485APOS 1 fp0033938_485apos.htm

 

AS FILED WITH THE U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION ON JUNE 13, 2018

 

File No. 033-42484

File No. 811-06400

 

U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM N-1A

 

  REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE  
  SECURITIES ACT OF 1933  
  POST-EFFECTIVE AMENDMENT NO. 296 /X/
  AND  
  REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE  
  INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940  
  AMENDMENT NO. 297 /X/

 

THE ADVISORS’ INNER CIRCLE FUND

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Charter)

 

One Freedom Valley Drive

Oaks, Pennsylvania 19456

(Address of Principal Executive Offices, Zip Code)

 

1-800-932-7781

(Registrant’s Telephone Number)

 

Michael Beattie

c/o SEI Investments

One Freedom Valley Drive

Oaks, Pennsylvania 19456

(Name and Address of Agent for Service)

 

Copy to:

 

Sean Graber, Esquire Dianne M. Descoteaux, Esquire
Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP c/o SEI Investments
1701 Market Street One Freedom Valley Drive
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103 Oaks, Pennsylvania 19456

 

It is proposed that this filing become effective (check appropriate box)

 

/   /  Immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)
/   /  On [date] pursuant to paragraph (b)
/   /  60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
/X/  75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)
/   /  On [date] pursuant to paragraph (a) of Rule 485

 

 

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION

 

THE INFORMATION IN THIS PROSPECTUS IS NOT COMPLETE AND MAY BE CHANGED. WE MAY NOT SELL THESE SECURITIES UNTIL THE REGISTRATION STATEMENT FILED WITH THE U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION IS EFFECTIVE. THIS PROSPECTUS IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL THESE SECURITIES AND IS NOT SOLICITING AN OFFER TO BUY THESE SECURITIES IN ANY JURISDICTION WHERE THE OFFER OR SALE IS NOT PERMITTED.

 

Preliminary Prospectus Dated June 13, 2018

 

The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund

 

Prospectus

 

[XX], 2018

 

LSV Emerging Markets Equity Fund

 

Institutional Class Shares: [XXXXX]

Investor Class Shares: [XXXXX]

 

Investment Adviser:

LSV Asset Management

 

The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 

 

About This Prospectus

 

This Prospectus has been arranged into different sections so that you can easily review this important information. For detailed information about the Fund, please see:

 

Page
Fund Summary XX
Investment Objective XX
Fund Fees and Expenses XX
Principal Investment Strategies XX
Principal Risks XX
Performance Information XX
Investment Adviser XX
Portfolio Managers XX
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares XX
Tax Information XX
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial  
Intermediaries XX
More Information about Risk XX
More Information about the Fund’s Investment  
Objective and Strategies XX
Information about Portfolio Holdings XX
More Information about the Investment Adviser XX
Portfolio Managers XX
Related Performance Data of the Adviser XX
Purchasing, Selling and Exchanging Fund Shares XX
Other Policies XX
Payments to Financial Intermediaries XX
Dividends and Distributions XX
Taxes XX
Additional Information XX
Financial Highlights XX
How to Obtain More Information about the Fund Back Cover

 

 

 

LSV EMERGING MARKETS EQUITY Fund

Investment Objective

 

The LSV Emerging Markets Equity Fund’s (the “Fund”) investment objective is long-term growth of capital.

 

Fund Fees and Expenses

 

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold Institutional Class Shares and Investor Class Shares of the Fund.

 

Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)

 

  Institutional
Class Shares

Investor
Class Shares

Management Fees 1.00% 1.00%
12b-1 Fees None 0.25%
Other Expenses1 0.50% 0.50%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 1.50% 1.75%
Less Fee Waivers and/or Expense Reimbursements2 (0.30)% (0.30)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Fee Waivers and/or Expense Reimbursements 1.20% 1.45%

 

1Other Expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
2LSV Asset Management (“LSV” or the “Adviser”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses in order to keep Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses after Fee Waivers and/or Expense Reimbursements (excluding interest, taxes, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) from exceeding 1.20% and 1.45% of the Fund’s Institutional Class Shares’ and Investor Class Shares’ average daily net assets, respectively, until February 28, 2020. This Agreement may be terminated: (i) by the Board of Trustees (the “Board”) of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund (the “Trust”), for any reason at any time, or (ii) by the Adviser, upon ninety (90) days’ prior written notice to the Trust, effective as of the close of business on February 28, 2020.

 

Example

 

This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.

 

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses (including one year of capped expenses in each period) remain the same. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

 

1 

 

  1 Year 3 Years
Institutional Class Shares $122 $424
Investor Class Shares $148 $501

 

Portfolio Turnover

 

The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not commenced investment operations as of the date of this Prospectus, it does not have portfolio turnover information to report.

 

Principal Investment Strategies

 

Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus any borrowings for investment purposes, in equity securities of emerging market companies. The equity securities in which the Fund invests are mainly common stocks, but may also include preferred stocks, American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs” and, together with ADRs, “Depositary Receipts”). Depositary Receipts are certificates issued by a bank or trust company that represent ownership of shares of a foreign issuer and generally trade on an established market, in the United States or elsewhere. Although the Fund may invest in securities of companies of any size, the Fund generally invests in companies with market capitalizations of $50 million or more at the time of initial purchase.

 

The Fund considers a company to be an emerging market company if: (i) the company’s primary issue trades on the exchange of an emerging markets country; (ii) the company is organized or maintains its principal place of business in an emerging markets country; or (iii) the company primarily generates its revenues in emerging markets countries. The Fund considers an “emerging market country” to include any country that is included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index (the “Index”) or that is publicly announced to be added to the Index.

 

In selecting securities for the Fund, the Adviser focuses on companies whose securities, in the Adviser’s opinion, are out-of-favor (undervalued) in the marketplace at the time of purchase in light of factors such as the company’s earnings, book value, revenues or cash flow, but show signs of recent improvement. The Adviser believes that these out-of-favor securities will produce superior future returns if their future growth exceeds the market’s low expectations.

 

The Adviser uses a quantitative investment model to make investment decisions for the Fund. The investment model ranks securities based on fundamental measures of value (such as the price-to-earnings ratio) and indicators of near-term appreciation potential (such as recent price appreciation). The investment model selects stocks to buy from the higher-ranked stocks and selects stocks to sell from those whose rankings have decreased, subject to overall risk controls.

 

Principal Risks

 

As with all mutual funds, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. You could lose money by investing in the Fund. A Fund share is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any government agency. The principal risk factors affecting shareholders’ investments in the Fund are set forth below.

 

2 

 

Since it purchases equity securities, the Fund is subject to the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. Historically, the equity markets have moved in cycles, and the value of the Fund’s equity securities may fluctuate drastically from day-to-day. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments. The prices of securities issued by such companies may suffer a decline in response. These factors contribute to price volatility, which is the principal risk of investing in the Fund.

 

Investing in foreign companies, including direct investments and through Depositary Receipts, which are traded on exchanges and represent an ownership in a foreign security, poses additional risks since political and economic events unique to a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers. These risks will not necessarily affect the U.S. economy or similar issuers located in the United States. In addition, investments in foreign companies are generally denominated in a foreign currency. As a result, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect (positively or negatively) the value of the Fund’s investments. These currency movements may occur separately from, and in response to, events that do not otherwise affect the value of the security in the issuer’s home country. Securities of foreign companies may not be registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and foreign companies are generally not subject to the regulatory controls imposed on U.S. issuers and, as a consequence, there is generally less publically available information about foreign securities than is available about domestic securities. Income from foreign securities owned by the Fund may be reduced by a withholding tax at the source, which would reduce income received from the securities comprising the portfolio. Foreign securities may also be more difficult to value than securities of U.S. issuers. While Depositary Receipts provide an alternative to directly purchasing the underlying foreign securities in their respective national markets and currencies, investments in Depositary Receipts continue to be subject to many of the risks associated with investing directly in foreign securities.

 

Investments in emerging markets securities are considered speculative and subject to heightened risks in addition to the general risks of investing in foreign securities. Unlike more established markets, emerging markets may have governments that are less stable, markets that are less liquid and economies that are less developed. In addition, the securities markets of emerging market countries may consist of companies with smaller market capitalizations and may suffer periods of relative illiquidity; significant price volatility; restrictions on foreign investment; and possible restrictions on repatriation of investment income and capital. Furthermore, foreign investors may be required to register the proceeds of sales, and future economic or political crises could lead to price controls, forced mergers, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, seizure, nationalization or creation of government monopolies.

 

As a result of the Fund’s investments in securities or other investments denominated in, and/or receiving revenues in, foreign currencies, the Fund will be subject to currency risk. Currency risk is the risk that foreign currencies will decline in value relative to the U.S. dollar, in which case, the dollar value of an investment in the Fund would be adversely affected.

 

The medium- and smaller-capitalization companies in which the Fund may invest may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, investments in these medium- and small-sized companies may pose additional risks, including liquidity risk, because these companies tend to have limited product lines, markets and financial resources, and may depend upon a relatively small management group. Therefore, medium- and small-capitalization stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies. These securities may be traded over-the-counter or listed on an exchange.

 

3 

 

Performance Information

 

The Fund is new, and therefore does not have performance history for a full calendar year. Once the Fund has completed a full calendar year of operations, a bar chart and table will be included that will provide some indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing the variability of the Fund’s returns and comparing the Fund’s performance to a broad measure of market performance.

 

Investment Adviser

 

LSV Asset Management

 

Portfolio Managers

 

Josef Lakonishok, CEO, CIO, and Partner, has managed the Fund since its inception in 2018.

 

Menno Vermeulen, CFA, Partner, has managed the Fund since its inception in 2018.

 

Puneet Mansharamani, CFA, Partner, has managed the Fund since its inception in 2018.

 

Greg Sleight, Partner, has managed the Fund since its inception in 2018.

 

Guy Lakonishok, CFA, Partner, has managed the Fund since its inception in 2018.

 

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares

 

To purchase Institutional Class Shares of the Fund for the first time, you must invest at least $100,000, including for IRAs. To purchase Investor Class Shares of the Fund for the first time, you must invest at least $1,000, including for IRAs. There are no minimum subsequent investment amounts for the Fund. The Fund may accept investments of smaller amounts in its sole discretion.

 

If you own your shares directly, you may redeem your shares on any day that the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) is open for business (a “Business Day”) by contacting the Fund directly by mail at: LSV Funds, P.O. Box 219009, Kansas City, MO 64121-9009 (Express Mail: LSV Funds c/o DST Systems, Inc., 430 West 7th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105) or telephone at 1-888-FUND-LSV (1-888-386-3578).

 

If you own your shares through an account with a broker or other institution, contact that broker or institution to redeem your shares. Your broker or institution may charge a fee for its services in addition to the fees charged by the Fund.

 

4 

 

Tax Information

 

The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or IRA, in which case your distributions will be taxed when withdrawn from the tax-deferred account.

 

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries

 

If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

 

5 

 

More Information about Risk

 

Investing in the Fund involves risk and there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its goal. The Adviser’s judgments about the markets, the economy, or companies may not anticipate actual market movements, economic conditions or company performance, and these judgments may affect the return on your investment. In fact, no matter how good of a job the Adviser does, you could lose money on your investment in the Fund, just as you could with similar investments.

 

The value of your investment in the Fund is based on the value of the securities the Fund holds. These prices change daily due to economic and other events that affect particular companies and other issuers. These price movements, sometimes called volatility, may be greater or lesser depending on the types of securities the Fund owns and the markets in which they trade. The effect on the Fund of a change in the value of a single security will depend on how widely the Fund diversifies its holdings.

 

Equity securities include common and preferred stocks and Depositary Receipts. Common stock represents an equity or ownership interest in an issuer. Preferred stock provides a fixed dividend that is paid before any dividends are paid to common stock holders, and which takes precedence over common stock in the event of a liquidation. Like common stock, preferred stocks represent partial ownership in a company, although preferred stock shareholders do not enjoy any of the voting rights of common stockholders. Also, unlike common stock, a preferred stock pays a fixed dividend that does not fluctuate, although the company does not have to pay this dividend if it lacks the financial ability to do so. Depositary receipts are described below. Fluctuations in the value of equity securities in which a mutual fund invests will cause the fund’s net asset value (“NAV”) to fluctuate. An investment in a portfolio of equity securities may be more suitable for long-term investors who can bear the risk of these share price fluctuations.

 

Investments in securities of foreign companies (including direct investments as well as investments through Depositary Receipts) can be more volatile than investments in U.S. companies. Diplomatic, political or economic developments, including nationalization or appropriation, could affect investments in foreign companies. Foreign securities markets generally have less trading volume and less liquidity than U.S. markets. In addition, the value of securities denominated in foreign currencies, and of dividends from such securities, can change significantly when foreign currencies strengthen or weaken relative to the U.S. dollar. Financial statements of foreign issuers are governed by different accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards than U.S. issuers and may be less transparent and uniform than in the United States. Thus, there may be less information publicly available about foreign issuers than about most U.S. issuers. Transaction costs are generally higher than those in the United States and expenses for custodial arrangements of foreign securities may be somewhat greater than typical expenses for custodial arrangements of similar U.S. securities. Some foreign governments levy withholding taxes against dividend and interest income. Although in some countries a portion of these taxes are recoverable, the non-recovered portion will reduce the income received from the securities comprising the portfolio. These risks may be heightened with respect to emerging market countries since political turmoil and rapid changes in economic conditions are more likely to occur in these countries.

 

Because non-U.S. securities are usually denominated in currencies other than the dollar, the value of the Fund’s portfolio may be influenced by currency exchange rates and exchange control regulations. The currencies of emerging market countries may experience significant declines against the U.S. dollar, and devaluation may occur subsequent to investments in these currencies by the Fund. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain emerging market countries.

 

6 

 

More Information about the Fund’s Investment Objective and Strategies

 

The Fund’s investment objective is long-term growth of capital. The investment objective may not be changed without shareholder approval.

 

The investments and strategies described in this Prospectus are those that the Fund uses under normal conditions. During unusual economic or market conditions, or for temporary defensive purposes, the Fund may invest up to 100% of its assets in money market instruments and other cash equivalents that would not ordinarily be consistent with its investment objective. If the Fund invests in this manner, it may not achieve its investment objective. The Fund will only make temporary defensive investments if the Adviser believes that the risk of loss outweighs the opportunity for total return or capital growth.

 

This Prospectus describes the Fund’s principal investment strategies, and the Fund will normally invest in the types of securities described in this Prospectus. In addition to the investments and strategies described in this Prospectus, the Fund also may invest, to a lesser extent, in other securities, use other strategies and engage in other investment practices that are not part of its principal investment strategies. These investments and strategies, as well as those described in this Prospectus, are described in the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (the “SAI”). For information on how to obtain a copy of the SAI, see the back cover of this Prospectus. For liquidity purposes, the Fund may invest a portion of its assets in cash, money market instruments or equity index futures contracts. However, the Fund intends to remain as fully invested as practicable regardless of market conditions. Of course, the Fund cannot guarantee that it will achieve its investment goal.

 

Information about Portfolio Holdings

 

A description of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the circumstances under which the Fund discloses its portfolio holdings is available in the SAI.

 

More Information about the Investment Adviser

 

Formed in 1994 as a Delaware general partnership, LSV Asset Management provides active, quantitative value equity management through the application of proprietary models. The Adviser’s general partners include officers and employees of the Adviser, who collectively own a majority of the Adviser, and SEI Funds, Inc. SEI Investments Company is the parent of SEI Funds, Inc. As of April 30, 2018, the Adviser had approximately $121 billion in assets under management. The Adviser’s principal place of business is located at 155 North Wacker Drive, Suite 4600, Chicago, IL 60606.

 

The Adviser makes investment decisions for the Fund and continuously reviews, supervises and administers the Fund’s investment program. The Board supervises the Adviser and establishes policies that the Adviser must follow in its management activities. For its services to the Fund, the Adviser is entitled to an investment advisory fee, which is calculated daily and paid monthly, at an annual rate of 1.00% of the average daily net assets of the Fund.

 

7 

 

The Adviser has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses of the Fund in order to keep net operating expenses (excluding interest, taxes, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) from exceeding 1.20% and 1.45% of the Fund’s Institutional Class Shares’ and Investor Class Shares’ average daily net assets, respectively, until February 28, 2020. The contractual expense limitation agreement may be terminated: (i) by the Board, for any reason at any time, or (ii) by the Adviser, upon ninety (90) days’ prior written notice to the Trust, effective as of the close of business on February 28, 2020. To maintain these expense limits, the Adviser may reduce a portion of its management fee and/or reimburse certain expenses of the Fund.

 

A discussion regarding the basis for the Board’s approval of the Fund’s investment advisory agreement will be available in the Fund’s Annual Report to Shareholders dated October 31, 2018, which will cover the period from the Fund’s inception to October 31, 2018.

 

Portfolio Managers

 

The Fund is managed by a team of investment professionals who are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund.

 

Josef Lakonishok has served as CEO, CIO, Partner and portfolio manager for LSV since its founding in 1994. He has more than 41 years of investment and research experience.

 

Menno Vermeulen, CFA, has served as a portfolio manager for LSV since 1995 and a Partner since 1998. He has more than 26 years of investment and research experience.

 

Puneet Mansharamani, CFA, has served as a Partner and portfolio manager for LSV since 2006. He has more than 19 years of investment experience.

 

Greg Sleight has served as a Quantitative Analyst of LSV since 2006, a Partner since 2012 and portfolio manager since 2014. He has more than 12 years of investment experience.

 

Guy Lakonishok, CFA, has served as a Quantitative Analyst of LSV since 2009, a Partner since 2013 and portfolio manager since 2014. He has more than 17 years of investment experience.

 

The SAI provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ compensation, other accounts managed and ownership of Fund shares.

 

Related Performance Data of the Adviser

 

The following tables give the related performance of all the actual separate accounts (each, an “Account”), referred to as a “Composite,” managed by the Adviser that have investment objectives, policies and strategies substantially similar to those of the Fund. The data does not represent the performance of the Fund. Performance is historical and does not represent the future performance of the Fund or of the Adviser.

 

The manner in which the performance was calculated for the Composite differs from that of registered mutual funds such as the Fund. If the performance was calculated in accordance with SEC standardized performance methodology, the performance results may have been different. The Adviser claims compliance with the Global Investment Performance Standards (“GIPS®”) and has prepared and presented the following in compliance with the GIPS® standards. The policies for valuing portfolios, calculating performance, and preparing compliant presentations are available upon request.

 

8 

 

All returns presented were calculated on a total return basis and include all dividends and interest, accrued income, and realized and unrealized gains and losses. All fees and expenses, except custodial fees, if any, were included in the calculations. Securities are valued as of trade-date. Each Account was under management by the Adviser for the entire reporting period in which the Account was included in the Composite. The currency used to express performance in the Composite is U.S. dollars. Performance results are presented both net of fees and gross of fees. Because of variation in fee levels, the “net of fees” Composite returns may not be reflective of performance in any one particular Account. Therefore, the performance information shown below is not necessarily representative of the performance information that typically would be shown for a registered mutual fund.

 

The Accounts that are included in the Composite are not subject to the same type of expenses to which the Fund is subject and are not subject to the diversification requirements, specific tax restrictions, and investment limitations imposed by the federal securities and tax laws. Consequently, the performance results for the Composite could have been adversely affected if the Accounts in the Composite were subject to the same fees and expenses or federal securities and tax laws as the Fund.

 

The investment results for the Composite presented below are not intended to predict or suggest the future returns of the Fund. The performance data shown below should not be considered a substitute for the Fund’s own performance information. Investors should be aware that the use of a methodology different than that used below to calculate performance could result in different performance data.

 

The FOLLOWING data does not represent the performance of the Fund

 

Performance Information for the Adviser’s Substantially Similar Composite1

(July 1, 2005 through December 31, 2017)

 

Year Total Pre-Tax
Return (Net of Fees)
Total Pre-Tax
Return (Gross of Fees)
MSCI Emerging
Markets Index2 (net)

Number of

Portfolios

Total Assets
at End of Period

($ Millions)

2017 31.64% 32.93% 37.28% 15 $7,220
2016 17.36% 18.53% 11.19% 13 $5,073
2015 (18.86)% (18.03)% (14.92)% 14 $4,549
2014 (0.54)% 0.46% (2.19)% 14 $5,811
2013 (0.93)% 0.06% (2.60)% 13 $5,192
2012 21.73% 22.94% 18.23% 12 $4,858
2011 (18.16)% (17.32)% (18.42)% 7 $2,938
2010 26.07% 27.31% 18.86% 7 $3,164
2009 93.47% 95.31% 78.50% 6 $2,297
2008 (51.96)% (51.44)% (53.33)% 7 $690

 

9 

 

Year Total Pre-Tax
Return (Net of Fees)
Total Pre-Tax
Return (Gross of Fees)
MSCI Emerging Markets Index2 (net) Number of
Portfolios

Total Assets
at End of Period

($ Millions)

2007 45.34% 46.76% 39.37% 7 $1,369
2006 32.70% 34.00% 32.16% 7 $876
20053 22.63% 23.23% 26.42% Five or fewer $239

 

Average Annual Total Pre-Tax Returns (as of 12/31/17)

 

 

Adviser’s

Composite Returns

 
Time Period

 

Net of Fees

 

Gross of Fees

MSCI Emerging

Markets Index (net)2

1 Year 31.64% 32.93% 37.28%
Since Inception4 10.31% 11.41% 8.43%

 

1Returns include the reinvestment of all income. Net results are calculated using the highest non-performance-based management fee in the Adviser’s standard fee schedule, which is applicable to the majority of the Accounts included in the Composite. Returns are based on fully discretionary accounts under management, including, for certain time periods, those accounts no longer with the Adviser.
2The MSCI Emerging Markets Index is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index designed to measure the equity market performance of emerging markets.
3Performance information is for the period July 1, 2005 to December 31, 2005.
4The Composite was created in July 2005.

 

10 

 

Purchasing, Selling and Exchanging Fund Shares

 

This section tells you how to purchase, sell (sometimes called “redeem”) and exchange Institutional Class Shares and Investor Class Shares of the Fund.

 

For information regarding the federal income tax consequences of transactions in shares of the Fund, including information about cost basis reporting, see “Taxes.”

 

How to Choose a Share Class

 

The Fund offers two classes of shares to investors, Institutional Class Shares and Investor Class Shares. Each share class has its own shareholder eligibility criteria, investment minimums, cost structure and other features. The following summarizes the primary features of Institutional Class Shares and Investor Class Shares. Contact your financial intermediary or the Fund for more information about the Fund’s share classes and how to choose between them.

 

Class Name Eligible Investors Investment Minimums Fees
Institutional Class Shares

Primarily institutional investors and individual investors who meet the initial investment minimum

Initial – $100,000 (including for IRAs)

 

Subsequent – None

No 12b-1 Fee.

 

 

Investor Class Shares

Primarily individual investors

 

Initial – $1,000 (including for IRAs)

 

Subsequent – None

0.25% 12b-1 Fee.

 

 

 

Institutional Class Shares and Investor Class Shares are offered to investors who purchase shares directly from the Fund or through certain financial intermediaries such as financial planners, investment advisers, broker-dealers or other financial institutions. An investor may be eligible to purchase more than one share class. However, if you purchase shares through a financial intermediary, you may only purchase that class of shares which your financial intermediary sells or services. Your financial intermediary can tell you which class of shares is available through the intermediary.

 

The Fund reserves the right to change the criteria for eligible investors and accept investments of smaller amounts in its sole discretion.

 

How to Purchase Fund Shares

 

To purchase shares directly from the Fund, complete and send in the application. If you need an application or have questions, please call 1-888-FUND-LSV.

 

All investments must be made by check, Automated Clearing House (“ACH”), or wire. All checks must be made payable in U.S. dollars and drawn on U.S. financial institutions. The Fund does not accept purchases made by third-party checks, credit cards, credit card checks, cash, traveler's checks, money orders or cashier's checks.

 

You may also buy shares through accounts with brokers and other institutions that are authorized to place trades in Fund shares for their customers. If you invest through an authorized institution, you will have to follow its procedures, which may be different from the procedures for investing directly. Your broker or institution may charge a fee for its services in addition to the fees charged by the Fund. You will also generally have to address your correspondence or questions regarding the Fund to your institution.

 

11 

 

The Fund reserves the right to suspend all sales of new shares or to reject any specific purchase order, including exchange purchases, for any reason. The Fund is not intended for excessive trading by shareholders in response to short-term market fluctuations. For more information about the Fund’s policy on excessive trading, see “Excessive Trading Policies and Procedures.”

 

The Fund does not generally accept investments by non-U.S. persons. Non-U.S. persons may be permitted to invest in the Fund subject to the satisfaction of enhanced due diligence. Please contact the Fund for more information.

 

By Mail

 

You can open an account with the Fund by sending a check and your account application to the address below. You can add to an existing account by sending the Fund a check and, if possible, the “Invest By Mail” stub that accompanies your confirmation statement. Be sure your check identifies clearly your name, your account number, the Fund’s name and the share class. Make your check payable to “LSV Emerging Markets Equity Fund.”

 

Regular Mail Address

 

LSV Funds

P.O. Box 219009

Kansas City, MO 64121-9009

 

Express Mail Address

 

LSV Funds

c/o DST Systems, Inc.

430 West 7th Street

Kansas City, MO 64105

 

The Fund does not consider the U.S. Postal Service or other independent delivery services to be its agents. Therefore, deposit in the mail or with such services of purchase orders does not constitute receipt by the Fund’s transfer agent. The share price used to fill the purchase order is the next price calculated by the Fund after the Fund’s transfer agent receives the order in proper form at the P.O. Box provided for regular mail delivery or the office address provided for express mail delivery.

 

By Wire

 

To open an account by wire, first call 1-888-FUND-LSV (1-888-386-3578) for details. To add to an existing account by wire, wire your money using the wiring instructions set forth below (be sure to include the Fund’s name, your account number and the share class).

 

Wiring Instructions

 

UMB Bank, NA

ABA #101000695

 

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LSV Funds

DDA Account #9870523965

Ref: Fund name/account name/account number/share class

 

By Automatic Investment Plan (via ACH)

 

You may not open an account via ACH. However, once you have established an account, you can set up an automatic investment plan by mailing a completed application to the Fund. These purchases can be made monthly, quarterly, semi-annually or annually in amounts of at least $25. To cancel or change a plan, write to the Fund at: LSV Funds, P.O. Box 219009, Kansas City, Missouri 64121-9009, (Express Mail Address: LSV Funds, c/o DST Systems, Inc., 430 West 7th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105). Please allow up to 15 days to create the plan and 3 days to cancel or change it.

 

Purchases In-Kind

 

Subject to the approval of the Fund, an investor may purchase shares of the Fund with liquid securities and other assets that are eligible for purchase by the Fund (consistent with the Fund’s investment policies and restrictions) and that have a value that is readily ascertainable in accordance with the Fund’s valuation policies. These transactions will be effected only if the Adviser deems the security to be an appropriate investment for the Fund. Assets purchased by the Fund in such a transaction will be valued in accordance with procedures adopted by the Fund. The Fund reserves the right to amend or terminate this practice at any time.

 

General Information

 

You may purchase shares on any day that the NYSE is open for business (a “Business Day”). Shares cannot be purchased by Federal Reserve wire on days when either the NYSE or the Federal Reserve is closed. The price per share will be the next determined NAV after the Fund or an authorized institution (defined below) receives your purchase order in proper form. “Proper form” means that the Fund was provided a complete and signed account application, including the investor’s social security number or tax identification number, and other identification required by law or regulation, as well as sufficient purchase proceeds.

 

The Fund calculates its NAV once each Business Day as of the close of normal trading on the NYSE (normally, 4:00 p.m., Eastern Time). To receive the current Business Day’s NAV, the Fund or an authorized institution must receive your purchase order in proper form before the close of normal trading on the NYSE. If the NYSE closes early, as in the case of scheduled half-day trading or unscheduled suspensions of trading, the Fund reserves the right to calculate NAV as of the earlier closing time. The Fund will not accept orders that request a particular day or price for the transaction or any other special conditions. Shares will only be priced on Business Days. Since securities that are traded on foreign exchanges may trade on days that are not Business Days, the value of the Fund’s assets may change on days when you are unable to purchase or redeem shares.

 

Buying or Selling Shares through a Financial Intermediary

 

In addition to being able to buy and sell Fund shares directly from the Fund through its transfer agent, you may also buy or sell shares of the Fund through accounts with financial intermediaries, such as brokers and other institutions that are authorized to place trades in Fund shares for their customers. When you purchase or sell Fund shares through a financial intermediary (rather than directly from the Fund), you may have to transmit your purchase and sale requests to the financial intermediary at an earlier time for your transaction to become effective that day. This allows the financial intermediary time to process your requests and transmit them to the Fund prior to the time the Fund calculates its NAV that day. Your financial intermediary is responsible for transmitting all purchase and redemption requests, investment information, documentation and money to the Fund on time. If your financial intermediary fails to do so, it may be responsible for any resulting fees or losses. Unless your financial intermediary is an authorized institution, orders transmitted by the financial intermediary and received by the Fund after the time NAV is calculated for a particular day will receive the following day’s NAV.

 

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Certain financial intermediaries, including certain broker-dealers and shareholder organizations, are authorized to act as agent on behalf of the Fund with respect to the receipt of purchase and redemption orders for Fund shares (“authorized institutions”). Authorized institutions are also authorized to designate other intermediaries to receive purchase and redemption orders on the Fund’s behalf. The Fund will be deemed to have received a purchase or redemption order when an authorized institution or, if applicable, an authorized institution’s designee, receives the order. Orders will be priced at the Fund’s next computed NAV after they are received by an authorized institution or an authorized institution’s designee. To determine whether your financial intermediary is an authorized institution or an authorized institution’s designee such that it may act as agent on behalf of the Fund with respect to purchase and redemption orders for Fund shares, you should contact your financial intermediary directly.

 

If you deal directly with a financial intermediary, you will have to follow its procedures for transacting with the Fund. Your financial intermediary may charge a fee for your purchase and/or redemption transactions. For more information about how to purchase or sell Fund shares through a financial intermediary, you should contact your financial intermediary directly.

 

How the Fund Calculates NAV

 

The NAV of the Fund’s shares is determined by dividing the total value of the Fund’s portfolio investments and other assets, less any liabilities, by the total number of shares outstanding.

 

In calculating NAV, the Fund generally values its investment portfolio at market price. If market prices are not readily available or the Fund reasonably believes that they are unreliable, such as in the case of a security value that has been materially affected by events occurring after the relevant market closes, the Fund is required to price those securities at fair value as determined in good faith using methods approved by the Board. Pursuant to the policies adopted by and under the ultimate supervision of the Board, these methods are implemented through the Trust’s Fair Value Pricing Committee, members of which are appointed by the Board. The Fund’s determination of a security’s fair value price often involves the consideration of a number of subjective factors, and is therefore subject to the unavoidable risk that the value that the Fund assigns to a security may be higher or lower than the security’s value would be if a reliable market quotation for the security was readily available.

 

With respect to non-U.S. securities held by the Fund, the Fund may take factors influencing specific markets or issuers into consideration in determining the fair value of a non-U.S. security. International securities markets may be open on days when the U.S. markets are closed. In such cases, the value of any international securities owned by the Fund may be significantly affected on days when investors cannot buy or sell shares. In addition, due to the difference in times between the close of the international markets and the time the Fund prices its shares, the value the Fund assigns to securities generally will not be the same as the quoted or published prices of those securities on their primary markets or exchanges. In determining fair value prices, the Fund may consider the performance of securities on their primary exchanges, foreign currency appreciation/depreciation, securities market movements in the United States, or other relevant information as related to the securities.

 

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Minimum Purchases

 

To purchase Institutional Class Shares of the Fund for the first time, you must invest at least $100,000, including for IRAs. To purchase Investor Class Shares of the Fund for the first time, you must invest at least $1,000, including for IRAs. There are no minimum subsequent investment amounts for the Fund. The Fund may accept investments of smaller amounts in its sole discretion.

 

Fund Codes

 

The reference information listed below will be helpful to you when you contact the Fund to purchase shares, check daily NAV or obtain additional information.

 

Fund Name Ticker Symbol CUSIP Fund Code
LSV Emerging Markets Equity Fund      
Institutional Class Shares [XX] [XX] [XX]
Investor Class Shares [XX] [XX] [XX]

 

How to Sell Your Fund Shares

 

If you own your shares directly, you may sell your shares on any Business Day by contacting the Fund directly by mail or telephone at 1-888-FUND-LSV.

 

If you own your shares through an account with a broker or other institution, contact that broker or institution to sell your shares. Your broker or institution may charge a fee for its services, in addition to the fees charged by the Fund.

 

If you would like to have your sales proceeds, including proceeds generated as a result of closing your account, sent to a third party or an address other than your own, please notify the Fund in writing.

 

Certain redemption requests will require a signature guarantee by an eligible guarantor institution. Eligible guarantors include commercial banks, savings and loans, savings banks, trust companies, credit unions, member firms of a national stock exchange, or any other member or participant of an approved signature guarantor program. For example, signature guarantees may be required if your address of record has changed in the last 30 days, if you want the proceeds sent to a bank other than the bank of record on your account, or if you ask that the proceeds be sent to a different person or address. Please note that a notary public is not an acceptable provider of a signature guarantee and that the Fund must be provided with the original guarantee. Signature guarantees are for the protection of Fund shareholders. Before it grants a redemption request, the

Fund may require a shareholder to furnish additional legal documents to ensure proper authorization.

 

Accounts held by a corporation, trust, fiduciary or partnership may require additional documentation along with a signature guaranteed letter of instruction. The Fund participates in the Paperless Legal Program (the “Program”), which eliminates the need for accompanying paper documentation on legal securities transfers. Requests received with a Medallion Signature Guarantee will be reviewed for the proper criteria to meet the guidelines of the Program and may not require additional documentation. Please contact Shareholder Services at 1-888-FUND-LSV for more information.

 

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The sale price of each share will be the next determined NAV after the Fund receives your request in proper form.

 

By Mail

 

To redeem shares by mail, please send a letter to the Fund signed by all registered parties on the account specifying:

 

The Fund name;
The share class;
The account number;
The dollar amount or number of shares you wish to redeem;
The account name(s); and
The address to which redemption (sale) proceeds should be sent.

 

All registered shareholders must sign the letter in the exact name(s) in which their account is registered and must designate any special capacity in which they are registered.

 

Regular Mail Address

 

LSV Funds

P.O. Box 219009

Kansas City, MO 64121-9009

 

Express Mail Address

 

LSV Funds

c/o DST Systems, Inc.

430 West 7th Street

Kansas City, MO 64105

 

The Fund does not consider the U.S. Postal Service or other independent delivery services to be its agents. Therefore, deposit in the mail or with such services of sale orders does not constitute receipt by the Fund’s transfer agent. The share price used to fill the sale order is the next price calculated by the Fund after the Fund’s transfer agent receives the order in proper form at the P.O. Box provided for regular mail delivery or the office address provided for express mail delivery.

 

By Telephone

 

You must first establish the telephone redemption privilege (and, if desired, the wire or ACH redemption privilege) by completing the appropriate sections of the account application. Call 1-888-FUND-LSV to redeem your shares. Based on your instructions, the Fund will mail your proceeds to you, or send them to your bank via wire or ACH.

 

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By Systematic Withdrawal Plan (via ACH)

 

If your account balance is at least $500,000 for Institutional Class Shares or $5,000 for Investor Class Shares, you may transfer as little as $100 per month from your account to another financial institution through a Systematic Withdrawal Plan (via ACH). To participate in this service you must complete the appropriate sections of the account application and mail it to the Fund.

 

Receiving Your Money

 

Normally, the Fund will send your sale proceeds within one Business Day after it receives your redemption request. The Fund, however, may take up to seven days to pay redemption proceeds. Your proceeds can be wired to your bank account (may be subject to a $10 fee), sent to you by check or sent via ACH to your bank account if you have established banking instructions with the Fund. If you are selling shares that were recently purchased by check or through ACH, redemption proceeds may not be available until your check has cleared or the ACH transaction has been completed (which may take up to 15 days from your date of purchase).

 

The Fund typically expects to sell portfolio assets and/or hold cash or cash equivalents to meet redemption requests. On a less regular basis, the Fund may also meet redemption requests by using short-term borrowings from its custodian and/or redeeming shares in-kind (as described below). These methods may be used during both normal and stressed market conditions.

 

Redemptions In-Kind

 

The Fund generally pays sale (redemption) proceeds in cash. However, under unusual conditions that make the payment of cash unwise and for the protection of the Fund’s remaining shareholders, the Fund might pay all or part of your redemption proceeds in securities with a market value equal to the redemption price (redemption in-kind). The Fund may also redeem in-kind to discourage short-term trading of shares. It is highly unlikely that your shares would ever be redeemed in-kind, but if they were you would have to pay transaction costs to sell the securities distributed to you, as well as taxes on any capital gains from the sale as with any redemption. In addition, you would continue to be subject to the risks of any market fluctuation in the value of the securities you receive in-kind until they are sold.

 

Involuntary Redemptions of Your Shares

 

If your account balance drops below $100,000 with respect to Institutional Class Shares and $1,000 with respect to Investor Class Shares because of redemptions, you may be required to sell your shares. The Fund generally will provide you at least 30 days’ written notice to give you time to add to your account and avoid the involuntary redemption of your shares. The Fund reserves the right to waive the minimum account value requirements in its sole discretion.

 

Suspension of Your Right to Sell Your Shares

 

The Fund may suspend your right to sell your shares or delay payment of redemption proceeds for more than seven days during times when the NYSE is closed, other than during customary weekends or holidays, or as otherwise permitted by the SEC. More information about this is in the SAI.

 

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How to Exchange Fund Shares

 

At no charge, you may convert Investor Class Shares of the Fund directly to Institutional Class Shares of the Fund or Institutional Class Shares of the Fund directly to Investor Class Shares of the Fund, where offered, by writing to or calling the Fund, subject to the fees and expenses of the share class you are converting, and provided that you meet the eligibility requirements applicable to investing in such share class, as set forth in the Prospectus. You may only exchange or convert shares between accounts with identical registrations (i.e., the same names and addresses). An exchange between share classes of the Fund is not a taxable event.

 

Telephone Transactions

 

Purchasing, selling and exchanging Fund shares over the telephone is extremely convenient, but not without risk. Although the Fund has certain safeguards and procedures to confirm the identity of callers and the authenticity of instructions, the Fund is not responsible for any losses or costs incurred by following telephone instructions it reasonably believes to be genuine. If you or your financial institution transact with the Fund over the telephone, you will generally bear the risk of any loss.

 

Other Policies

 

Excessive Trading Policies and Procedures

 

The Fund is intended for long-term investment purposes only and discourages shareholders from engaging in “market timing” or other types of excessive short-term trading. This frequent trading into and out of the Fund may present risks to the Fund’s long-term shareholders and could adversely affect shareholder returns. The risks posed by frequent trading include interfering with the efficient implementation of the Fund’s investment strategies, triggering the recognition of taxable gains and losses on the sale of Fund investments, requiring the Fund to maintain higher cash balances to meet redemption requests and experiencing increased transaction costs.

 

Because the Fund invests in small- and mid-cap securities, which often trade in lower volumes and may be less liquid, the Fund may be more susceptible to the risks posed by frequent trading because frequent transactions in the Fund’s shares may have a greater impact on the market prices of these types of securities.

 

In addition, because the Fund invests in foreign securities traded primarily on markets that close prior to the time the Fund determines its NAV, the risks posed by frequent trading may have a greater potential to dilute the value of Fund shares held by long-term shareholders than a fund investing exclusively in U.S. securities. In instances where a significant event that affects the value of one or more foreign securities held by the Fund takes place after the close of the primary foreign market, but before the time that the Fund determines its NAV, certain investors may seek to take advantage of the fact that there will be a delay in the adjustment of the market price for a security caused by this event until the foreign market reopens (sometimes referred to as “price” or “time zone” arbitrage). Shareholders who attempt this type of arbitrage may dilute the value of the Fund’s shares by virtue of their Fund share transaction, if those prices reflect the fair value of the foreign securities. Although the Fund has procedures designed to determine the fair value of foreign securities for purposes of calculating its NAV when such an event has occurred, fair value pricing, because it involves judgments which are inherently subjective, may not always eliminate the risk of price arbitrage. For more information about how the Fund uses fair value pricing, see “How the Fund Calculates NAV.”

 

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The Fund’s service providers will take steps reasonably designed to detect and deter frequent trading by shareholders pursuant to the Fund’s policies and procedures described in this Prospectus and approved by the Board. For purposes of applying these policies, the Fund’s service providers may consider the trading history of accounts under common ownership or control. The Fund’s policies and procedures include:

 

Shareholders are restricted from making more than four (4) “round trips” into or out of the Fund per calendar year. If a shareholder exceeds this amount, the Fund and/or its service providers may, at their discretion, reject any additional purchase or exchange orders. The Fund defines a “round trip” as a purchase into the Fund by a shareholder, followed by a subsequent redemption out of the Fund, of an amount the Adviser reasonably believes would be harmful or disruptive to the Fund.

 

The Fund reserves the right to reject any purchase or exchange request by any investor or group of investors for any reason without prior notice, including, in particular, if the Fund or the Adviser reasonably believes that the trading activity would be harmful or disruptive to the Fund.

 

The Fund and/or its service providers seek to apply these policies to the best of their abilities uniformly and in a manner they believe is consistent with the interests of the Fund’s long-term shareholders. The Fund does not knowingly accommodate frequent purchases and redemptions by Fund shareholders. Although these policies are designed to deter frequent trading, none of these measures alone nor all of them taken together eliminate the possibility that frequent trading in the Fund will occur. Systematic purchases and redemptions are exempt from these policies.

 

Financial intermediaries (such as investment advisers and broker-dealers) often establish omnibus accounts in the Fund for their customers through which transactions are placed. The Fund has entered into “information sharing agreements” with these financial intermediaries, which permit the Fund to obtain, upon request, information about the trading activity of the intermediary’s customers that invest in the Fund. If the Fund or its service providers identify omnibus account level trading patterns that have the potential to be detrimental to the Fund, the Fund or its service providers may, in their sole discretion, request from the financial intermediary information concerning the trading activity of its customers. Based upon a review of that information, if the Fund or its service providers determine that the trading activity of any customer may be detrimental to the Fund, they may, in their sole discretion, request the financial intermediary to restrict or limit further trading in the Fund by that customer. If the Fund is not satisfied that the intermediary has taken appropriate action, the Fund may terminate the intermediary’s ability to transact in Fund shares. When information regarding transactions in the Fund’s shares is requested by the Fund and such information is in the possession of a person that is itself a financial intermediary to a financial intermediary (an “indirect intermediary”), any financial intermediary with whom the Fund has an information sharing agreement is obligated to obtain transaction information from the indirect intermediary or, if directed by the Fund, to restrict or prohibit the indirect intermediary from purchasing shares of the Fund on behalf of other persons.

 

The Fund and its service providers will use reasonable efforts to work with financial intermediaries to identify excessive short-term trading in omnibus accounts that may be detrimental to the Fund. However, there can be no assurance that the monitoring of omnibus account level trading will enable the Fund to identify or prevent all such trading by a financial intermediary’s customers. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information.

 

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Customer Identification and Verification

 

To help the government fight the funding of terrorism and money laundering activities, federal law requires all financial institutions to obtain, verify, and record information that identifies each person who opens an account.

 

What this means to you: When you open an account, the Fund will ask your name, address, date of birth, and other information that will allow the Fund to identify you. This information is subject to verification to ensure the identity of all persons opening a mutual fund account.

 

The Fund is required by law to reject your new account application if the required identifying information is not provided.

 

In certain instances, the Fund is required to collect documents to fulfill its legal obligation. Documents provided in connection with your application will be used solely to establish and verify your identity.

 

Attempts to collect the missing information required on the application will be performed by either contacting you or, if applicable, your broker. If this information cannot be obtained within a reasonable timeframe established in the sole discretion of the Fund, your application will be rejected.

 

Upon receipt of your application in proper form (or upon receipt of all identifying information required on the application), your investment will be accepted and your order will be processed at the next-determined NAV.

 

The Fund reserves the right to close or liquidate your account at the next-determined NAV and remit proceeds to you via check if it is unable to verify your identity. Attempts to verify your identity will be performed within a reasonable timeframe established in the sole discretion of the Fund. Further, the Fund reserves the right to hold your proceeds until your original check clears the bank, which may take up to 15 days from the date of purchase. In such an instance, you may be subject to a gain or loss on Fund shares and will be subject to corresponding tax implications.

 

Anti-Money Laundering Program

 

Customer identification and verification is part of the Fund’s overall obligation to deter money laundering under federal law. The Fund has adopted an anti-money laundering compliance program designed to prevent the Fund from being used for money laundering or the financing of illegal activities. In this regard, the Fund reserves the right to: (i) refuse, cancel or rescind any purchase or exchange order; (ii) freeze any account and/or suspend account services; or (iii) involuntarily close your account in cases of threatening conduct or suspected fraudulent or illegal activity. These actions will be taken when, in the sole discretion of Fund management, they are deemed to be in the best interest of the Fund or in cases when the Fund is requested or compelled to do so by governmental or law enforcement authority. If your account is closed at the request of governmental or law enforcement authority, you may not receive proceeds of the redemption if the Fund is required to withhold such proceeds.

 

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Unclaimed Property

 

Each state has unclaimed property rules that generally provide for escheatment (or transfer) to the state of unclaimed property under various circumstances. Such circumstances include inactivity (e.g., no owner-initiated contact for a certain period), returned mail (e.g., when mail sent to a shareholder is returned by the post office, or “RPO,” as undeliverable), or a combination of both inactivity and returned mail. Once it flags property as unclaimed, the Fund will attempt to contact the shareholder, but if that attempt is unsuccessful, the account may be considered abandoned and escheated to the state.

 

Shareholders that reside in the state of Texas may designate a representative to receive escheatment notifications by completing and submitting a designation form that can be found on the website of the Texas Comptroller. While the designated representative does not have any rights to claim or access the shareholder’s account or assets, the escheatment period will cease if the representative communicates knowledge of the shareholder’s location and confirms that the shareholder has not abandoned his or her property. A completed designation form may be mailed to the Fund (if shares are held directly with the Fund) or to the shareholder’s financial intermediary (if shares are not held directly with the Fund).

 

More information on unclaimed property and how to maintain an active account is available through your state or by calling 1-888-FUND-LSV.

 

Payments to Financial Intermediaries

 

The Fund and/or the Adviser may compensate financial intermediaries for providing a variety of services to the Fund and/or its shareholders. Financial intermediaries include affiliated or unaffiliated brokers, dealers, banks (including bank trust departments), trust companies, registered investment advisers, financial planners, retirement plan administrators, insurance companies, and any other institution having a service, administration, or any similar arrangement with the Fund, its service providers or their respective affiliates. This section briefly describes how financial intermediaries may be paid for providing these services. For more information please see “Payments to Financial Intermediaries” in the SAI.

 

Distribution Plan

 

The Fund has adopted a distribution plan under Rule 12b-1 of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended, for Investor Class Shares that allows the Fund to pay distribution and/or service fees for the sale and distribution of Fund shares, and for services provided to shareholders. Because these fees are paid out of the Fund’s assets on an on-going basis, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges. The maximum annual Rule 12b-1 fee for Investor Class Shares of the Fund is 0.25%.

 

Payments by the Adviser

 

From time to time, the Adviser and/or its affiliates, in their discretion, may make payments to certain affiliated or unaffiliated financial intermediaries to compensate them for the costs associated with distribution, marketing, administration and shareholder servicing support for the Fund. These payments are sometimes characterized as “revenue sharing” payments and are made out of the Adviser’s and/or its affiliates’ own legitimate profits or other resources, and may be in addition to any payments made to financial intermediaries by the Fund. A financial intermediary may provide these services with respect to Fund shares sold or held through programs such as retirement plans, qualified tuition programs, fund supermarkets, fee-based advisory or wrap fee programs, bank trust programs, and insurance (e.g., individual or group annuity) programs. In addition, financial intermediaries may receive payments for making shares of the Fund available to their customers or registered representatives, including providing the Fund with “shelf space,” placing it on a preferred or recommended fund list, or promoting the Fund in certain sales programs that are sponsored by financial intermediaries. To the extent permitted by SEC and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) rules and other applicable laws and regulations, the Adviser and/or its affiliates may pay or allow other promotional incentives or payments to financial intermediaries.

 

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The level of payments made by the Adviser and/or its affiliates to individual financial intermediaries varies in any given year and may be negotiated on the basis of sales of Fund shares, the amount of Fund assets serviced by the financial intermediary or the quality of the financial intermediary’s relationship with the Adviser and/or its affiliates. These payments may be more or less than the payments received by the financial intermediaries from other mutual funds and may influence a financial intermediary to favor the sales of certain funds or share classes over others. In certain instances, the payments could be significant and may cause a conflict of interest for your financial intermediary. Any such payments will not change the NAV or price of the Fund’s shares. Please contact your financial intermediary for information about any payments it may receive in connection with the sale of Fund shares or the provision of services to Fund shareholders.

 

In addition to these payments, your financial intermediary may charge you account fees, commissions or transaction fees for buying or redeeming shares of the Fund, or other fees for servicing your account. Your financial intermediary should provide a schedule of its fees and services to you upon request.

 

Dividends and Distributions

 

The Fund distributes its net investment income and makes distributions of its net realized capital gains, if any, at least annually. If you own Fund shares on the Fund’s record date, you will be entitled to receive the distribution.

 

You will receive dividends and distributions in the form of additional Fund shares unless you elect to receive payment in cash. To elect cash payment, you must notify the Fund in writing prior to the date of the distribution. Your election will be effective for dividends and distributions paid after the Fund receives your written notice. To cancel your election, simply send the Fund written notice.

 

Taxes

 

Please consult your tax advisor regarding your specific questions about U.S. federal, state and local income taxes. Below is a summary of some important U.S. federal income tax issues that affect the Fund and its shareholders. This summary is based on current tax laws, which may change. This summary does not apply to shares held in an IRA or other tax-qualified plans, which are generally not subject to current tax. Transactions relating to shares held in such accounts may, however, be taxable at some time in the future.

 

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The recently enacted tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) makes significant changes to the U.S. federal income tax rules for taxation of individuals and corporations, generally effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017. Many of the changes applicable to individuals are temporary and would apply only to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 and before January 1, 2026. There are only minor changes with respect to the specific rules only applicable to regulated investment companies, such as the Fund. The Tax Act, however, makes numerous other changes to the tax rules that may affect shareholders and the Fund. You are urged to consult with your own tax advisor regarding how the Tax Act affects your investment in the Fund.

 

The Fund intends to distribute substantially all of its net investment income and net realized capital gains, if any. The dividends and distributions you receive, whether in cash or reinvested in additional shares of the Fund, may be subject to federal, state and local taxation, depending upon your tax situation. Income distributions, including distributions of net short-term capital gains, but excluding distributions of qualified dividend income, are generally taxable at ordinary income tax rates. Long-term capital gains distributions and distributions that are reported by the Fund as qualified dividend income are generally taxable at the rates applicable to long-term capital gains and currently set at a maximum tax rate for individuals at 20% (lower rates apply to individuals in lower tax brackets). Once a year the Fund (or its administrative agent) will send you a statement showing the types and total amount of distributions you received during the previous year.

 

You should note that if you purchase shares just before a distribution, the purchase price would reflect the amount of the upcoming distribution. In this case, you would be taxed on the entire amount of the distribution received, even though, as an economic matter, the distribution simply constitutes a return of your investment. This is known as “buying a dividend” and should be avoided by taxable investors.

 

Each sale of Fund shares may be a taxable event. A sale may result in a capital gain or loss to you. The gain or loss on the sale of Fund shares generally will be treated as a short-term capital gain or loss if you held the shares for 12 months or less or a long-term capital gain or loss if you held the shares for longer. Any loss realized upon a taxable disposition of Fund shares held for six months or less will be treated as long-term, rather than short-term, to the extent of any long-term capital gain distributions received (or deemed received) by you with respect to the Fund shares. All or a portion of any loss realized upon a taxable disposition of Fund shares will be disallowed if you purchase other substantially identical shares within 30 days before or after the disposition. In such a case, the basis of the newly purchased shares will be adjusted to reflect the disallowed loss.

 

U.S. individuals with income exceeding $200,000 ($250,000 if married and filing jointly) are subject to a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax on their “net investment income,” including interest, dividends, and capital gains (including capital gains realized on the sale or exchange of shares of the Fund).

 

The Fund (or its administrative agent) must report to the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) and furnish to Fund shareholders cost basis information for purchases of Fund shares. In addition to reporting the gross proceeds from the sale of Fund shares, the Fund is also required to report the cost basis information for such shares and indicate whether these shares had a short-term or long-term holding period. For each sale of Fund shares, the Fund will permit shareholders to elect from among several IRS-accepted cost basis methods, including the average basis method. In the absence of an election, the Fund will use the average basis method as the default cost basis method. The cost basis method elected by a Fund shareholder (or the cost basis method applied by default) for each sale of Fund shares may not be changed after the settlement date of each such sale of Fund shares. Fund shareholders should consult their tax advisors to determine the best IRS-accepted cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about cost basis reporting. Shareholders also should carefully review any cost basis information provided to them and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on their federal income tax returns.

 

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To the extent the Fund invests in foreign securities, it may be subject to foreign withholding taxes with respect to dividends or interest the Fund received from sources in foreign countries. If more than 50% of the total assets of the Fund at the close of its taxable year consists of stock or securities of foreign corporations, the Fund will be eligible to and intends to file an election with the IRS that may enable shareholders, in effect, to receive either the benefit of a foreign tax credit, or a deduction from such taxes, with respect to any foreign and U.S. possessions income taxes paid by the Fund, subject to certain limitations. If the Fund makes the election, the Fund (or its administrative agent) will report annually to its shareholders the respective amounts per share of the Fund’s income from sources within, and taxes paid to, foreign countries and U.S. possessions.

 

Because each shareholder’s tax situation is different, you should consult your tax advisor about the tax implications of an investment in the Fund.

 

More information about taxes is in the SAI.

 

Additional Information

 

The Trust enters into contractual arrangements with various parties, including, among others, the Fund’s investment adviser, custodian, transfer agent, accountants, administrator and distributor, who provide services to the Fund. Shareholders are not parties to, or intended (or “third-party”) beneficiaries of, any of those contractual arrangements, and those contractual arrangements are not intended to create in any individual shareholder or group of shareholders any right to enforce the terms of the contractual arrangements against the service providers or to seek any remedy under the contractual arrangements against the service providers, either directly or on behalf of the Trust.

 

This Prospectus and the SAI provide information concerning the Trust and the Fund that you should consider in determining whether to purchase shares of the Fund. The Fund may make changes to this information from time to time. Neither this Prospectus, the SAI or any document filed as an exhibit to the Trust’s registration statement, is intended to, nor does it, give rise to an agreement or contract between the Trust or the Fund and any shareholder, or give rise to any contract or other rights in any individual shareholder, group of shareholders or other person other than any rights conferred explicitly by federal or state securities laws that may not be waived.

  

24 

 

Financial Highlights

 

Because the Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this Prospectus, financial highlights for the Fund are not available.

 

25 

 

The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund

 

LSV Funds

 

Investment Adviser

 

LSV Asset Management

155 North Wacker Drive, Suite 4600

Chicago, Illinois 60606

 

Distributor

 

SEI Investments Distribution Co.

One Freedom Valley Drive

Oaks, Pennsylvania 19456

 

Legal Counsel

 

Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP

1701 Market Street

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103

 

More information about the Fund is available, without charge, through the following:

 

Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”): The SAI, dated [XX], as it may be amended from time to time, includes detailed information about The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund and the LSV Funds. The SAI is on file with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus. This means that the SAI, for legal purposes, is a part of this Prospectus.

 

Annual and Semi-Annual Reports: These reports list the Fund’s holdings and contain information from the Adviser about investment strategies, and recent market conditions and trends and their impact on Fund performance. The reports also contain detailed financial information about the Fund.

 

To Obtain an SAI, Annual or Semi-Annual Report, or More Information:

 

By Telephone:1-888-FUND-LSV (1-888-386-3578)

 

By Mail:LSV Funds

P.O. Box 219009

Kansas City, Missouri 64121-9009

 

By Internet:www.lsvasset.com

 

From the SEC: You can also obtain the SAI or the Annual and Semi-Annual Reports, as well as other information about The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund, from the EDGAR Database on the SEC’s website at: http://www.sec.gov. You may review and copy documents at the SEC Public Reference Room in Washington, DC (for information on the operation of the Public Reference Room, call 202-551-8090). You may request documents by mail from the SEC, upon payment of a duplicating fee, by writing to: U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Public Reference Section, Washington, DC 20549-1520. You may also obtain this information, upon payment of a duplicating fee, by e-mailing the SEC at the following address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

 

The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund’s Investment Company Act registration number is 811-06400.

 

[Inventory Code]

 

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION

 

THE INFORMATION IN THIS STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION IS NOT COMPLETE AND MAY BE CHANGED. WE MAY NOT SELL THESE SECURITIES UNTIL THE REGISTRATION STATEMENT FILED WITH THE U.S. SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION IS EFFECTIVE. THIS STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION IS NOT AN OFFER TO SELL THESE SECURITIES AND IS NOT SOLICITING AN OFFER TO BUY THESE SECURITIES IN ANY JURISDICTION WHERE THE OFFER OR SALE IS NOT PERMITTED.

 

PRELIMINARY STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION DATED JUNE 13, 2018

 

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

LSV EMERGING MARKETS EQUITY FUND

(Institutional Class Shares: [XXXXX])

(Investor Class Shares: [XXXXX])

 

a series of THE ADVISORS’ INNER CIRCLE FUND

 

[Date]

 

Investment Adviser:

LSV ASSET MANAGEMENT

 

This Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) is not a prospectus. This SAI is intended to provide additional information regarding the activities and operations of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund (the “Trust”) and the LSV Emerging Markets Equity Fund (the “Fund”). This SAI is incorporated by reference into and should be read in conjunction with the Fund’s prospectus dated [Date], as it may be amended from time to time (the “Prospectus”). Capitalized terms not defined herein are defined in the Prospectus. Shareholders may obtain copies of the Prospectus or the Fund’s annual or semi-annual report, when available, free of charge, by writing to the Fund at LSV Funds, P.O. Box 219009, Kansas City, MO 64121-9009 (Express Mail Address: LSV Funds, c/o DST Systems, Inc., 430 W. 7th Street, Kansas City, MO 64105) or calling the Fund at 1-888-FUND-LSV.

 

i

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  Page
THE TRUST S-XX
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES S-XX
DESCRIPTION OF PERMITTED INVESTMENTS S-XX
INVESTMENT LIMITATIONS S-XX
THE ADVISER S-XX
PORTFOLIO MANAGERS S-XX
THE ADMINISTRATOR S-XX
THE DISTRIBUTOR S-XX
PAYMENTS TO FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES S-XX
THE TRANSFER AGENT S-XX
THE CUSTODIAN S-XX
INDEPENDENT Registered public Accounting firm S-XX
LEGAL COUNSEL S-XX
SECURITIES LENDING S-XX
TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS OF THE TRUST S-XX
PURCHASING AND REDEEMING SHARES S-XX
DETERMINATION OF NET ASSET VALUE S-XX
TAXES.. S-XX
FUND TRANSACTIONS S-XX
PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS S-XX
DESCRIPTION OF SHARES S-XX
SHAREHOLDER LIABILITY S-XX
LIMITATION OF TRUSTEES’ LIABILITY S-XX
PROXY VOTING S-XX
CODES OF ETHICS S-XX
PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS AND CONTROL PERSONS S-XX
APPENDIX A – DESCRIPTION OF RATINGS A-1
APPENDIX B – PROXY VOTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES B-1
   
[Date] [Inventory Code]

 

ii

 

THE TRUST

 

General. The Fund is a separate series of the Trust. The Trust is an open-end investment management company established under Massachusetts law as a Massachusetts voluntary association (commonly known as a business trust) under a Declaration of Trust dated July 18, 1991, as amended and restated February 18, 1997 and amended May 15, 2012 (the “Declaration of Trust”). The Declaration of Trust permits the Trust to offer separate series (“funds”) of shares of beneficial interest (“shares”). The Trust reserves the right to create and issue shares of additional funds. Each fund is a separate mutual fund, and each share of each fund represents an equal proportionate interest in that fund. All consideration received by the Trust for shares of any fund and all assets of such fund belong solely to that fund and would be subject to liabilities related thereto. Each fund of the Trust pays its (i) operating expenses, including fees of its service providers, expenses of preparing prospectuses, proxy solicitation material and reports to shareholders, costs of custodial services and registering its shares under federal and state securities laws, pricing and insurance expenses, brokerage costs, interest charges, taxes and organization expenses, and (ii) pro rata share of the fund’s other expenses, including audit and legal expenses. Expenses attributable to a specific fund shall be payable solely out of the assets of that fund. Expenses not attributable to a specific fund are allocated across all of the funds on the basis of relative net assets. The other funds of the Trust are described in one or more separate statements of additional information.

 

Description of Multiple Classes of Shares. The Trust is authorized to offer shares of the Fund in Institutional Class Shares and Investor Class Shares. The different classes provide for variations in certain distribution expenses and minimum investment requirements. Minimum investment requirements and investor eligibility are described in the Prospectus. For more information on distribution expenses, see “Payments to Financial Intermediaries” in this SAI. The Trust reserves the right to create and issue additional classes of shares.

 

Voting Rights. Each shareholder of record is entitled to one vote for each share held on the record date for the meeting. The Fund will vote separately on matters relating solely to it. As a Massachusetts voluntary association, the Trust is not required, and does not intend, to hold annual meetings of shareholders. Approval of shareholders will be sought, however, for certain changes in the operation of the Trust and for the election of the Board of Trustees of the Trust (each, a “Trustee” and together, the “Board”) under certain circumstances. Under the Declaration of Trust, the Trustees have the power to liquidate the Fund without shareholder approval. While the Trustees have no present intention of exercising this power, they may do so if the Fund fails to reach a viable size within a reasonable amount of time or for such other reasons as may be determined by the Board.

 

In addition, a Trustee may be removed by the remaining Trustees or by shareholders at a special meeting called upon written request of shareholders owning at least 10% of the outstanding shares of the Trust. In the event that such a meeting is requested, the Trust will provide appropriate assistance and information to the shareholders requesting the meeting.

 

Any series of the Trust created on or after November 11, 1996 may reorganize or merge with one or more other series of the Trust or of another investment company. Any such reorganization or merger shall be pursuant to the terms and conditions specified in an agreement and plan of reorganization authorized and approved by the Trustees and entered into by the relevant series in connection therewith. In addition, such reorganization or merger may be authorized by vote of a majority of the Trustees then in office and, to the extent permitted by applicable law and the Declaration of Trust, without the approval of shareholders of any series.

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND POLICIES

 

The Fund’s investment objective and principal investment strategies are described in the Prospectus. The following information supplements, and should be read in conjunction with, the Prospectus. For a description of certain permitted investments discussed below, see “Description of Permitted Investments” in this SAI.

 

The Fund seeks long-term growth of capital. This goal is fundamental, and may not be changed without the consent of shareholders. There can be no assurance that the Fund will be able to achieve its investment objective. The Fund is classified as a “diversified” investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”).

 

S-1

 

DESCRIPTION OF PERMITTED INVESTMENTS

 

The following are descriptions of the permitted investments and the associated risk factors. The Fund may invest in any of the following instruments or engage in any of the following investment practices unless such investment or activity is inconsistent with or is not permitted by its stated investment policies, including those stated below.

 

Equity Securities. Equity securities represent ownership interests in a company and consist of common stocks, preferred stocks, warrants to acquire common stock, and securities convertible into common stock. Investments in equity securities in general are subject to market risks that may cause their prices to fluctuate over time. Fluctuations in the value of equity securities in which the Fund invests will cause the net asset value of the Fund to fluctuate. The Fund may purchase equity securities traded in the United States on registered exchanges or the over-the-counter market. Equity securities are described in more detail below:

 

Common Stock. Common stock represents an equity or ownership interest in an issuer. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds and preferred stock take precedence over the claims of those who own common stock.

 

Preferred Stock. Preferred stock represents an equity or ownership interest in an issuer that pays dividends at a specified rate and that has precedence over common stock in the payment of dividends. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds take precedence over the claims of those who own preferred and common stock.

 

Warrants. Warrants are instruments that entitle the holder to buy an equity security at a specific price for a specific period of time. Changes in the value of a warrant do not necessarily correspond to changes in the value of its underlying security. The price of a warrant may be more volatile than the price of its underlying security, and a warrant may offer greater potential for capital appreciation as well as capital loss. Warrants do not entitle a holder to dividends or voting rights with respect to the underlying security and do not represent any rights in the assets of the issuing company. A warrant ceases to have value if it is not exercised prior to its expiration date. These factors can make warrants more speculative than other types of investments.

 

Convertible Securities. Convertible securities are bonds, debentures, notes, preferred stocks or other securities that may be converted or exchanged (by the holder or by the issuer) into shares of the underlying common stock (or cash or securities of equivalent value) at a stated exchange ratio. A convertible security may also be called for redemption or conversion by the issuer after a particular date and under certain circumstances (including a specified price) established upon issue. If a convertible security held by the Fund is called for redemption or conversion, the Fund could be required to tender it for redemption, convert it into the underlying common stock, or sell it to a third party.

 

Convertible securities generally have less potential for gain or loss than common stocks. Convertible securities generally provide yields higher than the underlying common stocks, but generally lower than comparable non-convertible securities. Because of this higher yield, convertible securities generally sell at a price above their “conversion value,” which is the current market value of the stock to be received upon conversion. The difference between this conversion value and the price of convertible securities will vary over time depending on changes in the value of the underlying common stocks and interest rates. When the underlying common stocks decline in value, convertible securities will tend not to decline to the same extent because of the interest or dividend payments and the repayment of principal at maturity for certain types of convertible securities. However, securities that are convertible other than at the option of the holder generally do not limit the potential for loss to the same extent as securities convertible at the option of the holder. When the underlying common stocks rise in value, the value of convertible securities may also be expected to increase. At the same time, however, the difference between the market value of convertible securities and their conversion value will narrow, which means that the value of convertible securities will generally not increase to the same extent as the value of the underlying common stocks. Because convertible securities may also be interest-rate sensitive, their value may increase as interest rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise. Convertible securities are also subject to credit risk, and are often lower-quality securities.

 

S-2

 

Small and Medium Capitalization Issuers. Investing in equity securities of small and medium capitalization companies often involves greater risk than is customarily associated with investments in larger capitalization companies. This increased risk may be due to the greater business risks of smaller size, limited markets and financial resources, narrow product lines and frequent lack of depth of management. The securities of smaller companies are often traded in the over-the-counter market and even if listed on a national securities exchange may not be traded in volumes typical for that exchange. Consequently, the securities of smaller companies are less likely to be liquid, may have limited market stability, and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than securities of larger, more established growth companies or the market averages in general.

 

Foreign Securities

 

Types of Foreign Securities:

 

Foreign securities are debt and equity securities that are traded in markets outside of the U.S. The markets in which these securities are located can be developed or emerging. The Fund can invest in foreign securities in a number of ways, including:

 

The Fund can invest directly in foreign securities denominated in a foreign currency;

 

The Fund can invest in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”); European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”) and other similar global instruments; and

 

The Fund can invest in investment funds.

 

American Depositary Receipts. ADRs as well as other “hybrid” forms of ADRs, including EDRs and GDRs are certificates evidencing ownership of shares of a foreign issuer. These certificates are issued by depository banks and generally trade on an established market in the United States or elsewhere. A custodian bank or similar financial institution in the issuer’s home country holds the underlying shares in trust. The depository bank may not have physical custody of the underlying securities at all times and may charge fees for various services, including forwarding dividends and interest and corporate actions. ADRs are alternatives to directly purchasing the underlying foreign securities in their national markets and currencies. ADRs are subject to many of the risks associated with investing directly in foreign securities. EDRs are similar to ADRs, except that they are typically issued by European banks or trust companies.

 

ADRs can be sponsored or unsponsored. While these types are similar, there are differences regarding a holder’s rights and obligations and the practices of market participants. A depository may establish an unsponsored facility without participation by (or acquiescence of) the underlying issuer; typically, however, the depository requests a letter of non-objection from the underlying issuer prior to establishing the facility. Holders of unsponsored depositary receipts generally bear all the costs of the facility. The depository usually charges fees upon the deposit and withdrawal of the underlying securities, the conversion of dividends into U.S. dollars or other currency, the disposition of non-cash distributions, and the performance of other services. Sponsored depositary receipt facilities are created in generally the same manner as unsponsored facilities, except that sponsored depositary receipts are established jointly by a depository and the underlying issuer through a deposit agreement. The deposit agreement sets out the rights and responsibilities of the underlying issuer, the depository, and the depositary receipt holders. With sponsored facilities, the underlying issuer typically bears some of the costs of the depositary receipts (such as dividend payment fees of the depository), although most sponsored depositary receipts holders may bear costs such as deposit and withdrawal fees. Depositories of most sponsored depositary receipts agree to distribute notices of shareholder meetings, voting instructions, and other shareholder communications and information to the depositary receipt holders at the underlying issuer’s request. The depositary of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the issuer of the deposited security or to pass through, to the holders of the receipts, voting rights with respect to the deposited securities.

 

S-3

 

Emerging Markets. An “emerging market” country is any country that is included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index (the “Index”) or that is publicly announced to be added to the Index. Typically, emerging markets are in countries that are in the process of industrialization, with lower gross national products (“GNPs”) than more developed countries. There are currently over 150 countries that the international financial community generally considers to be emerging or developing countries, approximately 50 of which currently have stock markets.

 

Sovereign Debt Obligations. Sovereign debt obligations are issued or guaranteed by foreign governments or their agencies. Sovereign debt may be in the form of conventional securities or other types of debt instruments such as loans or loan participations. Governmental entities responsible for repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay principal and pay interest when due, and may require renegotiation or reschedule of debt payments. In addition, prospects for repayment of principal and payment of interest may depend on political as well as economic factors. Although some sovereign debt, such as Brady Bonds, is collateralized by U.S. government securities, repayment of principal and payment of interest is not guaranteed by the U.S. government.

 

Investment Funds. Some emerging countries currently prohibit direct foreign investment in the securities of their companies. Certain emerging countries, however, permit indirect foreign investment in the securities of companies listed and traded on their stock exchanges through investment funds that they have specifically authorized. Investments in these investment funds are subject to the provisions of the 1940 Act. If the Fund invests in such investment funds, shareholders will bear not only their proportionate share of the expenses of the Fund (including operating expenses and the fees of the Fund’s investment adviser, LSV Asset Management (“LSV” or the “Adviser”)), but also will indirectly bear similar expenses of the underlying investment funds. In addition, these investment funds may trade at a premium over their net asset value.

 

Risks of Foreign Securities:

 

Foreign securities, foreign currencies, and securities issued by U.S. entities with substantial foreign operations may involve significant risks in addition to the risks inherent in U.S. investments.

 

Political and Economic Factors. Local political, economic, regulatory, or social instability, military action or unrest, or adverse diplomatic developments may affect the value of foreign investments. Listed below are some of the more important political and economic factors that could negatively affect an investment in foreign securities:

 

The economies of foreign countries may differ from the economy of the United States in such areas as growth of GNP, rate of inflation, capital reinvestment, resource self-sufficiency, budget deficits and national debt;

 

Foreign governments sometimes participate to a significant degree, through ownership interests or regulation, in their respective economies. Actions by these governments could significantly influence the market prices of securities and payment of dividends;

 

The economies of many foreign countries are dependent on international trade and their trading partners and they could be severely affected if their trading partners were to enact protective trade barriers and economic conditions;

 

S-4

 

The internal policies of a particular foreign country may be less stable than in the United States. Other countries face significant external political risks, such as possible claims of sovereignty by other countries or tense and sometimes hostile border clashes; and

 

A foreign government may act adversely to the interests of U.S. investors, including expropriation or nationalization of assets, confiscatory taxation and other restrictions on U.S. investment. A country may restrict or control foreign investments in its securities markets. These restrictions could limit the Fund’s ability to invest in a particular country or make it very expensive for the Fund to invest in that country. Some countries require prior governmental approval, limit the types or amount of securities or companies in which a foreigner can invest, or may restrict the ability of foreign investors to repatriate their investment income and capital gains.

 

In June 2016, the United Kingdom (the “UK”) voted in a referendum to leave the European Union (“EU”). Although the precise timeframe for “Brexit” is uncertain, the UK formally notified the European Council of its intention to withdraw from the EU by invoking article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty in March 2017, and this formal notification began a two-year period of negotiations regarding the terms of the UK’s exit from the EU. It is unclear how withdrawal negotiations will be conducted and what the potential consequences may be. In addition, it is possible that measures could be taken to revote on the issue of Brexit, or that portions of the UK could seek to separate and remain a part of the EU. As a result of the political divisions within the UK and between the UK and the EU that the referendum vote has highlighted and the uncertain consequences of a Brexit, the UK and European economies and the broader global economy could be significantly impacted, which may result in increased volatility and illiquidity, and potentially lower economic growth in markets in the UK, Europe and globally that could potentially have an adverse effect on the value of the Fund’s investments.

 

Information and Supervision. There is generally less publicly available information about foreign companies than companies based in the United States. For example, there are often no reports and ratings published about foreign companies comparable to the ones written about U.S. companies. Foreign companies are typically not subject to uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, practices and requirements comparable to those applicable to U.S. companies. The lack of comparable information makes investment decisions concerning foreign companies more difficult and less reliable than those concerning domestic companies.

 

Stock Exchange and Market Risk. The Adviser anticipates that in most cases an exchange or over-the-counter market located outside of the United States will be the best available market for foreign securities. Foreign stock markets, while growing in volume and sophistication, are generally not as developed as the markets in the United States. Foreign stock markets tend to differ from those in the United States in a number of ways.

 

Foreign stock markets:

 

Are generally more volatile than, and not as developed or efficient as, those in the United States;

 

Have substantially less volume;

 

Trade securities that tend to be less liquid and experience rapid and erratic price movements;

 

Have generally higher commissions and are subject to set minimum rates, as opposed to negotiated rates;

 

Employ trading, settlement and custodial practices less developed than those in U.S. markets; and

 

May have different settlement practices, which may cause delays and increase the potential for failed settlements.

 

Foreign markets may offer less protection to shareholders than U.S. markets because:

 

S-5

 

Foreign accounting, auditing, and financial reporting requirements may render a foreign corporate balance sheet more difficult to understand and interpret than one subject to U.S. law and standards.

 

Adequate public information on foreign issuers may not be available, and it may be difficult to secure dividends and information regarding corporate actions on a timely basis.

 

In general, there is less overall governmental supervision and regulation of securities exchanges, brokers, and listed companies than in the United States.

 

Over-the-counter markets tend to be less regulated than stock exchange markets and, in certain countries, may be totally unregulated.

 

Economic or political concerns may influence regulatory enforcement and may make it difficult for shareholders to enforce their legal rights.

 

Restrictions on transferring securities within the United States or to U.S. persons may make a particular security less liquid than foreign securities of the same class that are not subject to such restrictions.

 

Foreign Currency Risk. While the Fund denominates its net asset value in U.S. dollars, the securities of foreign companies are frequently denominated in foreign currencies. Thus, a change in the value of a foreign currency against the U.S. dollar will result in a corresponding change in value of securities denominated in that currency. Some of the factors that may impair the investments denominated in a foreign currency are:

 

It may be expensive to convert foreign currencies into U.S. dollars and vice versa;

 

Complex political and economic factors may significantly affect the values of various currencies, including the U.S. dollar, and their exchange rates;

 

Government intervention may increase risks involved in purchasing or selling foreign currency options, forward contracts and futures contracts, since exchange rates may not be free to fluctuate in response to other market forces;

 

There may be no systematic reporting of last sale information for foreign currencies or regulatory requirement that quotations available through dealers or other market sources be firm or revised on a timely basis;

 

Available quotation information is generally representative of very large round-lot transactions in the inter-bank market and thus may not reflect exchange rates for smaller odd-lot transactions (less than $1 million) where rates may be less favorable; and

 

The inter-bank market in foreign currencies is a global, around-the-clock market. To the extent that a market is closed while the markets for the underlying currencies remain open, certain markets may not always reflect significant price and rate movements.

 

Taxes. Certain foreign governments levy withholding taxes on dividend and interest income. Although in some countries it is possible for the Fund to recover a portion of these taxes, the portion that cannot be recovered will reduce the income the Fund receives from its investments.

 

Emerging Markets. Investing in emerging markets may magnify the risks of foreign investing. Security prices in emerging markets can be significantly more volatile than those in more developed markets, reflecting the greater uncertainties of investing in less established markets and economies. In particular, countries with emerging markets may:

 

S-6

 

Have relatively unstable governments;

 

Present greater risks of nationalization of businesses, restrictions on foreign ownership and prohibitions on the repatriation of assets;

 

Offer less protection of property rights than more developed countries; and

 

Have economies that are based on only a few industries, may be highly vulnerable to changes in local or global trade conditions, and may suffer from extreme and volatile debt burdens or inflation rates.

 

Local securities markets may trade a small number of securities and may be unable to respond effectively to increases in trading volume, potentially making prompt liquidation of holdings difficult or impossible at times.

 

Money Market Securities. Money market securities include short-term U.S. government securities; custodial receipts evidencing separately traded interest and principal components of securities issued by the U.S. Treasury; commercial paper rated in the highest short-term rating category by an NRSRO, such as Standard & Poor’s Ratings Service (“S&P”) or Moody’s Investor Service (“Moody’s”), or determined by the Adviser to be of comparable quality at the time of purchase; short-term bank obligations (certificates of deposit, time deposits and bankers’ acceptances) of U.S. commercial banks with assets of at least $1 billion as of the end of their most recent fiscal year; and repurchase agreements involving such securities. Each of these money market securities are described below. For a description of ratings, see “Appendix A – Description of Ratings” to this SAI.

 

U.S. Government Securities. The Fund may invest in U.S. government securities. Securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or its agencies or instrumentalities include U.S. Treasury securities, which are backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury and which differ only in their interest rates, maturities, and times of issuance. U.S. Treasury bills have initial maturities of one-year or less; U.S. Treasury notes have initial maturities of one to ten years; and U.S. Treasury bonds generally have initial maturities of greater than ten years. U.S. Treasury notes and bonds typically pay coupon interest semi-annually and repay the principal at maturity. Certain U.S. government securities are issued or guaranteed by agencies or instrumentalities of the U.S. government including, but not limited to, obligations of U.S. government agencies or instrumentalities such as the Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), the Government National Mortgage Association (“Ginnie Mae”), the Small Business Administration, the Federal Farm Credit Administration, the Federal Home Loan Banks, Banks for Cooperatives (including the Central Bank for Cooperatives), the Federal Land Banks, the Federal Intermediate Credit Banks, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the Export-Import Bank of the United States, the Commodity Credit Corporation, the Federal Financing Bank, the Student Loan Marketing Association, the National Credit Union Administration and the Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (“Farmer Mac”).

 

Some obligations issued or guaranteed by U.S. government agencies and instrumentalities, including, for example, Ginnie Mae pass-through certificates, are supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Treasury. Other obligations issued by or guaranteed by federal agencies, such as those securities issued by Fannie Mae, are supported by the discretionary authority of the U.S. government to purchase certain obligations of the federal agency. Additionally, some obligations are issued by or guaranteed by federal agencies, such as those of the Federal Home Loan Banks, which are supported by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury. While the U.S. government provides financial support to such U.S. government-sponsored federal agencies, no assurance can be given that the U.S. government will always do so, since the U.S. government is not so obligated by law. Guarantees of principal by U.S. government agencies or instrumentalities may be a guarantee of payment at the maturity of the obligation so that in the event of a default prior to maturity there might not be a market and thus no means of realizing on the obligation prior to maturity. Guarantees as to the timely payment of principal and interest do not extend to the value or yield of these securities nor to the value of the Fund’s shares.

 

S-7

 

On September 7, 2008, the U.S. Treasury announced a federal takeover of Fannie Mae and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“Freddie Mac”), placing the two federal instrumentalities in conservatorship. Under the takeover, the U.S. Treasury agreed to acquire $1 billion of senior preferred stock of each instrumentality and obtained warrants for the purchase of common stock of each instrumentality (the “Senior Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement” or “Agreement”). Under the Agreement, the U.S. Treasury pledged to provide up to $200 billion per instrumentality as needed, including the contribution of cash capital to the instrumentalities in the event their liabilities exceed their assets. This was intended to ensure that the instrumentalities maintain a positive net worth and meet their financial obligations, preventing mandatory triggering of receivership. On December 24, 2009, the U.S. Treasury announced that it was amending the Agreement to allow the $200 billion cap on the U.S. Treasury’s funding commitment to increase as necessary to accommodate any cumulative reduction in net worth through the end of 2012. The unlimited support the U.S. Treasury extended to the two companies expired at the beginning of 2013 – Fannie Mae’s support is now capped at $125 billion and Freddie Mac has a limit of $149 billion.

 

On August 17, 2012, the U.S. Treasury announced that it was again amending the Agreement to terminate the requirement that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac each pay a 10% annual dividend. Instead, the companies will transfer to the U.S. Treasury on a quarterly basis all profits earned during a quarter that exceed a capital reserve amount of $3 billion. It is believed that the new amendment puts Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in a better position to service their debt because the companies no longer have to borrow from the U.S. Treasury to make fixed dividend payments. As part of the new terms, Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac also will be required to reduce their investment portfolios at an annual rate of 15% instead of the previous 10%, which puts each of them on track to cut their portfolios to a targeted $250 billion in 2018.

 

Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are the subject of several continuing class action lawsuits and investigations by federal regulators over certain accounting, disclosure or corporate governance matters, which (along with any resulting financial restatements) may adversely affect the guaranteeing entities. Importantly, the future of the entities is in serious question as the U.S. government reportedly is considering multiple options, ranging from nationalization, privatization, consolidation, or abolishment of the entities.

 

U.S. Treasury Obligations. U.S. Treasury obligations consist of direct obligations of the U.S. Treasury, including Treasury bills, notes and bonds, and separately traded interest and principal component parts of such obligations, including those transferable through the Federal book-entry system known as Separate Trading of Registered Interest and Principal of Securities (“STRIPS”). The STRIPS program lets investors hold and trade the individual interest and principal components of eligible Treasury notes and bonds as separate securities. Under the STRIPS program, the principal and interest components are separately issued by the U.S. Treasury at the request of depository financial institutions, which then trade the component parts separately.

 

Commercial Paper. Commercial paper is the term used to designate unsecured short-term promissory notes issued by corporations and other entities. Maturities on these issues vary from a few to 270 days.

 

Obligations of Domestic Banks, Foreign Banks and Foreign Branches of U.S. Banks. The Fund may invest in obligations issued by banks and other savings institutions. Investments in bank obligations include obligations of domestic branches of foreign banks and foreign branches of domestic banks. Such investments in domestic branches of foreign banks and foreign branches of domestic banks may involve risks that are different from investments in securities of domestic branches of U.S. banks. These risks may include future unfavorable political and economic developments, possible withholding taxes on interest income, seizure or nationalization of foreign deposits, currency controls, interest limitations, or other governmental restrictions which might affect the payment of principal or interest on the securities held by the Fund. Additionally, these institutions may be subject to less stringent reserve requirements and to different accounting, auditing, reporting and recordkeeping requirements than those applicable to domestic branches of U.S. banks. Bank obligations include the following:

 

S-8

 

Bankers’ Acceptances. Bankers’ acceptances are bills of exchange or time drafts drawn on and accepted by a commercial bank. Corporations use bankers’ acceptances to finance the shipment and storage of goods and to furnish dollar exchange. Maturities are generally six months or less.

 

Certificates of Deposit. Certificates of deposit are interest-bearing instruments with a specific maturity. They are issued by banks and savings and loan institutions in exchange for the deposit of funds and normally can be traded in the secondary market prior to maturity. Certificates of deposit with penalties for early withdrawal will be considered illiquid.

 

Time Deposits. Time deposits are non-negotiable receipts issued by a bank in exchange for the deposit of funds. Like a certificate of deposit, it earns a specified rate of interest over a definite period of time; however, it cannot be traded in the secondary market. Time deposits with a withdrawal penalty or that mature in more than seven days are considered to be illiquid securities.

 

Repurchase Agreements. The Fund may enter into repurchase agreements with financial institutions in order to increase its income. A repurchase agreement is an agreement under which a fund acquires a fixed income security (generally a security issued by the U.S. government or an agency thereof, a banker’s acceptance, or a certificate of deposit) from a commercial bank, broker, or dealer, and simultaneously agrees to resell such security to the seller at an agreed upon price and date (normally, the next business day). Because the security purchased constitutes collateral for the repurchase obligation, a repurchase agreement may be considered a loan that is collateralized by the security purchased. The acquisition of a repurchase agreement may be deemed to be an acquisition of the underlying securities as long as the obligation of the seller to repurchase the securities is collateralized fully. The Fund follows certain procedures designed to minimize the risks inherent in such agreements. These procedures include effecting repurchase transactions only with creditworthy financial institutions whose condition will be continually monitored by the Adviser. The repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund will provide that the underlying collateral at all times shall have a value at least equal to 102% of the resale price stated in the agreement and consist only of securities permissible under Section 101(47)(A)(i) of the Bankruptcy Code (the Adviser monitors compliance with this requirement). Under all repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund, the custodian or its agent must take possession of the underlying collateral. In the event of a default or bankruptcy by a selling financial institution, the Fund will seek to liquidate such collateral. However, the exercising of the Fund’s right to liquidate such collateral could involve certain costs or delays and, to the extent that proceeds from any sale upon a default of the obligation to repurchase were less than the repurchase price, the Fund could suffer a loss. The Fund may enter into “tri-party” repurchase agreements. In “tri-party” repurchase agreements, an unaffiliated third party custodian maintains accounts to hold collateral for the Fund and its counterparties and, therefore, the Fund may be subject to the credit risk of those custodians. It is the current policy of the Fund not to invest in repurchase agreements that do not mature within seven days if any such investment, together with any other illiquid assets held by the Fund, amounts to more than 15% of the Fund’s total assets. The investments of the Fund in repurchase agreements, at times, may be substantial when, in the view of the Adviser, liquidity or other considerations so warrant.

 

Reverse Repurchase Agreements. Reverse repurchase agreements are transactions in which the Fund sells portfolio securities to financial institutions, such as banks and broker-dealers, and agrees to repurchase them at a mutually agreed-upon date and price that is higher than the original sale price. Reverse repurchase agreements are similar to a fully collateralized borrowing by the Fund. At the time the Fund enters into a reverse repurchase agreement, it will earmark on the books of the Fund or place in a segregated account cash or liquid securities having a value equal to the repurchase price (including accrued interest) and will subsequently monitor the account to ensure that such equivalent value is maintained.

 

Reverse repurchase agreements involve risks. Reverse repurchase agreements are a form of leverage, and the use of reverse repurchase agreements by the Fund may increase the Fund’s volatility. Reverse repurchase agreements are also subject to the risk that the other party to the reverse repurchase agreement will be unable or unwilling to complete the transaction as scheduled, which may result in losses to the Fund. Reverse repurchase agreements also involve the risk that the market value of the securities sold by the Fund may decline below the price at which it is obligated to repurchase the securities. In addition, when the Fund invests the proceeds it receives in a reverse repurchase transaction, there is a risk that those investments may decline in value. In this circumstance, the Fund could be required to sell other investments in order to meet its obligations to repurchase the securities.

 

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Exchange-Traded Funds (“ETFs”). The Fund may invest in ETFs. ETFs may be structured as investment companies that are registered under the 1940 Act, typically as open-end funds or unit investment trusts. These ETFs are generally based on specific domestic and foreign market securities indices. An “index-based ETF” seeks to track the performance of an index by holding in its portfolio either the contents of the index or a representative sample of the securities in the index. Alternatively, ETFs may be structured as grantor trusts or other forms of pooled investment vehicles that are not registered or regulated under the 1940 Act. These ETFs typically hold commodities, precious metals, currency or other non-securities investments. ETFs, like mutual funds, have expenses associated with their operation, such as advisory and custody fees. When the Fund invests in an ETF, in addition to directly bearing expenses associated with its own operations, including the brokerage costs associated with the purchase and sale of shares of the ETF, the Fund will bear a pro rata portion of the ETF’s expenses. In addition, it may be more costly to own an ETF than to directly own the securities or other investments held by the ETF because of ETF expenses. The risks of owning shares of an ETF generally reflect the risks of owning the underlying securities or other investments held by the ETF, although lack of liquidity in the market for the shares of an ETF could result in the ETF’s value being more volatile than the underlying securities or other investments.

 

Securities of Other Investment Companies. The Fund may invest in shares of other investment companies, to the extent permitted by applicable law and subject to certain restrictions. These investment companies typically incur fees that are separate from those fees incurred directly by the Fund. The Fund’s purchase of such investment company securities results in the layering of expenses, such that shareholders would indirectly bear a proportionate share of the operating expenses of such investment companies, including advisory fees, in addition to paying the Fund’s expenses. Unless an exception is available, Section 12(d)(1)(A) of the 1940 Act prohibits a fund from (i) acquiring more than 3% of the voting shares of any one investment company, (ii) investing more than 5% of its total assets in any one investment company, and (iii) investing more than 10% of its total assets in all investment companies combined, including its ETF investments.

 

For hedging or other purposes, the Fund may invest in investment companies that seek to track the composition and/or performance of specific indexes or portions of specific indexes. Certain of these investment companies, known as ETFs, are traded on a securities exchange. (See “Exchange-Traded Funds” above). The market prices of index-based investments will fluctuate in accordance with changes in the underlying portfolio securities of the investment company and also due to supply and demand of the investment company’s shares on the exchange upon which the shares are traded. Index-based investments may not replicate or otherwise match the composition or performance of their specified index due to transaction costs, among other things.

 

Pursuant to orders issued by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) to each of certain iShares, Market Vectors, Vanguard, ProShares, PowerShares, Guggenheim (formerly, Claymore), Direxion, Wisdom Tree, Rydex, First Trust and SPDR exchange-traded funds (collectively, the “ETFs”) and procedures approved by the Board, the Fund may invest in these ETFs in excess of the 3% limit described above, provided that the Fund otherwise complies with the conditions of the SEC order, as it may be amended, and any other applicable investment limitations. Neither these ETFs nor their investment advisers make any representations regarding the advisability of investing in the ETFs.

 

Securities Lending. The Fund may lend portfolio securities to brokers, dealers and other financial organizations that meet capital and other credit requirements or other criteria established by the Board. These loans, if and when made, may not exceed 33 1/3% of the total asset value of the Fund (including the loan collateral). The Fund will not lend portfolio securities to the Adviser or their affiliates unless permissible under the 1940 Act and the rules and promulgations thereunder. Loans of portfolio securities will be fully collateralized by cash, letters of credit or U.S. government securities, and the collateral will be maintained in an amount equal to at least 100% of the current market value of the loaned securities by marking to market daily. Any gain or loss in the market price of the securities loaned that might occur during the term of the loan would be for the account of the Fund.

 

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The Fund may pay a part of the interest earned from the investment of collateral, or other fee, to an unaffiliated third party for acting as the Fund’s securities lending agent, but will bear all of any losses from the investment of collateral.

 

By lending its securities, the Fund may increase its income by receiving payments from the borrower that reflect the amount of any interest or any dividends payable on the loaned securities as well as by either investing cash collateral received from the borrower in short-term instruments or obtaining a fee from the borrower when U.S. government securities or letters of credit are used as collateral. Investing cash collateral subjects the Fund to market risk. The Fund remains obligated to return all collateral to the borrower under the terms of its securities lending arrangements, even if the value of investments made with the collateral decline. Accordingly, if the value of a security in which the cash collateral has been invested declines, the loss would be borne by the Fund, and the Fund may be required to liquidate other investments in order to return collateral to the borrower at the end of the loan. The Fund will adhere to the following conditions whenever its portfolio securities are loaned: (i) the Fund must receive at least 100% cash collateral or equivalent securities of the type discussed above from the borrower; (ii) the borrower must increase such collateral whenever the market value of the securities rises above the level of such collateral; (iii) the Fund must be able to terminate the loan on demand; (iv) the Fund must receive reasonable interest on the loan, as well as any dividends, interest or other distributions on the loaned securities and any increase in market value; (v) the Fund may pay only reasonable fees in connection with the loan (which fees may include fees payable to the lending agent, the borrower, the Fund’s administrator and the custodian); and (vi) voting rights on the loaned securities may pass to the borrower, provided, however, that if a material event adversely affecting the investment occurs, the Fund must terminate the loan and regain the right to vote the securities. The Board has adopted procedures reasonably designed to ensure that the foregoing criteria will be met. Loan agreements involve certain risks in the event of default or insolvency of the borrower, including possible delays or restrictions upon the Fund’s ability to recover the loaned securities or dispose of the collateral for the loan, which could give rise to loss because of adverse market action, expenses and/or delays in connection with the disposition of the underlying securities.

 

Derivatives

 

Derivatives are financial instruments whose value is based on an underlying asset (such as a stock or a bond), an underlying economic factor (such as an interest rate) or a market benchmark. Unless otherwise stated in the Prospectus, the Fund may use derivatives for a number of purposes including managing risk, gaining exposure to various markets in a cost-efficient manner, reducing transaction costs, remaining fully invested and speculating. The Fund may also invest in derivatives with the goal of protecting itself from broad fluctuations in market prices, interest rates or foreign currency exchange rates (a practice known as “hedging”). When hedging is successful, the Fund will have offset any depreciation in the value of its portfolio securities by the appreciation in the value of the derivative position. Although techniques other than the sale and purchase of derivatives could be used to control the exposure of the Fund to market fluctuations, the use of derivatives may be a more effective means of hedging this exposure. In the future, to the extent such use is consistent with the Fund’s investment objectives and is legally permissible, the Fund may use instruments and techniques that are not presently contemplated, but that may be subsequently developed.

 

There can be no assurance that a derivative strategy, if employed, will be successful. Because many derivatives have a leverage or borrowing component, adverse changes in the value or level of the underlying asset, reference rate or index can result in a loss substantially greater than the amount invested in the derivative itself. Certain derivatives have the potential for unlimited loss, regardless of the size of the initial investment. Accordingly, certain derivative transactions may be considered to constitute borrowing transactions for purposes of the 1940 Act. Such a derivative transaction will not be considered to constitute the issuance of a “senior security” by the Fund, and therefore such transaction will not be subject to the 300% asset coverage requirement otherwise applicable to borrowings by the Fund, if the Fund covers the transaction or segregates sufficient liquid assets (or such assets are “earmarked” on the Fund’s books) in accordance with the requirements and interpretations of the SEC and its staff. The Fund may enter into agreements with broker-dealers that require the broker-dealers to accept physical settlement for certain types of derivatives instruments. If this occurs, the Fund would treat such derivative instruments as being cash settled for purposes of determining the Fund’s coverage requirements.

 

S-11

 

Pursuant to rules adopted under the Commodity Exchange Act (“CEA”) by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”), the Fund must either operate within certain guidelines and restrictions with respect to the Fund’s use of futures, options on such futures, commodity options and certain swaps, or the Adviser will be subject to registration with the CFTC as a “commodity pool operator” (“CPO”).

 

Consistent with the CFTC’s regulations, the Trust, on behalf of the Fund, has filed a notice of exclusion from the definition of the term CPO under the CEA pursuant to CFTC Rule 4.5 and, therefore, the Fund is not subject to registration or regulation as CPOs under the CEA. As a result, the Fund will be limited in its ability to use futures, options on such futures, commodity options and certain swaps. Complying with the limitations may restrict the Adviser’s ability to implement the Fund’s investment strategies and may adversely affect the Fund’s performance.

 

Types of Derivatives:

 

Futures. A futures contract is an agreement between two parties whereby one party agrees to sell and the other party agrees to buy a specified amount of a financial instrument at an agreed upon price and time. The financial instrument underlying the contract may be a stock, stock index, bond, bond index, interest rate, foreign exchange rate or other similar instrument. Agreeing to buy the underlying financial instrument is called buying a futures contract or taking a long position in the contract. Likewise, agreeing to sell the underlying financial instrument is called selling a futures contract or taking a short position in the contract.

 

Futures contracts are traded in the United States on commodity exchanges or boards of trade (known as “contract markets”) approved for such trading and regulated by the CFTC. These contract markets standardize the terms, including the maturity date and underlying financial instrument, of all futures contracts.

 

Unlike other securities, the parties to a futures contract do not have to pay for or deliver the underlying financial instrument until some future date (the “delivery date”). Contract markets require both the purchaser and seller to deposit “initial margin” with a futures broker, known as a futures commission merchant or custodian bank, when they enter into the contract. Initial margin deposits are typically equal to a percentage of the contract’s value. Initial margin is similar to a performance bond or good faith deposit on a contract and is returned to the depositing party upon termination of the futures contract if all contractual obligations have been satisfied. After they open a futures contract, the parties to the transaction must compare the purchase price of the contract to its daily market value. If the value of the futures contract changes in such a way that a party’s position declines, that party must make additional “variation margin” payments so that the margin payment is adequate. On the other hand, the value of the contract may change in such a way that there is excess margin on deposit, possibly entitling the party that has a gain to receive all or a portion of this amount. This process is known as “marking to the market.” Variation margin does not represent a borrowing or loan by a party but is instead a settlement between the party and the futures broker of the amount one party would owe the other if the futures contract terminated. In computing daily net asset value, each party marks to market its open futures positions.

 

Although the terms of a futures contract call for the actual delivery of and payment for the underlying security, in many cases the parties may close the contract early by taking an opposite position in an identical contract. If the sale price upon closing out the contract is less than the original purchase price, the party closing out the contract will realize a loss. If the sale price upon closing out the contract is more than the original purchase price, the party closing out the contract will realize a gain. Conversely, if the purchase price upon closing out the contract is more than the original sale price, the party closing out the contract will realize a loss. If the purchase price upon closing out the contract is less than the original sale price, the party closing out the contract will realize a gain.

 

The Fund may incur commission expenses when it opens or closes a futures position.

 

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Options. An option is a contract between two parties for the purchase and sale of a financial instrument for a specified price (known as the “strike price” or “exercise price”) at any time during the option period. Unlike a futures contract, an option grants a right (not an obligation) to buy or sell a financial instrument. Generally, a seller of an option can grant a buyer two kinds of rights: a “call” (the right to buy the security) or a “put” (the right to sell the security). Options have various types of underlying instruments, including specific securities, indices of securities prices, foreign currencies, interest rates and futures contracts. Options may be traded on an exchange (exchange-traded options) or may be customized agreements between the parties (over-the-counter or “OTC” options). Like futures, a financial intermediary, known as a clearing corporation, financially backs exchange-traded options. However, OTC options have no such intermediary and are subject to the risk that the counterparty will not fulfill its obligations under the contract. The principal factors affecting the market value of an option include supply and demand, interest rates, the current market value of the underlying instrument relative to the exercise price of the option, the volatility of the underlying instrument, and the time remaining until the option expires.

 

Purchasing Put and Call Options

 

When the Fund purchases a put option, it buys the right to sell the instrument underlying the option at a fixed strike price. In return for this right, the Fund pays the current market price for the option (known as the “option premium”). The Fund may purchase put options to offset or hedge against a decline in the market value of its securities (“protective puts”) or to benefit from a decline in the price of securities that it does not own. The Fund would ordinarily realize a gain if, during the option period, the value of the underlying securities decreased below the exercise price sufficiently to cover the premium and transaction costs. However, if the price of the underlying instrument does not fall enough to offset the cost of purchasing the option, a put buyer would lose the premium and related transaction costs.

 

Call options are similar to put options, except that the Fund obtains the right to purchase, rather than sell, the underlying instrument at the option’s strike price. The Fund would normally purchase call options in anticipation of an increase in the market value of securities it owns or wants to buy. The Fund would ordinarily realize a gain if, during the option period, the value of the underlying instrument exceeded the exercise price plus the premium paid and related transaction costs. Otherwise, the Fund would realize either no gain or a loss on the purchase of the call option.

 

The purchaser of an option may terminate its position by:

 

Allowing it to expire and losing its entire premium;

 

Exercising the option and either selling (in the case of a put option) or buying (in the case of a call option) the underlying instrument at the strike price; or

 

Closing it out in the secondary market at its current price.

 

Selling (Writing) Put and Call Options

 

When the Fund writes a call option it assumes an obligation to sell specified securities to the holder of the option at a fixed strike price if the option is exercised at any time before the expiration date. Similarly, when the Fund writes a put option it assumes an obligation to purchase specified securities from the option holder at a fixed strike price if the option is exercised at any time before the expiration date. The Fund may terminate its position in an exchange-traded put option before exercise by buying an option identical to the one it has written. Similarly, the Fund may cancel an OTC option by entering into an offsetting transaction with the counterparty to the option.

 

The Fund could try to hedge against an increase in the value of securities it would like to acquire by writing a put option on those securities. If security prices rise, the Fund would expect the put option to expire and the premium it received to offset the increase in the security’s value. If security prices remain the same over time, the Fund would hope to profit by closing out the put option at a lower price. If security prices fall, the Fund may lose an amount of money equal to the difference between the value of the security and the premium it received. Writing covered put options may deprive the Fund of the opportunity to profit from a decrease in the market price of the securities it would like to acquire.

 

S-13

 

The characteristics of writing call options are similar to those of writing put options, except that call writers expect to profit if prices remain the same or fall. The Fund could try to hedge against a decline in the value of securities it already owns by writing a call option. If the price of that security falls as expected, the Fund would expect the option to expire and the premium it received to offset the decline of the security’s value. However, the Fund must be prepared to deliver the underlying instrument in return for the strike price, which may deprive it of the opportunity to profit from an increase in the market price of the securities it holds.

 

The Fund is permitted to write only “covered” options. At the time of selling a call option, the Fund may cover the option by owning, among other things:

 

The underlying security (or securities convertible into the underlying security without additional consideration), index, interest rate, foreign currency or futures contract;

 

A call option on the same security or index with the same or lesser exercise price;

 

A call option on the same security or index with a greater exercise price, provided that the Fund also segregates cash or liquid securities in an amount equal to the difference between the exercise prices;

 

Cash or liquid securities equal to at least the market value of the optioned securities, interest rate, foreign currency or futures contract; or

 

In the case of an index, the portfolio of securities that corresponds to the index.

 

At the time of selling a put option, the Fund may cover the option by, among other things:

 

Entering into a short position in the underlying security;

 

Purchasing a put option on the same security, index, interest rate, foreign currency or futures contract with the same or greater exercise price;

 

Purchasing a put option on the same security, index, interest rate, foreign currency or futures contract with a lesser exercise price and segregating cash or liquid securities in an amount equal to the difference between the exercise prices; or

 

Maintaining the entire exercise price in liquid securities.

 

Options on Securities Indices

 

Options on securities indices are similar to options on securities, except that the exercise of securities index options requires cash settlement payments and does not involve the actual purchase or sale of securities. In addition, securities index options are designed to reflect price fluctuations in a group of securities or segment of the securities market rather than price fluctuations in a single security.

 

Options on Credit Default Swaps

 

An option on a credit default swap (“CDS”) gives the holder the right to enter into a CDS at a specified future date and under specified terms in exchange for a purchase price or premium. The writer of the option bears the risk of any unfavorable move in the value of the CDS relative to the market value on the exercise date, while the purchaser may allow the option to expire unexercised.

 

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Options on Futures

 

An option on a futures contract provides the holder with the right to buy a futures contract (in the case of a call option) or sell a futures contract (in the case of a put option) at a fixed time and price. Upon exercise of the option by the holder, the contract market clearing house establishes a corresponding short position for the writer of the option (in the case of a call option) or a corresponding long position (in the case of a put option). If the option is exercised, the parties will be subject to the futures contracts. In addition, the writer of an option on a futures contract is subject to initial and variation margin requirements on the option position. Options on futures contracts are traded on the same contract market as the underlying futures contract.

 

The buyer or seller of an option on a futures contract may terminate the option early by purchasing or selling an option of the same series (i.e., the same exercise price and expiration date) as the option previously purchased or sold. The difference between the premiums paid and received represents the trader’s profit or loss on the transaction.

 

The Fund may purchase put and call options on futures contracts instead of selling or buying futures contracts. The Fund may buy a put option on a futures contract for the same reasons it would sell a futures contract. It also may purchase such a put option in order to hedge a long position in the underlying futures contract. The Fund may buy a call option on a futures contract for the same purpose as the actual purchase of a futures contract, such as in anticipation of favorable market conditions.

 

The Fund may write a call option on a futures contract to hedge against a decline in the prices of the instrument underlying the futures contracts. If the price of the futures contract at expiration were below the exercise price, the Fund would retain the option premium, which would offset, in part, any decline in the value of its portfolio securities.

 

The writing of a put option on a futures contract is similar to the purchase of the futures contracts, except that, if the market price declines, the Fund would pay more than the market price for the underlying instrument. The premium received on the sale of the put option, less any transaction costs, would reduce the net cost to the Fund.

 

Options on Foreign Currencies

 

A put option on a foreign currency gives the purchaser of the option the right to sell a foreign currency at the exercise price until the option expires. A call option on a foreign currency gives the purchaser of the option the right to purchase the currency at the exercise price until the option expires. The Fund may purchase or write put and call options on foreign currencies for the purpose of hedging against changes in future currency exchange rates.

 

The Fund may use foreign currency options given the same circumstances under which they could use forward foreign currency exchange contracts. For example, a decline in the U.S. dollar value of a foreign currency in which the Fund’s securities are denominated would reduce the U.S. dollar value of the securities, even if their value in the foreign currency remained constant. In order to hedge against such a risk, the Fund may purchase a put option on the foreign currency. If the value of the currency then declined, the Fund could sell the currency for a fixed amount in U.S. dollars and thereby offset, at least partially, the negative effect on its securities that otherwise would have resulted. Conversely, if the Fund anticipates a rise in the U.S. dollar value of a currency in which securities to be acquired are denominated, the Fund may purchase call options on the currency in order to offset, at least partially, the effects of negative movements in exchange rates. If currency exchange rates do not move in the direction or to the extent anticipated, the Fund could sustain losses on transactions in foreign currency options.

 

Combined Positions

 

The Fund may purchase and write options in combination with each other, or in combination with futures or forward contracts or swap agreements, to adjust the risk and return characteristics of the overall position. For example, the Fund could construct a combined position whose risk and return characteristics are similar to selling a futures contract by purchasing a put option and writing a call option on the same underlying instrument. Alternatively, the Fund could write a call option at one strike price and buy a call option at a lower price to reduce the risk of the written call option in the event of a substantial price increase. Because combined options positions involve multiple trades, they result in higher transaction costs and may be more difficult to open and close out.

 

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Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contracts. A forward foreign currency contract involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific amount of currency at a future date or date range at a specific price. In the case of a cancelable forward contract, the holder has the unilateral right to cancel the contract at maturity by paying a specified fee. Forward foreign currency exchange contracts differ from foreign currency futures contracts in certain respects. Unlike futures contracts, forward contracts:

 

Do not have standard maturity dates or amounts (i.e., the parties to the contract may fix the maturity date and the amount);

 

Are typically traded directly between currency traders (usually large commercial banks) and their customers in the inter-bank markets, as opposed to on exchanges regulated by the CFTC (note, however, that under new definitions adopted by the CFTC and SEC, many non-deliverable foreign currency forwards will be considered swaps for certain purposes, including determination of whether such instruments must be traded on exchanges and centrally cleared);

 

Do not require an initial margin deposit; and

 

May be closed by entering into a closing transaction with the currency trader who is a party to the original forward contract, as opposed to with a commodities exchange.

 

Foreign Currency Hedging Strategies

 

A “settlement hedge” or “transaction hedge” is designed to protect the Fund against an adverse change in foreign currency values between the date a security is purchased or sold and the date on which payment is made or received. Entering into a forward contract for the purchase or sale of the amount of foreign currency involved in an underlying security transaction for a fixed amount of U.S. dollars “locks in” the U.S. dollar price of the security. The Fund may also use forward contracts to purchase or sell a foreign currency when it anticipates purchasing or selling securities denominated in foreign currency, even if it has not yet selected the specific investments.

 

The Fund may use forward contracts to hedge against a decline in the value of existing investments denominated in foreign currency. Such a hedge, sometimes referred to as a “position hedge,” would tend to offset both positive and negative currency fluctuations, but would not offset changes in security values caused by other factors. The Fund could also hedge the position by selling another currency expected to perform similarly to the currency in which the Fund’s investment is denominated. This type of hedge, sometimes referred to as a “proxy hedge,” could offer advantages in terms of cost, yield, or efficiency, but generally would not hedge currency exposure as effectively as a direct hedge into U.S. dollars. Proxy hedges may result in losses if the currency used to hedge does not perform similarly to the currency in which the hedged securities are denominated.

 

Transaction and position hedging do not eliminate fluctuations in the underlying prices of the securities that the Fund owns or intends to purchase or sell. They simply establish a rate of exchange that one can achieve at some future point in time. Additionally, these techniques tend to minimize the risk of loss due to a decline in the value of the hedged currency and to limit any potential gain that might result from the increase in value of such currency.

 

The Fund may enter into forward contracts to shift its investment exposure from one currency into another. Such transactions may call for the delivery of one foreign currency in exchange for another foreign currency, including currencies in which its securities are not then denominated. This may include shifting exposure from U.S. dollars to a foreign currency, or from one foreign currency to another foreign currency. This type of strategy, sometimes known as a “cross-hedge,” will tend to reduce or eliminate exposure to the currency that is sold, and increase exposure to the currency that is purchased. Cross-hedges may protect against losses resulting from a decline in the hedged currency but will cause the Fund to assume the risk of fluctuations in the value of the currency it purchases. Cross-hedging transactions also involve the risk of imperfect correlation between changes in the values of the currencies involved.

 

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It is difficult to forecast with precision the market value of portfolio securities at the expiration or maturity of a forward or futures contract. Accordingly, the Fund may have to purchase additional foreign currency on the spot (cash) market if the market value of a security it is hedging is less than the amount of foreign currency it is obligated to deliver. Conversely, the Fund may have to sell on the spot market some of the foreign currency it received upon the sale of a security if the market value of such security exceeds the amount of foreign currency it is obligated to deliver.

 

Equity-Linked Securities. The Fund may invest in privately issued securities whose investment results are designed to correspond generally to the performance of a specified stock index or “basket” of securities, or sometimes a single stock (referred to as “equity-linked securities”). These securities are used for many of the same purposes as derivative instruments and share many of the same risks. Equity-linked securities may be considered illiquid and thus subject to the Fund’s restrictions on investments in illiquid securities.

 

Swap Agreements. A swap agreement is a financial instrument that typically involves the exchange of cash flows between two parties on specified dates (settlement dates), where the cash flows are based on agreed-upon prices, rates, indices, etc. The nominal amount on which the cash flows are calculated is called the notional amount. Swap agreements are individually negotiated and structured to include exposure to a variety of different types of investments or market factors, such as interest rates, foreign currency rates, mortgage securities, corporate borrowing rates, security prices or inflation rates.

 

Swap agreements may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the investments of the Fund and its share price. The performance of swap agreements may be affected by a change in the specific interest rate, currency, or other factors that determine the amounts of payments due to and from the Fund. If a swap agreement calls for payments by the Fund, the Fund must be prepared to make such payments when due. In addition, if the counterparty’s creditworthiness declined, the value of a swap agreement would be likely to decline, potentially resulting in losses.

 

Generally, swap agreements have a fixed maturity date that will be agreed upon by the parties. The agreement can be terminated before the maturity date under certain circumstances, such as default by one of the parties or insolvency, among others, and can be transferred by a party only with the prior written consent of the other party. The Fund may be able to eliminate its exposure under a swap agreement either by assignment or by other disposition, or by entering into an offsetting swap agreement with the same party or a similarly creditworthy party. If the counterparty is unable to meet its obligations under the contract, declares bankruptcy, defaults or becomes insolvent, the Fund may not be able to recover the money it expected to receive under the swap agreement. The Fund will not enter into any swap agreement unless the Adviser believes that the counterparty to the transaction is creditworthy.

 

A swap agreement can be a form of leverage, which can magnify the Fund’s gains or losses. In order to reduce the risk associated with leveraging, the Fund may cover its current obligations under swap agreements according to guidelines established by the SEC. If the Fund enters into a swap agreement on a net basis, it will segregate assets with a daily value at least equal to the excess, if any, of the Fund’s accrued obligations under the swap agreement over the accrued amount the Fund is entitled to receive under the agreement. If the Fund enters into a swap agreement on other than a net basis, it will segregate assets with a value equal to the full amount of the Fund’s accrued obligations under the swap agreement.

 

Equity Swaps

 

In a typical equity swap, one party agrees to pay another party the return on a stock, stock index or basket of stocks in return for a specified interest rate. By entering into an equity index swap, for example, the index receiver can gain exposure to stocks making up the index of securities without actually purchasing those stocks. Equity index swaps involve not only the risk associated with investment in the securities represented in the index, but also the risk that the performance of such securities, including dividends, will not exceed the return on the interest rate that the Fund will be committed to pay.

 

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Total Return Swaps

 

Total return swaps are contracts in which one party agrees to make payments of the total return from a reference instrument—which may be a single asset, a pool of assets or an index of assets—during a specified period, in return for payments equal to a fixed or floating rate of interest or the total return from another underlying reference instrument. The total return includes appreciation or depreciation on the underlying asset, plus any interest or dividend payments. Payments under the swap are based upon an agreed upon principal amount but, since the principal amount is not exchanged, it represents neither an asset nor a liability to either counterparty, and is referred to as notional. Total return swaps are marked to market daily using different sources, including quotations from counterparties, pricing services, brokers or market makers. The unrealized appreciation or depreciation related to the change in the valuation of the notional amount of the swap is combined with the amount due to the Fund at termination or settlement. The primary risks associated with total return swaps are credit risks (if the counterparty fails to meet its obligations) and market risk (if there is no liquid market for the swap or unfavorable changes occur to the underlying reference instrument).

 

Interest Rate Swaps

 

Interest rate swaps are financial instruments that involve the exchange of one type of interest rate for another type of interest rate cash flow on specified dates in the future. Some of the different types of interest rate swaps are “fixed-for-floating rate swaps,” “termed basis swaps” and “index amortizing swaps.” Fixed-for-floating rate swaps involve the exchange of fixed interest rate cash flows for floating rate cash flows. Termed basis swaps entail cash flows to both parties based on floating interest rates, where the interest rate indices are different. Index amortizing swaps are typically fixed-for-floating rate swaps where the notional amount changes if certain conditions are met.

 

As with a traditional investment in a debt security, the Fund could lose money by investing in an interest rate swap if interest rates change adversely. For example, if the Fund enters into a swap where it agrees to exchange a floating rate of interest for a fixed rate of interest, the Fund may have to pay more money than it receives. Similarly, if the Fund enters into a swap where it agrees to exchange a fixed rate of interest for a floating rate of interest, the Fund may receive less money than it has agreed to pay.

 

Currency Swaps

 

A currency swap is an agreement between two parties in which one party agrees to make interest rate payments in one currency and the other promises to make interest rate payments in another currency. The Fund may enter into a currency swap when it has one currency and desires a different currency. Typically, the interest rates that determine the currency swap payments are fixed, although occasionally one or both parties may pay a floating rate of interest. Unlike an interest rate swap, however, the principal amounts are exchanged at the beginning of the agreement and returned at the end of the agreement. Changes in foreign exchange rates and changes in interest rates, as described above, may negatively affect currency swaps.

 

Inflation Swaps

 

Inflation swaps are fixed-maturity, over-the-counter derivatives where one party pays a fixed rate in exchange for payments tied to an inflation index, such as the Consumer Price Index. The fixed rate, which is set by the parties at the initiation of the swap, is often referred to as the “breakeven inflation” rate and generally represents the current difference between treasury yields and Treasury Inflation Protected Securities yields of similar maturities at the initiation of the swap agreement. Inflation swaps are typically designated as “zero coupon,” where all cash flows are exchanged at maturity. The value of an inflation swap is expected to fluctuate in response to changes in the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation. An inflation swap can lose value if the realized rate of inflation over the life of the swap is less than the fixed market implied inflation rate (the breakeven inflation rate) the investor agreed to pay at the initiation of the swap.

 

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Credit Default Swaps

 

A credit default swap is an agreement between a “buyer” and a “seller” for credit protection. The credit default swap agreement may have as reference obligations one or more securities that are not then held by the Fund. The protection buyer is generally obligated to pay the protection seller an upfront payment and/or a periodic stream of payments over the term of the agreement until a credit event on a reference obligation has occurred. If no default occurs, the seller would keep the stream of payments and would have no payment obligations. If a credit event occurs, the seller generally must pay the buyer the full notional amount (the “par value”) of the swap.

 

Caps, Collars and Floors

 

Caps and floors have an effect similar to buying or writing options. In a typical cap or floor agreement, one party agrees to make payments only under specified circumstances, usually in return for payment of a fee by the other party. For example, the buyer of an interest rate cap obtains the right to receive payments to the extent that a specified interest rate exceeds an agreed-upon level. The seller of an interest rate floor is obligated to make payments to the extent that a specified interest rate falls below an agreed-upon level. An interest rate collar combines elements of buying a cap and selling a floor.

 

Risks of Derivatives:

 

While transactions in derivatives may reduce certain risks, these transactions themselves entail certain other risks. For example, unanticipated changes in interest rates, securities prices or currency exchange rates may result in a poorer overall performance of the Fund than if they had not entered into any derivatives transactions. Derivatives may magnify the Fund’s gains or losses, causing them to make or lose substantially more than they invested.

 

When used for hedging purposes, increases in the value of the securities the Fund holds or intends to acquire should offset any losses incurred with a derivative. Purchasing derivatives for purposes other than hedging could expose the Fund to greater risks.

 

Use of derivatives involves transaction costs, which may be significant, and may also increase the amount of taxable income to shareholders.

 

Correlation of Prices. The Fund’s ability to hedge its securities through derivatives depends on the degree to which price movements in the underlying index or instrument correlate with price movements in the relevant securities. In the case of poor correlation, the price of the securities the Fund is hedging may not move in the same amount, or even in the same direction as the hedging instrument. The Adviser will try to minimize this risk by investing in only those contracts whose behavior it expects to correlate with the behavior of the portfolio securities it is trying to hedge. However, if the Adviser’s prediction of interest and currency rates, market value, volatility or other economic factors is incorrect, the Fund may lose money, or may not make as much money as it expected.

 

Derivative prices can diverge from the prices of their underlying instruments, even if the characteristics of the underlying instruments are very similar to the derivative. Listed below are some of the factors that may cause such a divergence:

 

Current and anticipated short-term interest rates, changes in volatility of the underlying instrument, and the time remaining until expiration of the contract;

 

A difference between the derivatives and securities markets, including different levels of demand, how the instruments are traded, the imposition of daily price fluctuation limits or discontinued trading of an instrument; and

 

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Differences between the derivatives, such as different margin requirements, different liquidity of such markets and the participation of speculators in such markets.

 

Derivatives based upon a narrower index of securities, such as those of a particular industry group, may present greater risk than derivatives based on a broad market index. Since narrower indices are made up of a smaller number of securities, they are more susceptible to rapid and extreme price fluctuations because of changes in the value of those securities.

 

While currency futures and options values are expected to correlate with exchange rates, they may not reflect other factors that affect the value of the investments of the Fund. A currency hedge, for example, should protect a yen-denominated security from a decline in the yen, but will not protect the Fund against a price decline resulting from deterioration in the issuer’s creditworthiness. Because the value of the Fund’s foreign-denominated investments changes in response to many factors other than exchange rates, it may not be possible to match the amount of currency options and futures to the value of the Fund’s investments precisely over time.

 

Lack of Liquidity. Before a futures contract or option is exercised or expires, the Fund can terminate it only by entering into a closing purchase or sale transaction. Moreover, the Fund may close out a futures contract only on the exchange the contract was initially traded. Although the Fund intends to purchase options and futures only where there appears to be an active market, there is no guarantee that such a liquid market will exist. If there is no secondary market for the contract, or the market is illiquid, the Fund may not be able to close out its position. In an illiquid market, the Fund may:

 

Have to sell securities to meet its daily margin requirements at a time when it is disadvantageous to do so;

 

Have to purchase or sell the instrument underlying the contract;

 

Not be able to hedge its investments; and/or

 

Not be able to realize profits or limit its losses.

 

Derivatives may become illiquid (i.e., difficult to sell at a desired time and price) under a variety of market conditions. For example:

 

An exchange may suspend or limit trading in a particular derivative instrument, an entire category of derivatives or all derivatives, which sometimes occurs because of increased market volatility;

 

Unusual or unforeseen circumstances may interrupt normal operations of an exchange;

 

The facilities of the exchange may not be adequate to handle current trading volume;

 

Equipment failures, government intervention, insolvency of a brokerage firm or clearing house or other occurrences may disrupt normal trading activity; or

 

Investors may lose interest in a particular derivative or category of derivatives.

 

Management Risk. Successful use of derivatives by the Fund is subject to the ability of the Adviser to forecast stock market and interest rate trends. If the Adviser incorrectly predicts stock market and interest rate trends, the Fund may lose money by investing in derivatives. For example, if the Fund were to write a call option based on the Adviser’s expectation that the price of the underlying security would fall, but the price were to rise instead, the Fund could be required to sell the security upon exercise at a price below the current market price. Similarly, if the Fund were to write a put option based on the Adviser’s expectation that the price of the underlying security would rise, but the price were to fall instead, the Fund could be required to purchase the security upon exercise at a price higher than the current market price.

 

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Pricing Risk. At times, market conditions might make it hard to value some investments. For example, if the Fund has valued its securities too high, shareholders may end up paying too much for Fund shares when they buy into the Fund. If the Fund underestimates its price, shareholders may not receive the full market value for their Fund shares when they sell.

 

Margin. Because of the low margin deposits required upon the opening of a derivative position, such transactions involve an extremely high degree of leverage. Consequently, a relatively small price movement in a derivative may result in an immediate and substantial loss (as well as gain) to the Fund and it may lose more than it originally invested in the derivative.

 

If the price of a futures contract changes adversely, the Fund may have to sell securities at a time when it is disadvantageous to do so to meet its minimum daily margin requirement. The Fund may lose its margin deposits if a broker-dealer with whom it has an open futures contract or related option becomes insolvent or declares bankruptcy.

 

Volatility and Leverage. The Fund’s use of derivatives may have a leveraging effect. Leverage generally magnifies the effect of any increase or decrease in value of an underlying asset and results in increased volatility, which means the Fund will have the potential for greater gains, as well as the potential for greater losses, than if the Fund does not use derivative instruments that have a leveraging effect. The prices of derivatives are volatile (i.e., they may change rapidly, substantially and unpredictably) and are influenced by a variety of factors, including:

 

Actual and anticipated changes in interest rates;

 

Fiscal and monetary policies; and

 

National and international political events.

 

Most exchanges limit the amount by which the price of a derivative can change during a single trading day. Daily trading limits establish the maximum amount that the price of a derivative may vary from the settlement price of that derivative at the end of trading on the previous day. Once the price of a derivative reaches that value, the Fund may not trade that derivative at a price beyond that limit. The daily limit governs only price movements during a given day and does not limit potential gains or losses. Derivative prices have occasionally moved to the daily limit for several consecutive trading days, preventing prompt liquidation of the derivative.

 

Government Regulation. The regulation of derivatives markets in the U.S. is a rapidly changing area of law and is subject to modification by government and judicial action. In particular, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, signed into law in 2010, grants significant new authority to the SEC and the CFTC to impose comprehensive regulations on the over-the-counter and cleared derivatives markets. These regulations include, but are not limited to, mandatory clearing of certain derivatives and requirements relating to disclosure, margin and trade reporting. The new law and regulations may negatively impact the Fund by increasing transaction and/or regulatory compliance costs, limiting the availability of certain derivatives or otherwise adversely affecting the value or performance of the derivatives the Fund trades. In addition, the SEC proposed new derivatives rules in December 2015 that could limit the Fund’s use of derivatives, and adversely impact the Fund’s ability to achieve their investment objectives. Other potentially adverse regulatory obligations can develop suddenly and without notice.

 

Illiquid Securities. Illiquid securities are securities that cannot be sold or disposed of in the ordinary course of business (within seven days) at approximately the prices at which they are valued. Because of their illiquid nature, illiquid securities must be priced at fair value as determined in good faith pursuant to procedures approved by the Board. Despite such good faith efforts to determine fair value prices, the Fund’s illiquid securities are subject to the risk that the security’s fair value price may differ from the actual price which the Fund may ultimately realize upon its sale or disposition. Difficulty in selling illiquid securities may result in a loss or may be costly to the Fund. Under the supervision of the Board, the Adviser determines the liquidity of the Fund’s investments. In determining the liquidity of the Fund’s investments, the Adviser may consider various factors, including: (1) the frequency and volume of trades and quotations; (2) the number of dealers and prospective purchasers in the marketplace; (3) dealer undertakings to make a market; and (4) the nature of the security and the market in which it trades (including any demand, put or tender features, the mechanics and other requirements for transfer, any letters of credit or other credit enhancement features, any ratings, the number of holders, the method of soliciting offers, the time required to dispose of the security, and the ability to assign or offset the rights and obligations of the security). The Fund will not hold more than 15% of its net assets in illiquid securities.

 

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Restricted Securities. Restricted securities are securities that may not be sold freely to the public absent registration under the U.S. Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “1933 Act”) or an exemption from registration. As consistent with the Fund’s investment objective, the Fund may invest in Section 4(a)(2) commercial paper. Section 4(a)(2) commercial paper is issued in reliance on an exemption from registration under Section 4(a)(2) of the 1933 Act and is generally sold to institutional investors who purchase for investment. Any resale of such commercial paper must be in an exempt transaction, usually to an institutional investor through the issuer or investment dealers who make a market in such commercial paper. The Trust believes that Section 4(a)(2) commercial paper is liquid to the extent it meets the criteria established by the Board. The Trust intends to treat such commercial paper as liquid and not subject to the investment limitations applicable to illiquid securities or restricted securities.

 

Short Sales. As is consistent with the Fund’s investment objective, the Fund may engage in short sales that are either “uncovered” or “against the box.” A short sale is “against the box” if at all times during which the short position is open, a Fund owns at least an equal amount of the securities or securities convertible into, or exchangeable without further consideration for, securities of the same issue as the securities that are sold short. A short sale against the box is a taxable transaction to a Fund with respect to the securities that are sold short.

 

Special Risks of Cyber Attacks. As with any entity that conducts business through electronic means in the modern marketplace, the Fund, and its service providers, may be susceptible to operational and information security risks resulting from cyber attacks. Cyber attacks include, among other behaviors, stealing or corrupting data maintained online or digitally, denial of service attacks on websites, the unauthorized monitoring, release, misuse, loss, destruction or corruption of confidential information, unauthorized access to relevant systems, compromises to networks or devices that the Fund and its service providers use to service the Fund’s operations, ransomware, operational disruption or failures in the physical infrastructure or operating systems that support the Fund and its service providers, or various other forms of cyber security breaches. Cyber attacks affecting the Fund or the Adviser, the Fund’s distributor, custodian, or any other of the Fund’s intermediaries or service providers may adversely impact the Fund and its shareholders, potentially resulting in, among other things, financial losses or the inability of Fund shareholders to transact business. For instance, cyber attacks may interfere with the processing of shareholder transactions, impact the Fund’s ability to calculate its net asset value, cause the release of private shareholder information or confidential business information, impede trading, subject the Fund to regulatory fines or financial losses and/or cause reputational damage. The Fund may also incur additional costs for cyber security risk management purposes designed to mitigate or prevent the risk of cyber attacks. Such costs may be ongoing because threats of cyber attacks are constantly evolving as cyber attackers become more sophisticated and their techniques become more complex. Similar types of cyber security risks are also present for issuers of securities in which the Fund may invest, which could result in material adverse consequences for such issuers and may cause the Fund’s investments in such companies to lose value. There can be no assurance that the Fund, the Fund’s service providers, or the issuers of the securities in which the Fund invests will not suffer losses relating to cyber attacks or other information security breaches in the future.

 

INVESTMENT LIMITATIONS

 

Fundamental Policies

 

In addition to the investment objective of the Fund, the following are fundamental policies of the Fund. Fundamental policies cannot be changed without the consent of the holders of a majority of the Fund’s outstanding shares. The phrase “majority of the outstanding shares” means the vote of (i) 67% or more of the Fund’s shares present at a meeting, if more than 50% of the outstanding shares of the Fund are present or represented by proxy, or (ii) more than 50% of the Fund’s outstanding shares, whichever is less.

 

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1.The Fund may purchase securities of an issuer, except if such purchase would cause the Fund to fail to satisfy the diversification requirement for a diversified management company under the 1940 Act, the rules or regulations thereunder or any exemption therefrom, as such statute, rules or regulations may be amended or interpreted from time to time.

 

2.The Fund may not concentrate investments in a particular industry or group of industries, as concentration is defined under the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder or any exemption therefrom, as such statute, rules or regulations may be amended or interpreted from time to time, except that the Fund may invest without limitation in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities and repurchase agreements involving such securities or tax-exempt obligations of state or municipal governments and their political subdivisions.

 

3.The Fund may borrow money or issue senior securities (as defined under the 1940 Act), except as prohibited under the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder or any exemption therefrom, as such statute, rules or regulations may be amended or interpreted from time to time.

 

4.The Fund may make loans, except as prohibited under the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder or any exemption therefrom, as such statute, rules or regulations may be amended or interpreted from time to time.

 

5.The Fund may purchase or sell commodities or real estate, except as prohibited under the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder or any exemption therefrom, as such statute, rules or regulations may be amended or interpreted from time to time.

 

6.The Fund may underwrite securities issued by other persons, except as prohibited under the 1940 Act, the rules and regulations thereunder or any exemption therefrom, as such statute, rules or regulations may be amended or interpreted from time to time.

 

Non-Fundamental Policies

 

The following investment limitations of the Fund are non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board without shareholder approval:

 

1.The Fund may not purchase an investment if, as a result, more than 15% of the value of the Fund’s net assets would be invested in illiquid securities.

 

2.The Fund may not invest in unmarketable interests in real estate limited partnerships or invest directly in real estate. For the avoidance of doubt, the foregoing policy does not prevent the Fund from, among other things, purchasing marketable securities of companies that deal in real estate or interests therein (including REITs).

 

3.The Fund may purchase or sell financial and physical commodities, commodity contracts based on (or relating to) physical commodities or financial commodities and securities and derivative instruments whose values are derived from (in whole or in part) physical commodities or financial commodities.

 

Except with respect to Fund policies concerning borrowing, if a percentage restriction is adhered to at the time of an investment, a later increase or decrease in percentage resulting from changes in values or assets will not constitute a violation of such restriction. With respect to the limitation on illiquid securities, in the event that a subsequent change in net assets or other circumstances causes the Fund to exceed its limitation, the Fund will take steps to bring the aggregate amount of illiquid instruments back within the limitations as soon as reasonably practicable. With respect to the limitation on borrowing, in the event that a subsequent change in net assets or other circumstances causes the Fund to exceed its limitation, the Fund will take steps to bring the aggregate amount of borrowing back within the limitations within three days thereafter (not including Sundays and holidays).

 

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The following descriptions of certain provisions of the 1940 Act may assist investors in understanding the above policies and restrictions:

 

Diversification. Under the 1940 Act, a diversified investment management company, as to 75% of its total assets, may not purchase securities of any issuer (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agents or instrumentalities or securities of other investment companies) if, as a result, more than 5% of its total assets would be invested in the securities of such issuer, or more than 10% of the issuer’s outstanding voting securities would be held by the fund.

 

Concentration. The SEC has defined concentration as investing 25% or more of an investment company’s total assets in an industry or group of industries, with certain exceptions.

 

Borrowing. The 1940 Act presently allows a fund to borrow from any bank in an amount up to 33 1/3% of its total assets (including the amount borrowed) and to borrow for temporary purposes in an amount not exceeding 5% of the value of its total assets.

 

Senior Securities. Senior securities may include any obligation or instrument issued by a fund evidencing indebtedness. The 1940 Act generally prohibits funds from issuing senior securities, although it does not treat certain transactions as senior securities, such as certain borrowings, short sales, reverse repurchase agreements, firm commitment agreements and standby commitments, with appropriate earmarking or segregation of assets to cover such obligation.

 

Lending. Under the 1940 Act, a fund may only make loans if expressly permitted by its investment policies.

 

Underwriting. Under the 1940 Act, underwriting securities involves a fund purchasing securities directly from an issuer for the purpose of selling (distributing) them or participating in any such activity either directly or indirectly. Under the 1940 Act, a diversified fund may not make any commitment as underwriter, if immediately thereafter the amount of its outstanding underwriting commitments, plus the value of its investments in securities of issuers (other than investment companies) of which it owns more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities, exceeds 25% of the value of its total assets.

 

Commodities and Real Estate. The 1940 Act does not directly restrict an investment company’s ability to invest in commodities or real estate, but does require that every investment company have a fundamental investment policy governing such investments.

 

THE ADVISER

 

General. LSV Asset Management is a professional investment management firm registered with the SEC under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended. The Adviser was established in 1994 as a Delaware general partnership to provide active, quantitative value equity management through the application of proprietary models. LSV’s general partners include officers and employees of LSV, who collectively own a majority of LSV, and SEI Funds, Inc. SEI Investments Company is the parent of SEI Funds, Inc. As of April 30, 2018, the Adviser had approximately $121 billion in assets under management. LSV’s principal business address is 155 North Wacker Drive, Suite 4600, Chicago, IL 60606.

 

Advisory Agreement with the Trust. The Trust and the Adviser have entered into an investment advisory agreement dated March 15, 1999 (the “Advisory Agreement”) with respect to the Fund. Under the Advisory Agreement, the Adviser serves as the investment adviser and makes investment decisions for the Fund and continuously reviews, supervises and administers the investment program of the Fund, subject to the supervision of, and policies established by, the Trustees.

 

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After the initial two year term, the continuance of the Advisory Agreement must be specifically approved at least annually: (i) by the vote of the Trustees or by a vote of the majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund; and (ii) by the vote of a majority of the Trustees who are not parties to the Advisory Agreement or “interested persons” of any party thereto, cast in person at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on such approval. The Advisory Agreement will terminate automatically in the event of its assignment, and is terminable at any time without penalty by the Trustees or, with respect to the Fund, by a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Fund, on not less than 30 days’ nor more than 60 days’ written notice to the Adviser, or by the Adviser on 90 days’ written notice to the Trust. As used in the Advisory Agreement, the terms “majority of the outstanding voting securities,” “interested persons” and “assignment” have the same meaning as such terms in the 1940 Act.

 

Advisory Fees Paid to the Adviser. For its services under the Advisory Agreement, the Adviser is entitled to a fee, which is calculated daily and paid monthly, at an annual rate of 1.00% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. The Adviser has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse certain expenses of the Fund in order to keep net operating expenses (excluding interest, taxes, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) from exceeding certain levels as set forth below until February 28, 2020. The fee waivers may be renewed by the Adviser on an annual basis. This agreement may be terminated: (i) by the Board, for any reason at any time; or (ii) by the Adviser, upon ninety (90) days’ prior written notice to the Trust, effective as of the close of business on February 28, 2020.

 

Fund Class Expense Limit
LSV Emerging Markets Equity Fund Investor Class 1.45%
Institutional Class 1.20%

 

Investment Management Personnel of the Adviser. Messrs. Lakonishok, Vermeulen, Mansharamani, Sleight and Lakonishok have developed proprietary computer models based on their research of investor behavior and the performance of contrarian investment strategies. The portfolio decision making process is quantitative and driven by (i) a proprietary computer model which ranks securities based on fundamental measures of value, indicators of recent improved performance and volatility, and (ii) a risk control process that controls for residual benchmark risk. Refinements to the model are made as suggested by advances in the Adviser’s research and these refinements are generally incremental in nature. The Adviser may modify the investment model used to manage the Fund at any time without notice.

 

PORTFOLIO MANAGERS

 

This section includes information about the Fund’s portfolio managers, including information about other accounts they manage, the dollar range of Fund shares they own and how they are compensated.

 

Compensation. The Adviser compensates the portfolio managers for their management of the Fund. The portfolio managers’ compensation consists of a salary and discretionary bonus. Each of the portfolio managers is a Partner of the Adviser and thereby receives a portion of the overall profit of the firm as part of his ownership interests. The bonus is based upon the profitability of the firm and individual performance. Individual performance is subjective and may be based on a number of factors, such as the individual’s leadership and contribution to the strategic planning and development of the investment group.

 

Fund Shares Owned by the Portfolio Managers. The Fund is required to show the dollar amount range of each portfolio manager’s “beneficial ownership” of shares of the Fund as of the end of the most recently completed fiscal year. Dollar amount ranges disclosed are established by the SEC. “Beneficial ownership” is determined in accordance with Rule 16a-1(a)(2) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “1934 Act”). Because the Fund is new, as of the date of this SAI the portfolio managers did not beneficially own shares of the Fund.

 

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Other Accounts. In addition to the Fund, the portfolio managers may also be responsible for the day-to-day management of certain other accounts, as indicated by the following table. The information below is provided as of April 30, 2018.

 

Name

Registered

Investment Companies

Other Pooled

Investment Vehicles

Other Accounts
Number of Accounts

Total Assets

(in Billions)

Number of Accounts

Total Assets

(in Billions)

Number of Accounts

Total Assets

(in Billions)

Josef Lakonishok 38 $21.766 75* $30.081 453** $68.971
Menno Vermeulen 38 $21.766 75* $30.081 453** $68.971
Puneet Mansharamani 38 $21.766 75* $30.081 453** $68.971
Greg Sleight 38 $21.766 75* $30.081 453** $68.971
Guy Lakonishok 38 $21.766 75* $30.081 453** $68.971

 

*Includes 32 accounts with aggregated assets under management of $1.33 billion that are subject to performance-based advisory fees.
**Includes 44 accounts with aggregated assets under management of $10.06 billion that are subject to performance-based advisory fees.

 

Conflicts of Interest. The same team of portfolio managers is responsible for the day-to-day management of all of LSV’s accounts. LSV uses a proprietary quantitative investment model to manage all of LSV’s accounts. LSV relies extensively on its quantitative investment model regarding the advisability of investing in a particular company. Any investment decisions are generally made based on whether a buy or sell signal is received from the proprietary quantitative investment model. Accounts or funds with performance-based fees and accounts or funds in which employees may be invested could create an incentive to favor those accounts or funds over other accounts or funds in the allocation of investment opportunities. In addition, it is possible that a short position may be taken on a security that is held long in another portfolio. LSV has procedures designed to ensure that all clients are treated fairly and to prevent these potential conflicts from influencing the allocation of investment opportunities among clients. On a quarterly basis, the Forensic Testing Committee, consisting of the Chief Compliance Officer, Compliance Officer, Chief Operating Officer and Compliance Analyst, reviews, among other things, allocations of investment opportunities among clients and allocations of partially-filled block trades to confirm consistency with LSV’s policies and procedures.

 

THE ADMINISTRATOR

 

General. SEI Investments Global Funds Services (the “Administrator”), a Delaware statutory trust, has its principal business offices at One Freedom Valley Drive, Oaks, Pennsylvania 19456. SEI Investments Management Corporation (“SIMC”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of SEI Investments Company (“SEI Investments”), is the owner of all beneficial interest in the Administrator. SEI Investments and its subsidiaries and affiliates, including the Administrator, are leading providers of fund evaluation services, trust accounting systems, and brokerage and information services to financial institutions, institutional investors, and money managers. The Administrator and its affiliates also serve as administrator or sub-administrator to other mutual funds.

 

Administration Agreement with the Trust. The Trust and the Administrator have entered into an administration agreement, dated November 14, 1991, as amended and restated November 12, 2002 (the “Administration Agreement”). Under the Administration Agreement, the Administrator provides the Trust with administrative services, including regulatory reporting and all necessary office space, equipment, personnel and facilities.

 

S-26

 

The Administration Agreement provides that the Administrator shall not be liable for any error of judgment or mistake of law or for any loss suffered by the Trust in connection with the matters to which the Administration Agreement relates, except a loss resulting from willful misfeasance, bad faith or gross negligence on the part of the Administrator in the performance of its duties or from reckless disregard by it of its duties and obligations thereunder.

 

Administration Fees Paid to the Administrator. For its services under the Administration Agreement, the Administrator is paid a fee, which varies based on the average daily net assets of the Fund, subject to certain minimums.

 

THE DISTRIBUTOR

 

The Trust and SEI Investments Distribution Co. (the “Distributor”), a wholly-owned subsidiary of SEI Investments and an affiliate of the Administrator, are parties to a distribution agreement dated November 14, 1991, as amended and restated November 14, 2005 and as amended August 30, 2010 (the “Distribution Agreement”) whereby the Distributor acts as principal underwriter for the Trust’s shares.

 

The continuance of the Distribution Agreement must be specifically approved at least annually (i) by the vote of the Trustees or by a vote of the majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Trust and (ii) by the vote of a majority of the Trustees who are not “interested persons” of the Trust and have no direct or indirect financial interest in the operations of the Distribution Agreement or any related agreement, cast in person at a meeting called for the purpose of voting on such approval. The Distribution Agreement will terminate automatically in the event of its assignment (as such term is defined in the 1940 Act), and is terminable at any time without penalty by the Board or by a majority of the outstanding voting securities of the Trust, or by the Distributor, upon not less than 60 days’ written notice to the other party.

 

PAYMENTS TO FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

 

Distribution Plan. The Trust has adopted a Distribution Plan with respect to the Investor Class Shares (the “Plan”) in accordance with the provisions of Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act, which regulates circumstances under which an investment company may directly or indirectly bear expenses relating to the distribution of its shares. Continuance of the Plan must be approved annually by a majority of the Trustees and by a majority of the Trustees who are not interested persons (as defined in the 1940 Act) of the Trust and have no direct or indirect financial interest in the Plan or in any agreements related to the Plan (“Qualified Trustees”). The Plan requires that quarterly written reports of amounts spent under the Plan and the purposes of such expenditures be furnished to and reviewed by the Trustees. The Plan may not be amended to increase materially the amount that may be spent thereunder without approval by a majority of the outstanding shares of the Fund. All material amendments of the Plan will require approval by a majority of the Trustees and of the Qualified Trustees.

 

The Plan provides a method of paying for distribution and shareholder services, which may help the Fund grow or maintain asset levels to provide operational efficiencies and economies of scale, provided by the Distributor or other financial intermediaries that enter into agreements with the Distributor. The Fund may make payments to financial intermediaries, such as banks, savings and loan associations, insurance companies, investment counselors, broker-dealers, mutual fund “supermarkets” and the Distributor’s affiliates and subsidiaries, as compensation for services, reimbursement of expenses incurred in connection with distribution assistance or provision of shareholder services. The Distributor may, at its discretion, retain a portion of such payments to compensate itself for distribution services and distribution related expenses such as the costs of preparation, printing, mailing or otherwise disseminating sales literature, advertising, and prospectuses (other than those furnished to current shareholders of the Fund), promotional and incentive programs, and such other marketing expenses that the Distributor may incur.

 

S-27

 

Under the Plan, the Distributor or financial intermediaries may receive up to 0.25% of the average daily net assets of the Investor Class Shares as compensation for distribution and shareholder services. The Plan is characterized as a compensation plan since the distribution fee will be paid to the Distributor without regard to the distribution or shareholder service expenses incurred by the Distributor or the amount of payments made to financial intermediaries. The Trust intends to operate the Plan in accordance with its terms and with Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) rules concerning sales charges.

 

Payments by the Adviser. The Adviser and/or its affiliates, in their discretion, may make payments from their own resources and not from Fund assets to affiliated or unaffiliated brokers, dealers, banks (including bank trust departments), trust companies, registered investment advisers, financial planners, retirement plan administrators, insurance companies, and any other institution having a service, administration, or any similar arrangement with the Fund, their service providers or their respective affiliates, as incentives to help market and promote the Fund and/or in recognition of their distribution, marketing, administrative services, and/or processing support.

 

These additional payments may be made to financial intermediaries that sell Fund shares or provide services to the Fund, the Distributor or shareholders of the Fund through the financial intermediary’s retail distribution channel and/or fund supermarkets. Payments may also be made through the financial intermediary’s retirement, qualified tuition, fee-based advisory, wrap fee bank trust, or insurance (e.g., individual or group annuity) programs. These payments may include, but are not limited to, placing the Fund in a financial intermediary’s retail distribution channel or on a preferred or recommended fund list; providing business or shareholder financial planning assistance; educating financial intermediary personnel about the Fund; providing access to sales and management representatives of the financial intermediary; promoting sales of Fund shares; providing marketing and educational support; maintaining share balances and/or for sub-accounting, administrative or shareholder transaction processing services. A financial intermediary may perform the services itself or may arrange with a third party to perform the services.

 

The Adviser and/or its affiliates may also make payments from their own resources to financial intermediaries for costs associated with the purchase of products or services used in connection with sales and marketing, participation in and/or presentation at conferences or seminars, sales or training programs, client and investor entertainment and other sponsored events. The costs and expenses associated with these efforts may include travel, lodging, sponsorship at educational seminars and conferences, entertainment and meals to the extent permitted by law.

 

Revenue sharing payments may be negotiated based on a variety of factors, including the level of sales, the amount of Fund assets attributable to investments in the Fund by financial intermediaries’ customers, a flat fee or other measures as determined from time to time by the Adviser and/or its affiliates. A significant purpose of these payments is to increase the sales of Fund shares, which in turn may benefit the Adviser through increased fees as Fund assets grow.

 

Investors should understand that some financial intermediaries may also charge their clients fees in connection with purchases of shares or the provision of shareholder services.

 

THE TRANSFER AGENT

 

DST Systems, Inc., 333 W. 11th Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64105 (the “Transfer Agent”), serves as the Fund’s transfer agent and dividend disbursing agent under a transfer agency agreement with the Trust.

 

THE CUSTODIAN

 

U.S. Bank National Association, 800 Nicollett Mall, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55402-4302 (the “Custodian”), acts as the custodian of the Fund. The Custodian holds cash, securities and other assets of the Fund as required by the 1940 Act.

 

S-28

 

INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

[XX] [address], serves as independent registered public accounting firm for the Fund.

 

LEGAL COUNSEL

 

Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, 1701 Market Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19103-2921, serves as legal counsel to the Trust.

 

SECURITIES LENDING

 

Because the Fund is new, as of the date of this SAI, the Fund has not engaged in securities lending activities.

 

TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS OF THE TRUST

 

Board Responsibilities. The management and affairs of the Trust and its series, including the Fund described in this SAI, are overseen by the Trustees. The Board has approved contracts, as described above, under which certain companies provide essential management services to the Trust.

 

Like most mutual funds, the day-to-day business of the Trust, including the management of risk, is performed by third party service providers, such as the Adviser, the Distributor and the Administrator. The Trustees are responsible for overseeing the Trust’s service providers and, thus, have oversight responsibility with respect to risk management performed by those service providers. Risk management seeks to identify and address risks, i.e., events or circumstances that could have material adverse effects on the business, operations, shareholder services, investment performance or reputation of the funds. The funds and their service providers employ a variety of processes, procedures and controls to identify various possible events or circumstances, to lessen the probability of their occurrence and/or to mitigate the effects of such events or circumstances if they do occur. Each service provider is responsible for one or more discrete aspects of the Trust’s business (e.g., the Adviser is responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund’s portfolio investments) and, consequently, for managing the risks associated with that business. The Board has emphasized to the funds’ service providers the importance of maintaining vigorous risk management.

 

The Trustees’ role in risk oversight begins before the inception of a fund, at which time certain of the fund’s service providers present the Board with information concerning the investment objective, strategies and risks of the fund as well as proposed investment limitations for the fund. Additionally, the fund’s adviser provides the Board with an overview of, among other things, its investment philosophy, brokerage practices and compliance infrastructure. Thereafter, the Board continues its oversight function as various personnel, including the Trust’s Chief Compliance Officer, as well as personnel of the adviser and other service providers, such as the fund’s independent accountants, make periodic reports to the Audit Committee or to the Board with respect to various aspects of risk management. The Board and the Audit Committee oversee efforts by management and service providers to manage risks to which the funds may be exposed.

 

The Board is responsible for overseeing the nature, extent and quality of the services provided to the funds by the adviser and receives information about those services at its regular meetings. In addition, on an annual basis, in connection with its consideration of whether to renew the advisory agreement with the adviser, the Board meets with the adviser to review such services. Among other things, the Board regularly considers the adviser’s adherence to the funds’ investment restrictions and compliance with various fund policies and procedures and with applicable securities regulations. The Board also reviews information about the funds’ investments, including, for example, reports on the adviser’s use of derivatives in managing the funds, if any, as well as reports on the funds’ investments in other investment companies, if any.

 

The Trust’s Chief Compliance Officer reports regularly to the Board to review and discuss compliance issues and fund and adviser risk assessments. At least annually, the Trust’s Chief Compliance Officer provides the Board with a report reviewing the adequacy and effectiveness of the Trust’s policies and procedures and those of its service providers, including the adviser. The report addresses the operation of the policies and procedures of the Trust and each service provider since the date of the last report; any material changes to the policies and procedures since the date of the last report; any recommendations for material changes to the policies and procedures; and any material compliance matters since the date of the last report.

 

S-29

 

The Board receives reports from the funds’ service providers regarding operational risks and risks related to the valuation and liquidity of portfolio securities. The Trust’s Fair Value Pricing Committee makes regular reports to the Board concerning investments for which market quotations are not readily available. Annually, the independent registered public accounting firm reviews with the Audit Committee its audit of the funds’ financial statements, focusing on major areas of risk encountered by the funds and noting any significant deficiencies or material weaknesses in the funds’ internal controls. Additionally, in connection with its oversight function, the Board oversees fund management’s implementation of disclosure controls and procedures, which are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Trust in its periodic reports with the SEC are recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the required time periods. The Board also oversees the Trust’s internal controls over financial reporting, which comprise policies and procedures designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of the Trust’s financial reporting and the preparation of the Trust’s financial statements.

 

From their review of these reports and discussions with the adviser, the Chief Compliance Officer, the independent registered public accounting firm and other service providers, the Board and the Audit Committee learn in detail about the material risks of the funds, thereby facilitating a dialogue about how management and service providers identify and mitigate those risks.

 

The Board recognizes that not all risks that may affect the funds can be identified and/or quantified, that it may not be practical or cost-effective to eliminate or mitigate certain risks, that it may be necessary to bear certain risks (such as investment-related risks) to achieve the funds’ goals, and that the processes, procedures and controls employed to address certain risks may be limited in their effectiveness. Moreover, reports received by the Trustees as to risk management matters are typically summaries of the relevant information. Most of the funds’ investment management and business affairs are carried out by or through the funds’ adviser and other service providers, each of which has an independent interest in risk management but whose policies and the methods by which one or more risk management functions are carried out may differ from the funds’ and each other’s in the setting of priorities, the resources available or the effectiveness of relevant controls. As a result of the foregoing and other factors, the Board’s ability to monitor and manage risk, as a practical matter, is subject to limitations.

 

Members of the Board. There are eight members of the Board, six of whom are not interested persons of the Trust, as that term is defined in the 1940 Act (“independent Trustees”). Robert Nesher, an interested person of the Trust, serves as Chairman of the Board. Joseph T. Grause, Jr., an independent Trustee, serves as the lead independent Trustee. The Trust has determined its leadership structure is appropriate given the specific characteristics and circumstances of the Trust. The Trust made this determination in consideration of, among other things, the fact that the independent Trustees constitute a super majority (75%) of the Board, the fact that the chairperson of each Committee of the Board is an independent Trustee, the amount of assets under management in the Trust, and the number of funds (and classes of shares) overseen by the Board. The Board also believes that its leadership structure facilitates the orderly and efficient flow of information to the independent Trustees from fund management.

 

The Board has two standing committees: the Audit Committee and the Governance Committee. The Audit Committee and the Governance Committee are chaired by an independent Trustee and composed of all of the independent Trustees. In addition, the Board has a lead independent Trustee.

 

In his role as lead independent Trustee, Mr. Grause, among other things: (i) presides over Board meetings in the absence of the Chairman of the Board; (ii) presides over executive sessions of the independent Trustees; (iii) along with the Chairman of the Board, oversees the development of agendas for Board meetings; (iv) facilitates communication between the independent Trustees and management, and among the independent Trustees; (v) serves as a key point person for dealings between the independent Trustees and management; and (vi) has such other responsibilities as the Board or independent Trustees determine from time to time.

 

S-30

 

Set forth below are the names, years of birth, position with the Trust and length of time served, and the principal occupations and other directorships held during at least the last five years of each of the persons currently serving as a Trustee. There is no stated term of office for the Trustees. Nevertheless, an independent Trustee must retire from the Board as of the end of the calendar year in which such independent Trustee first attains the age of seventy-five years; provided, however, that, an independent Trustee may continue to serve for one or more additional one calendar year terms after attaining the age of seventy-five years (each calendar year a “Waiver Term”) if, and only if, prior to the beginning of such Waiver Term: (1) the Governance Committee (a) meets to review the performance of the independent Trustee; (b) finds that the continued service of such independent Trustee is in the best interests of the Trust; and (c) unanimously approves excepting the independent Trustee from the general retirement policy set out above; and (2) a majority of the Trustees approves excepting the independent Trustee from the general retirement policy set out above. Unless otherwise noted, the business address of each Trustee is SEI Investments Company, One Freedom Valley Drive, Oaks, Pennsylvania 19456.

 

Name and

Year of Birth

Position with

Trust and Length

of Time Served

Principal Occupations

in the Past 5 Years

Other

Directorships

Held in the

Past 5 Years

Interested Trustees

Robert Nesher

(Born: 1946)

 

Chairman of the Board of Trustees1

(since 1991)

SEI employee 1974 to present; currently performs various services on behalf of SEI Investments for which Mr. Nesher is compensated. Vice Chairman of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund III, Gallery Trust, Schroder Series Trust and Schroder Global Series Trust. President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee of SEI Daily Income Trust, SEI Tax Exempt Trust, SEI Institutional Managed Trust, SEI Institutional International Trust, SEI Institutional Investments Trust, SEI Asset Allocation Trust, Adviser Managed Trust, New Covenant Funds, SEI Insurance Products Trust and SEI Catholic Values Trust. President and Director of SEI Structured Credit Fund, LP. President, Chief Executive Officer and Director of SEI Alpha Strategy Portfolios, LP, 2007 to 2013. President and Director of SEI Opportunity Fund, L.P. to 2010. Vice Chairman of O’Connor EQUUS (closed-end investment company) to 2016. President, Chief Executive Officer and Trustee of SEI Liquid Asset Trust to 2016. Vice Chairman of Winton Series Trust to 2017. Vice Chairman of Winton Diversified Opportunities Fund (closed-end investment company) to 2018.

Current Directorships: Trustee of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds, The KP Funds, SEI Daily Income Trust, SEI Institutional International Trust, SEI Institutional Investments Trust, SEI Institutional Managed Trust, SEI Asset Allocation Trust, SEI Tax Exempt Trust, Adviser Managed Trust, New Covenant Funds, SEI Insurance Products Trust and SEI Catholic Values Trust. Director of SEI Structured Credit Fund, LP, SEI Global Master Fund plc, SEI Global Assets Fund plc, SEI Global Investments Fund plc, SEI Investments—Global Funds Services, Limited, SEI Investments Global, Limited, SEI Investments (Europe) Ltd., SEI Investments—Unit Trust Management (UK) Limited, SEI Multi-Strategy Funds PLC and SEI Global Nominee Ltd.

 

Former Directorships: Director of SEI Opportunity Fund, L.P. to 2010. Director of SEI Alpha Strategy Portfolios, LP to 2013. Trustee of SEI Liquid Asset Trust to 2016.

 

S-31

 

Name and

Year of Birth

Position with

Trust and Length

of Time Served

Principal Occupations

in the Past 5 Years

Other

Directorships

Held in the

Past 5 Years

N. Jeffrey Klauder

(Born: 1952)

 

Trustee1

(since 2018)

Executive Vice President and General Counsel of SEI Investments since 2004. Current Directorships: Trustee of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds and The KP Funds. Director of SEI Private Trust Company; SEI Investments Management Corporation; SEI Trust Company; SEI Investments (South Africa), Limited; SEI Investments (Canada) Company; SEI Global Fund Services Ltd.; SEI Investments Global Limited; SEI Global Master Fund; SEI Global Investments Fund; and SEI Global Assets Fund.
Independent Trustees

Joseph T. Grause, Jr.

(Born: 1952)

Trustee

(since 2011)

Lead Independent Trustee

(since 2018)

Self-Employed Consultant since 2012. Director of Endowments and Foundations, Morningstar Investment Management, Morningstar, Inc., 2010 to 2011. Director of International Consulting and Chief Executive Officer of Morningstar Associates Europe Limited, Morningstar, Inc., 2007 to 2010. Country Manager – Morningstar UK Limited, Morningstar, Inc., 2005 to 2007. Current Directorships: Trustee of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds and The KP Funds. Director of The Korea Fund, Inc.

 

S-32

 

Name and

Year of Birth

Position with

Trust and Length

of Time Served

Principal Occupations

in the Past 5 Years

Other

Directorships

Held in the

Past 5 Years

Mitchell A. Johnson

(Born: 1942)

 

Trustee

(since 2005)

Retired. Private Investor since 1994.

Current Directorships: Trustee of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds, The KP Funds, SEI Asset Allocation Trust, SEI Daily Income Trust, SEI Institutional International Trust, SEI Institutional Managed Trust, SEI Institutional Investments Trust, SEI Tax Exempt Trust, Adviser Managed Trust, New Covenant Funds, SEI Insurance Products Trust and SEI Catholic Values Trust. Director of Federal Agricultural Mortgage Corporation (Farmer Mac) since 1997.

 

Former Directorships: Director of SEI Alpha Strategy Portfolios, LP to 2013. Trustee of SEI Liquid Asset Trust to 2016.

Betty L. Krikorian

(Born: 1943)

Trustee

(since 2005)

Vice President, Compliance, AARP Financial Inc., from 2008 to 2010. Self-Employed Legal and Financial Services Consultant since 2003. Counsel (in-house) for State Street Bank from 1995 to 2003.

Current Directorships: Trustee of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds and The KP Funds.

 

Bruce Speca

(Born: 1956)

Trustee

(since 2011)

Global Head of Asset Allocation, Manulife Asset Management (subsidiary of Manulife Financial), 2010 to 2011. Executive Vice President – Investment Management Services, John Hancock Financial Services (subsidiary of Manulife Financial), 2003 to 2010. Current Directorships: Trustee of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds and The KP Funds. Director of Stone Harbor Investments Funds, Stone Harbor Emerging Markets Income Fund (closed-end fund) and Stone Harbor Emerging Markets Total Income Fund (closed-end fund).

George J. Sullivan, Jr.

(Born: 1942)

 

 

Trustee

(since 1999)

 

Retired since 2012. Self-Employed Consultant, Newfound Consultants Inc., 1997 to 2011.

Current Directorships: Trustee/Director of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds, The KP Funds, SEI Structured Credit Fund, LP, SEI Daily Income Trust, SEI Institutional International Trust, SEI Institutional Investments Trust, SEI Institutional Managed Trust, SEI Asset Allocation Trust, SEI Tax Exempt Trust, Adviser Managed Trust, New Covenant Funds, SEI Insurance Products Trust and SEI Catholic Values Trust.

 

Former Directorships: Director of SEI Opportunity Fund, L.P. to 2010. Director of SEI Alpha Strategy Portfolios, LP to 2013. Trustee of SEI Liquid Asset Trust to 2016. Trustee/ Director of State Street Navigator Securities Lending Trust to 2017. Member of the independent review committee for SEI’s Canadian-registered mutual funds to 2017.

 

S-33

 

Name and

Year of Birth

Position with

Trust and Length

of Time Served

Principal Occupations

in the Past 5 Years

Other

Directorships

Held in the

Past 5 Years

Tracie E. Ahern

(Born: 1968)

 

Trustee

(since 2018)

Principal, Danesmead Partners since 2016; Chief Operating Officer/Chief Financial Officer, Brightwood Capital Advisors LLC, 2015 to 2016; Advisor, Brightwood Capital Advisors LLC, 2016; Chief Financial Officer, Soros Fund Management LLC, 2007 to 2015.

Current Directorships: Trustee of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds and The KP Funds.

 

 

1Denotes Trustees who may be deemed to be “interested” persons of the Fund as that term is defined in the 1940 Act by virtue of their affiliation with the Distributor and/or its affiliates.

 

Individual Trustee Qualifications

 

The Trust has concluded that each of the Trustees should serve on the Board because of their ability to review and understand information about the Fund provided to them by management, to identify and request other information they may deem relevant to the performance of their duties, to question management and other service providers regarding material factors bearing on the management and administration of the Fund, and to exercise their business judgment in a manner that serves the best interests of the Fund’s shareholders. The Trust has concluded that each of the Trustees should serve as a Trustee based on their own experience, qualifications, attributes and skills as described below.

 

The Trust has concluded that Mr. Nesher should serve as Trustee because of the experience he has gained in his various roles with SEI Investments Company, which he joined in 1974, his knowledge of and experience in the financial services industry, and the experience he has gained serving as a trustee of the Trust since 1991.

 

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The Trust has concluded that Mr. Klauder should serve as Trustee because of the experience he has gained in his various roles with SEI Investments, which he joined in 2004, his knowledge of and experience in the financial services industry, and the experience he gained serving as a partner of a large law firm.

 

The Trust has concluded that Mr. Grause should serve as Trustee because of the knowledge and experience he gained in a variety of leadership roles with different financial institutions, his knowledge of the mutual fund and investment management industries, his past experience as an interested trustee and chair of the investment committee for a multi-managed investment company, and the experience he has gained serving as a trustee of the Trust since 2011.

 

The Trust has concluded that Mr. Johnson should serve as Trustee because of the experience he gained as a senior vice president, corporate finance, of a Fortune 500 company, his experience in and knowledge of the financial services and banking industries, the experience he gained serving as a director of other mutual funds, and the experience he has gained serving as a trustee of the Trust since 2005.

 

The Trust has concluded that Ms. Krikorian should serve as Trustee because of the experience she gained serving as a legal and financial services consultant, in-house counsel to a large custodian bank and Vice President of Compliance of an investment adviser, her background in fiduciary and banking law, her experience in and knowledge of the financial services industry, and the experience she has gained serving as a trustee of the Trust since 2005.

 

The Trust has concluded that Mr. Speca should serve as Trustee because of the knowledge and experience he gained serving as president of a mutual fund company and portfolio manager for a $95 billion complex of asset allocation funds, his over 25 years of experience working in a management capacity with mutual fund boards, and the experience he has gained serving as a trustee of the Trust since 2011.

 

The Trust has concluded that Mr. Sullivan should serve as Trustee because of the experience he gained as a certified public accountant and financial consultant, his experience in and knowledge of public company accounting and auditing and the financial services industry, the experience he gained as an officer of a large financial services firm in its operations department, and his experience from serving as a trustee of the Trust since 1999.

 

The Trust has concluded that Ms. Ahern should serve as Trustee because of the experience she gained in numerous finance, accounting, tax, compliance and administration roles in the investment management industry, and her experience serving as a director of multiple hedge funds, private equity funds and non-profit organizations.

 

In its periodic assessment of the effectiveness of the Board, the Board considers the complementary individual skills and experience of the individual Trustees primarily in the broader context of the Board’s overall composition so that the Board, as a body, possesses the appropriate (and appropriately diverse) skills and experience to oversee the business of the funds.

 

Board Committees. The Board has established the following standing committees:

 

Audit Committee. The Board has a standing Audit Committee that is composed of each of the independent Trustees. The Audit Committee operates under a written charter approved by the Board. The principal responsibilities of the Audit Committee include: (i) recommending which firm to engage as each fund’s independent registered public accounting firm and whether to terminate this relationship; (ii) reviewing the independent registered public accounting firm’s compensation, the proposed scope and terms of its engagement, and the firm’s independence; (iii) pre-approving audit and non-audit services provided by each fund’s independent registered public accounting firm to the Trust and certain other affiliated entities; (iv) serving as a channel of communication between the independent registered public accounting firm and the Trustees; (v) reviewing the results of each external audit, including any qualifications in the independent registered public accounting firm’s opinion, any related management letter, management’s responses to recommendations made by the independent registered public accounting firm in connection with the audit, reports submitted to the Committee by the internal auditing department of the Administrator that are material to the Trust as a whole, if any, and management’s responses to any such reports; (vi) reviewing each fund’s audited financial statements and considering any significant disputes between the Trust’s management and the independent registered public accounting firm that arose in connection with the preparation of those financial statements; (vii) considering, in consultation with the independent registered public accounting firm and the Trust’s senior internal accounting executive, if any, the independent registered public accounting firms’ reports on the adequacy of the Trust’s internal financial controls; (viii) reviewing, in consultation with each fund’s independent registered public accounting firm, major changes regarding auditing and accounting principles and practices to be followed when preparing each fund’s financial statements; and (ix) other audit related matters. Messrs. Grause, Johnson, Speca and Sullivan and Mses. Krikorian and Ahern currently serve as members of the Audit Committee. Mr. Sullivan serves as the Chairman of the Audit Committee. The Audit Committee meets periodically, as necessary, and met four (4) times during the most recently completed fiscal year.

 

S-35

 

Governance Committee. The Board has a standing Governance Committee (formerly the Nominating Committee) that is composed of each of the independent Trustees. The Governance Committee operates under a written charter approved by the Board. The principal responsibilities of the Governance Committee include: (i) considering and reviewing Board governance and compensation issues; (ii) conducting a self-assessment of the Board’s operations; (iii) selecting and nominating all persons to serve as independent Trustees; and (iv) reviewing shareholder recommendations for nominations to fill vacancies on the Board if such recommendations are submitted in writing and addressed to the Committee at the Trust’s office. Mses. Krikorian and Ahern and Messrs. Grause, Johnson, Speca and Sullivan currently serve as members of the Governance Committee. Ms. Krikorian serves as the Chairman of the Governance Committee. The Governance Committee meets periodically, as necessary, and met five (5) times during the most recently completed fiscal year.

 

Fair Value Pricing Committee. The Board has also established a standing Fair Value Pricing Committee that is composed of various representatives of the Trust’s service providers, as appointed by the Board. The Fair Value Pricing Committee operates under procedures approved by the Board. The principal responsibility of the Fair Value Pricing Committee is to determine the fair value of securities for which current market quotations are not readily available. The Fair Value Pricing Committee’s determinations are reviewed by the Board.

 

Fund Shares Owned by Board Members. The following table shows the dollar amount range of each Trustee’s “beneficial ownership” of shares of the Fund as of the end of the most recently completed calendar year. Dollar amount ranges disclosed are established by the SEC. “Beneficial ownership” is determined in accordance with Rule 16a-1(a)(2) under the 1934 Act. The Trustees and officers of the Trust own less than 1% of the outstanding shares of the Trust.

 


Name

Dollar Range of

Fund Shares (Fund)1

Aggregate Dollar Range of Shares

(All Funds in the Family
of Investment Companies)1

Interested Trustees
Nesher None None
Klauder None None
Independent Trustees
Grause None None
Johnson None None
Krikorian None None
Speca None None
Sullivan None None
Ahern None None

 

1Valuation date is December 31, 2017.

 

Board Compensation. The Trust paid the following fees to the Trustees during the fiscal year ended October 31, 2017.

 

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Name Aggregate Compensation
from the Trust
Pension or
Retirement
Benefits Accrued
as Part of Fund Expenses
Estimated
Annual Benefits
Upon Retirement
Total Compensation from the
Trust and Fund Complex1
Interested Trustees
Nesher $0 N/A N/A $0 for service on one (1) board
Klauder $0 N/A N/A $0 for service on one (1) board
Independent Trustees
Grause $111,968 N/A N/A $111,968 for service on one (1) board
Johnson $111,968 N/A N/A $111,968 for service on one (1) board
Krikorian $120,541 N/A N/A $120,541 for service on one (1) board
Speca $111,968 N/A N/A $111,968 for service on one (1) board
Sullivan $126,189 N/A N/A $126,189 for service on one (1) board
Ahern2 $0 N/A N/A $0 for service on one (1) board

 

1All funds in the Fund Complex are series of the Trust.
2Joined the Board on March 26, 2018.

 

Trust Officers. Set forth below are the names, years of birth, position with the Trust and length of time served, and the principal occupations for the last five years of each of the persons currently serving as executive officers of the Trust. There is no stated term of office for the officers of the Trust. Unless otherwise noted, the business address of each officer is SEI Investments Company, One Freedom Valley Drive, Oaks, Pennsylvania 19456. The Chief Compliance Officer is the only officer who receives compensation from the Trust for his services.

 

Certain officers of the Trust also serve as officers of one or more mutual funds for which SEI Investments Company or its affiliates act as investment manager, administrator or distributor.

 

Name and Year of Birth Position with Trust and
Length of Time Served
Principal Occupations
in Past 5 Years

Michael Beattie

(Born: 1965)

President

(since 2011)

Director of Client Service, SEI Investments, since 2004.

James Bernstein

(Born: 1962)

Vice President and Assistant Secretary

(since 2017)

Attorney, SEI Investments, since 2017.

 

Prior Positions: Self-employed consultant, 2017. Associate General Counsel & Vice President, Nationwide Funds Group and Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company, from 2002 to 2016. Assistant General Counsel & Vice President, Market Street Funds and Provident Mutual Insurance Company, from 1999 to 2002.

John Bourgeois

(Born: 1973)

Assistant Treasurer

(since 2017)

Fund Accounting Manager, SEI Investments, since 2000.

 

S-37

 

Name and Year of Birth Position with Trust and
Length of Time Served
Principal Occupations
in Past 5 Years

Stephen Connors

(Born: 1984)

Treasurer, Controller and Chief Financial Officer

(since 2015)

Director, SEI Investments, Fund Accounting, since 2014. Audit Manager, Deloitte & Touche LLP, from 2011 to 2014.

Dianne M. Descoteaux

(Born: 1977)

Vice President and Secretary

(since 2011)

Counsel at SEI Investments since 2010. Associate at Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, from 2006 to 2010.

Russell Emery

(Born: 1962)

Chief Compliance Officer

(since 2006)

Chief Compliance Officer of SEI Structured Credit Fund, LP since 2007. Chief Compliance Officer of SEI Alpha Strategy Portfolios, LP from 2007 to 2013. Chief Compliance Officer of The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund II, Bishop Street Funds, The KP Funds, The Advisors’ Inner Circle Fund III, Gallery Trust, Schroder Series Trust, Schroder Global Series Trust, SEI Institutional Managed Trust, SEI Asset Allocation Trust, SEI Institutional International Trust, SEI Institutional Investments Trust, SEI Daily Income Trust, SEI Tax Exempt Trust, Adviser Managed Trust, New Covenant Funds, SEI Insurance Products Trust and SEI Catholic Values Trust. Chief Compliance Officer of SEI Opportunity Fund, L.P. to 2010. Chief Compliance Officer of O’Connor EQUUS (closed-end investment company) to 2016. Chief Compliance Officer of SEI Liquid Asset Trust to 2016. Chief Compliance Officer of Winton Series Trust to 2017. Chief Compliance Officer of Winton Diversified Opportunities Fund (closed-end investment company) to 2018.
Robert Morrow
(Born: 1968)

Vice President

(since 2017)

Account Manager, SEI Investments, since 2007.

Bridget E. Sudall

(Born: 1980)

Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Officer and Privacy Officer (since 2015) Senior Associate and AML Officer, Morgan Stanley Alternative Investment Partners, from 2011 to 2015. Investor Services Team Lead, Morgan Stanley Alternative Investment Partners, from 2007 to 2011.

Lisa Whittaker

(Born: 1978)

Vice President and Assistant Secretary

(since 2013)

Attorney, SEI Investments, since 2012. Associate Counsel and Compliance Officer, The Glenmede Trust Company, N.A., from 2011 to 2012. Associate, Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP, from 2006 to 2011.

 

PURCHASING AND REDEEMING SHARES

 

Purchases and redemptions may be made through the Transfer Agent on any day the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) is open for business. Shares of the Fund are offered and redeemed on a continuous basis. Currently, the Trust is closed for business when the following holidays are observed: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

 

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It is currently the Trust’s policy to pay all redemptions in cash. The Trust retains the right, however, to alter this policy to provide for redemptions in whole or in part by a distribution in-kind of securities held by the Fund in lieu of cash. Shareholders may incur brokerage charges on the sale of any such securities so received in payment of redemptions. A shareholder will at all times be entitled to aggregate cash redemptions from all funds of the Trust up to the lesser of $250,000 or 1% of the Trust’s net assets during any 90-day period.

 

The Trust reserves the right to suspend the right of redemption and/or to postpone the date of payment upon redemption during times when the NYSE is closed, other than during customary weekends or holidays, for any period on which trading on the NYSE is restricted (as determined by the SEC by rule or regulation), or during the existence of an emergency (as determined by the SEC by rule or regulation) as a result of which disposal or valuation of the Fund’s securities is not reasonably practicable, or for such other periods as the SEC has by order permitted. The Trust also reserves the right to suspend sales of shares of the Fund for any period during which the NYSE, the Adviser, the Administrator, the Transfer Agent and/or the Custodian are not open for business.

 

DETERMINATION OF NET ASSET VALUE

 

General Policy. The Fund adheres to Section 2(a)(41), and Rule 2a-4 thereunder, of the 1940 Act with respect to the valuation of portfolio securities. In general, securities for which market quotations are readily available are valued at current market value, and all other securities are valued at fair value in accordance with procedures adopted by the Board. In complying with the 1940 Act, the Trust relies on guidance provided by the SEC and by the SEC staff in various interpretive letters and other guidance.

 

Equity Securities. Securities listed on a securities exchange, market or automated quotation system for which quotations are readily available (except for securities traded on NASDAQ), including securities traded over-the-counter, are valued at the last quoted sale price on an exchange or market (foreign or domestic) on which they are traded on the valuation date (or at approximately 4:00 p.m. Eastern Time if such exchange is normally open at that time), or, if there is no such reported sale on the valuation date, at the most recent quoted bid price. For securities traded on NASDAQ, the NASDAQ Official Closing Price will be used. If such prices are not available or determined to not represent the fair value of the security as of the Fund’s pricing time, the security will be valued at fair value as determined in good faith using methods approved by the Board.

 

Money Market Securities and other Debt Securities. If available, money market securities and other debt securities are priced based upon valuations provided by recognized independent, third-party pricing agents. Such values generally reflect the last reported sales price if the security is actively traded. The third-party pricing agents may also value debt securities by employing methodologies that utilize actual market transactions, broker-supplied valuations, or other methodologies designed to identify the market value for such securities. Such methodologies generally consider such factors as security prices, yields, maturities, call features, ratings and developments relating to specific securities in arriving at valuations. Money market securities and other debt securities with remaining maturities of sixty days or less may be valued at their amortized cost, which approximates market value. If such prices are not available or determined to not represent the fair value of the security as of the Fund’s pricing time, the security will be valued at fair value as determined in good faith using methods approved by the Board.

 

Foreign Securities. The prices for foreign securities are reported in local currency and converted to U.S. dollars using currency exchange rates. Exchange rates are provided daily by recognized independent pricing agents.

 

Derivatives and Other Complex Securities. Exchange traded options on securities and indices purchased by the Fund generally are valued at their last trade price or, if there is no last trade price, the last bid price. Exchange traded options on securities and indices written by the Fund generally are valued at their last trade price or, if there is no last trade price, the last asked price. In the case of options traded in the over-the-counter market, if the OTC option is also an exchange traded option, the Fund will follow the rules regarding the valuation of exchange traded options. If the OTC option is not also an exchange traded option, the Fund will value the option at fair value in accordance with procedures adopted by the Board.

 

S-39

 

Futures and swaps cleared through a central clearing house (“centrally cleared swaps”) are valued at the settlement price established each day by the board of the exchange on which they are traded. The daily settlement prices for financial futures are provided by an independent source. On days when there is excessive volume or market volatility, or the future or centrally cleared swap does not end trading by the time the Fund calculates net asset value, the settlement price may not be available at the time at which the Fund calculates its net asset value. On such days, the best available price (which is typically the last sales price) may be used to value the Fund’s futures or centrally cleared swaps position.

 

Foreign currency forward contracts are valued at the current day’s interpolated foreign exchange rate, as calculated using the current day’s spot rate, and the thirty, sixty, ninety and one-hundred eighty day forward rates provided by an independent source.

 

If available, non-centrally cleared swaps, collateralized debt obligations, collateralized loan obligations and bank loans are priced based on valuations provided by an independent third party pricing agent. If a price is not available from an independent third party pricing agent, the security will be valued at fair value as determined in good faith using methods approved by the Board.

 

Use of Third-Party Independent Pricing Agents and Independent Brokers. Pursuant to contracts with the Administrator, prices for most securities held by the Fund are provided daily by third-party independent pricing agents that are approved by the Board. The valuations provided by third-party independent pricing agents are reviewed daily by the Administrator.

 

If a security price cannot be obtained from an independent, third-party pricing agent, the Administrator shall seek to obtain a bid price from at least one independent broker.

 

Fair Value Procedures. Securities for which market prices are not “readily available” or which cannot be valued using the methodologies described above are valued in accordance with Fair Value Procedures established by the Board and implemented through the Fair Value Pricing Committee. The members of the Fair Value Pricing Committee report, as necessary, to the Board regarding portfolio valuation determinations. The Board, from time to time, will review these methods of valuation and will recommend changes which may be necessary to assure that the investments of the Fund are valued at fair value.

 

Some of the more common reasons that may necessitate a security being valued using Fair Value Procedures include: the security’s trading has been halted or suspended; the security has been de-listed from a national exchange; the security’s primary trading market is temporarily closed at a time when under normal conditions it would be open; the security has not been traded for an extended period of time; the security’s primary pricing source is not able or willing to provide a price; trading of the security is subject to local government-imposed restrictions; or a significant event with respect to a security has occurred after the close of the market or exchange on which the security principally trades and before the time the Fund calculates net asset value. When a security is valued in accordance with the Fair Value Procedures, the Fair Value Pricing Committee will determine the value after taking into consideration relevant information reasonably available to the Fair Value Pricing Committee.

 

TAXES

 

The following is only a summary of certain additional U.S. federal income tax considerations generally affecting the Fund and its shareholders that is intended to supplement the discussion contained in the Prospectus. No attempt is made to present a detailed explanation of the tax treatment of the Fund or its shareholders, and the discussion here and in the Prospectus is not intended as a substitute for careful tax planning. Shareholders are urged to consult their tax advisors with specific reference to their own tax situations, including their state, local, and foreign tax liabilities.

 

S-40

 

The following general discussion of certain federal income tax consequences is based on the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), and the regulations issued thereunder as in effect on the date of this SAI. New legislation, as well as administrative changes or court decisions, may significantly change the conclusions expressed herein, and may have a retroactive effect with respect to the transactions contemplated herein.

 

The recently enacted tax legislation commonly referred to as the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Tax Act”) makes significant changes to the U.S. federal income tax rules for taxation of individuals and corporations, generally effective for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017. Many of the changes applicable to individuals are temporary and would apply only to taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 and before January 1, 2026. There are only minor changes with respect to the specific rules only applicable to a regulated investment company (“RIC”), such as the Fund. The Tax Act, however, makes numerous other changes to the tax rules that may affect shareholders and the Fund. You are urged to consult with your own tax advisor regarding how the Tax Act affects your investment in the Fund.

 

Qualification as a Regulated Investment Company. The Fund intends to qualify and elect to be treated as a RIC. By following such a policy, the Fund expects to eliminate or reduce to a nominal amount the federal taxes to which they may be subject. A fund that qualifies as a RIC will generally not be subject to federal income taxes on the net investment income and net realized capital gains that the fund timely distributes to its shareholders. The Board reserves the right not to maintain the qualification of the Fund as a RIC if it determines such course of action to be beneficial to shareholders.

 

In order to qualify as a RIC under the Code, the Fund must distribute annually to its shareholders at least 90% of its net investment income (which includes dividends, taxable interest, and the excess of net short-term capital gains over net long-term capital losses, less operating expenses) and at least 90% of its net tax exempt interest income, for each tax year, if any (the “Distribution Requirement”) and also must meet certain additional requirements. Among these requirements are the following: (i) at least 90% of the Fund’s gross income each taxable year must be derived from dividends, interest, payments with respect to certain securities loans, and gains from the sale or other disposition of stock, securities, or foreign currencies, or other income (including but not limited to gains from options, futures or forward contracts) derived with respect to its business of investing in such stock, securities, or currencies, and net income derived from an interest in a qualified publicly traded partnership (the “Qualifying Income Test”); and (ii) at the close of each quarter of the Fund’s taxable year: (A) at least 50% of the value of the Fund’s total assets must be represented by cash and cash items, U.S. government securities, securities of other RICs and other securities, with such other securities limited, in respect to any one issuer, to an amount not greater than 5% of the value of the Fund’s total assets and that does not represent more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of such issuer including the equity securities of a qualified publicly traded partnership, and (B) not more than 25% of the value of the Fund’s total assets is invested, including through corporations in which the Fund owns a 20% or more voting stock interest, in the securities (other than U.S. government securities or the securities of other RICs) of any one issuer or the securities (other than the securities of another RIC) of two or more issuers that the Fund controls and which are engaged in the same or similar trades or businesses or related trades or businesses, or the securities of one or more qualified publicly traded partnerships (the “Asset Test”).

 

Although the Fund intends to distribute substantially all of their net investment income and may distribute their capital gains for any taxable year, the Fund will be subject to federal income taxation to the extent any such income or gains are not distributed. The Fund is treated as a separate corporation for federal income tax purposes. The Fund therefore is considered to be a separate entity in determining its treatment under the rules for RICs described herein. Losses in the Fund do not offset gains in another and the requirements (other than certain organizational requirements) for qualifying RIC status are determined at the Fund level rather than at the Trust level.

 

If the Fund fails to satisfy the Qualifying Income or Asset Tests in any taxable year, the Fund may be eligible for relief provisions if the failures are due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect and if a penalty tax is paid with respect to each failure to satisfy the applicable requirements. Additionally, relief is provided for certain de minimis failures of the diversification requirements where the Fund corrects the failure within a specified period. If the Fund fails to maintain qualification as a RIC for a tax year, and the relief provisions are not available, the Fund will be subject to federal income tax at regular corporate rates (which the Tax Act reduced to 21%) without any deduction for distributions to shareholders. In such case, its shareholders would be taxed as if they received ordinary dividends, although corporate shareholders could be eligible for the dividends received deduction (subject to certain limitations) and individuals may be able to benefit from the lower tax rates available to qualified dividend income. In addition, the Fund could be required to recognize unrealized gains, pay substantial taxes and interest, and make substantial distributions before requalifying as a RIC. The Board reserves the right not to maintain the qualification of the Fund as a RIC if it determines such course of action to be beneficial to shareholders.

 

S-41

 

The Fund may elect to treat part or all of any “qualified late year loss” as if it had been incurred in the succeeding taxable year in determining the Fund’s taxable income, net capital gain, net short-term capital gain, and earnings and profits. The effect of this election is to treat any such “qualified late year loss” as if it had been incurred in the succeeding taxable year in characterizing Fund distributions for any calendar year. A “qualified late year loss” generally includes net capital loss, net long-term capital loss, or net short-term capital loss incurred after October 31 of the current taxable year (commonly referred to as “post-October losses”) and certain other late-year losses.

 

The treatment of capital loss carryovers for the Fund is similar to the rules that apply to capital loss carryovers of individuals, which provide that such losses are carried over indefinitely. If the Fund has a “net capital loss” (that is, capital losses in excess of capital gains), for a taxable year beginning after December 22, 2010 (a “Post-2010 Loss”), the excess of the Fund’s net short-term capital losses over its net long-term capital gains is treated as a short-term capital loss arising on the first day of the Fund’s next taxable year, and the excess (if any) of the Fund’s net long-term capital losses over its net short-term capital gains is treated as a long-term capital loss arising on the first day of the Fund’s next taxable year. The Fund’s unused capital loss carryforwards that arose in taxable years that began on or before December 22, 2010 (“Pre-2011 Losses”) are available to be applied against future capital gains, if any, realized by the Fund prior to the expiration of those carryforwards, generally eight years after the year in which they arose. The Fund’s Post-2010 Losses must be fully utilized before the Fund will be permitted to utilize carryforwards of Pre-2011 Losses. In addition, the carryover of capital losses may be limited under the general loss limitation rules if the Fund experiences an ownership change as defined in the Code.

 

Federal Excise Tax. Notwithstanding the Distribution Requirement described above, which generally requires the Fund to distribute at least 90% of its annual investment company taxable income and the excess of its exempt interest income (but does not require any minimum distribution of net capital gain), the Fund will be subject to a nondeductible 4% federal excise tax to the extent it fails to distribute by the end of the calendar year at least 98% of its ordinary income and 98.2% of its capital gain net income (the excess of short- and long-term capital gains over short- and long-term capital losses) for the one-year period ending on October 31 of such year (including any retained amount from the prior calendar year on which the Fund paid no federal income tax). The Fund intends to make sufficient distributions to avoid liability for federal excise tax, but can make no assurances that such tax will be completely eliminated. The Fund may in certain circumstances be required to liquidate Fund investments in order to make sufficient distributions to avoid federal excise tax liability at a time when the Adviser might not otherwise have chosen to do so, and liquidation of investments in such circumstances may affect the ability of the Fund to satisfy the requirement for qualification as a RIC.

 

Distributions to Shareholders. The Fund receives income generally in the form of dividends and interest on investments. This income, plus net short-term capital gains, if any, less expenses incurred in the operation of the Fund, constitutes the Fund’s net investment income from which dividends may be paid to you. Any distributions by the Fund from such income will be taxable to you as ordinary income or at the lower capital gains rates that apply to individuals receiving qualified dividend income, whether you take them in cash or in additional shares.

 

Distributions by the Fund are currently eligible for the reduced maximum tax rate to individuals of 20% (lower rates apply to individuals in lower tax brackets) to the extent that the Fund receives qualified dividend income on the securities it holds and the Fund reports the distributions as qualified dividend income. Qualified dividend income is, in general, dividend income from taxable domestic corporations and certain foreign corporations (e.g., foreign corporations incorporated in a possession of the United States or in certain countries with a comprehensive tax treaty with the United States, or the stock of which is readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States). A dividend will not be treated as qualified dividend income to the extent that: (i) the shareholder has not held the shares on which the dividend was paid for more than 60 days during the 121-day period that begins on the date that is 60 days before the date on which the shares become “ex-dividend” (which is the day on which declared distributions (dividends or capital gains) are deducted from the Fund’s assets before it calculates the net asset value) with respect to such dividend, (ii) the Fund has not satisfied similar holding period requirements with respect to the securities it holds that paid the dividends distributed to the shareholder, (iii) the shareholder is under an obligation (whether pursuant to a short sale or otherwise) to make related payments with respect to substantially similar or related property, or (iv) the shareholder elects to treat such dividend as investment income under section 163(d)(4)(B) of the Code. Therefore, if you lend your shares in the Fund, such as pursuant to a securities lending arrangement, you may lose the ability to treat dividends (paid while the shares are held by the borrower) as qualified dividend income. Capital gain distributions consisting of the Fund’s net capital gains will be taxable as long-term capital gains for individual shareholders currently set at a maximum rate of 20% regardless of how long you have held your shares in the Fund.

 

S-42

 

In the case of corporate shareholders, Fund distributions (other than capital gain distributions) generally qualify for the dividends-received deduction to the extent such distributions are so reported and do not exceed the gross amount of qualifying dividends received by the Fund for the year. Generally, and subject to certain limitations (including certain holding period limitations), a dividend will be treated as a qualifying dividend if it has been received from a domestic corporation.

 

To the extent that the Fund makes a distribution of income received by the Fund in lieu of dividends (a “substitute payment”) with respect to securities on loan pursuant to a securities lending transaction, such income will not constitute qualified dividend income to individual shareholders and will not be eligible for the dividends received deduction for corporate shareholders.

 

If the Fund’s distributions exceed its taxable income and capital gains realized during a taxable year, all or a portion of the distributions made in the same taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. A return of capital distribution will generally not be taxable, but will reduce each shareholder’s cost basis in the Fund and result in a higher reported capital gain or lower reported capital loss when those shares on which the distribution was received are sold.

 

A dividend or distribution received shortly after the purchase of shares reduces the net asset value of the shares by the amount of the dividend or distribution and, although in effect a return of capital, will be taxable to the shareholder. If the net asset value of shares were reduced below the shareholder’s cost by dividends or distributions representing gains realized on sales of securities, such dividends or distributions would be a return of investment though taxable to the shareholder in the same manner as other dividends or distributions.

 

The Fund (or its administrative agents) will inform you of the amount of your ordinary income dividends, qualified dividend income and capital gain distributions, if any, and will advise you of their tax status for federal income tax purposes shortly after the close of each calendar year. If you have not held Fund shares for a full year, the Fund may report and distribute to you, as ordinary income, qualified dividend income or capital gain, a percentage of income that is not equal to the actual amount of such income earned during the period of your investment in the Fund.

 

Dividends declared to shareholders of record in October, November or December and actually paid in January of the following year will be treated as having been received by shareholders on December 31 of the calendar year in which declared. Under this rule, therefore, a shareholder may be taxed in one year on dividends or distributions actually received in January of the following year.

 

Sales, Exchanges or Redemptions. Any gain or loss recognized on a sale, exchange, or redemption of shares of the Fund by a shareholder who is not a dealer in securities will generally, for individual shareholders, be treated as a long-term capital gain or loss if the shares have been held for more than twelve months and otherwise will be treated as a short-term capital gain or loss. However, if shares on which a shareholder has received a net capital gain distribution are subsequently sold, exchanged, or redeemed and such shares have been held for six months or less, any loss recognized will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of the net capital gain distribution. In addition, the loss realized on a sale or other disposition of shares will be disallowed to the extent a shareholder repurchases (or enters into a contract to or option to repurchase) shares within a period of 61 days (beginning 30 days before and ending 30 days after the disposition of the shares). This loss disallowance rule will apply to shares received through the reinvestment of dividends during the 61-day period. For tax purposes, an exchange of your Fund shares for shares of a different fund is the same as a sale.

 

S-43

 

The Fund (or its administrative agents) must report to the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) and furnish to Fund shareholders cost basis information for Fund shares. In addition to reporting the gross proceeds from the sale of Fund shares, the Fund is also required to report the cost basis information for such shares and indicate whether these shares had a short-term or long-term holding period. For each sale of Fund shares, the Fund will permit shareholders to elect from among several IRS-accepted cost basis methods, including the average basis method. In the absence of an election, the Fund will use the average basis method as the default cost basis method. The cost basis method elected by the Fund shareholder (or the cost basis method applied by default) for each sale of Fund shares may not be changed after the settlement date of each such sale of Fund shares. Fund shareholders should consult their tax advisors to determine the best IRS-accepted cost basis method for their tax situation and to obtain more information about how cost basis reporting applies to them. Shareholders also should carefully review any cost basis information provided to them and make any additional basis, holding period or other adjustments that are required when reporting these amounts on their federal income tax returns.

 

U.S. individuals with income exceeding $200,000 ($250,000 if married and filing jointly) are subject to a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax on their “net investment income,” including interest, dividends, and capital gains (including capital gains realized on the sale or exchange of shares of the Fund).

 

Tax Treatment of Complex Securities. The Fund may invest in complex securities. These investments may be subject to numerous special and complex tax rules. These rules could affect the Fund’s ability to qualify as a RIC, affect whether gains and losses recognized by the Fund are treated as ordinary income or capital gain, accelerate the recognition of income to the Fund and/or defer the Fund’s ability to recognize losses, and, in limited cases, subject the Fund to U.S. federal income tax on income from certain of their foreign securities. In turn, these rules may affect the amount, timing or character of the income distributed to you by the Fund.

 

The Fund’s transactions in foreign currencies and forward foreign currency contracts will generally be subject to special provisions of the Code that, among other things, may affect the character of gains and losses realized by the Fund (i.e., may affect whether gains or losses are ordinary or capital), accelerate recognition of income to the Fund and defer losses. These rules could therefore affect the character, amount and timing of distributions to shareholders. These provisions also may require the Fund to mark-to-market certain types of positions in its portfolio (i.e., treat them as if they were closed out) which may cause the Fund to recognize income without receiving cash with which to make distributions in amounts necessary to satisfy the Distribution Requirements and for avoiding the excise tax described above. The Fund intends to monitor its transactions, intends to make the appropriate tax elections, and intends to make the appropriate entries in its books and records when it acquire any foreign currency or forward foreign currency contract in order to mitigate the effect of these rules so as to prevent disqualification of the Fund as a RIC and minimize the imposition of income and excise taxes.

 

If the Fund owns shares in certain foreign investment entities, referred to as “passive foreign investment companies” or “PFICs”, the Fund will generally be subject to one of the following special tax regimes: (i) the Fund may be liable for U.S. federal income tax, and an additional interest charge, on a portion of any “excess distribution” from such foreign entity or any gain from the disposition of such shares, even if the entire distribution or gain is paid out by the Fund as a dividend to its shareholders; (ii) if the Fund were able and elected to treat a PFIC as a “qualified electing fund” or “QEF”, the Fund would be required each year to include in income, and distribute to shareholders in accordance with the distribution requirements set forth above, the Fund’s pro rata share of the ordinary earnings and net capital gains of the PFIC, whether or not such earnings or gains are distributed to the Fund; or (iii) the Fund may be entitled to mark-to-market annually shares of the PFIC, and in such event would be required to distribute to shareholders any such mark-to-market gains in accordance with the distribution requirements set forth above. The Fund intends to make the appropriate tax elections, if possible, and take any additional steps that are necessary to mitigate the effect of these rules.

 

S-44

 

Foreign Taxes. Dividends and interest received by the Fund may be subject to income, withholding or other taxes imposed by foreign countries and U.S. possessions that would reduce the yield on the Fund’s stock or securities. Tax conventions between certain countries and the U.S. may reduce or eliminate these taxes. Foreign countries generally do not impose taxes on capital gains with respect to investments by foreign investors.

 

If more than 50% of the value of the Fund’s total assets at the close of its taxable year consists of stocks or securities of foreign corporations, the Fund will be eligible to and intends to file an election with the IRS that may enable shareholders, in effect, to receive either the benefit of a foreign tax credit, or a deduction from such taxes, with respect to any foreign and U.S. possessions income taxes paid by the Fund, subject to certain limitations. Pursuant to the election, the Fund will treat those taxes as dividends paid to its shareholders. Each such shareholder will be required to include a proportionate share of those taxes in gross income as income received from a foreign source and must treat the amount so included as if the shareholder had paid the foreign tax directly. The shareholder may then either deduct the taxes deemed paid by him or her in computing his or her taxable income or, alternatively, use the foregoing information in calculating any foreign tax credit they may be entitled to use against the shareholders’ federal income tax. If the Fund makes the election, the Fund (or its administrative agent) will report annually to its shareholders the respective amounts per share of the Fund’s income from sources within, and taxes paid to, foreign countries and U.S. possessions. If the Fund does not hold sufficient foreign securities to meet the above threshold, then shareholders will not be entitled to claim a credit or further deduction with respect to foreign taxes paid by the Fund.

 

A shareholder’s ability to claim a foreign tax credit or deduction in respect of foreign taxes paid by the Fund may be subject to certain limitations imposed by the Code, which may result in a shareholder not receiving a full credit or deduction (if any) for the amount of such taxes. In particular, shareholders must hold their Fund shares (without protection from risk of loss) on the ex-dividend date and for at least 15 additional days during the 30-day period surrounding the ex-dividend date to be eligible to claim a foreign tax credit with respect to a given dividend. Shareholders who do not itemize on their federal income tax returns may claim a credit (but no deduction) for such foreign taxes. Even if the Fund were eligible to make such an election for a given year, it may determine not to do so. Shareholders that are not subject to U.S. federal income tax, and those who invest in the Fund through tax-advantaged accounts (including those who invest through individual retirement accounts or other tax-advantaged retirement plans), generally will receive no benefit from any tax credit or deduction passed through by the Fund.

 

Backup Withholding. The Fund will be required in certain cases to withhold at a rate of 24% and remit to the U.S. Treasury the amount withheld on amounts payable to any shareholder who: (i) has provided the Fund either an incorrect tax identification number or no number at all; (ii) is subject to backup withholding by the IRS for failure to properly report payments of interest or dividends; (iii) has failed to certify to the Fund that such shareholder is not subject to backup withholding; or (iv) has failed to certify to the Fund that the shareholder is a U.S. person (including a resident alien).

 

Tax-Exempt Shareholders. Certain tax-exempt shareholders, including qualified pension plans, individual retirement accounts, salary deferral arrangements, 401(k)s, and other tax-exempt entities, generally are exempt from federal income taxation except with respect to their unrelated business taxable income (“UBTI”). Under the Tax Act, tax-exempt entities are not permitted to offset losses from one trade or business against the income or gain of another trade or business. Certain net losses incurred prior to January 1, 2018 are permitted to offset gain and income created by an unrelated trade or business, if otherwise available. Under current law, the Fund generally serves to block UBTI from being realized by their tax-exempt shareholders. However, notwithstanding the foregoing, the tax-exempt shareholder could realize UBTI by virtue of an investment in the Fund where, for example: (i) the Fund invests in residual interests of Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits (“REMICs”), (ii) the Fund invests in a REIT that is a taxable mortgage pool (“TMP”) or that has a subsidiary that is a TMP or that invests in the residual interest of a REMIC, or (iii) shares in the Fund constitute debt-financed property in the hands of the tax-exempt shareholder within the meaning of section 514(b) of the Code. Charitable remainder trusts are subject to special rules and should consult their tax advisor. The IRS has issued guidance with respect to these issues and prospective shareholders, especially charitable remainder trusts, are strongly encouraged to consult their tax advisors regarding these issues.

 

S-45

 

Non-U.S. Investors. Any non-U.S. investors in the Fund may be subject to U.S. withholding and estate tax and are encouraged to consult their tax advisors prior to investing in the Fund. Foreign shareholders (i.e., nonresident alien individuals and foreign corporations, partnerships, trusts and estates) are generally subject to U.S. withholding tax at the rate of 30% (or a lower tax treaty rate) on distributions derived from taxable ordinary income. The Fund may, under certain circumstances, report all or a portion of a dividend as an “interest-related dividend” or a “short-term capital gain dividend,” which would generally be exempt from this 30% U.S. withholding tax, provided certain other requirements are met. Short-term capital gain dividends received by a nonresident alien individual who is present in the U.S. for a period or periods aggregating 183 days or more during the taxable year are not exempt from this 30% withholding tax. Gains realized by foreign shareholders from the sale or other disposition of shares of the Fund generally are not subject to U.S. taxation, unless the recipient is an individual who is physically present in the U.S. for 183 days or more per year. Foreign shareholders who fail to provide an applicable IRS form may be subject to backup withholding on certain payments from the Fund. Backup withholding will not be applied to payments that are subject to the 30% (or lower applicable treaty rate) withholding tax described in this paragraph. Different tax consequences may result if the foreign shareholder is engaged in a trade or business within the United States. In addition, the tax consequences to a foreign shareholder entitled to claim the benefits of a tax treaty may be different than those described above.

 

Under legislation generally known as “FATCA” (the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act), the Fund is required to withhold 30% of certain ordinary dividends they pay, and, after December 31, 2018, 30% of the gross proceeds of share redemptions and certain capital gain dividends they pay, to shareholders that fail to meet prescribed information reporting or certification requirements. In general, no such withholding will be required with respect to a U.S. person or non-U.S. individual that timely provides the certifications required by the Fund or its agent on a valid IRS Form W-9 or applicable IRS Form W-8, respectively. Shareholders potentially subject to withholding include foreign financial institutions (“FFIs”), such as non-U.S. investment funds, and non-financial foreign entities (“NFFEs”). To avoid withholding under FATCA, an FFI generally must enter into an information sharing agreement with the IRS in which it agrees to report certain identifying information (including name, address, and taxpayer identification number) with respect to its U.S. account holders (which, in the case of an entity shareholder, may include its direct and indirect U.S. owners), and an NFFE generally must identify and provide other required information to the Fund or other withholding agent regarding its U.S. owners, if any. Such non-U.S. shareholders also may fall into certain exempt, excepted or deemed compliant categories as established by regulations and other guidance. A non-U.S. shareholder resident or doing business in a country that has entered into an intergovernmental agreement with the U.S. to implement FATCA will be exempt from FATCA withholding provided that the shareholder and the applicable foreign government comply with the terms of the agreement.

 

A non-U.S. entity that invests in the Fund will need to provide the Fund with documentation properly certifying the entity’s status under FATCA in order to avoid FATCA withholding. Non-U.S. investors in the Fund should consult their tax advisors in this regard.

 

Tax Shelter Reporting Regulations. Under U.S. Treasury regulations, generally, if a shareholder recognizes a loss of $2 million or more for an individual shareholder or $10 million or more for a corporate shareholder, the shareholder must file with the IRS a disclosure statement on Form 8886. Direct shareholders of portfolio securities are in many cases excepted from this reporting requirement, but under current guidance, shareholders of a RIC such as the Fund are not excepted. Future guidance may extend the current exception from this reporting requirement to shareholders of most or all RICs. The fact that a loss is reportable under these regulations does not affect the legal determination of whether the taxpayer’s treatment of the loss is proper. Shareholders should consult their tax advisors to determine the applicability of these regulations in light of their individual circumstances.

 

S-46

 

State Taxes. Depending upon state and local law, distributions by the Fund to its shareholders and the ownership of such shares may be subject to state and local taxes. Rules of state and local taxation of dividend and capital gains distributions from RICs often differ from the rules for federal income taxation described above. It is expected that the Fund will not be liable for any corporate excise, income or franchise tax in Massachusetts if it qualifies as a RIC for federal income tax purposes.

 

Many states grant tax-free status to dividends paid to you from interest earned on direct obligations of the U.S. government, subject in some states to minimum investment requirements that must be met by the Fund. Investment in Ginnie Mae or Fannie Mae securities, banker’s acceptances, commercial paper, and repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. government securities do not generally qualify for such tax-free treatment. The rules on exclusion of this income are different for corporate shareholders.

 

Shareholders are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding state and local taxes applicable to an investment in the Fund.

 

The Fund’s shares held in a tax-qualified retirement account will generally not be subject to federal taxation on income and capital gains distributions from the Fund until a shareholder begins receiving payments from its retirement account. Because each shareholder’s tax situation is different, shareholders should consult their tax advisor about the tax implications of an investment in the Fund.

 

FUND TRANSACTIONS

 

Brokerage Transactions. Generally, equity securities, both listed and over-the-counter, are bought and sold through brokerage transactions for which commissions are payable. Purchases from underwriters will include the underwriting commission or concession, and purchases from dealers serving as market makers will include a dealer’s mark-up or reflect a dealer’s mark-down. Money market securities and other debt securities are usually bought and sold directly from the issuer or an underwriter or market maker for the securities. Generally, the Fund will not pay brokerage commissions for such purchases. When a debt security is bought from an underwriter, the purchase price will usually include an underwriting commission or concession. When the Fund executes transactions in the over-the-counter market, it will generally deal with primary market makers unless prices that are more favorable are otherwise obtainable. The purchase price for securities bought from dealers serving as market makers will similarly include the dealer’s mark up or reflect a dealer’s mark down.

 

In addition, the Adviser may place a combined order for two or more accounts it manages, including the Fund, engaged in the purchase or sale of the same security if, in its judgment, joint execution is in the best interest of each participant and will result in best price and execution. Transactions involving commingled orders are allocated in a manner deemed equitable to each account or fund. Although it is recognized that, in some cases, the joint execution of orders could adversely affect the price or volume of the security that a particular account or the Fund may obtain, it is the opinion of the Adviser that the advantages of combined orders outweigh the possible disadvantages of combined orders.

 

Brokerage Selection. The Trust does not expect to use one particular broker or dealer, and when one or more brokers is believed capable of providing the best combination of price and execution, the Adviser may select a broker based upon brokerage or research services provided to the Adviser. The Adviser may pay a higher commission than otherwise obtainable from other brokers in return for such services only if a good faith determination is made that the commission is reasonable in relation to the services provided.

 

Section 28(e) of the 1934 Act permits the Adviser, under certain circumstances, to cause the Fund to pay a broker or dealer a commission for effecting a transaction in excess of the amount of commission another broker or dealer would have charged for effecting the transaction in recognition of the value of brokerage and research services provided by the broker or dealer. In addition to agency transactions, the Adviser may receive brokerage and research services in connection with certain riskless principal transactions, in accordance with applicable SEC guidance. Brokerage and research services include: (1) furnishing advice as to the value of securities, the advisability of investing in, purchasing or selling securities, and the availability of securities or purchasers or sellers of securities; (2) furnishing analyses and reports concerning issuers, industries, securities, economic factors and trends, portfolio strategy, and the performance of accounts; and (3) effecting securities transactions and performing functions incidental thereto (such as clearance, settlement, and custody). In the case of research services, the Adviser believes that access to independent investment research is beneficial to its investment decision-making processes and, therefore, to the Fund.

 

S-47

 

To the extent that research services may be a factor in selecting brokers, such services may be in written form or through direct contact with individuals and may include information as to particular companies and securities as well as market, economic, or institutional areas and information which assists in the valuation and pricing of investments. Examples of research-oriented services for which the Adviser might utilize Fund commissions include research reports and other information on the economy, industries, sectors, groups of securities, individual companies, statistical information, political developments, technical market action, pricing and appraisal services, credit analysis, risk measurement analysis, performance and other analysis. The Adviser may use research services furnished by brokers in servicing all client accounts and not all services may necessarily be used in connection with the account that paid commissions to the broker providing such services. Information so received by the Adviser will be in addition to and not in lieu of the services required to be performed by the Adviser under the Advisory Agreement. Any advisory or other fees paid to the Adviser are not reduced as a result of the receipt of research services.

 

In some cases the Adviser may receive a service from a broker that has both a “research” and a “non-research” use. When this occurs, the Adviser makes a good faith allocation, under all the circumstances, between the research and non-research uses of the service. The percentage of the service that is used for research purposes may be paid for with client commissions, while the Adviser will use its own funds to pay for the percentage of the service that is used for non-research purposes. In making this good faith allocation, the Adviser faces a potential conflict of interest, but the Adviser believes that its allocation procedures are reasonably designed to ensure that it appropriately allocates the anticipated use of such services to their research and non-research uses.

 

From time to time, the Adviser may purchase new issues of securities for clients, including the Fund, in a fixed price offering. In these situations, the seller may be a member of the selling group that will, in addition to selling securities, provide the Adviser with research services. FINRA has adopted rules expressly permitting these types of arrangements under certain circumstances. Generally, the seller will provide research “credits” in these situations at a rate that is higher than that which is available for typical secondary market transactions. These arrangements may not fall within the safe harbor of Section 28(e).

 

Brokerage with Fund Affiliates. The Fund may execute brokerage or other agency transactions through registered broker-dealer affiliates of either the Fund or the Adviser for a commission in conformity with the 1940 Act and rules promulgated by the SEC. The 1940 Act requires that commissions paid to the affiliate by the Fund for exchange transactions not exceed “usual and customary” brokerage commissions. The rules define “usual and customary” commissions to include amounts which are “reasonable and fair compared to the commission, fee or other remuneration received or to be received by other brokers in connection with comparable transactions involving similar securities being purchased or sold on a securities exchange during a comparable period of time.” The Trustees, including those who are not “interested persons” of the Fund, have adopted procedures for evaluating the reasonableness of commissions paid to affiliates and review these procedures periodically.

 

Securities of “Regular Broker-Dealers.” The Fund is required to identify any securities of their “regular brokers and dealers” (as such term is defined in the 1940 Act) that the Fund held during its most recent fiscal year. Because the Fund is new, as of the date of this SAI the fund does not hold any securities of “regular brokers and dealers.”

 

Portfolio Turnover Rates. Portfolio turnover is calculated by dividing the lesser of total purchases or sales of portfolio securities for the fiscal year by the monthly average value of portfolio securities owned during the fiscal year. Excluded from both the numerator and denominator are amounts relating to securities whose maturities at the time of acquisition were one year or less. Instruments excluded from the calculation of portfolio turnover generally would include the futures contracts in which the Fund may invest since such contracts generally have remaining maturities of less than one-year. The Fund may at times hold investments in other short-term instruments, such as repurchase agreements, which are excluded for purposes of computing portfolio turnover.

 

S-48

 

PORTFOLIO HOLDINGS

 

The Board has approved policies and procedures that govern the timing and circumstances regarding the disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio holdings information to shareholders and third parties. These policies and procedures are designed to ensure that disclosure of information regarding the Fund’s portfolio securities is in the best interests of each of the Fund’s shareholders, and include procedures to address conflicts between the interests of the Fund’s shareholders and those of the Fund’s Adviser, principal underwriter, or any affiliated person of the Fund, the Adviser, or the principal underwriter. Pursuant to such procedures, the Board has authorized the Adviser’s Chief Compliance Officer to authorize the release of the Fund’s portfolio holdings, as necessary, in conformity with the foregoing principles. The Adviser’s Chief Compliance Officer, either directly or through reports by the Trust’s Chief Compliance Officer, reports quarterly to the Board regarding the operation and administration of such policies and procedures.

 

Pursuant to applicable law, the Fund is required to disclose its complete portfolio holdings quarterly, within 60 days of the end of each fiscal quarter (currently, each January 31, April 30, July 31, and October 31). The Fund will disclose a complete or summary schedule of investments (which includes the Fund’s 50 largest holdings in unaffiliated issuers and each investment in unaffiliated issuers that exceeds one percent of the Fund’s net asset value (“Summary Schedule”)) in its Semi-Annual and Annual Reports which are distributed to the Fund’s shareholders. The Fund’s complete schedule of investments following the first and third fiscal quarters will be available in quarterly holdings reports filed with the SEC on Form N-Q, and the Fund’s complete schedule of investments following the second and fourth fiscal quarters, will be available in shareholder reports filed with the SEC on Form N-CSR.

 

Reports filed with the SEC on Form N-Q and Form N-CSR are not distributed to the Fund’s shareholders but are available, free of charge, on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov. Should the Fund include only a Summary Schedule rather than a complete schedule of investments in its Semi-Annual and Annual Reports, its Form N-CSR will be available without charge, upon request, by calling 1-888-FUND-LSV.

 

The Adviser’s website, at www.lsvasset.com, also provides information about the Fund’s complete portfolio holdings, including some or all of the following: security description, ticker, security identification number, price per share, par value, and interest rate updated as of the end of the most recent calendar quarter (i.e., each March 31, June 30, September 30, and December 31). This information on the website is provided within 15 business days at the end of each calendar quarter. The information on the Adviser’s website is publicly available to all categories of persons. The Adviser may exclude any portion of the Fund’s portfolio holdings from publication when deemed in the best interest of the Fund.

 

In addition to information provided to shareholders and the general public, portfolio holdings information may be disclosed as frequently as daily to certain service providers, such as the Custodian, Administrator or Transfer Agent, in connection with their services to the Fund. From time to time rating and ranking organizations, such as S&P, Lipper and Morningstar, Inc., may request non-public portfolio holdings information in connection with rating the Fund. Similarly, institutional investors, financial planners, pension plan sponsors and/or their consultants or other third-parties may request portfolio holdings information in order to assess the risks of the Fund’s portfolio along with related performance attribution statistics.

 

The Fund’s policies and procedures provide that the Adviser’s Chief Compliance Officer may authorize disclosure of non-public portfolio holdings information to such parties at differing times and/or with different lag times. Prior to making any disclosure to a third party, the Adviser’s Chief Compliance Officer must determine that such disclosure serves a reasonable business purpose, is in the best interests of the Fund’s shareholders and that conflicts between the interests of the Fund’s shareholders and those of the Fund’s Adviser, principal underwriter, or any affiliated person of the Fund are addressed. Portfolio holdings information may be disclosed no more frequently than monthly to ratings agencies, consultants and other qualified financial professionals or individuals.

 

S-49

 

The Adviser currently has arrangements to provide non-public portfolio holdings information to Marco Consulting Group. The Adviser reports the complete portfolio (including security name, ticker, CUSIP, number of shares, current market value and percentage of portfolio), as well as percentage weightings for the top ten holdings, on a monthly basis, with a three-day lag. The portfolio holdings are used to create 1) a quarterly profile to educate clients and 2) to conduct quarterly due diligence on the Fund. This information is considered confidential and will not be distributed to the public. The Fund believes these disclosures serve a legitimate business purpose. The Trust’s Chief Compliance Officer will regularly review these arrangements and will make periodic reports to the Board regarding disclosure pursuant to such arrangements.

 

With the exception of disclosures to rating and ranking organizations as described above, the Fund requires any third party receiving non-public holdings information to enter into a confidentiality agreement with the Adviser. The confidentiality agreement provides, among other things, that non-public portfolio holdings information will be kept confidential and that the recipient has a duty not to trade on the non-public information and will use such information solely to analyze and rank the Fund, or to perform due diligence and asset allocation, depending on the recipient of the information.

 

The Fund’s policies and procedures prohibit any compensation or other consideration from being paid to or received by any party in connection with the disclosure of portfolio holdings information, including the Fund, the Adviser and its affiliates or recipients of the Fund’s portfolio holdings information.

 

DESCRIPTION OF SHARES

 

The Declaration of Trust authorizes the issuance of an unlimited number of funds and shares of each fund, each of which represents an equal proportionate interest in that fund with each other share. Shares are entitled upon liquidation to a pro rata share in the net assets of the fund. Shareholders have no preemptive rights. The Declaration of Trust provides that the Trustees may create additional series or classes of shares. All consideration received by the Trust for shares of any additional funds and all assets in which such consideration is invested would belong to that fund and would be subject to the liabilities related thereto. Share certificates representing shares will not be issued. The Fund’s shares, when issued, are fully paid and non-assessable.

 

SHAREHOLDER LIABILITY

 

The Trust is an entity of the type commonly known as a “Massachusetts business trust.” Under Massachusetts law, shareholders of such a trust could, under certain circumstances, be held personally liable as partners for the obligations of the trust. Even if, however, the Trust were held to be a partnership, the possibility of the shareholders incurring financial loss for that reason appears remote because the Declaration of Trust contains an express disclaimer of shareholder liability for obligations of the Trust and requires that notice of such disclaimer be given in each agreement, obligation or instrument entered into or executed by or on behalf of the Trust or the Trustees, and because the Declaration of Trust provides for indemnification out of the Trust property for any shareholder held personally liable for the obligations of the Trust.

 

LIMITATION OF TRUSTEES’ LIABILITY

 

The Declaration of Trust provides that a Trustee shall be liable only for his or her own willful defaults and, if reasonable care has been exercised in the selection of officers, agents, employees or investment advisers, shall not be liable for any neglect or wrongdoing of any such person. The Declaration of Trust also provides that the Trust will indemnify its Trustees and officers against liabilities and expenses incurred in connection with actual or threatened litigation in which they may be involved because of their offices with the Trust unless it is determined in the manner provided in the Declaration of Trust that they have not acted in good faith in the reasonable belief that their actions were in the best interests of the Trust. However, nothing in the Declaration of Trust shall protect or indemnify a Trustee against any liability for his or her willful misfeasance, bad faith, gross negligence or reckless disregard of his or her duties. Nothing contained in this section attempts to disclaim a Trustee’s individual liability in any manner inconsistent with the federal securities laws.

 

S-50

 

PROXY VOTING

 

The Board has delegated responsibility for decisions regarding proxy voting for securities held by the Fund to the Adviser. The Adviser will vote such proxies in accordance with its proxy policies and procedures, which are included in Appendix B to this SAI.

 

The Trust is required to disclose annually the Fund’s complete proxy voting record during the most recent 12-month period ended June 30 on Form N-PX. This voting record is available: (i) without charge, upon request, by calling 1-888-FUND-LSV and (ii) on the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov.

 

CODES OF ETHICS

 

The Board, on behalf of the Trust, has adopted a Code of Ethics pursuant to Rule 17j-1 under the 1940 Act. In addition, the Adviser, the Distributor and the Administrator have adopted Codes of Ethics pursuant to Rule 17j-1. These Codes of Ethics apply to the personal investing activities of trustees, officers and certain employees (“Access Persons”). Rule 17j-1 and the Codes of Ethics are designed to prevent unlawful practices in connection with the purchase or sale of securities by Access Persons. Under each Code of Ethics, Access Persons are permitted to invest in securities, including securities that may be purchased or held by the Fund, but are required to report their personal securities transactions for monitoring purposes. In addition, certain Access Persons are required to obtain approval before investing in initial public offerings or private placements or are prohibited from making such investments. Copies of these Codes of Ethics are on file with the SEC, and are available to the public.

 

PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS AND CONTROL PERSONS

 

Because the Fund is new, as of the date of this SAI, the Fund does not have any beneficial owners to report.

 

S-51

 

APPENDIX A

 

DESCRIPTION OF RATINGS

 

Description of Ratings

 

The following descriptions of securities ratings have been published by Moody’s Investors Services, Inc. (“Moody’s”), Standard & Poor’s (“S&P”), and Fitch Ratings (“Fitch”), respectively.

 

Description of Moody’s Global RatingS

 

Ratings assigned on Moody’s global long-term and short-term rating scales are forward-looking opinions of the relative credit risks of financial obligations issued by non-financial corporates, financial institutions, structured finance vehicles, project finance vehicles, and public sector entities. Long-term ratings are assigned to issuers or obligations with an original maturity of one year or more and reflect both on the likelihood of a default on contractually promised payments and the expected financial loss suffered in the event of default. Short-term ratings are assigned to obligations with an original maturity of thirteen months or less and reflect both on the likelihood of a default on contractually promised payments and the expected financial loss suffered in the event of default.

 

Description of Moody’s Global Long-Term Ratings

 

Aaa Obligations rated Aaa are judged to be of the highest quality, subject to the lowest level of credit risk.

 

Aa Obligations rated Aa are judged to be of high quality and are subject to very low credit risk.

 

A Obligations rated A are judged to be upper-medium grade and are subject to low credit risk.

 

Baa Obligations rated Baa are judged to be medium-grade and subject to moderate credit risk and as such may possess certain speculative characteristics.

 

Ba Obligations rated Ba are judged to be speculative and are subject to substantial credit risk.

 

B Obligations rated B are considered speculative and are subject to high credit risk.

 

Caa Obligations rated Caa are judged to be speculative of poor standing and are subject to very high credit risk.

 

Ca Obligations rated Ca are highly speculative and are likely in, or very near, default, with some prospect of recovery of principal and interest.

 

C Obligations rated C are the lowest rated and are typically in default, with little prospect for recovery of principal or interest.

 

Note: Moody’s appends numerical modifiers 1, 2, and 3 to each generic rating classification from Aa through Caa. The modifier 1 indicates that the obligation ranks in the higher end of its generic rating category; the modifier 2 indicates a mid-range ranking; and the modifier 3 indicates a ranking in the lower end of that generic rating category.

 

Hybrid Indicator (hyb)

 

The hybrid indicator (hyb) is appended to all ratings of hybrid securities issued by banks, insurers, finance companies, and securities firms. By their terms, hybrid securities allow for the omission of scheduled dividends, interest, or principal payments, which can potentially result in impairment if such an omission occurs. Hybrid securities may also be subject to contractually allowable write-downs of principal that could result in impairment. Together with the hybrid indicator, the long-term obligation rating assigned to a hybrid security is an expression of the relative credit risk associated with that security.

 

A-1

 

Description of Moody’s Global Short-Term Ratings

 

P-1 Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-1 have a superior ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

 

P-2 Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-2 have a strong ability to repay short-term debt obligations.

 

P-3 Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Prime-3 have an acceptable ability to repay short-term obligations.

 

NP Issuers (or supporting institutions) rated Not Prime do not fall within any of the Prime rating categories.

 

Description of Moody’s U.S. Municipal Short-Term Obligation Ratings

 

The Municipal Investment Grade (“MIG”) scale is used to rate U.S. municipal bond anticipation notes of up to three years maturity. Municipal notes rated on the MIG scale may be secured by either pledged revenues or proceeds of a take-out financing received prior to note maturity. MIG ratings expire at the maturity of the obligation, and the issuer’s long-term rating is only one consideration in assigning the MIG rating. MIG ratings are divided into three levels—MIG 1 through MIG 3—while speculative grade short-term obligations are designated SG.

 

Moody’s U.S. municipal short-term obligation ratings are as follows:

 

MIG 1 This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by established cash flows, highly reliable liquidity support, or demonstrated broad-based access to the market for refinancing.

 

MIG 2 This designation denotes strong credit quality. Margins of protection are ample, although not as large as in the preceding group.

 

MIG 3 This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Liquidity and cash-flow protection may be narrow, and market access for refinancing is likely to be less well-established.

 

SG This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Debt instruments in this category may lack sufficient margins of protection.

 

Description of Moody’s Demand Obligation Ratings

 

In the case of variable rate demand obligations (“VRDOs”), a two-component rating is assigned: a long or short-term debt rating and a demand obligation rating. The first element represents Moody’s evaluation of risk associated with scheduled principal and interest payments. The second element represents Moody’s evaluation of risk associated with the ability to receive purchase price upon demand (“demand feature”). The second element uses a rating from a variation of the MIG scale called the Variable Municipal Investment Grade (“VMIG”) scale.

 

Moody’s demand obligation ratings are as follows:

 

VMIG 1 This designation denotes superior credit quality. Excellent protection is afforded by the superior short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

 

VMIG 2 This designation denotes strong credit quality. Good protection is afforded by the strong short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

 

A-2

 

VMIG 3 This designation denotes acceptable credit quality. Adequate protection is afforded by the satisfactory short-term credit strength of the liquidity provider and structural and legal protections that ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

 

SG This designation denotes speculative-grade credit quality. Demand features rated in this category may be supported by a liquidity provider that does not have an investment grade short-term rating or may lack the structural and/or legal protections necessary to ensure the timely payment of purchase price upon demand.

 

Description of S&P’s Issue Credit Ratings

 

An S&P issue credit rating is a forward-looking opinion about the creditworthiness of an obligor with respect to a specific financial obligation, a specific class of financial obligations, or a specific financial program (including ratings on medium-term note programs and commercial paper programs). It takes into consideration the creditworthiness of guarantors, insurers, or other forms of credit enhancement on the obligation and takes into account the currency in which the obligation is denominated. The opinion reflects S&P’s view of the obligor’s capacity and willingness to meet its financial commitments as they come due, and this opinion may assess terms, such as collateral security and subordination, which could affect ultimate payment in the event of default.

 

Issue credit ratings can be either long-term or short-term. Short-term ratings are generally assigned to those obligations considered short-term in the relevant market. Short-term ratings are also used to indicate the creditworthiness of an obligor with respect to put features on long-term obligations. Medium-term notes are assigned long-term ratings.

 

Issue credit ratings are based, in varying degrees, on S&P’s analysis of the following considerations:

 

• The likelihood of payment—the capacity and willingness of the obligor to meet its financial commitments on a financial obligation in accordance with the terms of the obligation;

 

• The nature of and provisions of the financial obligation; and the promise S&P imputes; and

 

• The protection afforded by, and relative position of, the financial obligation in the event of bankruptcy, reorganization, or other arrangement under the laws of bankruptcy and other laws affecting creditors’ rights.

 

An issue rating is an assessment of default risk but may incorporate an assessment of relative seniority or ultimate recovery in the event of default. Junior obligations are typically rated lower than senior obligations, to reflect lower priority in bankruptcy, as noted above. (Such differentiation may apply when an entity has both senior and subordinated obligations, secured and unsecured obligations, or operating company and holding company obligations.)

 

NR indicates that a rating has not been assigned or is no longer assigned.

 

Description of S&P’s Long-Term Issue Credit Ratings*

 

AAA An obligation rated ‘AAA’ has the highest rating assigned by S&P. The obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is extremely strong.

 

AA An obligation rated ‘AA’ differs from the highest-rated obligations only to a small degree. The obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is very strong.

 

A An obligation rated ‘A’ is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher-rated categories. However, the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is still strong.

 

A-3

 

BBB An obligation rated ‘BBB’ exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to weaken the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

 

BB; B; CCC; CC; and C Obligations rated ‘BB’, ‘B’, ‘CCC’, ‘CC’, and ‘C’ are regarded as having significant speculative characteristics. ‘BB’ indicates the least degree of speculation and ‘C’ the highest. While such obligations will likely have some quality and protective characteristics, these may be outweighed by large uncertainties or major exposure to adverse conditions.

 

BB An obligation rated ‘BB’ is less vulnerable to nonpayment than other speculative issues. However, it faces major ongoing uncertainties or exposure to adverse business, financial, or economic conditions that could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

 

B An obligation rated ‘B’ is more vulnerable to nonpayment than obligations rated ‘BB’, but the obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation. Adverse business, financial, or economic conditions will likely impair the obligor's capacity or willingness to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

 

CCC An obligation rated ‘CCC’ is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitments on the obligation. In the event of adverse business, financial, or economic conditions, the obligor is not likely to have the capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

 

CC An obligation rated ‘CC’ is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment. The ‘CC’ rating is used when a default has not yet occurred but S&P expects default to be a virtual certainty, regardless of the anticipated time to default.

 

C An obligation rated ‘C’ is currently highly vulnerable to nonpayment, and the obligation is expected to have lower relative seniority or lower ultimate recovery compared with obligations that are rated higher.

 

D An obligation rated ‘D’ is in default or in breach of an imputed promise. For non-hybrid capital instruments, the ‘D’ rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due, unless S&P believes that such payments will be made within five business days in the absence of a stated grace period or within the earlier of the stated grace period or 30 calendar days. The ‘D’ rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions. An obligation's rating is lowered to ‘D’ if it is subject to a distressed exchange offer.

 

*Ratings from ‘AA’ to ‘CCC’ may be modified by the addition of a plus (+) or minus (-) sign to show relative standing within the rating categories.

 

Description of S&P’s Short-Term Issue Credit Ratings

 

A-1 A short-term obligation rated ‘A-1’ is rated in the highest category by S&P. The obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is strong. Within this category, certain obligations are designated with a plus sign (+). This indicates that the obligor's capacity to meet its financial commitments on these obligations is extremely strong.

 

A-2 A short-term obligation rated ‘A-2’ is somewhat more susceptible to the adverse effects of changes in circumstances and economic conditions than obligations in higher rating categories. However, the obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation is satisfactory.

 

A-4

 

A-3 A short-term obligation rated ‘A-3’ exhibits adequate protection parameters. However, adverse economic conditions or changing circumstances are more likely to weaken an obligor’s capacity to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

 

B A short-term obligation rated ‘B’ is regarded as vulnerable and has significant speculative characteristics. The obligor currently has the capacity to meet its financial commitments; however, it faces major ongoing uncertainties that could lead to the obligor's inadequate capacity to meet its financial commitments.

 

C A short-term obligation rated ‘C’ is currently vulnerable to nonpayment and is dependent upon favorable business, financial, and economic conditions for the obligor to meet its financial commitments on the obligation.

 

D A short-term obligation rated ‘D’ is in default or in breach of an imputed promise. For non-hybrid capital instruments, the ‘D’ rating category is used when payments on an obligation are not made on the date due, unless S&P believes that such payments will be made within any stated grace period. However, any stated grace period longer than five business days will be treated as five business days. The ‘D’ rating also will be used upon the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of a similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions. An obligation's rating is lowered to ‘D’ if it is subject to a distressed exchange offer.

 

Description of S&P’s Municipal Short-Term Note Ratings

 

An S&P U.S. municipal note rating reflects S&P’s opinion about the liquidity factors and market access risks unique to the notes. Notes due in three years or less will likely receive a note rating. Notes with an original maturity of more than three years will most likely receive a long-term debt rating. In determining which type of rating, if any, to assign, S&P’s analysis will review the following considerations:

 

• Amortization schedule—the larger the final maturity relative to other maturities, the more likely it will be treated as a note; and

 

• Source of payment—the more dependent the issue is on the market for its refinancing, the more likely it will be treated as a note.

 

S&P’s municipal short-term note ratings are as follows:

 

SP-1 Strong capacity to pay principal and interest. An issue determined to possess a very strong capacity to pay debt service is given a plus (+) designation.

 

SP-2 Satisfactory capacity to pay principal and interest, with some vulnerability to adverse financial and economic changes over the term of the notes.

 

SP-3 Speculative capacity to pay principal and interest.

 

D ‘D’ is assigned upon failure to pay the note when due, completion of a distressed exchange offer, or the filing of a bankruptcy petition or the taking of similar action and where default on an obligation is a virtual certainty, for example due to automatic stay provisions.

 

Description of Fitch’s Credit Ratings

 

Fitch’s credit ratings relating to issuers are an opinion on the relative ability of an entity to meet financial commitments, such as interest, preferred dividends, repayment of principal, insurance claims or counterparty obligations. Credit ratings relating to securities and obligations of an issuer can include a recovery expectation. Credit ratings are used by investors as indications of the likelihood of receiving the money owed to them in accordance with the terms on which they invested.

 

A-5

 

The terms “investment grade” and “speculative grade” have established themselves over time as shorthand to describe the categories ‘AAA’ to ‘BBB’ (investment grade) and ‘BB’ to ‘D’ (speculative grade). The terms investment grade and speculative grade are market conventions, and do not imply any recommendation or endorsement of a specific security for investment purposes. Investment grade categories indicate relatively low to moderate credit risk, while ratings in the speculative categories either signal a higher level of credit risk or that a default has already occurred.

 

Fitch’s credit ratings do not directly address any risk other than credit risk. In particular, ratings do not deal with the risk of a market value loss on a rated security due to changes in interest rates, liquidity and other market considerations. However, in terms of payment obligation on the rated liability, market risk may be considered to the extent that it influences the ability of an issuer to pay upon a commitment. Ratings nonetheless do not reflect market risk to the extent that they influence the size or other conditionality of the obligation to pay upon a commitment (for example, in the case of index-linked bonds).

 

In the default components of ratings assigned to individual obligations or instruments, the agency typically rates to the likelihood of non-payment or default in accordance with the terms of that instrument’s documentation. In limited cases, Fitch may include additional considerations (i.e. rate to a higher or lower standard than that implied in the obligation’s documentation).

 

For the convenience of investors, Fitch may also include issues relating to a rated issuer that are not and have not been rated on its webpage. Such issues are denoted ‘NR.’

 

Note: The modifiers “+” or “-” may be appended to a rating to denote relative status within major rating categories. Such suffixes are not added to the ‘AAA’ ratings and ratings below the ‘CCC’ category. For the short-term rating category of ‘F1’, a ‘+’ may be appended.

 

Description of Fitch’s Long-Term Corporate Finance Obligations Ratings

 

AAA Highest credit quality. ‘AAA’ ratings denote the lowest expectation of credit risk. They are assigned only in cases of exceptionally strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is highly unlikely to be adversely affected by foreseeable events.

 

AA Very high credit quality. ‘AA’ ratings denote expectations of very low credit risk. They indicate very strong capacity for payment of financial commitments. This capacity is not significantly vulnerable to foreseeable events.

 

A High credit quality. ‘A’ ratings denote expectations of low credit risk. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered strong. This capacity may, nevertheless, be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic conditions than is the case for higher ratings.

 

BBB Good credit quality. ‘BBB’ ratings indicate that expectations of credit risk are currently low. The capacity for payment of financial commitments is considered adequate, but adverse business or economic conditions are more likely to impair this capacity.

 

BB Speculative. ‘BB’ ratings indicate an elevated vulnerability to credit risk, particularly in the event of adverse changes in business or economic conditions over time; however, business or financial alternatives may be available to allow financial commitments to be met.

 

B Highly speculative. ‘B’ ratings indicate that material credit risk is present.

 

CCC Substantial credit risk. ‘CCC’ ratings indicate that substantial credit risk is present.

 

A-6

 

CC Very high levels of credit risk. ‘CC’ ratings indicate very high levels of credit risk.

 

C Exceptionally high levels of credit risk. ‘C’ ratings indicate exceptionally high levels of credit risk.

 

Ratings in the categories of ‘CCC’, ‘CC’ and ‘C’ can also relate to obligations or issuers that are in default. In this case, the rating does not opine on default risk but reflects the recovery expectation only.

 

Defaulted obligations typically are not assigned ‘RD’ or ‘D’ ratings, but are instead rated in the ‘CCC’ to ‘C’ rating categories, depending on their recovery prospects and other relevant characteristics. This approach better aligns obligations that have comparable overall expected loss but varying vulnerability to default and loss.

 

Description of Fitch’s Short-Term Ratings

 

A short-term issuer or obligation rating is based in all cases on the short-term vulnerability to default of the rated entity and relates to the capacity to meet financial obligations in accordance with the documentation governing the relevant obligation. Short-term deposit ratings may be adjusted for loss severity. Short-Term Ratings are assigned to obligations whose initial maturity is viewed as “short term” based on market convention. Typically, this means up to 13 months for corporate, sovereign, and structured obligations, and up to 36 months for obligations in U.S. public finance markets.

 

Fitch’s short-term ratings are as follows:

 

F1 Highest short-term credit quality. Indicates the strongest intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments; may have an added “+” to denote any exceptionally strong credit feature.

 

F2 Good short-term credit quality. Good intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments.

 

F3 Fair short-term credit quality. The intrinsic capacity for timely payment of financial commitments is adequate.

 

B Speculative short-term credit quality. Minimal capacity for timely payment of financial commitments, plus heightened vulnerability to near term adverse changes in financial and economic conditions.

 

C High short-term default risk. Default is a real possibility.

 

RD Restricted default. Indicates an entity that has defaulted on one or more of its financial commitments, although it continues to meet other financial obligations. Typically applicable to entity ratings only.

 

D Default. Indicates a broad-based default event for an entity, or the default of a short-term obligation.

 

A-7

 

APPENDIX B – PROXY VOTING POLICIES AND PROCEDURES

 

LSV ASSET MANAGEMENT

 

PROXY VOTING PROCEDURES

 

LSV’s standard investment management agreement expressly authorizes LSV to vote proxies on behalf of the client’s account. Therefore, unless the client expressly reserves proxy voting responsibility, it is LSV’s responsibility to vote proxies relating to securities held for the client’s account.

 

ERISA Clients

 

With respect to ERISA plan clients, unless proxy voting responsibility has been expressly reserved, LSV, as the investment adviser for the account, must, subject to this policy, seek to vote all proxies relating to securities held for the plan’s account. If LSV is responsible for voting, LSV shall make appropriate arrangements with each account custodian to have proxies forwarded, on a timely basis to the appropriate person, and shall endeavor to correct delays or other problems relating to timely delivery of proxies and proxy materials. Fiduciary obligations of prudence and loyalty require an investment adviser with proxy voting responsibility to vote proxies on issues that affect the value of the client’s investment. Proxy voting decisions must be made solely in the best interests of the client’s account. In voting proxies, LSV is required to consider those factors that may affect the value of the client’s investment and may not subordinate the interests of the client to unrelated objectives.

 

General Policies

 

LSV has adopted proxy voting guidelines that provide direction in determining how various types of proxy issues are to be voted. LSV has engaged an expert independent third party to design guidelines for client accounts that are updated for current corporate governance issues, helping to ensure that clients’ best interests are served by voting decisions. Clients are sent a copy of their respective guidelines on an annual basis.

 

LSV’s quantitative investment process does not provide output or analysis that would be functional in analyzing proxy issues. LSV, therefore, has retained an expert independent third party to assist in proxy voting, currently Glass Lewis & Co. (“GLC”). GLC implements LSV’s proxy voting process, provides assistance in developing guidelines and provides analysis of proxy issues on a case-by-case basis. LSV is responsible for monitoring GLC to seek to ensure that proxies are appropriately voted. LSV will vote issues contrary to, or issues not covered by, the guidelines only when LSV believes it is in the best interest of the client. Where the client has provided proxy voting guidelines to LSV, those guidelines will be followed. In certain circumstances, clients are permitted to direct their vote in a particular solicitation. Direction from a client on a particular proxy vote will take precedence over the guidelines. LSV’s use of GLC is not a delegation of LSV’s fiduciary obligation to vote proxies for clients.

 

Should a material conflict arise between LSV’s interest and that of its clients, LSV will vote the proxies in accordance with the recommendation of the independent third party proxy voting service. A written record will be maintained describing the conflict of interest, and an explanation of how the vote made was in the client’s best interest.

 

LSV may be unable or may choose not to vote proxies in certain situations. For example, LSV may refrain from voting a proxy if (i) the cost of voting the proxy exceeds the expected benefit to the client, (ii) LSV is not given enough time to process the vote, (iii) voting the proxy requires the security to be “blocked” or frozen from trading or (iv) it is otherwise impractical or impossible to vote the proxy, such as in the case of voting a foreign security that must be cast in person.

 

B-1

 

Clients may receive a copy of this proxy voting policy and LSV’s voting record for their account by request. LSV will additionally provide any mutual fund for which LSV acts as adviser or sub-adviser, a copy of LSV’s voting record for the fund so that the fund may fulfill its obligation to report proxy votes to fund shareholders.

 

Recordkeeping.

 

LSV will retain:

 

(i)Copies of its proxy voting policies and procedures.

 

(ii)A copy of each proxy statement received regarding client securities (maintained by the proxy voting service and/or available on EDGAR).

 

(iii)A record of each vote cast on behalf of a client (maintained by the proxy voting service).

 

(iv)A copy of any document created that was material to the voting decision or that memorializes the basis for that decision (maintained by the proxy voting service).

 

(v)A copy of clients’ written requests for proxy voting information and a copy of LSV’s written response to a client’s request for proxy voting information for the client’s account.

 

(vi)LSV will ensure that it may obtain access to the proxy voting service’s records promptly upon LSV’s request.

 

The above listed information is intended to, among other things, enable clients to review LSV’s proxy voting procedures and actions taken in individual proxy voting situations.

 

LSV will maintain required materials in an easily accessible place for not less than five years from the end of the fiscal year during which the last entry took place, the first two years in LSV’s principal office.

 

Consideration of Environmental, Social and Governance Factors

 

LSV became a signatory to the Principles for Responsible Investment (PRI) in April 2014. GLC is also a signatory to the PRI. The PRI provides a framework, through its six principles, for consideration of environmental, social and governance ("ESG") factors in portfolio management and investment decision-making. The six principles ask an investment manager, to the extent consistent with its fiduciary duties, to seek to: (1) incorporate ESG issues into investment analysis and decision-making processes; (2) be an active owner and incorporate ESG issues into its ownership policies and practices; (3) obtain appropriate disclosure on ESG issues by the entities in which it invests; (4) promote acceptance and implementation of the PRI principles within the investment industry; (5) work to enhance its effectiveness in implementing the PRI principles; and (6) report on its activities and progress toward implementing the PRI principles.

 

For clients where LSV has proxy voting authority, certain ESG factors are built into our standard proxy voting guidelines. For example, GLC views the identification, mitigation and management of environmental and social risks as integral components when evaluating a company’s overall risk exposure. In cases where the board or management has failed to sufficiently identify and manage a material environmental or social risk that did or could negatively impact shareholder value, GLC will recommend shareholders vote against directors responsible for risk oversight in consideration of the nature of the risk and the potential effect on shareholder value. In addition, GLC generally recommends supporting shareholder proposals likely to increase and/or protect shareholder value and also those that promote the furtherance of shareholder rights. In evaluating shareholder resolutions regarding environmental and social issues, GLC examines: (1) direct environmental and social risk, (2) risk due to legislation and regulation, (3) legal and reputational risk, and (4) governance risk. Finally, through GLC, LSV is able to offer additional guidelines that provide another level of analysis for clients seeking to vote consistent with widely-accepted enhanced ESG practices. These ESG-specific guidelines are available to clients with a focus on disclosing and mitigating company risk with regard to ESG issues.

 

B-2

 

PART C: OTHER INFORMATION

 

ITEM 28. EXHIBITS:

 

(a)(1) Amended and Restated Agreement and Declaration of Trust of The Advisors' Inner Circle Fund (the “Registrant”) dated July 18, 1991, as amended and restated February 18, 1997, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (1)(b) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 28 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") via EDGAR Accession No. 0000950109-97-001691 on February 27, 1997.

 

(a)(2) Amendment No. 1, dated May 15, 2012, to the Registrant's Amended and Restated Agreement and Declaration of Trust dated July 18, 1991, as amended and restated February 18, 1997, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (a)(2) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 190 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-12-000262 on May 23, 2012.

 

(b) Registrant's Second Amended and Restated By-Laws are incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (b) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 179 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-12-000087 on February 28, 2012.

 

(c) Not Applicable.

 

(d)(1)(i) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated May 3, 1995, between the Registrant and First Manhattan Co. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (5)(g) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 24 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0000950109-96-001199 on February 28, 1996.

 

(d)(1)(ii) Amended and Restated Schedule, dated May 19, 1998, to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated May 3, 1995, between the Registrant and First Manhattan Co. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(9) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 34 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001047469-98-021496 on May 21, 1998.

 

(d)(1)(iii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated March 15, 1999, between the Registrant and LSV Asset Management is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(8) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 46 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-01-500070 on June 22, 2001.

 

(d)(1)(iv) Amended Schedule A, dated [ ], to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated March 15, 1999, between the Registrant and LSV Asset Management, to be filed by amendment.

 

(d)(1)(v) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 24, 2002, between the Registrant and Acadian Asset Management LLC (formerly, Acadian Asset Management, Inc.) is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(17) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 55 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-02-000263 on August 30, 2002.

 

(d)(1)(vi) Amended Schedule A to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 24, 2002, between the Registrant and Acadian Asset Management LLC (formerly, Acadian Asset Management, Inc.) is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(12) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 127 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-10- 000392 on September 3, 2010.

 

C-1

 

(d)(1)(vii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 24, 2002, between the Registrant and Cambiar Investors, LLC is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(19) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 55 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-02-000263 on August 30, 2002.

 

(d)(1)(viii) Amended Schedule A, dated August 30, 2016, to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 24, 2002, between the Registrant and Cambiar Investors, LLC is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(1)(viii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 267 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001529 on August 26, 2016.

 

(d)(1)(ix) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 24, 2002, between the Registrant and Investment Counselors of Maryland, LLC is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(23) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 55 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-02-000263 on August 30, 2002.

 

(d)(1)(x) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 24, 2002, between the Registrant and C.S. McKee, L.P. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(24) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 55 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-02-000263 on August 30, 2002.

 

(d)(1)(xi) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated October 10, 2016, between the Registrant and Rice Hall James & Associates LLC is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(1)(xi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 277 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000154 on February 28, 2017.

 

(d)(1)(xii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 24, 2002, between the Registrant and Thompson, Siegel & Walmsley LLC (formerly, Thompson, Siegel & Walmsley, Inc.) is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(27) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 55 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-02-000263 on August 30, 2002.

 

(d)(1)(xiii) Amendment and Revised Schedule A, dated June 1, 2010, to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 24, 2002, between the Registrant and Thompson, Siegel & Walmsley LLC (formerly, Thompson, Siegel & Walmsley, Inc.) is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(21) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 126 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-10-000336 on August 30, 2010.

 

(d)(1)(xiv) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated May 28, 2004, between the Registrant and Haverford Investment Management, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(30) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 79 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-05-000093 on February 25, 2005.

 

(d)(1)(xv) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated December 16, 2005, between the Registrant and Westwood Management Corp. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(28) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 88 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-06-000081 on February 28, 2006.

 

(d)(1)(xvi) Amended Schedule A, dated [ ], to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated December 16, 2005, between the Registrant and Westwood Management Corp., to be filed by amendment.

 

C-2

 

(d)(1)(xvii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated February 27, 2006, between the Registrant and Edgewood Management LLC is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(33) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 95 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-07-000007 on January 12, 2007.

 

(d)(1)(xviii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated March 10, 2010, between the Registrant and Sands Capital Management, LLC is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(30) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 123 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-10-000173 on April 30, 2010.

 

(d)(1)(xix) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated March 24, 2011, between the Registrant and AlphaOne Investment Services, LLC is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(35) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(d)(1)(xx) Amended Schedule A, dated December 19, 2017, to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated March 24, 2011, between the Registrant and AlphaOne Investment Services, LLC, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(1)(xx) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(d)(1)(xxi) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated June 20, 2011, between the Registrant and Loomis, Sayles & Company, L.P. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(37) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(d)(1)(xxii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated February 20, 2012, between the Registrant and Hamlin Capital Management, LLC is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(45) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 183 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-12-000195 on March 28, 2012.

 

(d)(1)(xxiii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated February 3, 2012, between the Trust and Thomson Horstmann & Bryant, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(45) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(d)(1)(xxiv) Amended Schedule A to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated February 3, 2012, between the Trust and Thomson Horstmann & Bryant, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(49) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 225 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000589 on October 9, 2013.

 

(d)(1)(xxv) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between the Registrant and Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(1)(xxviii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 236 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000442 on June 24, 2014.

 

(d)(1)(xxvi) Amended Schedule A, dated August 30, 2016, to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between the Registrant and Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(1)(xxvii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

C-3

 

(d)(1)(xxvii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated January 31, 2013, between the Registrant and Harvest Global Investments Limited is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(1)(xxix) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 236 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000442 on June 24, 2014.

 

(d)(1)(xxviii) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated September 3, 2013, between the Registrant and AT Investment Advisers, Inc. (formerly, Stein Roe Investment Counsel, Inc.) is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(1)(xxx) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 236 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000442 on June 24, 2014.

 

(d)(1)(xxix) Amended Schedule A, dated December 13, 2017, to the Investment Advisory Agreement, dated September 13, 2013, between the Registrant and AT Investment Advisers, Inc. (formerly, Stein Roe Investment Counsel, Inc.), is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(1)(xxix) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 288 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001113 on December 13, 2017.

 

(d)(1)(xxx) Investment Advisory Agreement, dated July 3, 2013, between the Registrant and Fayez Sarofim & Co. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(74) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 219 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000386 on July 26, 2013.

 

(d)(2)(i) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated December 27, 2011, between Westwood Management Corp. and SKY Harbor Capital Management, LLC, relating to the Westwood Short Duration High Yield Fund and Westwood Opportunistic High Yield Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(29) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(d)(2)(ii) Amended Schedule A, dated November 17, 2014, to the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated December 27, 2011, between Westwood Management Corp. and SKY Harbor Capital Management, LLC, relating to the Westwood Short Duration High Yield Fund and Westwood Opportunistic High Yield Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(ii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 248 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000803 on December 29, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(iii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Parametric Portfolio Associates® LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(ii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(iv) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and LSV Asset Management, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(iii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(v) Amended and Restated Schedule A, dated January 16, 2018, to the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and LSV Asset Management, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(v) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

C-4

 

(d)(2)(vi) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Harris Associates L.P., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(iv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(vii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Thornburg Investment Management, Inc., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(v) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(viii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Marsico Capital Management, LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(vi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(ix) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Cramer Rosenthal McGlynn LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(viii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(x) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Fairpointe Capital LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(ix) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xi) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Phocas Financial Corporation, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(x) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Allianz Global Investors U.S. LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xiii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated July 18, 2017, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Allianz Global Investors U.S. LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Income Opportunities Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xiii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(d)(2)(xiv) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Acadian Asset Management LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

C-5

 

(d)(2)(xv) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Driehaus Capital Management LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xiii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xvi) Amended Schedule A, dated [ ], to the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Driehaus Capital Management LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, to be filed by amendment.

 

(d)(2)(xvii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and OFI SteelPath, Inc., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Income Opportunities Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xiv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xviii) Amendment, dated May 18, 2016, to the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and OFI SteelPath, Inc., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Income Opportunities Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 277 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000154 on February 28, 2017.

 

(d)(2)(xix) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and ClariVest Asset Management LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund and Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xvi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xx) Amended Schedule A, dated December 15, 2014, to the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and ClariVest Asset Management LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund and Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xvii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(d)(2)(xxi) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, L.P., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xvii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xxii) Amendment, dated September [XX], 2017, to the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, L.P., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund, to be filed by amendment.

 

(d)(2)(xxiii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and BlackRock Financial Management, Inc., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xviii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

C-6

 

(d)(2)(xxiv) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated September 5, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Numeric Investors, LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund and Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xx) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 272 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001815 on October 31, 2016.

 

(d)(2)(xxv) Amended and Restated Schedule A, dated November 16, 2016, to the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated September 5, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Numeric Investors, LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund and Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 277 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000154 on February 28, 2017.

 

(d)(2)(xxvi) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated May 1, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Strategic Income Management, LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Income Opportunities Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xx) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xxvii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated June 3, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and AJO, LP, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xxviii) Amended Schedule A, dated August 31, 2015, to the Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated June 3, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and AJO, LP, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxiii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(d)(2)(xxix) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated June 3, 2014, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Wells Fargo Portfolio Risk Advisors, a Division of Structured Asset Investors, LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

(d)(2)(xxx) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated January 15, 2016, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Robert W. Baird & Co. Incorporated, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 263 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001304 on April 29, 2016.

 

(d)(2)(xxxi) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated August 24, 2016, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Franklin Advisers, Inc., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Core Plus Bond Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxvi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(d)(2)(xxxii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated August 24, 2016, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Loomis, Sayles & Company, L.P., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Core Plus Bond Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxvii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

C-7

 

(d)(2)(xxxiii) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated August 24, 2016, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Metropolitan West Asset Management LLC, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Core Plus Bond Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxviii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(d)(2)(xxxiv) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated August 24, 2016, between Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. and Prime Advisors, Inc., relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Core Plus Bond Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxix) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(d)(2)(xxxv) Investment Sub-Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated June 1, 2017, between BlackRock Financial Management, Inc. and BlackRock International Limited, relating to the Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxxv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 294 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-006346 on April 30, 2018.

 

(d)(2)(xxxvi) Investment Sub-Advisory Agreement, dated December 20, 2017, between AlphaOne Investment Services, LLC and Villanova Investment Management Company LLC, relating to the AlphaOne VIMCO Small Cap Value Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(2)(xxxii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(d)(3)(i) Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement, dated February 13, 2013, between the Registrant and LSV Asset Management, relating to the LSV Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(10) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(d)(3)(ii) Amended Schedule A, dated [ ], to the Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement, dated February 13, 2013, between the Registrant and LSV Asset Management, relating to the LSV Funds, to be filed by amendment.

 

(d)(3)(iii) Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement, dated September 1, 2016, between the Registrant and Cambiar Investors, LLC, relating to the Cambiar Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(3)(iii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 268 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001670 on September 1, 2016.

 

(d)(3)(iv) Amended Schedule A, dated February 28, 2018, to the Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement, dated September 1, 2016, between the Registrant and Cambiar Investors, LLC, relating to the Cambiar Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(3)(iv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 294 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-006346 on April 30, 2018.

 

(d)(3)(v) Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement, dated February 23, 2016, between the Registrant and Rice Hall James & Associates, LLC, relating to the Rice Hall James Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(3)(vi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 263 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001304 on April 29, 2016.

 

C-8

 

(d)(3)(vi) Expense Limitation Agreement, dated March 1, 2008, between the Registrant and Haverford Investment Management, Inc., relating to the Haverford Quality Growth Stock Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(25) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(d)(3)(vii) Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement, dated February 10, 2015, between the Registrant and Westwood Management Corp., relating to the Westwood Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(3)(ix) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 254 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-15-000298 on April 20, 2015.

 

(d)(3)(viii) Amended Schedule A, dated [ ], to the Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement, dated February 10, 2015, between the Registrant and Westwood Management Corp., relating to the Westwood Funds, to be filed by amendment.

 

(d)(3)(ix) Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement between the Registrant and Edgewood Management LLC, relating to the Edgewood Growth Fund, to be filed by amendment.

 

(d)(3)(x) Expense Limitation Agreement, dated March 31, 2010, between the Registrant and Sands Capital Management, LLC, relating to the Sands Capital Global Growth Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(34) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(d)(3)(xi) Expense Limitation Agreement, effective as of March 28, 2011, between the Registrant and AlphaOne Investment Services, LLC, relating to the AlphaOne Small Cap Opportunities Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(43) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 154 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-11-000353 on June 29, 2011.

 

(d)(3)(xii) Amended Schedule A, dated December 19, 2017, to the Expense Limitation Agreement, effective as of March 28, 2011, between the Registrant and AlphaOne Investment Services, LLC, relating to the AlphaOne Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(3)(xi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(d)(3)(xiii) Expense Limitation Agreement, dated December 15, 2011, between the Registrant and Loomis, Sayles & Company, L.P., relating to the Loomis Sayles Full Discretion Institutional Securitized Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(38) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(d)(3)(xiv) Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement, dated April 30, 2013, between the Registrant and Hamlin Capital Management, LLC, relating to the Hamlin High Dividend Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(42) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 210 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000257 on April 30, 2013.

 

(d)(3)(xv) Expense Limitation Agreement, dated March 28, 2012, between the Registrant and Thomson Horstmann & Bryant, Inc., relating to the Thomson Horstmann & Bryant MicroCap Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(46) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

C-9

 

(d)(3)(xvi) Amended Schedule A to the Expense Limitation Agreement, dated March 28, 2012, between the Registrant and Thomson Horstmann & Bryant, Inc., relating to the Thomson Horstmann & Bryant MicroCap Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(50) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 225 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000589 on October 9, 2013.

 

(d)(3)(xvii) Expense Limitation Agreement, dated January 31, 2013, between the Registrant and Harvest Global Investments Limited, relating to the Harvest Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(3)(xix) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 236 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000442 on June 24, 2014.

 

(d)(3)(xviii) Expense Limitation Agreement, dated February 23, 2016, between the Registrant and AT Investment Advisers, Inc., relating to the AT Disciplined Equity Fund, AT Income Opportunities Fund and AT Mid Cap Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(3)(xix) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(d)(3)(xix) Expense Limitation Agreement, dated December 13, 2017, between the Registrant and AT Investment Advisers, Inc., relating to the AT All Cap Growth Fund and AT Equity Income Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(3)(xviii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 288 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001113 on December 13, 2017.

 

(d)(3)(xx) Expense Limitation Agreement, effective as of July 3, 2013, between the Registrant and Fayez Sarofim & Co., relating to the Sarofim Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (d)(75) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 219 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000386 on July 26, 2013.

 

(e)(1)(i) Distribution Agreement, dated November 14, 1991, as amended and restated November 14, 2005, between the Registrant and SEI Investments Distribution Co. (formerly, SEI Financial Services Company) is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (e)(1)(i) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 252 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-15-000094 on February 27, 2015.

 

(e)(1)(ii) Amendment No. 1, effective as of August 30, 2010, to the Distribution Agreement, dated November 14, 1991, as amended and restated November 14, 2005, between the Registrant and SEI Investments Distribution Co. (formerly, SEI Financial Services Company), is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (e)(3) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 158 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-11-000517 on September 16, 2011.

 

(e)(2) Revised Form of Amended Sub-Distribution and Servicing Agreement for SEI Investments Distribution Co., dated October 2007, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (e)(2) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 76 to the Registration Statement of The Advisors' Inner Circle Fund II (File No. 033-50718), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-08-000222 on May 30, 2008.

 

(f) Not applicable.

 

C-10

 

(g)(1)(i) Amended and Restated Custody Agreement, dated February 12, 2013, between the Registrant and U.S. Bank, National Association, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (g)(1)(i) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 233 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000296 on April 30, 2014.

 

(g)(1)(ii) Amendment, dated November 6, 2013, to the Amended and Restated Custody Agreement dated February 12, 2013 between the Registrant and U.S. Bank, National Association, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (g)(1)(ii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 233 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000296 on April 30, 2014.

 

(g)(2)(i) Custodian Agreement, dated June 26, 2001, between the Registrant and MUFG Union Bank, N.A. (formerly, Union Bank of California, N.A.) is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (g)(2)(i) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(g)(2)(ii) Amended Appendix B, dated November 21, 2017, to the Custodian Agreement, dated June 26, 2001, between the Registrant and MUFG Union Bank, N.A. (formerly, Union Bank of California, N.A.), is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (g)(2)(ii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(g)(3)(i) Custodian Agreement, dated November 25, 2014, between the Registrant and Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (g)(3)(i) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(g)(3)(ii) Amendment, dated May 12, 2015, to the Custodian Agreement, dated November 25, 2014, between the Registrant and Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (g)(3)(ii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(g)(3)(iii) Amendment, dated November 6, 2015, to the Custodian Agreement, dated November 25, 2014, between the Registrant and Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (g)(3)(iii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(g)(3)(iv) Amendment, dated August 25, 2016, to the Custodian Agreement, dated November 25, 2014, between the Registrant and Brown Brothers Harriman & Co. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (g)(3)(iv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 272 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001815 on October 31, 2016.

 

(h)(1)(i) Administration Agreement, dated November 14, 1991, as amended and restated November 12, 2002, between the Registrant and SEI Investments Global Funds Services, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(3) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(h)(1)(ii) Amendment, dated June 11, 2014, relating to the LSV Funds, to the Administration Agreement, dated November 14, 1991, as amended and restated November 12, 2002, between the Registrant and SEI Investments Global Funds Services, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(1)(ii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 236 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000442 on June 24, 2014.

 

C-11

 

(h)(1)(iii) Amendment, dated May 18, 2016, to the Administration Agreement, dated November 14, 1991, as amended and restated November 12, 2002, between the Registrant and SEI Investments Global Funds Services, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(1)(iii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 268 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001670 on September 1, 2016.

 

(h)(1)(iv) Form of Amendment to the Administration Agreement, dated November 14, 1991, as amended and restated November 12, 2002, between the Registrant and SEI Investments Global Funds Services, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(1)(iv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(h)(2)(i) Transfer Agency and Service Agreement, dated January 15, 2003, between the Registrant and State Street Bank and Trust Company is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(62) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 67 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-03-000495 on August 28, 2003.

 

(h)(2)(ii) AML Delegation Amendment, dated May 20, 2003, to the Transfer Agency and Service Agreement, dated January 15, 2003, between the Registrant and State Street Bank and Trust Company is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(65) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 68 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-03-000630 on December 29, 2003.

 

(h)(2)(iii) Amendment to and Assignment of Transfer Agency and Service Agreement, dated March 8, 2018, between the Registrant and State Street Bank and Trust Company, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(2)(iii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 294 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-006346 on April 30, 2018.

 

(h)(2)(iv) Agency Agreement, dated April 1, 2006, between the Registrant and DST Systems, Inc., is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(7) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 190 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-12-000262 on May 23, 2012.

 

(h)(2)(v) Amendment, dated April 1, 2009, to the Agency Agreement, dated April 1, 2006, between the Registrant and DST Systems, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(2)(vi) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(h)(2)(vi) Amended Fee Schedule, dated August 30, 2012, to the Agency Agreement, dated April 1, 2006, between the Registrant and DST Systems, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(10) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 193 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-12-000370 on August 22, 2012.

 

(h)(2)(vii) Amendment, dated November 13, 2013, to the Agency Agreement, dated April 1, 2006, between the Registrant and DST Systems, Inc. is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(2)(viii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(h)(2)(viii) Amendment No. 3, dated April 30, 2018, to the Agency Agreement, dated April 1, 2006, between the Registrant and DST Systems, Inc., to be filed by amendment.

 

C-12

 

(h)(2)(ix) Transfer Agency Services Agreement, dated November 14, 2012, between the Registrant and Atlantic Shareholder Services, LLC, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(2)(viii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(h)(2)(x) Amendment, dated November 19, 2013, to the Transfer Agency Services Agreement, dated November 14, 2012, between the Registrant and Atlantic Shareholder Services, LLC, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(2)(ix) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(h)(3)(i) Shareholder Services Plan is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(3) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(h)(3)(ii) Amended Exhibit A to the Shareholder Services Plan, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(3)(ii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 288 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001113 on December 13, 2017.

 

(h)(4)(i) Securities Lending Agency Agreement, dated October 23, 2012, between the Registrant and Securities Lending Finance Trust Company, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(4)(i) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(h)(4)(ii) Securities Lending Authorization Agreement, dated November 3, 2014, between BNP Paribas, New York Branch and Edgewood Growth Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(4)(ii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(h)(4)(iii) First Amendment, dated February 3, 2015, to the Securities Lending Authorization Agreement, dated November 3, 2014, between BNP Paribas, acting through its New York Branch, and Edgewood Growth Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(4)(iii) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(h)(4)(iv) Securities Lending Authorization Agreement, dated June 2, 2016, between BNP Paribas, acting through its New York Branch, and the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (h)(4)(iv) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(i) Opinion and Consent of Counsel, Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP, to be filed by amendment.

 

(j) Not Applicable.

 

(k) Not Applicable.

 

(l) Not Applicable.

 

(m)(1)(i) Distribution Plan, dated August 8, 1994, as amended August 14, 2000, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (m) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 41 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0000950109-00-004829 on December 13, 2000.

 

C-13

 

(m)(1)(ii) Schedule A, as last amended [ ], to the Distribution Plan, dated August 8, 1994, as amended August 14, 2000, to be filed by amendment.

 

(m)(2)(i) Distribution Plan, dated September 17, 2002, relating to Investor Shares of the Rice Hall James SMID Cap Portfolio (formerly, Rice Hall James Mid Cap Portfolio), is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (m)(6) of Post- Effective Amendment No. 74 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-04- 000242 on June 1, 2004.

 

(m)(2)(ii) Amended Schedule A, dated November 13, 2007, to the Distribution Plan, dated September 17, 2002, relating to Investor Shares of the Rice Hall James SMID Cap Portfolio (formerly, Rice Hall James Mid Cap Portfolio), is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (m)(4) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 111 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-09-000276 on July 2, 2009.

 

(n)(1) Registrant's Amended and Restated Rule 18f-3 Plan, dated February 21, 2007, including Schedules and Certificates of Class Designation thereto, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (n) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 229 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000099 on February 28, 2014.

 

(n)(2) Amended and Restated Schedule M and Certificates of Class Designation to the Registrant’s Amended and Restated Rule 18f-3 Plan, dated February 21, 2007, relating to the LSV Funds, to be filed by amendment.

 

(n)(3) Amended and Restated Schedule B and Certificates of Class Designation to the Amended and Restated Rule 18f-3 Plan, dated February 21, 2007, relating to the Cambiar Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (n)(3) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 258 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-15-000632 on August 28, 2015.

 

(n)(4) Amended and Restated Schedule D and Certificates of Class Designation to the Amended and Restated Rule 18f-3 Plan, dated February 21, 2007, relating to the Westwood Funds, to be filed by amendment.

 

(n)(5) Schedule N and Certificates of Class Designation to the Registrant’s Amended and Restated Rule 18f-3 Plan, dated February 21, 2007, relating to the Acadian Emerging Markets Portfolio, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (n)(5) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 268 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001670 on September 1, 2016.

 

(n)(6) Amended and Restated Schedule C and Certificates of Class Designation to the Amended and Restated Rule 18f-3 Plan, dated February 21, 2007, relating to the Edgewood Growth Fund, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (n)(6) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 274 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001948 on December 30, 2016.

 

C-14

 

(n)(7) Amended and Restated Schedule L and Certificates of Class Designation to the Amended and Restated Rule 18f-3 Plan, dated February 21, 2007, relating to the AT Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (n)(7) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 288 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001113 on December 13, 2017.

 

(n)(8) Amended and Restated Schedule F and Certificates of Class Designation to the Amended and Restated Rule 18f-3 Plan, dated February 21, 2007, relating to the AlphaOne Funds, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (n)(8) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(o) Not Applicable.

 

(p)(1) Registrant's Code of Ethics, dated November 2007, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(1) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 100 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-07-000518 on November 15, 2007.

 

(p)(2) LSV Asset Management Revised Code of Ethics, dated November 29, 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(2) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(p)(3) Cambiar Investors, LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated April 1, 2016, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(3) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 267 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001529 on August 26, 2016.

 

(p)(4) Investment Counselors of Maryland, LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated November 2015, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(4) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(p)(5) C.S. McKee, L.P. Revised Code of Ethics, dated April 18, 2013, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(5) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 229 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000099 on February 28, 2014.

 

(p)(6) Thompson, Siegel & Walmsley, LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated December 5, 2016, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(6) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 277 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000154 on February 28, 2017.

 

(p)(7) First Manhattan Co. Revised Code of Ethics, dated December 2006, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(11) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 97 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-07-000146 on April 30, 2007.

 

(p)(8) Haverford Investment Management, Inc. Revised Code of Ethics, dated April 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(8) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 284 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000729 on August 28, 2017.

 

C-15

 

(p)(9) Rice Hall James & Associates, LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated June 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(9) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(p)(10) Acadian Asset Management LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated January 2016, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(10) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 272 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001815 on October 31, 2016.

 

(p)(11) Westwood Management Corp. Revised Code of Ethics, dated July 27, 2016, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(11) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 275 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001950 on December 30, 2016.

 

(p)(12) Edgewood Management LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated October 1, 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(12) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(p)(13) Sands Capital Management, LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated March 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(13) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 284 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000729 on August 28, 2017.

 

(p)(14) AlphaOne Investment Services, LLC Code of Ethics, dated May 1, 2011, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(20) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 158 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-11-000517 on September 16, 2011.

 

(p)(15) Loomis, Sayles & Company L.P. Revised Code of Ethics, dated August 9, 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(15) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(p)(16) SKY Harbor Capital Management, LLC Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(21) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 206 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000118 on March 1, 2013.

 

(p)(17) Hamlin Capital Management, LLC Revised Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(19) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 233 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000296 on April 30, 2014.

 

(p)(18) Thomson Horstmann & Bryant, Inc. Revised Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(20) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 229 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000099 on February 28, 2014.

 

(p)(19) SEI Investments Distribution Co. Code of Ethics, dated September 30, 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(19) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

C-16

 

(p)(20) Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(27) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 193 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-12-000370 on August 22, 2012.

 

(p)(21) Parametric Portfolio Associates® LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated July 1, 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(21) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 284 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000729 on August 28, 2017.

 

(p)(22) Harris Associates L.P. Revised Code of Ethics, dated September 21, 2016, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(23) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 274 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001948 on December 30, 2016.

 

(p)(23) Thornburg Investment Management Inc. Revised Code of Ethics, dated March 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(23) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 284 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000729 on August 28, 2017.

 

(p)(24) Marsico Capital Management, LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated August 10, 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(24) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(p)(25) Cramer Rosenthal McGlynn LLC Revised Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(26) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(p)(26) Fairpointe Capital LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated 2015, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(27) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(p)(27) Phocas Financial Corporation Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(35) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 193 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-12-000370 on August 22, 2012.

 

(p)(28) Allianz Global Investors U.S. LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated December 12, 2016, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(29) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 277 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000154 on February 28, 2017.

 

(p)(29) Driehaus Capital Management LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated June 15, 2015, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(30) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(p)(30) OFI SteelPath, Inc. Revised Code of Ethics, dated May 26, 2016, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(31) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 274 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001948 on December 30, 2016.

 

C-17

 

(p)(31) ClariVest Asset Management LLC Revised Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(31) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 284 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000729 on August 28, 2017.

 

(p)(32) Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, L.P. Revised Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(33) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 274 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001948 on December 30, 2016.

 

(p)(33) BlackRock Financial Management, Inc. Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(45) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 193 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-12-000370 on August 22, 2012.

 

(p)(34) Harvest Global Investments Limited Revised Code of Ethics, dated October 2015, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(36) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 263 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001304 on April 29, 2016.

 

(p)(35) AT Investment Advisers, Inc. Code of Ethics, dated March 31, 2010, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(46) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 221 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000503 on September 4, 2013.

 

(p)(36) Fayez Sarofim & Co. Code of Ethics, dated October 27, 2014, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(38) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 255 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-15-000328 on April 30, 2015.

 

(p)(37) SEI Investments Global Funds Services Code of Ethics, dated February 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(37) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(p)(38) Numeric Investors LLC Revised Code of Ethics, dated August 2014, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(40) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(p)(39) Strategic Income Management, LLC Code of Ethics, dated March 2013, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(45) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 229 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000099 on February 28, 2014.

 

(p)(40) AJO, LP Revised Code of Ethics, dated April 1, 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(40) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 284 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000729 on August 28, 2017.

 

(p)(41) Wells Fargo Portfolio Risk Advisors, a Division of Structured Asset Investors, LLC Code of Ethics, dated April 2014, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(46) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 239 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-14-000551 on August 28, 2014.

 

C-18

 

(p)(42) Robert W. Baird & Co. Incorporated Code of Ethics, dated November 30, 2015, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(44) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 261 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001069 on February 26, 2016.

 

(p)(43) Franklin Advisers, Inc. Code of Ethics, dated May 1, 2013, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(45) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(p)(44) Metropolitan West Asset Management LLC Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(46) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(p)(45) Prime Advisors, Inc. Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(47) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 266 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-16-001507 on August 24, 2016.

 

(p)(46) Villanova Investment Management Company LLC Code of Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(46) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 289 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-001158 on December 21, 2017.

 

(p)(47) BlackRock International Limited Code of Ethics, dated May 8, 2017, is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (p)(47) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 292 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-003073 on February 28, 2018.

 

(q)(1) Powers of Attorney for Ms. Betty L. Krikorian and Messrs. Robert A. Nesher, George J. Sullivan, Jr., Mitchell A. Johnson, Bruce Speca and Joseph T. Grause are incorporated herein by reference to Exhibit (q) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 212 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-13-000327 on June 18, 2013.

 

(q)(2) Power of Attorney for Mr.Stephen Connors is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (q)(2) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 258 to the Registrant's Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-15-000632 on August 28, 2015.

 

(q)(3) Resolution adopted by the Board of Trustees of the Registrant on February 28, 2017 is incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (q)(3) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 277 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001135428-17-000154 on February 28, 2017.

 

(q)(4) Powers of Attorney for Ms. Tracie E. Ahern and Mr. N. Jeffrey Klauder are incorporated herein by reference to exhibit (q)(4) of Post-Effective Amendment No. 294 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form N-1A (File No. 033-42484), filed with the SEC via EDGAR Accession No. 0001398344-18-006346 on April 30, 2018.

 

ITEM 29. PERSONS CONTROLLED BY OR UNDER COMMON CONTROL WITH REGISTRANT:

 

Not Applicable.

 

C-19

 

ITEM 30. INDEMNIFICATION:

 

Article VIII of the Agreement and Declaration of Trust filed as Exhibit (a) to the Registrant's Registration Statement is incorporated herein by reference. Insofar as indemnification for liabilities arising under the Securities Act of 1933 (the "1933 Act") may be permitted to trustees, directors, officers and controlling persons of the Registrant by the Registrant pursuant to the Agreement and Declaration of Trust or otherwise, the Registrant is aware that in the opinion of the SEC, such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the 1933 Act and, therefore, is unenforceable. In the event that a claim for indemnification against such liabilities (other than the payment by the Registrant of expenses incurred or paid by trustees, directors, officers or controlling persons of the Registrant in connection with the successful defense of any act, suit or proceeding) is asserted by such trustees, directors, officers or controlling persons in connection with the shares being registered, the Registrant will, unless in the opinion of its counsel the matter has been settled by controlling precedent, submit to a court of appropriate jurisdiction the question whether such indemnification by it is against public policy as expressed in the 1933 Act and will be governed by the final adjudication of such issues.

 

ITEM 31. BUSINESS AND OTHER CONNECTIONS OF INVESTMENT ADVISERS:

 

The following lists any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature in which each investment adviser, and each director, officer or partner of that investment adviser, is or has been engaged within the last two fiscal years for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner, or trustee. Unless noted below, none of the investment advisers, and/or director, officer or partner of each investment adviser, is or has been engaged within the last two fiscal years in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

Acadian Asset Management LLC

Acadian Asset Management LLC (“Acadian”) serves as the investment adviser to the Acadian Emerging Markets Portfolio and as an investment sub-adviser to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund. The principal address of Acadian is 260 Franklin Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02110. Acadian is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position with

Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

 John Chisholm, Executive Vice President, co-CEO, co-CIO

Acadian Asset Management (UK) Ltd

110 Cannon Street, 4th Floor
London

EC4N 6EU
United Kingdom

 

Acadian Asset Management (Australia) Ltd

20 Martin Place

Level 9, Suite 3
Sydney, NSW 2000
Australia

 

Acadian Asset Management (Japan)

Marunouchi Trust Tower Main
1-8-3 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-0005

Japan

 

Acadian Asset Management (Singapore) Pte Ltd

8 Shenton Way, #37-02
Singapore 068811

Affiliated Directorships

 

C-20

 

Name and Position with

Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Ross Dowd, Executive Vice President, co-CEO

Acadian Asset Management (UK) Ltd

110 Cannon Street, 4th Floor
London

EC4N 6EU
United Kingdom

 

Acadian Asset Management (Australia) Ltd

20 Martin Place

Level 9, Suite 3
Sydney, NSW 2000
Australia

 

Acadian Asset Management (Japan)

Marunouchi Trust Tower Main
1-8-3 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-0005

Japan

 

Acadian Asset Management (Singapore) Pte Ltd

8 Shenton Way, #37-02
Singapore 068811

Affiliated Directorships
Mark Minichiello, Executive Vice President, COO, Treasurer, Secretary

Acadian Asset Management (UK) Ltd

110 Cannon Street, 4th Floor
London

EC4N 6EU
United Kingdom

 

Acadian Asset Management (Australia) Ltd

20 Martin Place

Level 9, Suite 3
Sydney, NSW 2000
Australia

 

Acadian Asset Management (Japan)

Marunouchi Trust Tower Main
1-8-3 Marunouchi, Chiyoda-ku
Tokyo 100-0005

Japan

 

Acadian Asset Management (Singapore) Pte Ltd

8 Shenton Way, #37-02
Singapore 068811

Affiliated Directorships

Jennifer Souza, Member of Board of Managers

 

 

OMAM Inc. (f/k/a Old Mutual (US) Holdings Inc.)

(a holding company);

200 Clarendon Street, 53rd Floor

Boston, MA 02116

 

Acadian Asset Management LLC (an investment advisor);

260 Franklin Street

Boston, MA 02110

 

Investment Counselors of Maryland, LLC (an investment advisor);

300 East Lombard Street, Suite 810

Baltimore, MD 21202

Senior Vice President, Director of Affiliate

Management

 

 

 

Affiliated Directorships

 

C-21

 

Name and Position with

Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Christopher Hadley, Member of Board of Managers

OM Asset Management PLC (a public company traded on the NYSE);

5th Floor Millennium Bridge House

2 Lambeth Hill

London

EC4V 4GG

United Kingdom

 

OMAM Inc. (f/k/a Old Mutual (US) Holdings Inc.) (a holding company);

200 Clarendon Street, 53rd Floor

Boston, MA 02116

 

Acadian Asset Management LLC (an investment advisor)

260 Franklin Street

Boston, MA 02110

Executive Vice President and Chief Talent Officer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Executive Vice President and Chief Talent Officer

 

 

 

 

Affiliated Directorships

Aidan Riordan, Member of Board of Managers

OM Asset Management PLC (a public company traded on the NYSE);

5th Floor Millennium Bridge House

2 Lambeth Hill

London

EC4V 4GG

United Kingdom

 

OMAM Inc. (f/k/a Old Mutual (US) Holdings Inc.) (a holding company);

200 Clarendon Street, 53rd Floor

Boston, MA 02116

 

Acadian Asset Management LLC (an investment advisor);

260 Franklin Street

Boston, MA 02110

 

Barrow, Hanley, Mewhinney & Strauss, LLC (an investment advisor);

JPMorgan Chase Tower

2200 Ross Avenue, 31st Floor

Dallas, TX 75201

 

The Campbell Group, Inc. (a holding company for Campbell Global, LLC)

One South West Columbia, Suite 1720

Portland, OR 97258

 

Copper Rock Capital Partners LLC (an investment advisor);

200 Clarendon Street, 51st Floor

Boston, MA 02116

 

Landmark Partners LLC (an investment advisor);

10 Mill Pond Lane Simsbury
Simsbury, CT 06070

 

Investment Counselors of Maryland, LLC (an investment advisor);

300 East Lombard Street, Suite 810

Baltimore, MD 21202

 

OMAM International Ltd. (f/k/a Old Mutual Asset Management International, Ltd.) (an investment advisor);

Millennium Bridge House

2 Lambeth Hill
London

EC4V 4GG
England

 

Thompson, Siegel & Walmsley LLC (an investment advisor)

6806 Paragon Pl., Ste. 300

Richmond, VA 23230

Executive Vice President, Head of Affiliate Management

 

 

 

 

 

 

Director, Executive Vice President, Head of Affiliate Management

 

 

  

Affiliated Directorships

 

C-22

 

Name and Position with

Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Stephen Belgrad, Member of Board of Managers

OM Asset Management PLC (a public company traded on the NYSE);

5th Floor Millennium Bridge House

2 Lambeth Hill

London

EC4V 4GG

United Kingdom

 

OMAM Inc. (f/k/a Old Mutual (US) Holdings Inc.) (a holding company);

200 Clarendon Street, 53rd Floor

Boston, MA 02116

 

Acadian Asset Management LLC (an investment advisor);

260 Franklin Street

Boston, MA 02110

 

Landmark Partners LLC (an investment advisor);

10 Mill Pond Lane Simsbury
Simsbury, CT 06070

 

OMAM International Ltd. (f/k/a Old Mutual Asset Management International, Ltd.) (an investment advisor)

Millennium Bridge House

2 Lambeth Hill
London

EC4V 4GG
England

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

 

 

 

Affiliated Directorships

 

C-23

 

AJO, LP

AJO, LP (“AJO”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund. The principal address of AJO is 230 South Broad Street, 20th Floor, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19102. AJO is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of AJO engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

Allianz Global Investors U.S. LLC

Allianz Global Investors U.S. LLC (“AllianzGI US”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund and the Cornerstone Advisors Income Opportunities Fund. The principal address of AllianzGI US is 1633 Broadway, New York, New York 10019. AllianzGI US is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Douglas Eu, Member, Executive Committee Allianz Global Investors U.S. Holdings LLC

Allianz Global Investors Holdings LLC

1633 Broadway

New York, NY 10019

Managing Director, Chief Executive Officer

Allianz Global Investors GmbH

Bockenheimer Landstrasse 42-44

60323 Frankfurt

Germany

Member, Global Executive Committee
Barbara Claussen, Member, Executive Committee Allianz Global Investors U.S. Holdings LLC

Allianz Global Investors Holdings LLC

1633 Broadway

New York, NY 10019

Managing Director, Chief Administrative Officer, Member-Operating Committee
Erin Bengtson-Olivieri, Member, Executive Committee Allianz Global Investors U.S. Holdings LLC, Chief Financial Officer

Allianz Global Investors Holdings LLC

1633 Broadway

New York, NY 10019

Managing Director, Chief Financial Officer

Allianz Global Investors Distributors LLC

1633 Broadway

New York, NY 10019

Managing Director
Peter Bonanno, Member, Executive Committee Allianz Global Investors U.S. Holdings LLC

Allianz Global Investors Holdings LLC

1633 Broadway

New York, NY 10019

Managing Director, Chief Legal Officer, Secretary, Global General Counsel, Secretary - Executive Committee, Secretary - Operating Committee

Allianz Global Investors Distributors LLC

1633 Broadway

New York, NY 10019

Managing Director

 

C-24

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Paul Koo, Chief Compliance Officer

Allianz Global Investors Holdings LLC

1633 Broadway

New York, NY 10019

Director, Head of U.S. Compliance
Andreas Utermann, Chair, Global Executive Committee Allianz Global Investors

Allianz Global Investors GmbH

Bockenheimer Landstrasse 42-44

60323 Frankfurt

Germany

Managing Director, Global Chief Executive Officer, Global Chief Investment Officer

Tokio Marine Rogge Asset Management Ltd

199 Bishopsgate

London, England EC2M 3TY

Director

 

AlphaOne Investment Services, LLC

AlphaOne Investment Services, LLC (“AlphaOne”) serves as the investment adviser for the AlphaOne Small Cap Opportunities Fund, AlphaOne NextGen Technology Fund and AlphaOne VIMCO Small Cap Value Fund. The principal address of AlphaOne is 789 E. Lancaster Avenue, Suite 120, Villanova, Pennsylvania 19085. AlphaOne is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Paul Hondros, President and CEO

IntrustNet Insurance Services, LLC

7 Whippoorwill Rd.

Armonk, NY 10504

Chairman

 

AT Investment Advisers, Inc.

AT Investment Advisers, Inc. (“AT”) serves as the investment adviser for the AT Disciplined Equity Fund, AT Income Opportunities Fund, AT Mid Cap Equity Fund, AT All Cap Growth Fund and AT Equity Income Fund. The principal address of AT is One South Wacker Drive, Suite 3500, Chicago, Illinois 60606. AT is an investment adviser registered with the SEC under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Dan Brown, CFO

CIBC World Markets Corp.

425 Lexington Ave.

New York, NY 10017

Vice President Finance, US & Latin America
Stephen Wade, Director

CIBC World Markets Corp.

425 Lexington Avenue

New York, NY 10017

Senior Vice President and Chief Risk Officer, USA

 

BlackRock Financial Management, Inc.

BlackRock Financial Management, Inc. (“BlackRock”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund. The principal address of BlackRock is 55 East 52nd Street, New York, New York 10055. BlackRock is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

C-25

 

The information required by this Item 31 with respect to each director, officer or partner of BlackRock for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017 is incorporated herein by reference to Form ADV filed by BlackRock with the SEC.

 

BlackRock International Limited

BlackRock International Limited (“BIL”) serves as an investment sub-sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund. The principal address of BIL is Exchange Place One, 1 Semple Street, Edinburgh EH3 8BL, Scotland. BIL is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

The information required by this Item 31 with respect to each director, officer or partner of BIL for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017 is incorporated herein by reference to Form ADV filed by BIL with the SEC.

 

Cambiar Investors, LLC

Cambiar Investors, LLC (“Cambiar”) serves as the investment adviser to the Cambiar Opportunity Fund, the Cambiar International Equity Fund, the Cambiar Small Cap Fund, the Cambiar Global Ultra Focus Fund, the Cambiar SMID Fund, the Cambiar Global Equity Fund and the Cambiar International Small Cap Fund. The principal address of Cambiar is 200 Columbine Street, Suite 800, Denver, Colorado 80206. Cambiar is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of Cambiar engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

ClariVest Asset Management LLC

ClariVest Asset Management LLC (“ClariVest”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund and Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund. The principal address of ClariVest is 3611 Valley Centre Drive, Suite 100, San Diego, California 92130. ClariVest is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Aaron Ochstein

ClariVest Asset Management LLC

3611 Valley Centre Drive

Suite 100

San Diego, CA 92130

Manager
 

Eagle Asset Management Inc.

880 Carillon Parkway

St Petersburg, FL 33716

Senior Vice President, Global Head of Sales
 

Carillon Tower Advisers Inc. 880 Carillon Parkway

St Petersburg, FL 33716

Senior Vice President, Global Head of Sales

J. Cooper Abbott

Manager

Eagle Asset Management Inc.

880 Carillon Parkway

St Petersburg, FL 33716

Director, President
 

Carillon Tower Advisers

880 Carillon Parkway

St. Petersburg, Florida 33716

Chairman

President

 

ClariVest Asset Management LLC

3611 Valley Centre Drive

Suite 100

San Diego, CA 92130

Manager

 

C-26 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Courtland James

Manager

 

Eagle Asset Management Inc.

880 Carillon Parkway

St Petersburg, FL 33716

Executive Vice President

Director

Carillon Tower Advisers

880 Carillon Parkway

St. Petersburg, Florida 33716

Director

Executive Vice President

ClariVest Asset Management LLC
3611 Valley Centre Drive

Suite 100

San Diego, CA 92130

Manager

 

 

Cornerstone Advisors, Inc.

Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. (“Cornerstone”) serves as the investment adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund, Cornerstone Advisors Income Opportunities Fund, Cornerstone Advisors Public Alternatives Fund, Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund, and Cornerstone Advisors Core Plus Bond Fund. The principal address of Cornerstone is 225 108th Avenue NE, Suite 400, Bellevue, Washington 98004-5782. Cornerstone is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Anne Farrell

Director

Seattle Foundation

1200 – 5th Avenue, Suite 1300

Seattle, WA 98101

President Emeritus
Seattle University Trustee Emeritus
Delta Dental of Washington Director
KCTS Channel 9 Public Television Board Chairwoman
National Assoc. of Corporate Directors Directors

Greg Collins

Director

Parker Smith & Feek (PS&F)

2233 112th Ave NE

Bellevue, WA 98004

President/CEO
Overlake Medical Center Board Chairman
Seattle Metropolitan Chamber of Commerce Director

 

Cramer Rosenthal McGlynn LLC

Cramer Rosenthal McGlynn LLC (“CRM”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund. The principal address of CRM is 520 Madison Avenue, 20th Floor, New York, New York 10022. CRM is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

C-27 

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of CRM engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

C.S. McKee, L.P.

C.S. McKee, L.P. (“C.S. McKee”) serves as the investment adviser to the McKee International Equity Portfolio. The principal address of C.S. McKee is One Gateway Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15222. C.S. McKee is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Gregory M. Melvin

Chief Investment Officer

Dartmouth Capital, Inc.

750 Stonegate Drive
Wexford, PA 15090

President

 

Michael J. Donnelly

Vice President

Blue Devil Capital

2051 Murdstone Rd.

Pittsburgh, PA 15241

President

 

Driehaus Capital Management LLC

Driehaus Capital Management LLC (“Driehaus”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund. The principal address of Driehaus is 25 East Erie Street, Chicago, Illinois 60611-2703. Driehaus is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name of

Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Richard H. Driehaus

Chairman. Chief Investment Officer through 10/3/2017

Driehaus Capital Holdings LLLP* Chairman
Driehaus Mutual Funds** Trustee until 10/12/2017
Driehaus Securities LLC*** Chairman. President & Chief Executive Officer from 3/6/2017-12/31/2017

Robert H. Gordon

President and Chief Executive Officer through 3/6/2017

Driehaus Capital Holdings LLLP* President and Chief Executive Officer until 3/6/2017
Driehaus Mutual Funds** President until 3/6/2017
Driehaus Securities LLC*** President and Chief Executive Officer until 3/6/2017

Stephen J. Kneeley

Interim President and Chief Executive Officer from 3/6/2017 to 1/1/2018. Named Permanent President and Chief Executive Officer on 1/1/2018

Driehaus Capital Holdings LLLP*

 

Interim President and Chief Executive Officer from 3/6/2017 to 1/1/2018. Named Permanent President and Chief Executive Officer on 1/1/2018

Driehaus Mutual Funds**

 

Interim President from 3/6/2017 to 1/1/2018. Named Permanent President on 1/1/2018

Janet L. McWilliams

Managing Director, Secretary and General Counsel

Driehaus Capital Holdings LLLP* Senior Vice President and Secretary
Driehaus Mutual Funds** Chief Legal Officer and Assistant Vice President
Driehaus Securities LLC*** Managing Director, Secretary and General Counsel

 

C-28 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name of

Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Michelle L. Cahoon

Managing Director, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer

 

Driehaus Capital Holdings LLLP* Vice President, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer
Driehaus Mutual Funds** Vice President and Treasurer
Driehaus Securities LLC*** Managing Director, Treasurer and Chief Financial Officer

Stephen T. Weber

Managing Director, Sales and Relationship Management

Driehaus Securities LLC*** Managing Director, Sales and Relationship Management

Driehaus Securities LLC***

 

President and Chief Executive Officer effective 1/1/2018

Thomas M. Seftenberg

Managing Director, Relationship Management and Marketing

Driehaus Securities LLC*** Managing Director, Relationship Management and Marketing

Michael R. Shoemaker

Assistant Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer

Driehaus Mutual Funds** Chief Compliance Officer and Assistant Vice President
Driehaus Securities LLC*** Assistant Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer

Michael P. Kailus

Assistant Secretary

Driehaus Mutual Funds** Assistant Secretary and Anti-Money Laundering Compliance Officer
Driehaus Securities LLC*** Assistant Secretary
*Driehaus Capital Holdings LLLP, located at 25 East Erie Street, Chicago, IL 60611, is a holding company and is the majority owner of Driehaus Capital Management LLC and Driehaus Securities LLC.

 

**Driehaus Mutual Funds, located at 25 East Erie Street, Chicago, IL 60611, is an open-end management investment company registered with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission under the Investment Company Act of 1940.

 

***Driehaus Securities LLC, located at 25 East Erie Street, Chicago, IL 60611, is a limited-purpose broker-dealer registered with the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority (“FINRA”) and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

Edgewood Management LLC

Edgewood Management LLC (“Edgewood”) serves as the investment adviser to the Edgewood Growth Fund. The principal address of Edgewood is 535 Madison Avenue, 15th Floor, New York, New York 10022. Edgewood is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of Edgewood engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

Fairpointe Capital LLC

Fairpointe Capital LLC (“Fairpointe”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund. The principal address of Fairpointe is One North Franklin Street, Suite 3300, Chicago, Illinois 60606-2401. Fairpointe is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of Fairpointe engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

C-29 

 

Fayez Sarofim & Co.

Fayez Sarofim & Co. (“Fayez Sarofim”) serves as the investment adviser for the Sarofim Equity Fund. The principal address of Fayez Sarofim is 2907 Two Houston Center, 909 Fannin Street, Houston, Texas 77010. Fayez Sarofim is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Fayez Sarofim

Chairman, Co-Chief Investment Officer and Director (2015)

Sarofim Trust Co.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Chairman

Sarofim Realty Advisors Co.

8115 Preston Road
Suite 400
Dallas, TX 75225

Chairman and Director

Sarofim International Management Company

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, Chief Investment Officer and Director

The Sarofim Group, Inc.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Chairman, Chief Executive Officer and Director

Kinder Morgan, Inc.

500 Dallas

Suite 1000
Houston, TX 77002

Director

Christopher B. Sarofim

Vice Chairman

Kemper Corporation

One East Wacker Drive

Chicago, IL 60601

Director

Sarofim Trust Co.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Vice Chairman

Sarofim International Management Company

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Vice Chairman and President

The Sarofim Group, Inc.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Director, Vice Chairman

Raye G. White

Executive Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer, Chief Compliance Officer and Director

Sarofim Trust Co.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

President, Chief Executive Officer, Treasurer and Director

Sarofim International Management Company

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Executive Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer and Director

Sarofim Realty Advisors Co.

8115 Preston Road
Suite 400
Dallas, TX 75225

Secretary, Treasurer and Director

The Sarofim Group, Inc.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Executive Vice President, Secretary, Treasurer and Director

 

C-30 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

William Gentry Lee, Jr., CFA

Chief Executive Officer, Co-Chief Investment Officer and Director (2015)

Sarofim Trust Co.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Senior Vice President

Sarofim International Management Company

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Senior Vice President

Sarofim Realty Advisors Co.

8115 Preston Road
Suite 400
Dallas, TX 75225

Senior Vice President

The Sarofim Group, Inc.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Director, President

Charles E. Sheedy, CFA

Senior Vice President

Sarofim Trust Co.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Senior Vice President and Director

Sarofim Realty Advisors Co.

8115 Preston Road
Suite 400
Dallas, TX 75225

Vice Chairman

Sarofim International Management Company

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Senior Vice President

The Sarofim Group, Inc.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Senior Vice President

Alan R. Christensen, CFA

President and Head of Investment Risk

Sarofim Trust Co.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Vice President

Sarofim International Management Company

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Vice President

The Sarofim Group, Inc.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Vice President

 

C-31 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Daniel S. Crumrine

Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Deputy Chief Compliance Officer

Sarofim Trust Co.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, Secretary and Director

Sarofim Realty Advisors Co.

8115 Preston Road
Suite 400
Dallas, TX 75225

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Sarofim International Management Company

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

The Sarofim Group, Inc.

Two Houston Center

Suite 2907

Houston, TX 77010

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

 

First Manhattan Co.

First Manhattan Co. (“FMC”) serves as the investment adviser for the FMC Select Fund. The principal address of FMC is 399 Park Avenue, New York, New York 10022-7001. FMC is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

David S. Gottesman, Senior Managing Director

Berkshire Hathaway, Inc.

3555 Farnam Street

Omaha, NE 68131

Member, Board of Directors
Arthur J. Stainman, Senior Managing Director

Ark Restaurants Corp.

85 Fifth Avenue, 14th Floor

New York, NY 10003

Member, Board of Directors

 

 

Franklin Advisers, Inc.

Franklin Advisers, Inc. (“Franklin Advisers”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Core Plus Bond Fund. The principal address of Franklin Advisers is One Franklin Parkway, San Mateo, California 94403. Franklin Advisers is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of Franklin Advisers engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

C-32 

 

Hamlin Capital Management, LLC

Hamlin Capital Management, LLC (“Hamlin”) serves as the investment adviser for the Hamlin High Dividend Equity Fund. The principal address of Hamlin is 640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor, New York, New York 10019. Hamlin is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Mark Stitzer – Managing Partner

 

Hamlin Capital Advisors, LLC

5550 West Executive Drive, Suite 540

Tampa, FL 33609

Owner

Branchville Persistence, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner
Joseph Bridy – Senior Partner & Fixed Income Portfolio Manager

Hamlin Capital Advisors, LLC

5550 West Executive Drive, Suite 540

Tampa, FL 33609

Owner

Branchville Persistence, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner

Chris D’Agnes – Senior Partner & Equity Portfolio Manager

 

Hamlin Capital Advisors, LLC

5550 West Executive Drive, Suite 540

Tampa, FL 33609

Owner

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner
Charlie Garland – Senior Partner and Equity Portfolio Manager

Hamlin Capital Advisors, LLC

5550 West Executive Drive, Suite 540

Tampa, FL 33609

Owner

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner
Deborah Finegan – Senior Partner & Chief Operating Officer

Hamlin Capital Advisors, LLC

5550 West Executive Drive, Suite 540

Tampa, FL 33609

Owner

Branchville Persistence, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner
Vivian Pan – Senior Partner

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner

 

C-33 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Benjamin Kaufman – Partner & Senior Bond Analyst

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner
Parker Stitzer – Partner & Senior Bond Analyst

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner
Michael Tang – Partner & Senior Equity Analyst

Hamlin-Crest GP, LLC

640 Fifth Avenue, 6th Floor

New York, NY 10019

Owner

 

Harris Associates L.P.

Harris Associates L.P. (“Harris”) is a registered investment adviser under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. Harris serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund. The directors and executive officers of Harris, or Harris Associates, Inc. (“HAI”), its general partner, have had as their sole business, profession, vocation or employment during the past two years only their duties as executive officers/employees of Harris; Harris’ ultimate parent company, Natixis Investment Managers; HAI; Harris Associates Investment Trust (“HAIT”), a U.S. registered investment company consisting of the seven Oakmark Funds for which Harris serves as the advisor and sponsor; and/or Harris Associates Securities L.P. (“HASLP”), an affiliated limited-purpose broker-dealer of which Harris is a limited partner. The business address of Harris, HAI, HAIT and HASLP is 111 S. Wacker Drive, Suite 4600, Chicago, Illinois 60606. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position with

Investment Adviser

Name of

Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Kristi L. Rowsell

President

HAI Director and President
HAIT Trustee and President
HASLP President

Zachary Weber

Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

HAI Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer
HAIT Vice Principal
HASLP Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

David G. Herro

Deputy Chairman, Chief Investment Officer, International Equity, Portfolio Manager and Analyst

HAI

 

Director, Deputy Chairman, since 2015, and Chief Investment Officer, International Equity
HAIT Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark Global Fund, Oakmark Global Select Fund, Oakmark International Fund and Oakmark International Small Cap Fund)

Anthony P. Coniaris

Co-Chairman, Portfolio Manager and Analyst

HAI

 

Director, Co-Chairman, since 2016
HAIT Executive Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark Select Fund, Oakmark Global Fund, Oakmark Global Select Fund)

Kevin G. Grant

Co-Chairman, Portfolio Manager and Analyst

HAI

 

Director, Co-Chairman, since 2016
HAIT Executive Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark Fund)

 

C-34 

 

Name and Position with

Investment Adviser

Name of

Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Colin P. McFarland

Chief Compliance Officer

HAI Chief Compliance Officer

Clyde S. McGregor

Vice President and Portfolio Manager

HAI Vice President
HAIT Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark Equity and Income Fund and Oakmark Global Fund)

Thomas W. Murray

Vice President, Director of U.S. Research, Portfolio Manager and Analyst

HAI Vice President and Director of U.S. Research
HAIT Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark Select Fund)

William C. Nygren

Vice President, Chief Investment Officer, U.S. Equity, Portfolio Manager and Analyst

HAI Vice President and Chief Investment Officer, U.S. Equity, since 2017
HAIT Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark Fund, Oakmark Select Fund and Oakmark Global Select Fund)

Justin D. Hance

Vice President, Director of International Research, since 2016, Portfolio Manager and Analyst

HAI Vice President and Director of International Research
HAIT Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark International Small Cap Fund)

Michael L. Manelli

Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Analyst

HAI Vice President
HAIT Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark International Fund, Oakmark International Small Cap Fund)
M. Colin Hudson, Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Analyst HAI Vice President
HAIT Vice President and Portfolio Manager (Oakmark Equity and Income Fund)
Christopher W. Keller, Chief Operating Officer HAI Chief Operating Officer
HAIT Vice President

Jason E. Long

Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Analyst

HAI Vice President
HAIT Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Analyst (Oakmark Global Fund)

Ian J. McPheron

Interim General Counsel and Secretary

HAI Interim General Counsel and Secretary
HASLP Interim General Counsel, AML Officer and Secretary
HAIT Vice President

Michael J. Pietras

Chief Compliance Officer (HASLP)

HASLP Chief Compliance Officer
Jean Raby HAI Director since 2017

Natixis Investment Managers

21 quai d’Austerlitz 75013

Paris, France

Chief Executive Officer

 

C-35 

 

Name and Position with

Investment Adviser

Name of

Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

David Giunta HAI Director since 2017

Natixis Investment Managers, L.P.

888 Boylston Street

Boston, MA 02199

President and CEO, Natixis Investment Managers, L.P.
Beverly M. Bearden HAI Director since 2017

Natixis Investment Managers, L.P.

888 Boylston Street

Boston, MA 02199

Deputy Chief Executive Officer and Head of Human Resources, Natixis Investment Managers

 

Harvest Global Investments Limited

Harvest Global Investments Limited (“Harvest”) serves as the investment adviser for the Harvest Funds China All Assets and the Harvest Asian Bond Fund. The principal address of Harvest is 31/F One Exchange Square, 8 Connaught Place, Central Hong Kong. Harvest is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Zhao Xuejun

Director

Harvest Capital Management Co Limited

8/F, China Resources Building, No.8, Jianguomen Beidajie, Beijing, China

Director

Harvest Wealth Management Co., Ltd

Unit 4606-10, Shanghai Two ifc, 8 Century Avenue, Pudong New Area, Shanghai P.R.C

Director

Harvest Real Estate Investments (Cayman) Limited

190 Elgin Avenue, George Town Grand Cayman KY1-9005, Cayman Islands

Director

Harvest Real Estate Investment (HK) Limited

31/F, One Exchange Square, 8 Connaught Place, Central, Hong Kong

Director

Harvest Capital International (Cayman) Limited

190 Elgin Avenue, George Town

Grand Cayman KY1-9005

Cayman Islands

Director

Harvest Capital International (Hong Kong) Limited

701, 7/F, Tower 2, Silvercord, 30 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Director

igoldenbeta Network Technology (Cayman) Limited

190 Elgin Avenue, George Town, Grand Cayman KY1-9005, Cayman Islands

Director

 

C-36 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Li Ming

Director

Harvest Capital Management Co Limited

8/F, China Resources Building, No.8, Jianguomen Beidajie, Beijing

Director

Wang Wei

Director

Harvest Capital Management Co Limited

8/F, China Resources Building, No.8, Jianguomen Beidajie, Beijing

Chief Risk Officer,

Director

Harvest Alternative Investment Group Limited

Offshore Incorporations Centre, Road Town, Tortola, British Virgin Islands

Director

Harvest Global Capital Investments Limited

31/F, One Exchange Square, 8 Connaught Place, Central, Hong Kong

Director

Harvest Capital International (Cayman) Limited

190 Elgin Avenue, George Town

Grand Cayman KY1-9005

Cayman Islands

Director

Harvest Capital International (Hong Kong) Limited

701, 7/F, Tower 2, Silvercord, 30 Canton Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, Hong Kong

Director

Sun Chen

Director

Harvest USA Incorporation

160 Greentree Drive, Suite 101, City of Dover 19904, Country of Kent, State of Delaware

Director

HGI (USA) Investments LLC

708 Third Avenue

Sixth Floor

New York, NY 10017

Director

HGI (USA) LLC

708 Third Avenue

Sixth Floor

New York, NY 10017

Director

Harvest Global Investments (UK) Limited

5th Floor, 6 St. Andrew Street,

London, EC4A 3AE

Director

Harvest Global Capital Investments Limited

31/F, One Exchange Square, 8 Connaught Place, Central, Hong Kong

Director

 

C-37 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Kerry Chow

Employee

Harvest USA Incorporation

160 Greentree Drive, Suite 101, City of Dover 19904, Country of Kent, State of Delaware.

Director

HGI (USA) Investments LLC

708 Third Avenue

Sixth Floor

New York, NY 10017

Director

HGI (USA) LLC

708 Third Avenue

Sixth Floor

New York, NY 10017

Director

Harvest Global Investments (UK) Limited

5th Floor, 6 St. Andrew Street,

London, EC4A 3AE

Director

David Tong

Employee

Harvest USA Incorporation

160 Greentree Drive, Suite 101, City of Dover 19904, Country of Kent, State of Delaware.

Director

HGI (USA) Investments LLC

708 Third Avenue

Sixth Floor

New York, NY 10017

Director

HGI (USA) LLC

708 Third Avenue

Sixth Floor

New York, NY 10017

Director

Thomas Kwan

Employee

DKJ Company Limited

Flat E, 11/F, Block 4, Nam Fu Estate, Quarry Bay, HK

Director

Micro Eco Farm (HK) Limited

Rm A5, 3/F, On Tat Ind Bldg, No 3-5 Pat Tat St, Kowloon, HK

Director

 

C-38 

 

Haverford Financial Services, Inc.

Haverford Financial Services, Inc. (“Haverford”) serves as the investment adviser for the Haverford Quality Growth Stock Fund. The principal address of Haverford is Three Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450, Radnor, Pennsylvania 19087-4546. Haverford is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

George W. Connell

Vice Chairman & Owner

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice Chairman & Indirect Owner

 

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice Chairman & Indirect Owner

 

Drexel Morgan & Co.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

CEO, President & Owner

 

Drexel Morgan Capital Advisers, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 305

Radnor, PA 19087

Director, Indirect Owner

Red Wing Management II, LLC

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 305

Radnor, PA 19087

Indirect Owner

Joseph J. McLaughlin

Chairman, CEO & President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Chairman & CEO

 

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

Binney H. C. Wietlisbach

Executive Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

President, Director & Secretary

 

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

CEO & President

Henry B. Smith

Vice President and CIO

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President, Co-Chief Investment Officer & Director

 

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

 

C-39 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

David Brune

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

 

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

John H. Donaldson

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

 

Timothy A. Hoyle

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President & Co-Chief Investment Officer

 

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

Jeffrey M. Bagley

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

 

MarieElena V. Ness

Chief Compliance Officer

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

VP & Chief Compliance Officer

 

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

VP & Chief Compliance Officer

 

Drexel Morgan & Co.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

VP & Chief Compliance Officer

 

Regulatory Compliance Assistance, LLC Sole Member

Paul S. Rovner

Chief Financial Officer & Treasurer

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

VP, CFO, & Assistant Secretary

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

VP & CFO

Drexel Morgan & Co.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

VP & Secretary

Drexel Morgan Capital Advisers, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 305

Radnor, PA 19087

VP & CFO

 

C-40 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

John M. Derderian

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

 

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Secretary, Treasurer, Registered Principal

T. Keith Eby

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

Diane E. Goldstein

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Lydia C. Holiat

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

Charles L. Homer

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Drexel Morgan & Co.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Marketing

Seth D. Horwitz

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

Thomas J. Lynch

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

 

C-41 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Anne E. Mangini

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Drexel Morgan & Co.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Marketing

David C. Peppard

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

Patrice M. Shute

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

Robert F. Stiles

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Representative

John S. Supplee

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President & Chief Operating Officer

Haverford Trust Securities, Inc.

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Registered Principal

Christine E. Walker

Vice President

The Haverford Trust Company

3 Radnor Corporate Center, Suite 450

Radnor, PA 19087

Vice President

 

C-42 

 

Investment Counselors of Maryland, LLC

Investment Counselors of Maryland, LLC (“ICM”) serves as the investment adviser to the ICM Small Company Portfolio. The principal address of ICM is 300 East Lombard Street, Suite 810, Baltimore, Maryland 21202. ICM is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of ICM engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, L.P.

Kayne Anderson Capital Advisors, L.P. (“KACALP”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund. The principal address of KACALP is 1800 Avenue of the Stars, Third Floor, Los Angeles, California 90067. KACALP is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, the KACALP portfolio manager responsible for the management of the Cornerstone Advisors Real Assets Fund did not engage in any other business profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee, other than serving as Executive Vice President, Assistant Treasurer and Assistant Secretary of Kayne Anderson Energy Total Return Fund (“KYE”), Kayne Anderson MLP Investment Company (“KYN”), Kayne Anderson Midstream/Energy Fund (“KMF”), and Kayne Anderson Energy Development Company (“KED”). Each of these are publicly traded closed-end funds managed by KA Fund Advisors, LLC an affiliate of KACALP.

 

Loomis, Sayles & Company, L.P.

Loomis, Sayles & Company, L.P. (“Loomis Sayles”) serves as the investment adviser to the Loomis Sayles Full Discretion Institutional Securitized Fund and as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Core Plus Bond Fund. The address of Loomis Sayles is One Financial Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02111-2621. Loomis Sayles is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Robert J. Blanding, Formerly Chairman of the Board (1995 to 2017) and Director (1990 to 2017)

 

Loomis Sayles Distributors, Inc.

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

Director (1996 to 2016)

Loomis Sayles Investments Asia Pte. Ltd.

10 Collyer Quay #14-06, Ocean Financial Centre, Singapore 049315

Director (2012 to 2017)

Loomis Sayles Investments Limited

The Economist Plaza, 25 St. James’s Street, London, England SW1A 1 HA

Alternate Director (2011 to 2017)

Natixis Asset Management Japan Co. Ltd.

Hibiya Kokusai Building –4F – 2-2-3, Uchisaiwaicho Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-0011 – Japan

Director (2000 to 2017)

Daniel J. Fuss

Vice Chairman, Executive Vice President and Director

Loomis Sayles Funds I

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Executive Vice President

Loomis Sayles Funds II

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Executive Vice President

 

C-43 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

David L. Giunta

Director



Natixis Investment Managers (formerly Natixis Global Asset Management)

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

02199

President and Chief Executive Officer, US

Natixis Advisors, L.P. (formerly NGAM Advisors, L.P.)

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

President and Chief Executive Officer

Natixis Distribution Corporation (formerly NGAM Distribution Corporation)

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

02199

President and Chief Executive Officer

Natixis Distribution, L.P. (formerly NGAM Distribution, L.P.)

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

President and Chief Executive Officer

Loomis Sayles Funds I

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee and Executive Vice President

Loomis Sayles Funds II

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee, President and Chief Executive Officer

Natixis Funds Trust I

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee, President and Chief Executive Officer

Natixis Funds Trust II

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee, President and Chief Executive Officer

Natixis Funds Trust IV

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee, President and Chief Executive Officer

Natixis ETF Trust

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee, President and Chief Executive Officer

Gateway Trust

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee, President and Chief Executive Officer

John T. Hailer

Formerly Director (2008 to 2017)

Natixis Investment Managers (formerly Natixis Global Asset Management)

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

President and CEO, US & Asia

(2007 to 2017)

Natixis Funds Trust I

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee (2002 to 2016)

Natixis Funds Trust II

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee (2002 to 2016)

Natixis Funds Trust IV

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee (2002 to 2016)

Gateway Trust

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee (2007 to 2016)

Loomis Sayles Funds I

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee (2003 to 2016)

Loomis Sayles Funds II

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee (2003 to 2016)

 

C-44 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Kevin P. Charleston

Chairman, Chief Executive Officer, President and Director

 

 

Loomis Sayles Funds I

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee, President and Chief Executive Officer

Loomis Sayles Funds II

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

02199

Trustee

Natixis Funds Trust I

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee

Natixis Funds Trust II

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee

Natixis Funds Trust IV

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee

Natixis ETF Trust

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee

Gateway Trust

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA 02199

Trustee

Loomis Sayles Distributors, Inc.

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

Director

Loomis Sayles Investments Limited

The Economist Plaza, 25 St. James’s Street, London, England SW1A 1 HA

Executive Vice President

Loomis Sayles Trust Company, LLC

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

Manager and President

Loomis Sayles Investments Asia Pte. Ltd.

10 Collyer Quay #14-06, Ocean Financial Centre, Singapore 049315

Director and Chairman of the Board of Directors

John F. Gallagher III

Executive Vice President and Director

Loomis Sayles Distributors, Inc.

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

President

Loomis Sayles Distributors, L.P.

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

President

Loomis Sayles Investments Asia Pte. Ltd.

10 Collyer Quay #14-06, Ocean Financial Centre, Singapore 049315

Director

 

C-45 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Jean S. Loewenberg

Executive Vice President, General Counsel, Secretary and Director

Loomis Sayles Distributors, Inc.

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

Director

Loomis Sayles Investments Limited

The Economist Plaza, 25 St. James’s Street, London, England SW1A 1 HA

General Counsel and Secretary

Loomis Sayles Trust Company, LLC

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

Manager and Secretary

Loomis Sayles Investments Asia Pte. Ltd.

10 Collyer Quay #14-06, Ocean Financial Centre, Singapore 049315

Director

John R. Gidman

Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer and Director (formerly Chief Information Officer 2000 to 2016)

Loomis Sayles Solutions, LLC

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

President
Jaehoon Park, Executive Vice President, Chief Investment Officer and Director

Loomis Sayles Investments Asia Pte. Ltd.

10 Collyer Quay #14-06, Ocean Financial Centre, Singapore 049315

Director
Jean Raby

Natixis Investment Managers (formerly Natixis Global Asset Management)

888 Boylston Street, Boston, MA

02199

Chief Executive Officer and Member of the Senior Management Committee
John F. Russell, Executive Vice President and Director None. None.

Paul J. Sherba

Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Director

 

Loomis Sayles Distributors, Inc.

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

Vice President and Treasurer

Loomis Sayles Distributors, L.P.

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

Vice President and Treasurer

Loomis Sayles Trust Company, LLC

One Financial Center, Boston, MA 02111

Manager and Chief Financial Officer

Loomis Sayles Investments Asia Pte. Ltd.

10 Collyer Quay #14-06, Ocean Financial Centre, Singapore 049315

Director

Loomis Sayles Investments Limited

The Economist Plaza, 25 St. James’s Street, London, England SW1A 1 HA

Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

 

C-46 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Pierre P. Servant

Formerly Director (2007 to 2017)

Natixis Investment Managers (formerly Natixis Global Asset Management)

21 quai d’Austerlitz, 75634 Paris cedex 13 - France

CEO and Member of the Executive Board (2007 to 2017)
David L. Waldman Executive Vice President, Deputy Chief Investment Officer and Director None None

 

LSV Asset Management

LSV Asset Management (“LSV”) serves as the investment adviser to the LSV Value Equity Fund, LSV Conservative Value Equity Fund, LSV Small Cap Value Fund, LSV Global Value Fund, LSV U.S. Managed Volatility Fund, LSV Global Managed Volatility Fund and LSV Emerging Markets Equity Fund. LSV also serves as an investment sub-adviser to the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund. The address of LSV is 155 North Wacker Drive, Suite 4600, Chicago, Illinois 60606. LSV is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of LSV engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

Marsico Capital Management, LLC

Marsico Capital Management, LLC (“Marsico”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Global Public Equity Fund. The principal address of Marsico is 1200 17th Street, Suite 1600, Denver, Colorado 80202. Marsico is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940.

 

During the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017, no director, officer or partner of Marsico engaged in any other business, profession, vocation or employment of a substantial nature for his or her own account or in the capacity of director, officer, employee, partner or trustee.

 

Metropolitan West Asset Management LLC

Metropolitan West Asset Management LLC (“MetWest”) serves as an investment sub-adviser for the Cornerstone Advisors Core Plus Bond Fund. The principal address of MetWest is 865 S. Figueroa Street, Suite 1800, Los Angeles, California 90017. MetWest is an investment adviser registered under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940. The information listed below is for the fiscal years ended October 31, 2016 and 2017.

 

The principal business address of The TCW Group, Inc. (the “Group”), TCW Investment Management Company LLC (“TIMCO”), TCW Asset Management Company LLC (“TAMCO”), TCW LLC and Trust Company of the West is 865 South Figueroa Street, Suite 1800, Los Angeles, California 90017.

 

C-47 

 

Name and Position

with Investment Adviser

Name and Principal Business

Address of Other Company

Connection with

Other Company

Tad Rivelle

Chief Investment Officer – Fixed Income, Group Managing Director

The TCW Group, Inc.,

TCW Investment Management Company LLC,

TCW Asset Management Company LLC, TCW LLC and

Trust Company of the West

865 South Figueroa Street, Suite 1800, Los Angeles, California 90017

Group Managing Director, Chief Investment Officer - Fixed Income (TIMCO, TAMCO, and TCW LLC)

Laird Landmann

President

The TCW Group, Inc.,

TCW Investment Management Company LLC,

TCW Asset Management Company LLC, TCW LLC and

Trust Company of the West

865 South Figueroa Street, Suite 1800, Los Angeles, California 90017

Group Managing Director (TIMCO, TAMCO, TCW LLC, Group)

David Lippman

Chief Executive Officer