485APOS 1 cwvf485afiled0712.htm cwvf485afiled0712.htm - Generated by SEC Publisher for SEC Filing

 

SEC Registration Nos.
Nos. 811-06563 and 33-45829 

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549 

 

 

FORM N-1A 

 

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE
SECURITIES ACT OF 1933 

 

Post-Effective Amendment No. 37            XX

 

and/or

 

REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE
INVESTMENT ACT OF 1940 

 

Amendment No.37                         XX 

 

Calvert World Values Fund, Inc.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Charter) 

 

4550 Montgomery Avenue
 
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
 
(Address of Principal Executive Offices) 

 

Registrant's Telephone Number: (301) 951-4800 

 

William M. Tartikoff
4550 Montgomery Avenue
Bethesda, Maryland 20814
(Name and Address of Agent for Service)

 

 

It is proposed that this filing will become effective (check appropriate box):

o

 

immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)

o

 

on (date) pursuant to paragraph (b)

o

 

60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)

o

 

on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)

o

 

75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)

þ

 

on September 28, 2012 pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of Rule 485.

 


 

 

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE

 

This post-effective amendment relates solely to Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund (the "Fund"), a new series of Calvert World Values Fund, Inc. (the "Company"). No information relating to any other series or shares of the Company is amended or superseded hereby. This post-effective amendment is being filed to register Class A, Class C, Class I and Class Y shares of the Fund. 

 

Pursuant to the provisions of Rule 24f-2 under the Investment Company Act of 1940, Registrant declares that an indefinite number of its shares of common stock are being registered under the Securities Act of 1933 by this registration statement.

 


 

PROSPECTUS

CLASS A, C and Y
September 28, 2012

 

Class (Ticker)

Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund A (____) C (____) Y (____)

 

These securities have not been approved or disapproved by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) or any State Securities Commission, and neither the SEC nor any State Securities Commission has determined that this Prospectus is accurate or adequate. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.


 


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INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE

The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation by investing primarily in equity securities of companies located in emerging market countries, using the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria. This objective may be changed by the Fund’s Board of Directors without shareholder approval.

FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. You may qualify for sales charge discounts if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in Calvert non-money market mutual funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and under “Choosing a Share Class” on page ___ and “Reduced Sales Charges” on page ___ of this Prospectus, and under “Method of Distribution” on page ___ of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).

Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment)  
  Class A   Class C   Class Y  
 
Maximum sales charge (load) on 4.75 % None   None  
purchases (as a % of offering price)            
Maximum deferred sales charge None   1.00 % None  
(load) (as a % of amount purchased            
or redeemed, whichever is lower) 1            
Redemption fee (as a % of amount 2.00 % 2.00 % 2.00 %
redeemed or exchanged within 30            
days of purchase)            
 
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each  
year as a % of the value of your investment)          
  Class A   Class C   Class Y  
 
Management fees 1.30 % 1.30 % 1.30 %
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees 0.25 % 1.00 % None  
Other expenses 1.40 % 2.81 % 3.58 %

 

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Total annual fund operating 2.95 % 5.11 % 4.88 %
expenses            
 
Less fee waiver and/or expense (1.17 %) (2.33 %) (3.35 %)
reimbursement 2            
 
Net expenses 1.78 % 2.78 % 1.53 %

 

1 The contingent deferred sales charge reduces over time.

The investment advisor has agreed to contractually limit direct net annual fund operating expenses for Class A, Class C and Class Y through January 31, 2014. Direct net operating expenses will not exceed 1.78% for Class A, 2.78% for Class C and 1.53% for Class Y. Only the Board of Directors of the Fund may terminate the Fund's expense cap before the contractual period expires.

Example

This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in ot her mutual funds. The example assumes that: you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then either redeem or hold your shares at the end of those periods; your investment has a 5% return each year; the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same; and any Calvert expense limitation is in effect for the period indicated in the fee table above.

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, under these assumptions your costs would be:

Share Class 1 Year 3 Years
Class A $647 $1,128
Class C    
Expenses assuming    
 redemption $381 $1,102
   
Expenses assuming    
 no redemption $281 $1,102
   
Class Y $156 $839

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (“turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the “Example”, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has less than a full fiscal year of investment operations, no portfolio turnover rate is provided for the Fund at this time.

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INVESTMENTS, RISKS AND PERFORMANCE

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its assets, including borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of companies located in emerging market countries. The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ notice before changing this 80% policy.

Equity securities may include common stock, preferred stock, depositary receipts and equity-equivalent securities, including derivatives, such as futures, options and swaps.

The Subadvisor may consider emerging countries to be those included in the Fund’s benchmark index, the

MSCI Emerging Markets Index; countries classified as emerging economies by the World Bank; and other countries or markets with similar emerging characteristics. A company is considered to be located in an emerging market if it has a class of securities whose principal securities market is in an emerging country; is organized under the laws of, or has a principal office in, an emerging country; derives 50% or more of its total revenues or earnings from goods produced, sales made, or services provided in one or more emerging countries; or maintains 50% or more of its assets in one or more emerging countries.

The Fund may invest in companies of any market capitalization size but seeks to have market capitalization size characteristics similar to that of the MSCI Emerging Markets Index. The Fund is expected to invest its assets among companies located in emerging markets around the world. The Fund may also invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies and may engage in foreign currency transactions.

The Fund is non-diversified,” which means it may invest more of its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a “diversified” fund.

The Subadvisor seeks to identify companies that are trading at a discount to intrinsic value but have the potential to increase their book value. To this end, the Subadvisor combines a top-down country analysis with bottom-up fundamental company research. The country analysis includes an assessment of the risks and opportunities for each emerging market country through in-depth quantitative and qualitative analysis. In addition, the country research process produces a ranking of emerging markets countries based on expected returns with greater active weights allocated to higher-ranking countries. Fundamental company research also utilizes a number of qualitative and quantitative methods. Portfolio construction is determined by the Subadvisor based on its level of conviction in the country and company with input from proprietary risk models.

The Fund may sell a security when it no longer appears attractive by the Subadvisor or does not meet the Fund’s sustainability criteria.

Sustainable and Responsible Investing. The Fund seeks to invest in emerging market companies whose products/services or industrial/business practices contribute towards addressing one or more global sustainability challenges in their local and/or international markets, including development, poverty and health; environment and climate change; and rights and governance.

Investments are first selected for financial soundness and then evaluated according to these sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria, the application of which is in the economic interest of the Fund and its shareholders.

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Principal Risks

You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could underperform, because of the risks described below. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Non-Diversification Risk. Because the Fund may invest more of its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund, the gains or losses on a single stock may have greater impact on the Fund than a diversified fund.

Management Risk. The individual investments of the Fund may not perform as expected, and the Fund’s portfolio management practices may not achieve the desired result.

Stock Market Risk. The stock market may fall in value, causing prices of stocks held by the Fund to fall.

Market Capitalization Risks. Large-cap companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges such as changes in technology, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion. Prices of small-cap and mid-cap stocks can be more volatile than those of larger, more established companies. Small-cap and mid-cap companies are more likely to have more limited product lines, fewer capital resources and less depth of management than larger companies. Prices of microcap securities are generally even more volatile and their markets are even less liquid relative to small-cap, mid-cap and large-cap securities.

Common Stock Risk. Although common stocks have a history of long-term growth in value, their prices fluctuate based on changes in a company’s financial condition, on overall market and economic conditions, and on investors’ perception of a company’s well-being.

Preferred Stock Risk. The market value of preferred stock generally decreases when interest rates rise and is affected by the issuer’s ability to make payments on the preferred stock.

Foreign Securities Risk. Investing in foreign securities involves additional risks relating to political, social, and economic developments abroad. Other risks result from differences between regulations that apply to U.S. and foreign issuers and markets, and the potential for foreign markets to be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets. Foreign securities include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”). Unsponsored ADRs involve additional risks because U.S. reporting requirements do not apply and the issuing bank will recover shareholder distribution costs from movement of share prices and payment of dividends.

Foreign Currency Risk. Securities that trade or are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar may be adversely affected by fluctuations in currency exchange rates. When the U.S. dollar strengthens relative to a foreign currency, the U.S. dollar value of an investment denominated in that currency will typically fall. GDRs can involve direct currency risk since, unlike ADRs, they may not be U.S. dollar-denominated. ADRs indirectly bear currency risk because they represent an interest in securities that are not denominated in U.S. dollars.

Foreign Currency Transactions Risk. An investment transacted in a foreign currency may lose value due to fluctuations in the rate of exchange. These fluctuations can make the return on an investment go up or down, entirely apart from the quality or performance of the investment itself.

Emerging Markets Risk. The risks of investing in emerging market securities are greater than those of investing in securities of developed foreign countries. These risks include volatile currency exchange rates, periods of high inflation, increased risk of default, greater social, economic and political uncertainty and instability, less governmental supervision and regulation of securities markets, weaker auditing and financial reporting standards, lack of liquidity in the markets, and the significantly smaller market capitalizations of emerging

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market issuers.

Valuation Risk. A stock judged to be undervalued by the Subadvisor may actually be appropriately priced, and it may not appreciate as anticipated.

Derivatives Risk. In general, a derivative is a financial contract whose value is based on the value of a financial asset (such as a stock, bond, or currency), a physical asset (such as gold), or a market index (such as the S&P 500 Index). Derivative instruments are subject to a number of risks, including the risk of changes in the market price of the underlying asset, credit risk with respect to the counterparty, and liquidity risk. The Fund’s use of certain derivatives may also have a leveraging effect, which may increase the volatility of the Fund and reduce its returns.

Performance

Because the Fund has less than a full calendar year of investment operations, no performance information is presented for the Fund at this time.

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

Investment Advisor. Calvert Investment Management, Inc. (“Calvert” or the “Advisor”)

Investment Subadvisor. Hermes Investment Management Limited (“Hermes”)

Portfolio Manager Title Length of Time
Name   Managing Fund
Gary Greenberg Lead Portfolio Since September
  Manager, Hermes 2012
  Emerging Markets, Hermes  

 

BUYING AND SELLING SHARES

You can buy, sell (redeem) or exchange shares of the Fund, either through a financial professional or directly from the Fund, on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. The share price is based on the Fund’s net asset value, determined after receipt of your request in good order.

Minimum Investments        
Account Type   Initial   Subsequent
Regular Accounts $ 2,000 $ 250
IRA Accounts $ 1,000 $ 250

 

For automatic investment plans, the minimum initial investment requirements are waived if you establish a $100 monthly investment plan. For an account that has met the minimum initial investment requirement described above, you may make subsequent automatic investments of $50.

The Fund may waive investment minimums and applicable service fees for certain investors.

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Class A and C Shares. To buy shares, contact your financial professional or open an account by completing and signing an application (available at www.calvert.com or by calling 800-368-2748). Make your check payable to the Fund.

To Buy Shares  
New Accounts Calvert, P.O. Box 219544,
(include application): Kansas City, MO 64121-9544
Subsequent Investments Calvert, P.O. Box 219739,
(include investment slip): Kansas City, MO 64121-9739
By Registered, Certified or Calvert, c/o BFDS, 330 West 9th
Overnight Mail: Street, Kansas City, MO 64105-
  1514
To Sell Shares  
By Telephone Call 800-368-2745
By Mail Calvert, P.O. Box 219544,
  Kansas City, MO 64121-9544

Class Y Shares. Class Y shares are generally available only to wrap or similar fee-based programs offered by financial intermediaries. Class Y purchases must be made by bankwire or via the National Securities Clearing Corporation. For additional information, call 800-368-2746.

TAX INFORMATION

Unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account, any dividends and distributions made by a Fund are taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains and may also be subject to state and local taxes.

PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

If you purchase shares of a Fund through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financ ial intermediary’s Web site for more information.

MORE INFORMATION ON FEES AND EXPENSES

CONTINGENT DEFERRED SALES CHARGE

Subject to certain exceptions, the contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) imposed on the proceeds of Class C shares of a Fund redeemed within certain time periods after purchase is a percentage of the net asset value at the time of purchase or redemption, whichever is less.

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For Class C shares, a 1.00% CDSC is imposed on shares sold within one year. There is no charge on redemptions of Class C shares held for more than one year.

See “How to Buy Shares/Choosing a Share Class/Class C” and “Calculation of Contingent Deferred Sales Charge and Waiver of Sales Charges” in this Prospectus.

REDEMPTION FEE

The redemption fee applies to redemptions, including exchanges, within 30 days of purchase. This fee is intended to ensure that the portfolio trading costs are borne by investors making the transactions and not by shareholders already in the Fund. The fee is deducted from the redemption proceeds. It is payable to the Class of the Fund from which the redemption is made and is accounted for as an addition to paid -in capital. The fee will not be charged directly on certain retirement account platforms and other similar omnibus-type accounts, but rather on their participants by the subtransfer agent and remitted to the Fund. See “How to Sell Shares/Redemption Fee” in this

Prospectus for situations where the fee may be waived.

MANAGEMENT FEES

Management fees include the advisory fee paid by the Fund to the Advisor and the administrative fee paid by the Fund to Calvert Investment Administrative Services, Inc., an affiliate of the Advisor.

With respect to the amount of the Fund’s advisory fee, see “Advisory Fees” in this Prospectus. The administrative fees (as a percentage of the Fund’s net assets) paid by the Fund is 0.35%.

DISTRIBUTION AND SERVICE FEES

The following table shows the maximum annual amount of distribution and service fees payable under the Fund’s distribution plan for Class A shares and the amount of the Fund’s distribution and service fees authorized by the Fund’s Board of Directors for the current fiscal year. Fees payable under the distribution plan may be increased to the maximum amount, where applicable, only after approval of the Board of Directors.

Fund Maximum   Amount  
  Amount Payable   Authorized  
  (Class A)      
 
Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund 0.50 % 0.25 %

 

OTHER EXPENSES

“Other expenses” include custodial, transfer agent and subtransfer agent/recordkeeping payments, as well as various other expenses. Subtransfer agent/recordkeeping payments may be made to third parties (including affiliates of the Advisor) that provide recordkeeping and other administrative services.

CONTRACTUAL FEE WAIVERS AND/OR EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENTS

Where Calvert has contractually agreed to a fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement, the expense limitation doe s not limit any acquired fund fees and expenses paid indirectly by a shareholder. The Example in the Fund Summary reflects the expense limits set forth in the fee table but only through the contractual date. Under the terms of the contractual expense limitation, operating expenses do not include interest expense, brokerage commissions, extraordinary expenses, performance fee adjustments (if applicable), and taxes. The Fund does not expect to incur

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a material amount of interest expense in the fiscal year.

The Fund has an expense offset arrangement with the custodian bank whereby the custodian fees may be paid indirectly by credits on the Fund’s uninvested cash balances. These credits are used to reduce the Fund’s expenses. Under those circumstances where the Advisor has provided to the Fund a contract ual expense limitation, and to the extent any expense offset credits are earned, the Advisor may benefit from the expense offset arrangement and the Advisor’s obligation under the contractual limitation may be reduced by the credits earned. Expense offset credits, if applicable, are included in the line item “Less fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement” in the fee table in the Fund Summary.

See “Investment Advisor” in the Fund’s SAI for more information.

EXAMPLE

The Example in the Fund’s Fund Summary also assumes that you reinvest all dividends and distributions.

MORE INFORMATION ON INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS

A concise description of the Fund’s principal investment strategies and principal risks is provided under the earlier Fund Summary. On the following pages are further descriptions of these principal investment strategies and techniques, as well as certain non-principal investment strategies and techniques of the Fund, along with their associated risks. The Fund has additional non-principal investment policies and restrictions, which are discussed under “Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks” in the Fund’s SAI.

For certain investment strategies listed, the table below shows the Fund’s limitations as a percentage of either its net or total assets. Numbers in this table show maximum allowable amount only; for actual usage, consult the Fund’s annual/semi-annual reports. (Please see the pages of this Prospectus following the table for descriptions of the investment strategies and definitions of the principal types of risks involved. Explanatory information about certain investment strategies of the Fund is also provided below.)


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Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund

 

Exchange-Traded Funds

 

o

Conventional Securities

 

Stocks in General

 

*

Foreign Securities

*

Illiquid securities

 

15N

 

Leveraged Derivative Instruments

 

Options on securities and indices

 

5T1

 

Futures contract

 

5N2

 


1 Based on net premium payments.

2 Based on initial margin required to establish position.

Description of Investment Strategies and Associated Risks

The investment strategies listed in the table above are described below, and the principal types of risk involved with each strategy are listed. See the “Glossary of Certain Investment Risks” for definitions of these risk types.

Investment Techniques and Associated Risks

Active Trading Strategy/Turnover involves selling a securitysoon after purchase. An active trading strategy causes a Fund to have higher portfolio turnover compared to other funds, exceeding 100%, and may translate to higher transaction costs, such as commissions and custodian and settlement fees.  Because this strategymay cause the Fund to have a relatively high amount of short-term capital gains, which generallyare taxable at the ordinary income tax rate, it may increase an investor’s tax liability. Risks: Opportunity, Market and
Transaction
 
Temporary Defensive Positions. During adverse market, economic or political conditions, the Fund may depart from its principal investment strategies byholding cash and investing in cash equivalents.  During times of any temporarydefensive position, a Fund may not be able to achieve its investment objective. Risks: Opportunity
 
Exchange-Traded Funds (“ETFs”) are shares of other investment companies that can be traded in the econdarymarket (e.g., on an exchange) but whose underlying assets are stocks selected to track a particular index. ETFs are used for the limited purpose of managing a Fund’s cash position consistent with the Fund’s applicable benchmark to reduce deviations from the benchmark while enabling the Fund to accommodate its need for periodic liquidity. Risks: Correlation and Market

 

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Conventional Securities and Associated Risks  
 
Stocks in General. Common stocks represent an ownership interest in a company. They may or may not pay dividends or carry voting rights. Common stock occupies the most junior position in a company’s capital structure. Debt securities and preferred stocks have rights senior to a company’s common stock.  Stock prices overall may decline over short or even long periods. The type of stock (large-cap, mid-cap, growth, value, etc.) purchased pursuant to a Fund’s investment style tends to go through cycles of doing better or worse than the stock market in general, and its returns maytrail returns of other asset classes.
Finally, individual stocks maylose value for a variety of reasons, even when the overall stock market has increased. Factors which can negatively impact the value of common stocks include economic factors such as interest rates, and non-economic factors such as political events.
Risks: Market
 
Foreign securities. Foreign securities include securities issued byentities whose principal place of business is located outside the U.S. This includes debt instruments denominated in other currencies such as Eurobonds. Risks: Market, Currency,
Transaction, Liquidity,
Information and Political
 
Illiquid securities. Securities which cannot be readily sold because there is no active market. Special Equities (venture capital private placements) and High Social Impact Investments are illiquid. Risks: Liquidity, Market and
Transaction
 
 
Leveraged Derivative Instruments and Associated Risks  
 
Options on securities and indices. Contracts giving the holder the right but not the obligation to purchase or sell a security (or the cash value, in the case of an option on an index) at a specified price within or at a specified time. A call option gives the purchaser of the option the right to purchase the underlying securityfrom the writer of the option at a specified exercise price. A put option gives the purchaser of the option the right to sell the underlying securityto the writer of the option at a specified exercise price. Risks: Interest Rate, Currency, Market, Leverage, Correlation,
Liquidity, Credit and Opportunity
 
Futures contract. Agreement to buy or sell a specific amount of a commodityor financial instrument at a particular price on a specific future date. Risks: Interest Rate, Currency, Market, Leverage, Correlation,
Liquidity and Opportunity

 

Glossary of Certain Investment Risks
 
Correlation risk The risk that when a Fund “hedges,” two investments maynot behave in relation to one another the way Fund
managers expect them to, which may have unexpected or undesired results. For example, a hedge may reduce
potential gains or may exacerbate losses instead of reducing them. For ETFs, there is a risk of tracking error. An
ETF may not be able to exactly replicate the performance of the underlying indexdue to operating expenses and
other factors (e.g., holding cash even though the underlying benchmark indexis not composed of cash), and
because transactions occur at market prices instead of at net asset value.
 
Credit risk The risk that the issuer of a security or the counterparty to an investment contract may default or become unable
to pay its obligations when due.
 
Currency risk The risk that when a Fund buys, sells or holds a securitydenominated in foreign currency, adverse changes in
foreign currency rates may cause investment losses when a Fund’s investments are converted to U.S. dollars.
Currency risk may be hedged or unhedged. Unhedged currencyexposure mayresult in gains or losses as a
result of a change in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and the respective foreign currency.
Information risk The risk that information about a securityor issuer or the market might not be available, complete, accurate, or
comparable.

 

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Interest rate risk The risk that changes in interest rates will adverselyaffect the value of an investor’s fixed -income securities.  When interest rates rise, the value of fixed-income securities will generallyfall. Conversely, a drop in interest rates will generallycause an increase in the value of fixed-income securities. Longer-term securities and zero coupon/ “stripped” coupon securities (“strips”) are subject to greater interest rate risk.
Leverage risk The risk that occurs in some securities or techniques which tend to magnifythe effect of small changes in an index or a market. This can result in a loss that exceeds the amount actually invested.
 
Liquidity risk The risk that occurs when investments cannot be readilysold. A Fund may have to accept a les s-than-desirable price to complete the sale of an illiquid securityor may not be able to sell it at all.
 
Market risk The risk that securities prices in a market, a sector or an industrywill fluctuate, and that such movements might reduce an investment’s value.
 
Opportunity risk The risk of missing out on an investment opportunitybecause the assets needed to take advantage of it are committed to less advantageous investments or strategies.
 
Political risk The risk that may occur when the value of a foreign investment maybe adverselyaffected by nationalization, taxation, war, government instabilityor other economic or political actions or factors, including risk of expropriation.
 
Transaction risk The risk that a Fund may be delayed or unable to settle a transaction or that commissions and settlement expenses maybe higher than usual.

 

Explanation of Investment Strategies Used by the Fund

ADRs and GDRs. American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) are certificates evidencing an ownership interest in shares issued by a foreign company that are held by a custodian bank in the company’s home country. ADRs are U.S. dollar-denominated certificates issued by a U.S. bank and traded on exchanges or over-the-counter in the U.S. as domestic shares. The Fund may invest in either sponsored or unsponsored ADRs.

GDRs are certificates issued by an international bank that are generally traded in, and denominated in the currency of, countries other than the home country of the issuer of the underlying shares. Companies, including those from emerging markets, typically use GDRs to make their shares available to investors in two or more foreign countries.

Emerging Market Securities. Emerging market securities are exposed to a number of risks that may make these investments volatile in price or difficult to trade. Political risks may include unstable governments, nationalization, restrictions on foreign ownership, laws that prevent investors from getting their money out of a country and legal systems that do not protect property rights as well as the laws of the U.S. Market risks may include economies that concentrate in only a few industries, securities issued that are held by only a few investors, limited trading capacity in local exchanges and the possibility that markets or issues may be manipulated by foreign nationals who have inside information.

Preferred Stock. Preferred stock is a class of capital stock that typically pays dividends at a specified rate. It is generally senior to common stock but subordinate to debt securities with respect to the payment of dividends and on liquidation of the issuer.

Derivatives. The term “derivatives” covers a broad range of financial instruments, including swap agreements, options, warrants, futures contracts, and currency forwards, whose values are derived, at least in part, from the value of one or more indicators, such as a security, asset, index or reference rate. Derivatives may be used to manage exposure to securities prices and foreign currencies; as an efficient means of increasing or decreasing the Fund’s exposure to certain markets; to protect the value of portfolio securities; and to serve as a cash management tool.

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Foreign Currency Transactions. An investment transacted in a foreign currency may lose value due to fluctuations in the rate of exchange. These fluctuations can make the return on an investment go up or down, entirely apart from the quality or performance of the investment itself. The Fund may enter into foreign currency transactions either to facilitate settlement transactions or for purposes of hedging exposure to underlying currencies. To manage currency exposure, the Fund may enter into forward currency contracts to “lock in” the U.S. dollar price of the security. A forward currency contract involves an agreement to purchase or sell a specified currency at a specified future price set at the time of the contract.

Swaps. A swap is an agreement between two parties to exchange payments based on a reference asset. In a standard swap transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. The gross returns to be exchanged or “swapped” between the parties are generally calculated with respect to a “notional amount,” – i.e., the return on or increase in value of a particular dollar amount invested at a particular interest rate, in a particular foreign currency, or in a “basket” of securities representing a particular index.

Futures Contracts. A futures contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a security on a future date which has the effect of establishing the current price for the security. Many futures contracts by their terms require actual delivery and acceptance of securities, but some allow for cash settlement of the difference between the futures price and the market value of the underlying security or index at time of delivery. The value of a futures contract tends to increase and decrease in tandem with the value of the underlying instrument. The price of futures can be highly volatile; using them could lower total return, and the potential loss from futures can exceed a Fund's initial investment in such contracts.

PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS

The Fund’s portfolio holdings are included in Semi-Annual and Annual Reports that are distributed to shareholders of the Fund. The Fund also discloses its portfolio holdings in its Schedule of Investments on Form N-Q, which is filed with the SEC no later than 60 days after the close of the first and third fiscal quarters. These filings are publicly available at the SEC.

A description of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio securities is available under “Portfolio Holdings Disclosure” in the Fund’s SAI.

ABOUT SUSTAINABLE AND SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTING

CALVERT SOLUTION STRATEGIES®

Investment Selection Process

In seeking to achieve the Fund’s investment objective, investments are first selected for financial soundness and then evaluated according to the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria, the application of which is in the economic interest of the Fund and its shareholders.

Investments in fixed-income securities for the Fund may be made prior to the application of sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria and strategies, due to the nature of the fixed-income market, where unlike equities, fixed-income securities are not available on exchange traded markets, and the window of availability may not be sufficient to permit Calvert to perform sustainability and corporate responsibility analysis prior to purchase. However, following purchase, the fixed-income security is evaluated according to the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria and if it is not found to meet those standards, the security will be sold per Calvert’s procedures,

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at a time that is in the best interests of the shareholders.

Investment decisions on whether a company meets the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria typically apply to all securities issued by that company. In rare instances, however, different decisions can be made on a company’s equity and its debt.

The Fund may invest in ETFs for the limited purpose of managing the Fund’s cash position consistent wi th the

Fund’s applicable benchmark. The ETFs in which the Fund may invest will not be screened and will not be required to meet the sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria otherwise applicable to investments made by the Fund. In addition, the ETFs in which the Fund may invest may hold securities of companies or entities that the Fund could not invest in directly because such companies or entities do not meet the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria. The principal purpose of investing in ETFs is not to meet the sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria by investing in individual companies, but rather to help the Fund meet its investment objective by obtaining market exposure to securities in the Fund’s applicable benchmark while enabling it to accommodate its need for periodic liquidity.

The selection of an investment by the Fund does not constitute endorsement or validation by the Fund, nor does the exclusion of an investment necessarily reflect failure to satisfy the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria.

Sustainable and Socially Responsible Investment Criteria for Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund

The long-term performance of companies operating in long established and/or emerging markets alike depends on progress towards sustainable development. The Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund seeks to invest in companies whose products/services or industrial/business practices contribute towards addressing one or more global sustainability challenges in their local and/or international markets.

Actions by companies to address such global sustainability challenges include the following themes:

Development, Poverty and Health

Promoting economic development, income generation and poverty reduction

Improving quality of life in poor households and communities

Supporting agricultural innovation and food security

Providing access to safe medicines and low-cost health care

Expanding digital access and mobile communications for underserved communities and populations

Environment and Climate Change

Mitigating and adapting to climate change and other environmental challenges

Enhancing access to clean water and sanitation infrastructure

Rights and Governance

• Respecting human rights, labor rights, and Indigenous Peoples’ rights in local communities/workplaces

Fostering gender equity and diversity in workplaces and local communities

Overcoming corruption through transparency and improved governance

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In addition to evaluating companies according to these criteria, investments are also evaluated according to the

Fund’s threshold responsibility standards with respect to tobacco, weapons and human rights. The Fund has the following threshold responsibility standards which are applied in determining whether a security qualifies as an investment for the Fund:

The Fund will seek to avoid investing in companies that manufacture tobacco products.

The Fund will seek to avoid investing in companies that manufacture, design or sell weapons or the critical components of weapons that violate international humanitarian law.

The Fund will critically evaluate companies that significantly support governments that are under U.S. or international sanction for grave human rights abuses such as genocide or forced labor.

In addition to these threshold responsibility standards, investments will be evaluated and may be excluded for extraordinary events and controversial issues that may adversely affect a company’s reputation, operations and/or social license to operate.

SPECIAL INVESTMENT PROGRAMS

As part of Calvert’s and Fund shareholders’ ongoing commitment to providing and fostering innovative initiatives, the Fund may invest a small percentage of their respective assets through special investment programs that are non -principal investment strategies pioneered by Calvert High Social Impact Investments and Special Equities.

High Social Impact Investments

High Social Impact Investments is a program that targets up to 1% of the Fund’s assets. High Social Impact Investments offer a rate of return below the then-prevailing market rate and present attractive opportunities for furthering the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria.

These investments may be either debt or equity investments. These types of investments are illiquid. High Social Impact debt investments are unrated and below-investment grade, and involve a greater risk of default or price decline than investment grade securities. The Fund believes that these investments have a significant sustainability and social responsibility return through their impact in our local communities.

The Fund’s High Social Impact Investments are fair valued by a fair value team consisting of officers of the Fund and of the Fund’s Advisor, as determined in good faith under consistently applied valuation procedures adopted by the Fund’s Board and under the ultimate supervision of the Board. See “How Shares Are Priced” in this Prospectus. The Fund’s High Social Impact Investments can be made through direct investments, or placed th rough intermediaries, such as the Calvert Social Investment Foundation (as discussed below).

Pursuant to an exemptive order issued by the SEC, the Fund may invest those assets allocated for investment through the High Social Impact Investments program with the purchase of Community Investment Notes issued by the Calvert Social Investment Foundation. The Calvert Social Investment Foundation is a non -profit organization, legally distinct from the Fund and Calvert Investments, Inc., organized as a charitable and educational foundation for the purpose of increasing public awareness and knowledge of the concept of socially responsible investing. It has instituted the Calvert Community Investments program to raise assets from individual and institutional investors and then invest these assets in non-profit or not-for-profit community development organizations, community development banks, cooperatives and social enterprises that focus on low income housing, economic development, business development and other social and environmental considerations in urban and rural communities that may

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lead to a more just and sustainable society in the U.S. and around the globe.

The Fund may also invest in high social impact issuers through social enterprises in conjunction with the Special Equities investment program (see “Special Equities” below).

Special Equities

The Fund may invest in the Special Equities investment program that allows the Fund to promote especially promising approaches to sustainable and socially responsible investment goals through privately placed investments. Special Equities investments are subject to the Fund’s limit on illiquid securities (which is no more than 15% of the Fund’s net assets). The investments are generally venture capital privately placed investments in small, untried enterprises. These include pre-IPO companies and private funds, including limited partnerships. Most Special Equities investments are expected to have a projected market-rate risk-adjusted return. A small percentage of the program may be invested in Social Enterprises, issues that have a projected below-market risk-adjusted rate of return, but are expected to have a high degree of positive impact on societal change. The Special Equities Committee of the Fund identifies, evaluates, and selects the Special Equities investments. Special Equities involve a high degree of risk and are all subject to liquidity, information and transaction risk. Special Equities foreign investments are also subject to foreign securities risk, while Special Equities debt securities, which are generally below-investment grade, are also subject to credit risk. The risks associated with a Special Equities investment may cause the value of the investment to decline below its cost and, in some instances, to lose its value entirely. A Fund’s Special Equities investments are valued under the direction of the Fund’s Board.

Pursuant to approval by the Fund’s Board of Directors, the Fund has retained Stephen Moody and Daryn Dodson as consultants to provide investment research for the Special Equities Program.

Manager Discovery Program

As part of the ongoing commitment of Calvert to promote equal opportunity, Calvert has introduced the Manager Discovery Program. The program allocates up to 5% of a Fund’s assets to strong-performing yet often overlooked minority and women-owned money management firms. These firms must have a proven track record and investment discipline that mirror the investment objectives of a Fund. The Manager Discovery Program seeks to bring a dynamic new perspective to a Fund, while maintaining Calvert’s long -standing commitment to seeking financial performance and societal impact. No firm currently participates in the program.

MANAGEMENT OF FUND INVESTMENTS

ABOUT CALVERT

Calvert Investment Management, Inc. (Calvert), 4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 1000N, Bethesda, MD 20814, is the investment advisor for the Fund. Calvert provides the Fund with investment supervision and management and office space, furnishes executive and other personnel to the Fund and pays the salaries and fees of all Directors who are affiliated persons of and employed by Calvert. It has been ma naging mutual funds since 1976. As of August 31, 2012, Calvert was the investment advisor for 43 mutual fund portfolios and had over $__ billion in assets under management.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE ADVISOR, SUBADVISOR AND PORTFOLIO MANAGER

Additional information is provided below regarding each individual and/or member of a team who is employed by or associated with the Advisor of the Fund, and who is primarily (and jointly, as applicable) responsible for the day-to-

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day management of the Fund (each a “Portfolio Manager”). The Fund’s SAI provides additional information about each Portfolio Manager’s management of other accounts, compensation and ownership of securities in the Fund.

Hermes Investment Management Limited (Hermes), Lloyds Chambers, 1 Portsoken Street, London E1 8HZ, United Kingdom, is the Subadvisor for Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund. Hermes has managed the assets of the Fund since the Fund’s inception in September 2012.

Portfolio Manager Business Experience During Last 5 Years Role on Management Team
 
Gary Greenberg July 2011 present: Lead Portfolio Manager for Emerging Markets Lead Portfolio Manager
  Team, Hermes  
  2010 July 2011: Portfolio Manager for Emerging Markets Team,  
  Hermes  
  2007 - 2010: Managing Partner at Silkstone Capital  
  2003 - 2007: Managing Partner at Muse Capital  

 

Calvert and the Fund have obtained an exemptive order from the SEC to permit Calvert and the Fund, pursuant to approval by the Fund's Board of Directors, to enter into and materially amend contracts with the Fund’s Subadvisor, if any (that is not an “affiliated person” as defined under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”)) without shareholder approval. See “Investment Advisor and Subadvisor” in the Fund’s SAI for further details.

ADVISORY FEES

The aggregate annual advisory fee paid by the Fund as a percentage of the Fund’s average daily net assets is 0.95%. This figure is the total of all advisory fees paid directly by the Fund. The advisory fee does not include administrative fees.

A discussion regarding the basis for the approval by the Fund’s Board of Directors of the investment advisory agreement with respect to the Fund is available in the most recent Semi-Annual Report of the Fund covering the fiscal period that ends on March 31 each year.

SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION

For more information on buying and selling shares, please contact your financial professional or Calvert’s client services department at 800-368-2748.

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HOW TO BUY SHARES

Getting Started -- Before You Open an Account

You have a few decisions to make before you open an account in a mutual fund.

First, decide what kind of account you want to open. Calvert offers individual, joint, trust, Uniform Gifts/Transfers to Minor Accounts, Traditional and Roth IRAs, Coverdell Education Savings Accounts, Qualified Profit-Sharing and Money Purchase Plans, SIMPLE IRAs, SEP-IRAs, and several other types of accounts.

Then, decide which Class of shares is best for you. You should make this decision carefully, based on:

·         the amount you wish to invest;

·         the length of time you plan to keep the investment;

·         the Class expenses; and

·         whether you qualify for any reduction or waiver of sales charges.

Each investor’s financial considerations are different. You should consult with your financial intermediary to discuss which Class of shares is best for you.

Choosing a Share Class

The Fund offers three different Classes of shares in this prospectus: Class A, C and Y. Class I ($1,000,000 minimum) is offered in a separate prospectus. Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc. (“CID”) is the Fund’s distributor.

This chart shows the difference in the Classes and the general types of investors who may be interested in each Class. The sales charge you pay may differ slightly from the sales charge rate shown below due to rounding calculations.

Class A Shares: Front-End Sales Charge
Investor Type For all investors, particularly those investing $50,000 or more (which qualifies for a reduced sales charge), or who plan to hold the shares for a substantial period of time.
Initial Sales Charge Sales charge on each purchase of 4.75% or less, depending on the amount you invest. Purchases of Class A shares for accounts with $1 million or more are not subject to front-end sales charges, but may be subject to a 0.80% contingent deferred sales charge on shares sold (redeemed) within one year of purchase. See “Contingent Deferred Sales Charge” below in this chart.
Contingent Deferred Sales Charge None (except that an 0.80% contingent deferred sales charge mayapplyto certain redemptions for accounts with $1 million or more for which no sales charge was paid).
Distribution and/or Service Fees Class A shares have an annual 12b-1 fee of up to 0.50%.
Other Class A shares have lower annual expenses than Class C due to a lower 12b -1 fee.
Class C Shares: Deferred Sales Charge for One Year
Investor Type For investors who prefer not to pay a front-end sales charge and/or who are unsure of the length of their investment.
Initial Sales Charge None

 

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Contingent Deferred Sales Charge If you sell shares within 1 year, then you will pay a deferred sales charge of 1.00% at that time.
Distribution and/or Service Fees Class C shares have an annual 12b-1 fee of 1.00%.
Other The expenses of this Class are higher than Class Abecause of the higher 12b-1 fee. There is no
  conversion to Class A.
Class Y Shares: No Sales Charge  
Investor Type Generally available only to wrap or similar fee-based programs offered by financial intermediaries
that have entered into an agreement with CID, the Fund’s distributor, to offer Class Y shares to their
clients.
Initial Sales Charge None
Contingent Deferred Sales Charge None
Distribution and/or Service Fees Class Y shares have no 12b-1 fee.
 
Other Class Y shares have lower annual expenses than Class A and C because Class Y has no 12b-1
fee.

 

When the total balance of your existing Class C holdings of Calvert Funds reaches or exceeds $500,000, you should make future investments in Class A shares since you will qualify to pur chase Class A shares at a reduced sales load.

Class A

If you choose Class A, you will pay a front-end sales charge at the time of each purchase. This table shows the charges both as a percentage of offering price and as a percentage of the amount you invest. The term “offering price” includes the front-end sales charge. If you invest more, the percentage rate of sales charge will be lower. For example, if you invest more than $50,000 but less than $100,000 in the Fund, or if your cumulative purchases or the value in your account is more than $50,000 but less than $100,000,* then the sales charge is reduced to 3.75%. There is no initial sales charge on shares acquired through reinvestment of dividends or capital gain distributions.

Your investment in Class A Sales Charge % of offering price   % of Amt. Invested  
shares        
Less than $50,000 4.75 % 4.99 %
$50,000 but less than $100,000 3.75 % 3.90 %
$100,000 but less than $250,000 2.75 % 2.83 %
$250,000 but less than $500,000 1.75 % 1.78 %
$500,000 but less than $1,000,000 1.00 % 1.01 %
$1,000,000 and over None ** None **

 

* This is called “Rights of Accumulation.” The sales charge is calculated bytaking into account not only the dollar amount of the new purchase of shares, but also the current value of shares you have previouslypurchased in Calvert Funds that impose sales charges.

** Purchases of Class Ashares at net asset value for accounts with $1,000,000 or more on which a finder’s fee has been paid by CID are subject to a one-year CDSC of 0.80%. See “Calculation of Contingent Deferred Sales Charge and Waiver of Sales Charges” in this Prospectus.

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The Class A front-end sales charge may be waived for certain purchases or investors, such as participants in certain group retirement plans or other qualified groups and clients of certain investment advisers. See “Reduced Sales Charges” in this Prospectus.

Class C

If you choose Class C, there is no front-end sales charge as there is with Class A, but if you sell the shares within the first year, you will have to pay a 1% CDSC. Class C may be a good choice for you if you prefer not to pay a front-end sales charge and/or are unsure of the length of your investment.

Calculation of Contingent Deferred Sales Charge and Waiver of Sales Charges

The CDSC will not be charged on shares you received as dividends or from capital gains distributions.

Shares that are not subject to the CDSC will be redeemed first, followed by shares you have held the longest. The CDSC is calculated by determining the share value at both the time of purchase and redemption and then multiplying whichever value is less by the percentage that applies as shown above.

If you choose to sell only part of your shares, the capital appreciation for those shares only is included in the calculation, rather than the capital appreciation for the entire account.

The CDSC on Class C Shares will be waived if the shares were sold by a broker/dealer that has an agreement with CID to sell such shares for omnibus retirement account platforms and without a CDSC upon the redemption of the shares. For more information on the agreement, see “Service Fees and Arrangements with Broker/Dealers” below.

Ask your broker/dealer if this CDSC waiver applies to you (generally, applicable only to 401(k) and 403(b) platforms).

Class Y

Class Y shares are sold without any initial sales load or CDSC.

Class Y shares are generally available only to wrap or similar fee-based programs offered by financial intermediaries that have entered into an agreement with CID to offer Class Y shares to their clients.

Reduced Sales Charges

You may qualify for a reduced sales charge (sales load breakpoints/discount) through several purchase plans available. You must notify your broker/dealer or the Fund at the time of purchase to take advantage of the reduced sales charge. If you do not let your broker/dealer or Fund know that you are eligible for a reduc tion, you may not receive a reduced sales charge to which you are otherwise entitled. In order to determine your eligibility to receive a reduced sales charge, it may be necessary for you to provide your broker/dealer or Fund with information and

22


 

records, including account statements, of all relevant accounts invested in Calvert Funds. Information regarding sales load breakpoints/discounts is also available on Calvert’s website at www.calvert.com.

Rights of Accumulation can be applied to several accounts

In determining the applicable Class A sales load breakpoints/discount, you may take into account the current value of your existing holdings of any class of Calvert’s non-money market funds, including shares held by your family group or other qualified group* and through your retirement plan(s). In order to determine your eligibility to receive a sales charge discount, it may be necessary for you to provide your broker/dealer or Fund with information and records, including account statements, of all relevant accounts invested in Calvert Funds. Shares could then be purchased at the reduced sales charge which applies to the entire group; that is, the current value of shares previously purchased and currently held by all the members of the group.

______________________________________

* A “family group” includes a spouse, parent, stepparent, grandparent, child, stepchild, grandchild, sibling, father -in-law, mother-in-law, brother-in-law, or sister-in-law, including trusts and estates on which such persons are s ignatories.

A “qualified group” is one which:

1. has been in existence for more than six months, and

2. has a purpose other than acquiring shares at a discount, and

3. satisfies uniform criteria which enable CID and broker/dealers offering shares to rea lize economies of scale in distributing such shares.

A qualified group must have more than 10 members, must be available to arrange for group meetings between representatives of CID or broker/dealers distributing shares, and must agree to include sales and other materials related to the Fund in its publications and mailings to members at reduced or no cost to CID or broker/dealers.

Statement of Intention

You may reduce your Class A sales charge by establishing a statement of intention (“Statemen t”). A Statement allows you to combine all Calvert Funds (excluding money market funds) purchases of all share classes you intend to make over a 13-month period to determine the applicable sales charge.

A portion of your account will be held in escrow to cover additional Class A sales charges that may be due if your total investments over the 13-month period do not qualify for the applicable sales charge reduction. The Transfer Agent will hold in escrow Fund shares (computed to the nearest full share) equa l to 5% of the dollar amount specified in the Statement. All dividends and any capital gains distribution on the escrowed shares will be credited to your account.

If the total minimum investment specified under the Statement is completed within a 13 -month period, escrowed shares will be promptly released to you. However, shares acquired during the 13 -month period but sold prior to the completion of the investment commitment will not be included for purposes of determining whether the investment commitment has been satisfied.

Upon expiration of the Statement period, if the total purchases pursuant to the Statement are less than the amount specified in the Statement as the intended aggregate purchase amount, CID will debit the difference between the lower sales charge you paid and the dollar amount of sales charges which you would have paid if the total amount purchased had been made at a single time from your account. Full shares, if any, remaining in escrow after this adjustment will be released and, upon request, remitted to you.

The Statement may be revised upward at any time during the Statement period, and such a revision will be treated as a new Statement, except that the Statement period during which the purchase must be made will remain unchanged and there will be no retroactive reduction of the sales charges paid on prior purchases.

Your first purchase of shares at a reduced sales charge under a Statement indicates acceptance of these terms.

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Retirement Plans Under Section 457, Section 403(b)(7), or Se ction 401(k)

There is no sales charge on shares purchased for the benefit of a retirement plan under section 457 of the Code. There is no sales charge on shares purchased for the benefit of a retirement plan qualifying under section 403(b) or 401(k) of the Code if, at the time of purchase: (i) Calvert has been notified in writing that the 403(b) or 401(k) plan has at least 300 eligible employees and is not sponsored by a K-12 school district; or (ii) the cost or current value of shares a 401(k) plan has in Calvert Funds (except money market funds) is at least $1 million.

Neither the Fund, nor CID, nor any affiliate of CID will reimburse a plan or participant for any sales charges paid prior to receipt and confirmation by CID of such required written communication. Plan administrators should send requests for the waiver of sales charges based on the above conditions to: Calvert Retirement Plans, 4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 1000N, Bethesda, Maryland 20814.

College Savings Plans under Section 529

There is no sales charge on shares purchased for the D.C. College Savings Plan if, at the time of purchase, the owner of the savings plan account is: (i) a District of Columbia resident, or (ii) a participant in payroll deduction to the D.C. College Savings Plan of a business with at least 300 employees.

Other Circumstances

There is no sales charge on shares of any Calvert Fund sold to or constituting the following:

·         current or retired Directors, Trustees, or Officers of the Calvert Funds or Calvert and its affiliates; employees of Calvert and its affiliates; or their family members (see definition of “family group” under “Reduced Sales Charges” above);

·         directors, officers, and employees of any subadvisor for the Calvert Funds, employees of broker/dealers distributing the Fund’s shares and family members of the subadvisor, or broker/dealer;

·         purchases made through a registered investment advisor;

·         trust departments of banks or savings institutions for trust clients of such bank or institution;

·         purchases through a broker/dealer maintaining an omnibus account with the Fund, provided the purchases are made by:

(a)       investment advisors or financial planners placing trades for their own accounts (or the accounts of their clients) and who charge a management, consulting, or other fee for their services;

(b)       clients of such investment advisors or financial planners who place trades for their own accounts if such accounts are linked to the master account of such investment advisor or financial planner on the books and records of the broker/dealer or agent; or

(c)       retirement and deferred compensation plans and trusts, including, but not limited to, those defined in section 401(a) or section 403(b) of the Code, and “rabbi trusts;” and

·         the portion of any direct rollover from a participant’s employer-sponsored retirement plan account or direct transfer from a 403(b) plan account to a Calvert IRA with Calvert or its agent as the custodian that is funded by the sale immediately prior to the rollover/transfer of Calvert Fund shares held in the plan account, provided that documentation accompanies the rollover/transfer instruction that reasonably supports this funding source requirement.

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Dividends and Capital Gain Distributions from other Calvert Funds

You may prearrange to have your dividends and capital gain distributions from the Fund automatically invested in another Calvert Fund account with no additional sales charge.

Purchases made at Net Asset Value (“NAV”)

If you make a purchase at NAV, you may exchange shares in that amount to another Calvert Fund without incurring a sales charge.

Reinstatement Privilege (Class A)

Subject to the Fund’s market timing policy, if you redeem Class A shares and then within 90 days decide to reinvest in any Calvert Fund, you may reinvest in Class A of the Fund at the NAV next computed after the reinvestment order is received, without a sales charge. Each Fund reserves the right to modify or eliminate this privilege.

Distribution and Service Fees

The Fund has adopted a plan under Rule 12b-1 of the 1940 Act that allows the Fund to pay distribution fees for the sale and distribution of its shares (except with respect to Class Y, which has no Rule 12b-1 plan). The distribution plan also allows the Fund to pay service fees to persons (such as your financial professional) for services provided to shareholders. See “Method of Distribution” in the Fund’s SAI for fur ther discussion of these services. Because these fees are paid out of the Fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, over time, these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges. Please see “Service Fees and Arrangements with Broker/Dealers” in this Prospectus for more service fee and other information regarding arrangements with broker/dealers.

The following table shows the maximum annual percentage payable under the distribution plan, and the amoun t actually paid by the Fund. Fees payable under the distribution plan may be increased to the maximum amount only after approval by the Fund’s Board of Directors. The fees are based on average daily net assets by Class.

Maximum Payable under Plan/Amount Actually Paid
  Class A Class C
Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund 0.50%/0.25% 1.00%/1.00%*

 

* For Class C, 0.75% of the Fund’s average daily net assets is paid for distribution services and 0.25% is paid for shareholder services.

Service Fees and Arrangements with Broker/Dealers

CID, the Fund’s distributor, pays broker/dealers a commission, or reallowance (expressed as a percentage of the offering price for Class A, and a percentage of the amount invested for Class C), when you purchase shares of non-money market funds (except with respect to Class Y). CID also pays broker/dealers an ongoing service fee (except with respect to Class Y) while you own shares of that Fund (expressed as an annual percentage rate of average daily net assets held in Calvert accounts by that dealer). The following table shows the maximum commissions and service fees paid by CID to broker/dealers, which differ depending on the Class.

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  Maximum Commission/Service Fees
  Class A* Class C**
 
Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund 4.00%/0.25% 1.00%/1.00%

 

* Class A service fees begin to accrue in the first month after purchase.

** Class C pays broker/dealers a service fee of 0.25% and additional compensation of 0.75% for a total annual percentage rate of 1%. These fees begin to accrue in the 13th month after purchase.

If the selling broker/dealer has an agreement with CID to sell Class C shares for omnibus retirement account platforms and without a CDSC upon the redemption of the shares, CID does not pay the s elling broker/dealer a commission but does pay the selling broker/dealer a service fee and additional compensation totaling 1.00%, which may begin in the first month, rather than in the 13th month after purchase.

During special sales promotions, CID may reallow to broker/dealers the full Class A front-end sales charge. CID may also pay additional concessions, including de minimis non-cash promotional incentives, such as de minimis merchandise or trips, to broker/dealers employing registered representatives who have sold or are expected to sell a minimum dollar amount of shares of a Fund and/or shares of other Funds underwritten by CID. CID may make expense reimbursements for special training of a broker/dealer’s registered representatives, advertising or equipment, or to defray the expenses of sales contests. Calvert, CID, or their affiliates may pay, from their own resources, certain broker/dealers and/or other persons, for the sale and distribution of the securities or for services to a Fund. These amounts may be significant.

Payments may include additional compensation beyond the regularly scheduled rates and finder’s fees. CID may pay broker/dealers a finder’s fee on Class A shares purchased at NAV in accounts with $1 million or more. Where paid, the finder’s fee is 0.80% of the NAV purchase amount on the first $2 million, 0.64% over $2 million up to $3 million, 0.40% over $3 million up to $50 million, 0.20% over $50 million up to $100 million, and 0.12% over $100 million. If a finder’s fee is paid, and some or all of the purchase is exchanged into another Calvert Fund with a lower finder’s fee within one year, then CID may recoup the difference in the finder’s fee from the broker/dealer. Purchases of shares at NAV for accounts on which a finder’s fee has been paid are subject to a one -year CDSC of 0.80%. All payments will be in compliance with the rules of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority.

How to Open an Account (Class A and C Shares)

Complete and sign an application for each new account (the application is available at www.calvert.com or by calling 800-368-2748). When multiple classes of shares are offered, please specify which class you wish to purchase. For more information, contact your financial professional or Calvert’s client services department at 800 -368-2748.

Please see the Fund Summary above with respect to the minimum initial investment amount and the minimum amount for subsequent investments. The Fund may charge a $2 service fee on additional purchases of less than $250. The Fund may waive investment minimums and applicable service fees for investors who buy shares through certain omnibus accounts, certain wrap fee programs that charge an asset-based fee, and in other cases, at the Fund’s discretion.

For purchases, please make your check payable to the Fund in U.S. dollars and send it along with your application to: Calvert, P.O. Box 219544, Kansas City, MO 64121-9544, or if you use registered, certified or overnight mail, to: Calvert, c/o BFDS, 330 West 9th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105-1807.

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How to Open an Account (Class Y Shares)

Class Y shares are generally available only to wrap or similar fee-based programs offered by financial intermediaries that have entered into an agreement with CID, the Fund’s distributor, to offer Class Y shares to their clients. A financial intermediary includes a broker, dealer, bank (including a bank tr ust department), registered investment adviser, financial planner, retirement plan administrator, third -party administrator, insurance company and any other institution having a selling or administration agreement with CID.

The use of Class Y shares by a financial intermediary will depend on, among other things, the structure of the particular fee-based program. CID will make, in its sole discretion, all determinations as to eligibility to purchase Class Y shares of the Fund.

Please see the Fund Summary with respect to the minimum initial investment amount and the minimum amount for subsequent investments. The Fund may charge a $2 service fee on additional purchases of less than $250. All Class Y purchases must be made by bankwire or via the National Securities Clearing Corporation (“NSCC”), in U.S. dollars. For additional information and wire instructions, call Calvert at 800 -368-2746.

Subsequent Investments (Class A and C Shares)

To make an investment after you open an account, include your investment slip and send your request to: Calvert, P.O. Box 219739, Kansas City, MO 64121-9739, or if you use registered, certified or overnight mail, to: Calvert, c/o BFDS, 330 West 9th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105-1807.

Once you open an account, you may also buy or sell shares by telephone or electronic funds transfer.

Federal Holidays

There are some federal holidays, i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day, when the New York Stock Exchange

(“NYSE”) is open and the Fund is open but check purchases and electronic funds transfers (i.e., bank wires and ACH funds transfers) cannot be received because the banks and post offices are closed.

Customer Identification

Federal regulations require all financial institutions to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account. In order to verify your identity, the Fund requires your name, date of birth, residential street address or principal place of business, social security number and employer identification number or other governmental issued identification when you open an account. The Fund may place limits on account transactions while it is in the process of attempting to verify your identity. If the Fund is unable to verify your identity, the Fund may be required to redeem your shares and close your account.

Through your Broker/Dealer

Your broker/dealer must receive your purchase request before the close of regular trading (gen erally 4 p.m. ET) on the NYSE to receive that day’s NAV. Your broker/dealer will be responsible for furnishing all necessary documentation to Calvert and may charge you for services provided.

HOW SHARES ARE PRICED

The price of shares is based on the Fund’s NAV. The NAV is computed by adding the value of the Fund’s securities holdings plus other assets, subtracting liabilities, and then dividing the result by th e number of shares outstanding. The NAV of each class will be calculated separately.

The NAV is calculated as of the close of each business day, which coincides with the closing of the regular session

27


 

of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. ET). The Fund is open for business each day the NYSE is open.

The Fund may hold securities that are primarily listed on foreign exchanges that trade on days when the NYSE is closed. The Fund does not price shares on days when the NYSE is closed, even if foreign markets may be open. As a result, the value of the Fund’s shares may change on days when you will not be able to buy or sell your shares.

Generally, portfolio securities and other assets are valued based on market quotations. Debt securities are valued utilizing the average of bid prices or at bid prices based on a matrix system (which considers such factors as security prices, yields, maturities and ratings) furnished by dealers through an independent pricing service. Debt securities that will mature in 60 days or less are valued at amortized cost, which approximates fair value.

Under the oversight of the Board of Directors and pursuant to the Fund’s valuation procedures adopted by the Board, the Advisor determines when a market quotation is not readily available or reliable for a particular security.

Investments for which market quotations are not readily available or reliable are fair valued by a fair value team consisting of officers of the Fund and of the Advisor, as determined in good faith under consistently applied procedures under the general supervision of the Board of Directors. No single standard exists for determining fair value, which depends on the circumstances of each investment, but in general fair value is deemed to be the amount an owner might reasonably expect to receive for a security upon its current sale.

In making a fair value determination, under the ultimate supervision of the Board, the Advisor, pursuant to the Fund’s valuation procedures, generally considers a variety of qualitative and quantitative factors relevant to the particular security or type of security. These factors may change over time and are reviewed periodically to ascertain whether there are changes in the particular circumstances affecting an investment which may warrant a change in either the valuation methodology for the investment, or the fair value derived from that methodology, or both. The general factors considered typically include, for example, fundamental analytical data relating to the investment, the nature and duration of restrictions, if any, on the security, and the forces that influence the market in which the security is purchased and sold, as well as the type of security, the size of the holding and numerous other specific factors. Foreign securities are valued based on quotations from the principal market in which such securities are normally traded. If events occur after the close of the principal market in which securities are traded, and before the close of business of the Fund, that are expected to materially affect the value of those securities, then they are valued at their fair value taking these events into account. In addition, fair value pricing may be used for high -yield debt securities or in other instances where a portfolio security is not traded in significant volume for a substantial period.

For assistance in making fair value determinations, the Board has retained a third-party fair value pricing service, pursuant to the Fund’s valuation procedures and under the ultimate supervision of the Board, to quantitatively value holdings of the Fund that trade on foreign exchanges. From time to time, market moves in the U.S. subsequent to the close of those local markets but prior to the Fund’s official pricing time of 4 p.m. Eastern Time may cause those local market prices to not be representative of what a reasonable investor would pay for those securities. In the event of such market movements in excess of previously established and Board-approved thresholds, the Fund’s service providers quantitatively estimate the fair value of each affected security. The values are calculated using the service provider’s proprietary models based upon the actual market close and trailing data from various benchmarks, futures and currencies. Factors that may influence the results of this process include changes in U.S. market index values, price movements in futures contracts based on foreign markets that trade in the U.S., and changes in industry or economic sector indices.

The values assigned to fair value investments are based on available information and do not necessarily represent amounts that might ultimately be realized. Further, because of the inherent uncertainty of valuation, the fair values may differ significantly from the value that would have been used had a ready market for the investment existed, and these differences could be material.

WHEN YOUR ACCOUNT WILL BE CREDITED

Your purchase will be processed at the next NAV calculated after your request is received in good order, as defined below.

All of your purchases must be made in U.S. dollars. No cash or third-party checks will be accepted. No credit card or credit loan checks will be accepted. The Fund reserves the right to suspend the offering of shares for a period of time or to reject any specific purchase order. All purchase orders must be sent to the Transfer Agent; however, as a convenience, check purchases received at Calvert’s office in Bethesda, Maryland, will be sent by overnight delivery to the Transfer Agent and will be credited the next business day upon receipt. Any check purchase received without an investment slip may cause delayed crediting. Any purchase less than the $250 minimum for subsequent investments may be charged a service fee of $2. If your check does not clear your ba nk, your purchase will be

28


 

canceled and you will be charged a $25 fee plus any costs incurred. All purchases will be confirmed and credited to your account in full and fractional shares (rounded to the nearest 1/1000th of a share). See “Request in Good Orde r” below.

Request in Good Order

All requests (both purchase orders and redemption requests) must be received by the Transfer Agent in “good order.” This means that your request must include:

·         The Fund name and account number.

·         The amount of the transaction (in dollars or shares).

·         Signatures of all owners exactly as registered on the account (for mail requests).

·         Signature guarantees (if required).*

·         Any supporting legal documentation that may be required.

·         Any outstanding certificates representing shares to be redeemed.

* For instance, a signature guarantee must be provided by all registered account shareholders when redemption proceeds are sent to a different person or address. A signature guarantee can be obtained from most commercial and savings banks, credit unions, trust companies, or member firms of a U.S. stock exchange. Notarization is not the equivalent of a signature guarantee.

Transactions are processed at the NAV next computed after the Transfer Agent has received all required information. Requests received in good order before the close of regular NYSE trading (generally 4 p.m. ET) will receive that day’s closing NAV; otherwise you will receive the next business day’s NAV.

Purchase and Redemption of Shares through a Financial Intermediary

The Fund has authorized one or more broker/dealers to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund’s behalf. Such broker/dealers are authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund’s behalf. The Fund will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized broker/dealer, or if applicable, a broker/dealer’s authorized designee, receives the order in good order. The customer orders will be priced at the Fund’s NAV next computed after they are received by an authorized broker/dealer or the broker/dealer’s authorized designee.

HOW TO SELL SHARES

You may redeem all or a portion of the shares from your account by telephone or mail on any day the Fund is open for business, provided the amount requested is not on hold or held in escrow pursuant to a statement of intention. When you purchase by check or with ACH funds transfer, the purchase will be on hold for up to 10 business days from the date of receipt. During the hold period, redemption proceeds will not be sent until the Transfer Agent is reasonably satisfied that the purchase payment has been collected.

Your shares will be redeemed at the next NAV calculated after your redemption request is received by the Transfer Agent in good order (less any applicable CDSC and/or redemption fee). The proceeds will normally be sent to you on the next business day, but if making immediate payment could adversely affect the Fund, it may take up to seven (7) days to make payment. Electronic funds transfer redemptions generally will be credited to your bank account by

29


 

the second business day after your phone call.

The Fund has the right to redeem shares in assets other than cash for redemption amounts exceeding, in any 90 -day period, $250,000 or 1% of the NAV of the Fund, whichever is less, by making redemptions-in-kind (distributions of a pro rata share of the portfolio securities, rather than cash). A redemption -in-kind transfers the transaction costs associated with redeeming the security from the Fund to the shareholder. The shareholder will also bear any market risks associated with the portfolio security until the security can be sold.

The Fund reserves the right to suspend or postpone redemptions during any period when:

(a) trading on the NYSE is restricted, as determined by the SEC, or the NYSE is closed all day for other than customary weekend and holiday closings; (b) the SEC has granted an order to the Fund permitting such suspension; or (c) an emergency, as determined by the SEC, exists, making disposal of portfolio securities or valuation of net assets of the Fund not reasonably practicable.

There are some federal holidays, however, i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day, when the NYSE is open and the Fund is open but redemptions cannot be mailed or made by electronic funds transfer because the post offices and banks are closed.

Follow these suggestions to ensure timely processing of your redemption request:

By Telephone (Class A and C Shares) - call 800-368-2745

You may redeem shares from your account by telephone and have your money mailed to your address of record or electronically transferred to a bank you have previously authorized. A $5 charge may be imposed on wire transfers of less than $1,000.

Written Requests (Class A and C Shares)

Send your written requests to: Calvert, P.O. Box 219544, Kansas City, MO 64121 -9544.

Your letter should include your account number, name of the Fund and Class, and the number of shares or the dollar amount you are redeeming, and how you want the money sent to you. Please provide a daytime telephone number, if possible, for us to call if we have questions. If the money is being sent to a new bank, person, or address other than the address of record, your letter must be signature guaranteed.

Systematic Check Redemptions (Class A and C Shares)

If you maintain an account with a balance of $10,000 or more, you may have up to two (2) redemption checks for a fixed amount mailed to you at your address of record on the 15th of the month, simply by sending a letter with all information, including your account number, and the dollar amount ($100 minimum). If you would like a regular check mailed to another person or place, your letter must be signature guaranteed. Unless they ot herwise qualify for a waiver, Class C shares redeemed by Systematic Check Redemption will be subject to the CDSC.

Corporations and Associations (Class A and C Shares)

Your letter of instruction and corporate resolution should be signed by person(s) authorized to act on the account, accompanied by signature guarantee(s).

Trusts (Class A and C Shares)

Your letter of instruction should be signed by the Trustee(s) (as Trustee(s)), with a signature guarantee. (If the Trustee’s name is not registered on your account, please provide a copy of the trust document, certified within the last 60 days).

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Through your Broker/Dealer

Your broker/dealer must receive your request before the close of regular trading on the NYSE to receive that day’s

NAV. Your broker/dealer will be responsible for furnishing all necessary documentation to Calvert and may charge you for services provided.

Redemption Fee

In its effort to detect and prevent market timing, the Fund charges a 2% redemption fee on redemptions, including exchanges, within 30 days of purchase into the Fund unless the shares are held through an intermediary that has been authorized by Fund management to apply its own redemption fee policy, as described under “Other Calvert

Features/Policies -- Market Timing Policy” below. In the event of any such authorization, shareholders should contact the intermediary through which the Fund shares are held for more information on the redemption fee policy that applies to those shares, including any applicable waivers.

For those shares to which the Fund’s redemption fee policy is applicable, the redemption fee will only be waived in the following circumstances:

·        Redemption upon the death or disability of the shareholder, plan participant, or beneficiary. “Disability” means a total disability as evidenced by a determination by the U.S. Social Security Administration.

·        Minimum required distributions from retirement plan accounts for shareholders 70 1/2 and older. The maximum amount subject to this waiver is based only upon the shareholder’s Calvert retirement accoun ts.

·        The return of an excess contribution or deferral amount, pursuant to sections 408(d)(4) or (5), 401(k)(8), 402(g)(2), or 401(m)(6) of the Code.

·        Involuntary redemptions of accounts under procedures set forth by the Fund’s Board of Directors.

·        Redemption for the reallocation of purchases received under a systematic investment plan for rebalancing purposes, or by a discretionary platform for mutual fund wrap programs for rebalancing purposes.

·        Redemption of shares purchased with reinvested dividends or capital gain distributions.

·        Shares transferred from one retirement plan to another in the same Fund.

·        Shares redeemed as part of a retirement plan termination or restructuring.

·        Redemption of shares of a Fund held as a default investment option in a retire ment plan.

·        Exchange or redemption transactions by an account that the Fund or its Transfer Agent reasonably believes is maintained in an omnibus account by a service provider that does not have the systematic capability of assessing the redemption fee at the individual or participant account level. For this purpose, an omnibus account is a Fund account where the ownership of, or interest in, Fund shares by more than one individual or participant is held through the account and the subaccounting for such Fund account is done by the service provider, not the Fund’s Transfer Agent.

In order to determine your eligibility for a redemption fee waiver, it may be necessary to notify your broker/dealer or the Fund of the qualifying circumstances and to provide any applicable supporting documentation.

For shares held through an intermediary in an omnibus account, Calvert relies on the intermediary to assess any applicable redemption fee on underlying shareholder accounts. There are no assurances that intermediaries will properly assess the fee.

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OTHER CALVERT FEATURES / POLICIES

Website

For 24-hour performance information, visit www.calvert.com.

You can obtain account information and authorize certain transactions with the convenience of logging on to www.calvert.com (Class A and C only).

The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus; our website address is included as an inactive textual reference only.

Account Services (Class A and C Shares)

By signing up for services when completing an application to open your Class A or Class C account, you avoid having to obtain a signature guarantee. If you wish to add services at a later date t o an existing account, the Fund requires a signature guarantee to verify your signature. You may obtain a signature guara ntee from any bank, trust company and savings and loan association, credit union, broker-dealer firm or member of a domestic stock exchange. A notary public cannot provide a signature guarantee.

ACH Funds Transfer (Class A and C Shares)

You may purchase Class A or Class C shares or sell Class A or Class C shares by ACH funds transfer without the time delay of mailing a check or the added expense of a wire. Use this service to transfer up to $300,000 electronically. Allow one or two business days after you place your request for the transfer to take place. Money transferred to purchase new Class A or Class C shares will be subject to a hold of up to 10 business days before any subsequent redemption requests for those shares are honored. Transaction requests must be received by 4 p.m. ET. You may request this service on your initial account application. ACH funds transfer transactions returned for insufficient funds will incur a $25 charge.

Telephone Transactions (Class A and C Shares)

You may purchase Class A or Class C shares, or redeem or exchange Class A or Class C shares, or request an electronic funds transfer by telephone if you have pre-authorized service instructions. You receive telephone privileges automatically when you open your account unless you elect otherwise. For our mutual protection, the Fund, the shareholder servicing agent and its affiliates use precautions such as verifying shareholder identity and recording telephone calls to confirm instructions given by phone. A confirmation statement is sent for these transactions; please review this statement and verify the accuracy of your transaction immediately.

Exchanges

Calvert offers a wide variety of investment options that include common stock funds, tax-exempt and corporate bond funds, and money market funds; call your broker/dealer or Calvert representative for more information. We make it easy for you to purchase shares in other Calvert Funds if your investment goals change. The exchange privilege offers flexibility by allowing you to exchange shares on which you have already paid a sales charge from one mutual fund to another at no additional charge.

For Class A and C shares, complete and sign an account application, taking care to register your new account in the same name and taxpayer identification number as your existing Calvert account(s). You may then give exchange instructions by telephone if telephone redemptions have been authorized and the shares are not in certificate form.

32


 

Before you make an exchange, please note the following:

Each exchange represents the sale of shares of one Fund and the purchase of shares of another. Therefore, you could realize a taxable gain or loss on an exchange. Shares may only be exchanged for shares of the same class of another Calvert Fund, except that Class A or Class C shares of a Fund may be exchanged for Class Y shares of the same Fund (no sales charges or other charges will apply to any such exchange), provided you meet the Fund’s eligibility requirements for purchasing Class Y shares; the Class C shares you wish to exchange must not currently be subject to a CDSC.

An exchange must satisfy the minimum investment amount for that Calvert Fund. You may exchange shares acquired by reinvestment of dividends or distributions into another Calvert Fund at no additional charge.

No CDSC is imposed on exchanges of shares subject to a CDSC at the time of the exchange. The applicable CDSC is imposed at the time the shares acquired by the exchange are redeemed.

Exchange requests will not be accepted on any day when Calvert is open but the Fund’s custodian bank is closed (i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day); these exchange requests will be processed the next day the Fund’s custodian bank is open.

The Fund reserves the right to terminate or modify the exchange privilege with 60 days’ written notice.

Market Timing Policy

In general, the Fund is designed for long-term investment and not as a frequent or short-term trading (“market timing”) vehicle. The Fund discourages frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares by Fund shareholders. Further, the Fund does not accommodate frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares by Fund shareholders. Accordingly, the Fund’s Board of Directors has adopted policies and procedures in an effort to detect and prevent market timing in the Fund, which may require you to pay a redemption fee, as described under “How to

Sell Shares - Redemption Fee” in this Prospectus. The Fund believes that market timing activity is not in the best interest of shareholders. Market timing can be disruptive to the portfolio management process and may adversely impact the ability of the Advisor to implement the Fund’s investment strategies. In addition, market timing can disrupt the management of the Fund and raise its expenses through: increased trading and transaction costs; forced and unplanned portfolio turnover; time-zone arbitrage for securities traded on foreign markets; and large asset swings that decrease the Fund’s ability to provide maximum investment return to all shareholders. This in turn can have an adverse effect on Fund performance. In addition to seeking to limit market timing by imposition of redemption fees, the Fund or Calvert at its discretion may reject any purchase or exchange request (purchase side only) it believes to be market timing. However, there is no guarantee that Calvert will detect or prevent market timing activity.

Shareholders may hold the shares of the Fund through a service provider, such as a broker/dealer or a retirement plan, which has adopted market timing policies that differ from the market timing policies adopted by the Fund’s

Board of Directors. In formulating their market timing policies, these service providers may or may not seek input from Calvert regarding certain aspects of their market timing policies, such as the amount of any redemption fee, the minimum holding period or the applicability of trading blocks. As a result, the market timing policies adopted by service providers may be quite dissimilar from the policies adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. The Board of Directors of the Fund has authorized Fund management to defer to the market timing and redemption fee policies of any service provider that distributes shares of the Fund through an omnibus account if the service provider’s policies, in Fund management’s judgment, are reasonably designed to detect and deter market timing transactions. Shareholders may contact Calvert to determine if the service provider through which the shareholder holds shares of the Fund has been authorized by Fund management to apply its own market timing and redemption fee policies in lieu of the policies adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. In the event of any such authorization, shareholders should contact the service provider through which the Fund shares are held for more information on the market timing policies and any redemption fees that apply to those shares.

As stated under “How to Sell Shares” in this Prospectus, a redemption fee will not be assessed on Fund shares held

33


 

through an omnibus account if the service provider maintaining that account:

(i) does not have the systematic capability of assessing the redemption fee at the individual or participant account level, or

(ii) as described above, implements its own policies and procedures to detect and prevent market timing and such policies do not provide for the assessment of a redemption fee.

If a significant percentage of the Fund’s shareholder accounts are held through omnibus accounts that are not subject to a redemption fee, then the Fund would be more susceptible to the risks of market timing activity in the Fund. Even if an omnibus account is not subject to a redemption fee, if a Fund or its Transfer Agent or share holder servicing agent suspects there is market timing activity in the account, Calvert will seek full cooperation from the service provider maintaining the account to identify the underlying participant. Calvert expects the service provider to take immediate action to stop any further market timing activity in the Fund by such participant(s) or plan, or else the Fund will be withdrawn as an investment option for that account. Calvert expects all service providers that maintain omnibus accounts to make reasonable efforts to identify and restrict the short-term trading activities of underlying participants in the Fund.

The Fund and CID reserve the right at any time to reject or cancel any part of any purchase or exchange order (purchase side only). Orders are canceled within one business day, and the purchase price is returned to the investor. The Fund and CID also may modify any terms or conditions of purchase of shares of the Fund (upon prior notice) or withdraw all or any part of the offering made by this Prospectus.

Electronic Delivery of Prospectuses and Shareholder Reports

You may request electronic delivery of Fund prospectuses and annual and semi-annual reports by calling client services at 800-368-2745 or enrolling online at www.calvert.com.

Combined General Mailings (Householding)

Multiple accounts held directly with Calvert that have the same social security numb er will receive one mailing per household of information such as prospectuses and semi-annual and annual reports. Call Calvert client services at 800-368-2745 to request further grouping of accounts to receive fewer mailings, or to request that each accoun t still receive a separate mailing. Separate statements will be generated for each separate account and will be mailed in one envelope for each combination above. Multiple accounts held through a broker/dealer (or other financial intermediary) that share the same household address may receive one mailing.

Special Services and Charges

The Fund pays for shareholder services but not for special services that are required by a few shareholders, such as a request for a historical transcript of an account or a stop payment on a draft. You may be required to pay a fee for these special services; for example, the fee for stop payments is $25.

If you are purchasing shares through a program of services offered by a broker/dealer or other financial institution, you should read the program materials together with this Prospectus. Certain features may be modified in these programs. Investors may be charged a fee if they effect transactions in Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other agent.

Minimum Account Balance/Low Balance Fee

Please maintain a balance in each of your Fund accounts of at least $1,000 per class.

34


 

If the balance in your account falls below the minimum during a month, the account may be closed and the proceeds mailed to the address of record. You will receive notice that your account is below the minimum and will be closed if the balance is not brought up to the required minimum within 30 days.

Shares held through an omnibus account or wrap-fee program for which the Fund has waived investment minimums are not subject to this requirement.

DIVIDENDS, CAPITAL GAINS, AND TAXES

The Fund pays dividends from its net investment income on an annual basis. Net investment income consists of interest income and dividends declared and paid on investments, less expenses. Distributions of net short-term capital gains (treated as dividends for tax purposes) and net long-term capital gains, if any, are normally paid once a year; however, the Fund does not anticipate making any such distributions unless available capital loss carryovers have been used or have expired. Dividend and distribution payments will vary between classes.

Dividend Payment Options

Dividends and any distributions are automatically reinvested in the Fund at NAV (without sales charge), unless you elect to have amounts of $10 or more paid in cash (by check or by electronic funds transfer). Dividends and distributions from any Calvert Fund may be automatically invested in an identically registered account in any other Calvert Fund at NAV. If reinvested in the same account, new shares will be purchased at NAV on the reinvestment date, which is generally 1 to 3 days prior to the payment date. You must notify the Fund in writing to change your payment options. If you elect to have dividends and/or distributions paid in cash, and the U.S. Postal Service returns the check as undeliverable, it, as well as future dividends and distributions, will be reinvested in additional shares. No dividends will accrue on amounts represented by uncashed distribution or redemption checks.

Buying a Dividend

At the time of purchase, the share price of each class may reflect undistributed income, capital gains or unrealized appreciation of securities. Any income or capital gains from these amounts which are later distributed to you are fully taxable. On the ex-dividend date for a distribution, share value is reduced by the amount of the distribution. If you buy shares just before the ex-dividend date (“buying a dividend”), you will pay the full price for the shares and then receive a portion of the price back as a taxable distribution.

Federal Taxes

In January, the Fund will mail Form 1099-DIV indicating the federal tax status of dividends and any capital gain distributions paid to you during the past year. Generally, dividends and distributions are taxable in the year they are paid. However, any dividends and distributions paid in January but declared during the pr ior three months are taxable in the year declared. Dividends and distributions are taxable to you regardless of whether they are taken in cash or reinvested. Dividends, including short-term capital gains, are taxable as ordinary income. Distributions from long-term capital gains are taxable as long-term capital gains, regardless of how long you have owned shares.

You may realize a capital gain or loss when you sell or exchange shares. This capital gain or loss will be short - or long-term, depending on how long you have owned the shares which were sold. In January, the Fund whose shares you have sold or exchanged in the past year will mail Form 1099-B indicating the total amount of all such sales, including exchanges. You should keep your annual year-end account statements to determine the cost (basis) of the shares to report on your tax returns.

35


 

Cost Basis Reporting

Effective January 1, 2012, mutual funds must report cost basis information to you and the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) when you sell or exchange shares acquired on or after January 1, 2012 in your non-retirement accounts. The new cost basis regulations do not affect retirement accounts, money market funds, and shares acquired before January 1, 2012. A Fund will permit shareholders to elect from among several IRS-accepted cost basis methods, including average cost. In the absence of an election by a shareholder, the Fund will use the average cost method with respect to that shareholder. The cost basis method a shareholder elects may not be chang ed with respect to a redemption of shares after the settlement date of the redemption. Shareholders should consult with their tax advisors to determine the best IRS-accepted cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how the new cost basis reporting rules apply to them.

Other Tax Information

In addition to federal taxes, you may be subject to state or local taxes on your investment, depending on the laws in your area. You may receive additional information regarding foreign source income and foreign taxes to assist in your calculation of foreign tax credits.

Some of the dividends may be identified as qualified dividend income and be eligible for the reduced federal tax rate if the individual investor meets the holding period requirement. Dividends paid by the Fund may be eligible for the dividends received deduction available to corporate taxpayers. Corporate taxpayers requiring this information may contact Calvert.

Taxpayer Identification Number

If we do not have your correct Social Security or Taxpayer Identification Number (“TIN”) and a signed certified application or Form W-9, Federal law requires us to withhold 28% of your reportable dividends, and possibly 28% of certain redemptions. In addition, you may be subject to a fine by the Internal Revenue Service. You will also be prohibited from opening another account by exchange. If this TIN information is not received within 60 days after your account is established, your account may be redeemed (closed) at the current NAV on the date of redemption. Calvert reserves the right to reject any new account or any purchase order for failure to supply a certified TIN.

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To Open an Account:

800-368-2748

Performance and Prices:

www. calvert.com
24 hours, 7 days a week

Service for Existing Accounts:

Shareholders 800-368-2745
Brokers 800-368-2746

TDD for Hearing-Impaired:

800-541-1524

Calvert Office:

4550 Montgomery Avenue
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814

Registered, Certified or Overnight Mail:

Calvert c/o BFDS
330 West 9th Street
Kansas City, MO 64105

PRINCIPAL UNDERWRITER

Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc.
4550 Montgomery Avenue
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814

For investors who want more information about the Funds, the following documents are available free upon request:

Annual/Semi-Annual Reports: Additional information about the Fund’s investments is available in the Fund’s Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to shareholders. In the Fund’s Annual Report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.

Statement of Additional Information (SAI): The SAI for the Fund provides more detailed information about the Fund, including a description of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of its portfolio holdings.

The SAI for the Fund is incorporated into this prospectus by reference.

37


 

You can get free copies of reports and SAIs, request other information and discuss your questions about the Fund by contacting your financial professional, or the Fund at:

Calvert Investments, Inc.
4550 Montgomery Ave.
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814
Telephone: 1-800-368-2745

The Fund also makes available its SAI and its Annual and Semi-Annual Reports free of charge on Calvert’s website at the following Internet address: www.calvert.com

You can review and copy information about the Fund (including its SAI) at the SEC’s Public Reference Room in Washington, D.C. Information on the operation of the public reference room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-202-551-8090. Reports and other information about the Fund are available on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s Internet site at http://www.sec.gov. Copies of this information may also be obtained, upon payment of a duplicating fee, by electronic request at publicinfo@sec.gov, or by writing to the Public Reference Section of the SEC, Washington, D.C. 20549-1520.

Investment CompanyAct file:

No. 811-06563 Calvert World Values Fund, Inc. (Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund)

Printed on recycled paper using soyinks

38

 

PROSPECTUS
Class I

 

September 28, 2012

 

 

 

Class (Ticker)

Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund

I (____)

 

 

These securities have not been approved or disapproved by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) or any State Securities Commission, and neither the SEC nor any State Securities Commission has determined that this Prospectus is accurate or adequate. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 


 

 

                                                                                                                                                                         

 

Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund Prospectus

Class I

September 28, 2012

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page

 

 

 

FUND SUMMARY  

 

(This section summarizes Fund fees, investment strategies, risks, past performance, and purchase and sale procedures.)

 

 

MORE INFORMATION ON FEES AND EXPENSES

 

(This section provides details on Fund fees and expenses.)

 

 

MORE INFORMATION ON INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS

(This section provides details on Fund investment strategies and risks.)

 

 

Portfolio Holdings

 

 

ABOUT SUSTAINABLE AND SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTING

 

(This section describes the sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria of the Fund.)

 

 

Calvert Solution Strategies ®

 

 

Investment Selection Process

 

Sustainable and Responsible Investment Criteria

for Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund

 

 

 

 

 

Special Investment Programs

 

 

High Social Impact Investments

 

 

Special Equities

 

 

MANAGEMENT OF FUND INVESTMENTS

 

(This section provides details on Fund investment.) managers.)

 

 

About Calvert

 

 

More Information about the Advisor, Subadvisor and Portfolio Manager

 

 

Advisory Fees

 

 

SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION

 

(This section provides details on how to purchase and sell Fund shares, how shares are valued, and information on dividends, distributions and taxes.)

 

 

How to Open an Account

 

 

How Shares are Priced

 

 

When Your Account will be Credited

 

 

How to Sell Shares

 

 

Other Calvert Features/Policies (Exchanges, Market Timing Policy, etc.)

 

 

Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes

 

 

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FUND SUMMARY                                              Calvert Solution Strategies®                                                                                                                                           

CALVERT EMERGING MARKETS EQUITY FUND 

 

Class (Ticker): 

 

I ( ____) 

 

 

 

 

 

INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE

The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation by investing primarily in equity securities of companies located in emerging market countries, using the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria. This objective may be changed by the Fund’s Board of Directors without shareholder approval.

 

FEES AND EXPENSES OF THE FUND

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund.

 

Class I

 

Redemption fee (as a % of amount redeemed or exchanged within 7 days of purchase)

 

2.00%

 

 

Class I

 

Management fees

 

1.05%

 

Distribution and service (12b-1) fees

 

None

 

Other expenses

 

0.79%

 

Total annual fund operating expenses

 

1.84%

 

Less fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement 1

 

(0.41%)

 

Net expenses

 

1.43%

 

 


1    The investment advisor has agreed to contractually limit direct net annual fund operating expenses to 1.43% through January 31, 2014.  Only the Board of Directors of the Fund may terminate the Fund's expense cap before the contractual period expires.    
  

 

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Example

This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that:

·         you invest $1,000,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated; 

·         your investment has a 5% return each year;

·         the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same; and

·         any Calvert expense limitation is in effect for the period indicated in the fee table above.

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, under these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year

3 Years

$14,555

$49,679

 

Portfolio Turnover

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (“turns over” its portfolio).  A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account.  These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the “Example”, affect the Fund’s performance.  Because the Fund has less than a full fiscal year of investment operations, no portfolio turnover rate is provided for the Fund at this time.   

 

INVESTMENTS, RISKS AND PERFORMANCE

Principal Investment Strategies

The Fund normally invests at least 80% of its assets, including borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of companies located in emerging market countries.  The Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ notice before changing this 80% policy.  

 

Equity securities may include common stock, preferred stock, depositary receipts and equity-equivalent securities, including derivatives, such as futures, options and swaps. 

 

The Subadvisor may consider emerging countries to be those included in the Fund’s benchmark index, the MSCI Emerging Markets Index; countries classified as emerging economies by the World Bank; and other countries or markets with similar emerging characteristics.  A company is considered to be located in an emerging market if it has a class of securities whose principal securities market is in an emerging country; is organized under the laws of, or has a principal office in, an emerging country; derives 50% or more of its total revenues or earnings from goods produced, sales made, or services provided in one or more emerging countries; or maintains 50% or more of its assets in one or more emerging countries.

 

The Fund may invest in companies of any market capitalization size but seeks to have market capitalization size characteristics similar to that of the MSCI Emerging Markets Index.  The Fund is expected to invest its assets among companies located in emerging markets around the world.  The Fund may also invest in securities denominated in foreign currencies and may engage in foreign currency transactions.

 

The Fund is “non-diversified,” which means it may invest more of its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a “diversified” fund. 

 

The Subadvisor seeks to identify companies that are trading at a discount to intrinsic value but have the potential to increase their book value.  To this end, the Subadvisor combines a top-down country analysis with bottom-up fundamental company research.  The country analysis includes an assessment of the risks and opportunities for each emerging market country through in-depth quantitative and qualitative analysis.  In addition, the country research process produces a ranking of emerging markets countries based on expected returns with greater active weights allocated to higher-ranking countries.  Fundamental company research also utilizes a number of qualitative and quantitative methods.  Portfolio construction is determined by the Subadvisor based on its level of conviction in the country and company with input from proprietary risk models. 

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The Fund may sell a security when it no longer appears attractive by the Subadvisor or does not meet the Fund’s sustainability criteria.

 

Sustainable and Responsible Investing.  The Fund seeks to invest in emerging market companies whose products/services or industrial/business practices contribute towards addressing one or more global sustainability challenges in their local and/or international markets, including development, poverty and health; environment and climate change; and rights and governance.

Investments are first selected for financial soundness and then evaluated according to these sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria, the application of which is in the economic interest of the Fund and its shareholders.

 

Principal Risks

You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could underperform, because of the risks described below.  An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency.

Non-Diversification Risk. Because the Fund may invest more of its assets in a smaller number of issuers than a diversified fund, the gains or losses on a single stock may have greater impact on the Fund than a diversified fund.

Management Risk.  The individual investments of the Fund may not perform as expected, and the Fund’s portfolio management practices may not achieve the desired result.

Stock Market Risk.  The stock market may fall in value, causing prices of stocks held by the Fund to fall.

Market Capitalization Risks. Large-cap companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges such as changes in technology, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion. Prices of small-cap and mid-cap stocks can be more volatile than those of larger, more established companies. Small-cap and mid-cap companies are more likely to have more limited product lines, fewer capital resources and less depth of management than larger companies. Prices of microcap securities are generally even more volatile and their markets are even less liquid relative to small-cap, mid-cap and large-cap securities.

Common Stock Risk.  Although common stocks have a history of long-term growth in value, their prices fluctuate based on changes in a company’s financial condition, on overall market and economic conditions, and on investors’ perception of a company’s well-being.

Preferred Stock Risk. The market value of preferred stock generally decreases when interest rates rise and is affected by the issuer’s ability to make payments on the preferred stock.

Foreign Securities Risk. Investing in foreign securities involves additional risks relating to political, social, and economic developments abroad. Other risks result from differences between regulations that apply to U.S. and foreign issuers and markets, and the potential for foreign markets to be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets. Foreign securities include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”). Unsponsored ADRs involve additional risks because U.S. reporting requirements do not apply and the issuing bank will recover shareholder distribution costs from movement of share prices and payment of dividends.

Foreign Currency Risk. Securities that trade or are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar may be adversely affected by fluctuations in currency exchange rates. When the U.S. dollar strengthens relative to a foreign currency, the U.S. dollar value of an investment denominated in that currency will typically fall.  GDRs can involve direct currency risk since, unlike ADRs, they may not be U.S. dollar-denominated. ADRs indirectly bear currency risk because they represent an interest in securities that are not denominated in U.S. dollars.

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Foreign Currency Transactions Risk.  An investment transacted in a foreign currency may lose value due to fluctuations in the rate of exchange. These fluctuations can make the return on an investment go up or down, entirely apart from the quality or performance of the investment itself.

Emerging Markets Risk. The risks of investing in emerging market securities are greater than those of investing in securities of developed foreign countries. These risks include volatile currency exchange rates, periods of high inflation, increased risk of default, greater social, economic and political uncertainty and instability, less governmental supervision and regulation of securities markets, weaker auditing and financial reporting standards, lack of liquidity in the markets, and the significantly smaller market capitalizations of emerging market issuers.

Valuation Risk. A stock judged to be undervalued by the Subadvisor may actually be appropriately priced, and it may not appreciate as anticipated.

Derivatives Risk. In general, a derivative is a financial contract whose value is based on the value of a financial asset (such as a stock, bond, or currency), a physical asset (such as gold), or a market index (such as the S&P 500 Index). Derivative instruments are subject to a number of risks, including the risk of changes in the market price of the underlying asset, credit risk with respect to the counterparty, and liquidity risk. The Fund’s use of certain derivatives may also have a leveraging effect, which may increase the volatility of the Fund and reduce its returns.

 

Performance

Because the Fund has less than a full calendar year of investment operations, no performance information is presented for the Fund at this time.

 

PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT

Investment Advisor.  Calvert Investment Management, Inc. (“Calvert” or the “Advisor”)

Investment Subadvisor.  Hermes Investment Management Limited (“Hermes”)

Portfolio Manager Name

 

Title

 

Length of Time

Managing Fund

 

Gary Greenberg

 

Lead Portfolio Manager, Hermes Emerging Markets, Hermes

 

Since September 2012

 



 

BUYING AND SELLING SHARES


You can buy, sell (redeem) or exchange shares of the Fund, either through a financial professional or directly from the Fund, on any day that the New York Stock Exchange is open. The share price is based on the Fund’s net asset value, determined after receipt of your request in good order. To purchase shares directly from the Fund, open an account by completing and signing an application (available at www.calvert.com or by calling 800-368-2748).

All initial purchases must be made by bankwire or ACH funds transfer (each an “electronic funds transfer”) in U.S. dollars.

 

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Minimum to Open Fund Account

$1,000,000

The Fund may waive the initial investment minimum for certain institutional accounts where it is believed to be in the best interest of the Fund and its shareholders.

 

To Buy Shares

 

New Accounts (include application) and Subsequent Investments:

 

 

For wire instructions, call 800-327-2109

 

 

To Sell Shares

 

By Telephone

 

Call 800-368-2745

 

TAX INFORMATION

Unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account, any dividends and distributions made by the Fund are taxable to you as ordinary income or capital gains and may also be subject to state and local taxes.

 

PAYMENTS TO BROKER/DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker/dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services.  These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker/dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment.  Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s Web site for more information.

 

MORE INFORMATION ON FEES AND EXPENSES

REDEMPTION FEE

The redemption fee applies to redemptions, including exchanges, within 7 days of purchase. This fee is intended to ensure that the portfolio trading costs are borne by investors making the transactions and not by shareholders already in the Fund. The fee is deducted from the redemption proceeds. It is payable to the Class I shares of the Fund and is accounted for as an addition to paid-in capital. The fee will not be charged directly on certain retirement account platforms and other similar omnibus-type accounts, but rather on their participants by the subtransfer agent and remitted to the Fund.  Accounts of foundations, endowments, state and local governments, and those that use certain types of consultants are excluded from the Class I redemption fee.  See “How to Sell Shares/Redemption Fee” in this Prospectus for situations where the fee may be waived.

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MANAGEMENT FEES

Management fees include the advisory fee paid by the Fund to the Advisor and the administrative fee paid by the Fund to Calvert Investment Administrative Services, Inc., an affiliate of the Advisor.

With respect to the amount of the Fund’s advisory fee, see “Advisory Fees” in this Prospectus. The administrative fees (as a percentage of the Fund’s net assets) paid by the Fund is 0.10%.

OTHER EXPENSES

“Other expenses” include custodial, transfer agent and subtransfer agent/recordkeeping payments, as well as various other expenses. Subtransfer agent/recordkeeping payments may be made to third parties (including affiliates of the Advisor) that provide recordkeeping and other administrative services.

CONTRACTUAL FEE WAIVERS AND/OR EXPENSE REIMBURSEMENTS

Where Calvert has contractually agreed to a fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement, the expense limitation does not limit any acquired fund fees and expenses paid indirectly by a shareholder. The Example in the Fund Summary reflects the expense limits set forth in the fee table but only through the contractual date. Under the terms of the contractual expense limitation, operating expenses do not include interest expense, brokerage commissions, extraordinary expenses, performance fee adjustments (if applicable), and taxes. The Fund does not expect to incur a material amount of interest expense in the fiscal year.

The Fund has an expense offset arrangement with the custodian bank whereby the custodian fees may be paid indirectly by credits on the Fund’s uninvested cash balances. These credits are used to reduce the Fund’s expenses. Under those circumstances where the Advisor has provided to the Fund a contractual expense limitation, and to the extent any expense offset credits are earned, the Advisor may benefit from the expense offset arrangement and the Advisor’s obligation under the contractual limitation may be reduced by the credits earned. Expense offset credits, if applicable, are included in the line item “Less fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement” in the fee table in the Fund Summary.

See “Investment Advisor” in the Fund’s SAI for more information.

 

EXAMPLE

The Example in the Fund’s Fund Summary also assumes that you reinvest all dividends and distributions.

 

MORE INFORMATION ON INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS

 

A concise description of the Fund’s principal investment strategies and principal risks is provided under the earlier Fund Summary. On the following pages are further descriptions of these principal investment strategies and techniques, as well as certain non-principal investment strategies and techniques of the Fund, along with their associated risks. The Fund has additional non-principal investment policies and restrictions, which are discussed under “Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks” in the Fund’s SAI.

For certain investment strategies listed, the table below shows the Fund’s limitations as a percentage of either its net or total assets. Numbers in this table show maximum allowable amount only; for actual usage, consult the Fund’s annual/semi-annual reports. (Please see the pages of this Prospectus following the table for descriptions of the investment strategies and definitions of the principal types of risks involved. Explanatory information about certain investment strategies of the Fund is also provided below.)

 

 

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Key to Table

*         Fund currently uses as a principal investment strategy

□        Permitted, but not a principal investment strategy

xN      Allowed up to x% of Fund’s net assets

xT       Allowed up to x% of Fund’s total assets

 

 

 

Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund

 

Investment Techniques

 

Active Trading Strategy/Turnover

 

o 

Temporary Defensive Positions

 

o 

Exchange-Traded Funds

 

o

Conventional Securities

 

Stocks in General

 

*

Foreign Securities

*

Illiquid securities

 

15N

 

Leveraged Derivative Instruments

 

Options on securities and indices

 

5T1

 

Futures contract

 

5N2

 

 

 

1     Based on net premium payments.

2     Based on initial margin required to establish position.

 

Description of Investment Strategies and Associated Risks

The investment strategies listed in the table above are described below, and the principal types of risk involved with each strategy are listed. See the “Glossary of Certain Investment Risks” for definitions of these risk types.

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Investment Techniques and Associated Risks

 

Active Trading Strategy/Turnover involves selling a security soon after purchase. An active trading strategy causes a Fund to have higher portfolio turnover compared to other funds, exceeding 100%, and may translate to higher transaction costs, such as commissions and custodian and settlement fees. Because this strategy may cause the Fund to have a relatively high amount of short-term capital gains, which generally are taxable at the ordinary income tax rate, it may increase an investor’s tax liability.

 

Risks: Opportunity, Market and Transaction

 

Temporary Defensive Positions. During adverse market, economic or political conditions, the Fund may depart from its principal investment strategies by holding cash and investing in cash equivalents. During times of any temporary defensive position, a Fund may not be able to achieve its investment objective.

 

Risks: Opportunity

 

Exchange-Traded Funds (“ETFs”) are shares of other investment companies that can be traded in the secondary market (e.g., on an exchange) but whose underlying assets are stocks selected to track a particular index. ETFs are used for the limited purpose of managing a Fund’s cash position consistent with the Fund’s applicable benchmark to reduce deviations from the benchmark while enabling the Fund to accommodate its need for periodic liquidity.

 

Risks: Correlation and Market

 

Conventional Securities and Associated Risks

 

Stocks in General. Common stocks represent an ownership interest in a company. They may or may not pay dividends or carry voting rights. Common stock occupies the most junior position in a company’s capital structure. Debt securities and preferred stocks have rights senior to a company’s common stock. Stock prices overall may decline over short or even long periods. The type of stock (large-cap, mid-cap, growth, value, etc.) purchased pursuant to a Fund’s investment style tends to go through cycles of doing better or worse than the stock market in general, and its returns may trail returns of other asset classes. Finally, individual stocks may lose value for a variety of reasons, even when the overall stock market has increased. Factors which can negatively impact the value of common stocks include economic factors such as interest rates, and non-economic factors such as political events.

 

Risks: Market

 

Foreign securities. Foreign securities include securities issued by entities whose principal place of business is located outside the U.S. This includes debt instruments denominated in other currencies such as Eurobonds.

 

Risks: Market, Currency, Transaction, Liquidity, Information and Political

 

Illiquid securities. Securities which cannot be readily sold because there is no active market. Special Equities (venture capital private placements) and High Social Impact Investments are illiquid.

 

Risks: Liquidity, Market and Transaction

 

 

 

Leveraged Derivative Instruments and Associated Risks

 

Options on securities and indices. Contracts giving the holder the right but not the obligation to purchase or sell a security (or the cash value, in the case of an option on an index) at a specified price within or at a specified time. A call option gives the purchaser of the option the right to purchase the underlying security from the writer of the option at a specified exercise price. A put option gives the purchaser of the option the right to sell the underlying security to the writer of the option at a specified exercise price.

 

Risks: Interest Rate, Currency, Market, Leverage, Correlation, Liquidity, Credit and Opportunity

 

Futures contract. Agreement to buy or sell a specific amount of a commodity or financial instrument at a particular price on a specific future date.

 

Risks: Interest Rate, Currency, Market, Leverage, Correlation, Liquidity and Opportunity

 

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Glossary of Certain Investment Risks

 

Correlation risk

 

The risk that when a Fund “hedges,” two investments may not behave in relation to one another the way Fund managers expect them to, which may have unexpected or undesired results. For example, a hedge may reduce potential gains or may exacerbate losses instead of reducing them. For ETFs, there is a risk of tracking error. An ETF may not be able to exactly replicate the performance of the underlying index due to operating expenses and other factors (e.g., holding cash even though the underlying benchmark index is not composed of cash), and because transactions occur at market prices instead of at net asset value.

 

Credit risk

 

The risk that the issuer of a security or the counterparty to an investment contract may default or become unable to pay its obligations when due.

 

Currency risk

 

The risk that when a Fund buys, sells or holds a security denominated in foreign currency, adverse changes in foreign currency rates may cause investment losses when a Fund’s investments are converted to U.S. dollars. Currency risk may be hedged or unhedged. Unhedged currency exposure may result in gains or losses as a result of a change in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and the respective foreign currency.

 

Information risk

 

The risk that information about a security or issuer or the market might not be available, complete, accurate, or comparable.

 

Interest rate risk

 

The risk that changes in interest rates will adversely affect the value of an investor’s fixed-income securities. When interest rates rise, the value of fixed-income securities will generally fall. Conversely, a drop in interest rates will generally cause an increase in the value of fixed-income securities. Longer-term securities and zero coupon/ “stripped” coupon securities (“strips”) are subject to greater interest rate risk.

 

Leverage risk

 

The risk that occurs in some securities or techniques which tend to magnify the effect of small changes in an index or a market. This can result in a loss that exceeds the amount actually invested.  

 

Liquidity risk

 

The risk that occurs when investments cannot be readily sold. A Fund may have to accept a less-than-desirable price to complete the sale of an illiquid security or may not be able to sell it at all.

 

Market risk

 

The risk that securities prices in a market, a sector or an industry will fluctuate, and that such movements might reduce an investment’s value.

 

Opportunity risk

 

The risk of missing out on an investment opportunity because the assets needed to take advantage of it are committed to less advantageous investments or strategies.

 

Political risk

 

The risk that may occur when the value of a foreign investment may be adversely affected by nationalization, taxation, war, government instability or other economic or political actions or factors, including risk of expropriation.

 

Transaction risk

 

The risk that a Fund may be delayed or unable to settle a transaction or that commissions and settlement expenses may be higher than usual.

 

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Explanation of Investment Strategies Used by the Fund

ADRs and GDRs. American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) are certificates evidencing an ownership interest in shares issued by a foreign company that are held by a custodian bank in the company’s home country. ADRs are U.S. dollar-denominated certificates issued by a U.S. bank and traded on exchanges or over-the-counter in the U.S. as domestic shares. The Fund may invest in either sponsored or unsponsored ADRs. GDRs are certificates issued by an international bank that are generally traded in, and denominated in the currency of, countries other than the home country of the issuer of the underlying shares. Companies, including those from emerging markets, typically use GDRs to make their shares available to investors in two or more foreign countries.

Emerging Market Securities.  Emerging market securities are exposed to a number of risks that may make these investments volatile in price or difficult to trade.  Political risks  may include unstable governments, nationalization, restrictions on foreign ownership, laws that prevent investors from getting their money out of a country and legal systems that do not protect property rights as well as the laws of the U.S. Market risks may include economies that concentrate in only a few industries, securities issued that are held by only a few investors, limited trading capacity in local exchanges and the possibility that markets or issues may be manipulated by foreign nationals who have inside information.

Preferred Stock Preferred stock is a class of capital stock that typically pays dividends at a specified rate. It is generally senior to common stock but subordinate to debt securities with respect to the payment of dividends and on liquidation of the issuer.

Derivatives.  The term “derivatives” covers a broad range of financial instruments, including swap agreements, options, warrants, futures contracts, and currency forwards, whose values are derived, at least in part, from the value of one or more indicators, such as a security, asset, index or reference rate.  Derivatives may be used to manage exposure to securities prices and foreign currencies; as an efficient means of increasing or decreasing the Fund’s exposure to certain markets; to protect the value of portfolio securities; and to serve as a cash management tool.

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Foreign Currency Transactions. An investment transacted in a foreign currency may lose value due to fluctuations in the rate of exchange.  These fluctuations can make the return on an investment go up or down, entirely apart from the quality or performance of the investment itself.  The  Fund may enter into foreign currency transactions either to facilitate settlement transactions or for purposes of hedging exposure to underlying currencies.  To manage currency exposure, the Fund may enter into forward currency contracts to “lock in” the U.S. dollar price of the security. A forward currency contract involves an agreement to purchase or sell a specified currency at a specified future price set at the time of the contract.

Swaps. A swap is an agreement between two parties to exchange payments based on a reference asset. In a standard swap transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. The gross returns to be exchanged or “swapped” between the parties are generally calculated with respect to a “notional amount,” – i.e., the return on or increase in value of a particular dollar amount invested at a particular interest rate, in a particular foreign currency, or in a “basket” of securities representing a particular index.

Futures Contracts. A futures contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a security on a future date which has the effect of establishing the current price for the security. Many futures contracts by their terms require actual delivery and acceptance of securities, but some allow for cash settlement of the difference between the futures price and the market value of the underlying security or index at time of delivery. The value of a futures contract tends to increase and decrease in tandem with the value of the underlying instrument. The price of futures can be highly volatile; using them could lower total return, and the potential loss from futures can exceed a Fund's initial investment in such contracts.

PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS

The Fund’s portfolio holdings are included in Semi-Annual and Annual Reports that are distributed to shareholders of the Fund. The Fund also discloses its portfolio holdings in its Schedule of Investments on Form N-Q, which is filed with the SEC no later than 60 days after the close of the first and third fiscal quarters. These filings are publicly available at the SEC.

A description of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio securities is available under “Portfolio Holdings Disclosure” in the Fund’s SAI.

 

ABOUT SUSTAINABLE AND SOCIALLY RESPONSIBLE INVESTING

 

CALVERT SOLUTION STRATEGIES® 

 

Investment Selection Process

In seeking to achieve the Fund’s investment objective, investments are first selected for financial soundness and then evaluated according to the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria, the application of which is in the economic interest of the Fund and its shareholders.

Investments in fixed-income securities for the Fund may be made prior to the application of sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria and strategies, due to the nature of the fixed-income market, where unlike equities, fixed-income securities are not available on exchange traded markets, and the window of availability may not be sufficient to permit Calvert to perform sustainability and corporate responsibility analysis prior to purchase. However, following purchase, the fixed-income security is evaluated according to the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria and if it is not found to meet those standards, the security will be sold per Calvert’s procedures, at a time that is in the best interests of the shareholders.

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Investment decisions on whether a company meets the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria typically apply to all securities issued by that company. In rare instances, however, different decisions can be made on a company’s equity and its debt.

The Fund may invest in ETFs for the limited purpose of managing the Fund’s cash position consistent with the Fund’s applicable benchmark. The ETFs in which the Fund may invest will not be screened and will not be required to meet the sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria otherwise applicable to investments made by the Fund. In addition, the ETFs in which the Fund may invest may hold securities of companies or entities that the Fund could not invest in directly because such companies or entities do not meet the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria. The principal purpose of investing in ETFs is not to meet the sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria by investing in individual companies, but rather to help the Fund meet its investment objective by obtaining market exposure to securities in the Fund’s applicable benchmark while enabling it to accommodate its need for periodic liquidity.

The selection of an investment by the Fund does not constitute endorsement or validation by the Fund, nor does the exclusion of an investment necessarily reflect failure to satisfy the Fund’s sustainability and corporate responsibility criteria.

 

Sustainable and Socially Responsible Investment Criteria for Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund

The long-term performance of companies operating in long established and/or emerging markets alike depends on progress towards sustainable development.  The Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund seeks to invest in companies whose products/services or industrial/business practices contribute towards addressing one or more global sustainability challenges in their local and/or international markets.  

Actions by companies to address such global sustainability challenges include the following themes:

 

Development, Poverty and Health

•           Promoting economic development, income generation and poverty reduction

•           Improving quality of life in poor households and communities

•           Supporting agricultural innovation and food security

•           Providing access to safe medicines and low-cost health care

•           Expanding digital access and mobile communications for underserved communities and populations

 

Environment and Climate Change

•           Mitigating and adapting to climate change and other environmental challenges

•           Enhancing access to clean water and sanitation infrastructure

 

Rights and Governance

•           Respecting human rights, labor rights, and Indigenous Peoples’ rights in local communities/workplaces

•           Fostering gender equity and diversity in workplaces and local communities 

•           Overcoming corruption through transparency and improved governance

 

In addition to evaluating companies according to these criteria, investments are also evaluated according to the Fund’s threshold responsibility standards with respect to tobacco, weapons and human rights.  The Fund has the following threshold responsibility standards which are applied in determining whether a security qualifies as an investment for the Fund:

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•           The Fund will seek to avoid investing in companies that manufacture tobacco products.

•           The Fund will seek to avoid investing in companies that manufacture, design or sell weapons or the critical components of weapons that violate international humanitarian law.

•           The Fund will critically evaluate companies that significantly support governments that are under U.S. or international sanction for grave human rights abuses such as genocide or forced labor.

 

In addition to these threshold responsibility standards, investments will be evaluated and may be excluded for extraordinary events and controversial issues that may adversely affect a company’s reputation, operations and/or social license to operate.

 

SPECIAL INVESTMENT PROGRAMS

 

As part of Calvert’s and Fund shareholders’ ongoing commitment to providing and fostering innovative initiatives, the Fund may invest a small percentage of their respective assets through special investment programs that are non-principal investment strategies pioneered by Calvert – High Social Impact Investments and Special Equities.

High Social Impact Investments

 

High Social Impact Investments is a program that targets up to 1% of the Fund’s assets. High Social Impact Investments offer a rate of return below the then-prevailing market rate and present attractive opportunities for furthering the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria.

These investments may be either debt or equity investments. These types of investments are illiquid. High Social Impact debt investments are unrated and below-investment grade, and involve a greater risk of default or price decline than investment grade securities. The Fund believes that these investments have a significant sustainability and social responsibility return through their impact in our local communities.

The Fund’s High Social Impact Investments are fair valued by a fair value team consisting of officers of the Fund and of the Fund’s Advisor, as determined in good faith under consistently applied valuation procedures adopted by the Fund’s Board and under the ultimate supervision of the Board. See “How Shares Are Priced” in this Prospectus. The Fund’s High Social Impact Investments can be made through direct investments, or placed through intermediaries, such as the Calvert Social Investment Foundation (as discussed below).

Pursuant to an exemptive order issued by the SEC, the Fund may invest those assets allocated for investment through the High Social Impact Investments program with the purchase of Community Investment Notes issued by the Calvert Social Investment Foundation. The Calvert Social Investment Foundation is a non-profit organization, legally distinct from the Fund and Calvert Investments, Inc., organized as a charitable and educational foundation for the purpose of increasing public awareness and knowledge of the concept of socially responsible investing. It has instituted the Calvert Community Investments program to raise assets from individual and institutional investors and then invest these assets in non-profit or not-for-profit community development organizations, community development banks, cooperatives and social enterprises that focus on low income housing, economic development, business development and other social and environmental considerations in urban and rural communities that may lead to a more just and sustainable society in the U.S. and around the globe.

The Fund may also invest in high social impact issuers through social enterprises in conjunction with the Special Equities investment program (see “Special Equities” below).  

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Special Equities

The Fund may invest in the Special Equities investment program that allows the Fund to promote especially promising approaches to sustainable and socially responsible investment goals through privately placed investments. Special Equities investments are subject to the Fund’s limit on illiquid securities (which is no more than 15% of the Fund’s net assets). The investments are generally venture capital privately placed investments in small, untried enterprises. These include pre-IPO companies and private funds, including limited partnerships. Most Special Equities investments are expected to have a projected market-rate risk-adjusted return. A small percentage of the program may be invested in Social Enterprises, issues that have a projected below-market risk-adjusted rate of return, but are expected to have a high degree of positive impact on societal change. The Special Equities Committee of the Fund identifies, evaluates, and selects the Special Equities investments.  Special Equities involve a high degree of risk and are all subject to liquidity, information and transaction risk.  Special Equities foreign investments are also subject to foreign securities risk, while Special Equities debt securities, which are generally below-investment grade, are also subject to credit risk. The risks associated with a Special Equities investment may cause the value of the investment to decline below its cost and, in some instances, to lose its value entirely. A Fund’s Special Equities investments are valued under the direction of the Fund’s Board.

Pursuant to approval by the Fund’s Board of Directors, the Fund has retained Stephen Moody and Daryn Dodson as consultants to provide investment research for the Special Equities Program.

 

Manager Discovery Program

 

As part of the ongoing commitment of Calvert to promote equal opportunity, Calvert has introduced the Manager Discovery Program. The program allocates up to 5% of a Fund’s assets to strong-performing yet often overlooked minority and women-owned money management firms. These firms must have a proven track record and investment discipline that mirror the investment objectives of a Fund. The Manager Discovery Program seeks to bring a dynamic new perspective to a Fund, while maintaining Calvert’s long-standing commitment to seeking financial performance and societal impact. No firm currently participates in the program.

 

MANAGEMENT OF FUND INVESTMENTS

 

ABOUT CALVERT

Calvert Investment Management, Inc. (Calvert), 4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 1000N, Bethesda, MD 20814, is the investment advisor for the Fund.  Calvert provides the Fund with investment supervision and management and office space, furnishes executive and other personnel to the Fund and pays the salaries and fees of all Directors who are affiliated persons of and employed by Calvert. It has been managing mutual funds since 1976. As of August 31, 2012, Calvert was the investment advisor for 43 mutual fund portfolios and had over $­­__ billion in assets under management.

MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE ADVISOR, SUBADVISOR AND PORTFOLIO MANAGER

Additional information is provided below regarding each individual and/or member of a team who is employed by or associated with the Advisor of the Fund, and who is primarily (and jointly, as applicable) responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund (each a “Portfolio Manager”). The Fund’s SAI provides additional information about each Portfolio Manager’s management of other accounts, compensation and ownership of securities in the Fund.

 

Hermes Investment Management Limited (Hermes), Lloyds Chambers, 1 Portsoken Street, London E1 8HZ, United Kingdom, is the Subadvisor for Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund.  Hermes has managed the assets of the Fund since the Fund’s inception in September 2012.

 

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Portfolio Manager

 

Business Experience During Last 5 Years

 

Role on Management Team

Gary Greenberg

July 2011 – present: Lead Portfolio Manager for Emerging Markets Team, Hermes

2010 – July 2011: Portfolio Manager for Emerging Markets Team, Hermes

2007 - 2010: Managing Partner at Silkstone Capital

2003 - 2007: Managing Partner at Muse Capital

 

Lead Portfolio Manager

 

________________________________________

Calvert and the Fund have obtained an exemptive order from the SEC to permit Calvert and the Fund, pursuant to approval by the Fund's Board of Directors, to enter into and materially amend contracts with the Fund’s Subadvisor, if any (that is not an “affiliated person” as defined under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”)) without shareholder approval. See “Investment Advisor and Subadvisor” in the Fund’s SAI for further details.

ADVISORY FEES

The aggregate annual advisory fee paid by the Fund as a percentage of the Fund’s average daily net assets is 0.95%. This figure is the total of all advisory fees paid directly by the Fund.  The advisory fee does not include administrative fees.

________________________________________

A discussion regarding the basis for the approval by the Fund’s Board of Directors of the investment advisory agreement with respect to the Fund is available in the most recent Semi-Annual Report of the Fund covering the fiscal period that ends on March 31 each year.

SHAREHOLDER INFORMATION

For more information on buying and selling shares, please contact your financial professional or Calvert’s client services department at 800-368-2748.

 

How to Open an Account

Complete and sign an application for each new account. Be sure to specify Class I. After your account is open, you may buy shares and wire funds by telephone. All subsequent purchases must be made by an electronic funds transfer or through the National Securities Clearing Corporation (“NSCC”), in U.S. dollars. Each ACH funds transfer is limited to $300,000. Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc. (“CID”) is the Funds’ distributor. For more information and wire instructions, call Calvert at 800-327-2109.

Minimum to Open Fund Account: $1,000,000

The Fund may waive the initial investment minimum for certain institutional accounts where it is believed to be in the best interest of the Fund and its shareholders. Examples include the following:

• the investment would permit a previously closed Class I in the Fund to reopen, at no additional expense to other  Fund Classes;

• the investor has agreed to make additional Class I investments within a reasonable amount of time;

 

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• discretionary wrap programs;

• omnibus accounts purchasing for a fund of funds; and

• certain omnibus accounts and employer sponsored retirement or employee benefit plan accounts.

Federal Holidays

There are some federal holidays, i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day, when the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open and the Fund is open but electronic funds transfers cannot be received because the banks are closed.

Customer Identification

Federal regulations require all financial institutions to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account.  In order to verify your identity, the Fund requires your name, date of birth, residential street address or principal place of business, social security number and employer identification number or other governmental issued identification when you open an account. The Fund may place limits on account transactions while it is in the process of attempting to verify your identity. If the Fund is unable to verify your identity, the Fund may be required to redeem your shares and close your account.

Through your Broker/Dealer

Your broker/dealer must receive your purchase request before the close of regular trading (generally 4 p.m. ET) on the NYSE to receive that day’s NAV. Your broker/dealer will be responsible for furnishing all necessary documentation to Calvert and may charge you for services provided.

HOW SHARES ARE PRICED

The price of shares is based on the Fund’s NAV. The NAV is computed by adding the value of the Fund’s securities holdings plus other assets, subtracting liabilities, and then dividing the result by the number of shares outstanding. The NAV of each class will be calculated separately.

The NAV is calculated as of the close of each business day, which coincides with the closing of the regular session of the NYSE (generally 4 p.m. ET). The Fund is open for business each day the NYSE is open.

The Fund may hold securities that are primarily listed on foreign exchanges that trade on days when the NYSE is closed. The Fund does not price shares on days when the NYSE is closed, even if foreign markets may be open. As a result, the value of the Fund’s shares may change on days when you will not be able to buy or sell your shares.

Generally, portfolio securities and other assets are valued based on market quotations. Debt securities are valued utilizing the average of bid prices or at bid prices based on a matrix system (which considers such factors as security prices, yields, maturities and ratings) furnished by dealers through an independent pricing service. Debt securities that will mature in 60 days or less are valued at amortized cost, which approximates fair value.

Under the oversight of the Board of Directors and pursuant to the Fund’s valuation procedures adopted by the Board, the Advisor determines when a market quotation is not readily available or reliable for a particular security.

Investments for which market quotations are not readily available or reliable are fair valued by a fair value team consisting of officers of the Fund and of the Advisor, as determined in good faith under consistently applied procedures under the general supervision of the Board of Directors. No single standard exists for determining fair value, which depends on the circumstances of each investment, but in general fair value is deemed to be the amount an owner might reasonably expect to receive for a security upon its current sale.

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In making a fair value determination, under the ultimate supervision of the Board, the Advisor, pursuant to the Fund’s valuation procedures, generally considers a variety of qualitative and quantitative factors relevant to the particular security or type of security. These factors may change over time and are reviewed periodically to ascertain whether there are changes in the particular circumstances affecting an investment which may warrant a change in either the valuation methodology for the investment, or the fair value derived from that methodology, or both. The general factors considered typically include, for example, fundamental analytical data relating to the investment, the nature and duration of restrictions, if any, on the security, and the forces that influence the market in which the security is purchased and sold, as well as the type of security, the size of the holding and numerous other specific factors. Foreign securities are valued based on quotations from the principal market in which such securities are normally traded. If events occur after the close of the principal market in which securities are traded, and before the close of business of the Fund, that are expected to materially affect the value of those securities, then they are valued at their fair value taking these events into account. In addition, fair value pricing may be used for high-yield debt securities or in other instances where a portfolio security is not traded in significant volume for a substantial period.

For assistance in making fair value determinations, the Board has retained a third-party fair value pricing service, pursuant to the Fund’s valuation procedures and under the ultimate supervision of the Board, to quantitatively value holdings of the Fund that trade on foreign exchanges. From time to time, market moves in the U.S. subsequent to the close of those local markets but prior to the Fund’s official pricing time of 4 p.m. Eastern Time may cause those local market prices to not be representative of what a reasonable investor would pay for those securities. In the event of such market movements in excess of previously established and Board-approved thresholds, the Fund’s service providers quantitatively estimate the fair value of each affected security. The values are calculated using the service provider’s proprietary models based upon the actual market close and trailing data from various benchmarks, futures and currencies. Factors that may influence the results of this process include changes in U.S. market index values, price movements in futures contracts based on foreign markets that trade in the U.S., and changes in industry or economic sector indices.

The values assigned to fair value investments are based on available information and do not necessarily represent amounts that might ultimately be realized. Further, because of the inherent uncertainty of valuation, the fair values may differ significantly from the value that would have been used had a ready market for the investment existed, and these differences could be material.

WHEN YOUR ACCOUNT WILL BE CREDITED

Your purchase will be processed at the next NAV calculated after your request is received in good order, as defined below. All of your purchases must be made in U.S. dollars. No cash will be accepted. No credit card or credit loan checks will be accepted. The Fund reserves the right to suspend the offering of shares for a period of time or to reject any specific purchase order. All purchase orders must be sent to the Transfer Agent. All purchases will be confirmed and credited to your account in full and fractional shares (rounded to the nearest 1/1000th of a share). See “Request in Good Order” below.

Request in Good Order

All requests (both purchase orders and redemption requests) must be received by the Transfer Agent in “good order.” This means that your request must include:

·           The Fund name and account number.

·           The amount of the transaction (in dollars or shares).

·           Signatures of all owners exactly as registered on the account (for mail requests).

·           Signature guarantees (if required).*

·           Any supporting legal documentation that may be required.

 
 

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·           Any outstanding certificates representing shares to be redeemed.

 

* For instance, a signature guarantee must be provided by all registered account shareholders when redemption proceeds are sent to a different person or address. A signature guarantee can be obtained from most commercial and savings banks, credit unions, trust companies, or member firms of a U.S. stock exchange. Notarization is not the equivalent of a signature guarantee.

Transactions are processed at the NAV next computed after the Transfer Agent has received all required information. Requests received in good order before the close of regular NYSE trading (generally 4 p.m. ET) will receive that day’s closing NAV; otherwise you will receive the next business day’s NAV.

Purchase and Redemption of Shares through a Financial Intermediary

The Fund has authorized one or more broker/dealers to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund’s behalf. Such broker/dealers are authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund’s behalf. The Fund will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized broker/dealer, or if applicable, a broker/dealer’s authorized designee, receives the order in good order. The customer orders will be priced at the Fund’s NAV next computed after they are received by an authorized broker/dealer or the broker/dealer’s authorized designee.

HOW TO SELL SHARES

You may redeem all or a portion of the shares from your account by telephone or mail on any day the Fund is open for business, provided the amount requested is not on hold. When you purchase by ACH funds transfer, the purchase will be on hold for up to 10 business days from the date of receipt. During the hold period, redemption proceeds will not be sent until the Transfer Agent is reasonably satisfied that the purchase payment has been collected. 

Your shares will be redeemed at the next NAV calculated after your redemption request is received by the Transfer Agent in good order (less any applicable redemption fee). The proceeds will normally be sent to you on the next business day, but if making immediate payment could adversely affect the Fund, it may take up to seven (7) days to make payment. Electronic funds transfer redemptions generally will be credited to your bank account by the second business day after your phone call.

The Fund has the right to redeem shares in assets other than cash for redemption amounts exceeding, in any 90-day period, $250,000 or 1% of the NAV of the Fund, whichever is less, by making redemptions-in-kind (distributions of a pro rata share of the portfolio securities, rather than cash). A redemption-in-kind transfers the transaction costs associated with redeeming the security from the Fund to the shareholder. The shareholder will also bear any market risks associated with the portfolio security until the security can be sold.

The Fund reserves the right to suspend or postpone redemptions during any period when:

(a)           trading on the NYSE is restricted, as determined by the SEC, or the NYSE is closed all day for other than customary weekend and holiday closings;

(b)           the SEC has granted an order to the Fund permitting such suspension; or

(c)           an emergency, as determined by the SEC, exists, making disposal of portfolio securities or valuation of net assets of the Fund not reasonably practicable.

There are some federal holidays, however, i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day, when the NYSE is open and the Fund is open but redemptions cannot be made by electronic funds transfer because the banks are closed.

 

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Follow these suggestions to ensure timely processing of your redemption request:

By Telephone - call 800-368-2745

You may redeem shares from your account by telephone and have your money sent by electronic funds transfer to a bank you have previously authorized. All redemptions must be made by an electronic funds transfer or through the NSCC, in U.S. dollars. Each ACH funds transfer is limited to $300,000. To add instructions to permit an electronic funds transfer to be sent to an account not previously authorized you must send us those instructions in a letter that is signature guaranteed.


Written Requests

Send your written requests to: Calvert, P.O. Box 219544, Kansas City, MO 64121-9544.

Your letter should include your account number, name of the Fund and Class, and the number of shares or the dollar amount you are redeeming, and how you want the money sent to your authorized account. Please provide a daytime telephone number, if possible, for us to call if we have questions. If the money is being sent to an account other than the account of record, your letter must be signature guaranteed.

 

Corporations and Associations

Your letter of instruction and corporate resolution should be signed by person(s) authorized to act on the account, accompanied by signature guarantee(s).

Trusts  

Your letter of instruction should be signed by the Trustee(s) (as Trustee(s)), with a signature guarantee. (If the Trustee’s name is not registered on your account, please provide a copy of the trust document, certified within the last 60 days).

Through your Broker/Dealer

Your broker/dealer must receive your request before the close of regular trading on the NYSE to receive that day’s NAV. Your broker/dealer will be responsible for furnishing all necessary documentation to Calvert and may charge you for services provided.


Redemption Fee

In its effort to detect and prevent market timing, the Fund charges a 2% redemption fee on redemptions, including exchanges, within 7 days of purchase into the Fund unless the shares are held through an intermediary that has been authorized by Fund management to apply its own redemption fee policy, as described under “Other Calvert Features/Policies -- Market Timing Policy” below. In the event of any such authorization, shareholders should contact the intermediary through which the Fund shares are held for more information on the redemption fee policy that applies to those shares, including any applicable waivers.

For those shares to which the Fund’s redemption fee policy is applicable, the redemption fee will only be waived in the following circumstances:

 

·         Accounts of foundations, endowments, state and local governments, and those that use consultants.

·         Redemption upon the death or disability of the shareholder, plan participant, or beneficiary. “Disability” means a total disability as evidenced by a determination by the U.S. Social Security Administration.

·         Minimum required distributions from retirement plan accounts for shareholders 70 1/2 and older. The maximum amount subject to this waiver is based only upon the shareholder’s Calvert retirement accounts.

·         The return of an excess contribution or deferral amount, pursuant to sections 408(d)(4) or (5), 401(k)(8), 402(g)(2), or 401(m)(6) of the Code.

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·         Involuntary redemptions of accounts under procedures set forth by the Fund’s Board of Directors.

·         Redemption for the reallocation of purchases received under a systematic investment plan for rebalancing purposes, or by a discretionary platform for mutual fund wrap programs for rebalancing purposes.

·         Redemption of shares purchased with reinvested dividends or capital gain distributions.

·         Shares transferred from one retirement plan to another in the same Fund.

·         Shares redeemed as part of a retirement plan termination or restructuring.

·         Redemption of shares of a Fund held as a default investment option in a retirement plan.

·         Exchange or redemption transactions by an account that the Fund or its Transfer Agent reasonably believes is maintained in an omnibus account by a service provider that does not have the systematic capability of assessing the redemption fee at the individual or participant account level. For this purpose, an omnibus account is a Fund account where the ownership of, or interest in, Fund shares by more than one individual or participant is held through the account and the subaccounting for such Fund account is done by the service provider, not the Fund’s Transfer Agent.

In order to determine your eligibility for a redemption fee waiver, it may be necessary to notify your broker/dealer or the Fund of the qualifying circumstances and to provide any applicable supporting documentation.

 

For shares held through an intermediary in an omnibus account, Calvert relies on the intermediary to assess any applicable redemption fee on underlying shareholder accounts. There are no assurances that intermediaries will properly assess the fee.

 

 

OTHER CALVERT FEATURES / POLICIES 

Website

For 24-hour performance information, visit www.calvert.com.

You can obtain current performance and pricing information and verify account balances with the convenience of logging on to www.calvert.com.

 

The information on our website is not incorporated by reference into this prospectus; our website address is included as an inactive textual reference only.

Telephone Transactions

You may purchase, redeem or exchange shares, or request an electronic funds transfer by telephone if you have pre-authorized service instructions. You receive telephone privileges automatically when you open your account unless you elect otherwise. For our mutual protection, the Fund, the shareholder servicing agent and its affiliates use precautions such as verifying shareholder identity and recording telephone calls to confirm instructions given by phone. A confirmation statement is sent for these transactions; please review this statement and verify the accuracy of your transaction immediately.

Exchanges

Calvert offers a wide variety of investment options that include common stock funds, tax-exempt and corporate bond funds, and money market funds; call your broker/dealer or Calvert representative for more information. We make it easy for you to purchase shares in other Calvert Funds if your investment goals change.

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Complete and sign an account application, taking care to register your new account in the same name and taxpayer identification number as your existing Calvert account(s). You may then give exchange instructions by telephone if telephone redemptions have been authorized and the shares are not in certificate form.

 

Before you make an exchange, please note the following:

Each exchange represents the sale of shares of one Fund and the purchase of shares of another. Therefore, you could realize a taxable gain or loss on an exchange. Shares may only be exchanged for shares of the same class of another Calvert Fund, and the exchange must satisfy the minimum investment amount for that Calvert Fund.

Exchange requests will not be accepted on any day when Calvert is open but the Fund’s custodian bank is closed (i.e., Columbus Day and Veterans Day); these exchange requests will be processed the next day the Fund’s custodian bank is open.

The Fund reserves the right to terminate or modify the exchange privilege with 60 days’ written notice.

Market Timing Policy

In general, the Fund is designed for long-term investment and not as a frequent or short-term trading (“market timing”) vehicle. The Fund discourages frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares by Fund shareholders. Further, the Fund does not accommodate frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares by Fund shareholders. Accordingly, the Fund’s Board of Directors has adopted policies and procedures in an effort to detect and prevent market timing in the Fund, which may require you to pay a redemption fee, as described under “How to Sell Shares - Redemption Fee” in this Prospectus. The Fund believes that market timing activity is not in the best interest of shareholders. Market timing can be disruptive to the portfolio management process and may adversely impact the ability of the Advisor to implement the Fund’s investment strategies. In addition, market timing can disrupt the management of the Fund and raise its expenses through: increased trading and transaction costs; forced and unplanned portfolio turnover; time-zone arbitrage for securities traded on foreign markets; and large asset swings that decrease the Fund’s ability to provide maximum investment return to all shareholders. This in turn can have an adverse effect on Fund performance. In addition to seeking to limit market timing by imposition of redemption fees, the Fund or Calvert at its discretion may reject any purchase or exchange request (purchase side only) it believes to be market timing. However, there is no guarantee that Calvert will detect or prevent market timing activity.

Shareholders may hold the shares of the Fund through a service provider, such as a broker/dealer or a retirement plan, which has adopted market timing policies that differ from the market timing policies adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. In formulating their market timing policies, these service providers may or may not seek input from Calvert regarding certain aspects of their market timing policies, such as the amount of any redemption fee, the minimum holding period or the applicability of trading blocks. As a result, the market timing policies adopted by service providers may be quite dissimilar from the policies adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. The Board of Directors of the Fund has authorized Fund management to defer to the market timing and redemption fee policies of any service provider that distributes shares of the Fund through an omnibus account if the service provider’s policies, in Fund management’s judgment, are reasonably designed to detect and deter market timing transactions. Shareholders may contact Calvert to determine if the service provider through which the shareholder holds shares of the Fund has been authorized by Fund management to apply its own market timing and redemption fee policies in lieu of the policies adopted by the Fund’s Board of Directors. In the event of any such authorization, shareholders should contact the service provider through which the Fund shares are held for more information on the market timing policies and any redemption fees that apply to those shares.

As stated under “How to Sell Shares” in this Prospectus, a redemption fee will not be assessed on Fund shares held through an omnibus account if the service provider maintaining that account:

(i)        does not have the systematic capability of assessing the redemption fee at the individual or participant account level, or

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(ii)        as described above, implements its own policies and procedures to detect and prevent market timing and such policies do not provide for the assessment of a redemption fee.

If a significant percentage of the Fund’s shareholder accounts are held through omnibus accounts that are not subject to a redemption fee, then the Fund would be more susceptible to the risks of market timing activity in the Fund. Even if an omnibus account is not subject to a redemption fee, if a Fund or its Transfer Agent or shareholder servicing agent suspects there is market timing activity in the account, Calvert will seek full cooperation from the service provider maintaining the account to identify the underlying participant. Calvert expects the service provider to take immediate action to stop any further market timing activity in the Fund by such participant(s) or plan, or else the Fund will be withdrawn as an investment option for that account. Calvert expects all service providers that maintain omnibus accounts to make reasonable efforts to identify and restrict the short-term trading activities of underlying participants in the Fund.

The Fund and CID reserve the right at any time to reject or cancel any part of any purchase or exchange order (purchase side only). Orders are canceled within one business day, and the purchase price is returned to the investor. The Fund and CID also may modify any terms or conditions of purchase of shares of the Fund (upon prior notice) or withdraw all or any part of the offering made by this Prospectus.

Electronic Delivery of Prospectuses and Shareholder Reports

You may request electronic delivery of Fund prospectuses and annual and semi-annual reports by calling client services at 800-368-2745 or enrolling online at www.calvert.com.

Combined General Mailings (Householding)

Multiple accounts held directly with Calvert that have the same social security number will receive one mailing per household of information such as prospectuses and semi-annual and annual reports. Call Calvert client services at 800-368-2745 to request further grouping of accounts to receive fewer mailings, or to request that each account still receive a separate mailing. Separate statements will be generated for each separate account and will be mailed in one envelope for each combination above. Multiple accounts held through a broker/dealer (or other financial intermediary) that share the same household address may receive one mailing.

Special Services and Charges

The Fund pays for shareholder services but not for special services that are required by a few shareholders, such as a request for a historical transcript of an account. You may be required to pay a fee for these special services.

 

If you are purchasing shares through a program of services offered by a broker/dealer or other financial institution, you should read the program materials together with this Prospectus. Certain features may be modified in these programs. Investors may be charged a fee if they effect transactions in Fund shares through a broker/dealer or other agent.

Minimum Account Balance/Low Balance Fee

Please maintain a balance in each of your Fund accounts of at least $1,000,000 per account.

If the balance in your account falls below the minimum during a month, the account may be closed and the proceeds mailed to the address of record. You will receive notice that your account is below the minimum and will be closed or moved to Class A (at NAV) if the balance is not brought up to the required minimum within 30 days.

Shares held through an omnibus account or wrap-fee program for which the Fund has waived investment minimums are not subject to this requirement.

 

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DIVIDENDS, CAPITAL GAINS, AND TAXES

The Fund pays dividends from its net investment income on an annual basis. Net investment income consists of interest income and dividends declared and paid on investments, less expenses. Distributions of net short-term capital gains (treated as dividends for tax purposes) and net long-term capital gains, if any, are normally paid once a year; however, the Fund does not anticipate making any such distributions unless available capital loss carryovers have been used or have expired. Dividend and distribution payments will vary between classes.

Dividend Payment Options

Dividends and any distributions are automatically reinvested in the Fund at NAV (without sales charge), unless you elect to have amounts of $10 or more paid to you by electronic funds transfer to a predesignated bank account. Dividends and distributions from any Calvert Fund may be automatically invested in an identically registered account in any other Calvert Fund at NAV. If reinvested in the same account, new shares will be purchased at NAV on the reinvestment date, which is generally 1 to 3 days prior to the payment date. You must notify the Fund in writing to change your payment options.

Buying a Dividend

At the time of purchase, the share price of each class may reflect undistributed income, capital gains or unrealized appreciation of securities. Any income or capital gains from these amounts which are later distributed to you are fully taxable. On the ex-dividend date for a distribution, share value is reduced by the amount of the distribution. If you buy shares just before the ex-dividend date (“buying a dividend”), you will pay the full price for the shares and then receive a portion of the price back as a taxable distribution.

Federal Taxes

In January, the Fund will mail Form 1099-DIV indicating the federal tax status of dividends and any capital gain distributions paid to you during the past year. Generally, dividends and distributions are taxable in the year they are paid. However, any dividends and distributions paid in January but declared during the prior three months are taxable in the year declared. Dividends and distributions are taxable to you regardless of whether they are taken in cash or reinvested. Dividends, including short-term capital gains, are taxable as ordinary income. Distributions from long-term capital gains are taxable as long-term capital gains, regardless of how long you have owned shares.

You may realize a capital gain or loss when you sell or exchange shares. This capital gain or loss will be short- or long-term, depending on how long you have owned the shares which were sold. In January, the Fund whose shares you have sold or exchanged in the past year will mail Form 1099-B indicating the total amount of all such sales, including exchanges. You should keep your annual year-end account statements to determine the cost (basis) of the shares to report on your tax returns.

 

Cost Basis Reporting

Effective January 1, 2012, mutual funds must report cost basis information to you and the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) when you sell or exchange shares acquired on or after January 1, 2012 in your non-retirement accounts. The new cost basis regulations do not affect retirement accounts, money market funds, and shares acquired before January 1, 2012. A Fund will permit shareholders to elect from among several IRS-accepted cost basis methods, including average cost. In the absence of an election by a shareholder, the Fund will use the average cost method with respect to that shareholder. The cost basis method a shareholder elects may not be changed with respect to a redemption of shares after the settlement date of the redemption. Shareholders should consult with their tax advisors to determine the best IRS-accepted cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how the new cost basis reporting rules apply to them.

 

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Other Tax Information

In addition to federal taxes, you may be subject to state or local taxes on your investment, depending on the laws in your area. You may receive additional information regarding foreign source income and foreign taxes to assist in your calculation of foreign tax credits.

Some of the dividends may be identified as qualified dividend income and be eligible for the reduced federal tax rate if the individual investor meets the holding period requirement. Dividends paid by the Fund may be eligible for the dividends received deduction available to corporate taxpayers. Corporate taxpayers requiring this information may contact Calvert.

Taxpayer Identification Number

If we do not have your correct Social Security or Taxpayer Identification Number (“TIN”) and a signed certified application or Form W-9, Federal law requires us to withhold 28% of your reportable dividends, and possibly 28% of certain redemptions. In addition, you may be subject to a fine by the Internal Revenue Service. You will also be prohibited from opening another account by exchange. If this TIN information is not received within 60 days after your account is established, your account may be redeemed (closed) at the current NAV on the date of redemption. Calvert reserves the right to reject any new account or any purchase order for failure to supply a certified TIN.

 

26

 


 

 

To Open an Account:

800-327-2109

 

 

Performance and Prices:
www.calvert.com
24 hours, 7 days a week

 

 

Service for Existing Accounts:
800-327-2109 

 

 

TDD for Hearing-Impaired:
800-541-1524 

 

 

Calvert Office:
4550 Montgomery Avenue
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814

 

 

Registered, Certified or
Overnight Mail:
Calvert
c/o BFDS
330 West 9th Street
Kansas City, MO 64105

 

 

PRINCIPAL UNDERWRITER
Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc.
4550 Montgomery Avenue
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814

 

 

For investors who want more information about the Funds, the following documents are available free upon request:

 

Annual/Semi-Annual Reports: Additional information about the Fund’s investments is available in the Fund’s Annual and Semi-Annual Reports to shareholders. In the Fund’s Annual Report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.

 

Statement of Additional Information (SAI): The SAI for the Fund provides more detailed information about the Fund, including a description of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of its portfolio holdings. The SAI for the Fund is incorporated into this prospectus by reference.

 

You can get free copies of reports and SAIs, request other information and discuss your questions about the Fund by contacting your financial professional, or the Fund at:

27

 


 

 

 

Calvert Investments, Inc.
4550 Montgomery Ave.
Suite 1000N
Bethesda, MD 20814
Telephone: 1-800-327-2109

 

The Fund also makes available its SAI and its Annual and Semi-Annual Reports free of charge on Calvert’s website at the following Internet address:

www.calvert.com

 

You can review and copy information about the Fund (including its SAI) at the SEC’s Public Reference Room in Washington, D.C. Information on the operation of the public reference room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-202-551-8090. Reports and other information about the Fund are available on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s Internet site at http://www.sec.gov. Copies of this information may also be obtained, upon payment of a duplicating fee, by electronic request at publicinfo@sec.gov, or by writing to the Public Reference Section of the SEC, Washington, D.C. 20549-1520.

 

Investment Company Act file:

 

No. 811-06563 Calvert World Values Fund, Inc. (Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund)

 

Printed on recycled paper using soy inks

28

 


 

 

 

Calvert Solution Strategies®

Calvert Investments®

 

                                                                                                                                                               

 

CALVERT WORLD VALUES FUND, INC.

Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund

 

4550 Montgomery Avenue, Bethesda, Maryland 20814

 

Statement of Additional Information

 

September 28, 2012

 

 

 

 

Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund

 

A (_____)

C (_____)  

 I (_____)            Y (____)

 

 

   

New Account Information:

(800) 368-2748 (301) 951-4820

Client

Services:

 

(800) 368-2745

Broker

Services:

(800) 368-2746 (301) 951-4850

TDD for the Hearing-Impaired:

 

(800) 541-1524

 

 

 

 

                This Statement of Additional Information ("SAI") is not a prospectus. Investors should read the SAI in conjunction with the Fund's Prospectus dated September 28, 2012. The Fund’s Prospectus and most recent shareholder report may be obtained free of charge by writing the Fund at the above address, calling the Fund at 800‑368‑2745, or visiting our website at www. calvert.com.

 


 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks

 

Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks

 

Additional Risk Disclosure

 

Investment Restrictions

 

Dividends, Distributions, and Taxes

 

Net Asset Value

 

Calculation of Total Return

 

Purchase and Redemption of Shares

 

Directors and Officers

 

Investment Advisor and Subadvisor

 

Portfolio Manager Disclosure

 

Administrative Services Agent

 

Method of Distribution

 

Transfer and Shareholder Servicing Agents

 

Portfolio Transactions

 

Portfolio Holdings Disclosure

 

Personal Securities Transactions

 

Proxy Voting Disclosure

 

Process for Delivering Shareholder Communications to the Board of Directors

 

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm and Custodian

 

General Information

 

Control Persons and Principal Holders of Securities

 

Fund Service Providers

 

Appendix A – Global Proxy Voting Guidelines

 

Appendix B – Corporate Bond & Commercial Paper Ratings

 

 

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION ON PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT POLICIES AND RISKS

 

                 

Foreign Securities

                Investments in foreign securities may present risks not typically involved in domestic investments. The Fund may purchase foreign securities directly on foreign markets.  These securities are subject to the risk of currency fluctuation relative to the U.S. dollar.  Foreign securities may also involve different accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards and various administrative difficulties such as delays in clearing and settling portfolio trades or in receiving payment of dividends or other distributions.  The Fund may also invest in American Depositary Receipts ("ADRs") and other receipts evidencing ownership of foreign securities, such as Global Depositary Receipts ("GDRs"). ADRs are United States ("U.S.") dollar-denominated and traded in the United States on exchanges or over the counter, and can be either sponsored or unsponsored. The company sponsoring the ADR is subject to U.S. reporting requirements and will pay the costs of distributing dividends and shareholder materials.  With an unsponsored ADR, the U.S. bank will recover costs from the movement of share prices and the payment of dividends. Less information is normally available on unsponsored ADRs. By investing in ADRs rather than directly in foreign issuers' stock, the Fund may possibly avoid some currency and some liquidity risks. However, the value of the foreign securities underlying the ADR may still be impacted by currency fluctuations.  The information available for ADRs is subject to the more uniform and more exacting accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards of the domestic market or exchange on which they are traded. GDRs can involve currency risk since they may not be U.S. dollar-denominated.

                Additional costs may be incurred in connection with international investment since foreign brokerage commissions and the custodial costs associated with maintaining foreign portfolio securities are generally higher than in the United States. Fee expense may also be incurred on currency exchanges when the Fund changes investments from one country to another or convert foreign securities holdings into U.S. dollars.


 

 

                U.S. Government policies have at times, in the past, through imposition of currency controls, changes in tax policy and other restrictions, discouraged certain investments abroad by U.S. investors. In addition, foreign countries may impose withholding and taxes on dividends and interest.

                  

Emerging Market Securities.  Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund invests a substantial portion of its assets in emerging markets.  Investing in emerging market countries involves certain risks not typically associated with investing in the United States, and it imposes risks greater than, or in addition to, risks of investing in more developed foreign countries. These risks include, but are not limited to, the following: greater risks of nationalization or expropriation of assets or confiscatory taxation; currency devaluations and other currency exchange rate fluctuations; greater social, economic, and political uncertainty and instability (including amplified risk of war and terrorism); more substantial government involvement in the economy; less government supervision and regulation of the securities markets and participants in those markets, and possible arbitrary and unpredictable enforcement of securities regulations; controls on foreign investment and limitations on repatriation of invested capital and on the Fund’s ability to exchange local currencies for U.S. dollars; unavailability of currency-hedging techniques in certain emerging market countries; the fact that companies in emerging market countries may be smaller, less seasoned, or newly organized; the difference in, or lack of, auditing and financial reporting standards, which may result in unavailability of material information about issuers; the risk that it may be more difficult to obtain and/or enforce a judgment in a court outside the United States; and greater price volatility, substantially less liquidity, and significantly smaller market capitalization of securities markets. Also, any change in the leadership or politics of emerging market countries, or the countries that exercise a significant influence over those countries, may halt the expansion of or reverse the liberalization of foreign investment policies now occurring and adversely affect existing investment opportunities. Furthermore, high rates of inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries. Custodial services and other investment-related costs are often more expensive in emerging market countries, which can reduce a fund’s income from investments in securities or debt instruments of emerging market country issuers.

 

Small-Cap Issuers

                The securities of small-cap issuers may be less actively traded than the securities of larger-cap issuers, may trade in a more limited volume, and may change in value more abruptly than securities of larger companies.

                Information concerning these securities may not be readily available so that the companies may be less actively followed by stock analysts. Small-cap issuers do not usually participate in market rallies to the same extent as more widely known securities, and they tend to have a relatively higher percentage of insider ownership.

                Investing in smaller, new issuers generally involves greater risk than investing in larger, established issuers. Small-cap issuers may have limited product lines, markets, or financial resources and may lack management depth. The securities in such companies may also have limited marketability and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than securities of larger, more established companies or the market averages in general.

 

Mid-Cap Issuers

The securities of mid-cap issuers often have greater price volatility, lower trading volume and less liquidity than the securities of larger, more established companies.  Investing in mid-cap issuers generally involves greater risk than investing in larger, established issuers. These companies tend to have smaller revenues, narrower product lines, less management depth and experience, smaller shares of their product or service markets, fewer financial resources and less competitive strength than larger companies.

 

Large-Cap Issuers  

Investing in large-cap issuers generally involves the risk that these companies may grow more slowly than the economy as a whole or not at all. Compared to small and mid-cap companies, large cap companies are more widely followed in the market, which can make it more difficult to find attractive stocks that are not overpriced. Large-cap stocks also may be less responsive to competitive opportunities and challenges, such as changes in technology, and may offer less potential for long-term capital appreciation.

 

Issuer Non-Diversification Risk

The Fund is non-diversified and may focus its investments on a small number of issuers. A fund that is "non-diversified" may invest a greater percentage of its assets in the securities of a single issuer than a fund that is "diversified." A fund that invests in a relatively small number of issuers is more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political, or regulatory occurrence than a more diversified fund might be. Some of those issuers might also present substantial credit, interest rate or other risks.


 

 

 

Forward Foreign Currency Contracts

Since investments in securities of issuers domiciled in foreign countries usually involve currencies of the foreign countries, and since the Fund may temporarily hold funds in foreign currencies during the completion of investment programs, the value of the assets of the Fund as measured in U.S. dollars may be affected favorably or unfavorably by changes in foreign currency exchange rates and exchange control regulations. For example, if the value of the foreign currency in which a security is denominated increases or decreases in relation to the value of the U.S. dollar, the value of the security in U.S. dollars will increase or decrease correspondingly. The Fund will conduct its foreign currency exchange transactions either on a spot (i.e., cash) basis at the current rate prevailing in the foreign exchange market, or by entering into forward contracts to purchase or sell foreign currencies. The Fund may also use foreign currency options and futures.

A forward foreign currency contract involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date which may be any fixed number of days from the date of the contract agreed upon by the parties, at a price set at the time of the contract. These contracts are traded both in the interbank market conducted directly between currency traders (usually large commercial banks) and between the currency traders and their customers. A forward foreign currency contract generally has no deposit requirement, and no commissions are charged at any stage for trades.

The Fund may enter into forward foreign currency contracts for two reasons. First, the Fund may desire to preserve the U.S. dollar price of a security when it enters into a contract for the purchase or sale of a security denominated in a foreign currency. The Fund may be able to protect itself against possible losses resulting from changes in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and foreign currencies during the period between the date the security is purchased or sold and the date on which payment is made or received by entering into a forward contract for the purchase or sale, for a fixed amount of dollars, of the amount of the foreign currency involved in the underlying security transactions.

Second, the Fund may have exposure to a particular foreign currency from that Fund's portfolio securities and the Advisor and/or Subadvisor may anticipate a substantial decline in the value of that currency against the U.S. dollar. Similarly, the Fund may have exposure to a particular currency because of an overweight allocation to that currency in comparison to the Fund's benchmark. The precise matching of the forward foreign currency contract amounts and the value of the portfolio securities involved will not generally be possible since the future value of the securities will change as a consequence of market movements between the date the forward contract is entered into and the date it matures. The projection of currency market movements is difficult, and the successful execution of this hedging strategy is uncertain. Although forward foreign currency contracts tend to limit the risk of loss due to a decline in the value of the hedged currency, at the same time they tend to limit any potential gain which might result should the value of such currency increase.

 

Derivatives

The Fund may use various techniques to increase or decrease its exposure to changing security prices, interest rates, or other factors that affect security values. These techniques may involve derivative transactions such as buying and selling options and futures contracts and leveraged notes, entering into swap agreements, and purchasing indexed securities for the purpose of adjusting the risk and return characteristics of the Fund. The Fund can use these practices either as a substitute for alternative permissible investments or as protection against a move that has an adverse effect on the Fund's portfolio securities. If the Advisor and/or Subadvisor judges market conditions incorrectly or employs a strategy that does not correlate well with the Fund's investments, or if the counterparty to the transaction does not perform as promised, these techniques could result in a loss. These techniques may increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed. Derivatives are often illiquid, which can make it difficult to value them.

 

Options and Futures Contracts

                The Fund may purchase put and call options and write covered call options and secured put options on securities which meet the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, and may employ a variety of option combination strategies.  The Fund may also engage in the purchase and sale of futures contracts, foreign currency futures contracts and interest rate futures contracts.  In addition, the Fund may write covered call options and secured put options on such futures contracts.  The Fund’s use of options and futures is described more fully below.


 

 

                The Fund may engage in such transactions only for hedging purposes, including hedging of the Fund’s cash position. They may not engage in such transactions for the purposes of speculation or leverage.  Such investment policies and techniques may involve a greater degree of risk than those inherent in more conservative investment approaches.

                Options are typically classified as either American-style or European-style, based on the dates on which the option may be exercised. American-style options may be exercised at any time prior to the expiration date and European-style options may only be exercised on the expiration date. Option contracts traded on futures exchanges are mainly American-style, and options traded over-the-counter are mainly European-style.

The value of an option will fluctuate based primarily on the time remaining until expiration of the option, known as the option’s time value, and the difference between the then-prevailing price of the underlying security and the option’s exercise price.  This difference, known as the option’s intrinsic value, determines whether an option is in-the-money, at-the-money or out-of-the-money at any point in time.  If there is an existing secondary market for an option, it can be closed out at any time by the Fund for a gain or a loss.  Alternatively, the holder of an in-the-money American-style option may exercise the option at any time prior to the expiration date, while the holder of an in-the-money European-style option must wait until the expiration date to exercise the option.  Options that expire out-of-the-money are worthless resulting in a loss of the entire premium paid.

                Other principal factors that affect the market value of an option include supply and demand, interest rates, and the current market price and price volatility of the underlying security.

 

Purchasing Options.  The Fund will pay a premium (plus any commission) to purchase an option.  The premium reflects the total of the option’s time value and intrinsic value.  The purchaser of an option has a right to buy (in the case of a call option) or sell (in the case of a put option) the underlying security at the exercise price and has no obligation after the premium has been paid.

Call Options.  The purchase of a call option on a security is similar to taking a long position because the value of the option generally increases as the price of the underlying security increases.  However, in the event that the underlying security declines in value, losses on options are limited to the premium paid to purchase the option.  Although a call option has the potential to increase in value from higher prices for the underlying security, because the option will expire on its expiration date, any such gains may be more than offset by reductions in the option’s time value or other valuation factors.  The Fund may only buy call options to hedge its available cash balance, to limit the risk of a substantial increase in the market price of a security which the Fund intends to purchase, or to close an outstanding position that resulted from writing a corresponding call option.  Any profit or loss from such a closing transaction will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the call option plus the related transaction costs.  The Fund may purchase securities by exercising a call option solely on the basis of considerations consistent with the investment objectives and policies of the Fund.

                Put Options.  The purchase of a put option on a security is similar to taking a short position (selling a security that you do not own) in that security because the value of the option generally increases as the value of the underlying security decreases.  However, in the event that the underlying security increases in value, losses on the option are limited to the premium paid to purchase the option.  Although a put option has the potential to increase in value from lower prices for the underlying security, because the option will expire on its expiration date, any such gains may be more than offset by reductions in the option’s time value or other valuation factors.  The Fund may purchase put options to protect its portfolio securities against the risk of declining prices or to close an outstanding position that resulted from writing a corresponding put option.  Any profit or loss from such a closing transaction will depend on whether the amount received is more or less than the premium paid for the put option plus the related transaction costs. 

 

Writing Options.   The Fund may write certain types of options.  Writing options means that the Fund is selling an investor the right, but not the obligation, to purchase (in the case of a call option) or to sell (in the case of a put option) a security or index at the exercise price in exchange for the option premium.  The writer of an option has the obligation to sell (in the case of a call option) or buy (in the case of a put option) the underlying security and has no rights other than to receive the premium.  Writing options involves more risk than purchasing options because a writer of an option has the potential to realize a gain that is limited to the value of the premium (less any commission) and takes on potentially unlimited risk from increases in the price of the underlying security, in the case of a call option, and the risk that the underlying security may decline to zero, in the case of a put option (which would require the writer of the put option to pay the exercise price for a security that is worthless).  Accordingly, the Fund may only write covered call options and secured put options, which mitigate these substantial risks.   A call option is deemed “covered” if the Fund owns the security.  A put option is deemed “secured” if the Fund has segregated cash or securities having an aggregate value equal to the total purchase price the Fund will have to pay if the put option is exercised.


 

 

Call Options.   The Fund that writes a call option on a security will receive the option premium (less any commission), which helps to mitigate the effect of any depreciation in the market value of that security.  However, because the Fund is obligated to sell that security at the exercise price, this strategy also limits the Fund's ability to benefit from an increase in the price of the security above the exercise price.

The Fund may write covered call options on securities.  This means that so long as the Fund is obligated as the writer of a call option, the Fund will own the underlying security.  The Fund may write such options in order to receive the premiums from options that expire and to seek net gains from closing purchase transactions with respect to such options. Writing covered call options can increase the income of the Fund and thus reduce declines in the NAV per share of the Fund if securities covered by such options decline in value. Exercise of a call option by the purchaser, however, will cause the Fund to forego future appreciation of the securities covered by the option. The Fund's turnover may increase through the exercise of a call option that it has written; this may occur if the market value of the underlying security increases and the Fund has not entered into a closing purchase transaction. When the Fund writes a covered call option, it will realize a profit in the amount of the premium, less a commission, so long as the price of the underlying security remains below the exercise price.

Put Options.   A Fund that writes a put option on a security will receive the option premium (less any commission), which effectively reduces the Fund's acquisition cost for that security.  A Fund that is contemplating an investment in a security but that is uncertain about its near-term price trajectory could write a put option on a security; the premium will provide the Fund with a partial buffer against a price increase, while providing the Fund with an opportunity to acquire the security at the lower exercise price.  However, the Fund remains obligated to purchase the underlying security from the buyer of the put option (usually in the event the price of the security falls below the exercise price). Accordingly, this strategy may result in unexpected losses if the option is exercised against the Fund at a time when the price of the security has declined below the exercise price by more than the amount of the premium received.

The Fund may only write secured put options, which requires the Fund to segregate cash or securities, through its custodian, having a value at least equal to the exercise price of the put option.  If the value of the segregated securities declines below the exercise price of the put option, the Fund will have to segregate additional assets.  When the Fund writes a secured put option, it will realize a profit in the amount of the premium, less a commission, so long as the price of the underlying security remains above the exercise price.

 

Foreign Currency Options. A foreign currency option provides the option buyer with the right to buy or sell a stated amount of foreign currency at the exercise price at a specified date or during the term of the option. A call option gives its owner the right, but not the obligation, to buy the currency, while a put option gives its owner the right, but not the obligation, to sell the currency. The option writer is obligated to sell the underlying foreign currency (in the case of a call option) or buy the underlying foreign currency (in the case of a put option) if it is exercised. However, either seller or buyer may close its position prior to expiration.

                A call rises in value if the underlying currency appreciates. Conversely, a put rises in value if the underlying currency depreciates. While purchasing a foreign currency option can protect the Fund against an adverse movement in the value of a foreign currency, it limits the gain which might result from a favorable movement in the value of such currency due to the payment of the option premium. For example, if the Fund held securities denominated in an appreciating foreign currency and had purchased a foreign currency put to hedge against a decline in the value of the currency, it would not have to exercise its put. Similarly, if the Fund had entered into a contract to purchase a security denominated in a foreign currency and had purchased a foreign currency call to hedge against a rise in the value of the currency but instead the currency had depreciated in value between the date of purchase and the settlement date, it would not have to exercise its call but could acquire in the spot market the amount of foreign currency needed for settlement.

                The information provided above under “Purchasing Options” and “Writing Options” is applicable to options on foreign currencies, except that references therein to securities should instead refer to foreign currencies.

 

Exchange-Traded Options.   The Fund may purchase and write put and call options in standard contracts traded on national securities exchanges on securities of issuers which meet the Fund's sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria and on foreign currencies.  Options exchanges may provide liquidity in the secondary market. Although the Fund intends to acquire and write only such exchange-traded options for which an active secondary market appears to exist, there can be no assurance that such a market will exist for any particular option contract at any particular time. The absence of a liquid market might prevent the Fund from closing an options position, which could impair the Fund’s ability to hedge effectively. The inability to close out a written option position may have an adverse effect on the Fund’s liquidity because it may be required to hold the securities covering or securing the option until the option expires or is exercised.


 

 

The information provided above under “Purchasing Options” and “Writing Options” is applicable to exchange-traded options. 

                 

Over-the-Counter ("OTC") Options. The Fund may invest in OTC options.  OTC options differ from exchange-traded options in several respects. They are transacted directly with dealers and not with a clearing corporation, and there is a risk of non-performance by the dealer. OTC options are available for a greater variety of securities and foreign currencies, and in a wider range of expiration dates and exercise prices, than are exchange-traded options. Since there is no exchange, pricing is normally done by reference to information from a market maker.

                A writer or purchaser of a put or call option can terminate it voluntarily only by entering into a closing transaction. In the case of OTC options, there can be no assurance that a continuous liquid secondary market will exist for any particular option at any specific time. Consequently, the Fund may be able to realize the value of an OTC option it has purchased only by exercising it or entering into a closing sale transaction with the dealer that issued it. Similarly, when the Fund writes an OTC option, it generally can close out that option prior to its expiration only by entering into a closing purchase transaction with the dealer to which it originally wrote the option. If the Fund has written a covered call option and is unable to effect a closing transaction, it cannot sell the underlying security or foreign currency until the option expires or the option is exercised. Therefore, the writer of a covered OTC call option may not be able to sell an underlying security even though it might otherwise be advantageous to do so. Likewise, the writer of a secured OTC put option may be unable to sell the segregated securities that secure the put to raise cash for other investment purposes so long as it is obligated as a put writer. Similarly, a purchaser of an OTC put or call option might also find it difficult to terminate its position on a timely basis in the absence of a secondary market.

                The information provided above under “Purchasing Options” and “Writing Options” is applicable to OTC options.

 

Futures Transactions. The Fund may purchase and sell futures contracts, but only when, in the judgment of the Advisor and/or Subadvisor, such a position acts as a hedge.  The Fund may not enter into futures contracts for the purpose of speculation or leverage. These futures contracts may include, but are not limited to, market index futures contracts and futures contracts based on U.S. Government obligations.

                A futures contract is an agreement between two parties to buy and sell a security on a future date which has the effect of establishing the current price for the security. Many futures contracts by their terms require actual delivery and acceptance of securities, but some allow for cash settlement of the difference between the futures price and the market value of the underlying security or index at time of delivery.  In most cases the contracts are closed out before the settlement date without making or taking delivery of securities. Upon buying or selling a futures contract, the Fund deposits initial margin with its custodian, and thereafter daily payments of maintenance margin are made to and from the executing broker.  Payments of maintenance margin reflect changes in the value of the futures contract, with the Fund being obligated to make such payments if the security underlying the futures position becomes less valuable and entitled to receive such payments if the security underlying the futures position becomes more valuable.

                The Fund can use these practices only for hedging purposes and not for speculation or leverage. If the Advisor and/or Subadvisor judge market conditions incorrectly or employ a strategy that does not correlate well with the Fund's investments, these techniques could result in a loss. These techniques may increase the volatility of the Fund and may involve a small investment of cash relative to the magnitude of the risk assumed.

                Futures contracts are designed by boards of trade which are designated "contracts markets" by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission ("CFTC"). As series of a registered investment company, the Fund is eligible for exclusion from the CFTC's definition of "commodity pool operator," meaning that the Fund may invest in futures contracts under specified conditions without registering with the CFTC. Futures contracts trade on contracts markets in a manner that is similar to the way a stock trades on a stock exchange and the boards of trade, through their clearing corporations, guarantee performance of the contracts.

 

Options on Futures Contracts.    The Fund may purchase put or call options, write secured put options or write covered call options on futures contracts that the Fund could otherwise invest in and that are traded on a U.S. exchange or a board of trade.  The Fund may also enter into closing transactions with respect to such options to terminate an existing position.


 

 

The Fund may only invest in options on futures contracts to hedge its portfolio securities or its available cash balance and not for speculation or leverage purposes.

                The information provided above under “Purchasing Options” and “Writing Options” is applicable to options on futures contracts, except that references therein to securities should instead refer to futures contracts.

 

Foreign Currency Futures Transactions.  The Fund may use foreign currency futures contracts and options on such futures contracts.  See also “—Foreign Currency Options.”  Through the purchase or sale of these contracts and options, the Fund may be able to achieve many of the same objectives attainable through the use of foreign currency forward contracts, but more effectively and possibly at a lower cost. See “—Forward Foreign Currency Contracts."

                Unlike forward foreign currency contracts, foreign currency futures contracts and options on foreign currency futures contracts are standardized as to amount and delivery period and are traded on boards of trade and commodities exchanges. It is anticipated that such contracts may provide greater liquidity and lower cost than forward foreign currency contracts although actual liquidity and costs will vary based on the particular currency and market conditions at the time of the transaction.

 

Additional Risks of Options and Futures Contracts.  If the Fund has sold futures or takes options positions to hedge against a decline in the market and the market later advances, the Fund may suffer a loss on the futures contracts or options which it would not have experienced if it had not hedged. Correlation is also imperfect between movements in the prices of futures contracts and movements in prices of the securities which are the subject of the hedge. Thus the price of the futures contract or option may move more than or less than the price of the securities being hedged. Where the Fund has sold futures or taken options positions to hedge against a decline in the market, the price of the futures contract may advance and the value of the portfolio securities in the Fund may decline. If this were to occur, the Fund might lose money on the futures contracts or options and also experience a decline in the value of its portfolio securities.

                The Fund can close out futures positions and options on futures in the secondary market only on an exchange or board of trade or with an OTC market maker. Although the Fund intends to purchase or sell only such futures, and purchase or write such options, for which an active secondary market appears to exist, there can be no assurance that such a market will exist for any particular futures contract or option at any particular time. This might prevent the Fund from closing a futures position or an option on a futures contract, which could require the Fund to make daily margin payments in the event of adverse price movements. If the Fund cannot close out an option position, it may be required to exercise the option to realize any profit or the option may expire worthless.

                Although some of the securities underlying an index future contract, an option on an index future contract or an option on an index may not necessarily meet the Fund's sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, any such hedge position taken by the Fund will not constitute a direct ownership interest in the underlying securities.

 

 

 

NON-PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT POLICIES AND RISKS

 

Temporary Defensive Positions

For temporary defensive purposes – which may include a lack of adequate purchase candidates or an unfavorable market environment – the Fund may invest in cash or cash equivalents. Cash equivalents include instruments such as, but not limited to, U.S. government and agency obligations, certificates of deposit, banker's acceptances, time deposits, commercial paper, short-term corporate debt securities, and repurchase agreements. The Fund’s investments in temporary defensive positions are generally not  insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation, even though a bank may be the issuer.

 

Short-Term Instruments

                The Fund may invest in short-term instruments, including money market instruments, on an ongoing basis to provide liquidity or for other reasons. Money market instruments are generally short-term investments that may include but are not limited to: (i) short-term obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities (including government-sponsored enterprises); (ii) negotiable certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, fixed time deposits and other obligations of U.S. and foreign banks (including foreign branches) and similar instruments; (iii) commercial paper; (iv) repurchase agreements; (v) short-term U.S. dollar-denominated obligations of foreign banks (including U.S. branches) that, in the opinion of the Advisor or Subadvisor, are of comparable quality to obligations of U.S. banks that may be purchased by the Fund; and (vi) money market funds. Time deposits are non-negotiable deposits maintained in banking institutions for specified periods of time at stated interest rates. Bankers’ acceptances are time drafts drawn on commercial banks by borrowers, usually in connection with international transactions.


 

 

 

Repurchase Agreements

                The Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in repurchase agreements, except that investments in repurchase agreements may exceed this limit for temporary defensive purposes. Repurchase agreements are arrangements under which a Fund buys a security, and the seller simultaneously agrees to repurchase the security at a mutually agreed-upon time and price reflecting a market rate of interest. Repurchase agreements are short-term money market investments, designed to generate current income. A Fund engages in repurchase agreements in order to earn a higher rate of return than it could earn simply by investing in the obligation which is the subject of the repurchase agreement.

Repurchase agreements are not, however, without risk. In the event of the bankruptcy of a seller during the term of a repurchase agreement, a legal question exists as to whether the Fund would be deemed the owner of the underlying security or would be deemed only to have a security interest in and lien upon such security. The Fund will only engage in repurchase agreements with recognized securities dealers and banks determined to present minimal credit risk by the Advisor under the direction and supervision of the Fund’s Board of Directors (the “Board”). In addition, the Fund will only engage in repurchase agreements reasonably designed to secure fully during the term of the agreement the seller's obligation to repurchase the underlying security and will monitor the market value of the underlying security during the term of the agreement. If the value of the underlying security declines and is not at least equal to the repurchase price due the Fund pursuant to the agreement, the Fund will require the seller to pledge additional securities or cash to secure the seller's obligations pursuant to the agreement. If the seller defaults on its obligation to repurchase and the value of the underlying security declines, the Fund may incur a loss and may incur expenses in selling the underlying security.

While an underlying security may mature after one year, repurchase agreements are generally for periods of less than one year. Repurchase agreements not terminable within seven days are considered illiquid.

  

Reverse Repurchase Agreements

The Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in reverse repurchase agreements. Under a reverse repurchase agreement, a Fund sells portfolio securities to a bank or securities dealer and agrees to repurchase those securities from such party at an agreed upon date and price reflecting a market rate of interest. The Fund invests the proceeds from each reverse repurchase agreement in obligations in which it is authorized to invest. The Fund intends to enter into a reverse repurchase agreement only when the interest income expected to be earned on the obligation in which the Fund plans to invest the proceeds exceeds the amount the Fund will pay in interest to the other party to the agreement plus all costs associated with the transaction. The Fund does not intend to borrow for leverage purposes. The Fund will only be permitted to pledge assets to the extent necessary to secure borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements. 

                During the time a reverse repurchase agreement is outstanding, the Fund will maintain in a segregated custodial account an amount of cash, U.S. Government securities or other liquid, high-quality debt securities at least equal in value to the repurchase price. The Fund will mark to market the value of assets held in the segregated account, and will place additional assets in the account whenever the total value of the account falls below the amount required under applicable regulations.

                The Fund’s use of reverse repurchase agreements involves the risk that the other party to the agreements could become subject to bankruptcy or liquidation proceedings during the period the agreements are outstanding. In such event, the Fund may not be able to repurchase the securities it has sold to that other party. Under those circumstances, if at the expiration of the agreement such securities are of greater value than the proceeds obtained by the Fund under the agreement, the Fund may have been better off had it not entered into the agreement. However, the Fund will enter into reverse repurchase agreements only with banks and dealers that the Advisor believes present minimal credit risks under guidelines adopted by the Board.

 

Special Equities Investments

The Special Equities program allows the Fund to promote especially promising approaches to sustainable and responsible investment goals through privately placed investments. As stated in the Prospectus, the Special Equities Committee of the Fund identifies, evaluates and selects Special Equities investments.


 

 

The Special Equities program, while generally comprising a small percentage of any participating Fund’s assets, invests in many investments that involve relatively high risks. These include foreign securities, below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities, emerging market securities, real estate investment trusts, small-cap issuers, limited partnerships, and securities with equity and debt characteristics, among others. See “Foreign Securities”, “Foreign Securities—Emerging Market Securities” and “Small-Cap Issuers” in “Supplemental Information on Principal Investment Policies and Risks” above, and “Below-Investment Grade, High-Yield Debt Securities”, “Real Estate Investment Trusts”, “Limited Partnerships”, “Securities with Equity and Debt Characteristics”, and “Illiquid Securities” in this section on Non-Principal Investment Policies and Risks.  Funds participating in the Special Equities program may also invest in unsecured debt which does not have the benefits of a secured creditor in the event of bankruptcy.  A Special Equities investment may lose its entire value if the business enterprise does not succeed.  Because of their illiquid nature and contractual transfer restrictions, Special Equities investments may not be easily sold or transferred.

The Fund has retained independent consultants to provide investment research-related services with respect to the Special Equities program.

 

High Social Impact Investments

                The High Social Impact Investments program targets a percentage of the Fund's assets to directly support the growth of community-based organizations for the purposes of promoting business creation, housing development, and economic and social development of urban and rural communities.  These investments may be either debt or equity investments and are illiquid. High Social Impact debt investments are unrated and are deemed by the Advisor to be the equivalent of below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities - that is, lower quality debt securities (generally those rated BB or lower by Standard and Poor's Rating Services ("S&P") or Ba or lower by Moody's Investors Service, Inc. ("Moody's"), known as "junk bonds").  These securities have moderate to poor protection of principal and interest payments and have speculative characteristics. (See Appendix B for a description of the ratings). Rather than earning a higher rate, as would be expected to compensate for the higher risk (i.e., lower credit quality), they earn a rate of return that is lower than the then-prevailing market rate.  There is no secondary market for these securities.

                The Fund may make its High Social Impact Investments through direct investments, or through intermediaries, such as through the purchase of notes issued by the Calvert Social Investment Foundation, a non-profit organization, legally distinct from the Fund and Calvert Investments, Inc., organized as a charitable and educational foundation for the purpose of increasing public awareness and knowledge of the concept of socially responsible investing. The Foundation prepares its own careful credit analysis to attempt to identify those community development issuers whose financial condition is adequate to meet future obligations or is expected to be adequate in the future.  Through portfolio diversification and credit analysis, investment risk can be reduced, although there can be no assurance that losses will not occur.

                The Fund may make direct High Social Impact Investments through the Special Equities program (the Fund has not yet commenced investing in this program); such investments are referred to as Social Enterprise investments.

 

Limited Partnerships

The Fund may invest in limited partnerships, primarily through the Special Equities program.  Investments in limited partnerships pose special investment risks.  A limited partnership is generally taxed as a pass-through entity; i.e., the income and expenses of the partnership are not taxed at the partnership level but are passed-through to its limited partners, such as the Fund, who include their pro rata share of the partnership’s income and expenses in their own taxes.  This pass-through may potentially cause non-compliance by the Fund with certain tax laws and regulations to which the Fund is subject, and subject them to penalties under the tax laws, including possible loss of their own pass-through treatment under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.  The term of a limited partnership is generally 10 years or more. Limited partnership units are illiquid and subject to contractual transfer restrictions, thus the Fund will generally not be able to sell an investment in a limited partnership but will be required to hold it for the entire term of the partnership.  Certain decisions that could adversely affect the Fund, such as whether the limited partnership should be allowed to borrow money, may be made by a majority in interest of the limited partners.  The Fund also bears indirectly its proportionate share of the limited partnership’s management fee and operating expenses. When the Fund makes an investment in a limited partnership, it signs a subscription agreement committing it to a certain investment amount; this amount is generally not paid all at once, but rather drawn down over time by the partnership’s general partner as investment opportunities present themselves.  As a result, the Fund must set aside sufficient assets to be able to fund any future capital calls. Limited partnerships have relatively concentrated holdings; as a consequence, the return on a partnership may be adversely impacted by the poor performance of a small number of investments, especially if the partnership needs to mark down the valuation of one or more of its holdings.


 

 

 

Securities With Equity And Debt Characteristics

The Fund may invest in securities that have a combination of equity and debt characteristics (the Fund has not yet commenced investing in the Special Equities program through which these investments are made) . These securities may at times behave more like equity than debt or vice versa.  Some types of convertible bonds, preferred stocks or other preferred securities automatically convert into common stock or other securities at a stated conversion ratio and some may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a predetermined price.  These securities, prior to conversion, may pay a fixed rate of interest or a dividend. Because convertible securities have both debt and equity characteristics, their values vary in response to many factors, including the values of the securities into which they are convertible, general market and economic conditions, as well as changes in the credit quality of the issuer.

 

Real Estate Investment Trusts

The Fund may make investments related to real estate, including real estate investment trusts ("REITs").  Risks associated with investments in securities of companies in the real estate industry include: decline in the value of real estate; risks related to general and local economic conditions; overbuilding and increased competition; increases in property taxes and operating expenses; changes in zoning laws; casualty or condemnation losses; variations in rental income; changes in the value of neighborhoods; the appeal of properties to tenants; and increases in interest rates.  In addition, equity REITs, which own real estate properties, may be affected by changes in the values of the underlying property owned by the REITS, while mortgage REITs, which make construction, development, and long-term mortgage loans, may be affected by the quality of credit extended. REITs are dependent upon management skills, may not be diversified, and are subject to the risks of financing projects.  REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers, self-liquidation and the possibility of failing to qualify for tax-free pass-through of income under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, and failing to maintain exemption from the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended.  If an issuer of debt securities collateralized by real estate defaults, REITs could end up holding the underlying real estate. REITs also have expenses themselves that are ultimately paid by the shareholder.

 

Illiquid Securities

The Fund may not purchase illiquid securities if more than 15% of the value of its net assets would be invested in such securities. The Advisor will monitor the amount of illiquid securities in the Fund, under the supervision of the Board, to ensure compliance with the Fund’s investment restrictions.

Historically, illiquid securities have included securities subject to contractual or legal restrictions on resale because they have not been registered under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”), securities that are otherwise not readily marketable, and repurchase agreements having a maturity of longer than seven days. Securities that have not been registered under the Securities Act are referred to as private placement or restricted securities and are purchased directly from the issuer or in the secondary market.  Mutual funds do not typically hold a significant amount of these restricted or other illiquid securities because of the potential for delays on resale and uncertainty in valuation.  Limitations on resale may have an adverse effect on the marketability of the securities, and the Fund might be unable to sell restricted or other illiquid securities promptly or at reasonable prices.

Notwithstanding the above, the Fund may purchase securities which, while privately placed, are eligible for purchase and sale under Rule 144A under the Securities Act.  This rule permits certain qualified institutional buyers, such as the Fund, to trade in privately placed securities even though such securities are not registered under the Securities Act.  If the Board determines, based upon a continuing review of Rule 144A securities, that they are liquid, they will not be subject to the 15% limit on illiquid investments.  The Board has adopted guidelines as part of the Pricing Procedures and delegated to the Advisor the daily function of determining the liquidity of restricted securities.  The Board retains sufficient oversight and is ultimately responsible for the determinations.

Restricted securities will be priced at fair value as determined in accordance with procedures prescribed by the Board.

 

Below-Investment Grade, High-Yield Debt Securities

                Below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities are lower quality debt securities (generally those rated BB or lower by S&P or Ba or lower by Moody's, known as "junk bonds"). These securities have moderate to poor protection of principal and interest payments and have speculative characteristics. (See Appendix B for a description of the ratings). The Fund considers a security to be investment grade if it has received an investment grade rating from at least one nationally recognized statistical rating organization ("NRSRO"), or is an unrated security of comparable quality as determined by the Advisor or Subadvisor. Below-investment grade, high-yield debt securities involve greater risk of default or price declines due to changes in the issuer's creditworthiness than investment-grade debt securities. Because the market for lower-rated securities may be thinner and less active than for higher-rated securities, there may be market price volatility for these securities and limited liquidity in the resale market. Market prices for these securities may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty or rising interest rates. Unrated debt securities may fall into the lower quality category. Unrated securities usually are not attractive to as many buyers as rated securities are, which may make them less marketable.


 

 

                The quality limitation set forth in the Fund's investment policy is determined immediately after the Fund's acquisition of a given security. Accordingly, any later change in ratings will not be considered when determining whether an investment complies with the Fund's investment policy. Through portfolio diversification and credit analysis, investment risk can be reduced, although there can be no assurance that losses will not occur.

 

Exchange-Traded Funds ("ETFs")

                ETFs are shares of other investment companies that can be traded in the secondary market (e.g., on an exchange) and whose underlying assets are generally stocks selected to track a particular index. Therefore, an ETF can track the performance of an index in much the same way as a traditional indexed mutual fund. But unlike many traditional investment companies, which are only bought and sold at closing NAV, ETFs are tradable in the secondary market on an intra-day basis, and are redeemed principally in-kind at each day's next calculated NAV. Although there can be no guarantee that an ETF’s intra-day price changes will accurately track the price changes of the related index, ETFs benefit from an in-kind redemption mechanism that is designed to protect ongoing shareholders from adverse effects on the ETFs that could arise from frequent cash creation and redemption transactions. Moreover, in contrast to conventional indexed mutual funds where redemptions can have an adverse tax impact on shareholders because of the need to sell portfolio securities (which sales may generate taxable gains), the in-kind redemption mechanism of the ETFs generally will not lead to a taxable event for the ETF or its ongoing shareholders.

The Fund may purchase shares of ETFs for the limited purpose of managing the Fund’s cash position consistent with the Fund's benchmark.  For example, an ETF may be purchased if the Fund has excess cash and it may be held until the Advisor and/or Subadvisor decides to make other permissible investments.  Similarly, if the Fund should receive a large redemption request, the Fund could sell some or all of an ETF position to lessen the exposure to the market.  The sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria of any Fund will not apply to an investment in an ETF or to any of the individual underlying securities held by the ETF.  Accordingly, the Fund could have indirect exposure to a company that does not meet the Fund’s sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria and that could therefore not be purchased directly by the Fund.  ETF investments, however, (i) will not constitute a direct ownership interest in any security that does not meet applicable sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria, (ii) will be limited to the amount of net cash available, which, in general, is not expected to be a material portion of the Fund and (iii) will be used principally to help reduce deviations from the Fund’s benchmark.

Some of the risks of investing in ETFs are similar to those of investing in an indexed mutual fund, including (i) market risk (the risk of fluctuating stock prices in general), (ii) asset class risk (the risk of fluctuating prices of the stocks represented in the ETF's index), (iii) tracking error risk (the risk of errors in matching the ETF's underlying assets to the index), (iv) industry concentration risk (the risk of the stocks in a particular index being concentrated in an industry performing poorly relative to other stocks) and (v) the risk that since an ETF is not actively managed it cannot sell poorly performing stocks as long as they are represented in the index. In addition, ETFs may trade at a discount from their NAV and, because ETFs operate as open-end investment companies or unit investment trusts, they incur fees that are separate from the fees incurred directly by the Fund.  Therefore, the Fund's purchase of an ETF results in the layering of expenses, such that Fund shareholders indirectly bear a proportionate share of any operating expenses of the ETF.

 

Lending Portfolio Securities

The Fund may lend portfolio securities to member firms of the New York Stock Exchange and commercial banks with assets of one billion dollars or more, provided the aggregate value of the securities loaned by the Fund will not exceed 33 1/3% of its total assets. However, the Fund does not currently intend to loan portfolio securities.

Any such loans must be secured continuously in the form of cash or cash equivalents such as U.S. Treasury bills. The amount of the collateral must on a current basis equal or exceed the market value of the loaned securities, and the Fund must be able to terminate such loans upon notice at any time. The Fund will exercise its right to terminate a securities loan in order to preserve its right to vote upon matters of importance affecting holders of the securities, including social responsibility matters.


 

 

The advantage of such loans is that the Fund continues to receive the equivalent of the interest earned or dividends paid by the issuers on the loaned securities while at the same time earning interest on the cash or equivalent collateral which may be invested in accordance with the Fund's investment objective, policies and restrictions.

                Securities loans are usually made to broker-dealers and other financial institutions to facilitate their delivery of such securities. As with any extension of credit, there may be risks of delay in recovery and possibly loss of rights in the loaned securities should the borrower of the loaned securities fail financially. However, the Fund will make loans of its portfolio securities only to those firms the Advisor and/or Subadvisor deem creditworthy and only on terms the Advisor and/or Subadvisor believe should compensate for such risk. On termination of the loan, the borrower is obligated to return the securities to the Fund. The Fund will recognize any gain or loss in the market value of the securities during the loan period. The Fund may pay reasonable custodial fees in connection with the loan.

 

Leverage

To the extent that the Fund makes purchases of securities where borrowing exceeds 5% of the Fund’s total assets, the Fund may engage in transactions which create leverage. However, the Fund does not currently intend to engage in such transactions.

In leveraged transactions, borrowing magnifies the potential for gain or loss on the Fund’s portfolio securities and therefore, if employed, increases the possibility of fluctuation in the Fund’s net asset value (“NAV”).

                Any use of leverage by the Fund is premised generally upon the expectation that the Fund will achieve a greater return on its investments with the proceeds from the borrowed funds than the additional costs the Fund incurs as a result of such leverage. If the income or capital appreciation from the securities purchased with borrowed funds is not sufficient to cover the cost of leverage or if the Fund incurs capital losses, the return of the Fund will be less than if leverage had not been used.  The Subadvisor may determine to maintain the Fund's leveraged position if it expects that the long-term benefits to the Fund's shareholders of maintaining the leveraged position will outweigh the current reduced return. 

Leverage creates risks which may adversely affect the return for shareholders, including:

                ·               fluctuations in interest rates on borrowings and short-term debt; and

·              the potential for a decline in the value of an investment acquired with borrowed funds, while the Fund's obligations under such borrowing remain fixed. If interest rates rise or if the Fund otherwise incurs losses on its investments, the Fund's NAV attributable to its shares will reflect the resulting decline in the value of its portfolio holdings.

Capital raised through borrowing will be subject to dividend payments or interest costs that may or may not exceed the income and appreciation on the assets purchased.  The Fund also may be required to maintain minimum average balances in connection with borrowings or to pay a commitment or other fee to maintain a line of credit; either of these requirements will increase the cost of borrowing over the stated interest rate. Certain types of borrowings may result in the Fund being subject to covenants in credit agreements, including those relating to asset coverage, borrowing base and portfolio composition requirements and additional covenants that may affect the Fund's ability to pay dividends and distributions on its shares in certain instances.  The Fund may also be required to pledge its assets to lenders in connection with certain types of borrowing.  The Advisor does not anticipate that these covenants or restrictions will adversely affect the Subadvisor's ability to manage the Fund's portfolio in accordance with the Fund's investment objective and policies.  These covenants or restrictions may also force the Fund to liquidate investments at times and at prices that are not favorable to the Fund, or to forego investments that the Advisor otherwise views as favorable.

To reduce its borrowings, the Fund might be required to sell securities at a time when it would be disadvantageous to do so.  In addition, because interest on money borrowed is a Fund expense that it would not otherwise incur, the Fund may have less net investment income during periods when its borrowings are substantial.  The interest paid by the Fund on borrowings may be more or less than the yield on the securities purchased with borrowed funds, depending on prevailing market conditions.

To reduce the risks of borrowing, the Fund will limit its borrowings as described in the "Investment Restrictions" section.

 


 

 

 

Charitable Contributions

On occasion, the Fund may make de minimis charitable contributions to groups intended to further the Fund's sustainable and socially responsible investment purpose, including but not limited to educating investors about sustainable and socially responsible investing.

 

 

ADDITIONAL RISK DISCLOSURE

 

Recent Events in the Financial Markets

Since 2008 the United States and other countries have experienced significant disruptions to their financial markets impacting the liquidity and volatility of securities generally, including securities in which the Fund may invest.  During periods of extreme market volatility, prices of securities held by the Fund may be negatively impacted due to imbalances between market participants seeking to sell the same or similar securities and market participants willing or able to buy such securities.  As a result, the market prices of securities held by the Fund could go down, at times without regard to the financial condition of or specific events impacting the issuer of the security. 

The instability in the financial markets has led the U.S. Government and other governments to take a number of unprecedented actions designed to support certain financial institutions and segments of the financial markets that have experienced extreme volatility, and in some cases a lack of liquidity. Federal, state, and other governments, their regulatory agencies, or self regulatory organizations may take actions that affect the regulation of the instruments in which the Fund invests, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that are unforeseeable. Legislation or regulation may also change the way in which the Fund itself is regulated. Such legislation or regulation could limit or preclude the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objectives.

 

INVESTMENT restrictions

 

Fundamental Investment Restrictions

                The Fund has adopted the following fundamental investment restrictions. These restrictions may not be changed without the approval of the holders of a majority of the outstanding shares of the Fund as defined under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”).

 

 (1) The Fund may not concentrate its investments in the securities of issuers primarily engaged in any particular industry or group of industries (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or its agencies or instrumentalities and repurchase agreements secured thereby).

(2) The Fund may not issue senior securities or borrow money, except from banks and through reverse repurchase agreements in an amount up to 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund’s total assets (including the amount borrowed).

(3) The Fund may not underwrite the securities of other issuers, except to the extent that in connection with the disposition of portfolio securities, the Fund may be deemed to be an underwriter.

(4) The Fund may not invest directly in commodities or real estate, although the Fund may invest in securities which are secured by real estate or real estate mortgages and securities of issuers which invest or deal in commodities, commodity futures, real estate, or real estate mortgages.

(5) The Fund may not lend any security or make any loan, including engaging in repurchase agreements, if, as a result, more than 33 1/3% of the Fund’s total assets would be loaned to other parties, except through the purchase of debt securities or other debt instruments.

 

         

        Under the interpretation of the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") staff, "concentrate" means to invest 25% or more of total assets in the securities of issuers primarily engaged in any one industry or group of industries.

         

        The Fund may invest up to 10% of its net assets in reverse repurchase agreements.

         


 

 

        Under current law the Fund may underwrite securities only in compliance with the conditions of sections 10(f) and 12(c) of the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder wherein the Fund may underwrite securities to the extent that the Fund may be considered an underwriter within the meaning of the Securities Act in selling a portfolio security.

 

Nonfundamental Investment Restrictions

                The Board has adopted the following nonfundamental investment restrictions. A nonfundamental investment restriction can be changed by the Board at any time without a shareholder vote.

 

(1) The Fund will, under normal circumstances, invest at least 80% of its assets, including borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of companies located in emerging market countries.

(2) The Fund may not enter into reverse repurchase agreements if the aggregate proceeds from outstanding reverse repurchase agreements, when added to other outstanding borrowings permitted by the 1940 Act, would exceed 33 1/3% of the Fund's total assets. The Fund will not make any purchases of securities if borrowing exceeds 5% of total assets of the Fund.

(3) The Fund may not purchase illiquid securities if more than 15% of the value of the Fund’s net assets would be invested in such securities. The Fund may buy and sell securities outside the U.S. that are not registered with the SEC or marketable in the U.S.

(4) The Fund may not make short sales of securities or purchase any securities on margin except as provided with respect to options, futures contracts, and options on futures contracts.

(5) The Fund may not enter into a futures contract or an option on a futures contract if the aggregate initial margins and premiums required to establish these positions would exceed 5% of the Fund's net assets.

(6) The Fund may not purchase a put or call option on a security (including a straddle or spread) if the value of that option premium, when aggregated with the premiums on all other options on securities held by the Fund, would exceed 5% of the Fund's total assets.

                (7) With respect to Fundamental Investment Restriction (2) regarding borrowing, in order to secure any permitted borrowings and reverse repurchase agreements, the Fund may only pledge, mortgage or hypothecate assets up to 33 1/3% of the value of the Fund's total assets.

                (8) The Fund may not purchase or retain securities issued by companies for the purpose of exercising control.

  

Except for the liquidity and borrowing restrictions, any investment restriction which involves a maximum percentage of securities or assets shall not be considered to be violated unless an excess over the applicable percentage occurs immediately after an acquisition of securities or utilization of assets and results therefrom.

 

DIVIDENDS, DISTRIBUTIONS, AND TAXES

 

                The Fund intends to continue to qualify as regulated investment companies under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"). If for any reason the Fund should fail to qualify, it would be taxed as a corporation at the Fund level, rather than passing through its income and gains to shareholders.

Distributions of realized net capital gains, if any, are normally paid once a year; however, the Fund does not intend to make any such distributions unless available capital loss carryovers, if any, have been used or have expired. Utilization of these capital loss carryforwards may be subject to annual limitations under section 382 of the Code.  As of September 28, 2012, the Fund had no capital loss carryforwards.  

                The Fund is required to withhold 28% of any reportable dividends and long-term capital gain distributions paid and 28% of each reportable redemption transaction if: (a) the shareholder's social security number or other taxpayer identification number ("TIN") is not provided or an obviously incorrect TIN is provided; (b) the shareholder does not certify under penalties of perjury that the TIN provided is the shareholder's correct TIN and that the shareholder is not subject to backup withholding under section 3406(a)(1)(C) of the Code because of underreporting (however, failure to provide certification as to the application of section 3406(a)(1)(C) will result only in backup withholding on dividends, not on redemptions); or (c) the Fund is notified by the Internal Revenue Service that the TIN provided by the shareholder is incorrect or that there has been underreporting of interest or dividends by the shareholder. Affected shareholders will receive statements at least annually specifying the amount withheld.


 

 

                In addition, the Fund is required to report to the Internal Revenue Service the following information with respect to each redemption transaction occurring in the Fund: (a) the shareholder's name, address, account number and taxpayer identification number; (b) the total dollar value of the redemptions; (c) the Fund's identifying CUSIP number; and (d) cost basis information for shares acquired on or after January 1, 2012.

                Certain shareholders are, however, exempt from the backup withholding and broker reporting requirements. Exempt shareholders include: corporations; financial institutions; tax-exempt organizations; individual retirement plans; the U.S., a State, the District of Columbia, a U.S. possession, a foreign government, an international organization, or any political subdivision, agency or instrumentality of any of the foregoing; U.S. registered commodities or securities dealers; real estate investment trusts; registered investment companies; bank common trust funds; certain charitable trusts; and foreign central banks of issue. Non-resident aliens, certain foreign partnerships and foreign corporations are generally not subject to either requirement but may instead be subject to withholding under sections 1441 or 1442 of the Code. Shareholders claiming exemption from backup withholding and broker reporting should call or write the Fund for further information.

                A fund that has more than 50% of its total assets invested in foreign securities at its fiscal year end is eligible to pass through any applicable foreign tax credits to its shareholders under Section 853 of the Code.  In addition, for individual investors who meet certain holding period requirements, some dividends may be identified as “qualified dividend income” and be eligible for the reduced federal tax rate.

 

net asset value

 

                The public offering price of the shares of the Fund is the NAV per share (plus, for Class A shares, the applicable sales charge). The Fund's NAV per share is determined by dividing total net assets (the value of its assets net of liabilities, including accrued expenses and fees) by the number of shares outstanding for each class. The NAV fluctuates based on the market value of the Fund's investments. The NAV per share of the Fund is determined every business day as of the close of the regular session of the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) (generally 4:00 p.m. Eastern time).  The Fund does not determine NAV on certain national holidays or other days on which the NYSE is closed: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents' Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas Day. In calculating NAV, the Fund follows standard industry practice by recording security transactions and their valuations on the business day following the security transaction trade date. This practice is known as “trade date plus one” or “T + 1 accounting.” Thus, changes in holdings of portfolio securities are reflected in the first calculation of net asset value on the first business day following the trade date, as permitted by applicable law. Security transactions for money market instruments are recorded on the trade date.

 

 

          calculation of total return

 

The Fund may advertise "total return." Total return is calculated separately for each class. Total return differs from yield in that yield figures measure only the income component of the Fund's investments, while total return includes not only the effect of income dividends but also any change in NAV, or principal amount, during the stated period. Total return is computed by taking the total number of shares purchased by a hypothetical $1,000 investment after deducting any applicable sales charge, adding all additional shares purchased within the period with reinvested dividends and distributions, calculating the value of those shares at the end of the period, and dividing the result by the initial $1,000 investment. Note: "Total Return" as quoted in the Financial Highlights section of the Fund's Prospectus and Annual Report to Shareholders, however, per SEC instructions, does not reflect deduction of the sales charge, and corresponds to "return without maximum load" (or "w/o max load" or "at NAV") as referred to herein. For periods of more than one year, the cumulative total return is then adjusted for the number of years, taking compounding into account, to calculate average annual total return during that period.

                Total return before taxes is computed according to the following formula:

 

P(1 + T)n = ERV

 

where P = a hypothetical initial payment of $1,000; T = total return; n = number of years; and ERV = the ending redeemable value of a hypothetical $1,000 payment made at the beginning of the period.

Total return after taxes on distributions is computed according to the following formula:


 

 

P(1 +T)n = ATV D

 

where P = a hypothetical initial payment of $1,000; T = average annual total return (after taxes on distributions); n = number of years and ATV D  = the ending  value of a hypothetical $1,000 payment made at the beginning of the 1, 5, or 10 year periods at the end of such periods (or portions thereof if applicable) after taxes on fund distributions but not after taxes on redemption.

                Total return after taxes on distributions and sale of fund shares is computed according to the following formula:

 

P(1 +T)n = ATV DR

 

where P = a hypothetical initial payment of $1,000; T = average annual total return (after taxes on distributions and redemption); n = number of years and ATV DR = the ending value of a hypothetical $1,000 payment made at the beginning of the 1, 5, or 10 year periods at the end of such periods (or portions thereof if applicable), after taxes on fund distributions and redemption.

                Total return is historical in nature and is not intended to indicate future performance. All total return quotations, including returns after taxes, reflect the deduction of the Fund's maximum sales charge ("return with maximum load"), except quotations of "return without maximum load" (or "without CDSC" or "at NAV") which do not deduct a sales charge. Return without maximum load, which will be higher than total return, should be considered only by investors, such as participants in certain pension plans, to whom the sales charge does not apply, or for purposes of comparison only with comparable figures which also do not reflect sales charges, such as Lipper averages. Thus, in the above formula, for return without maximum load, P = the entire $1,000 hypothetical initial investment and does not reflect deduction of any sales charge; for return with maximum load, P= a hypothetical initial investment of $1,000 less any sales charge actually imposed at the beginning of the period for which the performance is being calculated. 

                Total return, like NAV per share, fluctuates in response to changes in market conditions. Total return for any particular time period should not be considered an indication of future return.

                The Fund has no performance history to date because it commenced operations on September 28, 2012.

 

Purchase and redemption of shares

 

The Fund has authorized one or more broker/dealers to receive on its behalf purchase and redemption orders.  Such broker/dealers are authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund's behalf.  The Fund will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized broker/dealer, or if applicable, a broker/dealer's authorized designee, receives the order in good order. The customer orders will be priced at the Fund's NAV next computed after they are received by an authorized broker/dealer or the broker/dealer's authorized designee.

The Fund has no  arrangement with any person to permit frequent purchases and redemptions of Fund shares.

Share certificates will not be issued unless requested in writing by the investor.  If share certificates have been issued, then the certificate must be delivered to the Fund's transfer agent with any redemption request.  This could result in delays.  If the certificates have been lost, the shareholder will have to pay to post an indemnity bond in case the original certificates are later presented by another person.  No certificates will be issued for fractional shares.

                The Fund has filed a notice of election with the SEC pursuant to Rule 18f-1 under the 1940 Act.  The notice states that the Fund may honor redemptions that, during any 90-day period, exceed $250,000 or 1% of the NAV of the Fund, whichever is less, by redemptions-in-kind (distributions of a pro rata share of the portfolio securities, rather than cash). The notice of election is irrevocable while Rule 18f-1 is in effect unless the SEC permits the withdrawal of such notice.

                See the Prospectus for more details on purchases and redemptions.

 

DIRECTORs and officers

 

          The Board of Directors for Calvert World Values Fund, Inc. supervises the Fund's activities and reviews its contracts with companies that provide it with services.  Business information about the Directors and Officers as well as information regarding the experience, qualifications, attributes and skills of the Directors is provided below.  Independent Directors refers to those Directors who are not “interested persons” as that term is defined in the 1940 Act and the rules thereunder.


 

 

 

 

 

Position

 

Position

 

# of Calvert

 

Other

Name &

with

Start

Principal Occupation

Portfolios

Directorships During the

Age

Fund

Date

During Last 5 Years

Overseen

Past Five Years

INDEPENDENT DIRECTORS

REBECCA L. ADAMSON

AGE: 63

Director

2005

 

President of the national non-profit, First People’s Worldwide, formerly First Nations Financial Project. Founded by her in 1980, First People’s Worldwide is the only American Indian alternative development institute in the country.

16

·         Bay & Paul Foundation

 

RICHARD L. BAIRD, JR.

AGE: 64

Director & Chair

 

2005

 

 

President and CEO of Adagio Health Inc. in Pittsburgh, PA, a non-profit corporation which provides family planning services, nutrition, maternal/child health care, and various health screening services and community preventive health programs.

26

             None

JOHN G. GUFFEY, JR.

AGE: 64

Director

 

 

1992

 

 

President of Aurora Press Inc., a privately held publisher of trade paperbacks.

26

·         Ariel Funds (3)

(through 12/31/11)

·         Calvert Social Investment Foundation

·         Calvert Ventures, LLC

MILES D. HARPER, III

AGE: 49

Director

2005

 

Partner, Gainer Donnelly & Desroches (public accounting firm) since January 1999.

16

·         Bridgeway Funds (14)

JOY V. JONES

AGE: 62

Director

2005

 

Attorney.

 

16

·         Director, Conduit Street Restaurants Limited

TERRENCE J. MOLLNER, Ed.D.

AGE: 67

Director

 

1992

 

Founder, Chairperson and President of The Love Skill Foundation, Inc., an educational organization focused on the personal skills and organizations described in Dr. Mollner’s book, The Love Skill: We Are Mastering the 7 Layers of Human Maturity, particularly businesses that freely chose to give priority to the common good. Chairperson, Stakeholder of Capital, Inc., an asset management firm and financial services provider in Amherst, MA.

 

16

·         Calvert Social Investment Foundation

·         Ben & Jerry's Homemade, Inc.

·         ArtNOW, Inc.

·         Yourolivebranch.org 

SYDNEY A. MORRIS

AGE: 63

Director

2005

 

The Rev. Dr. Morris currently serves as Parish Minister to the Keweenaw Unitarian Universalist Fellowship in Houghton, MI. She is a graduate of Harvard Divinity School and is immediate past chair of the Unitarian Universalist National Committee on Socially Responsible Investing.

16

           None

INTERESTED DIRECTORS

BARBARA J. KRUMSIEK*

AGE: 60

 

Director &

President

1997

 

President, Chief Executive Officer and Chair of Calvert Investments, Inc.

 

 

 

44

·         Calvert Social Investment Foundation

·         Pepco Holdings, Inc.

·         Acacia Life Insurance Company (Chair)

(through 4/29/12)

·         Griffin Realty Corp.

 

D. Wayne Silby, Esq.*

AGE: 64

Director

 

 

1992

 

Mr. Silby is the founding Chair of the Calvert Funds. He is the Chair-Elect and a principal of Syntao.com, a Beijing-based company promoting corporate social responsibility.

26

·         Ameritas Mutual Holding Company

·         Calvert Social Investment Foundation

·         Giving Assets, Inc.

·         Studio School Fund

·         Syntao.com China

·         The ICE Organization


 

 

 

 

Position

Position

Principal Occupation

During Last 5 Years

Name &

with

Start

Age

Fund

Date

OFFICERS

MICHAEL T. ABRAMO

AGE: 39

Vice President

2011

Vice President of Advisor (since 2011) and portfolio manager for Calvert’s taxable fixed-income funds.

KAREN BECKER

AGE: 59

Chief Compliance Officer

2005

 

Chief Compliance Officer for the Calvert Funds and Head of the Securities Operations Department for the Advisor.

SUSAN walker Bender, Esq. 

AGE: 54

Assistant Vice-President &

Assistant Secretary

1992

 

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary and Associate General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc.

THOMAS DAILEY

AGE: 48

Vice President

2010

Vice President of the Advisor and lead portfolio manager for Calvert’s taxable and tax-exempt money market funds and municipal funds.

MATTHEW DUCH

AGE: 37

Vice President

2011

Vice President of the Advisor (since 2011) and portfolio manager for Calvert's taxable fixed-income funds.

IVY WAFFORD DUKE, Esq. 

AGE: 44

Assistant Vice-President &

Assistant Secretary

1996

 

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary and Deputy General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc., and Chief Compliance Officer for the Advisor and Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc..

 

PATRICK FAUL

AGE: 47

Vice President

2010

Vice President of the Advisor since 2008, and Head of Credit Research for the Advisor since 2009. Prior to 2009, Mr. Faul was Co-Head of Credit Research (2008) and a Senior Securities Analyst (prior to 2008) for the Advisor.

TRACI L. GOLDT

AGE: 38

Assistant Secretary

2004

 

Electronic Filing and Administrative Operations Manager (since 2011) and Executive Assistant to General Counsel (prior to 2011), Calvert Investments, Inc.

 

HUI PING HO, CPA

AGE: 48

Assistant Treasurer

2000

 

Assistant Treasurer and Tax Compliance Manager of Calvert Investments, Inc.

LANCELOT A. KING, Esq. 

AGE: 42

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

2002

 

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary and Associate General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc.

 

 

edith lillie

aGE: 55

Assistant Secretary

2007

Assistant Secretary (since 2007) and Regulatory Matters Manager of Calvert Investments, Inc.

AUGUSTO DIVO MACEDO, Esq.

AGE: 49

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

2007

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary, and Associate Counsel Compliance of Calvert Investments, Inc.  

JANE B. MAXWELL, Esq.

AGE: 60

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

2005

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary & Assistant General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc.

 

 

 

 

ANDREW K. NIEBLER,  Esq. 

AGE: 45

Assistant Vice President & Assistant Secretary

2006

Assistant Vice President, Assistant Secretary & Associate General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc. 

CATHERINE P. ROY

AGE: 56

 

Vice President

2004

 

 

Senior Vice President of the Advisor and Chief Investment Officer – Fixed Income

William M. Tartikoff, Esq.  

AGE: 65

Vice President and Secretary

1992

 

Senior Vice President, Secretary, and General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc.

NATALIE

TRUNOW

AGE: 44

Vice President

2008

Senior Vice President of the Advisor, and Chief Investment Officer - Equities. Prior to joining Calvert in August 2008, Ms. Trunow was the Section Head (2005-2008) and Portfolio Manager (2001-2008) for the Global Public Markets Group of General Motors Asset Management.

Ronald M. WolfsheimeR, CPA   

AGE: 60

Treasurer

1992

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial and Administrative Officer of Calvert Investments, Inc.

MICHAEL V. YUHAS JR., CPA   

AGE: 51

Fund Controller

1999

 

Vice President of Fund Administration of Calvert Investment Administrative Services, Inc.


 

 

 

*Ms. Krumsiek is an interested person of the Fund since she is an Officer and Director of the Fund's Advisor and certain affiliates.  Mr. Silby is an interested person of the Fund since he is a Director of the parent company of the Fund's Advisor.

  

                The address of the Directors and Officers is 4550 Montgomery Avenue, Suite 1000N, Bethesda, Maryland 20814, with the exception of Mr. Silby, whose address is 1715 18th Street, N.W., Washington, DC  20009. As of September 28, 2012, the Directors and Officers as a group owned less than 1% of the Fund's outstanding shares.

 

 

Additional Information about the Directors

 

The Board believes that each Director’s experience, qualifications, attributes or skills on an individual basis and in combination with those of the other Directors lead to the conclusion that the Directors possess the requisite experience, qualifications, attributes and skills to serve on the Board.  The Board believes that the Directors’ ability to review critically, evaluate, question and discuss information provided to them; to interact effectively with the Advisor, Subadvisor, other service providers, legal counsel and independent public accountants; and to exercise effective business judgment in the performance of their duties as Directors, support this conclusion.  The Board has also considered the contributions that each Director can make to the Board and the Fund.  In addition, the following specific experience, qualifications, attributes and/or skills apply as to each Director:  Ms. Adamson, experience as a president of a non-profit organization and experience as a board member of a private foundation; Mr. Baird, experience as a chief executive officer of a non-profit corporation; Mr. Guffey, experience as a director and officer of private companies and experience as a board member of various organizations; Mr. Harper, experience as a partner of a public accounting firm and experience as a board member of a mutual fund complex; Ms. Jones, legal experience and experience as a director of a private foundation; Mr. Mollner, experience as a board member of various organizations; Rev. Dr. Morris, ecclesiastical leadership experience; Ms. Krumsiek, leadership roles within the Advisor and certain of its affiliates and experience as a board member of various organizations; and Mr. Silby, experience as a director and officer of private companies and experience as a board member of various organizations.  References to the experience, qualifications, attributes and/or skills of the Directors are pursuant to requirements of the SEC, do not constitute holding out of the Board or any Director as having special expertise or experience, and shall not impose any greater responsibility or liability on any such Director or on the Board by reason thereof.

 

Board Structure

 

The Board is responsible for overseeing the management and operations of the Fund.  The Board consists of seven Independent Directors and two Directors who are interested persons of the Fund.  Richard L. Baird, Jr., who is an Independent Director, serves as Chairperson of the Board.  The Board has five standing Committees:  the Governance Committee, the Audit Committee, the Social Committee, the Investment Performance Oversight Committee and the Special Equities Committee.  Each of the Governance, Audit, Social and Investment Performance Oversight Committees is chaired by an Independent Director.  In addition, each of the Governance and Audit Committees is composed solely of Independent Directors. 


 

 

Through the Governance and Audit Committees, the Independent Directors consider and address important matters involving the Fund, including those presenting conflicts or potential conflicts of interest for Fund management.  The Independent Directors also regularly meet outside the presence of Fund management and are advised by independent legal counsel.  The Board has determined that its committees help ensure that the Fund has effective and independent governance and oversight.  The Board has also determined that its leadership structure is appropriate given the Advisor’s sponsorship of the Fund and that investors have selected the Advisor to provide overall management to the Fund.  The Board also believes its leadership structure facilitates the orderly and efficient flow of information to the Independent Directors from Fund management.

The Governance Committee addresses matters of fund governance, including policies on Director compensation and on Board and Committee structure and responsibilities; the functions of the Governance Committee of the Board also include those of a nominating committee, e.g.,  initiation and consideration of nominations for the appointment or election of independent Directors of the Board.  These matters were addressed in meetings held nine times in the past fiscal year.  The current members of this Committee are Ms. Adamson, Rev. Dr. Morris and Mr. Baird, each an Independent Director

The Audit Committee approves and recommends to the Board independent public accountants to conduct the annual audit of the Fund’s financial statements; reviews with the independent public accountants the outline, scope, and results of the annual audit; and reviews the performance and fees charged by the independent public accountants for professional services.  In addition, the Audit Committee meets with the Fund’s independent public accountants and representatives of Fund management to review accounting activities and areas of financial reporting and control. The Audit Committee also oversees Calvert’s High Social Impact Investments program and Fund purchases of Community Investment Notes issued by the Calvert Social Investment Foundation. This Committee met eleven times in the past fiscal year. The current members of this Committee are Ms. Jones and Messrs. Baird, Harper and Mollner, each an Independent Director.

The Social Committee addresses matters relating to the sustainable and socially responsible investment criteria used by the Fund and their application. This Committee met five times in the past fiscal year.  The current members of this Committee are Mses. Adamson, Jones and Krumsiek, and Rev. Dr. Morris.  With the exception of Ms. Krumsiek, the members of this Committee are Independent Directors.

The Investment Performance Oversight Committee oversees the Fund’s investment performance, including the performance of the Fund’s sub-advisors. This Committee met five times in the past fiscal year.  The current members of this Committee are Ms. Krumsiek and Messrs. Guffey, Harper and Silby.  With the exceptions of Ms. Krumsiek and Mr. Silby, the members of this Committee are Independent Directors.

The Special Equities Committee oversees the Fund’s Special Equities program, including review, selection and fair valuation of the social venture capital investments. This Committee met twelve times in the past fiscal year. The current members of this Committee are Ms. Krumsiek and Messrs. Guffey, Mollner and Silby.  With the exceptions of Ms. Krumsiek and Mr. Silby, the members of this Committee are Independent Directors.

The Board has retained Lipper Analytical Services, Inc. to provide the Board with an independent analysis of investment performance and expenses for the Fund, in connection with the Board’s annual consideration of the renewal of the Fund’s investment advisory, subadvisory and underwriting agreements, as required by Section 15(c) of the 1940 Act.

 

Board Oversight of Risk

 

An integral part of the Board’s overall responsibility for overseeing the management and operations of the Fund is the Board’s oversight of the risk management of the Fund’s investment programs and business affairs.  The Fund is subject to a number of risks, such as investment risk, credit and counterparty risk, valuation risk, risk of operational failure or lack of business continuity, and legal, compliance and regulatory risk.  The Fund, the Advisor, the Subadvisor and other service providers to the Fund have implemented various processes, procedures and controls to identify risks to the Fund, to lessen the probability of their occurrence and to mitigate any adverse effect should they occur.  Different processes, procedures and controls are employed with respect to different types of risks.

The Board exercises oversight of the risk management process primarily through the Audit and Investment Performance Oversight Committees, and through oversight by the Board itself.  In addition to adopting, and periodically reviewing, policies and procedures designed to address risks to the Fund, the Board requires management of the Advisor and the Fund, including the Fund’s Chief Compliance Officer (“CCO”), to report to the Board and the Committees of the Board on a variety of matters, including matters relating to risk management, at regular and special meetings.  The Board and the Audit Committee receive regular reports from the Fund’s independent public accountants on internal control and financial reporting matters.  On at least a quarterly basis, the Independent Directors meet with the Fund’s CCO, including outside the presence of management, to discuss issues related to compliance.  Furthermore, the Board receives a quarterly report from the Fund’s CCO regarding the operation of the compliance policies and procedures of the Fund and its primary service providers.  The Board and the Investment Performance Oversight Committee also receive regular reports from the Advisor on the investments and securities trading of the Fund, including their investment performance and asset weightings compared to appropriate benchmarks, as well as reports regarding the valuation of the Fund’s securities.  The Board also receives reports from the Fund’s primary service providers, including the Subadvisor, regarding their operations as they relate to the Fund. 


 

 

 

Directors’ Ownership of Fund Shares

                 

                The Directors owned shares in the Fund and in all other Calvert Funds for which they serve on the Board, in the following amounts as of December 31, 2011:

 

 

 

Dollar Range of

Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities

 

Equity Securities

in All Registered Investment Companies Overseen

Name of Director

in the Fund

By Director in Calvert Family of Funds

 

Independent Directors

 

 

Rebecca Adamson

None

>$100,000

 

Richard L. Baird, Jr.

None

>$100,000

 

John G. Guffey, Jr.

None

>$100,000

 

Miles D. Harper, III

None

>$100,000

 

Joy V. Jones

None

>$100,000

 

Terrence J. Mollner

None

$10,001-$50,000

 

Sydney A. Morris 

None

$50,001-$100,000

 

Interested Directors 

 

 

 

Barbara J. Krumsiek

None

>$100,000

 

D. Wayne Silby, Esq.

None

>$100,000

 

         

                 

 

Directors’ Compensation

Director Compensation Table

 

Calvert World Values Fund, Inc.

 

                The following table (unaudited numbers) sets forth information describing the compensation of each Director  for his/her services to the Fund for the Fund’s fiscal year ended September 30, 2012 (includes estimates for future payments through September 30, 2012) and to all of the portfolios in the Fund Complex.  Each fund within Calvert World Values Fund, Inc. is responsible for a proportionate share of these payments.

 

 

Name of Person, Position

Aggregate Compensation From Funds (Includes Pension or Retirement Benefits)

Pension or Retirement Benefits Accrued As Part of Fund Expenses

Total Compensation From Funds and Fund Complex Paid to Directors****

Rebecca Adamson**

(Director)

 

$

$

$

Richard L. Baird, Jr.**

(Director)

$

$

$

John Guffey, Jr.**

(Director)

$

$

$

Miles D. Harper, III**

(Director)

$

$

$

Joy V. Jones**

(Director)

$

$

$

Terrence J. Mollner, Ed.D**

(Director)

$

$

$

Sydney A. Morris

(Director)

$

$

$

Barbara J. Krumsiek*

(Director & President)

$

$

$

D. Wayne Silby, Esq.*,**

(Director & Chair)

$

$

$


 

 

 

*Ms. Krumsiek is an interested person of the Fund since she is an Officer and Director of the Advisor and certain affiliates. Mr. Silby is an interested person of the Fund since he is a Director of the parent company of the Advisor.

 

**Mses. Adamson and Jones, Rev. Dr. Morris and Messrs. Baird, Guffey, Harper, Mollner and Silby have chosen to defer a portion of their compensation. As of August 31, 2012, total deferred compensation for service on all applicable Calvert Fund Boards, including dividends and capital appreciation, was $_______; $_______; $_______; $_______; $_______; $_______; $_______; and $_______, for each of them, respectively.

 

****As of September 28, 2012, the Fund Complex consisted of forty-four (44) Funds.

 

Directors not employed by the Advisor or its affiliates may elect to defer receipt of all or a percentage of their fees and deem such deferred amounts to be invested in any Calvert Fund through the Directors’ Deferred Compensation Plan. Management believes this will have a negligible effect on the Fund's assets, liabilities, net assets, and net income per share

 

investment advisor and subadvisor

 

                The Fund's Investment Advisor is Calvert Investment Management, Inc. (“Calvert” or the “Advisor”), a subsidiary of Calvert Investments, Inc., which is a subsidiary of Ameritas Mutual Holding Company. Under the Investment Advisory Agreement with respect to the Fund, the Advisor provides investment advice to the Fund and oversees the day-to-day operations, subject to the supervision and direction of the Board. The Advisor provides the Fund with investment supervision and management, and office space; furnishes executive and other personnel to the Fund; and pays the salaries and fees of all Directors who are employees of the Advisor or its affiliates. The Fund pays all of its administrative and operating expenses, including: custodial, registrar, dividend disbursing and transfer agency fees; administrative service fees; federal and state securities registration fees; salaries, fees and expenses of Directors, executive officers and employees of the Fund, who are not employees of the Advisor or of its affiliates; insurance premiums; trade association dues; legal and audit fees; interest, taxes and other business fees; expenses of printing and mailing reports, notices, prospectuses, and proxy material to shareholders; shareholder meeting expenses; and brokerage commissions and other costs associated with the purchase and sale of portfolio securities. As explained in the prospectus under the heading “Contractual Fee Waivers and/or Expense Reimbursements”, the Fund has an expense offset arrangement with the custodian bank whereby the custodian fees may be paid indirectly by credits on the Fund’s uninvested cash balances. These credits are used to reduce Fund expenses. Where the total annual fund operating expenses are subject to a contractual expense limitation, the Advisor could be deemed to have an incentive to leave greater cash balances at the custodian, since it receives the benefit of any expense offset credit. The Board periodically reviews and evaluates the expense offset arrangement.


 

 

Under the Investment Advisory Agreement, for services provided to the Fund, the Advisor receives an annual fee, payable monthly, of 0.95% of the Fund's average daily net assets. The investment advisory fee for the Fund includes the cost of evaluating investments according to that Fund’s sustainable and responsible investment criteria. 

The Advisor reserves the right to (i) waive all or a part of its fee; (ii) reimburse the Fund for expenses; and (iii) pay broker/dealers in consideration of their promotional or administrative services. The Advisor may, but is not required to, waive current payment of its fees or reimburse expenses of the Fund, except as noted in the Fund's Prospectus. Investment advisory fees are allocated among classes as the Fund-level expense based on net assets.

 

Subadvisor

Hermes Investment Management Limited (“Hermes”) is a wholly owned subsidiary of Hermes Fund Managers Limited, which is 99.9% owned by BT Pension Scheme Trustees Limited and 0.1% owned by Hermes Employee Benefit Trust.  Hermes receives a subadvisory fee, paid by the Advisor, of 0.65% of the average daily net assets of the Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund.

The Advisor and the Fund have received an exemptive order to permit it and the Advisor to enter into and materially amend the Investment Subadvisory Agreement (entered into with any subadvisor that is not an “affiliated person,” as defined in Section 2(a)(3) of the 1940 Act) without shareholder approval. Within 90 days of the hiring of any Subadvisor or the implementation of any material change in the Investment Subadvisory Agreement, the Fund will furnish its shareholders information about the new Subadvisor or Investment Subadvisory Agreement that would be included in a proxy statement. Such information will include any change in such disclosure caused by the addition of a new Subadvisor or any material change in the Investment Subadvisory Agreement of the Fund. The Fund will meet this condition by providing shareholders, within 90 days of the hiring of the Subadvisor or implementation of any material change to the terms of an Investment Subadvisory Agreement, with an information statement to this effect.

 

PORTFOLIO MANAGER DISCLOSURE

 

Additional information about the Fund’s Portfolio Managers, identified in the Prospectus of the Fund, is provided below.  

 

A.            Other Accounts Managed by Portfolio Managers of the Fund

 

The following Portfolio Manager of the Fund is also primarily responsible for day-to-day management of the portfolios of the other accounts indicated below.  This information includes accounts managed by any group which includes the identified Portfolio Manager.  The “Other Accounts” category includes accounts managed in the Portfolio Manager’s personal as well as professional capacities.

 

 

Hermes:

Gary Greenberg

 

Accounts Managed other than Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund as of August 31, 2012

Registered Investment Companies

Other Pooled Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts

Number of Other Accounts Managed

 

 

 

Total Assets in Other Accounts Managed

$

$

$

Number of Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

 

 

 

Total Assets in Other Accounts in which Advisory Fee is Based on Account’s Performance

$

$

$


 

 

 

B.            Potential Conflicts of Interest in Managing a Fund and Other Accounts

 

The following describes material conflicts of interest, which may potentially arise in connection with the management of the Fund’s investments by a Portfolio Manager and that individual’s simultaneous management of the investments of any other accounts listed in this SAI.  See “Other Accounts Managed by Portfolio Managers of the Fund” above.

 

Hermes:

Gary Greenberg

 

Hermes has taken steps to address potential conflicts of interest from managing more than one account.  Note that the focus of the Hermes Emerging Markets Team is purely on emerging markets equity management. All accounts managed by the team follow the same underlying investment philosophy and are managed in a similar manner.   

Trades are allocated to accounts in line with investment guidelines, ensuring all investment restrictions are considered. Trades follow a strict dealing procedure and are allocated fairly and on the exact same basis as the intended allocation recorded on the dealing ticket. For clients with similar mandates, Hermes may aggregate a client order with an order or orders for other clients if it is likely that the aggregation will work overall to the advantage of all clients whose order is aggregated.  In the event of only being able to partially fill an aggregated order, allocation will occur on a reduced pro rata basis, unless allocation becomes uneconomic for a client. When it is no longer in the client’s interest to receive the reduced allocation, Hermes may eliminate those clients from the allocation and reallocate the remaining part of the order on a rota basis to the remaining clients so that there is no systemic bias for or against a client or clients.

Hermes’ general principles for preventing conflicts of interest are as follows:

• Hermes endeavors always to act professionally and independently with the client’s best interests in   mind, and to take all reasonable steps to identify circumstances that may give rise to conflicts of interest entailing a material risk of damage to the client’s interests.

• Hermes establishes appropriate mechanisms and systems to manage those conflicts.

• Hermes maintains systems designed to prevent actual damage to client interests through any identified   conflicts.

Where appropriate internal measures designed to manage conflicts of interest are considered insufficient to mitigate, with reasonable confidence, risks of damage to a client’s interests, Hermes will disclose the general or specific nature of these conflicts of interest openly to the client or clients concerned.

 

 

C.            Compensation of Portfolio Managers of the Fund

 

Set forth below are the structure of and method used to determine (1) the cash and non-cash compensation received by the Portfolio Manager from the Fund, the Advisor or Subadvisor (if any) of the Fund, or any other sources with respect to management of the Fund, and (2) the cash and non-cash compensation received by the Portfolio Manager from any other accounts listed in this SAI.  See “Other Accounts Managed by Portfolio Managers of the Fund” above.

 


 

Hermes:
Gary Greenberg

Compensation with Respect to Management of Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund and Other Accounts as of August 31, 2012

 

Type of Compensation Received

Source of Compensation

Criteria on which Compensation is Based

 

Salary

Hermes

Base salary at market median of relevant peer group.

Bonus

Hermes

An annual bonus pool that is derived from a fixed proportion of performance fees and a variable proportion of operating profit (excluding performance fees). This variability is determined by performance against benchmark, peers and business objectives. A significant proportion of the annual bonus is deferred, and at least half of this deferral must be invested alongside client funds.

 

 

Deferred Compensation

Hermes

N/A

Other Compensation or Benefits Not Generally Available to All Salaried Employees

Hermes

Key executives in the investment team are rewarded with a long-term equity plan in Hermes Fund Managers Ltd. The shares contain rights linked to proportion of the growth in both the profits and value created in the underlying investment boutique.

 

 

D.            Securities Ownership of Portfolio Managers of the Fund

 

                With respect to each Portfolio Manager identified in the Prospectus, the following information sets forth the Portfolio Manager’s beneficial ownership of securities as of August 31, 2012 in the Fund(s) managed by that individual. Those securities were valued as of August 31, 2012. (Specified ranges: none; $1 to $10,000; $10,001 to $50,000; $50,001 to $100,000; $100,001 to $500,000; $500,001 to $1,000,000; or over $1,000,000.)

 

 

Fund

Firm

Name of Portfolio Manager

Fund Ownership

 

 

 

 

Capital Emerging Markets Equity Fund

Hermes

Gary Greenberg

None

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Administrative services agent

 

                Calvert Investment Administrative Services, Inc. (“CIAS”), an affiliate of the Advisor, has been retained by the Fund to provide certain administrative services necessary to the conduct of its affairs, including the preparation of regulatory filings and shareholder reports.  For providing such services, CIAS receives an annual administrative fee payable monthly (as a percentage of average daily net assets) as follows:

 

 

Class A, C and Y

Class I

 

0.35%

0.10%

 

                                                         

method of distribution

 

                Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc. (“CID”) is the principal underwriter and distributor for the Fund. CID is an affiliate of the Advisor. Under the terms of its underwriting agreement with the Fund, CID markets and distributes the Fund’s shares and is responsible for preparing advertising and sales literature, and printing and mailing prospectuses to prospective investors. 

                Pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act, the Fund has adopted Distribution Plans ("Plans"), which permit the Fund to pay certain expenses associated with the distribution and servicing of shares. Such expenses for Class A shares may not exceed, on an annual basis, 0.50% of Class A average daily net assets.  However, the Board has determined that, until further action by the Board, the Fund shall not pay Class A distribution expenses in excess of 0.25% of Class A average daily net assets. Expenses under the Fund’s Class C Plan may not exceed, on an annual basis, 1.00% of the average daily net assets of Class C.  Neither Class I nor Class Y has a Plan.  The Class A Plan reimburses CID only for expenses it incurs, while the Class C Plan compensates CID at a set rate regardless of CID's expenses.  Plan expenses may be spent for advertising, printing and mailing of prospectuses to persons who are not already Fund shareholders, compensation to broker/dealers, underwriters, and salespersons.


 

 

The Fund's Plans were approved by the Board, including the Directors who are not "interested persons" of the Fund (as that term is defined in the 1940 Act) and who have no direct or indirect financial interest in the operation of the Plans or in any agreements related to the Plans. The selection and nomination of the Directors who are not interested persons of the Fund are committed to the discretion of such independent Directors. In establishing the Plans, the Directors considered various factors including the amount of the distribution expenses. The Directors determined that there is a reasonable likelihood that the Plans will benefit the Fund and its shareholders, including economies of scale at higher asset levels, better investment opportunities, and more flexibility in managing a growing portfolio.

                The Plans may be terminated by vote of a majority of the independent Directors who have no direct or indirect financial interest in the Plans, or by vote of a majority of the outstanding shares of the affected class of the Fund. Any change in the Plans that would materially increase the distribution cost to a Fund requires approval of the shareholders of the affected class; otherwise, the Plans may be amended by the Directors, including a majority of the independent Directors as described above. The Plans will continue in effect for successive one-year terms provided that such continuance is specifically approved by (i) the vote of a majority of the Directors who are not parties to the Plans or interested persons of any such party and who have no direct or indirect financial interest in the Plans, and (ii) the vote of a majority of the entire Board.

                As noted above, distribution and shareholding servicing expenses are paid to broker/dealers through sales charges (paid by the investor) and 12b-1 Plan expenses (paid by the Fund as part of the annual operating expenses).  In addition to these payments, the Advisor, CID and/or their affiliates, at their own expense, may incur costs and pay expenses associated with the distribution of shares of the Fund.  The Advisor, CID and/or their affiliates have agreed to pay certain firms compensation based on sales of Fund shares or on assets held in those firms' accounts for their marketing, distribution, and shareholder servicing of Fund shares, above the usual sales charges, distribution and service fees.  In other instances, one of these entities may make annual payments to a broker/dealer in order to be included in a wrap or preferred provider program.  This list may be changed from time to time. As of June 30, 2012, the Advisor, CID and/or their affiliates had special arrangements regarding one or more Calvert Funds with the following firms: Ameriprise Financial Services, Ameritas Life Insurance Corp., Charles Schwab & Co., Inc., CUSO, Fidelity, First Ameritas Life Insurance Corp., J.P. Morgan, LPL Financial Services, Marshall & Ilsley, Merrill Lynch, Morgan Stanley Smith Barney, National Financial Services, LLC, Pershing, Prudential Investment Management Services, Raymond James, SunGard Institutional Brokerage Inc., Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, UBS Financial Services, Union Central Life Insurance Company and Wells Fargo Advisors.

Where payments are being made to a broker/dealer to encourage sales of Fund shares, the broker/dealer has an incentive to recommend Fund shares to its customers.  Neither the Advisor nor the Subadvisor uses Fund brokerage to compensate broker/dealers for the sale of Fund shares. 

                The Fund has entered into an agreement with CID as principal underwriter.  CID makes a continuous offering of the Fund's securities on a "best efforts" basis. Under the terms of the agreement, CID is entitled to receive a distribution fee and a service fee from the Fund based on the average daily net assets of the Fund's respective classes. These fees are paid pursuant to the Fund’s Plans.

Class A shares are offered at NAV plus a front-end sales charge as follows:

 

 

As a % of

As a % of

Allowed to

Amount of

Offering

net amount

Brokers as a % of

Investment

Price

invested

offering price

Less than $50,000

4.75%

4.99%

4.00%

$50,000 but less than $100,000

3.75%

3.90%

3.00%

$100,000 but less than $250,000

2.75%

2.83%

2.25%

$250,000 but less than $500,000

1.75%

1.78%

1.25%

$500,000 but less than $1,000,000

1.00%

1.01%

0.80%

$1,000,000 and over

0.00%

0.00%

0.00%

 


 

 

CID receives any front-end sales charge or CDSC paid. A portion of the front-end sales charge may be reallowed to dealers.

Fund Directors and certain other affiliated persons of the Fund are exempt from the sales charge since the distribution costs are minimal to persons already familiar with the Fund. Other groups (e.g., group retirement plans) are exempt due to economies of scale in distribution. See the prospectus for additional share purchase information.

 

transfer and shareholder servicing agentS

 

Boston Financial Data Services, Inc. ("BFDS"), a subsidiary of State Street Bank & Trust Company, N.A., has been retained by the Fund to act as transfer agent and dividend disbursing agent. These responsibilities include: responding to certain shareholder inquiries and instructions, crediting and debiting shareholder accounts for purchases and redemptions of Fund shares and confirming such transactions, and daily updating of shareholder accounts to reflect declaration and payment of dividends.

                Calvert Investment Services, Inc. (“CIS”), a subsidiary of Calvert Investments, Inc., has been retained by the Fund to act as shareholder servicing agent. Shareholder servicing responsibilities include responding to shareholder inquiries and instructions concerning their accounts, entering any telephoned purchases or redemptions into the BFDS system, maintenance of broker/dealer data, and preparing and distributing statements to shareholders regarding their accounts.

            For these services, BFDS receives a fee based on the number of shareholder accounts and transactions, while CIS receives a fee based on the asset class (money market, fixed income and equities) and the resources necessary to support the various services each asset class requires.  CIS may contract with subagents, at the Fund's expense, to provide recordkeeping and subaccounting services to the Fund. 

 

portfolio transactions

 

The Fund’s Advisor and Subadvisor place orders with broker-dealers for the Fund’s portfolio transactions.  Purchases and sales of equity securities on a securities exchange or an over-the-counter market are effected through broker-dealers who receive commissions for their services. Generally, commissions relating to securities traded on foreign exchanges will be higher than commissions relating to securities traded on U.S. exchanges and may not be subject to negotiation. Equity securities may also be purchased from underwriters at prices that include underwriting fees. Fixed income securities are generally traded at a net price with dealers acting as principal for their own accounts without a stated commission. The price of the security usually includes profit to the dealers. In underwritten offerings, securities are purchased at a fixed price, which includes an amount of compensation to the underwriter, generally referred to as the underwriter's concession or discount.  Prices for fixed-income securities in secondary trades usually include undisclosed compensation to the market-maker reflecting the spread between the bid and ask prices for the securities.

Portfolio transactions are undertaken on the basis of their desirability from an investment standpoint. The Fund’s Advisor and Subadvisor make investment decisions and the choice of brokers and dealers under the direction and supervision of the Board.

Broker/dealers who execute transactions on behalf of the Fund are selected on the basis of their execution capability and trading expertise considering, among other factors, the overall reasonableness of the brokerage commissions, current market conditions, size and timing of the order, difficulty of execution, per share price, market familiarity, reliability, integrity, and financial condition, subject to the Advisor's/Subadvisor's obligation to seek best execution. The Fund has adopted a policy that prohibits the Advisor and the Subadvisor from using Fund brokerage to compensate broker/dealers for promotion or sale of Fund shares.

The Fund’s Advisor and Subadvisor select brokers on the basis of best execution. In some cases they select brokers that provide research and research-related services to them. These research services include advice, either directly or through publications or writings, as to the value of securities, the advisability of investing in, purchasing or selling securities, and the availability of securities or purchasers or sellers of securities; furnishing of analyses and reports concerning issuers, securities or industries; providing information on economic factors and trends; assisting in determining portfolio strategy; providing computer software used in security analyses; providing portfolio performance evaluation and technical market analyses; and providing other services relevant to the investment decision making process. Other such services are designed primarily to assist the Advisor in monitoring the investment activities of the Subadvisor of the Fund. Such services include portfolio attribution systems, return-based style analysis, and trade-execution analysis.


 

 

If, in the judgment of the Advisor or Subadvisor, the Fund or other accounts managed by them will be benefited by supplemental research services, they are authorized to pay brokerage commissions to a broker furnishing such services which are in excess of commissions which another broker may have charged for effecting the same transaction. It is the policy of the Advisor that such research services will be used for the benefit of the Fund as well as other Calvert funds and managed accounts.

 

PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS DISCLOSURE

 

                The Fund has adopted a Portfolio Holdings Disclosure Policy ("Disclosure Policy") that is designed to prevent the inappropriate disclosure of or the misuse of non-public information regarding the Fund's portfolio holdings.

 

Publicly Available Portfolio Holdings

                Information regarding a Fund’s portfolio holdings is publicly available: (1) at the time such information is filed with the SEC in a publicly available filing; or (2) the day next following the day when such information is posted on the www.calvert.com  website. This information may be a Fund's complete portfolio holdings disclosed in its Semi-Annual or Annual Reports and filed with the SEC on Form N-CSR or in its quarterly holding reports filed with the SEC on Form N-Q after a Fund’s first and third fiscal quarters. In addition, each Calvert Money Market Fund discloses month-end portfolio holdings information on calvert.com within five business days after the end of each month and files more detailed month-end portfolio holdings information with the SEC on Form N-MFP within five business days after the end of each month. The information contained in the Form N-MFP is made available to the public on the SEC’s website 60 days after the end of the month to which the information pertains. From time to time, a Fund may disclose on www.calvert.com  whether it holds a particular security, in response to media inquiries. A Fund's publicly available portfolio holdings may be provided to third parties without prior approval under the Disclosure Policy.

 

Non-Public Portfolio Holdings

The Fund’s Disclosure Policy, as described generally below, allows the disclosure of a Fund's non-public portfolio holdings for the Fund's legitimate business purposes, subject to certain conditions, to: (1) rating and ranking organizations; (2) certain service providers; and (3) certain other recipients.  Non-public portfolio holdings may not be disclosed to members of the media under any circumstance. 

Subject to approval from the Legal Department of Calvert Investments, Inc., a representative from the Administrator may provide a Fund’s non-public portfolio holdings to a recognized rating and ranking organization, without limitation on the condition that the non-public portfolio holdings will be used solely for the purposes of developing a rating and subject to a written agreement requiring confidentiality and prohibiting the use of the information for trading.

A service provider or other third party that receives information about a Fund’s non-public portfolio holdings where necessary to enable the provider to perform its contractual services for the Fund (e.g.,  a person that performs account maintenance and record keeping services) may receive non-public portfolio holdings without limitation on the condition that the non-public portfolio holdings will be used solely for the purpose of servicing the Fund and subject to a written agreement requiring confidentiality and prohibiting the use of the information for trading.

A Fund’s partial or complete portfolio holdings may be disclosed to certain other recipients, current and prospective shareholders of the Fund and current and prospective clients of the Advisor, provided that: (1) the recipient makes a specific request to the General Counsel of Calvert Investments, Inc. (or his designee) (“Authorized Individual”); (2) the Authorized Individual determines that the Fund has a legitimate business purpose for disclosing non-public portfolio holdings information to the recipient; (3) the Authorized Individual (if other than the General Counsel) obtains prior approval from the Legal Department; and (4) the recipient signs a confidentiality agreement that provides that the non-public portfolio holdings will be kept confidential, may not be used to trade, and may not be disseminated or used for any purpose other than the purpose approved by the Authorized Individual. The Disclosure Policy further provides that, in approving a request, the Authorized Individual considers the recipient’s need for the relevant holdings information, whether the disclosure will benefit the Fund, or, at a minimum, not harm the Fund, and what conflicts may result from such disclosures.

Under the Disclosure Policy, neither a Fund, the Advisor nor any other party is permitted to receive compensation or other consideration from or on behalf of the recipient in connection with disclosure to the recipient of the Fund's non-public portfolio holdings. The Disclosure Policy is subject to annual review by the Board. The Board shall also receive annual reports from Fund management on those entities to whom such disclosure has been made.


 

 

 

Ongoing Arrangements

The following is a list of those entities to whom information about the Fund’s portfolio securities is made available and the frequency (following a 15 day lag), including the identity of the persons who receive information pursuant to such arrangements. In all such cases, disclosure is made subject to a written confidentiality agreement, which includes provisions preventing use of the information to trade.   

 

Name of Entity

Information Provided

Frequency Provided

Aris Corporation

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Asset Consulting Group

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Asset Strategy Consultants

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Bank of Oklahoma Trust Company

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Baybridge Consulting

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Bidart & Ross

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Bloomberg

Portfolio Holdings

Monthly

Blue Prairie Group

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Callan Associates

Portfolio Characteristics, Top Holdings

Quarterly

Cambridge Associates

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Capital Market Consultants, LLC

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Care Group

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Citigroup Consulting

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Colonial Consulting

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Consulting Services Group

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Cook Street Consulting

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Dahab Consulting

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

DiMeo Schneider & Associates, L.L.C.

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Evaluation Associates

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

FactSet

Portfolio Holdings

Monthly

Fulton Financial/Claremont Investments

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Fund Evaluation Group

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Hartland & Co.

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

HC Asset Management

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Hewitt Ennisknupp

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Innovest Portfolio Solutions

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Institutional Consulting Group

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Institutional Shareholder Services

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Investment Company Institute

Portfolio Holdings (Money Market Funds only)

Quarterly

KPMG

Portfolio Holdings

Annually

LCG Associates

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Mass Mutual

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Mees Pierson

Portfolio Holdings, Portfolio Characteristics, Asset Allocation

Quarterly

Mennonite Foundation

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Mercer Consulting, Inc.

Portfolio Characteristics, Top Holdings

Quarterly

Millennium Trust Company

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Milliman & Associates

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Monroe Vos Consulting

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Monticello & Associates

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Morningstar

Portfolio Holdings

Monthly

New England Pension Consulting

Portfolio Characteristics, Top Holdings

Quarterly

Patagonia

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Prime Buchholz

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

PWC

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

R.V. Kuhns

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Reliance Financial

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Rocaton Investment Advisors

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Rogers Casey

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Segal Advisors

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Sierra Fund

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Smith Hayes Consulting

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

State of Idaho

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Summit Investment Partners

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Summit Strategies

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Thomson Reuters/Lipper

Portfolio Holdings

Monthly

TIAA-CREF Trust Company

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

TRUSCO

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Uhrlaub

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Watson Wyatt

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Wells Fargo Private Client Group

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Wilshire Associates

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Woodcock Financial

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly

Wurts and Associates

Portfolio Holdings

Quarterly


 

 

 

Personal securities transactions

 

                The Fund, its Advisor, Subadvisor, and principal underwriter have adopted a Code of Ethics pursuant to Rule 17j-1 of the 1940 Act. The Code of Ethics is designed to protect the public from abusive trading practices and to maintain ethical standards for access persons as defined in the rule when dealing with the public. The Code of Ethics permits the investment personnel of the Advisor to invest in securities that may be purchased or held by the Fund. The Code of Ethics contains certain conditions such as preclearance and restrictions on use of material nonpublic information.

 

PROXY VOTING DISCLOSURE

 

Please refer to Appendix A of this SAI for the Global Proxy Voting Guidelines of the Calvert Funds. The Guidelines include the policies and procedures that the Fund uses in determining how to vote proxies relating to portfolio securities, as well as when a vote presents a possible conflict of interest between the interests of Fund shareholders, and those of the Fund's Advisor, principal underwriter, or an affiliated person of the Fund, its Advisor, or principal underwriter.

 

PROCESS FOR DELIVERING SHAREHOLDER COMMUNICATIONS TO THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS

 

Any shareholder who wishes to send a communication to the Board should send the communication to the attention of the Fund's Secretary at the following address:

 


 

 

                Calvert Funds

                Attn: [Name of Fund] Secretary

                4550 Montgomery Avenue

                Bethesda, Maryland 20814

 

All communications should state the specific Calvert Fund to which the communication relates.  After reviewing the communication, the Fund's Secretary will forward the communication to the Board.

In its function as a nominating committee, the Governance Committee of the Board will consider any candidates for vacancies on the Board from any shareholder of the Fund who has held his or her shares for at least five years.  Shareholders of the Fund who wish to nominate a candidate to the Board of the Fund must submit the recommendation in writing to the attention of the Fund's Secretary at 4550 Montgomery Avenue, Bethesda, MD 20814.  The recommendation must include biographical information, including business experience for the past ten years and a description of the qualifications of the proposed nominee, along with a statement from the proposed nominee that he or she is willing to serve and meets the requirements to be an independent Director. A shareholder wishing to recommend to the Governance Committee a candidate for election as a Director may request the Fund's Policy for the Consideration of Director Nominees by contacting the Fund's Secretary at the address above.

If a shareholder wishes to send a communication directly to an individual Director or to a Committee of the Board, the communication should be specifically addressed to such individual Director or Committee and sent in care of the Fund's Secretary at the address above.  Communications to individual Directors or to a Committee sent in care of the Fund's Secretary will be forwarded to the individual Director or to the Committee, as applicable.

 

independent REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTing firm and custodian

 

KPMG LLP serves as the independent registered public accounting firm for the Fund.  State Street Bank & Trust Company, N.A. serves as custodian of the Fund’s investments. The custodian has no part in deciding the Fund's investment policies or the choice of securities that are to be purchased or sold for the Fund.

 

 

general information

 

                Calvert World Values Fund, Inc. is an open-end management investment company, organized as a Maryland corporation on February 14, 1992. It has four series: the International Equity Fund and the International Opportunities Fund, each of which is diversified; and Calvert Emerging Markets Equity Fund and Capital Accumulation Fund, each of which is non-diversified.

                Each share of the Fund represents an equal proportionate interest in that series with each other share and is entitled to such dividends and distributions out of the income belonging to such series as declared by the Board. Calvert Emerging Markets Equity offers four separate classes of shares: Class A, Class C, Class I and Class Y.  Each class of the Fund represents interests in the same portfolio of investments but, as further described in the Prospectus, each class is subject to differing sales charges and expenses, resulting in differing net asset values and distributions. Upon liquidation of the Fund, shareholders of each class are entitled to share pro rata in the net assets belonging to that series available for distribution.

                The Fund is not required to hold annual shareholder meetings, but special meetings may be called for certain purposes such as electing Directors, changing fundamental policies, or approving a management contract. As a shareholder, you receive one vote for each share you own, except that matters affecting classes differently, such as Distribution Plans, will be voted on separately by the affected class(es). 

 

control persons and principal holders of securities

 

            As of September 28, 2012, to the Fund's knowledge, the following shareholders owned of record or beneficially 5% or more of the outstanding voting securities of the class of the Fund as shown:

 

Fund Name

Name & Address

% of Ownership

 

 

 

 

__% of Class A  

 

[____________]

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

__% of Class C

 

[___________]

 

 

 

 

 

 

__% of Class I

 

[___________]

 

 

 

__% of Class Y

 

[____________]

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

FUND SERVICE PROVIDERS

 

INVESTMENT ADVISOR                                                                               

Calvert Investment Management, Inc.                                                          

4550 Montgomery Avenue                                                                                

Suite 1000N                                                                                                           

Bethesda, Maryland 20814                                                                               

                                                                                                                                 

Shareholder ServicING AGENT                                                       

Calvert Investment Services, Inc.                                                                   

4550 Montgomery Avenue                                                                                

Suite 1000N                                                                                                           

Bethesda, Maryland 20814                                                                               

 

PRINCIPAL UNDERWRITER                                                                        

Calvert Investment Distributors, Inc.                                                             

4550 Montgomery Avenue                                                                                

Suite 1000N                                                                                                           

Bethesda, Maryland 20814

 

ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES AGENT

Calvert Investment Administrative Services, Inc.

4550 Montgomery Avenue

Suite 1000N

Bethesda, MD 20814

 

TRANSFER AGENT

Boston Financial Data Services, Inc.

330 West 9th Street

Kansas City, Missouri 64105

 

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

KPMG LLP

1601 Market Street

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103

 

CUSTODIAN

State Street Bank & Trust Company, N.A.

225 Franklin Street

Boston, Massachusetts 02110

 


 

 

 

APPENDIX A

 

 

GLOBAL PROXY VOTING GUIDELINES

FOR

CALVERT FAMILY OF FUNDS

 

I.             Introduction

Calvert believes that healthy corporations are characterized by sound corporate governance and overall corporate sustainability and social responsibility.  The well-governed company meets high standards of corporate ethics and operates in the best interests of shareowners.  The sustainable and socially responsible company meets high standards of corporate ethics and operates in the best interests of other stakeholders (employees, customers, communities and the environment).  In our view, companies that combine good governance and corporate sustainability and social responsibility are better positioned for long-term success. 

·         Long-Term Value.  Responsible, healthy companies are those that focus on long-term value creation that aligns the interests of management with those of shareowners and other stakeholders.  Good governance is likely to be compromised when a company becomes myopic, focusing on current earnings expectations and other short-term goals rather than the fundamental soundness of the enterprise over the longer term.  A focus on long-term value creation also increases the relevance of companies’ environmental management, treatment of workers and communities, and other sustainability and social responsibility factors.  Just as a short-term focus on earnings performance can compromise long-term shareowner interests, so can poor treatment of workers, communities, the environment or other stakeholders create short-term gain while increasing risks and compromising performance over the longer term.   Calvert’s proxy voting guidelines support governance structures and policies that keep the focus of company management on long-term corporate health and sustainable financial, social and environmental performance. 

·         Accountability.   Corporate management must be accountable to many interests, including investors, stakeholders, and regulators.  Management of a company must be accountable to the board of directors; the board must be accountable to the company’s shareowners; and the board and management together must be accountable to the stakeholders.  Some governance structures by their very nature weaken accountability, including corporations that are too insulated from possible takeovers.  Certain other governance structures are well suited to manage this accountability:  independent boards that represent a wide variety of interests and perspectives; full disclosure of company performance on financial, environmental, and social metrics; charters, bylaws, and procedures that allow shareholders to express their wishes and concerns; and compensation structures that work to align the interests and time-frames of management and owners.  Calvert’s proxy voting guidelines support structures that create and reinforce accountability, and oppose those that do not.

·           Sustainability.   Well-governed companies are those whose operations are financially, socially and environmentally sustainable. Sustainability requires fair treatment of shareholders and other stakeholders in order to position the company for continued viability and growth over time.  Effective corporate governance, like national governance, cannot indefinitely ignore or exploit certain groups or interests to the benefit of others without incurring mounting risks for the corporation.  For example, companies that provide excessive compensation to executives at the expense of other employees and shareowners are creating risks that may be expressed in rising employee turnover or activist campaigns targeting corporate practices.  Companies that fail to account for potential liabilities associated with climate change may be creating risks that will be expressed in costly government regulation or uninsured catastrophic losses.  Calvert’s proxy voting guidelines aim to support sustainable governance that attends fairly to the interests of shareowners, workers, communities and the environment.

As a long-term equity investor, Calvert strives to encourage corporate responsibility, which includes respectful treatment of workers, suppliers, customers and communities, environmental stewardship, product integrity and high standards of corporate ethics as well as more traditional measures of sound corporate governance.   Companies that combine good governance and social responsibility strive to avoid unnecessary financial risk while serving the interests of both shareowners and stakeholders.  In our view, Good Governance + Sustainability and Social Responsibility = Corporate Responsibility. 


 

 

On behalf of our shareholders, Calvert Funds generally vote our proxies in accordance with the positions set forth in these Proxy Voting Guidelines (“the Guidelines”).   The Guidelines are not meant to be exhaustive, nor can they anticipate every potential voting issue on which the Fund may be asked to cast their proxies.  There also may be instances when the Advisor votes the Fund’ shares in a manner that does not strictly adhere to or is inconsistent with these Guidelines if doing so is in the best interests of the Fund’ shareholders. Also, to the extent that the Guidelines do not address potential voting issues, the Fund delegate to the appropriate advisor the authority to act on its behalf to promote the applicable Funds’ investment objectives and social goals.  To the extent the Fund vote proxies in a manner not strictly in accordance with these Guidelines, and such votes present a potential conflict of interest, the Fund will proceed in accordance with Section IV below.

  • When support for or opposition to a proxy proposal as described below is qualified with the term, “ordinarily,” this means that the Fund advisor generally foresees voting all shares as described except in special circumstances where the advisor determines that a contrary vote may be in the best interests of Fund shareholders.  
  • When support for or opposition to a proxy proposal is qualified by the expression, “on a case by case basis,” this means that the Fund advisor cannot determine in advance whether such proposals are generally in the best interests of Fund shareholders and will reserve judgment until such time as the specific proposal is reviewed and evaluated.
  • When we use the term, “shareholder,” we are referring to Calvert’s mutual fund shareholders whose proxy votes we cast in accordance with these Guidelines.  When we use the term, “shareowner,” we are referring to the equity owners of stock in publicly traded corporations.     

Calvert appreciates that issues brought to shareholders may change over time, as both investors’ concerns and rules governing inclusion of specific items in corporate proxies change.  Corporate governance laws and best practices codes are continuously evolving, worldwide. We have constructed these Guidelines to be both general enough and sufficiently flexible to adapt to such changes.  Internationally, corporate governance codes have more in common with each other than do the laws and cultures of the countries in which the companies are domiciled. In light of these different regulatory contexts the Fund advisor will assess both best practices in the country in question and consistency with the Fund's Guidelines prior to voting proxies. To that end, we have not attempted to address every specific issue that may arise on a proxy ballot.

Calvert’s proxy voting record is available on the Fund’ web site, www.calvert.com, and is also available on the Securities and Exchange Commission’s website at www.sec.gov.

 

II.            CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

A.            Board and Governance Issues

The board of directors (“the board”) is responsible for the overall governance of the corporation, including representing the interests of shareowners and overseeing the company’s relationships with other stakeholders.  While company boards in most countries do not have a statutory responsibility to protect stakeholders, the duties of care and loyalty encompass the brand, financial, and reputational risks that can result from inadequate attention to stakeholder interests.  Thus, in our view, a board’s fiduciary duties encompass stakeholder relations as well as protecting shareowner interests. 

One of the most fundamental sources of good governance is independence.  Directors who have financial or other affiliations with companies on whose boards they serve may face conflicts of interest between their own interests and those of the corporation’s shareowners and other stakeholders.  In our view, the board should be composed of a majority of independent directors and key committees, including the audit, compensation, and nominating and/or governance committees, should be composed exclusively of independent directors. 


 

 

Independent directors are those who do not have a material financial or personal relationship with the company or any of its managers that could compromise the director’s objectivity and fiduciary responsibility to shareowners.  In general, this means that an independent director should have no affiliation with the company other than a seat on the board and (in some cases) ownership of sufficient company stock to give the director a stake in the company’s financial performance, but not so great as to constitute a controlling or significant interest.

Because the board’s ability to represent shareowners independently of management can be compromised when the Chair is also a member of management, it is beneficial for the Chair of the board to be an independent director.   

Another critical component of good governance is diversity.  Well-governed companies benefit from a wide diversity of perspective and background on their boards.  To bring such diversity to the board, directors should be chosen to reflect diversity of experience, perspective, expertise, gender, race, culture, age and geography.  Calvert believes that in an increasingly complex global marketplace, the ability to draw on a wide range of viewpoints, backgrounds, skills, and experience is critical to a company's success. Corporate diversity helps companies increase the likelihood of making the right strategic and operational decisions, contributes to a more positive public image and reputation, and catalyzes efforts to recruit, retain, and promote the best people, including women and minorities.

Companies that are private may take some time to achieve an adequate balance of diversity and independence on their boards.  For private companies, the fund advisor will vote on a case-by-case basis on board independence and board diversity matters.

Each director should also be willing and able to devote sufficient time and effort to the duties of a director.  Directors who routinely fail to attend board meetings, regardless of the number of boards on which they serve, are not devoting sufficient attention to good corporate governance.

The board should periodically evaluate its performance, the performance of its various committees, and the performance of individual board members in governing the corporation. 

Board Independence

·         The Fund advisor will oppose  slates of directors without at least a majority of independent directors. 

·         The Fund advisor will support proposals requesting that the majority of directors be independent and that the board audit, compensation and/or nominating committees be composed exclusively of independent directors.

·         The Fund advisor will oppose non-independent directors candidates nominated to the audit, compensation and/or nominating committees.

·         The Fund advisor will support proposals seeking to separate the positions of Chair of the board and Chief Executive Officer as well as resolutions asking for the Chair to be an independent director.    

Board Diversity

·         The Fund advisor will oppose  slates of directors that result in a board that does not include both women and people of color.

·         The Fund advisor will support  proposals requesting that companies adopt policies or nominating committee charters to assure that diversity is a key attribute of every director search.

Board Accountability

·         The Fund advisor will oppose  slates of directors in situations where the company failed to take action on shareowner proposals that passed in previous years. 

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily oppose  director candidates who have not attended a sufficient number of meetings of the board or key committees on which they served to effectively discharge their duties as directors.

·         The Fund advisor will oppose directors who sit on more than four public company boards and oppose directors serve as CEO and sit on more than two additional boards. 


 

 

Board Committee on Sustainability/Corporate Social Responsibility Issues

Shareholders have filed binding resolutions seeking the creation of a board committee dedicated to long term strategic thinking and risk management of sustainability issues including environment, human rights, diversity and others. While we believe all directors should be informed and active on sustainability issues, we do see the value of a focused sustainability committee.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  the creation of a board level committee on sustainability/corporate social responsibility issues. 

Limitations, Director Liability and Indemnification

Because of increased litigation brought against directors of corporations and the increased costs of director's liability insurance, many states have passed laws limiting director liability for actions taken in good faith. It is argued that such indemnification is necessary for companies to be able to attract the most qualified individuals to their boards. 

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals seeking to indemnify directors and limit director liability for acts excluding fraud or other wanton or willful misconduct or illegal acts, but will oppose  proposals seeking to indemnify directors for all acts.

Limit Directors' Tenure

Corporate directors generally may stand for re-election indefinitely.  Opponents of this practice suggest that limited tenure would inject new perspectives into the boardroom as well as possibly creating room for directors from diverse backgrounds.  However, continuity is also important and there are other mechanisms such as voting against or withholding votes during the election of directors, which shareholders can use to voice their opposition to certain candidates.  It may be in the best interests of the shareowners for long-serving directors to remain on the board, providing they maintain their independence as well as the independent perspective they bring to the board.

·         The Fund advisor will examine and vote on a case-by-case basis proposals to limit director tenure.   

Director Stock Ownership

Advocates of requirements that directors own shares of company stock argue that stock ownership helps to align the interests of directors with the interests of shareowners.  Yet there are ways that such requirements may also undermine good governance:  limiting board service only to those who can afford to purchase shares; or encouraging companies to use stock awards as part or all of director compensation.  In the latter case, unless there are mandatory holding requirements or other stipulations that help to assure that director and shareowner incentives are indeed aligned, awards of stock as compensation can create conflicts of interest where board members may make decisions for personal gain rather than for the benefit of shareowners.  Thus, in some circumstances director stock ownership requirements may be beneficial and in others detrimental to the creation of long-term shareowner value.

·         The Fund advisor will examine and vote on a case-by-case basis proposals requiring that corporate directors own shares in the company.   

·         The Fund advisor will oppose  excessive awards of stock or stock options to directors. 

Director Elections

Contested Election of Directors

Contested elections of directors frequently occur when a board or shareholder nominated candidate or slate runs for the purpose of seeking a significant change or improvement in corporate policy, control, or structure. Competing slates will be evaluated based upon the personal qualifications of the candidates, the economic impact of the policies that they advance, and their expressed and demonstrated commitment to the interests of all shareholders.

·         The Fund advisor will evaluate director nominees on case-by-case  basis in contested election of directors.

Classified or Staggered Boards

On a classified (or staggered) board, directors are divided into separate classes with directors in each class elected to overlapping three-year terms. Companies argue that such boards offer continuity in strategic direction, which promotes long-term planning. However, in some instances these structures may deter legitimate efforts to elect new directors or takeover attempts that may benefit shareowners.


 

 

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals to elect all board members annually and to remove classified boards.

Majority Vote Standard

A majority voting standard allows shareholders with a majority of votes in favor or against determine the election of board nominees.  Currently, most board elections are uncontested and allow directors to be elected with a plurality of votes.  Calvert believes majority voting increases director accountability to shareholders, as directors recognize shareholders have a voice in the election process.

·         The Fund advisor will generally support  both precatory and binding resolutions seeking to establish a majority vote standard.

Cumulative Voting

Cumulative voting allows shareowners to "stack" their votes behind one or a few directors running for the board, thereby helping a minority of shareowners to win board representation. Cumulative voting gives minority shareowners a voice in corporate affairs proportionate to their actual strength in voting shares.  However, like many tools, cumulative voting can be misused.   In general, where shareowner rights and voice are well protected by a strong, diverse, and independent board and key committees, where shareowners may call special meetings or act by written consent, and in the absence of strong anti-takeover provisions, cumulative voting is usually unnecessary.

·         The Fund advisor will examine and vote on a case-by-case basis proposals calling for cumulative voting in the election of directors. 

 

Shareholder Rights

Supermajority Vote Requirements

Supermajority vote requirements in a company's charter or bylaws require a level of voting approval in excess of a simple majority. Generally, supermajority provisions require at least 2/3 affirmative votes for passage of issues.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily oppose  supermajority vote requirements.

Shareowner Access to Proxy

Equal access proposals ask companies to give shareowners access to proxy materials to state their views on contested issues, including director nominations. In some cases, such proposals allow shareowners holding a certain percentage of shares to nominate directors.  There is no reason why management should be allowed to nominate directors while shareowners – whom directors are supposed to represent – are deprived of the same right.    We support the view that shareowners should be granted access to the proxy ballot in the nomination of directors. 

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support proposals for shareowner access to the proxy ballot.

Restrictions on Shareowners Acting by Written Consent

Written consent allows shareowners to initiate and carry out a shareowner action without waiting until the annual meeting, or by calling a special meeting.  It permits action to be taken by the written consent of the same percentage of outstanding shares that would be required to effect the proposed action at a shareowner meeting.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily oppose proposals to restrict, limit or eliminate the right of shareowners to act by written consent.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals to allow or facilitate shareowner action by written consent.

Restrictions on Shareowners Calling Meetings

It is common for company management to retain the right to call special meetings of shareowners at any time, but shareowners often do not have similar rights.  In general, we support the right of shareowners to call special meetings, even in extraordinary circumstances, such as consideration of a takeover bid.  Restrictions on the right of shareowners to call a meeting can also restrict the ability of shareowners to force company management to consider shareowner proposals or director candidates. 


 

 

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily oppose restrictions on the right of shareowners to call special meetings; as such restrictions limit the right of shareowners to participate in governance.

Dual or Multiple Classes of Stock

In order to maintain corporate control in the hands of a certain group of shareowners, companies may seek to create multiple classes of stock with differing rights pertaining to voting and dividends.  Creation of multiple classes of stock limits the right of some shareowners – often a majority of shareowners – to exercise influence over the governance of the corporation.   This approach in turn diffuses directors’ incentives to exercise appropriate oversight and control over management.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily oppose  proposals to create dual classes of stock.  However, the advisor will examine and vote on a case-by-case basis proposals to create classes of stock offering different dividend rights (such as one class that pays cash dividends and a second that pays stock dividends), and may support such proposals if they do not limit shareowner rights.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support proposals to recapitalize stock such that each share is equal to one vote.

Ratification of Auditor and Audit Committee

The annual shareholder ratification of the outside auditors is standard practice.  While it is recognized that the company is in the best position to evaluate the competence of the outside auditors, we believe that outside auditors must ultimately be accountable to shareowners.   Further, Calvert recognizes the critical responsibilities of the audit committee and its members including the oversight of financial statements and internal reporting controls. 

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily oppose  proposals seeking ratification of the auditor when fees for non-audit consulting services exceed 25 % of all fees or in any other case where the advisor determines that the independence of the auditor may be compromised.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals to adopt a policy to ensure that the auditor will only provide audit services to the company and not provide other services.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support proposals that set a reasonable mandatory rotation of the auditor (at least every five years).

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support proposals that call for more stringent measures to ensure auditor independence.

In a number of countries companies routinely appoint internal statutory auditors.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  the appointment or reelection of internal statutory auditors unless there are concerns about audit methods used or the audit reports produced, or if there are questions regarding the auditors being voted on.

In some countries, shareholder election of auditors is not common practice.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals that call for the annual election of auditors by shareholders.

Audit Committee

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily oppose  members of the audit committee where the audit committee has approved an audit contract where non-audit fees exceed audit fees or in any other case where the advisor determines that the independence of the auditor may be compromised.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily oppose members of the audit committee at companies with ineffective internal controls, considering whether the company has a history of accounting issues, or significant recent problems, and the board’s response to them


 

 

Transparency and Disclosure

International corporate governance is constantly changing and there have been waves of development of governance codes around the world.  The common thread throughout all of these codes is that shareowners want their companies to be transparent.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support proposals that call for full disclosure of company financial performance.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals that call for an annual financial audit by external and independent auditors.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support proposals that call for disclosure of ownership, structure, and objectives of companies, including the rights of minority shareholders vis-à-vis the rights of major shareholders.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals that call for disclosure of corporate governance codes and structures.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals that call for disclosure of related party transactions.

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals that call for disclosure of the board nominating process.

B.            Executive and Employee Compensation

Executive risks and rewards need to be better aligned with those of employees, shareowners and the long-term performance of the corporation.  Prosperity should be shared broadly within a company, as should the downside risk of share ownership.  Executive compensation packages should also be transparent and shareowners should have the right and responsibility to vote on compensation plans and strategy. 

There are many companies whose executive compensation seems disconnected from the actual performance of the corporation and creation of shareowner value.  The structure of these compensation plans often determines the level of alignment between management and shareowner interests.  Calvert stresses the importance of pay-for-performance, where executive compensation is linked to clearly defined and rigorous criteria.  These executives should not only enjoy the benefits when the company performs well, but boards should ensure executives are accordingly penalized when they are unable to meet established performance criteria. 

Stock option plans transfer significant amounts of wealth from shareowners to highly paid executives and directors.  Reasonable limits must be set on dilution caused by such plans, which should be designed to provide incentives as opposed to risk-free rewards.

Disclosure of CEO, Executive, Board and Employee Compensation

·         The Fund advisor will ordinarily support  proposals requesting companies disclose compensation practices and policies--including salaries, option awards, bonuses, and restricted stock grants--of top management, Board of Directors, and employees.

CEO and Executive Compensation 

·         The Fund advisor will oppose executive compensation proposals if we determine that the compensation does not reflect the financial, economic and social circumstances of the company (i.e., during times of financial strains or underperformance).

·