10-K 1 ddr-10k_20151231.htm 10-K ddr-10k_20151231.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

R

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2015

OR

£

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from                to               

Commission file number 1-11690

 

DDR Corp.  

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

Ohio

 

34-1723097

(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

3300 Enterprise Parkway, Beachwood, Ohio 44122

(Address of Principal Executive Offices — Zip Code)

(216) 755-5500

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Common Shares, Par Value $0.10 Per Share

 

New York Stock Exchange

 

 

 

Depositary Shares, each representing 1/20 of a share of 6.5% Class J Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Shares without Par Value

 

New York Stock Exchange

 

 

 

Depositary Shares, each representing 1/20 of a share of 6.25% Class K Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Shares without Par Value

 

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

None

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.  Yes R     No £

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.  Yes £     No R

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes R     No £

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).  Yes R     No £

 


 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  £

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer R

 

Accelerated filer £

Non-accelerated filer £

Smaller reporting company £

 

 

 

 

 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes £     No R

The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant at June 30, 2015, was $4.7 billion.  

(APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE REGISTRANTS)

Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the registrant’s classes of common stock, as of the latest practicable date.  

365,311,573 common shares outstanding as of February 12, 2016

 

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

The registrant incorporates by reference in Part III hereof portions of its definitive Proxy Statement for its 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders.  

 

 

 

 

 


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Item No.

 

 

 

Report Page

 

 

PART I

1.

 

Business

 

4

1A.

 

Risk Factors

 

6

1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 

15

2.

 

Properties

 

15

3.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

36

4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 

36

 

 

PART II

5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 

37

6.

 

Selected Financial Data

 

39

7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

41

7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

69

8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

70

9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

70

9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 

70

9B.

 

Other Information

 

71

 

 

PART III

10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

71

11.

 

Executive Compensation

 

72

12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

72

13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

72

14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

72

 

 

PART IV

15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

73

 

 

 

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PART I

 

Item 1.

BUSINESS

General Development of Business

DDR Corp., an Ohio corporation (the “Company” or “DDR”), a self-administered and self-managed real estate investment trust (“REIT”), is in the business of acquiring, owning, developing, redeveloping, expanding, leasing and managing shopping centers.  In addition, the Company engages in the origination and acquisition of loans and debt securities, which are generally collateralized directly or indirectly by shopping centers.  Unless otherwise provided, references herein to the Company or DDR include DDR Corp., its wholly-owned and majority-owned subsidiaries and its consolidated and unconsolidated joint ventures.  

The Company is self-administered and self-managed and, therefore, has not engaged, nor does it expect to retain, any REIT advisor.  The Company manages substantially all of the Portfolio Properties as defined herein.  At December 31, 2015, the Company owned and managed more than 115 million total square feet of gross leasable area (“GLA”).  

Financial Information About Industry Segments

See the Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for certain information regarding the Company’s reportable segments, which is incorporated herein by reference to such information.  

Narrative Description of Business

The Company’s portfolio as of February 12, 2016, consisted of 352 shopping centers (including 158 centers owned through joint ventures) and more than 1,000 acres of undeveloped land (of which approximately 100 acres are owned through unconsolidated joint ventures).  The shopping centers are located in 37 states as well as Puerto Rico (14 assets).  The shopping centers and land are collectively referred to as the “Portfolio Properties.”  From January 1, 2013, to February 12, 2016, the Company acquired 133 shopping centers (including 76 that were acquired by two unconsolidated joint ventures and 44 that were acquired from unconsolidated joint ventures) aggregating 27.4 million square feet of Company-owned GLA for an aggregate purchase price of $5.2 billion.  From January 1, 2013, to February 12, 2016, the Company sold 199 shopping centers (including 91 properties owned through unconsolidated joint ventures) aggregating 24.4 million square feet of Company-owned GLA for an aggregate sales price of $2.6 billion.  In 2014, the Company sold its entire investment in 10 assets in Brazil for an aggregate sales price of $343.6 million.  

The following tables present the operating statistics affecting base and percentage rental revenues summarized by the following portfolios: combined shopping center portfolio, wholly-owned shopping center portfolio and joint venture shopping center portfolio.  

 

 

Combined Shopping

Center Portfolio

December 31,

 

 

Wholly-Owned

Shopping Centers

December 31,

 

 

Joint Venture

Shopping Centers

December 31,

 

 

2015

 

 

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

 

 

 

2014

 

 

2015

 

 

 

 

2014

 

Centers owned

 

367

 

 

 

 

 

415

 

 

 

198

 

 

 

 

 

226

 

 

 

169

 

 

 

 

 

189

 

Aggregate occupancy rate

 

93.3

%

 

 

 

 

93.5

%

 

 

93.3

%

 

 

 

 

93.9

%

 

 

93.1

%

 

 

 

 

92.8

%

Average annualized base rent per occupied

   square foot(A)

$

14.48

 

 

 

 

$

13.91

 

 

$

14.80

 

 

 

 

$

14.22

 

 

$

13.95

 

 

 

 

$

13.38

 

 

 

(A)

Increase primarily was due to the impact of the Company’s strategic portfolio realignment achieved through the recycling of capital from asset sales into the acquisition of high-quality power centers, as well as continued leasing of the existing portfolio at positive rental spreads.  

Strategy and Philosophy

The Company’s mission is to create shareholder value by inspiring an extraordinary team to thoughtfully allocate time and capital to the highest quality portfolio of power centers.  The Company strives to own premier locations for our retail partners to win market share and provide value and convenience for their customers.  The organization is focused on optimizing portfolio performance within a constantly evolving retail landscape.  

The strategy, philosophy, investment and financing policies of the Company, and its policies with respect to certain other activities including its growth, debt capitalization, dividends, status as a REIT and operating policies, are determined by management and the Board of Directors.  Although the Board of Directors has no present intention to amend or revise its policies, the Board of Directors may do so from time to time without a vote of the Company’s shareholders.  

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The Company’s key strategies are summarized as follows:

 

·

Focus on long-term net asset value creation within the portfolio through strategic leasing, re-tenanting and redevelopment of the Company’s portfolio to be the preeminent landlord to the retailers that are winning market share and that are most successfully adapting in an omni-channel retailing environment;

 

·

Invest in assets that are expected to appreciate over the long term and where retailers will desire to locate for the best marketing and distribution of their goods and services;

 

·

Focus on the transactional analysis of which assets are more valuable in the Company’s operating platform and which are more valuable to someone else;

 

·

Develop and execute an action plan for those assets or tenants that could have a negative impact on cash flow and perceived portfolio quality over the long term;

 

·

Continue to focus on balance sheet improvement achieved through lowering leverage and maintaining long-term debt duration that allows for access to capital in all market cycles and

 

·

Continue to build and develop a team of empowered employees to execute with excellence.  

Recent Developments

See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in Item 7 and the Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015, for information on certain recent developments of the Company, which is incorporated herein by reference to such information.  

Tenants and Competition

As one of the nation’s largest owners and operators of shopping centers (measured by total GLA), the Company has established close relationships with a large number of major national and regional retailers.  The Company’s management is associated with and actively participates in many shopping center and REIT industry organizations.  

Notwithstanding these relationships, numerous developers and real estate companies, private and public, compete with the Company in leasing space in shopping centers to tenants.  The Company competes with other real estate companies and developers in terms of rental rate, property location, availability of other space, management services and maintenance.  

The Company’s five largest tenants based on the Company’s aggregate annualized base rental revenues, including its proportionate share of joint venture aggregate annualized base rental revenues, are TJX Companies, Bed Bath & Beyond, Walmart, PetSmart and Kohl's, representing 3.5%, 3.2%, 3.0%, 2.8% and 2.2%, respectively, of the Company’s aggregate annualized base rental revenues at December 31, 2015.  For more information on the Company’s tenants, see Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under the caption Company Fundamentals.  

Qualification as a Real Estate Investment Trust

As of December 31, 2015, the Company met the qualification requirements of a REIT under Sections 856-860 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”).  As a result, the Company, with the exception of its taxable REIT subsidiary (“TRS”), will not be subject to federal income tax to the extent it meets certain requirements of the Code.  

Employees

As of February 12, 2016, the Company employed 576 full-time individuals including executive, administrative and field personnel.  The Company considers its relations with its personnel to be good.  

Corporate Headquarters

The Company is an Ohio corporation and was incorporated in 1992.  The Company’s executive offices are located at 3300 Enterprise Parkway, Beachwood, Ohio 44122, and its telephone number is (216) 755-5500.  The Company’s website is http://www.ddr.com.  The Company uses the Investors section of its website as a channel for routine distribution of important

5


 

information, including news releases, analyst presentations and financial information.  The Company posts filings as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the SEC, including the Company’s annual, quarterly and current reports on Forms 10-K, 10-Q and 8-K, the Company’s proxy statements and any amendments to those reports or statements.  All such postings and filings are available on the Company’s website free of charge.  In addition, this website allows investors and other interested persons to sign up to automatically receive e-mail alerts when the Company posts news releases and financial information on its website.  The SEC also maintains a website (http://www.sec.gov) that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.  The content on, or accessible through, any website referred to in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2015, is not incorporated by reference into, and shall not be deemed part of, this Form 10-K unless expressly noted.  

 

 

Item 1A.

RISK FACTORS

The risks described below could materially and adversely affect the Company’s results of operations, financial condition, liquidity and cash flows.  These risks are not the only risks the Company faces.  The Company’s business operations could also be affected by additional factors that are not presently known to it or that the Company currently considers to be immaterial to its operations.  

The Economic Performance and Value of the Company’s Shopping Centers Depend on Many Factors, Each of Which Could Have an Adverse Impact on the Company’s Cash Flows and Operating Results

The economic performance and value of the Company’s real estate holdings can be affected by many factors, including the following:

 

·

Changes in the national, regional, local and international economic climate;

 

·

Local conditions, such as an oversupply of space or a reduction in demand for real estate in the area;

 

·

The attractiveness of the properties to tenants;

 

·

The increase in consumer purchases through the Internet;

 

·

The Company’s ability to provide adequate management services and to maintain its properties;

 

·

Increased operating costs, if these costs cannot be passed through to tenants and

 

·

The expense of periodically renovating, repairing and reletting spaces.  

Because the Company’s properties consist primarily of shopping centers, the Company’s performance is linked to general economic conditions in the market for retail space.  The market for retail space has been and may continue to be adversely affected by weakness in the national, regional and local economies, the adverse financial condition of some large retailing companies, the ongoing consolidation in the retail sector, increases in consumer Internet purchases and the excess amount of retail space in a number of markets.  To the extent that any of these conditions occur, they are likely to affect market rents for retail space.  In addition, the Company may face challenges in the management and maintenance of its properties or incur increased operating costs, such as real estate taxes, insurance and utilities, that may make its properties unattractive to tenants.  The loss of rental revenues from a number of the Company’s tenants and its inability to replace such tenants may adversely affect the Company’s profitability and ability to meet its debt and other financial obligations and make distributions to shareholders.  

6


 

The Company Relies on Major Tenants, Making It Vulnerable to Changes in the Business and Financial Condition of, or Demand for Its Space by, Such Tenants

As of December 31, 2015, the annualized base rental revenues of the Company’s tenants that are equal to or exceed 1.5% of the Company’s aggregate annualized shopping center base rental revenues, including its proportionate share of joint venture aggregate annualized shopping center base rental revenues, are as follows:

 

Tenant

 

% of Annualized Base

Rental Revenues

 

TJX Companies

 

 

3.5%

 

Bed Bath & Beyond

 

 

3.2%

 

Walmart

 

 

3.0%

 

PetSmart

 

 

2.8%

 

Kohl's

 

 

2.2%

 

Best Buy

 

 

2.1%

 

Dick's Sporting Goods

 

 

2.0%

 

Ross Stores

 

 

1.9%

 

AMC Theatres

 

 

1.9%

 

Michaels

 

 

1.8%

 

Gap

 

 

1.6%

 

 

The retail shopping sector has been affected by economic conditions as well as the competitive nature of the retail business and the competition for market share where stronger retailers have out-positioned some of the weaker retailers.  These shifts have forced some market share away from weaker retailers and required them, in some cases, to declare bankruptcy and/or close stores.  

As information becomes available regarding the status of the Company’s leases with tenants in financial distress or as the future plans for their spaces change, the Company may be required to write off and/or accelerate depreciation and amortization expense associated with a significant portion of the tenant-related deferred charges in future periods.  The Company’s income and ability to meet its financial obligations could also be adversely affected in the event of the bankruptcy, insolvency or significant downturn in the business of one of these tenants or any of the Company’s other major tenants.  In addition, the Company’s results could be adversely affected if any of these tenants do not renew their leases as they expire on terms favorable to the Company or at all.  

The Company’s Dependence on Rental Income May Adversely Affect Its Ability to Meet Its Debt Obligations and Make Distributions to Shareholders

Substantially all of the Company’s income is derived from rental income from real property.  As a result, the Company’s performance depends on its ability to collect rent from tenants.  The Company’s income and funds for distribution would be negatively affected if a significant number of its tenants, or any of its major tenants, were to do the following:

 

·

Experience a downturn in their business that significantly weakens their ability to meet their obligations to the Company;

 

·

Delay lease commencements;

 

·

Decline to extend or renew leases upon expiration;

 

·

Fail to make rental payments when due or

 

·

Close stores or declare bankruptcy.

Any of these actions could result in the termination of tenants’ leases and the loss of rental income attributable to the terminated leases.  Lease terminations by an anchor tenant or a failure by that anchor tenant to occupy the premises could also result in lease terminations or reductions in rent by other tenants in the same shopping centers under the terms of some leases.  In addition, the Company cannot be certain that any tenant whose lease expires will renew that lease or that it will be able to re-lease space on economically advantageous terms.  The loss of rental revenues from a number of the Company’s major tenants and its inability to replace such tenants may adversely affect the Company’s profitability and its ability to meet debt and other financial obligations and make distributions to shareholders.  

7


 

The Company’s Ability to Increase Its Debt Could Adversely Affect Its Cash Flow

At December 31, 2015, the Company had outstanding debt of $5.1 billion (excluding its proportionate share of unconsolidated joint venture mortgage debt aggregating $441.9 million as of December 31, 2015). The Company intends to maintain a conservative ratio of debt to total market capitalization (the sum of the aggregate market value of the Company’s common shares and operating partnership units, the liquidation preference on any preferred shares outstanding and its total consolidated indebtedness).  The Company is subject to limitations under its credit facilities and indentures relating to its ability to incur additional debt; however, the Company’s organizational documents do not contain any limitation on the amount or percentage of indebtedness it may incur.  If the Company were to become more highly leveraged, its cash needs to fund debt service would increase accordingly.  Under such circumstances, the Company’s risk of decreases in cash flow due to fluctuations in the real estate market, reliance on its major tenants, acquisition and development costs and the other factors discussed in these risk factors, could subject the Company to an even greater adverse impact on its financial condition and results of operations.  In addition, increased leverage could increase the risk of default on the Company’s debt obligations, which could further reduce its cash available for distribution and adversely affect its ability to dispose of its portfolio on favorable terms, which could cause the Company to incur losses and reduce its cash flows.  

Disruptions in the Financial Markets Could Affect the Company’s Ability to Obtain Financing on Reasonable Terms and Have Other Adverse Effects on the Company and the Market Price of the Company’s Common Shares

The U.S. and global equity and credit markets have experienced significant price volatility, dislocations and liquidity disruptions in the past, which have caused market prices of many stocks to fluctuate substantially and the spreads on prospective debt financings to widen considerably.  These circumstances materially affected liquidity in the financial markets, making terms for certain financings less attractive and, in certain cases, resulting in the unavailability of certain types of financing.  Uncertainty in the equity and credit markets may negatively affect the Company’s ability to access additional financing at reasonable terms or at all, which may negatively affect the Company’s ability to refinance its debt, obtain new financing or make acquisitions.  These circumstances may also adversely affect the Company’s tenants, including their ability to enter into new leases, pay their rents when due and renew their leases at rates at least as favorable as their current rates.  

A prolonged downturn in the equity or credit markets may cause the Company to seek alternative sources of potentially less attractive financing and may require it to adjust its business plan accordingly.  In addition, these factors may make it more difficult for the Company to sell properties or may adversely affect the price it receives for properties that it does sell, as prospective buyers may experience increased costs of financing or difficulties in obtaining financing.  These events in the equity and credit markets may make it more difficult or costly for the Company to raise capital through the issuance of its equity or debt securities.  These disruptions in the financial markets also may have a material adverse effect on the market value of the Company’s common shares and other adverse effects on the Company or the economy in general.  There can be no assurances that government responses to the disruptions in the financial markets will restore consumer confidence, stabilize the markets or increase liquidity and the availability of equity or credit financing.  

Changes in the Company’s Credit Ratings or the Debt Markets, as well as Market Conditions in the Credit Markets, Could Adversely Affect the Company’s Publicly Traded Debt and Revolving Credit Facilities

The market value for the Company’s publicly traded debt depends on many factors, including the following:

 

·

The Company’s credit ratings with major credit rating agencies;

 

·

The prevailing interest rates being paid by, or the market price for publicly traded debt issued by, other companies similar to the Company;

 

·

The Company’s financial condition, liquidity, leverage, financial performance and prospects and

 

·

The overall condition of the financial markets.  

The condition of the financial markets and prevailing interest rates have fluctuated in the past and are likely to fluctuate in the future.  The U.S. credit markets and the sub-prime residential mortgage market have experienced severe dislocations and liquidity disruptions in the past.  Furthermore, uncertain market conditions can be exacerbated by leverage.  The occurrence of these circumstances in the credit markets and/or additional fluctuations in the financial markets and prevailing interest rates could have an adverse effect on the Company’s ability to access capital and its cost of capital.  

In addition, credit rating agencies continually review their ratings for the companies they follow, including the Company.  The credit rating agencies also evaluate the real estate industry as a whole and may change their credit rating for the Company based on

8


 

their overall view of the industry.  Any rating organization that rates the Company’s publicly traded debt may lower the rating or decide, at its sole discretion, not to rate the publicly traded debt.  The ratings of the Company’s publicly traded debt are based primarily on the rating organization’s assessment of the likelihood of timely payment of interest when due and the payment of principal on the maturity date.  A negative change in the Company’s rating could have an adverse effect on the Company’s revolving credit facilities and market price of the Company’s publicly traded debt as well as the Company’s ability to access capital and its cost of capital.  

The Company’s Cash Flows and Operating Results Could Be Adversely Affected by Required Payments of Debt or Related Interest and Other Risks of Its Debt Financing

The Company is generally subject to the risks associated with debt financing.  These risks include the following:

 

·

The Company’s cash flow may not satisfy required payments of principal and interest;

 

·

The Company may not be able to refinance existing indebtedness on its properties as necessary, or the terms of the refinancing may be less favorable to the Company than the terms of existing debt;

 

·

Required debt payments are not reduced if the economic performance of any property declines;

 

·

Debt service obligations could reduce funds available for distribution to the Company’s shareholders and funds available for development, redevelopment and acquisitions;

 

·

Any default on the Company’s indebtedness could result in acceleration of those obligations, which could result in the acceleration of other debt obligations and possible loss of property to foreclosure and

 

·

The Company may not be able to finance necessary capital expenditures for purposes such as re-leasing space on favorable terms or at all.  

If a property is mortgaged to secure payment of indebtedness and the Company cannot or does not make the mortgage payments, it may have to surrender the property to the lender with a consequent loss of any prospective income and equity value from such property, which may also adversely affect the Company’s credit ratings.  Any of these risks can place strains on the Company’s cash flows, reduce its ability to grow and adversely affect its results of operations.  

The Company’s Financial Condition Could Be Adversely Affected by Financial Covenants

The Company’s credit facilities and the indentures under which its senior and subordinated unsecured indebtedness is, or may be, issued contain certain financial and operating covenants, including, among other things, leverage ratios and certain coverage ratios, as well as limitations on the Company’s ability to incur secured and unsecured indebtedness, sell all or substantially all of its assets and engage in mergers and certain acquisitions.  These credit facilities and indentures also contain customary default provisions including the failure to pay principal and interest issued thereunder in a timely manner, the failure to comply with the Company’s financial and operating covenants, the occurrence of a material adverse effect on the Company and the failure of the Company or its majority-owned subsidiaries (i.e., entities in which the Company has a greater than 50% interest) to pay when due certain indebtedness in excess of certain thresholds beyond applicable grace and cure periods.  These covenants could limit the Company’s ability to obtain additional funds needed to address cash shortfalls or pursue growth opportunities or transactions that would provide substantial return to its shareholders.  In addition, a breach of these covenants could cause a default or accelerate some or all of the Company’s indebtedness, which could have a material adverse effect on its financial condition.  

The Company Has Variable-Rate Debt and Is Subject to Interest Rate Risk

The Company has indebtedness with interest rates that vary depending upon the market index.  In addition, the Company has revolving credit facilities that bear interest at a variable rate on any amounts drawn on the facilities.  The Company may incur additional variable-rate debt in the future.  Increases in interest rates on variable-rate debt would increase the Company’s interest expense, which would negatively affect net earnings and cash available for payment of its debt obligations and distributions to its shareholders.  

9


 

Property Ownership Through Partnerships and Joint Ventures Could Limit the Company’s Control of Those Investments and Reduce Its Expected Return

Partnership or joint venture investments may involve risks not otherwise present for investments made solely by the Company, including the possibility that the Company’s partner or co-venturer might become bankrupt, that its partner or co-venturer might at any time have different interests or goals than the Company and that its partner or co-venturer may take action contrary to the Company’s instructions, requests, policies or objectives, including the Company’s policy with respect to maintaining its qualification as a REIT.  In addition, the Company’s partner or co-venturer could have different investment criteria that would impact the assets held by the joint venture or its interest in the joint venture.  These situations could have an impact on the Company’s revenues from its joint ventures.  Other risks of joint venture investments include impasse on decisions, such as a sale, because neither the Company’s partner or co-venturer nor the Company would have full control over the partnership or joint venture.  These factors could limit the return that the Company receives from such investments, cause its cash flows to be lower than its estimates or lead to business conflicts or litigation.  There is no limitation under the Company’s Articles of Incorporation, or its Code of Regulations, as to the amount of funds that the Company may invest in partnerships or joint ventures.  In addition, a partner or co-venturer may not have access to sufficient capital to satisfy its funding obligations to the joint venture.  Furthermore, if credit conditions in the capital markets deteriorate, the Company could be required to reduce the carrying value of its equity method investments if a loss in the carrying value of the investment is considered an other than temporary decline.  As of December 31, 2015, the Company had $467.7 million of investments in and advances to unconsolidated joint ventures holding 168 operating shopping centers.  

The Company’s Real Estate Assets May Be Subject to Impairment Charges

On a periodic basis, the Company assesses whether there are any indicators that the value of its real estate assets and other investments may be impaired.  A property’s value is impaired only if the estimate of the aggregate future cash flows (undiscounted and without interest charges) to be generated by the property are less than the carrying value of the property.  In the Company’s estimate of cash flows, it considers factors such as expected future operating income, trends and prospects, the effects of demand, competition and other factors.  If the Company is evaluating the potential sale of an asset or development alternatives, the undiscounted future cash flow considerations include the most likely course of action at the balance sheet date based on current plans, intended holding periods and available market information.  The Company is required to make subjective assessments as to whether there are impairments in the value of its real estate assets and other investments.  These assessments have a direct impact on the Company’s earnings because recording an impairment charge results in an immediate negative adjustment to earnings.  For example, in the first quarter of 2015, the Company recorded impairment charges on 25 operating shopping centers and several land parcels aggregating $279.0 million.  There can be no assurance that the Company will not take additional charges in the future related to the impairment of its assets.  Any future impairment could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations in the period in which the charge is taken.  

The Company’s Acquisition Activities May Not Produce the Cash Flows That It Expects and May Be Limited by Competitive Pressures or Other Factors

The Company intends to acquire retail properties only to the extent that suitable acquisitions can be made on advantageous terms.  Acquisitions of commercial properties entail risks such as the following:

 

·

The Company may be unable to identify, or may have difficulty identifying, acquisition opportunities that fit its investment strategy;

 

·

The Company’s estimates on expected occupancy and rental rates may differ from actual conditions;

 

·

The Company’s estimates of the costs of any redevelopment or repositioning of acquired properties may prove to be inaccurate;

 

·

The Company may be unable to operate successfully in new markets where acquired properties are located due to a lack of market knowledge or understanding of local economies;

 

·

The properties may become subject to environmental liabilities that the Company was unaware of at the time the Company acquired the property;

 

·

The Company may be unable to successfully integrate new properties into its existing operations or

 

·

The Company may have difficulty obtaining financing on acceptable terms or paying the operating expenses and debt service associated with acquired properties prior to sufficient occupancy.  

10


 

In addition, the Company may not be in a position or have the opportunity in the future to make suitable property acquisitions on advantageous terms due to competition for such properties with others engaged in real estate investment, some of which may have greater financial resources than the Company.  The Company’s inability to successfully acquire new properties may affect the Company’s ability to achieve its anticipated return on investment, which could have an adverse effect on its results of operations.  

Real Estate Property Investments Are Illiquid; Therefore, the Company May Not Be Able to Dispose of Properties When Desired or on Favorable Terms

Real estate investments generally cannot be disposed of quickly.  In addition, the federal income tax code imposes restrictions, which are not applicable to other types of real estate companies, on the ability of a REIT to dispose of properties.  Therefore, the Company may not be able to diversify its portfolio in response to economic or other conditions promptly or on favorable terms, which could cause the Company to incur losses and reduce its cash flows and adversely affect distributions to shareholders.  

The Company’s Development, Redevelopment and Construction Activities Could Affect Its Operating Results

The Company intends to continue the selective development, redevelopment and construction of retail properties in accordance with its development underwriting policies as opportunities arise.  The Company’s development, redevelopment and construction activities include the following risks:

 

·

Construction costs of a project may exceed the Company’s original estimates;

 

·

Occupancy rates and rents at a newly completed property may not be sufficient to make the property profitable;

 

·

Rental rates per square foot could be less than projected;

 

·

Financing may not be available to the Company on favorable terms for development of a property;

 

·

The Company may not complete construction and lease-up on schedule, resulting in increased debt service expense and construction costs;

 

·

The Company may not be able to obtain, or may experience delays in obtaining, necessary zoning, land use, building, occupancy and other required governmental permits and authorizations and

 

·

The Company may abandon development or redevelopment opportunities after expending resources to determine feasibility.

Additionally, the time frame required for development, construction and lease-up of these properties means that the Company may wait several years for a significant cash return.  If any of the above events occur, the development of properties may hinder the Company’s growth and have an adverse effect on its results of operations and cash flows.  In addition, new development activities, regardless of whether they are ultimately successful, typically require substantial time and attention from management.  

If the Company Fails to Qualify as a REIT in Any Taxable Year, It Will Be Subject to U.S. Federal Income Tax as a Regular Corporation and Could Have Significant Tax Liability

The Company intends to operate in a manner that allows it to qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes.  However, REIT qualification requires that the Company satisfy numerous requirements (some on an annual or quarterly basis) established under highly technical and complex provisions of the Code, for which there are a limited number of judicial or administrative interpretations.  The Company’s status as a REIT requires an analysis of various factual matters and circumstances that are not entirely within its control.  Accordingly, the Company’s ability to qualify and remain qualified as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes is not certain.  Even a technical or inadvertent violation of the REIT requirements could jeopardize the Company’s REIT qualification.  Furthermore, Congress or the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) might change the tax laws or regulations and the courts could issue new rulings, in each case potentially having a retroactive effect that could make it more difficult or impossible for the Company to continue to qualify as a REIT.  If the Company fails to qualify as a REIT in any tax year, the following would result:

 

·

The Company would be taxed as a regular domestic corporation, which, among other things, means that it would be unable to deduct distributions to its shareholders in computing its taxable income and would be subject to U.S. federal income tax on its taxable income at regular corporate rates;

11


 

 

·

Any resulting tax liability could be substantial and would reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to shareholders and could force the Company to liquidate assets or take other actions that could have a detrimental effect on its operating results and 

 

·

Unless the Company were entitled to relief under applicable statutory provisions, it would be disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which the Company lost its qualification, and its cash available for debt service obligations and distribution to its shareholders, therefore, would be reduced for each of the years in which the Company does not qualify as a REIT.  

Even if the Company remains qualified as a REIT, it may face other tax liabilities that reduce its cash flow.  The Company’s TRS is subject to taxation, and any changes in the laws affecting the Company’s TRS may increase the Company’s tax expenses.  The Company may also be subject to certain federal, state and local taxes on its income and property either directly or at the level of its subsidiaries.  Any of these taxes would decrease cash available for debt service obligations and distribution to the Company’s shareholders.  

Compliance with REIT Requirements May Negatively Affect the Company’s Operating Decisions

To maintain its status as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the Company must meet certain requirements on an ongoing basis, including requirements regarding its sources of income, the nature and diversification of its assets, the amounts the Company distributes to its shareholders and the ownership of its shares.  The Company may also be required to make distributions to its shareholders when it does not have funds readily available for distribution or at times when the Company’s funds are otherwise needed to fund capital expenditures or debt service obligations.  

As a REIT, the Company must distribute at least 90% of its annual net taxable income (excluding net capital gains) to its shareholders.  To the extent that the Company satisfies this distribution requirement, but distributes less than 100% of its net taxable income, the Company will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax on its undistributed taxable income.  In addition, the Company will be subject to a 4% non-deductible excise tax if the actual amount paid to its shareholders in a calendar year is less than the minimum amount specified under U.S. federal tax laws.  From time to time, the Company may generate taxable income greater than its income for financial reporting purposes, or its net taxable income may be greater than its cash flow available for distribution to its shareholders.  If the Company does not have other funds available in these situations, it could be required to borrow funds, sell its securities or a portion of its properties at unfavorable prices or find other sources of funds in order to meet the REIT distribution requirements and avoid corporate income tax and the 4% excise tax.  

In addition, the REIT provisions of the Code impose a 100% tax on income from “prohibited transactions.”  Prohibited transactions generally include sales of assets, other than foreclosure property, that constitute inventory or other property held for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business.  This 100% tax could affect the Company’s decisions to sell property if it believes such sales could be treated as a prohibited transaction.  However, the Company would not be subject to this tax if it were to sell assets through its TRS.  The Company will also be subject to a 100% tax on certain amounts if the economic arrangements between the Company and its TRS are not comparable to similar arrangements among unrelated parties.  

Dividends Paid by REITs Generally Do Not Qualify for Reduced Tax Rates

In general, the maximum U.S. federal income tax rate for dividends paid to individual U.S. shareholders is 20%.  Due to its REIT status, the Company’s distributions to individual shareholders generally are not eligible for the reduced rates.  

The Company Is Subject to Litigation That Could Adversely Affect Its Results of Operations

The Company is a defendant from time to time in lawsuits and regulatory proceedings relating to its business.  Due to the inherent uncertainties of litigation and regulatory proceedings, the Company cannot accurately predict the ultimate outcome of any such litigation or proceedings.  An unfavorable outcome could adversely affect the Company’s business, financial condition or results of operations.  Any such litigation could also lead to increased volatility of the trading price of the Company’s common shares.  For a further discussion of litigation risks, see “Legal Matters” in Note 9—Commitments and Contingencies to the Consolidated Financial Statements.  

The Company’s Real Estate Investments May Contain Environmental Risks That Could Adversely Affect Its Results of Operations

The acquisition of properties may subject the Company to liabilities, including environmental liabilities.  The Company’s operating expenses could be higher than anticipated due to the cost of complying with existing or future environmental laws and

12


 

regulations.  In addition, under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, the Company may be considered an owner or operator of real property or to have arranged for the disposal or treatment of hazardous or toxic substances.  As a result, the Company may become liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous substances released on or in its properties.  The Company may also be liable for other potential costs that could relate to hazardous or toxic substances (including governmental fines and injuries to persons and property).  The Company may incur such liability whether or not it knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of such hazardous or toxic substances.  Such liability could be of substantial magnitude and divert management’s attention from other aspects of the Company’s business and, as a result, could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s operating results and financial condition, as well as its ability to make distributions to shareholders.  

An Uninsured Loss on the Company’s Properties or a Loss That Exceeds the Limits of the Company’s Insurance Policies Could Subject the Company to Lost Capital or Revenue on Those Properties

Under the terms and conditions of the leases currently in effect on the Company’s properties, tenants generally are required to indemnify and hold the Company harmless from liabilities resulting from injury to persons, air, water, land or property, on or off the premises, due to activities conducted on the properties, except for claims arising from the negligence or intentional misconduct of the Company or its agents.  Additionally, tenants are generally required, at the tenant’s expense, to obtain and keep in full force during the term of the lease liability and full replacement value property damage insurance policies.  The Company has obtained comprehensive liability, casualty, flood, terrorism and rental loss insurance policies on its properties.  All of these policies may involve substantial deductibles and certain exclusions.  Furthermore, there is no assurance that the Company may be able to renew or secure additional insurance policies on commercially reasonable terms or at all.  In addition, tenants could fail to properly maintain their insurance policies or be unable to pay the deductibles.  Should a loss occur that is uninsured or is in an amount exceeding the combined aggregate limits for the policies noted above, or in the event of a loss that is subject to a substantial deductible under an insurance policy, the Company could lose all or part of its capital invested in, and anticipated revenue from, one or more of the properties, which could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s operating results and financial condition, as well as its ability to make distributions to shareholders.  

The Company’s Properties Could Be Subject to Damage from Weather-Related Factors

A number of the Company’s properties are located in areas that are subject to natural disasters.  Certain of the Company’s properties are located in California and in other areas with higher risk of earthquakes.  In addition, many of the Company’s properties are located in coastal regions, including 14 properties located on the island of Puerto Rico as of February 12, 2016, and would therefore be affected by any future increases in sea levels or in the frequency or severity of hurricanes and tropical storms, whether such increases are caused by global climate changes or other factors.  

The Company’s Investments in Real Estate Assets Outside the Continental United States May Be Subject to Additional Risks

Investments and operations outside the continental United States generally are subject to various political and other risks that are different from and in addition to risks inherent in the investment in real estate generally discussed in these risk factors and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2015.  The Company currently has investments in consolidated and unconsolidated joint ventures with real estate assets outside the continental United States, including Puerto Rico, and may increase its investment in real estate in jurisdictions outside the continental United States in the future.  The Company may not realize the intended benefits of these investments due to the uncertainty of foreign or novel laws and markets including, but not limited to, unexpected changes in the regulatory requirements such as the enactment of laws prohibiting or restricting the Company’s ability to own property, political and economic instability in certain geographic locations, labor disruptions, difficulties in managing international operations, potentially adverse tax consequences, including unexpected or unfavorable changes in tax structure, laws restricting the Company’s ability to transfer profits between jurisdictions or to repatriate profits to the United States, additional accounting and control expenses and the administrative burden associated with complying with laws from a variety of jurisdictions.  

In addition, financing may not be available at acceptable rates outside, and equity requirements may be different from the Company’s strategy in, the continental United States.  Each of these factors may adversely affect the Company’s ability to achieve anticipated return on investment, which could have an adverse effect on its results of operations.  

The Company Could Be Subject to Risks Relating to the Puerto Rican Economy and Government

 

In recent years, the economy in Puerto Rico has experienced a sustained downturn and the territorial government of Puerto Rico has operated at substantial spending deficits.  In light of these economic conditions, the territorial government’s current and expected cash flows, and recent credit downgrades that triggered acceleration clauses in certain outstanding municipal bonds and other bonds, the territorial government of Puerto Rico and certain utilities have announced that they expect to be unable to meet their existing debt obligations. If the territorial government and certain utilities are not able to restructure their debt obligations or obtain forbearance on debt service payments, they may be unable to provide various services (including utilities) relied upon in the operation of businesses

13


 

in Puerto Rico.  Furthermore, inaccessibility of utilities and other government services, along with a continued economic downturn and increases in taxes in Puerto Rico, may result in continued or increased migration of residents of Puerto Rico to the mainland United States and elsewhere, which could decrease the territory’s tax base, exacerbating the territorial government’s cash flow issues, and decrease the number of consumers in Puerto Rico. In turn, consumers who remain in Puerto Rico could have less disposable income for the purchase of goods, which may result in declining merchant sales and merchant inability to expand or lease new space or pay rent or pay other expenses for new or existing operations, or result in a general decline in prevailing rental rates.  As of December 31, 2015, the Company owned 14 assets in Puerto Rico, aggregating 4.8 million square feet of Company-owned GLA and representing 7.6% of the Company’s annualized consolidated revenues for its portfolio at 100% and 5.7% of Company-owned GLA.  The persistence or further deterioration of economic conditions in Puerto Rico could have a negative impact on the Company’s results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

Compliance with Certain Laws and Governmental Rules and Regulations May Require the Company to Make Unplanned Expenditures That Adversely Affect the Company’s Cash Flows

The Company is required to operate its properties in compliance with certain laws and governmental rules and regulations, including the Americans with Disabilities Act, fire and safety regulations, building codes and other land use regulations, as currently in effect or as they may be enacted or adopted and become applicable to the properties, from time to time.  The Company may be required to make substantial capital expenditures to make upgrades at its properties or otherwise comply with those requirements, and these expenditures could have a material adverse effect on its ability to meet its financial obligations and make distributions to shareholders.  

The Company May Be Unable to Retain and Attract Key Management Personnel

The Company may be unable to retain and attract talented executives.  In the event of the loss of key management personnel to competitors, or upon unexpected death, disability or retirement, the Company may not be able to find replacements with comparable skill, ability and industry expertise.  The Company’s operating results and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected until suitable replacements are identified and retained, if at all.  

The Company’s Articles of Incorporation Contain Limitations on Acquisitions and Changes in Control

In order to maintain the Company’s status as a REIT, its Articles of Incorporation prohibit any person, except for certain shareholders as set forth in the Company’s Articles of Incorporation, from owning more than 5% of the Company’s outstanding common shares.  This restriction is likely to discourage third parties from acquiring control of the Company without consent of its Board of Directors even if a change in control were in the best interests of shareholders.  

The Company Has Significant Shareholders Who May Exert Influence on the Company as a Result of Their Considerable Beneficial Ownership of the Company’s Common Shares, and Their Interests May Differ from the Interests of Other Shareholders

The Company has shareholders, including Mr. Alexander Otto who is a member of the Board of Directors, who, because of their considerable beneficial ownership of the Company’s common shares, are in a position to exert significant influence over the Company.  These shareholders may exert influence with respect to matters that are brought to a vote of the Company’s Board of Directors and/or the holders of the Company’s common shares.  Among others, these matters include the election of the Company’s Board of Directors, corporate finance transactions and joint venture activity, merger, acquisition and disposition activity, and amendments to the Company’s Articles of Incorporation and Code of Regulations.  In the context of major corporate events, the interests of the Company’s significant shareholders may differ from the interests of other shareholders.  For example, if a significant shareholder does not support a merger, tender offer, sale of assets or other business combination because the shareholder judges it to be inconsistent with the shareholder’s investment strategy, the Company may be unable to enter into or consummate a transaction that would enable other shareholders to realize a premium over the then-prevailing market prices for common shares.  Furthermore, if the Company’s significant shareholders sell substantial amounts of the Company’s common shares in the public market to enhance the shareholders’ liquidity positions, fund alternative investments or for other reasons, the trading price of the Company’s common shares could decline significantly and other shareholders may be unable to sell their common shares at favorable prices.  The Company cannot predict or control how the Company’s significant shareholders may use the influence they have as a result of their common share holdings.

14


 

Changes in Market Conditions Could Adversely Affect the Market Price of the Company’s Publicly Traded Securities

As with other publicly traded securities, the market price of the Company’s publicly traded securities depends on various market conditions, which may change from time to time.  Among the market conditions that may affect the market price of the Company’s publicly traded securities are the following:

 

·

The extent of institutional investor interest in the Company;

 

·

The reputation of REITs generally and the reputation of REITs with similar portfolios;

 

·

The attractiveness of the securities of REITs in comparison to securities issued by other entities (including securities issued by other real estate companies or sovereign governments), bank deposits or other investments;

 

·

The Company’s financial condition and performance;

 

·

The market’s perception of the Company’s growth potential and future cash dividends;

 

·

An increase in market interest rates, which may lead prospective investors to demand a higher distribution rate in relation to the price paid for the Company’s shares and

 

·

General economic and financial market conditions.  

The Company May Issue Additional Securities Without Shareholder Approval

The Company can issue preferred shares and common shares without shareholder approval subject to certain limitations in the Company’s Articles of Incorporation.  Holders of preferred shares have priority over holders of common shares, and the issuance of additional shares reduces the interest of existing holders in the Company.  

The Company Faces Risks Relating to Cybersecurity Attacks and Other Data Breaches

The Company’s business is at risk from and may be impacted by cybersecurity intrusions and other data security breaches. Such attacks could range from individual attempts to gain unauthorized access to information technology systems, to more sophisticated and coordinated security threats such as social engineering.  While the Company maintains some of its own critical information technology systems, it also depends on third parties to provide important information technology services relating to several key business functions, such as payroll, human resources, electronic communications and certain finance functions. Although the Company and such third parties employ a number of measures to prevent, detect and mitigate these threats, including password protection, firewalls, backup servers, threat monitoring and periodic penetration testing, there is no guarantee such efforts will be successful in preventing a data breach. Furthermore, the security measures employed by third-party service providers may prove to be ineffective at preventing breaches of their systems. Data breach incidents could compromise the confidential information of the Company’s tenants, employees and third-party vendors and disrupt the Company’s business operations.

 

Item 1B.

UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

 

Item 2.

PROPERTIES

At December 31, 2015, the Portfolio Properties included 367 shopping centers (including 169 centers owned through joint ventures).  At December 31, 2015, the Portfolio Properties also included more than 1,000 acres of undeveloped land including parcels located adjacent to certain of the shopping centers.  At December 31, 2015, the Portfolio Properties aggregated 83.6 million square feet of Company-owned GLA (115.5 million square feet of total GLA) located in 38 states, plus Puerto Rico.  These centers are principally in the Southeast and Midwest, with significant concentrations in Florida, Georgia, Ohio and North Carolina, as well as Puerto Rico.  The 14 assets owned in Puerto Rico aggregate 4.8 million square feet of Company-owned GLA (5.1 million square feet of total GLA).  At December 31, 2015, the Company also owned an interest in two land parcels in Canada.  

At December 31, 2015, the average annualized base rent per square foot of Company-owned GLA of the Company’s 198 wholly-owned shopping centers was $14.80.  For the 169 shopping centers owned through joint ventures, average annualized base rent per square foot was $13.95 at December 31, 2015.  The Company’s average annualized base rent per square foot does not

15


 

consider tenant expense reimbursements.  The Company generally does not enter into significant tenant concessions on a lease-by-lease basis.  

The Company’s shopping centers are designed to attract local area customers and are typically anchored by two or more national tenant anchors (such as Walmart, Kohl’s or Target).  The properties often include discounters, warehouse clubs, dollar stores and specialty grocers as additional anchors or tenants.  The tenants of the shopping centers typically cater to the consumer’s desire for value and convenience and offer day-to-day necessities rather than high-priced luxury items.  As one of the nation’s largest owners and operators of shopping centers (measured by total GLA), the Company has established close relationships with a large number of major national and regional retailers, many of which occupy space in its shopping centers.  

Information as to the Company’s 10 largest tenants based on total annualized rental revenues and Company-owned GLA at December 31, 2015, is set forth in Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” under the caption Company Fundamentals of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.  For additional details related to property encumbrances for the Company’s wholly-owned assets, see “Real Estate and Accumulated Depreciation” (Schedule III) herein.  At December 31, 2015, the Company owned an investment in 168 properties owned through unconsolidated joint ventures, which served as collateral for joint venture mortgage debt aggregating approximately $3.2 billion (of which the Company’s proportionate share is $441.9 million) and which is not reflected in the consolidated indebtedness.  In addition, as of December 31, 2015, unless otherwise indicated, with respect to the 367 shopping centers:

 

·

The 50 largest assets represent 34.9% of the Company’s annualized base rent per square foot and 26.0% of total GLA;

 

·

145 of these properties are anchored by a Walmart, Kohl’s or Target store;

 

·

242 of these properties include a grocery component;

 

·

Properties range in size from approximately 10,000 square feet to approximately 1,500,000 square feet of total GLA (with 155 properties exceeding 300,000 square feet of total GLA);

 

·

78.8% of the aggregate Company-owned GLA of these properties is leased to national tenants, including subsidiaries of national tenants and

 

·

93.3% of the aggregate Company-owned GLA of these properties was occupied as of December 31, 2015.  With respect to the properties owned by the Company, including its unconsolidated joint ventures, as of December 31 in each of the last five years beginning with 2011, between 89.1% and 93.5% of the aggregate Company-owned GLA of these properties was occupied.

Tenant Lease Expirations and Renewals

The following table shows the impact of tenant lease expirations through 2025 at the Company’s 198 wholly-owned shopping centers, assuming that none of the tenants exercise any of their renewal options:

 

Expiration

Year

 

No. of

Leases

Expiring

 

 

Approximate GLA

in Square Feet

(Thousands)

 

 

Annualized Base

Rent Under

Expiring Leases

(Thousands)

 

 

Average Base Rent

per Square Foot

Under Expiring

Leases

 

 

Percentage of

Total GLA

Represented by

Expiring Leases

 

 

Percentage of

Total Base Rental

Revenues

Represented by

Expiring Leases

 

2016

 

 

480

 

 

 

2,868

 

 

$

47,020

 

 

$

16.40

 

 

 

5.9%

 

 

 

7.2%

 

2017

 

 

611

 

 

 

6,079

 

 

 

83,336

 

 

 

13.71

 

 

 

12.6%

 

 

 

12.8%

 

2018

 

 

650

 

 

 

6,197

 

 

 

93,076

 

 

 

15.02

 

 

 

12.8%

 

 

 

14.3%

 

2019

 

 

510

 

 

 

6,107

 

 

 

84,891

 

 

 

13.90

 

 

 

12.6%

 

 

 

13.0%

 

2020

 

 

508

 

 

 

4,798

 

 

 

75,432

 

 

 

15.72

 

 

 

9.9%

 

 

 

11.6%

 

2021

 

 

303

 

 

 

5,244

 

 

 

65,904

 

 

 

12.57

 

 

 

10.8%

 

 

 

10.1%

 

2022

 

 

214

 

 

 

3,298

 

 

 

44,817

 

 

 

13.59

 

 

 

6.8%

 

 

 

6.9%

 

2023

 

 

191

 

 

 

2,841

 

 

 

38,349

 

 

 

13.50

 

 

 

5.9%

 

 

 

5.9%

 

2024

 

 

212

 

 

 

2,448

 

 

 

37,986

 

 

 

15.52

 

 

 

5.1%

 

 

 

5.8%

 

2025

 

 

173

 

 

 

1,720

 

 

 

30,366

 

 

 

17.65

 

 

 

3.6%

 

 

 

4.7%

 

Total

 

 

3,852

 

 

 

41,600

 

 

$

601,177

 

 

$

14.45

 

 

 

86.0%

 

 

 

92.3%

 

 

16


 

The following table shows the impact of tenant lease expirations at the joint venture level through 2025 at the Company’s 169 shopping centers owned through joint ventures, assuming that none of the tenants exercise any of their renewal options:

 

Expiration

Year

 

No. of

Leases

Expiring

 

 

Approximate GLA

in Square Feet

(Thousands)

 

 

Annualized Base

Rent Under

Expiring Leases

(Thousands)

 

 

Average Base Rent

per Square Foot

Under Expiring

Leases

 

 

Percentage of

Total GLA

Represented by

Expiring Leases

 

 

Percentage of

Total Base Rental

Revenues

Represented by

Expiring Leases

 

2016

 

 

361

 

 

 

1,959

 

 

$

28,479

 

 

$

14.54

 

 

 

6.9%

 

 

 

7.9%

 

2017

 

 

490

 

 

 

3,250

 

 

 

47,698

 

 

 

14.67

 

 

 

11.5%

 

 

 

13.2%

 

2018

 

 

494

 

 

 

3,423

 

 

 

52,284

 

 

 

15.27

 

 

 

12.1%

 

 

 

14.5%

 

2019

 

 

393

 

 

 

3,325

 

 

 

49,786

 

 

 

14.97

 

 

 

11.8%

 

 

 

13.8%

 

2020

 

 

376

 

 

 

3,332

 

 

 

44,658

 

 

 

13.40

 

 

 

11.8%

 

 

 

12.4%

 

2021

 

 

232

 

 

 

3,455

 

 

 

42,506

 

 

 

12.30

 

 

 

12.2%

 

 

 

11.8%

 

2022

 

 

127

 

 

 

1,733

 

 

 

21,409

 

 

 

12.36

 

 

 

6.1%

 

 

 

5.9%

 

2023

 

 

95

 

 

 

1,660

 

 

 

18,633

 

 

 

11.22

 

 

 

5.9%

 

 

 

5.2%

 

2024

 

 

99

 

 

 

1,299

 

 

 

17,604

 

 

 

13.55

 

 

 

4.6%

 

 

 

4.9%

 

2025

 

 

76

 

 

 

835

 

 

 

11,906

 

 

 

14.25

 

 

 

3.0%

 

 

 

3.3%

 

Total

 

 

2,743

 

 

 

24,271

 

 

$

334,963

 

 

$

13.80

 

 

 

85.9%

 

 

 

92.9%

 

 

The rental payments under certain of these leases will remain constant until the expiration of their base terms, regardless of inflationary increases.  There can be no assurance that any of these leases will be renewed or that any replacement tenants will be obtained if not renewed.  

 

 

 

17


 

DDR Corp.

Shopping Center Property List at December 31, 2015

 

 

 

Location

 

Center

 

Year Developed/

Redeveloped

 

Year Acquired

 

DDR Ownership Interest

 

 

Owned GLA

(000's)

 

 

Total Annualized Base Rent

(000's)

 

 

Average Base Rent

(Per SF)(1)

 

 

Key Tenants

 

 

Alabama

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

Birmingham, AL

 

Brook Highland Plaza

 

2003

 

1994

 

 

100%

 

 

 

549

 

 

$

4,380

 

 

$

9.46

 

 

Books-A-Million, Dick's Sporting Goods, HomeGoods, Lowe's, Michaels, OfficeMax, Sprouts Farmers Market, Stein Mart

2

 

Birmingham, AL

 

River Ridge

 

2001

 

2007

 

 

15%

 

 

 

172

 

 

$

2,681

 

 

$

16.23

 

 

Best Buy, Nordstrom Rack, Staples, Target (Not Owned)

3

 

Huntsville, AL

 

Valley Bend

 

2002

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

425

 

 

$

5,936

 

 

$

14.10

 

 

Barnes & Noble, Bed Bath & Beyond, Carmike Cinemas (Not Owned), Dick's Sporting Goods, Hobby Lobby, Kohl's (Not Owned), Marshalls, Ross Dress for Less, Target (Not Owned)

4

 

Huntsville, AL

 

Westside Centre

 

2002

 

2007

 

 

15%

 

 

 

477

 

 

$

4,660

 

 

$

12.14

 

 

Big Lots, Dick's Sporting Goods, hhgregg, Marshalls, Michaels, Ross Dress for Less, Stein Mart, Target (Not Owned)

5

 

Northport, AL

 

Big Lots & Tractor Supply

 

1992

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

58

 

 

$

294

 

 

$

5.07

 

 

Big Lots, Tractor Supply Company

6

 

Oxford, AL

 

Oxford Exchange

 

2006

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

334

 

 

$

3,995

 

 

$

12.19

 

 

Bed Bath & Beyond, Best Buy, Dick's Sporting Goods, Hobby Lobby, Home Depot (Not Owned), Kohl's (Not Owned), PetSmart, Ross Dress for Less, Sam's Club (Not Owned),

T.J. Maxx, Target (Not Owned)

7

 

Tuscaloosa, AL

 

McFarland Plaza

 

1999

 

2007

 

 

15%

 

 

 

199

 

 

$

1,464

 

 

$

8.77

 

 

Michaels, Ross Dress for Less, Stein Mart, Toys "R" Us

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Alaska

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8

 

Anchorage, AK

 

Dimond Crossing

 

1981

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

85

 

 

$

1,361

 

 

$

15.95

 

 

Bed Bath & Beyond, PetSmart

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arizona

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9

 

Gilbert, AZ

 

San Tan Marketplace

 

2005

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

286

 

 

$

4,282

 

 

$

15.53

 

 

Bed Bath & Beyond, Big Lots, DSW, Jo-Ann, Marshalls,

Sam's Club (Not Owned), Walmart (Not Owned)

10

 

Phoenix, AZ

 

Ahwatukee Foothills Towne Center

 

2013

 

1998

 

 

100%

 

 

 

679

 

 

$

10,068

 

 

$

16.07

 

 

AMC Theatres, Ashley Furniture HomeStore, Babies "R" Us,

Best Buy, Jo-Ann, Marshalls, Michaels, OfficeMax, RoomStore, Ross Dress for Less, Sprouts Farmers Market

11

 

Phoenix, AZ

 

Arrowhead Crossing

 

1995

 

1996

 

 

100%

 

 

 

337

 

 

$

4,973

 

 

$

14.76

 

 

Barnes & Noble, DSW, Golfsmith, Hobby Lobby, HomeGoods, Nordstrom Rack, Old Navy, Savers (Not Owned), Staples,

T.J. Maxx

12

 

Phoenix, AZ

 

Deer Valley Towne Center

 

1996

 

1999

 

 

100%

 

 

 

197

 

 

$

3,233

 

 

$

19.24

 

 

AMC Theatres (Not Owned), Michaels, PetSmart,

Ross Dress for Less, Target (Not Owned)

13

 

Phoenix, AZ

 

Paradise Village Gateway

 

2004

 

2003

 

 

67%

 

 

 

295

 

 

$

5,047

 

 

$

17.49

 

 

Albertsons, Bed Bath & Beyond, PetSmart, Ross Dress for Less, Staples

 

18


 

DDR Corp.

Shopping Center Property List at December 31, 2015

 

 

 

Location

 

Center

 

Year Developed/

Redeveloped

 

Year Acquired

 

DDR Ownership Interest

 

 

Owned GLA

(000's)

 

 

Total Annualized Base Rent

(000's)

 

 

Average Base Rent

(Per SF)(1)

 

 

Key Tenants

14

 

Prescott, AZ

 

Shops at Prescott Gateway

 

2012

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

35

 

 

$

966

 

 

$

27.86

 

 

Trader Joe's

15

 

Queen Creek, AZ

 

Plaza at Power Marketplace

 

2007

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

71

 

 

$

1,437

 

 

$

21.11

 

 

LA Fitness

16

 

Tucson, AZ

 

Silverado Plaza

 

1999

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

78

 

 

$

738

 

 

$

9.63

 

 

17

 

Tucson, AZ

 

Tucson Spectrum

 

2008

 

2012

 

 

100%

 

 

 

715

 

 

$

9,553

 

 

$

14.28

 

 

Bed Bath & Beyond, Best Buy, Dollar Tree, Food City,

Harkins Theatre, Home Depot (Not Owned), JCPenney,

LA Fitness, Marshalls, Michaels, OfficeMax, Old Navy,

Party City, PetSmart, Ross Dress for Less,

Sports Authority, Target (Not Owned)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arkansas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18

 

North Little Rock, AR

 

McCain Plaza

 

2004

 

1994

 

 

100%

 

 

 

290

 

 

$

2,179

 

 

$

9.19

 

 

Bed Bath & Beyond, Burlington, Michaels,

Ross Dress for Less, T.J. Maxx

19

 

Russellville, AR

 

Valley Park Centre

 

1992

 

1994

 

 

100%

 

 

 

296

 

 

$

2,191

 

 

$

7.83

 

 

Belk, Hobby Lobby, JCPenney, Ross Dress for Less,

T.J. Maxx

20

 

Sherwood, AR

 

Sherwood Retail Center

 

1986

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

123

 

 

$

569

 

 

$

4.62

 

 

Gander Mountain, Mardel's, Tractor Supply Company

21

 

Springdale, AR

 

Walgreens

 

2009

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

15

 

 

$

390

 

 

$

26.80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

California

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22

 

Buena Park, CA

 

Buena Park Place

 

2009

 

2004

 

 

100%

 

 

 

211

 

 

$

3,138

 

 

$

14.88

 

 

Aldi, Kohl's, Michaels

23

 

Fontana, CA

 

Falcon Ridge Town Center

 

2005

 

2013

 

 

100%

 

 

 

300

 

 

$

6,011

 

 

$

20.14

 

 

24 Hour Fitness, Aki-Home, Michaels, Ross Dress for Less, Sports Authority, Stater Bros Markets,

Target (Not Owned)

24

 

Long Beach, CA

 

The Pike Outlets(2)

 

2015

 

DEV

 

 

100%

 

 

 

393

 

 

$

4,649

 

 

$

20.77

 

 

Cinemark, H&M, Nike, Restoration Hardware

25

 

Oakland, CA

 

Whole Foods at Bay Place

 

2006

 

2013

 

 

100%

 

 

 

57

 

 

$

2,413

 

 

$

42.17

 

 

Whole Foods

26

 

Pasadena, CA

 

Paseo Colorado

 

2001

 

2003

 

 

100%

 

 

 

540

 

 

$

6,560

 

 

$

29.95

 

 

Arclight Cinemas, DSW, Equinox, Hyatt

27

 

Richmond, CA

 

Hilltop Plaza

 

2000

 

2002

 

 

20%

 

 

 

246

 

 

$

2,447

 

 

$

16.47

 

 

99 Cents Only, Century Theatre, dd's Discounts,

Ross Dress for Less

28

 

Roseville, CA

 

Ridge at Creekside

 

2007

 

2014

 

 

100%

 

 

 

275

 

 

$

5,741

 

 

$

20.91

 

 

Bed Bath & Beyond, buybuy BABY, Cost Plus World Market, Macy's Furniture Gallery, REI

29

 

San Francisco, CA

 

1000 Van Ness Plaza

 

1998

 

2002

 

 

100%

 

 

 

123

 

 

$

3,962

 

 

$

36.05

 

 

AMC Theatres, The Studio Mix

30

 

Valencia, CA

 

River Oaks Shopping Center(2)

 

2010

 

2006

 

 

100%

 

 

 

76

 

 

$

1,511

 

 

$

19.78

 

 

buybuy BABY, Sprouts Farmers Market

31

 

Vista, CA

 

Vista Village

 

2007

 

2013

 

 

100%

 

 

 

194

 

 

$

4,147

 

 

$

25.07

 

 

Cinepolis, Frazier Farms, Lowe's (Not Owned),

Staples (Not Owned)

32

 

West Covina, CA

 

Eastland Center

 

1957

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

811

 

 

$

10,749

 

 

$

13.93

 

 

Albertsons, Ashley Furniture HomeStore, Burlington,

Dick's Sporting Goods, Hobby Lobby, Marshalls,

Ross Dress for Less, Target, Walmart

33

 

Whittier, CA

 

Whittwood Town Center

 

1960

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

783

 

 

$

6,168

 

 

$

9.18

 

 

24 Hour Fitness, JCPenney, Kohl's, PetSmart, Sears, Target, Vons

 

19


 

DDR Corp.

Shopping Center Property List at December 31, 2015

 

 

 

Location

 

Center

 

Year Developed/

Redeveloped

 

Year Acquired

 

DDR Ownership Interest

 

 

Owned GLA

(000's)

 

 

Total Annualized Base Rent

(000's)

 

 

Average Base Rent

(Per SF)(1)

 

 

Key Tenants

 

 

Colorado

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

34

 

Aurora, CO

 

Cornerstar

 

2008

 

2014

 

 

5%

 

 

 

430

 

 

$

7,921

 

 

$

18.77

 

 

24 Hour Fitness, Cornerstar Wine & Liquor,

Dick's Sporting Goods, HomeGoods, Marshalls,

Office Depot, Ross Dress for Less, Sprouts Farmers Market,

Target (Not Owned), Ulta Beauty

35

 

Aurora, CO

 

Pioneer Hills

 

2003

 

2003

 

 

100%

 

 

 

139

 

 

$

1,683

 

 

$

16.20

 

 

Bed Bath & Beyond, Home Depot (Not Owned),

Walmart (Not Owned)

36

 

Centennial, CO

 

Centennial Promenade

 

2002

 

1997

 

 

100%

 

 

 

419

 

 

$

7,091

 

 

$

17.73

 

 

Cavender's, Conn's, Golfsmith, HomeGoods,

IKEA (Not Owned), Michaels, REI (Not Owned),

Ross Dress for Less, Stickley Furniture, Toys "R" Us,

Wow! Furniture (Not Owned)

37

 

Colorado Springs, CO

 

Chapel Hills

 

2000

 

2011

 

 

100%

 

 

 

446

 

 

$

4,803