10-K 1 slb-10k_20161231.htm SLB-10K-20161231 slb-10k_20161231.htm

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

Form 10-K

 

(Mark One)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from __________ to __________

Commission File Number 1-4601

 

Schlumberger N.V.

(Schlumberger Limited)

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Curaçao

 

52-0684746

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)

 

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

 

 

 

42, rue Saint-Dominique
Paris, France

 

75007

 

 

 

5599 San Felipe, 17th Floor
Houston, Texas, United States of America

 

77056

 

 

 

62 Buckingham Gate,

London, United Kingdom

 

SW1E 6AJ

 

 

 

Parkstraat 83, The Hague,
The Netherlands

 

2514 JG

(Addresses of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Codes)

Registrant’s telephone number in the United States, including area code, is: (713) 513-2000

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

 

New York Stock Exchange

Euronext Paris

The London Stock Exchange

SIX Swiss Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. YES NO

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. YES NO

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. YES NO

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files.) YES NO

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer

 

 

Accelerated filer

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

 

Smaller reporting company

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). YES NO

As of June 30, 2016, the aggregate market value of the common stock of the registrant held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $109.9 billion.

As of December 31, 2016, the number of shares of common stock outstanding was 1,391,475,510.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Certain information required to be furnished pursuant to Part III of this Form 10-K is set forth in, and is hereby incorporated by reference herein from, Schlumberger’s definitive proxy statement for its 2017 Annual General Meeting of Stockholders, to be filed by Schlumberger with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days after December 31, 2016 (the “2017 Proxy Statement”).

 

 

 


SCHLUMBERGER LIMITED

Table of Contents

Form 10-K

 

 

 

Page

PART I

 

 

 

 

 

Item 1.

Business

3

 

 

 

Item 1A.

Risk Factors

7

 

 

 

Item 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

10

 

 

 

Item 2.

Properties

10

 

 

 

Item 3.

Legal Proceedings

10

 

 

 

Item 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

11

 

 

 

PART II

 

 

 

 

 

Item 5.

Market for Schlumberger’s Common Stock, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

11

 

 

 

Item 6.

Selected Financial Data

13

 

 

 

Item 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

14

 

 

 

Item 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

27

 

 

 

Item 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

30

 

 

 

Item 9.

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

66

 

 

 

Item 9A.

Controls and Procedures

66

 

 

 

Item 9B.

Other Information

67

 

 

 

PART III

 

 

 

 

 

Item 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance of Schlumberger

68

 

 

 

Item 11.

Executive Compensation

68

 

 

 

Item 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

68

 

 

 

Item 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

68

 

 

 

Item 14.

Principal Accounting Fees and Services

68

 

 

 

PART IV

 

 

 

 

 

Item 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

69

 

 

 

 

Signatures

70

 

 

 

 

Certifications

 

 

 

2

 


PART I

 

Item 1. Business.

All references in this report to “Registrant,” “Company,” “Schlumberger,” “we” or “our” are to Schlumberger Limited (Schlumberger N.V., incorporated in Curaçao) and its consolidated subsidiaries.

Founded in 1926, Schlumberger is the world’s leading provider of technology for reservoir characterization, drilling, production and processing to the oil and gas industry. Having invented wireline logging as a technique for obtaining downhole data in oil and gas wells, today Schlumberger supplies the industry’s most comprehensive range of products and services, from exploration through production, and integrated pore-to-pipeline solutions that optimize hydrocarbon recovery to deliver reservoir performance. As of December 31, 2016, the Company employed approximately 100,000 people of over 140 nationalities operating in more than 85 countries. Schlumberger has principal executive offices in Paris, Houston, London and The Hague.

On April 1, 2016, Schlumberger acquired all of the outstanding shares of Cameron International Corporation (“Cameron”), a leading provider of flow equipment products, systems and services to the oil and gas industry worldwide. The acquisition is expected to create technology-driven growth by integrating Schlumberger reservoir and well technologies with Cameron wellhead and surface equipment, flow control and processing technology. The combination of the two complementary technology portfolios provides the industry’s most comprehensive range of products and services, from exploration to production and integrated pore-to-pipeline solutions that optimize hydrocarbon recovery to deliver reservoir performance.  In connection with this transaction, Schlumberger issued 138 million shares of its common stock, valued at approximately $9.9 billion as of the acquisition date, and paid cash of $2.8 billion.

Schlumberger operates in each of the major oilfield service markets, managing its business through four Groups: Reservoir Characterization, Drilling, Production and Cameron.  Each Group consists of a number of technology-based service and product lines, or Technologies.  These Technologies cover the entire life cycle of the reservoir and correspond to a number of markets in which Schlumberger holds leading positions. The role of the Groups and Technologies is to support Schlumberger in providing the best possible service to customers and to ensure that Schlumberger remains at the forefront of technology development and services integration.  The Groups and Technologies are collectively responsible for driving excellence in execution throughout their businesses; overseeing operational processes, resource allocation and personnel; and delivering superior financial results.

The Groups are as follows:

Reservoir Characterization Group – Consists of the principal Technologies involved in finding and defining hydrocarbon resources.  These include WesternGeco®, Wireline, Testing & Process, Software Integrated Solutions (SIS) and Integrated Services Management (ISM).

 

 

WesternGeco is a leading geophysical services supplier, providing comprehensive worldwide reservoir imaging, monitoring and development services.  It provides increasingly accurate measurements and images of subsurface geology and rock properties for both customer proprietary and multiclient surveys. WesternGeco offers the industry’s most extensive multi-client library.

 

 

Wireline provides the information necessary to evaluate subsurface formation rocks and fluids to plan and monitor well construction, and to monitor and evaluate well production.  Wireline offers both openhole and cased-hole services including wireline perforating. Slickline services provide downhole mechanical well intervention.

 

 

Testing & Process provides exploration and production pressure and flow-rate measurement services both at the surface and downhole.  Through its Process Systems offering, Testing & Process provides equipment for the upstream, midstream and downstream separation of oil, gas, and produced water and water injection systems. Testing & Process also provides tubing-conveyed perforating services.

 

 

Software Integrated Solutions sells proprietary software and provides consulting, information management and IT infrastructure services to customers in the oil and gas industry. SIS also offers expert consulting services for reservoir characterization, field development planning and production enhancement, as well as industry-leading petrotechnical data services and training solutions.

 

 

Integrated Services Management provides coordination and management of Schlumberger services, products, and third parties in projects around the world. ISM offers a certified Integrated Services Project Manager as a focal point of contact between the project owner and the various Schlumberger services, ensuring alignment of project objectives.

Drilling Group – Consists of the principal Technologies involved in the drilling and positioning of oil and gas wells and comprises Bits & Drilling Tools, M-I SWACO®, Drilling & Measurements, Land Rigs and Integrated Drilling Services (IDS).

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Bits & Drilling Tools designs, manufactures and markets roller cone and fixed cutter drill bits for all environments. The drill bits include designs for premium market segments where faster penetration rates and increased footage provide significant economic benefits in lowering overall well costs. Drilling Tools includes a wide variety of bottom-hole-assembly, borehole-enlargement technologies and impact tools, as well as a comprehensive collection of tubulars and tubular services for oil and gas drilling operations.

 

 

M-I SWACO is a supplier of drilling fluid systems engineered to improve drilling performance by anticipating fluids-related problems; fluid systems and specialty equipment designed to optimize wellbore productivity; and production technology solutions formulated to maximize production rates. M-I SWACO also provides engineered managed pressure drilling and underbalanced drilling solutions, as well as environmental services and products to safely manage waste volumes generated in both drilling and production operations.

 

 

Drilling & Measurements provides mud logging services for geological and drilling surveillance, directional drilling, measurement-while-drilling and logging-while-drilling services for all well profiles as well as engineering support.

 

 

Land Rigs provides land drilling rigs and related support services.  The land drilling system of the future, currently under development, represents an integrated drilling platform bringing together digitally enabled surface and downhole hardware combined with a common optimization software to create a step-change in operational efficiency.

 

 

Integrated Drilling Services supplies all of the services necessary to construct or change the architecture (re-entry) of wells. IDS covers all aspects of well planning, well drilling, engineering, supervision, logistics, procurement and contracting of third parties, and drilling rig management.

Production Group – Consists of the principal Technologies involved in the lifetime production of oil and gas reservoirs and includes Well Services, Completions, Artificial Lift, Integrated Production Services (IPS) and Schlumberger Production Management (SPM).

 

 

Well Services provides services used during oil and gas well drilling and completion as well as those used to maintain optimal production throughout the life of a well. Such services include pressure pumping, well cementing and stimulation, and coiled tubing equipment for downhole mechanical well intervention, reservoir monitoring and downhole data acquisition.

 

 

Completions supplies well completion services and equipment that include packers, safety valves, sand control technology as well as a range of intelligent well completions technology and equipment.

 

 

Artificial Lift provides production equipment and optimization services using electrical submersible pumps, gas lift equipment, rod lift systems, progressing cavity pumps and surface horizontal pumping systems.

 

 

Integrated Production Services offers the project scope necessary to abandon, maintain, or increase the production of single or multiple wells. All aspects of project planning are addressed and include well engineering, wellsite supervision, civil engineering, logistics, procurement, contracting of third parties, and workovers.

 

 

Schlumberger Production Management is a business model for field production projects. This model combines the required services and products of the Technologies with drilling rig management, specialized engineering and project management expertise to provide a complete solution to well construction and production improvement.

 

SPM commercial arrangements create alignment between Schlumberger and the asset holder and/or the operator whereby Schlumberger receives remuneration in line with its value creation.  These projects are generally focused on developing and co-managing production of customer assets under long-term agreements.  Schlumberger manages approximately 235,000 barrels per day of oil equivalent on behalf of its clients. Schlumberger will invest its own services and products, and in some cases cash, into the field development activities and operations.  Although in certain arrangements Schlumberger is paid for a portion of the services or products it provides, generally Schlumberger will not be paid at the time of providing its services or upon delivery of its products.  Instead, Schlumberger is generally compensated based upon cash flow generated or on a fee-per-barrel basis.  This may include certain arrangements whereby Schlumberger is only compensated based upon incremental production that it helps deliver above a mutually agreed baseline.

Cameron Group – Consists of the principal Technologies involved in pressure and flow control for drilling and intervention rigs, oil and gas wells and production facilities, and includes OneSubsea®, Surface Systems, Drilling Systems, and Valves & Measurement.

 

 

OneSubsea provides integrated solutions, products, systems and services for the subsea oil and gas market, including integrated subsea production systems involving wellheads, subsea trees, manifolds and flowline connectors, control systems,

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connectors and services designed to maximize reservoir recovery and extend the life of each field.  OneSubsea offers integration and optimization of the entire production system over the life of the field by leveraging flow control expertise and process technologies with petrotechnical expertise and reservoir and production technologies.

 

 

Surface Systems designs and manufactures onshore and offshore platform wellhead systems and processing solutions, including valves, chokes, actuators and Christmas trees, and provides services to oil and gas operators.

 

 

Drilling Systems provides drilling equipment and services to shipyards, drilling contractors, E&P companies and rental tool companies. The products fall into two broad categories: pressure control equipment and rotary drilling equipment.  These products are designed for either onshore or offshore applications and include drilling equipment packages, blowout preventers (BOPs), BOP control systems, connectors, riser systems, valves and choke manifold systems, top drives, mud pumps, pipe handling equipment, rig designs and rig kits.

 

 

Valves & Measurement serves portions of the upstream, midstream and downstream markets and provides valve products and measurement systems that are primarily used to control, direct and measure the flow of oil and gas as they are moved from wellheads through flow lines, gathering lines and transmission systems to refineries, petrochemical plants and industrial centers for processing.

Supporting the Groups is a global network of research and engineering centers. Through this organization, Schlumberger is committed to advanced technology programs that enhance oilfield efficiency, lower finding and producing costs, improve productivity, maximize reserve recovery and increase asset value while accomplishing these goals in a safe and environmentally sound manner.

Schlumberger’s business is also reported through four geographic Areas: North America, Latin America, Europe/CIS/Africa and Middle East & Asia. Within these Areas, a network of GeoMarket* regions provides logistical, technical and commercial coordination.

The GeoMarket structure offers customers a single point of contact at the local level for field operations and brings together geographically focused teams to meet local needs and deliver customized solutions. The Areas and GeoMarkets are responsible for providing the most efficient and cost effective support possible to the operations.

Schlumberger primarily uses its own personnel to market its offerings. The customer base, business risks and opportunities for growth are essentially uniform across all services. Manufacturing and engineering facilities as well as research centers are shared, and the labor force is interchangeable. Technological innovation, quality of service and price differentiation are the principal methods of competition, which vary geographically with respect to the different services offered. While Schlumberger has numerous competitors, both large and small, Schlumberger believes that it is an industry leader in providing geophysical equipment and  services, wireline logging, well production testing, exploration and production software, surface equipment, artificial lift, coiled-tubing services, drilling and completion fluids, solids control and waste management, drilling pressure control, drill bits, measurement-while-drilling, logging-while-drilling, directional-drilling services and surface data (mud) logging.

GENERAL

Intellectual Property

Schlumberger owns and controls a variety of intellectual property, including but not limited to patents, proprietary information and software tools and applications that, in the aggregate, are material to Schlumberger’s business. While Schlumberger seeks and holds numerous patents covering various products and processes, no particular patent or group of patents is considered material to Schlumberger’s business.

Seasonality

Seasonal changes in weather and significant weather events can temporarily affect the delivery of oilfield services. For example, the spring thaw in Canada and consequent road restrictions can affect activity levels, while the winter months in the North Sea, Russia and China can produce severe weather conditions that typically result in temporarily reduced levels of activity. In addition, hurricanes and typhoons can disrupt coastal and offshore operations. Furthermore, customer spending patterns for multiclient data, software and other oilfield services and products generally result in higher activity in the fourth quarter of each year as clients seek to utilize their annual budgets.

Customers and Backlog of Orders

For the year ended December 31, 2016, no single customer exceeded 10% of consolidated revenue. Other than WesternGeco, and the OneSubsea and Drilling Systems businesses acquired in the Cameron transaction, Schlumberger has no significant backlog due to the

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nature of its businesses. The WesternGeco backlog was $0.8 billion at December 31, 2016 (the vast majority of which is expected to be recognized as revenue in 2017) and $1.1 billion at December 31, 2015.  The combined backlog of the OneSubsea and Drilling Systems businesses was $3.1 billion at December 31, 2016, of which approximately 60% is expected to be recognized as revenue during 2017.

Financial Information

Financial information by business segment and geographic area for the years ended December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014 is provided in Note 17 of the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Executive Officers of Schlumberger

The following table sets forth, as of January 25, 2017, the names and ages of the executive officers of Schlumberger, including all offices and positions held by each for at least the past five years.

 

Name

Age

Current Position and Five-Year Business Experience

 

 

 

Paal Kibsgaard

49

Chairman of the Board of Directors, since April 2015; Chief Executive Officer, since August 2011; and Director since April 2011.

 

 

 

Simon Ayat

62

Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, since March 2007.

 

 

 

Alexander C. Juden

56

Secretary and General Counsel, since April 2009.

 

 

 

Ashok Belani

58

Executive Vice President Technology, since January 2011.

 

 

 

Jean-Francois Poupeau

55

Executive Vice President Corporate Development and Communications, since June 2012; and President, Drilling Group, May 2010 to June 2012.

 

 

 

Khaled Al Mogharbel

46

President, Drilling Group, since July 2013; and President, Middle East, August 2011 to June 2013.

 

 

 

 

Stephane Biguet

48

Vice President and Treasurer, since December 2016; Vice President Controller, Operations, from August 2015 to December 2016; Vice President Controller, Operations & Integration,  from November  2013 to August 2015; and Vice President, Global Shared Services Organization, August 2011 to October 2013.

 

 

 

Mark Danton

60

Vice President – Director of Taxes, since January 1999.

 

 

 

Simon Farrant

52

Vice President Investor Relations, since February 2014; Special Projects Manager, December 2013 to January 2014; Vice President and General Manager, North Sea GeoMarket, April 2012 to November 2013; and Integration Manager, Smith Merger, April 2010 to April 2012.

 

 

 

Aaron Gatt Floridia

48

Chief Commercial Officer, since May 2016; and President, Reservoir Characterization Group, August 2011 to May 2016.

 

 

 

Amerino Gatti

46

President, Production Group, since May 2016; President; Well Services, July 2013 to May 2016; and Vice President Production Group North America Land, June 2010 to June 2013.

 

 

 

Howard Guild

45

Chief Accounting Officer, since July 2005.

 

 

 

Imran Kizilbash

50

Vice President, Schlumberger Venture Fund, since December 2016; Vice President and Treasurer, November 2013 to December 2016; Controller, Operations & Integration, July 2013 to October 2013; and Controller, Operations, January 2011 to June 2013.

 

 

 

Saul R. Laureles

51

Director, Corporate Legal, since July 2014; Assistant Secretary, since April 2007; Deputy General Counsel, Governance and Securities, October 2012 to June 2014; and Senior Counsel, April 2007 to October 2012.

 

 

 

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Catherine MacGregor

44

President, Reservoir Characterization Group, since August 2016; President, Europe and Africa, July 2013 to July 2016; and Wireline President, May 2009 to June 2013.

 

 

 

Gerard Martellozo

61

Vice President Human Resources, since June 2014; Senior Advisor to the CEO, August 2012 to May 2014; and Human Resources Manager, Drilling Group, May 2010 to July 2012.

 

 

 

Abdellah Merad

43

Vice President Controller, Operations, since December 2016; Vice President, Global Shared Services Organization, from November 2013 to December 2016; GeoMarket Cost Management Project Manager, from August 2013 to November 2013; and North Africa GeoMarket Manager, from June 2010 to July 2013.

 

 

 

R. Scott Rowe

45

President, Cameron Group, since April 2016; President and Chief Executive Officer, Cameron, October 2015 to April 2016; President and Chief Operating Officer, Cameron, October 2014 to September 2015; Chief Executive Officer, OneSubsea, March 2014 to September 2014; President, Subsea System, August 2012 to February 2014; and President, Engineered & Process Values, April 2010 to August 2012.

 

 

 

Patrick Schorn

48

President, Operations, since August 2015; President, Operations & Integration, July 2013 to August 2015; and President, Production Group, January 2011 to June 2013.

Available Information

The Schlumberger Internet website is www.slb.com. Schlumberger uses its Investor Relations website, www.slb.com/ir, as a routine channel for distribution of important information, including news releases, analyst presentations, and financial information. Schlumberger makes available free of charge through its Investor Relations website at www.slb.com/ir access to its Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, its Proxy Statements and Forms 3, 4 and 5 filed on behalf of directors and executive officers, and amendments to each of those reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Alternatively, you may access these reports at the SEC’s Internet website at www.sec.gov.  Copies are also available, without charge, from Schlumberger Investor Relations, 5599 San Felipe, 17th Floor, Houston, Texas 77056.  Unless expressly noted, the information on our website or any other website is not incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K and should not be considered part of this Form 10-K or any other filing Schlumberger makes with the SEC.

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

The following discussion of risk factors known to us contains important information for the understanding of our “forward-looking statements,” which are discussed immediately following Item 7A. of this Form 10-K and elsewhere. These risk factors should also be read in conjunction with Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes included in this Form 10-K.

We urge you to consider carefully the risks described below, as well as in other reports and materials that we file with the SEC and the other information included or incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K. If any of the risks described below or elsewhere in this Form 10-K were to materialize, our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows or prospects could be materially adversely affected. In such case, the trading price of our common stock could decline and you could lose part or all of your investment. Additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem immaterial may also materially adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Demand for the majority of our services is substantially dependent on the levels of expenditures by our customers.  The current significant oil and gas industry downturn has resulted in reduced demand for oilfield services, which has had, and may continue to have, a material adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows. If these conditions worsen or oil and gas prices do not improve, it could have a further material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Demand for the majority of our services depends substantially on the level of expenditures by our customers for the exploration, development and production of oil and natural gas reserves. These expenditures are generally dependent on our customers’ views of future oil and natural gas prices and are sensitive to our customers’ views of future economic growth and the resulting impact on demand for oil and natural gas.  Since 2014, oil and gas prices have declined significantly, resulting in lower expenditures by our customers.  As a result, many of our customers have reduced or delayed their oil and gas exploration and production spending, reducing the demand for our products and services and exerting downward pressure on the prices that we charge.  These conditions have had, and may continue to have, an adverse impact on our financial condition.  

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The continued low oil and gas prices have caused a reduction in cash flows for our customers, which has had a significant adverse effect on the financial condition of some of our customers. This has resulted, in and may continue to result in, project modifications, delays and cancellations, general business disruptions, and delays in payment of, or nonpayment of, amounts that are owed to us. These effects could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

The prices for oil and natural gas have historically been volatile and can be affected by a variety of factors, including:

 

demand for hydrocarbons, which is affected by general economic and business conditions;

 

the ability or willingness of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (“OPEC”) to set and maintain production levels for oil;

 

oil and gas production levels by non-OPEC countries;

 

the level of excess production capacity;

 

political and economic uncertainty and geopolitical unrest;

 

the level of worldwide oil and gas exploration and production activity;

 

access to potential resources;

 

governmental policies and subsidies;

 

the costs of exploring for, producing and delivering oil and gas;

 

technological advances affecting energy consumption; and

 

weather conditions.

There can be no assurance that the demand or pricing for oil and natural gas will follow historic patterns or recover meaningfully in the near term.  Continued or worsening conditions in the oil and gas industry could have a further material adverse affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

A significant portion of our revenue is derived from our non-United States operations, which exposes us to risks inherent in doing business in each of the over 85 countries in which we operate.

Our non-United States operations accounted for approximately 80% of our consolidated revenue in 2016, 76% in 2015 and 71% in 2014. Operations in countries other than the United States are subject to various risks, including:

 

volatility in political, social and economic conditions;

 

exposure to expropriation of our assets or other governmental actions;

 

social unrest, acts of terrorism, war or other armed conflict;

 

confiscatory taxation or other adverse tax policies;

 

deprivation of contract rights;

 

trade and economic sanctions or other restrictions imposed by the United States, the European Union or other countries;

 

restrictions under the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) or similar legislation;

 

restrictions on the repatriation of income or capital;

 

currency exchange controls;

 

inflation; and

 

currency exchange rate fluctuations and devaluations.

Our failure to comply with complex US and foreign laws and regulations could have a material adverse effect on our operations.

We are subject to complex US and foreign laws and regulations, such as the FCPA, the U.K. Bribery Act and various other anti-bribery and anti-corruption laws.  We are also subject to trade control regulations and trade sanctions laws that restrict the movement of certain goods to, and certain operations in, various countries or with certain persons.  Our ability to transfer people and products among certain countries is subject to maintaining required licenses and complying with these laws and regulations. The internal controls, policies and procedures, and employee training and compliance programs we have implemented to deter prohibited practices may not be effective in preventing employees, contractors or agents from violating or circumventing such internal policies or violating applicable laws and regulations.  Any determination that we have violated or are responsible for violations of anti-bribery, trade

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control, trade sanctions or anti-corruption laws could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition.  Violations of international and US laws and regulations or the loss of any required licenses may result in fines and penalties, criminal sanctions, administrative remedies or restrictions on business conduct, and could have a material adverse effect on our reputation and our business, operating results and financial condition.

Environmental compliance costs and liabilities could reduce our earnings and cash available for operations.

We are subject to increasingly stringent laws and regulations relating to importation and use of hazardous materials, radioactive materials, chemicals and explosives and to environmental protection, including laws and regulations governing air emissions, hydraulic fracturing, water discharges and waste management. We incur, and expect to continue to incur, capital and operating costs to comply with environmental laws and regulations. The technical requirements of these laws and regulations are becoming increasingly complex, stringent and expensive to implement. These laws may provide for “strict liability” for remediation costs, damages to natural resources or threats to public health and safety. Strict liability can render a party liable for damages without regard to negligence or fault on the part of the party. Some environmental laws provide for joint and several strict liability for remediation of spills and releases of hazardous substances.

We use and generate hazardous substances and wastes in our operations. In addition, many of our current and former properties are, or have been, used for industrial purposes. Accordingly, we could become subject to material liabilities relating to the investigation and cleanup of potentially contaminated properties, and to claims alleging personal injury or property damage as the result of exposures to, or releases of, hazardous substances. In addition, stricter enforcement of existing laws and regulations, new laws and regulations, the discovery of previously unknown contamination or the imposition of new or increased requirements could require us to incur costs or become the basis for new or increased liabilities that could reduce our earnings and our cash available for operations.

We could be subject to substantial liability claims, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

The technical complexities of our operations expose us to a wide range of significant health, safety and environmental risks. Our offerings involve production-related activities, radioactive materials, chemicals, explosives and other equipment and services that are deployed in challenging exploration, development and production environments. An accident involving these services or equipment, or a failure of a product, could cause personal injury, loss of life, damage to or destruction of property, equipment or the environment, or suspension of operations. Our insurance may not protect us against liability for certain kinds of events, including events involving pollution, or against losses resulting from business interruption. Moreover, we may not be able to maintain insurance at levels of risk coverage or policy limits that we deem adequate. Any damages caused by our services or products that are not covered by insurance, or are in excess of policy limits or subject to substantial deductibles, could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Demand for our products and services could be reduced by existing and future legislation or regulations.

Environmental advocacy groups and regulatory agencies in the United States and other countries have been focusing considerable attention on the emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gasses and their potential role in climate change.  Existing or future legislation and regulations related to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change, as well as government initiatives to conserve energy or promote the use of alternative energy sources, may significantly curtail demand for and production of fossil fuels such as oil and gas in areas of the world where our customers operate and thus adversely affect future demand for our services. This may, in turn, adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Some international, national, state and local governments and agencies have also adopted laws and regulations or are evaluating proposed legislation and regulations that are focused on the extraction of shale gas or oil using hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulic fracturing is a stimulation treatment routinely performed on oil and gas wells in low-permeability reservoirs. Specially engineered fluids are pumped at high pressure and rate into the reservoir interval to be treated, causing cracks in the target formation. Proppant, such as sand of a particular size, is mixed with the treatment fluid to keep the cracks open when the treatment is complete. Future hydraulic fracturing-related legislation or regulations could limit or ban hydraulic fracturing, or lead to operational delays and increased costs, and therefore reduce demand for our pressure pumping services. If such additional international, national, state or local legislation or regulations are enacted, it could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

If we are unable to maintain technology leadership, this could adversely affect any competitive advantage we hold.

The oilfield service industry is highly competitive.  Our ability to continually provide competitive technology and services can impact our ability to defend, maintain or increase prices for our services, maintain market share, and negotiate acceptable contract terms with our customers.  If we are unable to continue to develop and produce competitive technology or deliver it to our clients in a timely and cost-competitive manner in the various markets we serve, it could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

9

 


Limitations on our ability to protect our intellectual property rights, including our trade secrets, could cause a loss in revenue and any competitive advantage we hold.

Some of our products or services, and the processes we use to produce or provide them, have been granted patent protection, have patent applications pending or are trade secrets. Our business may be adversely affected if our patents are unenforceable, the claims allowed under our patents are not sufficient to protect our technology, our patent applications are denied or our trade secrets are not adequately protected. Our competitors may be able to develop technology independently that is similar to ours without infringing on our patents or gaining access to our trade secrets, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We may be subject to litigation if another party claims that we have infringed upon its intellectual property rights.

The tools, techniques, methodologies, programs and components we use to provide our services may infringe upon the intellectual property rights of others. Infringement claims generally result in significant legal and other costs and may distract management from running our core business. Royalty payments under licenses from third parties, if available, would increase our costs. Additionally, developing non-infringing technologies would increase our costs. If a license were not available, we might not be able to continue providing a particular service or product, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Failure to obtain and retain skilled technical personnel could impede our operations.

We require highly skilled personnel to operate and provide technical services and support for our business. Competition for the personnel required for our businesses intensifies as activity increases. In periods of high utilization it may become more difficult to find and retain qualified individuals. This could increase our costs or have other adverse effects on our operations.

Severe weather conditions may adversely affect our operations.

Our business may be materially affected by severe weather conditions in areas where we operate. This may entail the evacuation of personnel and stoppage of services. In addition, if particularly severe weather affects platforms or structures, this may result in a suspension of activities. Any of these events could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

Cybersecurity risks and threats could adversely affect our business.

We rely heavily on information systems to conduct our business.  There can be no assurance that the systems we have designed to prevent or limit the effects of cyber incidents or attacks will be sufficient to prevent or detect such incidents or attacks, or to avoid a material impact on our systems when such incidents or attacks do occur.  If our systems for protecting against cybersecurity risks are circumvented or breached, this could result in the loss of our intellectual property or other proprietary information, including customer data, and disruption of our business operations.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

None.

Item 2. Properties.

Schlumberger owns or leases numerous manufacturing facilities, administrative offices, service centers, research centers, data processing centers, mines, ore, drilling fluid and production chemical processing centers, sales offices and warehouses throughout the world. Schlumberger views its principal manufacturing, mining and processing facilities, research centers and data processing centers as its “principal owned or leased facilities.”

The following sets forth Schlumberger’s principal owned or leased facilities:

Beijing, China; Beziers and Clamart, France; Fuchinobe, Japan; Kleppestø and Stavanger, Norway; Singapore; Abingdon and Cambridge, United Kingdom; Moscow, Russia; Johor, Malaysia; and within the United States: Boston, Massachusetts; Houston, Katy, Rosharon and Sugar Land, Texas; Berwick, Louisiana; Battle Mountain, Nevada and Greybull, Wyoming.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

The information with respect to this Item 3. Legal Proceedings is set forth in Note 16 of the Consolidated Financial Statements.

10

 


Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

The barite and bentonite mining operations of M-I LLC, an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, are subject to regulation by the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977. Information concerning mine safety violations or other regulatory matters required by section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and Item 104 of Regulation S-K is included in Exhibit 95 to this Form 10-K.

PART II

 

Item 5. Market for Schlumberger’s Common Stock, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

As of December 31, 2016, there were 26,201 stockholders of record. The principal United States market for Schlumberger’s common stock is the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), where it is traded under the symbol “SLB,” although it is traded on other exchanges in and outside the United States, including the Euronext Paris, the London Stock Exchange and the SIX Swiss Exchange.

Common Stock, Market Prices and Dividends Declared per Share

Quarterly high and low prices for Schlumberger’s common stock as reported by the NYSE (composite transactions), together with dividends declared per share in each quarter of 2016 and 2015, were as follows:

 

 

Price Range

 

 

Dividends

 

 

High

 

 

Low

 

 

Declared

 

2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUARTERS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First

$

76.16

 

 

$

59.60

 

 

$

0.50

 

Second

 

81.96

 

 

 

71.69

 

 

 

0.50

 

Third

 

83.97

 

 

 

74.33

 

 

 

0.50

 

Fourth

 

87.00

 

 

 

77.48

 

 

 

0.50

 

2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

QUARTERS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First

$

89.00

 

 

$

75.60

 

 

$

0.50

 

Second

 

95.13

 

 

 

83.60

 

 

 

0.50

 

Third

 

86.69

 

 

 

67.75

 

 

 

0.50

 

Fourth

 

82.43

 

 

 

66.57

 

 

 

0.50

 

 

There are no legal restrictions on the payment of dividends or ownership or voting of such shares, except as to shares held as treasury stock. Under current legislation, stockholders are not subject to any Curaçao withholding or other Curaçao taxes attributable to the ownership of such shares.

11

 


The following graph compares the cumulative total stockholder return on Schlumberger common stock with the cumulative total return on the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (S&P 500 Index) and the cumulative total return on the Philadelphia Oil Service Index. It assumes $100 was invested on December 31, 2011 in Schlumberger common stock, in the S&P 500 Index and in the Philadelphia Oil Service Index, as well as the reinvestment of dividends on the last day of the month of payment. The stockholder return set forth below is not necessarily indicative of future performance. The following graph and related information shall not be deemed “soliciting material” or to be “filed” with the SEC, nor shall such information be incorporated by reference into any future filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, except to the extent that Schlumberger specifically incorporates it by reference into such filing.

 

Comparison of Five-Year Cumulative Total Return Among

Schlumberger Common Stock, the S&P 500 Index and the

Philadelphia Oil Service Index

 

 

Share Repurchases

On July 18, 2013, the Schlumberger Board of Directors (the “Board”) approved a $10 billion share repurchase program for Schlumberger common stock, to be completed at the latest by June 30, 2018.

12

 


Schlumberger’s common stock repurchase program activity for the three months ended December 31, 2016 was as follows:

  

 

(Stated in thousands, except per share amounts)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Number of Shares Purchased

 

 

Average price Paid per Share

 

 

Total Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Program

 

 

Maximum Value of Shares that may yet be Purchased Under the Program

 

October 1 through October 31, 2016

 

327.5

 

 

$

77.98

 

 

 

327.5

 

 

$

735,996

 

November 1 through November 30, 2016

 

1,091.0

 

 

$

78.22

 

 

 

1,091.0

 

 

$

650,653

 

December 1 through December 31, 2016

 

71.0

 

 

$

79.02

 

 

 

71.0

 

 

$

645,040

 

 

 

1,489.5

 

 

$

73.86

 

 

 

1,489.5

 

 

 

 

 

 

In connection with the exercise of stock options under Schlumberger’s stock incentive plans, Schlumberger routinely receives shares of its common stock from optionholders in consideration of the exercise price of the stock options. Schlumberger does not view these transactions as requiring disclosure under this Item 5 as the number of shares of Schlumberger common stock received from optionholders is not material.

On January 21, 2016, the Board approved a new $10 billion share repurchase program for Schlumberger common stock.  This new program will take effect once the remaining $0.6 billion authorized to be repurchased under the July 18, 2013 program is exhausted.

Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities

None.

Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

The following selected consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with both “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” of this Form 10-K in order to understand factors, such as business combinations and charges and credits, which may affect the comparability of the Selected Financial Data:

 

(Stated in millions, except per share amounts)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

2013

 

 

2012

 

Revenue

$

27,810

 

 

$

35,475

 

 

$

48,580

 

 

$

45,266

 

 

$

41,731

 

Income (loss) from continuing operations

$

(1,687

)

 

$

2,072

 

 

$

5,643

 

 

$

6,801

 

 

$

5,230

 

Diluted earnings (loss) per share from continuing operations

$

(1.24

)

 

$

1.63

 

 

$

4.31

 

 

$

5.10

 

 

$

3.91

 

Cash

$

2,929

 

 

$

2,793

 

 

$

3,130

 

 

$

3,472

 

 

$

1,905

 

Short-term investments

$

6,328

 

 

$

10,241

 

 

$

4,371

 

 

$

4,898

 

 

$

4,369

 

Working capital

$

8,868

 

 

$

12,791

 

 

$

10,518

 

 

$

12,700

 

 

$

11,788

 

Fixed income investments, held to maturity

$

238

 

 

$

418

 

 

$

442

 

 

$

363

 

 

$

245

 

Total assets

$

77,956

 

 

$

68,005

 

 

$

66,904

 

 

$

67,100

 

 

$

61,547

 

Long-term debt

$

16,463

 

 

$

14,442

 

 

$

10,565

 

 

$

10,393

 

 

$

9,509

 

Total debt

$

19,616

 

 

$

18,999

 

 

$

13,330

 

 

$

13,176

 

 

$

11,630

 

Schlumberger stockholders' equity

$

41,078

 

 

$

35,633

 

 

$

37,850

 

 

$

39,469

 

 

$

34,751

 

Cash dividends declared per share

$

2.00

 

 

$

2.00

 

 

$

1.60

 

 

$

1.25

 

 

$

1.10

 

 

 

 

 

13

 


Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

The following discussion and analysis contains forward-looking statements, including, without limitation, statements relating to our plans, strategies, objectives, expectations, intentions and resources. Such forward-looking statements should be read in conjunction with our disclosures under “Item 1A. Risk Factors” of this Form 10-K.

2016 Executive Overview

On April 1, 2016, Schlumberger completed its acquisition of Cameron, combining their complementary portfolios into a pore-to-pipeline products and services offering for the world’s oil and gas industry.  The transaction enables the creation of technology-driven growth by integrating Schlumberger reservoir and well technology with Cameron wellhead and surface equipment, flow control and processing technology.

Schlumberger revenue of $27.8 billion in 2016 represented a decrease of 22% from 2015, despite three quarters of activity from the acquired Cameron Group, which contributed $4.2 billion in revenue.  Excluding the Cameron Group, revenue declined 34%.  This revenue drop was due to continued weakness in exploration and production spending as a result of the deepest and longest industry crisis in more than 30 years.

The year began with Brent crude prices experiencing the sharpest fall in 30 years to $26 per barrel in January 2016, thus continuing the downturn that the oil and gas industry endured during the previous year.

Given two successive years of investment cuts, oil supply growth slowed significantly despite record OPEC production. Non-OPEC production fell sharply, largely due to a significant drop in US light tight oil production. However, robust global demand enabled the oil markets to tighten and draw down on the vast accumulation of crude and product stocks by mid-year.

The year’s end was marked by OPEC and certain non-OPEC countries, including Russia, agreeing to cut production by a combined 1.7 million barrels per day.  These agreements are expected to accelerate the drawdown of stocks in 2017 and have subsequently spurred a recovery in oil prices, which reached $55 per barrel at the end of 2016.

In the natural gas markets, US production declined during 2016 as a result of the drop in gas drilling activity, while demand growth was robust throughout the year. Low gas prices during most of 2016 encouraged the power sector to continue to favor gas over coal. The year was also marked by the start-up of the Sabine Pass liquefied natural gas (LNG) plant in Texas, which exported its first shipment in early 2016, thus starting a trend that should make the US the third largest exporter of LNG by the end of 2020.

Europe continued to see modest demand growth due in part to coal plant retirements. Gas prices, however, fell to a seven-year low as supplies from Russia, Norway and North Africa reached record highs. The Asian markets continued to be in slow growth mode, albeit with slight improvements in China. Nonetheless, oversupply persisted as Australian LNG exports ramped up, driving LNG prices down even further from the already low-levels of 2015. The global outlook for LNG is largely unchanged, with continued oversupply and low prices.

Schlumberger’s financial performance in 2016 was severely impacted by the significant decrease in land-based activity, particularly in North America where the average land rig count dropped 46% as compared to the previous year. Supply overcapacity in the land market remained high for most of 2016, resulting in pricing pressure across a broad range of oilfield services.  As a result, North America revenue, excluding the impact of the Cameron Group, declined 48% due to a decrease in US land revenue of 52%.  Including the Cameron Group, North America revenue decreased 32%.  Internationally, revenue declined 28%, excluding the impact of Cameron (17% including the Cameron Group) due to customer budget cuts, activity disruptions and a shift in revenue mix that impacted Schlumberger’s results in most basins and market segments around the world.  Revenue in the Europe, CIS & Africa Area decreased due to lower demand for exploration and development-related products and services as E&P budgets were reduced, particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa.  In Latin America, revenue declined due to customer budget constraints across the Area and, more specifically, in Venezuela where operations were scaled back to align with collections.  Middle East & Asia revenue decreased primarily due to reduced activity in Asia-Pacific countries, while robust activity in the Middle East was more than offset by pricing concessions.

Since the start of this downturn, and as it deepened during 2016, Schlumberger has navigated the commercial landscape by balancing pricing concessions and market share and also by proactively removing significant costs through workforce reductions, internal efficiency improvements and strong supply chain management. As a result, Schlumberger has delivered superior financial results by maintaining pretax operating margins well above 10% and delivering sufficient free cash flow to cover a range of strategic capital investments, as well as our ongoing dividend commitments.

14

 


After nine quarters of unprecedented activity decline, the business environment stabilized in the third quarter of 2016 and revenue increased slightly in the fourth quarter, suggesting that the bottom of this cycle has been reached.

Schlumberger expects the growth in E&P investments in 2017 to be led initially by land operators in North America.  E&P spending surveys currently indicate that 2017 E&P investments in North America will increase by approximately 30%, which should lead to both higher activity and a recovery in service industry pricing.

Schlumberger expects the 2017 recovery in the international markets to proceed more slowly than in North America. This will likely lead to a third successive year of underinvestment, with a continued low rate of new project approvals and an accelerating production decline in the aging production base.  These factors taken together are increasing the likelihood of a significant supply deficit in the medium term, which can only be avoided by a broad-based global increase in E&P spending, which is expected to start unfolding in the later parts of 2017 and leading into 2018.

Fourth Quarter 2016 Results

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Stated in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fourth Quarter 2016

 

 

Third Quarter 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before

 

 

Revenue

 

 

Taxes

 

 

Revenue

 

 

Taxes

 

Reservoir Characterization

$

1,699

 

 

$

316

 

 

$

1,689

 

 

$

322

 

Drilling

 

2,013

 

 

 

234

 

 

 

2,021

 

 

 

218

 

Production

 

2,179

 

 

 

132

 

 

 

2,083

 

 

 

98

 

Cameron

 

1,346

 

 

 

188

 

 

 

1,341

 

 

 

215

 

Eliminations & other

 

(130

)

 

 

(60

)

 

 

(115

)

 

 

(38

)

Pretax operating income

 

 

 

 

 

810

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

815

 

Corporate & other (1)

 

 

 

 

 

(245

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(267

)

Interest income (2)

 

 

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24

 

Interest expense (3)

 

 

 

 

 

(126

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(135

)

Charges & credits (4)

 

 

 

 

 

(675

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(237

)

 

$

7,107

 

 

$

(213

)

 

$

7,019

 

 

$

200

 

 

(1)

Comprised principally of certain corporate expenses not allocated to the segments, stock-based compensation costs, amortization expense associated with certain intangible assets, certain centrally managed initiatives and other nonoperating items.  

(2) 

Excludes interest income included in the segments’ income (fourth quarter 2016: $7 million; third quarter 2016: $7 million).

(3) 

Excludes interest expense included in the segments’ income (fourth quarter 2016: $13 million; third quarter 2016: $14 million).

(4)

Charges and credits are described in detail in Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

Fourth-quarter revenue of $7.1 billion increased 1% sequentially.  This increase was primarily driven by the Production Group, which grew 5% due to increased hydraulic fracturing activity in the Middle East and in North America land.

Fourth-quarter pretax operating margin was essentially flat sequentially at 11.4% as margin improvements in the Production and Drilling Groups were balanced by contractions in the Cameron and Reservoir Characterization Groups.

Reservoir Characterization Group

Fourth-quarter revenue of $1.7 billion increased 1% sequentially due to the ramp-up in Testing & Process activity in Kuwait and increased software license and maintenance sales. These effects were slightly offset by the seasonal decrease in Wireline activity in Norway and Russia.

Pretax operating margin of 19% decreased 49 basis points (bps) sequentially as the increased contribution from software and maintenance sales was more than offset by the decline in high-margin Wireline activities.

15

 


Drilling Group

Fourth-quarter revenue of $2.0 billion was flat sequentially as the continued strong directional drilling activity in North America land was offset by lower drilling activity in the International Areas. The improvement in North America revenue primarily came from increased uptake of Drilling & Measurements, Bits & Drilling Tools technologies. The lower revenue in the International Areas was primarily due to completed Drilling & Measurement projects, while the winter slowdown in Russia and Norway affected Drilling & Measurements and M-I SWACO activity.

Pretax operating margin of 12% expanded 81 bps sequentially despite revenue being flat. This was largely due to pricing improvements from greater uptake of drilling technologies on increasing activity on land in the US, which mainly affected Drilling & Measurements and Bits & Drilling Tools.

Production Group

Fourth-quarter revenue of $2.2 billion increased 5% sequentially as a result of strong fracturing activity on unconventional resource developments on land in the Middle East, mainly in Saudi Arabia, and in North America where the land rig count and fracturing stage count increased.  Revenue on land in the US increased both on volume and on a modest pricing recovery.

Pretax operating margin of 6% increased 134 bps sequentially on increased activity, which drove efficiency and better operational execution in the Middle East. The modest pricing recovery on land in the US also contributed to the margin expansion.

Cameron Group

Fourth-quarter revenue of $1.3 billion was flat sequentially. Among the Group’s businesses, OneSubsea reported an 11% sequential increase from strong project activity and execution, while Surface Systems posted strong sales in the Middle East. These increases, however, were offset by a decline in revenue in Drilling Systems driven by a declining backlog and lower bookings. Valves & Measurement was also lower following the prior quarter’s strong international shipments.

Pretax operating margin of 14% declined 207 bps sequentially due to the drop in high-margin Drilling Systems project volume.

 

Full-Year 2016 Results

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Stated in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before

 

 

Revenue

 

 

Taxes

 

 

Revenue

 

 

Taxes

 

Reservoir Characterization

$

6,743

 

 

$

1,228

 

 

$

9,738

 

 

$

2,465

 

Drilling

 

8,561

 

 

 

994

 

 

 

13,563

 

 

 

2,538

 

Production

 

8,709

 

 

 

528

 

 

 

12,311

 

 

 

1,570

 

Cameron

 

4,211

 

 

 

653

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

-

 

Eliminations & other

 

(414

)

 

 

(130

)

 

 

(137

)

 

 

(63

)

Pretax operating income

 

 

 

 

 

3,273

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6,510

 

Corporate & other (1)

 

 

 

 

 

(925

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(768

)

Interest income (2)

 

 

 

 

 

84

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

30

 

Interest expense (3)

 

 

 

 

 

(517

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(316

)

Charges & credits (4)

 

 

 

 

 

(3,820

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(2,575

)

 

$

27,810

 

 

$

(1,905

)

 

$

35,475

 

 

$

2,881

 

 

(1) 

Comprised principally of certain corporate expenses not allocated to the segments, stock-based compensation costs, amortization expense associated with certain intangible assets, certain centrally managed initiatives and other nonoperating items.  Full-year 2016 includes $189 million of amortization expense associated with intangible assets recorded as a result of the acquisition of Cameron, which was completed on April 1, 2016.

(2)

Excludes interest income included in the segments’ income (2016: $26 million; 2015: $22 million).

(3)

Excludes interest expense included in the segments’ income (2016: $53 million; 2015: $30 million).

(4) 

Charges and credits are described in detail in Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

16

 


Full-year 2016 revenue of $27.8 billion decreased 22% year-on-year.  This included nine months of activity from the acquired Cameron Group, which contributed $4.2 billion of revenue.  

Full-year 2016 revenue from the Reservoir Characterization and Production Groups declined by 31% and 29%, respectively, as a result of lower demand for exploration- and development-related products and services as E&P budgets were further reduced.  Drilling Group revenue fell 37% due to the rig count decline in both North America and internationally.

Full-year 2016 pretax operating income margin decreased 658 bps to 12% as a result of the overall decline in activity and pervasive pricing concessions.  The margin decrease was highest in the Reservoir Characterization Group, which contracted by 710 bps to 18%.  Drilling Group pretax operating margin fell 710 bps to 12%, while the Production Group decreased 669 bps to 6%.  The Cameron Group posted a pretax margin of 16%.

Reservoir Characterization Group

Full-year 2016 revenue of $6.7 billion decreased 31% year-on-year primarily due to sustained cuts in exploration and discretionary spending.

Year-on-year, pretax operating margin decreased 710 bps to 18% due to reduced high-margin Wireline and Testing Services activities.

Drilling Group

Full-year 2016 revenue of $8.6 billion decreased 37% year-on-year primarily due to the severe drop in rig count in both North America and internationally combined with pricing pressure that mainly affected Drilling & Measurements and M-I SWACO activity.

Year-on-year, pretax operating margin decreased 710 bps to 12% primarily due to the significant decline in higher-margin activities of Drilling & Measurements combined with pricing weakness.

Production Group

Full-year 2016 revenue of $8.7 billion decreased 29% year-on-year with most of the decrease attributable to a decline in North America, particularly on Well Services pressure pumping technologies driven by activity declines and pricing pressure as the land rig count declined dramatically.

Year-on-year, pretax operating margin decreased 669 bps to 6% as a result of lower activity and increasing pricing pressure, which continued to impact North America land.

Cameron Group

Cameron Group contributed nine-month revenue of $4.2 billion and pretax operating margin of 16%.  Revenue was impacted by a declining project backlog as well as a further slowdown in North America land activity, which also affected the short-cycle businesses of the Valves & Measurement and Surface product lines.

Pretax operating margin of 16% was driven by strong project execution and manufacturing efficiency in OneSubsea and overall cost control across the Group.

17

 


Full-Year 2015 Results

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Stated in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income

 

 

 

 

 

 

Income

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before

 

 

Revenue

 

 

Taxes

 

 

Revenue

 

 

Taxes

 

Reservoir Characterization

$

9,738

 

 

$

2,465

 

 

$

13,339

 

 

$

3,770

 

Drilling

 

13,563

 

 

 

2,538

 

 

 

18,128

 

 

 

3,805

 

Production

 

12,311

 

 

 

1,570

 

 

 

17,329

 

 

 

3,130

 

Eliminations & other

 

(137

)

 

 

(63

)

 

 

(216

)

 

 

(129

)

Pretax operating income

 

 

 

 

 

6,510

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10,576

 

Corporate & other (1)

 

 

 

 

 

(768

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(848

)

Interest income (2)

 

 

 

 

 

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

31

 

Interest expense (3)

 

 

 

 

 

(316

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(347

)

Charges and credits (4)

 

 

 

 

 

(2,575

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(1,773

)

 

$

35,475

 

 

$

2,881

 

 

$

48,580

 

 

$

7,639

 

 

(1)

Comprised principally of certain corporate expenses not allocated to the segments, stock-based compensation costs, amortization expense associated with certain intangible assets, certain centrally managed initiatives and other nonoperating items.

(2)

Excludes interest income included in the segments’ income (2015: $22 million; 2014: $20 million).

(3)

Excludes interest expense included in the segments’ income (2015: $30 million; 2014: $22 million).

(4) 

Charges and credits are described in detail in Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

Full-year 2015 revenue of $35.5 billion decreased 27% year-on-year.  This decrease was primarily due to customer budget cuts and pricing concessions as customers responded to lower commodity prices.  Revenue was also impacted by the fall of certain currencies against the US dollar, which accounted for approximately 20% of the revenue decline.

Full-year 2015 revenue from the Reservoir Characterization and Drilling Groups declined by 27% and 25%, respectively, as a result of lower demand as E&P budgets were reduced due to lower commodity prices.  Production Group revenue fell by 29% due to activity reductions and pricing pressure as the land rig count dropped drastically in North America.

Full-year 2015 pretax operating income margin decreased 342 bps to 18% as a result of the overall decline in activity combined with the pricing pressure which most notably impacted the businesses in North America.

Reservoir Characterization Group

Full-year 2015 revenue of $9.7 billion was 27% lower than the same period last year primarily due to sustained customer cuts in exploration and discretionary spending that impacted all Technologies.

Year-on-year, pretax operating margin decreased 295 bps to 25% as a result of an unfavorable overall revenue mix reflecting the decline in high-margin exploration activity as well as lower high-margin multiclient and software sales.

Drilling Group

Full-year 2015 revenue of $13.6 billion was 25% lower than the previous year primarily due to the severe drop in rig count in North America, reduced activity levels and service pricing concessions internationally.  Unfavorable currency effects in Russia and Venezuela also contributed to the decline.

Year-on-year, pretax operating margin decreased 228 bps to 19%, primarily due to a decrease in higher-margin activities of Drilling & Measurements as well as pricing concessions.  Despite the revenue decline, prompt action on cost management and the benefit of a local cost structure that minimized the impact of unfavorable currency effects on pretax operating income helped limit the operating margin decline.

18

 


Production Group

Full-year 2015 revenue of $12.3 billion decreased 29% year-on-year, with approximately two-thirds of the decline attributable to Well Services pressure pumping technologies as a result of activity reductions and pricing pressure as the land rig count declined dramatically in North America.

Year-on-year, pretax operating margin declined 531 bps to 13% as lower activity and increasing pricing pressure continued in North America land.  

 

Interest and Other Income

Interest & other income consisted of the following:

 

(Stated in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Interest income

$

110

 

 

$

52

 

 

$

51

 

Earnings of equity method investments

 

90

 

 

 

184

 

 

 

240

 

 

$

200

 

 

$

236

 

 

$

291

 

 

The increase in interest income in 2016 as compared to 2015 and 2014 is primarily attributable to the higher cash and short-term investment balances as a result of the issuance of $6.0 billion of Senior Notes during the fourth quarter of 2015.

The decrease in earnings of equity method investments primarily reflects the effects of the downturn in the oil and gas industry, which has negatively impacted the majority of Schlumberger’s investments in affiliates, particularly those in North America.  The decrease in 2016 also reflects the fact that Schlumberger stopped recording equity income from the OneSubsea joint venture in April 2016 as a result of Schlumberger’s acquisition of Cameron.

Interest Expense

Interest expense of $570 million in 2016 increased by $224 million compared to 2015 primarily due to the issuance of $6.0 billion of Senior Notes during the fourth quarter of 2015 and the impact of the $3.0 billion of debt assumed in the acquisition of Cameron.

Interest expense of $346 million in 2015 decreased by $23 million compared to 2014, as the impact of a higher weighted average debt balance of approximately $0.5 billion was more than offset by a 30 bps decrease in the weighted average borrowing rates from 2.8% in 2014 to 2.5% in 2015.

Other

Research & engineering and General & administrative expenses, as a percentage of Revenue, were as follows:

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Research & engineering

 

3.6

%

 

 

3.1

%

 

 

2.5

%

General & administrative

 

1.4

%

 

 

1.4

%

 

 

1.0

%

 

Although Research & engineering and General & administrative costs have either increased or remained flat as a percentage of Revenue in 2016 as compared to 2015, they have decreased in absolute dollar terms as a result of cost control measures that have been implemented, offset in part by the impact of the Cameron acquisition.

Income Taxes

The Schlumberger effective tax rate was 14.6% in 2016, 25.9% in 2015, and 25.2% in 2014.

The Schlumberger effective tax rate is sensitive to the geographic mix of earnings. When the percentage of pretax earnings generated outside of North America increases, the Schlumberger effective tax rate will generally decrease. Conversely, when the percentage of pretax earnings generated outside of North America decreases, the Schlumberger effective tax rate will generally increase.

19

 


The effective tax rate for each of 2016, 2015 and 2014 was significantly impacted by the charges and credits described in Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements because they were only partially tax effective.  Excluding the impact of these charges and credits, the effective tax rate was 15.9% in 2016, 20.2% in 2015 and 21.9% in 2014.  The decrease in the effective tax rate, excluding the impact of charges and credits, was primarily attributable to a change in the geographic mix of earnings and the favorable resolution of tax examinations in certain jurisdictions.

It is expected that the effective tax rate will gradually increase over the course of 2017 as a result of the expected improvement in activity in North America.

Charges and Credits

Schlumberger recorded significant charges and credits in continuing operations during 2016, 2015 and 2014. These charges and credits, which are summarized below, are more fully described in Note 3 to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

The following is a summary of the 2016 charges and credits, of which $3.172 billion were classified as Impairments & other and $648 million were classified as Merger & integration in the Consolidated Statement of Income:

 

 

(Stated in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pretax

 

 

Tax

 

 

Net

 

Workforce reductions

$

880

 

 

$

69

 

 

$

811

 

Fixed asset impairments

 

684

 

 

 

52

 

 

 

632

 

Inventory write-downs

 

616

 

 

 

49

 

 

 

567

 

Amortization of inventory fair value adjustment

 

299

 

 

 

90

 

 

 

209

 

Facility closure costs

 

226

 

 

 

53

 

 

 

173

 

North America pressure pumping asset impairments

 

209

 

 

 

67

 

 

 

142

 

Multiclient seismic data impairment

 

198

 

 

 

62

 

 

 

136

 

Facility impairments

 

165

 

 

 

58

 

 

 

107

 

Other merger and integration-related

 

160

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

132

 

Costs associated with exiting certain activities

 

98

 

 

 

23

 

 

 

75

 

Merger-related employee benefits

 

83

 

 

 

13

 

 

 

70

 

Currency devaluation loss in Egypt

 

63

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

63

 

Other restructuring charges

 

55

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

55

 

Professional fees

 

45

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

35

 

Contract termination costs

 

39

 

 

 

9

 

 

 

30

 

 

$

3,820

 

 

$

583

 

 

$

3,237

 

The following is a summary of the 2015 charges and credits, all of which were classified as Impairments & other in the Consolidated Statement of Income:

 

(Stated in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pretax

 

 

Tax

 

 

Net

 

Workforce reductions

$

920

 

 

$

107

 

 

$

813

 

Fixed asset impairments

 

776

 

 

 

141

 

 

 

635

 

Inventory write-downs

 

269

 

 

 

27

 

 

 

242

 

Impairment of SPM project

 

182

 

 

 

36

 

 

 

146

 

Facility closures

 

177

 

 

 

37

 

 

 

140

 

Geopolitical events

 

77

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

77

 

Currency devaluation loss in Venezuela

 

49

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

49

 

Contract termination costs

 

41

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

39

 

Other

 

84

 

 

 

7

 

 

 

77

 

 

$

2,575

 

 

$

357

 

 

$

2,218

 

20

 


The following is a summary of the 2014 charges and credits, all of which were classified as Impairments & other in the Consolidated Statement of Income:

 

 

(Stated in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pretax

 

 

Tax

 

 

Net

 

WesternGeco restructuring

$

806

 

 

$

25

 

 

$

781

 

Currency devaluation loss in Venezuela

 

472

 

 

 

-

 

 

 

472

 

Workforce reduction

 

296

 

 

 

37

 

 

 

259

 

Impairment of SPM project

 

199

 

 

 

72

 

 

 

127

 

 

$

1,773

 

 

$

134

 

 

$

1,639

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

Schlumberger had total Cash, Short-term investments and Fixed income investments, held to maturity of $9.5 billion, $13.5 billion and $7.9 billion at December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.  Total debt was $19.6 billion, $19.0 billion and $13.3 billion at December 31, 2016, 2015 and 2014, respectively.

Details of the components of liquidity as well as changes in liquidity follows:

 

(Stated in millions)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dec. 31,

 

 

Dec. 31,

 

 

Dec. 31,

 

Components of Liquidity:

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Cash

$

2,929

 

 

$

2,793

 

 

$

3,130

 

Short-term investments

 

6,328

 

 

 

10,241

 

 

 

4,371

 

Fixed income investments, held to maturity

 

238

 

 

 

418

 

 

 

442

 

Long-term debt – current portion

 

(1,975

)

 

 

(3,011

)

 

 

(1,244

)

Short-term borrowings

 

(1,178

)

 

 

(1,546

)

 

 

(1,521

)

Long-term debt

 

(16,463

)

 

 

(14,442

)

 

 

(10,565

)

Net debt (1)

$

(10,121

)

 

$

(5,547

)

 

$

(5,387

)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Changes in Liquidity:

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Income (loss) from continuing operations before noncontrolling interests

$

(1,627

)

 

$

2,135