/A

(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES x NO o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). YES x NO o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

                 
  Large accelerated filer x           Accelerated filer o  
                 
  Non-accelerated filer o           Smaller reporting company o  
  (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)              

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). YES o NO x

Number of shares of Common Stock outstanding as of March 12, 2013: 125,385,122


Copart, Inc.

Index to the Quarterly Report

January 31, 2013

                 
  Description              
  PART I — Financial Information           3  
  Item 1 — Financial Statements           3  
  Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets           3  
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income           4  
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income           5  
  Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows           6  
  Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements           7  
                 
  Item 2 — Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations           16  
  Overview           16  
  Acquisitions and New Operations           17  
  Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates           18  
  Results of Operations           21  
  Liquidity and Capital Resources           24  
                 
  Item 3 — Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk           26  
                 
  Item 4 — Controls and Procedures           26  
  Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures           26  
  Changes in Internal Controls           27  
                 
  PART II — Other Information           27  
  Item 1 — Legal Proceedings           27  
  Item 1A — Risk Factors           27  
  Item 2 — Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities and Use of Proceeds           36  
  Item 6 — Exhibits           36  
  Signatures           37  


PART I — FINANCIAL INFORMATION

ITEM 1. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Copart, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in thousands, except share amounts)
(Unaudited)

                       
        January 31,
2013
          July 31,
2012
 
  ASSETS                    
  Current assets:                    
  Cash and cash equivalents   $ 49,510         $ 140,112  
  Accounts receivable, net     198,805           138,966  
  Vehicle pooling costs     20,060           15,728  
  Inventories     11,043           8,494  
  Income taxes receivable     12,462           2,312  
  Deferred income taxes     4,207           3,600  
  Prepaid expenses and other assets     11,633           9,155  
  Assets held for sale     4,185           3,926  
  Total current assets     311,905           322,293  
  Property and equipment, net     657,424           587,163  
  Intangibles, net     14,925           7,985  
  Goodwill     210,188           196,438  
  Deferred income taxes     27,596           22,280  
  Other assets     31,908           18,907  
  Total assets   $ 1,253,946         $ 1,155,066  
                       
  LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS' EQUITY                    
  Current liabilities:                    
  Accounts payable and accrued liabilities   $ 125,400         $ 102,958  
  Deferred revenue     5,363           5,390  
  Income taxes payable     6,083           3,082  
  Current portion of long-term debt and capital lease obligations     75,177           75,170  
  Other current liabilities     788           785  
  Total current liabilities     212,811           187,385  
  Deferred income taxes     9,153           7,186  
  Income taxes payable     24,434           22,531  
  Long-term debt and capital lease obligations     333,068           368,950  
  Other liabilities     6,977           7,897  
  Total liabilities     586,443           593,949  
  Commitments and contingencies                    
  Stockholders' equity:                    
  Preferred stock, $0.0001 par value - 5,000,000 shares authorized; no shares issued and outstanding at January 31, 2013 and July 31, 2012, respectively     -           -  
  Common stock, $0.0001 par value - 180,000,000 shares authorized; 125,284,122 and 124,393,700 shares issued and outstanding at January 31, 2013 and July 31, 2012, respectively     13           12  
  Additional paid-in capital     353,111           326,187  
  Accumulated other comprehensive loss     (32,270 )         (38,043 )
  Retained earnings     346,649           272,961  
  Total stockholders' equity     667,503           561,117  
  Total liabilities and stockholders' equity   $ 1,253,946         $ 1,155,066  

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

3


Copart, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income
(in thousands, except per share amounts)
(Unaudited)

                                               
        Three months ended
January 31,
          Six months ended
January 31,
 
        2013           2012           2013           2012  
  Service revenues and vehicle sales:                                            
  Service revenues   $ 216,920         $ 186,852         $ 412,099         $ 369,668  
  Vehicle sales     49,265           41,052           92,952           83,862  
  Total service revenues and vehicle sales     266,185           227,904           505,051           453,530  
                                               
  Operating costs and expenses:                                            
  Yard operations     127,164           94,603           224,283           190,810  
  Cost of vehicle sales     42,204           33,605           78,515           67,799  
  General and administrative     34,047           27,386           65,126           57,235  
  Impairment of long-lived assets     -           8,771           -           8,771  
  Total operating costs and expenses     203,415           164,365           367,924           324,615  
  Operating income     62,770           63,539           137,127           128,915  
  Other (expense) income:                                            
  Interest expense     (2,588 )         (3,033 )         (5,220 )         (5,220 )
  Interest income     191           119           347           181  
  Other income, net     744           1,591           451           2,155  
  Total other expense     (1,653 )         (1,323 )         (4,422 )         (2,884 )
  Income before income taxes     61,117           62,216           132,705           126,031  
  Income taxes     21,477           21,613           47,220           44,279  
  Net income   $ 39,640         $ 40,603         $ 85,485         $ 81,752  
                                               
  Earnings per share-basic                                            
  Basic net income per share   $ 0.32         $ 0.32         $ 0.69         $ 0.63  
  Weighted average common shares outstanding     124,709           128,306           124,505           129,870  
                                               
  Earnings per share-diluted                                            
  Diluted net income per share   $ 0.31         $ 0.31         $ 0.66         $ 0.62  
  Diluted weighted average common shares outstanding     129,520           131,590           128,997           132,696  

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

4


Copart, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
(in thousands)
(Unaudited)

                                                     
              Three months ended January 31,           Six months ended January 31,  
              2013           2012           2013           2012  
  Net income, as reported         $ 39,640         $ 40,603         $ 85,485         $ 81,752  
  Other comprehensive income:                                                  
  Interest rate swaps, net of tax effects of $308, $(684), $464, and $(684)           544           (2,459 )         820           (3,073 )
  Foreign currency translation adjustments           (2,109 )         (6,114 )         4,953           (9,614 )
  Total comprehensive income         $ 38,075         $ 32,030         $ 91,258         $ 69,065  

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

5


Copart, Inc.
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
(in thousands)
(Unaudited)

                       
        Six months ended
January 31,
 
        2013           2012  
  Cash flows from operating activities:                    
  Net income   $ 85,485         $ 81,752  
  Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:                    
  Depreciation and amortization     27,451           24,247  
  Allowance for doubtful accounts     184           (99 )
  Impairment of long-lived assets     -           8,771  
  Stock-based compensation     9,920           11,028  
  Excess benefits from stock-based compensation     (5,293 )         (1,104 )
  Gain on sale of property and equipment     (183 )         (963 )
  Deferred incomes taxes     (6,986 )         (9,068 )
  Changes in operating assets and liabilities:                    
  Accounts receivable     (59,165 )         (29,549 )
  Vehicle pooling costs     (4,325 )         268  
  Inventories     (2,535 )         498  
  Prepaid expenses and other current assets     (3,529 )         5,933  
  Other assets     (7,014 )         247  
  Accounts payable and accrued liabilities     18,695           (5,431 )
  Deferred revenue     (28 )         697  
  Income taxes receivable     (4,776 )         3,281  
  Income taxes payable     4,918           (12 )
  Other liabilities     271           (148 )
  Net cash provided by operating activities     53,090           90,348  
  Cash flows from investing activities:                    
  Purchases of property and equipment     (85,682 )         (14,875 )
  Proceeds from sale of property and equipment     990           761  
  Proceeds from sale of assets held for sale     861           -  
  Purchases of assets and liabilities in connection with acquisitions, net of cash acquired     (31,243 )         (180 )
  Net cash used in investing activities     (115,074 )         (14,294 )
  Cash flows from financing activities:                    
  Proceeds from the exercise of stock options     16,358           6,335  
  Excess tax benefit from stock-based payment compensation     5,293           1,104  
  Proceeds from the issuance of Employee Stock Purchase Plan shares     951           1,019  
  Repurchases of common stock     (14,512 )         (135,395 )
  Proceeds from the issuance of long-term debt     -           125,000  
  Debt offering costs     -           (313 )
  Principal payments on long-term debt     (37,505 )         (18,750 )
  Net cash used in financing activities     (29,415 )         (21,000 )
                       
  Effect of foreign currency translation     797           (1,423 )
  Net (decrease) increase in cash and cash equivalents     (90,602 )         53,631  
  Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of period     140,112           74,009  
  Cash and cash equivalents at end of period   $ 49,510         $ 127,640  
  Supplemental disclosure of cash flow information:                    
  Interest paid   $ 5,220         $ 5,221  
  Income taxes paid   $ 55,874         $ 50,019  

See accompanying notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.

6


Copart, Inc.
Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements
January 31, 2013
(Unaudited)

NOTE 1 - Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Description of Business

The Company provides vehicle sellers with a full range of services to process and sell vehicles over the Internet through the Company's Virtual Bidding Second Generation (VB2) Internet auction-style sales technology. Sellers are primarily insurance companies but also include banks and financial institutions, charities, car dealerships, fleet operators, and vehicle rental companies. The Company sells principally to licensed vehicle dismantlers, rebuilders, repair licensees, used vehicle dealers and exporters; however at certain locations, the Company sells directly to the general public. The majority of vehicles sold on behalf of insurance companies are either damaged vehicles deemed a total loss or not economically repairable by the insurance companies or are recovered stolen vehicles for which an insurance settlement with the vehicle owner has already been made. The Company offers vehicle sellers a full range of services that expedite each stage of the vehicle sales process, minimize administrative and processing costs and maximize the ultimate sales price. In the United States and Canada (North America), the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.) and Brazil the Company sells vehicles primarily as an agent and derives revenue primarily from fees paid by vehicle sellers and vehicle buyers as well as related fees for services such as towing and storage. In the United Kingdom (U.K.), the Company operates both on a principal basis, purchasing the salvage vehicle outright from the insurance company and reselling the vehicle for its own account, and as an agent. In Germany, the Company derives revenue from sales listing fees for listing vehicles on behalf of many German insurance companies.

In January 2012, the Company changed the state in which it is incorporated (the Reincorporation), and is now incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware. All references to "we," "us," "our," or "the Company" herein refer to the California corporation prior to the date of the Reincorporation, and to the Delaware corporation on and after the date of the Reincorporation.

On March 8, 2012, the Company's board of directors approved a two-for-one stock split effected in the form of a stock dividend. The additional shares resulting from the stock split were distributed after the closing of trading on March 28, 2012 to stockholders of record on March 23, 2012. The stock dividend increased the number of shares of common stock outstanding and all per share amounts have been adjusted for the stock dividend. Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified to conform to current year presentation.

Principles of Consolidation

The condensed consolidated financial statements of the Company include the accounts of the parent company and its wholly owned subsidiaries, including its foreign wholly owned subsidiaries. Significant intercompany transactions and balances have been eliminated in consolidation.

In the opinion of the management of the Company, the accompanying unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements contain all adjustments (which are normal recurring accruals) necessary to present fairly its financial position as of January 31, 2013 and July 31, 2012, its consolidated statement of income for the three and six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, its consolidated statement of comprehensive income for the three and six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, and its consolidated statement of cash flows for the six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012. Interim results for the six months ended January 31, 2013 are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any future period, or for the entire year ending July 31, 2013. These condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with the rules and regulations of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in financial statements prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles have been condensed or omitted pursuant to such rules and regulations. The interim condensed consolidated financial statements should be read in conjunction with the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2012.

Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Estimates are used for, but not limited to, vehicle pooling costs, self-insured reserves, allowance for doubtful accounts, income taxes, revenue recognition, stock-based compensation, long-lived asset and goodwill impairment calculations and contingencies. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

Revenue Recognition

The Company provides a portfolio of services to its sellers and buyers that facilitate the sale and delivery of a vehicle from seller to buyer. These services include the ability to use the Company's Internet sales technology and vehicle delivery, loading, title processing, preparation and storage. The Company evaluates multiple-element arrangements relative to its member and seller agreements.

7


The services provided to the seller of a vehicle involve disposing of a vehicle on the seller's behalf and, under most of the Company's current North American contracts, collecting the proceeds from the member. Pre-sale services, including towing, title processing, preparation and storage, as well as sale fees and other enhancement services meet the criteria for separate units of accounting. The revenue associated with each service is recognized upon completion of the respective service, net of applicable rebates or allowances. For certain sellers who are charged a proportionate fee based on high bid of the vehicle, the revenue associated with the pre-sale services is recognized upon completion of the sale when the total arrangement is fixed and determinable. The estimated selling price of each service is determined based on management's best estimate and allotted based on the relative selling price method.

Vehicle sales, where vehicles are purchased and remarketed on the Company's own behalf, are recognized on the sale date, which is typically the point of high bid acceptance. Upon high bid acceptance, a legal binding contract is formed with the member, and the gross sales price is recorded as revenue.

The Company also provides a number of services to the buyer of the vehicle, charging a separate fee for each service. Each of these services has been assessed to determine whether the requirements have been met to separate them into units of accounting within a multiple-element arrangement. The Company has concluded that the sale and the post-sale services are separate units of accounting. The fees for sale services are recognized upon completion of the sale, and the fees for the post-sale services are recognized upon successful completion of those services using the relative selling price method.

The Company also charges members an annual registration fee for the right to participate in its vehicle sales program, which is recognized ratably over the term of the arrangement, and relist and late-payment fees, which are recognized upon receipt of payment by the member. No provision for returns has been established, as all sales are final with no right of return, although the Company provides for bad debt expense in the case of non-performance by its members or sellers.

The Company allocates arrangement consideration based upon management's best estimate of the selling price of the separate units of accounting contained within an arrangement containing multiple deliverables. Significant inputs in the Company's estimates of the selling price of separate units of accounting include market and pricing trends, pricing customization and practices, and profit objectives for the services.

Vehicle Pooling Costs

The Company defers in vehicle pooling costs certain yard operation expenses associated with vehicles consigned to and received by the Company, but not sold as of the end of the period. The Company quantifies the deferred costs using a calculation that includes the number of vehicles at its facilities at the beginning and end of the period, the number of vehicles sold during the period and an allocation of certain yard operation costs of the period. The primary expenses allocated and deferred are certain facility costs, labor, transportation and vehicle processing. If the allocation factors change, then yard operation expenses could increase or decrease correspondingly in the future. These costs are expensed as vehicles are sold in subsequent periods on an average cost basis.

The Company applies the provisions of accounting guidance for subsequent measurement of inventory to our vehicle pooling costs. The provision requires that items such as idle facility expense, excessive spoilage, double freight and re-handling costs be recognized as current period charges regardless of whether they meet the criteria of "so abnormal" as provided in the guidance. In addition, the guidance requires that the allocation of fixed production overhead to the costs of conversion be based on the normal capacity of production facilities.

In early November 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeastern coast of the United States. As a result of the extensive flooding that it caused, the Company expended additional costs for i) temporary storage facilities, ii) premiums for subhaulers as they were reassigned from other regions, iii) labor costs incurred for overtime, travel and lodging due to the reassignment of employees to the affected region, and iv) equipment costs as additional loaders were leased to handle the increased volume. These costs, which are characterized as "abnormal" under ASC 330, Inventory, were expensed as incurred and not included in inventory. These costs, net of the associated revenues, generated a loss of $11.9 million during the quarter and had a negative after tax impact on diluted earnings per share in the quarter of $0.06. At the end of the quarter, over half of the incremental salvage vehicles received as a result of Hurricane Sandy remained unsold and in inventory.

Foreign Currency Translation

The Company records foreign currency translation adjustments from the process of translating the functional currency of the financial statements of our foreign subsidiaries into the U.S. dollar reporting currency. The Canadian dollar, the British pound, the U.A.E. dirham, the Brazilian real and the Euro are the functional currencies of the Company's foreign subsidiaries, Copart Canada, Copart Europe, Copart GCC, Copart Brazil and Copart Germany respectively, as they are the primary currencies within the economic environment in which each subsidiary operates. The original equity investment in the respective subsidiaries is translated at historical rates. Assets and liabilities of the respective subsidiary's operations are translated into U.S. dollars at period-end exchange rates, and revenues and expenses are translated into U.S. dollars at average exchange rates in effect during each reporting period. Adjustments resulting from the translation of each subsidiary's financial statements are reported in other comprehensive income.

8


The cumulative effects of foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations are as follows (in thousands):

           
  Cumulative loss on foreign currency translation as of July 31, 2011   $ (23,225 )
  Loss on foreign currency translation     (11,708 )
  Cumulative loss on foreign currency translation as of July 31, 2012   $ (34,933 )
  Gain on foreign currency translation     4,953  
  Cumulative loss on foreign currency translation as of January 31, 2013   $ (29,980 )

Income Taxes

Income taxes are accounted for under the asset and liability method. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the estimated future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax basis and operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date.

In accordance with the provisions of Accounting Standards Codification 740, Income Taxes (ASC 740), a two-step approach is applied to the recognition and measurement of uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. The first step is to determine if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained in an audit, including resolution of any related appeals or litigation processes. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely to be realized upon ultimate settlement. The Company recognizes interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions in the provision for income taxes on its condensed consolidated statements of income.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

The Company records its financial assets and liabilities at fair value in accordance with the framework for measuring fair value in generally accepted accounting principles. In accordance with ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, as amended by Accounting Standards Update 2011-04, the Company considers fair value as an exit price, representing the amount that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants under current market conditions. This framework establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value:

           
  Level I     Observable inputs that reflect unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities traded in active markets.  
  Level II     Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level I that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Interest rate hedges are valued at exit prices obtained from the counter-party.  
  Level III     Inputs that are generally unobservable. These inputs may be used with internally developed methodologies that result in management's best estimate.  

The amounts recorded for financial instruments in the Company's consolidated financial statements, which included cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate their fair values as of January 31, 2013 and July 31, 2012, due to the short-term nature of those instruments, and are classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy. Cash equivalents are classified within Level I of the fair value hierarchy because they are valued using quoted market prices. See Note 3. Long-Term Debt for fair value disclosures related to the Company's long-term debt.

Derivatives and Hedging

The Company has entered into two interest rate swaps to eliminate interest rate risk on the Company's variable rate Term Loan, and the swaps are designated as effective cash flow hedges under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging (see Note 4. Derivatives and Hedging). Each quarter, the Company measures hedge effectiveness using the "hypothetical derivative method" and records in earnings any hedge ineffectiveness with the effective portion of the hedges change in fair value recorded in other comprehensive income or loss.

Assets Held for Sale

The Company has removed certain assets from operations and offered them for sale. These assets, which include certain real estate, are reflected at their fair market value in the financial statements and are a Level II fair value measurement based on sales transactions of similar assets.

9


Segments and Other Geographic Reporting

The Company's North American region and its United Kingdom region are considered two separate operating segments, which have been aggregated into one reportable segment because they share similar economic characteristics. The Company's new operations in Brazil, Germany and U.A.E. are included within the U.K. operating segment as they are immaterial to the Company's consolidated results of operations and financial position.

NOTE 2 - Cash and Cash Equivalents

The Company considers all highly liquid investments purchased with original maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase to be cash equivalents. Cash and cash equivalents include cash held in checking and money market accounts. The Company periodically invests its excess cash in money market funds and U.S. Treasury Bills. The Company's cash and cash equivalents are placed with high credit quality financial institutions. The Company generally classifies its investment portfolio not otherwise qualifying as cash and cash equivalents as available-for-sale securities. Available-for-sale securities are reported at fair value, with unrealized gains and losses reported as a component of stockholders' equity and comprehensive income. Unrealized losses are charged against income when a decline in the fair market value of an individual security is determined to be other than temporary. Realized gains and losses on investments are included in interest income.

NOTE 3 - Long-Term Debt

On December 14, 2010, the Company entered into an Amended and Restated Credit Facility Agreement (Credit Facility), which supersedes the Company's previously disclosed credit agreement with Bank of America, N.A. (Bank of America). The Credit Facility is an unsecured credit agreement providing for (i) a $100.0 million revolving credit facility, including a $100.0 million alternative currency borrowing sublimit and a $50.0 million letter of credit sublimit (Revolving Credit) and (ii) a term loan facility of $400.0 million (Term Loan). On January 14, 2011, the full $400.0 million provided under the Term Loan was borrowed. On September, 29, 2011, the Company amended the credit agreement increasing the amount of the Term Loan facility from $400.0 million to $500.0 million. In March 2013, the Company amended the credit agreement to increase the net leverage ratio at which restrictive spending covenants are introduced from 1:1 to 1.5:1.

The Term Loan, which at January 31, 2013 had $406.3 million outstanding, amortizes $18.8 million each quarter beginning December 31, 2011 with all outstanding borrowings due on December 14, 2015. All amounts borrowed under the Term Loan may be prepaid without premium or penalty.

Amounts borrowed under the Credit Facility bear interest, subject to certain restrictions, at a fluctuating rate based on (i) the Eurocurrency Rate; (ii) the Federal Funds Rate; or (iii) the Prime Rate as described in the Credit Facility. The Company has entered into two interest rate swaps (see Note 4. Derivatives and Hedging) to exchange its variable interest rate payments commitment for fixed interest rate payments on the Term Loan balance, which at January 31, 2013, totaled $406.3 million. A default interest rate applies on all obligations during an event of default under the credit facility, at a rate per annum equal to 2.0% above the otherwise applicable interest rate. The Company's interest rate at January 31, 2013 is the 0.21% Eurocurrency Rate plus the 1.5% Applicable Rate. The Applicable Rate can fluctuate between 1.5% and 2.0% depending on the Company's consolidated net leverage ratio (as defined in the Credit Facility). The Credit Facility is guaranteed by the Company's material domestic subsidiaries. The carrying amount of the Credit Facility is comprised of borrowing under which interest accrues under a fluctuating interest rate structure. Accordingly, the carrying value approximates fair value at January 31, 2013 and is classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy.

Amounts borrowed under the Revolving Credit may be repaid and reborrowed until the maturity date, which is December 14, 2015. The Credit Facility requires the Company to pay a commitment fee on the unused portion of the Revolving Credit. The commitment fee ranges from 0.075% to 0.125% per annum depending on the Company's leverage ratio. The Company had no outstanding borrowings under the Revolving Credit at the end of the period.

The Credit Facility contains customary representations and warranties and may place certain business operating restrictions on the Company relating to, among other things, indebtedness, liens and other encumbrances, investments, mergers and acquisitions, asset sales, dividends and distributions and redemptions of capital stock. In addition, the Credit Facility provides for the following financial covenants: (i) earnings before income tax, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA); (ii) leverage ratio; (iii) interest coverage ratio; and (iv) limitations on capital expenditures. The Credit Facility contains events of default that include, among others, non-payment of principal, interest or fees, violation of covenants, inaccuracy of representations and warranties, cross-defaults to certain other indebtedness, bankruptcy and insolvency defaults, material judgments, invalidity of the loan documents and events constituting a change of control. The Company is in compliance with all covenants as of January 31, 2013.

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NOTE 4 - Derivatives and Hedging

The Company has entered into two interest rate swaps to exchange its variable interest rate payments commitment for fixed interest rate payments on the Term Loan balance which, at January 31, 2013 totaled $406.3 million. The first swap fixed the Company's interest rate at 85 basis points plus the one month LIBOR rate on the first $312.5 million of our term debt. The second swap fixed the Company's interest rate at 69 basis points plus the one month LIBOR rate on the next $93.8 million of our term debt.

The swaps are a designated effective cash flow hedge under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging, and are recorded in other liabilities at its fair value, which at January 31, 2013 is $3.6 million. Each quarter, the Company measures hedge effectiveness using the "hypothetical derivative method" and records in earnings any hedge ineffectiveness with the effective portion of the hedge's change in fair value recorded in other comprehensive income or loss.

The notional amount of the swap amortizes until all outstanding borrowings are due on the Term Loan on December 14, 2015 (see Note 3. Long-Term Debt). At January 31, 2013, the notional amount of the interest rate swaps was equal to the Term Loan balance, $406.3 million. The notional amount of the two derivative transactions amortizes $18.8 million per quarter through September 30, 2015 and $200.0 million on December 14, 2015.

The hedge provided by the swaps could prove to be ineffective for a number of reasons, including early retirement of the Term Loan, as allowed under the Credit Facility, or in the event the counterparty to the interest rate swaps is determined in the future to not be creditworthy. The Company has no plans for early retirement of the Term Loan.

The interest rate swaps are classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy as the derivatives are valued using observable inputs. The Company determines fair value of the derivative utilizing observable market data of swap rates and basis rates. These inputs are placed into a pricing model using a discounted cash flow methodology in order to calculate the mark-to-market value of the interest rate swap.

The fair value of the interest rate swaps, a Level II financial instrument, is (in thousands):

                       
  As of     Asset or (Liability)     Gain or (loss) in Comprehensive Income     Amount Reclassified into Earnings  
  January 31, 2013   $ (3,587 ) $ (2,290 ) $  
  July 31, 2012   $ (4,872 ) $ (3,110 ) $  

NOTE 5 - Goodwill and Intangible Assets

The following table sets forth amortizable intangible assets by major asset class as of the dates indicated (in thousands):

                       
        January 31, 2013           July 31, 2012  
  Amortized intangibles:                    
  Covenants not to compete   $ 11,447         $ 11,087  
  Supply contracts     32,252           26,041  
  Trade name     2,524           -  
  Licenses and databases     1,566           1,316  
  Software     271           -  
  Accumulated amortization     (33,135 )         (30,459 )
  Net intangibles   $ 14,925         $ 7,985  

Aggregate amortization expense on amortizable intangible assets was $1.1 million and $2.2 million for the three and six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

The change in the carrying amount of goodwill is as follows (in thousands):

           
  Balance as of July 31, 2012   $ 196,438  
  Goodwill recorded during the period     13,456  
  Effect of foreign currency exchange rates     294  
  Balance as of January 31, 2013   $ 210,188  

NOTE 6 - Net Income Per Share

The table below reconciles basic weighted shares outstanding to diluted weighted average shares outstanding (in thousands):

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              Three Months Ended January 31,           Six Months Ended January 31,        
              2013           2012           2013           2012        
  Basic weighted average shares outstanding           124,709           128,306           124,505           129,870        
  Effect of dilutive securities - stock options           4,811           3,284           4,492           2,826        
  Diluted weighted average shares outstanding           129,520           131,590           128,997           132,696        

There were no material adjustments to net income required in calculating diluted net income per share. Excluded from the dilutive earnings per share calculation were 247,500 and 2,310,000 stock options for the three months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, because their effect would have been anti-dilutive and excluded from the dilutive earnings per share calculation were 358,005 and 2,266,430 stock options for the six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, because their effect would have been anti-dilutive.

NOTE 7 - Stock-based Compensation

The Company recognizes compensation expense for stock option awards on a straight-line basis over the requisite service period of the award. The following is a summary of option activity for the Company's stock options for the six months ended January 31, 2013:

                                               
        Shares           Weighted-
average
Exercise Price
          Weighted-average
Remaining
Contractual Term
          Aggregate
Intrinsic Value
 
        (in 000s)                                   (in 000s)  
  Outstanding at July 31, 2012     16,179         $ 16.24                          
  Grants of options     271         $ 29.19                          
  Exercises     (1,338 )       $ 13.63                          
  Forfeitures or expirations     (33 )       $ 26.08                          
                                               
  Outstanding at January 31, 2013     15,079         $ 16.68           6.35         $ 289,944  
                                               
  Exercisable at January 31, 2013     10,419         $ 15.89           5.93         $ 208,545  

The aggregate intrinsic value is calculated as the difference between the exercise price of the underlying awards and the quoted price of our common stock for the 15,079,333 options that were in-the-money at January 31, 2013.

The table below sets forth the stock-based compensation recognized by the Company:

                                                                                   
              Three Months Ended January 31,           Six Months Ended January 31,        
              2013           2012           2013           2012        
  General and administrative         $ 4,245         $ 4,793         $ 8,815         $ 9,643        
  Yard operations           501           702           1,105           1,385        
            $ 4,746         $ 5,495         $ 9,920         $ 11,028        

NOTE 8 - Common Stock Repurchases

On September 22, 2011, the Company's board of directors approved a 40 million share increase in the Company's stock repurchase program, bringing the total current authorization to 98 million shares. The repurchases may be effected through solicited or unsolicited transactions in the open market or in privately negotiated transactions. No time limit has been placed on the duration of the stock repurchase program. Subject to applicable securities laws, such repurchases will be made at such times and in such amounts as the Company deems appropriate and may be discontinued at any time. The Company repurchased 500,000 shares of its common stock during the six months ended January 31, 2013, at a weighted average price of $27.77 per share totaling $13.9 million. The Company repurchased 6,080,708 shares of its common stock during the six months ended January 31, 2012 at a weighted average price of $22.18 per share totaling $134.9 million. The total number of shares repurchased under the program as of January 31, 2013 was 50,286,782 and 47,713,218 shares were available for repurchase under the program.

Additionally, on January 14, 2011, the Company completed a tender offer to purchase up to 21,052,630 shares of its common stock at a price of $19.00 per share. Directors and executive officers of the Company were expressly prohibited from participating in the tender offer by our board of directors under the Company's Securities Trading Policy. In connection with the tender offer, the Company accepted for purchase 24,344,176 shares of its common stock. The shares accepted for purchase are comprised of the 21,052,630 shares the Company offered to purchase and an additional 3,291,546 shares purchased pursuant to the Company's right to purchase additional shares up to 2% of its outstanding shares. The shares purchased as a result of the tender offer are not part of the Company's repurchase program. The purchase of the shares of common stock was funded

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by the proceeds relating to the issuance of long-term debt. The impact dilutive earnings per share of all repurchased shares on the weighted average number of common shares outstanding for the three months ended January 31, 2013 is less than $0.01.

In the first, second and third quarters of fiscal 2012 and the second quarter of fiscal 2013, certain executive officers exercised stock options through cashless exercises. A portion of the options exercised were net settled in satisfaction of the exercise price and federal and state minimum statutory tax withholding requirements. The Company remitted $2.6 million in fiscal year 2012 and $0.6 million in fiscal year 2013 to the proper taxing authorities in satisfaction of the employees' minimum statutory withholding requirements. The exercises are summarized in the following table:

                                                     
  Period           Options
Exercised
    Exercise
Price
    Shares Net
Settled for
Exercise
    Shares
Withheld
for Taxes(1)
    Net
Shares to
Employee
    Share
Price for
Withholding
    Tax
Withholding
(in 000's)
 
  FY 2012-Q1     40,000   $ 9.00     16,082     8,974     14,944   $ 22.39   $ 201  
  FY 2012-Q2     20,000   $ 9.00     7,506     4,584     7,910   $ 23.98   $ 110  
  FY 2012-Q3     322,520   $ 10.74     131,299     85,683     105,538   $ 26.38   $ 2,260  
  FY 2013-Q2     73,228   $ 8.89     18,127     17,461     37,640   $ 35.91   $ 627  

(1)Shares withheld for taxes are treated as a repurchase of shares for accounting purposes but do not count against the Company's stock repurchase program.

NOTE 9 - Income Taxes

The Company applies the provisions of the accounting standard for uncertain tax positions to its income taxes. For benefits to be realized, a tax position must be more likely than not to be sustained upon examination. The amount recognized is measured as the largest amount of benefit that is greater than 50 percent likely of being realized upon ultimate settlement.

As of January 31, 2013, the total gross unrecognized tax benefit was $24.4 million, including interest and penalty.

As of January 31, 2013, the gross amounts of the Company's liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits were classified as long-term income taxes payable, in the accompanying condensed consolidated balance sheet. Over the next twelve months, the Company's existing positions will continue to generate an increase in liabilities for unrecognized tax benefits, as well as a likely decrease in liabilities as a result of the lapse of the applicable statute of limitations and the conclusion of income tax audits. The expected decrease in liabilities relating to unrecognized tax benefits will have a positive effect on the Company's consolidated results of operations and financial position when realized. The Company recognized interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions in income tax expense. The amount of interest and penalties accrued for the six months ended January 31, 2013 was $1.1 million.

The Company files income tax returns in the U.S. federal jurisdiction, various states, Canada and the U.K. The Company is currently under audit by the state of New York for fiscal years 2008, 2009 and 2010. The Company is no longer subject to U.S. federal and state income tax examination for fiscal years prior to 2009, with the exception of New York. At this time, the Company does not believe that the outcome of any examination will have a material impact on the Company's consolidated results of operations and financial position.

The Company has not provided for U.S. federal income and foreign withholding taxes from undistributed earnings of its foreign operations, because the Company intends to reinvest such earnings indefinitely in the operations and potential acquisitions related to its foreign operations. Upon distribution of those earnings in the form of dividends or otherwise, the Company would be subject to U.S. income taxes (subject to an adjustment for foreign tax credits). It is not practical to determine the income tax liability that might be incurred if these earnings were to be distributed. If these earnings were distributed, foreign tax credits may become available under current law to reduce or eliminate the resultant U.S. income tax liability.

NOTE 10 - Recent Accounting Pronouncements

In July 2012, the FASB issued ASU 2012-02, Testing Indefinite-Lived Intangible Assets for Impairment, which amended the guidance in ASU 2011-08 to simplify the testing of indefinite-lived intangible assets other than goodwill for impairment. ASU 2012-02 is effective for annual and interim impairment tests performed for fiscal years beginning September 15, 2012 and earlier adoption is permitted. The Company's adoption of ASU 2012-02 did not have a material impact on the Company's condensed consolidated results of operations and financial position.

In February 2013, the FASB ASU 2013-02, "Reporting Amounts Reclassified Out of Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income," which amends ASC 220, "Comprehensive Income." The amended guidance requires entities to provide information about the amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income by component. Additionally, entities are required to present, either on the face of the financial statements or in the notes, significant amounts reclassified out of accumulated other comprehensive income by the respective line items of net income. The amended guidance does not change the current requirements for reporting net income or other comprehensive income. The amendments are effective prospectively for reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2012. The Company's adoption of ASU 2013-02 did not have a material impact on the Company's condensed consolidated results of operations and financial position.

13


NOTE 11 - Legal Proceedings

The Company is subject to threats of litigation and is involved in actual litigation and damage claims arising in the ordinary course of business, such as actions related to injuries, property damage, and handling or disposal of vehicles. The material pending legal proceedings to which the Company is a party to, or of which any of the Company's property is subject to, include the following matters:

On August 21, 2008, a former employee filed a Charge of Discrimination with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, or EEOC, claiming, in part, that he was denied employment based on his race and subjected to unlawful retaliation. The Company responded to the Charge of Discrimination explaining that it has a policy prohibiting the employment of individuals with certain criminal offenses and that the former employee was terminated after it was belatedly discovered that he had been convicted of a felony and other crimes prior to being hired by the Company. The Charge of Discrimination lay dormant at the EEOC for over two years. In January, 2011, however, the EEOC began actively investigating the allegations and challenging the Company's policy of conducting criminal background checks and denying employment based on certain criminal convictions. It was the EEOC's position that such a practice was unlawful because the policy allegedly had a disparate impact on minorities. It is the Company's position that its policy is required by one of its largest auto insurance company customers. Because the Company's customer is in the insurance and financial services industry, its operations are heavily regulated. The Federal Deposit Insurance Act (12 U.S.C. §1829) prohibits savings and loan holding companies, such as the Company's customer, from employing "any person who has been convicted of any criminal offense involving dishonesty or a breach of trust or money laundering, or has agreed to enter into a pretrial diversion or similar program in connection with a prosecution for such offense." In turn, it is the Company's understanding that its customer is obligated to make sure its vendors, such as the Company, comply with similar hiring restrictions. By letter dated March 16, 2012, the EEOC notified the Company that it had concluded its investigation and was closing its file on this matter. Moreover, the EEOC made a determination of no reasonable cause, meaning that the EEOC had no reasonable cause to believe that discrimination occurred based upon evidence obtained in the investigation, but that the charging party may exercise the right to bring private court action.

On April 23, 2010, Deborah Hill filed suit against the Company in the Twentieth Judicial Circuit of Collier County, Florida, alleging negligent destruction of evidence in connection with a stored vehicle that suffered damage due to a fire at its facility in Florida where the vehicle was being stored. Relief sought is for compensatory damages, costs and interest allowed by law. On January 30, 2013, the Court granted the Company's motion for summary judgment, finding that the Company did not owe any duty to Ms. Hill to preserve her car as evidence. The summary judgment resolves Ms. Hill's claim against the Company in its entirety in favor of the Company. On February 22, 2013, Ms Hill's attorneys filed an appeal of the summary judgment. The Company believes the claim is without merit and intends to vigorously defend the appeal.

On September 21, 2010, Robert Ortiz and Carlos Torres filed suit against the Company in Superior Court of San Bernardino County, San Bernardino District, which purported to be a class action on behalf of persons employed by the Company in the positions of facilities managers and assistant general managers in California at any time since the date four years prior to September 21, 2010. The complaint alleges failure to pay wages and overtime wages, failure to provide meal breaks and rest breaks, in violation of various California Labor and Business and Professional Code sections, due to alleged misclassification of facilities managers and assistant general managers as exempt employees. Relief sought includes class certification, injunctive relief, damages according to proof, restitution for unpaid wages, disgorgement of ill-gotten gains, civil penalties, attorney's fees and costs, interest, and punitive damages. A mediation of the matter occurred on February 12, 2013, and resulted in a settlement of the matter for an immaterial amount. The parties are in the process of getting the Court's approval of the settlement and administering the settlement funds.

In connection with its response to Hurricane Sandy, the Company entered into various short-term lease/license agreements with certain land owners in New York and New Jersey to marshal and store storm damaged vehicles until they are sold. In November and December 2012, various actions were commenced against the Company and land owners. In New York, actions were brought by the Town of Southampton, the County of Suffolk, the Town of Brookhaven and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, seeking declaratory and injunctive relief as well as civil penalties, in connection with alleged violations of local zoning, land use and environmental regulations. In New Jersey, actions were brought by the Townships of Hillsborough and Mansfield (in Burlington County) seeking to impose monetary damages in unspecified amounts, as well as injunctive relief. The Company is defending the claims and believes it has bona fide legal defenses. The claims by the various plaintiffs will be mitigated with the sale and removal of vehicles from the various short-term storage locations in New York and New Jersey. 

The Company provides for costs relating to these matters when a loss is probable and the amount can be reasonably estimated. The effect of the outcome of these matters on the Company's future consolidated results of operations and cash flows cannot be predicted because any such effect depends on future results of operations and the amount and timing of the resolution of such matters. The Company believes that any ultimate liability will not have a material effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows. However, the amount of the liabilities associated with these claims, if any, cannot be determined with certainty. The Company maintains insurance which may or may not provide coverage for claims made against the Company. There is no assurance that there will be insurance coverage available when and if needed. Additionally,

14


the insurance that the Company carries requires that the Company pay for costs and/or claims exposure up to the amount of the insurance deductibles negotiated when insurance is purchased.

Governmental Proceedings

The Georgia Department of Revenue, or DOR, conducted a sales and use tax audit of the Company's operations in Georgia for the period from January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2011. As a result of the audit, the DOR issued a notice of proposed assessment for uncollected sales taxes in which it asserted that the Company failed to remit sales taxes totaling $73.8 million, including penalties and interest. In issuing the notice of proposed assessment, the DOR stated its policy position that sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers are subject to Georgia sales and use tax.

The Company has engaged a Georgia law firm and outside tax advisors to review the conduct of its business operations in Georgia, the notice of assessment, and the DOR's policy position. In particular, the Company's outside legal counsel has provided the Company an opinion that its sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax. In rendering its opinion, the Company's counsel noted that non-U.S. registered resellers are unable to comply strictly with technical requirements for a Georgia certificate of exemption but concluded that its sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax notwithstanding this technical inability to comply.

Based on the opinion from the Company's outside law firm and advice from outside tax advisors, the Company has not provided for the payment of this assessment in its consolidated financial statements. The Company believes it has strong defenses to the DOR's notice of proposed assessment and intends to defend this matter. The Company has filed a request for protest or administrative appeal with the State of Georgia. There can be no assurance, however, that this matter will be resolved in the Company's favor or that the Company will not ultimately be required to make a substantial payment to the Georgia DOR. The Company understands that Georgia law and DOR regulations are ambiguous on many of the points at issue in the audit, and litigating and defending the matter in Georgia could be expensive and time-consuming and result in substantial management distraction. If the matter were to be resolved in a manner adverse to the Company, it could have a material adverse effect on the Company's consolidated results of operations, financial position and cash flows.

NOTE 12 - Restructuring

The Company relocated its corporate headquarters to Dallas, Texas in 2012. The Company recognized $1.0 million and $3.1 million for three months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, in general and administrative expense. Restructuring-related costs for the six months ended January 31, 2013 are $0.6 million for severance and $0.7 million for the costs of relocating employees to Texas. Restructuring-related costs for the six months ended January 31, 2012 are $1.1 million for severance and $2.0 million for the costs of relocating employees to Texas.

                             
       

Balance at
July 31, 2012
(in 000's)

   

Expense
(in 000's)

   

Payments
(in 000's)

   

Balance at
January 31, 2013
(in 000's)

 
  Severance   $  1,800   $  572   $  472   $  1,900  

The Company decided to transition to a third party managed data center during the three months ended October 31, 2012. The Company reviewed the useful life of certain assets related to its data centers and determined they should be revised from an average of 60 months to an average of 45 months to reflect the shorter useful lives of these assets. This change in estimate is accounted for on a prospective basis, resulting in increased depreciation expense over the revised useful lives. This change will result in $6.6 million and $2.7 million in accelerated depreciation expense to be recorded in fiscal 2013 and fiscal 2014, respectively, of which $2.7 million was recognized in the six months ended January 31, 2013.

NOTE 13 - Acquisitions

During the three months ended January 31, 2013, the Company acquired a salvage vehicle auction business in Brazil and an auction platform in Germany for total purchase price of $34.9 million.

These acquisitions were completed because of the strategic fit with the Company's business and have been accounted for using the purchase method in accordance with FASB ASC 805, which has resulted in the recognition of goodwill in the Company's consolidated financial statements. This goodwill arises because the purchase price reflects a number of factors including their future earnings and cash flow potential; the multiple to earnings, cash flow and other factors at which similar businesses have been purchased by other acquirers, the competitive nature of the process by which the Company acquired the businesses; and because of the complementary strategic fit and resulting synergies brought to existing operations. The goodwill arising from these acquisitions is within Level III of the fair value hierarchy as it is valued using unobservable inputs from third party valuation specialists. Goodwill is not amortized for financial reporting purposes, but is amortized for tax purposes. Intangible assets acquired included covenants not to compete, supply contracts, trade names, licenses and databases and software with useful life ranging from 5 to 8 years. The purchase price allocation for Germany is not final for intangible assets acquired due to final valuation by the Company's third party valuation specialists. The Company believes the potential changes to its preliminary purchase price allocation will not have a material impact on the Company's condensed consolidated financial position and results of operations.

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The following table summarizes the preliminary purchase price allocation based on the estimated fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed (in thousands) for these acquisitions:

                 
  Total cash paid, net of cash acquired   $ 31,243  
  Contingent consideration     3,690  
  Total acquisition price   $ 34,933  
  Allocation of the acquisition price:        
  Accounts receivable and prepaid expenses      848  
  Property and equipment      9,054  
  Property in escrow      6,371  
  Intangible assets     9,197  
  Goodwill recorded during the period     13,456  
  Liabilities assumed     (3,993 )
  Fair value of net assets and liabilities acquired   $ 34,933  

The acquisitions do not result in a significant change in the Company's consolidated results of operations individually nor in the aggregate; therefore pro forma financial information has not been presented. The operating results have been included in the Company's condensed consolidated financial position and results of operations since the acquisition dates. The acquisition-related expenses incurred during the six months ended January 31, 2013 were not significant and are included in general and administrative expenses in the Company's condensed consolidated financial position and results of operations.

ITEM 2. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

This Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, including the information incorporated by reference herein, contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the Securities Act), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, (the Exchange Act). All statements other than statements of historical facts are statements that could be deemed forward-looking statements. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terms such as "may," "will," "should," "expect," "plan," "intend," "forecast," "anticipate," "believe," "estimate," "predict," "potential," "continue" or the negative of these terms or other comparable terminology. The forward-looking statements contained in this Form 10-Q involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and situations that may cause our or our industry's actual results, level of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these statements. These forward-looking statements are made in reliance upon the safe harbor provision of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These factors include those listed in Part I, Item 1A.—"Risk Factors" of this Form 10-Q and those discussed elsewhere in this Form 10-Q. We encourage investors to review these factors carefully together with the other matters referred to herein, as well as in the other documents we file with the Securities and Exchange Commission, or SEC. We may from time to time make additional written and oral forward-looking statements, including statements contained in our filings with the SEC. We do not undertake to update any forward-looking statement that may be made from time to time by us or on our behalf.

Although we believe that, based on information currently available to us and our management, the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. In addition, historical information should not be considered an indicator of future performance.

Overview

We are a leading provider of online auctions and vehicle remarketing services in the United States (U.S.), Canada, the United Kingdom (U.K.), the United Arab Emirates (U.A.E.), Brazil and Germany.

We provide vehicle sellers with a full range of services to process and sell vehicles over the Internet through our Virtual Bidding Second Generation Internet auction-style sales technology, which we refer to as VB2. Vehicle sellers consist primarily of insurance companies, but also include banks and financial institutions, charities, car dealerships, fleet operators and vehicle rental companies. We then sell the vehicles principally to licensed vehicle dismantlers, rebuilders, repair licensees, used vehicle dealers and exporters and, at certain locations, to the general public. The majority of the vehicles sold on behalf of insurance companies are either damaged vehicles deemed a total loss or not economically repairable by the insurance companies or are recovered stolen vehicles for which an insurance settlement with the vehicle owner has already been made. We offer vehicle sellers a full range of services that expedite each stage of the vehicle sales process, minimize administrative and processing costs and maximize the ultimate sales price.

In the U.S. and Canada (North America), the U.A.E. and Brazil we sell vehicles primarily as an agent and derive revenue primarily from fees paid by vehicle sellers and vehicle buyers as well as related fees for services such as towing and storage.

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In the U.K., we operate both on a principal basis, purchasing the salvage vehicle outright from the insurance companies and reselling the vehicle for our own account, and as an agent. In Germany, we derive revenue from sales listing fees for listing vehicles on behalf of many German insurance companies.

Our revenues consist of sales transaction fees charged to vehicle sellers and vehicle buyers, transportation revenue, purchased vehicle revenues, and other remarketing services. Revenues from sellers are generally generated either on a fixed fee contract basis where we collect a fixed amount for selling each vehicle regardless of the selling price of the vehicle or, under our Percentage Incentive Program, or PIP, where our fees are generally based on a predetermined percentage of the vehicle sales price. Under the consignment, or fixed fee program, we generally charge an additional fee for title processing and special preparation. Although sometimes included in the consignment fee, we may also charge additional fees for the cost of transporting the vehicle to our facility, storage of the vehicle, and other incidental costs. Under the consignment programs, only the fees associated with vehicle processing are recorded in revenue, not the actual sales price (gross proceeds). Sales transaction fees also include fees charged to vehicle buyers for purchasing vehicles, storage, loading and annual registration. Transportation revenue includes charges to sellers for towing vehicles under certain contracts and towing charges assessed to buyers for delivering vehicles. Purchased vehicle revenue includes the gross sales price of the vehicle which we have purchased or are otherwise considered to own and is primarily generated in the U.K.

Operating costs consist primarily of operating personnel (which includes yard management, clerical and yard employees), rent, contract vehicle towing, insurance, fuel, equipment maintenance and repair, and costs of vehicles we sold under purchase contracts. Costs associated with general and administrative expenses consist primarily of executive management, accounting, data processing, sales personnel, human resources, professional fees, research and development and marketing expenses.

We converted all of our North American and U.K. sales to VB2 during fiscal 2004 and fiscal 2008, respectively. VB2 opens our sales process to registered buyers (whom we refer to as members) anywhere in the world who have Internet access. This technology and model employs a two-step bidding process. The first step is an open preliminary bidding feature that allows a member to enter bids either at a bidding station at the storage facility or over the Internet during the preview. To improve the effectiveness of bidding, the VB2 system lets members see the current high bids on the vehicles they want to purchase. The preliminary bidding step is an open bid format similar to eBay®. Members enter the maximum price they are willing to pay for a vehicle and VB2's BID4U feature will incrementally bid on the vehicle on their behalf during all phases of the auction. Preliminary bidding ends one hour prior to the start of a second bidding step, an Internet-only virtual auction. This second step allows bidders the opportunity to bid against each other and the high preliminary bidder. The bidders enter bids via the Internet in real time while BID4U submits bids for the high preliminary bidder, up to their maximum bid. When bidding stops, a countdown is initiated. If no bids are received during the countdown, the vehicle sells to the highest bidder.

We believe the implementation of VB2 has increased the pool of available buyers for each sale, which has resulted in added competition and an increase in the amount buyers are willing to pay for vehicles. We also believe that it has improved the efficiency of our operations by eliminating the expense and capital requirements associated with live auctions.

Acquisitions and New Operations

We have acquired eight facilities and established two new facilities since August 1, 2011 through January 31, 2013. All of these acquisitions have been accounted for using the purchase method of accounting.

As part of our overall expansion strategy of offering integrated services to vehicle sellers, we anticipate acquiring and developing facilities in new regions, as well as the regions currently served by our facilities. We believe that these acquisitions and openings strengthen our coverage as we have 162 facilities located in North America, the U.K., the U.A.E., and Brazil as of January 31, 2013 and are able to provide national coverage for our sellers.

The following table sets forth facilities that we have acquired or opened from August 1, 2011 through January 31, 2013:

                                         
  Locations           Acquisition
or Greenfield
          Date           Geographic Service Area  
  Atlanta, Georgia           Greenfield           August 2011           United States  
  Edmonton, Canada           Acquisition           May 2012           Canada  
  Calgary, Canada           Acquisition           May 2012           Canada  
  Dubai, U.A.E.           Acquisition           August 2012           United Arab Emirates  
  Webster, New Hampshire           Greenfield           September 2012           United States  
  Embu, Brazil           Acquisition           November 2012           Brazil  
  Pirapora, Brazil           Acquisition           November 2012           Brazil  
  Osasco, Brazil           Acquisition           November 2012           Brazil  
  Mapfre, Brazil           Acquisition           November 2012           Brazil  
  Porto Seguro, Brazil           Acquisition           November 2012           Brazil  

The period-to-period comparability of our consolidated operating results and financial position is affected by business acquisitions, new openings, weather and product introductions during such periods. In particular, we have certain contracts

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inherited through our U.K. acquisitions that require us to act as a principal, purchasing vehicles from the insurance companies and reselling them for our own account. It is our intention, where possible, to migrate these contracts to the agency model in future periods. Changes in the amount of revenue derived in a period from principal transactions relative to total revenue will impact revenue growth and margin percentages.

In addition to growth through business acquisitions, we seek to increase revenues and profitability by, among other things, (i) acquiring and developing additional vehicle storage facilities in key markets; (ii) pursuing national and regional vehicle seller agreements; (iii) expanding our service offerings to sellers and members; and (iv) expanding the application of VB2 into new markets. In addition, we implement our pricing structure and auction procedures and attempt to introduce cost efficiencies at each of our acquired facilities by implementing our operational procedures, integrating our management information systems and redeploying personnel, when necessary.

In November 2012, we acquired a salvage vehicle auction business in Brazil and an auction platform in Germany for total purchase price of $34.9 million.

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

The preparation of condensed consolidated financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, and the related disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to vehicle pooling costs, self-insured reserves, allowance for doubtful accounts, income taxes, revenue recognition, stock-based compensation, long-lived asset impairment calculations and contingencies. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe are reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying value of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

Management has discussed the selection of critical accounting policies and estimates with the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors and the Audit Committee has reviewed our disclosure relating to critical accounting policies and estimates in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. Our significant accounting policies are described in the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements - Note 1. Description of Business and Summary of Significant Accounting Policies. The following is a summary of the more significant judgments and estimates included in our critical accounting policies used in the preparation of our condensed consolidated financial statements. We discuss, where appropriate, sensitivity to change based on other outcomes reasonably likely to occur.

Revenue Recognition

We provide a portfolio of services to our sellers and buyers that facilitate the sale and delivery of a vehicle from seller to buyer. These services include the ability to use our Internet sales technology and vehicle delivery, loading, title processing, preparation and storage. We evaluate multiple-element arrangements relative to our member and seller agreements.

The services we provide to the seller of a vehicle involve disposing of a vehicle on the seller's behalf and, under most of our current North American contracts, collecting the proceeds from the member. Pre-sale services, including towing, title processing, preparation and storage, as well as sale fees and other enhancement service fees meet the criteria for separate units of accounting. The revenue associated with each service is recognized upon completion of the respective service, net of applicable rebates or allowances. For certain sellers who are charged a proportionate fee based on high bid of the vehicle, the revenue associated with the pre-sale services are recognized upon completion of the sale when the total arrangement is fixed and determinable. The selling price of each service is determined based on management's best estimate and allotted based on the relative selling price method.

Vehicle sales, where vehicles are purchased and remarketed on our own behalf, are recognized on the sale date, which is typically the point of high bid acceptance. Upon high bid acceptance, a legal binding contract is formed with the member, and we record the gross sales price as revenue.

We also provide a number of services to the buyer of the vehicle, charging a separate fee for each service. Each of these services has been assessed to determine whether we have met the requirements to separate them into units of accounting within a multiple-element arrangement. We have concluded that the sale and the post-sale services are separate units of accounting.

The fees for sale services are recognized upon completion of the sale, and the fees for the post-sale services are recognized upon successful completion of those services using the relative selling price method.

We also charge members an annual registration fee for the right to participate in our vehicle sales program, which is recognized ratably over the term of the arrangement, and relist and late-payment fees, which are recognized upon receipt of payment by the member. No provision for returns has been established, as all sales are final with no right of return, although we provide for bad debt expense in the case of non-performance by our members or sellers.

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We allocate arrangement consideration based on the relative estimated selling prices of the separate units of accounting containing multiple deliverables. Estimated selling prices are determined using management's best estimate. Significant inputs in our estimates of the selling price of separate units of accounting include market and pricing trends, pricing customization and practices, and profit objectives for the services.

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

We record our financial assets and liabilities at fair value in accordance with the framework for measuring fair value in generally accepted accounting principles. In accordance with ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures, as amended by Accounting Standards Update 2011-04, we consider fair value as an exit price, representing the amount that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants under current market conditions. This framework establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs used to measure fair value:

           
  Level I     Observable inputs that reflect unadjusted quoted prices for identical assets or liabilities traded in active markets.  
  Level II     Inputs other than quoted prices included within Level I that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly. Interest rate hedges are valued at exit prices obtained from the counter-party.  
  Level III     Inputs that are generally unobservable. These inputs may be used with internally developed methodologies that result in management's best estimate.  

The amounts recorded for financial instruments in our condensed consolidated financial statements, which included cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate their fair values as of January 31, 2013 and July 31, 2012, due to the short-term nature of those instruments, and are classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy. Cash equivalents are classified within Level I of the fair value hierarchy because they are valued using quoted market prices. See Note 3. Long-Term Debt for fair value disclosures related to our long-term debt.

Vehicle Pooling Costs

We defer in vehicle pooling costs certain yard operation expenses associated with vehicles consigned to and received by us, but not sold as of the balance sheet date. We quantify the deferred costs using a calculation that includes the number of vehicles at our facilities at the beginning and end of the period, the number of vehicles sold during the period and an allocation of certain yard operation expenses of the period. The primary expenses allocated and deferred are certain facility costs, labor, and vehicle processing. If our allocation factors change, then yard operation expenses could increase or decrease correspondingly in the future. These costs are expensed as vehicles are sold in subsequent periods on an average cost basis. Given the fixed cost nature of our business there is not a direct correlation in an increase in expenses or units processed on vehicle pooling costs.

We apply the provisions of accounting guidance for subsequent measurement of inventory to our vehicle pooling costs. The provision requires that items such as idle facility expense, excessive spoilage, double freight and re-handling costs be recognized as current period charges regardless of whether they meet the criteria of "so abnormal" as provided in the guidance. In addition, the guidance requires that the allocation of fixed production overhead to the costs of conversion be based on the normal capacity of production facilities.

In early November 2012, Hurricane Sandy hit the Northeastern coast of the United States. As a result of the extensive flooding that it caused, we expended additional costs for i) temporary storage facilities, ii) premiums for subhaulers as they were reassigned from other regions, iii) labor costs incurred for overtime, travel and lodging due to the reassignment of employees to the affected region, and iv) equipment costs as additional loaders were leased to handle the increased volume. These costs, which are characterized as "abnormal" under ASC 330, Inventory, were expensed as incurred and not included in inventory. These costs, net of the associated revenues, generated a loss of $11.9 million during the quarter and had a negative after tax impact on diluted earnings per share in the quarter of $0.06. At the end of the quarter, over half of the incremental salvage vehicles received as a result of Hurricane Sandy remained unsold and in inventory. The Company expects the majority of these vehicles to be sold in the next quarter.

Derivatives and Hedging

We have entered into two interest rate swaps to eliminate interest rate risk on our variable rate Term Loan, and the swaps are designated as effective cash flow hedges under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging, (see Note 4. Derivatives and Hedging). Each quarter, we measure hedge effectiveness using the "hypothetical derivative method" and record in earnings any hedge ineffectiveness with the effective portion of the hedges' change in fair value recorded in other comprehensive income or loss.

Capitalized Software Costs

We capitalize system development costs and website development costs related to our enterprise computing services during the application development stage. Costs related to preliminary project activities and post implementation activities are expensed as incurred. Internal-use software is amortized on a straight line basis over its estimated useful life, generally three years. Management evaluates the useful lives of these assets on an annual basis and tests for impairment whenever events or changes

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in circumstances occur that could impact the recoverability of these assets. Total capitalized software as of January 31, 2013 and July 31, 2012 was $61.3 million and $55.0 million, respectively. Accumulated amortization expense related to software for January 31, 2013 and July 31, 2012 totaled $23.7 million and $19.1 million, respectively.

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

We maintain an allowance for doubtful accounts in order to provide for estimated losses resulting from disputed amounts billed to sellers or members and the inability of our sellers or members to make required payments. If billing disputes exceed expectations and/or if the financial condition of our sellers or members were to deteriorate, additional allowances may be required. The allowance is calculated by taking both seller and buyer accounts receivables written off during the previous 12 month period as a percentage of the total accounts receivable balance, i.e. total write-offs/total accounts receivable (write-off percentage). We note that a one percentage point deviation in the write-off percentage would have resulted in an increase or decrease to the allowance for doubtful accounts balance of $1.8 million.

Valuation of Goodwill

We evaluate the impairment of goodwill of our North America and U.K. operating segments annually (or on an interim basis if certain indicators are present) by comparing the fair value of the operating segment to its carrying value. Future adverse changes in market conditions or poor operating results of the operating segments could result in an inability to recover the carrying value of the investment, thereby requiring impairment charges in the future.

Income Taxes and Deferred Tax Assets

We account for income tax exposures as required under ASC 740, Income Taxes. We are subject to income taxes in the U.S., Canada, the U.K., Brazil and Germany. In arriving at a provision of income taxes, we first calculate taxes payable in accordance with the prevailing tax laws in the jurisdictions in which we operate; we then analyze the timing differences between the financial reporting and tax basis of our assets and liabilities, such as various accruals, depreciation and amortization. The tax effects of the timing difference are presented as deferred tax assets and liabilities in the condensed consolidated balance sheet. We assess the probability that the deferred tax assets will be realized based on our ability to generate future taxable income. In the event that it is more likely than not the full benefit would not be realized from the deferred tax assets we carry on our condensed consolidated balance sheet, we record a valuation allowance to reduce the carrying value of the deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized. As of January 31, 2013, we had approximately $1.2 million of valuation allowance arising from the state operating losses where we had discontinued certain operations in prior years and from capital losses in the U.S. and the U.K. To the extent we establish a valuation allowance or change the amount of valuation allowance in a period, we reflect the change with a corresponding increase or decrease in our income tax provision in the condensed consolidated statements of income.

Historically, our income taxes have been sufficiently provided to cover our actual income tax liabilities among the jurisdictions in which we operate. Nonetheless, our future effective tax rate could still be adversely affected by several factors, including (i) the geographical allocation of our future earnings; (ii) the change in tax laws or our interpretation of tax laws; (iii) the changes in governing regulations and accounting principles; (iv) the changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities; and (v) the outcome of the income tax examinations. As a result, we routinely assess the possibilities of material changes resulting from the aforementioned factors to determine the adequacy of our income tax provision.

Based on our results for the six months ended January 31, 2013, a one percentage point change in our provision for income taxes as a percentage of income before taxes would have resulted in an increase or decrease in the provision of $1.3 million.

We apply the provision of ASC 740, which contains a two-step approach to recognizing and measuring uncertain tax positions. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of related appeals or litigation processes, if any. The second step is to measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely of being realized upon settlement.

Although we believe we have adequately reserved for our uncertain tax positions, no assurance can be given that the final tax outcome of these matters will not be different. We adjust these reserves in light of changing facts and circumstances, such as the closing of a tax audit or the refinement of an estimate. To the extent that the final tax outcome of these matters is different than the amounts recorded, such differences will impact the provision for income taxes in the period in which such determination is made. The provision for income taxes includes the impact of reserve provisions and changes to reserves that are considered appropriate, as well as the related net interest settlement of any particular position, could require the use of cash. In addition, we are subject to the continuous examination of our income tax returns by various taxing authorities, including the Internal Revenue Service and U.S. states. We regularly assess the likelihood of adverse outcomes resulting from these examinations to determine the adequacy of our provision for income taxes.

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Long-lived Asset Valuation, Including Intangible Assets

We evaluate long-lived assets, including property and equipment and certain identifiable intangibles for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets is measured by comparing the carrying amount of an asset to the estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to be generated by the use of the asset. If the estimated undiscounted cash flows change in the future, we may be required to reduce the carrying amount of an asset.

Stock-based Compensation

We account for our stock-based awards to employees and non-employees using the fair value method. Compensation cost related to stock-based payment transactions are recognized based on the fair value of the equity or liability instruments issued. Determining the fair value of options using the Black-Scholes Merton option pricing model, or other currently accepted option valuation models, requires highly subjective assumptions, including future stock price volatility and expected time until exercise, which greatly affect the calculated fair value on the measurement date. If actual results are not consistent with our assumptions and judgments used in estimating the key assumptions, we may be required to record additional compensation or income tax expense, which could have a material impact on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

Retained Insurance Liabilities

We are partially self-insured for certain losses related to medical, general liability, workers' compensation and auto liability. Our insurance policies are subject to a $250,000 deductible per claim, with the exception of our medical policy which is $225,000 per claim. In addition, each of our policies contains an aggregate stop loss which limits our ultimate exposure. Our liability represents an estimate of the ultimate cost of claims incurred as of the balance sheet date. The estimated liability is not discounted and is established based upon analysis of historical data and actuarial estimates. The primary estimates used in the actuarial analysis include total payroll and revenue. Our estimates have not materially fluctuated from actual results. While we believe these estimates are reasonable based on the information currently available, if actual trends, including the severity of claims and medical cost inflation, differ from our estimates, our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows could be impacted. The process of determining our insurance reserves requires estimates with various assumptions, each of which can positively or negatively impact those balances. The total amount reserved for all policies is $5.7 million as of January 31, 2013. If the total number of participants in the medical plan changed by 10% we estimate that our medical expense would change by $0.8 million and our medical accrual would change by $0.4 million. If our total payroll changed by 10% we estimate that our workers' compensation expense and our accrual for workers' compensation expenses would change by $0.1 million. A 10% change in revenue would change our insurance premium for the general liability and umbrella policy by less than $25,000.

Segment Reporting

Our North American and U.K. regions are considered two separate operating segments, which have been aggregated into one reportable segment because they share similar economic characteristics. Our new operations in Brazil, Germany and U.A.E. are included within the U.K. operating segment as they are immaterial to our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

Recently Issued Accounting Standards

For a description of the new accounting standards that affect us, refer to the Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements - Note 10. Recent Accounting Pronouncements.

Results of Operations

Three Months Ended January 31, 2013 Compared to Three Months Ended January 31, 2012

Revenues. The following sets forth revenue by class of revenue (in thousands, except percentages):

                                                     
              2013           Percentage of
Revenue
          2012           Percentage of
Revenue
 
  Service revenues         $ 216,920           81 %       $ 186,852           82 %
  Vehicle sales           49,265           19 %         41,052           18 %
            $ 266,185           100 %       $ 227,904           100 %

  

Service Revenues. Service revenues were $216.9 million during the three months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $186.9 million for the same period last year, an increase of $30.0 million, or 16.1%. Growth in unit volume generated $14.0 million in additional service revenue relative to last year and was driven primarily by incremental volumes received as a result of Hurricane Sandy as well as growth in the number of units sold on behalf of charities, franchise and independent car dealerships and from international acquisitions. Growth in the average revenue per car sold generated $15.6 million in additional revenue over last year. The higher revenue per car was driven primarily by the increase in the average selling price per vehicle in North

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America. In North America over 50% of our service revenue is tied in some manner to the ultimate selling price of the vehicle. We believe the increase in the average selling price was driven primarily by: (i) the year over year change in commodity pricing as we believe that commodity pricing, particularly the per ton price for crushed car bodies, has an impact on the ultimate selling price of vehicles sold for scrap and vehicles sold for dismantling and (ii) the general increase in used car pricing, which we believe has an impact on the average selling price of vehicles which are repaired and retailed or purchased by the end user. We cannot determine the impact of the movement of these influences as we cannot determine which vehicles are sold to the end user or for scrap, dismantling, retailing or export. Nor can we predict their future movement. Accordingly, we cannot quantify the specific impact that commodity pricing and used car pricing had on the selling price of vehicles and ultimately on service revenue. The average GBP to USD exchange rate was 1.60 and 1.56 dollars to the pound for the three months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, and led to an increase of $0.4 million.

Vehicle Sales. We have certain contracts, primarily in the U.K., that require us to act as a principal, purchasing vehicles from the insurance companies and reselling them for our own account. In North America, we purchase vehicles from individuals in open market transactions and resell them for our own account. Vehicle sales revenues were $49.3 million during the three months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $41.1 million for the same period last year, an increase of $8.2 million, or 20.0%. The increase was due primarily to growth in unit volume driven primarily by increased purchase car activity in the U.K. The beneficial impact on recorded vehicle sales revenue due to the change in the GBP to USD exchange rate was less than $0.8 million.

Yard Operation Expenses. Yard operation expenses, excluding depreciation and amortization, were $116.5 million during the three months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $86.4 million for the same period last year. Compared to the same period last year, yard operation expense grew by $30.1 million, or 34.8%, and included $20.1 million of abnormal costs for temporary storage facilities, premiums for subhaulers, labor costs incurred from overtime, travel and lodging, and equipment costs associated with Hurricane Sandy. These costs do not include normal expenses associated with the increased unit volume created by the hurricane, which are deferred until the sale of the units and are recognized as vehicle pooling costs on the balance sheet. The balance of the increase was due to normal cost associated with the increase in the units processed in the quarter. There was a detrimental impact of $0.3 million on yard operating expenses due to the change in the GBP to USD exchange rate. At the end of the quarter, over half of the incremental salvage vehicles received as a result of Hurricane Sandy remained unsold and in inventory. We expect the majority of these vehicles to be sold in the next quarter.

Yard operation depreciation and amortization expenses were $10.7 million and $8.2 million for the three months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. The increase in yard operation depreciation and amortization expense is due primarily to accelerated depreciation from the shorter useful lives of our data center assets.

Cost of Vehicle Sales. The cost of vehicle sales were $42.2 million during the three months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $33.6 million for the same period last year, an increase of $8.6 million, or 25.6%. The growth was due to an increase in the cost of units sold and an increase in the total units sold, which resulted in increases of $2.4 million and $5.6 million, respectively. The detrimental impact on the cost of sales due to the change in the GBP to USD exchange rate was $0.6 million.

General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses, excluding impairment, depreciation and amortization, were $30.1 million for the three months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $23.4 million for the same period last year, an increase of $6.7 million or 28.6%. The growth was due primarily to i) the administrative infrastructure required by international operations as we expanded into Brazil, Germany and the U.A.E.; ii) the increase in technology and development costs as we develop new products, like our new mobile app; and iii) the incremental costs associated with the rollout of our new ERP system, which will allow us to operate worldwide on a common platform and provide scalability and functionality we currently do not have. The detrimental impact on general and administrative expenses due to the change in the GBP to USD exchange rate was less than $0.1 million. General and administrative depreciation and amortization expenses were $4.0 million for the three months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Impairment. During the three months ended January 31, 2012, we recorded an impairment of $8.8 million associated with the write down to fair market value of certain assets, primarily real estate, computer hardware and its fleet of private aircraft which have been removed from operations and, if not disposed of, are reflected in assets held for sale on the balance sheet. 

Other Income (Expense). Interest expense decreased by $0.5 million reflecting the principal payments on the outstanding term loan. Other income primarily includes the income from the rent of certain real property, foreign exchange rate gains and losses and gains and losses from the disposal of assets, and will fluctuate based on the nature of those activities during the period. Other income was $0.7 million and $1.6 million during the three months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Income Taxes. Our effective income tax rates for the three months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012 were 35.1% and 34.7%, respectively. The change in tax rates was primarily driven by the geographical allocation of income and fluctuations in the U.S. state taxes.

Six Months Ended January 31, 2013 Compared to Six Months Ended January 31, 2012

Revenues. The following sets forth revenue by class of revenue (in thousands, except percentages):

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              2013           Percentage of
Revenue
          2012           Percentage of
Revenue
 
  Service revenues         $ 412,099           82 %       $ 369,668           82 %
  Vehicle sales           92,952           18 %         83,862           18 %
            $ 505,051           100 %       $ 453,530           100 %

 Service Revenues. Service revenues were $412.1 million during the six months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $369.7 million for the same period last year, an increase of $42.4 million, or 11.5%. Growth in unit volume generated $24.1 million in additional service revenue relative to last year and was driven primarily by incremental volumes received as a result of Hurricane Sandy as well as growth in the number of units sold on behalf of charities, franchise and independent car dealerships and from international acquisitions. Growth in the average revenue per car sold generated $17.9 million in additional revenue over last year. The higher revenue per car was driven primarily by the increase in the average selling price per vehicle in North America. In North America over 50% of our service revenue is tied in some manner to the ultimate selling price of the vehicle. We believe the increase in the average selling price was driven primarily by: (i) the year over year change in commodity pricing as we believe that commodity pricing, particularly the per ton price for crushed car bodies, has an impact on the ultimate selling price of vehicles sold for scrap and vehicles sold for dismantling and (ii) the general increase in used car pricing, which we believe has an impact on the average selling price of vehicles which are repaired and retailed or purchased by the end user. We cannot determine the impact of the movement of these influences as we cannot determine which vehicles are sold to the end user or for scrap, dismantling, retailing or export. Nor can we predict their future movement. Accordingly, we cannot quantify the specific impact that commodity pricing and used car pricing had on the selling price of vehicles and ultimately on service revenue. The average GBP to USD exchange rate was 1.60 and 1.58 dollars to the pound for the six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively, and led to an increase of $0.4 million.

Vehicle Sales. We have certain contracts, primarily in the U.K., that require us to act as a principal, purchasing vehicles from the insurance companies and reselling them for our own account. In North America we purchase vehicles from individuals in open market transactions and resell them for our own account. Vehicle sales revenues were $93.0 million during the six months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $83.9 million for the same period last year, an increase of $9.1 million, or 10.9%. The increase was due primarily to growth in unit volume driven primarily by increased purchase car activity in the U.K. The beneficial impact on recorded vehicle sales revenue due to the change in the GBP to USD exchange rate was $0.7 million.

Yard Operation Expenses. Yard operation expenses, excluding depreciation and amortization, were $204.5 million during the six months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $174.4 million for the same period last year. Compared to the same period last year, yard operation expense grew by $30.1 million, or 17.3%, and included $20.1 million of abnormal costs for temporary storage facilities, premiums for subhaulers, labor costs incurred from overtime, travel and lodging, and equipment costs associated with Hurricane Sandy. These costs do not include normal expenses associated with the increased unit volume created by the hurricane, which are deferred until the sale of the units and are recognized as vehicle pooling costs on the balance sheet. The balance of the increase was due to the normal cost associated with the increase in the units processed in the quarter. There was a detrimental impact on yard operating expenses due to the change in the GBP to USD exchange rate of $0.3 million. At the end of the quarter, over half of the incremental salvage vehicles received as a result of Hurricane Sandy remained unsold and in inventory. We expect the majority of these vehicles to be sold in the next quarter.

Included in yard operation costs were depreciation and amortization expenses which were $19.8 million and $16.4 million for the six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively. The increase in yard operation depreciation and amortization expense is due primarily to accelerated depreciation from the shorter useful lives of our data center assets.

Cost of Vehicle Sales. The cost of vehicles sales were $78.5 million during the six months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $67.8 million for the same period last year, an increase of $10.7 million, or 15.8%. The growth was due to an increase in the total units sold and an increase in the cost of units sold, which resulted in increases of $9.5 million and $0.6 million, respectively. The detrimental impact on the cost of sales due to the change in the GBP to USD exchange rate was $0.6 million.

General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses, excluding impairment, depreciation and amortization, were $57.4 million for the six months ended January 31, 2013 compared to $49.4 million for the same period last year, an increase of $8.0 million, or 16.2%. The growth was due primarily to i) the administrative infrastructure required by international operations as we expanded into Brazil, Germany and the U.A.E.; ii) the increase in technology and development costs as we develop new products, like our new mobile app; and iii) the incremental costs associated with the rollout of our new ERP system, which will allow us to operate worldwide on a common platform and provide scalability and functionality we currently do not have. The detrimental impact on general and administrative expenses due to the change in the GBP to USD exchange rate was less than $0.1 million. General and administrative depreciation and amortization expenses were $7.7 million and $7.9 million for the six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Impairment. During the six months ended January 31, 2012, we recorded an impairment of $8.8 million associated with the write down to fair market value of certain assets, primarily real estate, computer hardware and its fleet of private aircraft which have been removed from operations and, if not disposed of, are reflected in assets held for sale on the balance sheet. 

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Other (Expense) Income. Other (expense) income primarily includes the income from the rent of certain real property, foreign exchange rate gains and losses and gains and losses from the disposal of assets, and will fluctuate based on the nature of those activities during the period. Other income was $0.5 million and $2.2 million during the six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012, respectively.

Income Taxes. Our effective income tax rates for the six months ended January 31, 2013 and 2012 were 35.6% and 35.1%, respectively. The change in the overall tax rate was driven by fluctuations in the U.S. state taxes and the geographical allocation of our taxable income.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Our primary source of working capital is net income. Accordingly, factors affecting net income are the principal factors affecting the generation of working capital. Those primary factors: (i) seasonality; (ii) market wins and losses; (iii) supplier mix; (iv) accident frequency; (v) salvage frequency; (vi) change in market share of our existing suppliers; (vii) commodity pricing; (viii) used car pricing; (ix) foreign currency exchange rates; (x) product mix; and (xi) contract mix to the extent appropriate, are discussed in the Results of Operations and Risk Factors sections of this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q.

Potential internal sources of additional working capital are the sale of assets or the issuance of equity through option exercises and shares issued under our Employee Stock Purchase Plan. A potential external source of additional working capital is the issuance of debt and equity. However, with respect to the issuance of equity or debt, we cannot predict if these sources will be available in the future and, if available, if they can be issued under terms commercially acceptable to us.

Historically, we have financed our growth through cash generated from operations, public offerings of common stock, the equity issued in conjunction with certain acquisitions and debt financing. Our primary source of cash generated by operations is from the collection of sellers' fees, members' fees and reimbursable advances from the proceeds of vehicle sales. Our business is seasonal as inclement weather during the winter months increases the frequency of accidents and, consequently, the number of cars deemed as totaled by the insurance companies. During the winter months, most of our facilities process 10% to 30% more vehicles than at other times of the year. This increased volume requires the increased use of our cash to pay out advances and handling costs of the additional business.

As of January 31, 2013, we had working capital of $99.1 million, including cash and cash equivalents of $49.5 million. Cash equivalents consisted of bank deposits and funds invested in money market accounts, which bear interest at a variable rate. Cash and cash equivalents decreased by $90.6 million from July 31, 2012 to January 31, 2013 due primarily to cash used for acquisitions and a $59.8 million increase in accounts receivable related primarily to Hurricane Sandy.

We believe that our currently available cash and cash equivalents and cash generated from operations will be sufficient to satisfy our operating and working capital requirements for at least the next 12 months. However, if we experience significant growth in the future, we may be required to raise additional cash through the issuance of new debt or additional equity.

As of January 31, 2013, $21.7 million of the $49.5 million of cash and cash equivalents was held by our foreign subsidiaries. If these funds are needed for our operations in the U.S., we would be required to accrue and pay U.S. taxes to repatriate these funds. However, our intent is to permanently reinvest these funds outside of the U.S. and our current plans do not demonstrate a need to repatriate them to fund our U.S. operations.

Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities decreased by $37.3 million to $53.1 million during the six months ended January 31, 2013, when compared to the six months ended January 31, 2012, due to changes in operating assets and liabilities and a $3.7 million increase in net income. In particular, we experienced significant increases in its accounts receivables, vehicle pooling costs and inventories as a result of Hurricane Sandy related transactions and volumes.

Investing Activities

Net cash used in investing activities increased by $100.8 million to $115.1 million during the six months ended January 31, 2013, when compared to the six months ended January 31, 2012. The $70.8 million increase in capital expenditures was due primarily to land acquisitions during the quarter. The $31.1 million increase in purchase of assets and liabilities in connection with acquisitions relates primarily to our acquisitions in Brazil and Germany.

Financing Activities

Net cash used in financing activities increased by $8.4 million to $29.4 million during the six months ended January 31, 2013, when compared to the same period in the prior year principally due to higher debt principle repayments totaling $18.8 million (See Note 3. Long-Term Debt). In 2012, we received $125.0 million of cash from long-term debt during the six months ended January 31, 2012, which was used to repurchase $135.4 million of outstanding common stock which did not recur in the current period (See Note 8. Common Stock Repurchases).

Credit Facility

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On December 14, 2010, we entered into an Amended and Restated Credit Facility Agreement (Credit Facility), which supersedes our previously disclosed credit agreement with Bank of America, N.A. (Bank of America). The Credit Facility is an unsecured credit agreement providing for (i) a $100.0 million revolving credit facility, including a $100.0 million alternative currency borrowing sublimit and a $50.0 million letter of credit sublimit (Revolving Credit) and (ii) a term loan facility of $400.0 million (Term Loan). On January 14, 2011, the full $400.0 million provided under the Term Loan was borrowed. On September 29, 2011, we amended the credit agreement increasing the amount of the Term Loan facility from $400.0 million to $500.0 million. In March 2013, we amended the credit agreement to increase the net leverage ratio at which restrictive spending covenants are introduced from 1:1 to 1.5:1.

The Term Loan, which at January 31, 2013 had $406.3 million outstanding, amortizes $18.8 million each quarter beginning December 31, 2011, with all outstanding borrowings due on December 14, 2015. All amounts borrowed under the Term Loan may be prepaid without premium or penalty.

Amounts borrowed under the Credit Facility bear interest, subject to certain restrictions, at a fluctuating rate based on (i) the Eurocurrency Rate; (ii) the Federal Funds Rate; or (iii) the Prime Rate as described in the Credit Facility. We have entered into two interest rate swaps (see Note 4. Derivatives and Hedging) to exchange our variable interest rate payments commitment for fixed interest rate payments on the Term Loan balance, which at January 31, 2013 totaled $406.3 million. A default interest rate applies on all obligations during an event of default under the credit facility, at a rate per annum equal to 2.0% above the otherwise applicable interest rate. Our interest rate at January 31, 2013 is the 0.21% Eurocurrency Rate plus the 1.5% Applicable Rate. The Applicable Rate can fluctuate between 1.5% and 2.0% depending on our consolidated net leverage ratio (as defined in the Credit Facility). The Credit Facility is guaranteed by our material domestic subsidiaries. The carrying amount of the Credit Facility is comprised of borrowing under which interest accrues under a fluctuating interest rate structure. Accordingly, the carrying value approximates fair value at January 31, 2013 and is classified within Level II of the fair value hierarchy.

Amounts borrowed under the Revolving Credit may be repaid and reborrowed until the maturity date, which is December 14, 2015. The Credit Facility requires us to pay a commitment fee on the unused portion of the Revolving Credit. The commitment fee ranges from 0.075% to 0.125% per annum depending on our leverage ratio. We had no outstanding borrowings under the Revolving Credit at the end of the period.

The Credit Facility contains customary representations and warranties and may place certain business operating restrictions on us relating to, among other things, indebtedness, liens and other encumbrances, investments, mergers and acquisitions, asset sales, dividends and distributions and redemptions of capital stock. In addition, the Credit Facility provides for the following financial covenants: (i) earnings before income tax, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA); (ii) leverage ratio; (iii) interest coverage ratio; and (iv) limitations on capital expenditures. The Credit Facility contains events of default that include, among others, non-payment of principal, interest or fees, violation of covenants, inaccuracy of representations and warranties, cross-defaults to certain other indebtedness, bankruptcy and insolvency defaults, material judgments, invalidity of the loan documents and events constituting a change of control. We are in compliance with all covenants as of January 31, 2013.

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

As of January 31, 2013, we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as defined in Item 303(a)(4) of Regulation S-K promulgated under the Exchange Act.

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ITEM 3. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

Our principal exposures to financial market risk are interest rate risk, foreign currency risk and translation risk.

Interest Income Risk

The primary objective of our investment activities is to preserve principal while secondarily maximizing yields without significantly increasing risk. To achieve this objective in the current uncertain global financial markets, as of January 31, 2013, all of our total cash and cash equivalents were held in bank deposits and money market funds. As the interest rates on a material portion of our cash and cash equivalents are variable, a change in interest rates earned on our investment portfolio would impact interest income along with cash flows, but would not materially impact the fair market value of the related underlying instruments. As of January 31, 2013, we held no direct investments in auction rate securities, collateralized debt obligations, structured investment vehicles or mortgaged-backed securities. Based on the average cash balance held during the six months ended January 31, 2013, a 10% change in our interest yield would not materially affect our operating results.

Interest Expense Risk

Our total borrowings under the Credit Facility were $406.3 million as of January 31, 2013. Amounts borrowed under the Credit Facility bear interest, subject to certain restrictions, at a fluctuating rate based on (i) the Eurocurrency Rate, (ii) the Federal Funds Rate or (iii) the Prime Rate as described in the Credit Facility. A default interest rate applies on all obligations during an event of default under the Credit Facility, at a rate per annum equal to 2.0% above the otherwise applicable interest rate.

We have entered into two interest rate swaps to exchange our variable interest rate payments commitment for fixed interest rate payments on the Term Loan balance.

Foreign Currency and Translation Exposure

Fluctuations in the foreign currencies create volatility in our reported results of operations because we are required to consolidate the results of operations of our foreign currency denominated subsidiaries. International net revenues result from transactions by our Canadian, U.K., U.A.E., Brazilian and German operations and are typically denominated in the local currency of each country. These operations also incur a majority of their expenses in the local currency, the Canadian dollar, the British pound, the U.A.E. dirham, the Brazilian real and Euro. Our international operations are subject to risks associated with foreign exchange rate volatility. Accordingly, our future results could be materially adversely impacted by changes in these or other factors. A hypothetical uniform 10% strengthening or weakening in the value of the U.S. dollar relative to the Canadian dollar, British pound, U.A.E. dirham, Brazilian real or Euro in which our revenues and profits are denominated would result in a decrease/increase to revenue of $11.1 million for the six months ended January 31, 2013.

Fluctuations in the foreign currencies create volatility in our reported consolidated financial position because we are required to remeasure substantially all assets and liabilities held by our foreign subsidiaries at the current exchange rate at the close of the accounting period. At January 31, 2013, the cumulative effect of foreign exchange rate fluctuations on our consolidated financial position was a net translation loss of $30.0 million. This loss is recognized as an adjustment to stockholders' equity through accumulated other comprehensive income. A 10% strengthening or weakening in the value of the U.S. dollar relative to the Canadian dollar, British pound, U.A.E. dirham, Brazilian real or Euro will not have a material effect on our consolidated financial position.

We do not hedge our exposure to translation risks arising from fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.

ITEM 4. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

(a) Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

We conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Exchange Act), or Disclosure Controls, as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q. This evaluation, or Controls Evaluation, was performed under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our Chief Executive Officer (our CEO) and our Chief Financial Officer (our CFO). Disclosure Controls are controls and procedures designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act, such as this Quarterly Report, is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC's rules and forms. Disclosure Controls include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our CEO and CFO, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure. Our Disclosure Controls include some, but not all, components of our internal control over financial reporting.

Based upon the Controls Evaluation, our CEO and CFO have concluded that, as of the end of the period covered by this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q, our Disclosure Controls were effective to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is accumulated and communicated to management, including the CEO

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and CFO, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure, and that such information is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 (b) Changes in Internal Controls

There have not been any changes in our internal control over financial reporting during the most recent fiscal quarter that have materially affected or are reasonably likely to materially affect our internal control over financial reporting.

PART II - OTHER INFORMATION

ITEM 1. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

The information set forth above under Note 11. — Legal Proceedings contained in the "Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements" is incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

Set forth below and elsewhere in this Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q and in other documents we file with the SEC are descriptions of the risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from the results contemplated by the forward-looking statements contained in this report. The descriptions below include any material changes to and supersede the description of the risk factors affecting our business previously disclosed in "Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors" of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2012.

We depend on a limited number of major vehicle sellers for a substantial portion of our revenues. The loss of one or more of these major sellers could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position, and an inability to increase our sources of vehicle supply could adversely affect our growth rates.

No single customer accounted for more than 10% of our revenue during the six months ended January 31, 2013. Historically, a limited number of vehicle sellers have collectively accounted for a substantial portion of our revenues. Seller arrangements are either written or oral agreements typically subject to cancellation by either party upon 30 to 90 days notice. Vehicle sellers have terminated agreements with us in the past in particular markets, which has affected the pricing for sales services in those markets. There can be no assurance that our existing agreements will not be cancelled. Furthermore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to enter into future agreements with vehicle sellers or that we will be able to retain our existing supply of salvage vehicles. A reduction in vehicles from a significant vehicle seller or any material changes in the terms of an arrangement with a significant vehicle seller could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position. In addition, a failure to increase our sources of vehicle supply could adversely affect our earnings and revenue growth rates.

Our expansion into markets outside North America, including recent expansions in Europe, Brazil and the Middle East, expose us to risks arising from operating in international markets. Any failure to successfully integrate businesses acquired outside of North America into our operations could have an adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

We first expanded our operations outside North America in 2007 with a significant acquisition in the United Kingdom (the U.K.), and we continue to evaluate acquisitions and other opportunities outside North America. In August 2012, we announced our acquisition of a company in the United Arab Emirates (the U.A.E.), and in November 2012, we announced our acquisitions of companies in Brazil and Germany. Acquisitions or other strategies to expand our operations outside North America pose substantial risks and uncertainties that could have an adverse effect on our future operating results. In particular, we may not be successful in realizing anticipated synergies from these acquisitions, or we may experience unanticipated costs or expenses integrating the acquired operations into our existing business. We have and may continue to incur substantial expenses establishing new yards or operations in international markets. Among other things, we will ultimately deploy our proprietary auction technologies at all of our foreign operations and we cannot predict whether this deployment will be successful or will result in increases in the revenues or operating efficiencies of any acquired companies relative to their historic operating performance. Integration of our respective operations, including information technology integration and integration of financial and administrative functions, may not proceed as we anticipate and could result in unanticipated costs or expenses (including unanticipated capital expenditures) that could have an adverse effect on our future operating results. We cannot provide any assurances that we will achieve our business and financial objectives in connection with these acquisitions or our strategic decision to expand our operations internationally.

As we continue to expand our business internationally, we will need to develop policies and procedures to manage our business on a global scale. Operationally, acquired businesses typically depend on key seller relationships, and our failure to maintain those relationships would have an adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and could have an adverse effect on our future operating results.

In addition, we anticipate our international operations will subject us to a variety of risks associated with operating on an international basis, including:

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• the difficulty of managing and staffing foreign offices and the increased travel, infrastructure and legal compliance costs associated with multiple international locations;

• the need to localize our product offerings, particularly the need to implement our online auction platform in foreign countries;

• tariffs and trade barriers and other regulatory or contractual limitations on our ability to operate in certain foreign markets;

• exposure to foreign currency exchange rate risk, which may have an adverse impact on our revenues and revenue growth rates;

• adapting to different business cultures and market structures, particularly where we seek to implement our auction model in markets where insurers have historically not played a substantial role in the disposition of salvage vehicles;

• ensuring compliance with applicable legislation and regulations that affect our international operations, including applicable anticorruption legislation in the United States and the U.K. and export control and sanctions laws; and

• repatriation of funds currently held in foreign jurisdictions to the U.S. may result in higher effective tax rates.

As we continue to expand our business globally, our success will depend, in large part, on our ability to anticipate and effectively manage these and other risks associated with our international operations. Our failure to manage any of these risks successfully could harm our international operations and have an adverse effect on our operating results.

In addition, certain acquisitions in the U.K. may be reviewed by the Office of Fair Trade (OFT) and/or Competition Commission (U.K. Regulators). If an inquiry is made by U.K. Regulators, we may be required to demonstrate that our acquisitions will not result, or be expected to result, in a substantial lessening of competition in a U.K. market. Although we believe that there will not be a substantial lessening of competition in a U.K. market, based on our analysis of the relevant U.K. markets, there can be no assurance that the U.K. Regulators will agree with us if they decide to make an inquiry. If the U.K. Regulators determine that by our acquisitions of certain assets, there is or likely will be a substantial lessening of competition in a U.K. market, we could be required to divest some portion of our U.K. assets. In the event of a divestiture order by the U.K. Regulators, the assets disposed may be sold for substantially less than their carrying value. Accordingly, any divestiture could have a material adverse effect on our operating results in the period of the divestiture.

We face risks associated with the implementation of our salvage auction model in markets that may not operate on the same terms as the North American market. For example, the U.K. market operates on a principal rather than agent basis, which has tended to have an adverse impact on our gross margin percentages and has exposed us to inventory risks that we do not experience in North America.

Some of our target markets outside North America operate in a manner substantially different than our historic market in North America. For example, the U.K. market operates primarily on the principal model, in which we take title to vehicles, rather than the agency model employed in North America, in which we act as a sales agent for the legal owner of vehicles. As a result, our operations in the U.K. have had and will continue to have an adverse impact on our consolidated gross margin percentages. Operating on a principal basis exposes us to inventory risks, including losses from theft, damage, and obsolescence. In addition, our business in North America and the U.K. has been established and grown based largely on our ability to build relationships with insurance carriers. In other markets, insurers have traditionally been less involved in the disposition of salvage vehicles. As we expand into markets outside North America and the U.K., we cannot predict whether markets will readily adapt to our strategy of online auctions of automobiles sourced principally through vehicle insurers.

If the implementation of our new Enterprise Resource Planning ("ERP") system is not executed efficiently and effectively, our business, financial position, and our consolidated operating results could be adversely affected.

We are in the process of converting our primary management information system to a new standard ERP system, which will occur in phases through 2013 and 2014. In the event this conversion of our primary management information system is not executed efficiently and effectively, the conversion may cause interruptions in our primary management information systems, which may make our website and services unavailable. This type of interruption could prevent us from processing vehicles for our sellers and may prevent us from selling vehicles through our Internet bidding platform, VB2, which would adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

In addition, our information and technology systems are vulnerable to damage or interruption from computer viruses, network failures, computer and telecommunications failures, infiltration by unauthorized persons and security breaches, usage errors by our employees, power outages and catastrophic events such as fires, tornadoes, floods, hurricanes and earthquakes. Although we have not been the victim of cyber attacks or other cyber incidents that have had a material impact on our consolidated operating results or financial position, we have from time to time experienced cyber security breaches such as computer viruses and similar information technology violations in the ordinary course of business. We have implemented various measures to manage our risks related to system and network disruptions. If these systems are compromised, become inoperable for extended periods of time or cease to function properly, we may have to make a significant investment to fix or replace them and our ability to provide many of our electronic and online solutions to our customers may be impaired. If that were to occur, it could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated operating results and financial position.

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Implementation of our online auction model in new markets may not result in the same synergies and benefits that we achieved when we implemented the model in North America and the U.K.

We believe that the implementation of our proprietary auction technologies across our operations over the last decade had a favorable impact on our results of operations by increasing the size and geographic scope of our buyer base, increasing the average selling price for vehicles sold through our sales, and lowering expenses associated with vehicle sales. We implemented our online system across all of our North American and U.K. salvage yards beginning in fiscal 2004 and fiscal 2008, respectively, and experienced increases in revenues and average selling prices as well as improved operating efficiencies in both markets. In considering new markets, we consider the potential synergies from the implementation of our model based in large part on our experience in North America and the U.K. We cannot predict whether these synergies will also be realized in new markets.

Failure to have sufficient capacity to accept additional cars at one or more of our storage facilities could adversely affect our relationships with insurance companies or other sellers of vehicles.

Capacity at our storage facilities varies from period to period and from region to region. For example, following adverse weather conditions in a particular area, our yards in that area may fill and limit our ability to accept additional salvage vehicles while we process existing inventories. For example, Hurricanes Katrina, Rita and Sandy had, in certain quarters, an adverse effect on our operating results, in part because of yard capacity constraints in the Gulf Coast area and in the Northeastern cost of the United States, respectively. We regularly evaluate our capacity in all our markets and, where appropriate, seek to increase capacity through the acquisition of additional land and yards. We may not be able to reach agreements to purchase independent storage facilities in markets where we have limited excess capacity, and zoning restrictions or difficulties obtaining use permits may limit our ability to expand our capacity through acquisitions of new land. Failure to have sufficient capacity at one or more of our yards could adversely affect our relationships with insurance companies or other sellers of vehicles, which could have an adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

Because the growth of our business has been due in large part to acquisitions and development of new facilities, the rate of growth of our business and revenues may decline if we are not able to successfully complete acquisitions and develop new facilities.

We seek to increase our sales and profitability through the acquisition of additional facilities and the development of new facilities. There can be no assurance that we will be able to:

• continue to acquire additional facilities on favorable terms;

• expand existing facilities in no-growth regulatory environments;

• increase revenues and profitability at acquired and new facilities;

• maintain the historical revenue and earnings growth rates we have been able to obtain through facility openings and strategic acquisitions; or

• create new vehicle storage facilities that meet our current revenue and profitability requirements.

As we continue to expand our operations, our failure to manage growth could harm our business and adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

Our ability to manage growth depends not only on our ability to successfully integrate new facilities, but also on our ability to:

• hire, train and manage additional qualified personnel;

• establish new relationships or expand existing relationships with vehicle sellers;

• identify and acquire or lease suitable premises on competitive terms;

• secure adequate capital; and

• maintain the supply of vehicles from vehicle sellers.

Our inability to control or manage these growth factors effectively could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

Our annual and quarterly performance may fluctuate, causing the price of our stock to decline.

Our revenues and operating results have fluctuated in the past and can be expected to continue to fluctuate in the future on a quarterly and annual basis as a result of a number of factors, many of which are beyond our control. Factors that may affect our operating results include, but are not limited to, the following:

• fluctuations in the market value of salvage and used vehicles;

• the impact of foreign exchange gain and loss as a result of international operations;

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• our ability to successfully integrate our newly acquired operations in international markets and any additional markets we may enter;

• the availability of salvage vehicles;

• variations in vehicle accident rates;

• member participation in the Internet bidding process;

• delays or changes in state title processing;

• changes in international, state or federal laws or regulations affecting salvage vehicles;

• changes in local laws affecting who may purchase salvage vehicles;

• our ability to integrate and manage our acquisitions successfully;

• the timing and size of our new facility openings;

• the announcement of new vehicle supply agreements by us or our competitors;

• the severity of weather and seasonality of weather patterns;

• the amount and timing of operating costs and capital expenditures relating to the maintenance and expansion of our business, operations and infrastructure;

• the availability and cost of general business insurance;

• labor costs and collective bargaining;

• changes in the current levels of out of state and foreign demand for salvage vehicles;

• the introduction of a similar Internet product by a competitor;

• the ability to obtain necessary permits to operate; and

• the impact of our conversion to a new ERP system, if the conversion is not executed efficiently and effectively.

Due to the foregoing factors, our operating results in one or more future periods can be expected to fluctuate. As a result, we believe that period-to-period comparisons of our results of operations are not necessarily meaningful and should not be relied upon as any indication of future performance. In the event such fluctuations result in our financial performance being below the expectations of public market analysts and investors, the price of our common stock could decline substantially.

Our Internet-based sales model has increased the relative importance of intellectual property assets to our business, and any inability to protect those rights could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial position, or results of operations.

Our intellectual property rights include patents relating to our auction technologies as well as trademarks, trade secrets, copyrights and other intellectual property rights. In addition, we may enter into agreements with third parties regarding the license or other use of our intellectual property in foreign jurisdictions. Effective intellectual property protection may not be available in every country in which our products and services are distributed, deployed, or made available. We seek to maintain certain intellectual property rights as trade secrets. The secrecy could be compromised by third parties, or intentionally or accidentally by our employees, which would cause us to lose the competitive advantage resulting from those trade secrets. Any significant impairment of our intellectual property rights, or any inability to protect our intellectual property rights, could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial position or cash flows.

We have in the past been and may in the future be subject to intellectual property rights claims, which are costly to defend, could require us to pay damages, and could limit our ability to use certain technologies in the future.

Litigation based on allegations of infringement or other violations of intellectual property rights are common among companies who rely heavily on intellectual property rights. Our reliance on intellectual property rights has increased significantly in recent years as we have implemented our auction-style sales technologies across our business and ceased conducting live auctions. As we face increasing competition, the possibility of intellectual property rights claims against us grows. Litigation and any other intellectual property claims, whether with or without merit, can be time-consuming, expensive to litigate and settle, and can divert management resources and attention from our core business. An adverse determination in current or future litigation could prevent us from offering our products and services in the manner currently conducted. We may also have to pay damages or seek a license for the technology, which may not be available on reasonable terms and which may significantly increase our operating expenses, if it is available for us to license at all. We could also be required to develop alternative non-infringing technology, which could require significant effort and expense.

If we experience problems with our trucking fleet operations, our business could be harmed.

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We rely solely upon independent subhaulers to pick up and deliver vehicles to and from our North American storage facilities. We also utilize, to a lesser extent, independent subhaulers in the U.K. Our failure to pick up and deliver vehicles in a timely and accurate manner could harm our reputation and brand, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. Further, an increase in fuel cost may lead to increased prices charged by our independent subhaulers, which may significantly increase our cost. We may not be able to pass these costs on to our sellers or buyers.

In addition to using independent subhaulers, in the U.K. we utilize a fleet of company trucks to pick up and deliver vehicles from our U.K. storage facilities. In connection therewith, we are subject to the risks associated with providing trucking services, including inclement weather, disruptions in transportation infrastructure, availability and price of fuel, any of which could result in an increase in our operating expenses and reduction in our net income.

We are partially self-insured for certain losses and if our estimates of the cost of future claims differ from actual trends, our results of our operations could be harmed.

We are partially self-insured for certain losses related to medical insurance, general liability, workers' compensation and auto liability. Our liability represents an estimate of the ultimate cost of claims incurred as of the balance sheet date. The estimated liability is not discounted and is established based upon analysis of historical data and actuarial estimates. While we believe these estimates are reasonable based on the information currently available, if actual trends, including the severity of claims and medical cost inflation, differ from our estimates, our results of operations could be impacted. Further, we rely on independent actuaries to assist us in establishing the proper amount of reserves for anticipated payouts associated with these self-insured exposures.

Our executive officers, directors and their affiliates hold a large percentage of our stock and their interests may differ from other stockholders.

Our executive officers, directors and their affiliates beneficially own, in the aggregate, 11% of our common stock as of January 31, 2013. If they were to act together, these stockholders would have significant influence over most matters requiring approval by stockholders, including the election of directors, any amendments to our articles of incorporation and certain significant corporate transactions, including potential merger or acquisition transactions. In addition, without the consent of these stockholders, we could be delayed or prevented from entering into transactions that could be beneficial to us or our other investors. These stockholders may take these actions even if they are opposed by our other investors.

We have certain provisions in our certificate of incorporation and bylaws, which may have an anti-takeover effect or that may delay, defer or prevent acquisition bids for us that a stockholder might consider favorable and limit attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management.

Our board of directors is authorized to create and issue from time to time, without stockholder approval, up to an aggregate of 5,000,000 shares of undesignated preferred stock, the terms of which may be established and shares of which may be issued without stockholder approval, and which may include rights superior to the rights of the holders of common stock. In addition, our bylaws establish advance notice requirements for nominations for elections to our board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon by stockholders at stockholder meetings. These anti-takeover provisions and other provisions under Delaware law could discourage, delay or prevent a transaction involving a change in control of our company, even if doing so would benefit our stockholders. These provisions could also discourage proxy contests and make it more difficult for you and other stockholders to elect directors of your choosing and cause us to take other corporate actions you desire.

If we lose key management or are unable to attract and retain the talent required for our business, we may not be able to successfully manage our business or achieve our objectives.

Our future success depends in large part upon the leadership and performance of our executive management team, all of whom are employed on an at-will basis and none of whom are subject to any agreements not to compete. If we lose the service of one or more of our executive officers or key employees, in particular Willis J. Johnson, our Chairman; A. Jayson Adair, our Chief Executive Officer; and Vincent W. Mitz, our President, or if one or more of them decides to join a competitor or otherwise compete directly or indirectly with us, we may not be able to successfully manage our business or achieve our business objectives.

Our cash investments are subject to numerous risks.

We may invest our excess cash in securities or money market funds backed by securities, which may include U.S. treasuries, other federal, state and municipal debt, bonds, preferred stock, commercial paper, insurance contracts and other securities both privately and publicly traded. All securities are subject to risk, including fluctuations in interest rates, credit risk, market risk and systemic economic risk. Changes or movements in any of these risk factors may result in a loss or impairment to our invested cash and may have a material effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

The impairment of capitalized development costs could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.

We capitalize certain costs associated with the development of new software products, new software for internal use and major software enhancements to existing software. These costs are amortized over the estimated useful life of the software

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beginning with its introduction or roll out. If, at any time, it is determined that capitalized software provides a reduced economic benefit, the unamortized portion of the capitalized development costs will be expensed, in part or in full, as an impairment, which may have a material impact on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

New member programs could impact our operating results.

We have or will initiate programs to open our auctions to the general public. These programs include the Registered Broker program through which the public can purchase vehicles through a registered member and the Market Maker program through which registered members can open Copart storefronts with Internet kiosks enabling the general public to search our inventory and purchase vehicles. Initiating programs that allow access to our online auctions to the general public may involve material expenditures and we cannot predict what future benefit, if any, will be derived.

Factors such as mild weather conditions can have an adverse effect on our revenues and operating results as well as our revenue and earnings growth rates by reducing the available supply of salvage vehicles. Conversely, extreme weather conditions can result in an oversupply of salvage vehicles that requires us to incur abnormal expenses to respond to market demands.

Mild weather conditions tend to result in a decrease in the available supply of salvage vehicles because traffic accidents decrease and fewer automobiles are damaged. Accordingly, mild weather can have an adverse effect on our salvage vehicle inventories, which would be expected to have an adverse effect on our revenue and operating results and related growth rates. Conversely, our inventories will tend to increase in poor weather such as a harsh winter or as a result of adverse weather-related conditions such as flooding. During periods of mild weather conditions, our ability to increase our revenues and improve our operating results and related growth will be increasingly dependent on our ability to obtain additional vehicle sellers and to compete more effectively in the market, each of which is subject to the other risks and uncertainties described in these sections. In addition, extreme weather conditions, although they increase the available supply of salvage cars, can have an adverse effect on our operating results. For example, during the fiscal year ended July 31, 2006 and during the fiscal year 2013, we recognized substantial additional costs associated with the impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in Gulf Coast states and Hurricane Sandy in the Northeastern coast of the United States, respectively. These additional costs, characterized as "abnormal" under ASC 330, Inventory, included the additional subhauling, payroll, equipment and facilities expenses directly related to the operating conditions created by the hurricanes. In the event that we were to again experience extremely adverse weather or other anomalous conditions that result in an abnormally high number of salvage vehicles in one or more of our markets, those conditions could have an adverse effect on our future operating results.

Macroeconomic factors such as high fuel prices, declines in commodity prices, and declines in used car prices may have an adverse effect on our revenues and operating results as well as our earnings growth rates.

Macroeconomic factors that affect oil prices and the automobile and commodity markets can have adverse effects on our revenues, revenue growth rates (if any), and operating results. Significant increases in the cost of fuel could lead to a reduction in miles driven per car and a reduction in accident rates. A material reduction in accident rates could have a material impact on revenue growth. In addition, under our percentage incentive program contracts, or PIP, the cost of towing the vehicle to one of our facilities is included in the PIP fee. We may incur increased fees, which we may not be able to pass on to our vehicle sellers. A material increase in tow rates could have a material impact on our operating results. Volatility in fuel, commodity, and used car prices could have a material adverse effect on our revenues and revenue growth rates in future periods.

The salvage vehicle sales industry is highly competitive and we may not be able to compete successfully.

We face significant competition for the supply of salvage vehicles and for the buyers of those vehicles. We believe our principal competitors include other auction and vehicle remarketing service companies with whom we compete directly in obtaining vehicles from insurance companies and other sellers, and large vehicle dismantlers, who may buy salvage vehicles directly from insurance companies, bypassing the salvage sales process. Many of the insurance companies have established relationships with competitive remarketing companies and large dismantlers. Certain of our competitors may have greater financial resources than us. Due to the limited number of vehicle sellers, particularly in the U.K., the absence of long-term contractual commitments between us and our sellers and the increasingly competitive market environment, there can be no assurance that our competitors will not gain market share at our expense.

We may also encounter significant competition for local, regional and national supply agreements with vehicle sellers. There can be no assurance that the existence of other local, regional or national contracts entered into by our competitors will not have a material adverse effect on our business or our expansion plans. Furthermore, we are likely to face competition from major competitors in the acquisition of vehicle storage facilities, which could significantly increase the cost of such acquisitions and thereby materially impede our expansion objectives or have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations. These potential new competitors may include consolidators of automobile dismantling businesses, organized salvage vehicle buying groups, automobile manufacturers, automobile auctioneers and software companies. While most vehicle sellers have abandoned or reduced efforts to sell salvage vehicles directly without the use of service providers such as us, there can be no assurance that this trend will continue, which could adversely affect our market share, consolidated results of operations and financial condition. Additionally, existing or new competitors may be significantly larger and have greater financial and marketing resources than us; therefore, there can be no assurance that we will be able to compete successfully in the future.

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Government regulation of the salvage vehicle sales industry may impair our operations, increase our costs of doing business and create potential liability.

Participants in the salvage vehicle sales industry are subject to, and may be required to expend funds to ensure compliance with a variety of governmental, regulatory and administrative rules, regulations, land use ordinances, licensure requirements and procedures, including those governing vehicle registration, the environment, zoning and land use. Failure to comply with present or future regulations or changes in interpretations of existing regulations may result in impairment of our operations and the imposition of penalties and other liabilities. At various times, we may be involved in disputes with local governmental officials regarding the development and/or operation of our business facilities. We believe that we are in compliance in all material respects with applicable regulatory requirements. We may be subject to similar types of regulations by federal, national, international, provincial, state, and local governmental agencies in new markets. In addition, new regulatory requirements or changes in existing requirements may delay or increase the cost of opening new facilities, may limit our base of salvage vehicle buyers and may decrease demand for our vehicles.

Changes in laws affecting the importation of salvage vehicles may have an adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

Our Internet-based auction-style model has allowed us to offer our products and services to international markets and has increased our international buyer base. As a result, foreign importers of salvage vehicles now represent a significant part of our total buyer base. Changes in laws and regulations that restrict the importation of salvage vehicles into foreign countries may reduce the demand for salvage vehicles and impact our ability to maintain or increase our international buyer base. For example, in March 2008, a decree issued by the president of Mexico became effective that placed restrictions on the types of vehicles that can be imported into Mexico from the United States. The adoption of similar laws or regulations in other jurisdictions that have the effect of reducing or curtailing our activities abroad could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position by reducing the demand for our products and services.

The operation of our storage facilities poses certain environmental risks, which could adversely affect our consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

Our operations are subject to federal, state, national, provincial and local laws and regulations regarding the protection of the environment in the countries which we have storage facilities. In the salvage vehicle remarketing industry, large numbers of wrecked vehicles are stored at storage facilities and, during that time, spills of fuel, motor oil and other fluids may occur, resulting in soil, surface water or groundwater contamination. In addition, certain of our facilities generate and/or store petroleum products and other hazardous materials, including waste solvents and used oil. In the U.K., we provide vehicle de-pollution and crushing services for End-of-Life program vehicles. We could incur substantial expenditures for preventative, investigative or remedial action and could be exposed to liability arising from our operations, contamination by previous users of certain of our acquired facilities, or the disposal of our waste at off-site locations. Environmental laws and regulations could become more stringent over time and there can be no assurance that we or our operations will not be subject to significant costs in the future. Although we have obtained indemnification for pre-existing environmental liabilities from many of the persons and entities from whom we have acquired facilities, there can be no assurance that such indemnifications will be adequate. Any such expenditures or liabilities could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

Volatility in the capital and credit markets may negatively affect our business, operating results, or financial condition.

The capital and credit markets have experienced extreme volatility and disruption, which has led to an economic downturn in the U.S. and abroad. As a result of the economic downturn, the number of miles driven may decrease, which may lead to fewer accident claims, a reduction of vehicle repairs, and fewer salvage vehicles. Adverse credit conditions may also affect the ability of members to secure financing to purchase salvaged vehicles which may adversely affect demand. In addition, if the banking system or the financial markets deteriorate or remain volatile our credit facility may be affected.

If we determine that our goodwill has become impaired, we could incur significant charges that would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations.

Goodwill represents the excess of cost over the fair market value of assets acquired in business combinations. In recent periods, the amount of goodwill on our consolidated balance sheet has increased substantially, principally as a result of a series of acquisitions we have made in Brazil and Germany in fiscal 2013. As of January 31, 2013, the amount of goodwill on our consolidated balance sheet subject to future impairment testing was $210.2 million.

Pursuant to ASC 350, Intangibles—Goodwill and Other, we are required to annually test goodwill and intangible assets with indefinite lives to determine if impairment has occurred. Additionally, interim reviews must be performed whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that impairment may have occurred. If the testing performed indicates that impairment has occurred, we are required to record a non-cash impairment charge for the difference between the carrying value of the goodwill or other intangible assets and the implied fair value of the goodwill or other intangible assets in the period the determination is made. The testing of goodwill and other intangible assets for impairment requires us to make significant estimates about our future performance and cash flows, as well as other assumptions. These estimates can be affected by numerous factors, including changes in the definition of a business segment in which we operate; changes in economic, industry

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or market conditions; changes in business operations; changes in competition; or potential changes in the share price of our common stock and market capitalization. Changes in these factors, or changes in actual performance compared with estimates of our future performance, could affect the fair value of goodwill or other intangible assets, which may result in an impairment charge. For example, continued deterioration in worldwide economic conditions could affect these assumptions and lead us to determine that goodwill impairment is required with respect to our acquisitions in the U.K., Brazil or Germany. We cannot accurately predict the amount or timing of any impairment of assets. Should the value of our goodwill or other intangible assets become impaired, it could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and could result in our incurring net losses in future periods.

An adverse outcome of a pending Georgia sales tax audit could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.

The Georgia Department of Revenue, or DOR, conducted a sales and use tax audit of our operations in Georgia for the period from January 1, 2007 through June 30, 2011. As a result of the audit, the DOR issued a notice of proposed assessment for uncollected sales taxes in which it asserted that we failed to remit sales taxes totaling $73.8 million, including penalties and interest. In issuing the notice of proposed assessment, the DOR stated its policy position that sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers are subject to Georgia sales and use tax.

We have engaged a Georgia law firm and outside tax advisors to review the conduct of our business operations in Georgia, the notice of assessment, and the DOR's policy position. In particular, our outside legal counsel has provided us with an opinion that our sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax. In rendering its opinion, our counsel noted that non-U.S. registered resellers are unable to comply strictly with technical requirements for a Georgia certificate of exemption but concluded that our sales for resale to non-U.S. registered resellers should not be subject to Georgia sales and use tax notwithstanding this technical inability to comply.

Based on the opinion from our outside law firm and advice from outside tax advisors, we have not provided for the payment of this assessment in our consolidated financial statements. We believe we have strong defenses to the DOR's notice of proposed assessment and intend to defend this matter. We have filed a request for protest or administrative appeal with the State of Georgia. There can be no assurance, however, that this matter will be resolved in our favor or that we will not ultimately be required to make a substantial payment to the Georgia DOR. We understand that Georgia law and DOR regulations are ambiguous on many of the points at issue in the audit, and litigating and defending the matter in Georgia could be expensive and time-consuming and result in substantial management distraction. If the matter were to be resolved in a manner adverse to us, it could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

New accounting pronouncements or new interpretations of existing standards could require us to make adjustments to accounting policies that could adversely affect the consolidated financial statements.

The Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, and the SEC, from time to time issue new pronouncements or new interpretations of existing accounting standards that require changes to our accounting policies and procedures. To date, we do not believe any new pronouncements or interpretations have had a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial position, but future pronouncements or interpretations could require a change or changes in our policies or procedures.

Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could result in declines in our reported revenues and earnings.

Our reported revenues and earnings are subject to fluctuations in currency exchange rates. We do not engage in foreign currency hedging arrangements and, consequently, foreign currency fluctuations may adversely affect our revenues and earnings. Should we choose to engage in hedging activities in the future we cannot be assured our hedges will be effective or that the costs of the hedges will exceed their benefits. Fluctuations in the rate of exchange between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies, primarily the British pound, Canadian dollar, U.A.E. dirham, Brazilian real and Euro could adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position.

Fluctuations in the U.S. unemployment rates could result in declines in revenue from processing insurance vehicles.

Increases in unemployment may lead to an increase in the number of uninsured motorists. Uninsured motorists are responsible for disposition of their vehicle if involved in an accident. Disposition generally is either the repair or disposal of the vehicle. In the situation where the owner of the wrecked vehicle, and not an insurance company, is responsible for its disposition, we believe it is more likely that vehicle will be repaired or, if disposed, disposed through channels other than us.

If the interest rate swaps entered into in connection with our credit facility prove ineffective, it could result in volatility in our operating results, including potential losses, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows.

We entered into two interest rate swaps to exchange our variable interest rate payment commitments for fixed interest rate payments on the Term Loan. The notional amount of the two derivative transactions amortizes $18.8 million per quarter until September 30, 2015 and $200 million on December 14, 2015. The first swap agreement fixed our interest rate with respect to a notional amount of $312.5 million of our Term Loan, at 85 basis points plus the Applicable Rate as outlined in our Credit

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Facility Agreement. The second swap agreement fixed our interest rate with respect to a notional amount of $93.8 million of our Term Loan, at 69 basis points plus the Applicable Rate as outlined in our Credit Facility Agreement. The Applicable Rate can fluctuate between 1.5% and 2.0% depending on our consolidated net leverage ratio (as defined in the Credit Facility) and, at January 31, 2013 was 1.5%.

We recorded the swaps at fair value, and are currently designated as an effective cash flow hedge under ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging. Each quarter, we measure hedge effectiveness using the "hypothetical derivative method" and record in earnings any gains or losses resulting from hedge ineffectiveness. The hedge provided by our swaps could prove to be ineffective for a number of reasons, including early retirement the Term Loan, as is allowed under the Credit Facility, or in the event the counterparty to the interest rate swaps are determined in the future to not be creditworthy. Any determination that the hedge created by the swaps is ineffective could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and cash flows and result in volatility in our operating results. In addition, any changes in relevant accounting standards relating to the swaps, especially ASC 815, Derivatives and Hedging, could materially increase earnings volatility.

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  ITEM 2.     UNREGISTERED SALES OF EQUITY SECURITIES AND USE OF PROCEEDS  

The following table sets forth information concerning the number of shares of our common stock purchased by us during the six months ended January 31, 2013.

                             
  Period     Total
Number
Of Shares
Purchased
    Average
Price Paid
Per Share
    Total Number of
Shares Purchased
as Part of Publicly
Announced Program
    Maximum Number
of Shares That May Yet Be Purchased
Under the Program
 
  Balance at July 31, 2012     --     --     --     48,213,218  
  August 1, 2012, through August 31, 2012     500,000   $ 27.77     500,000     47,713,218  
  September 1 2012, through September 30, 2012     --     --     --     47,713,218  
  October 1, 2012, through October 31, 2013     --     --     --     47,713,218  
  November 1, 2012 through November 30, 2012     --     --     --     47,713,218  
  December 1, 2012 through December 31, 2012     --     --     --     47,713,218  
  January 1, 2013 through January 31, 2013     --     --     --     47,713,218  
  Total     500,000   $ 27.77     500,000     47,713,218  

  

           
  ITEM 6.     EXHIBITS  

                             
     
  (a)     Exhibits        
                 
        31.1           Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002  
                       
        31.2           Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002  
                       
        32.1(1 )         Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002  
                       
        32.2(1 )         Certification of Chief Financial Officer, pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002  
                       
        101.INS(2 )         XBRL Instance Document