10-K 1 a2017form10-k.htm 10-K Document
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, DC  20549
FORM 10-K
  x
Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017
or
  o
Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
Commission File Number: 1-9819
DYNEX CAPITAL, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Virginia
52-1549373
(State or other jurisdiction of
(I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)
Identification No.)
 
 
4991 Lake Brook Drive, Suite 100, Glen Allen, Virginia
23060-9245
(Address of principal executive offices)
(Zip Code)
 
 
(804) 217-5800
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
 
 
 
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $.01 par value
New York Stock Exchange
8.50% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, par value $0.01 per share
New York Stock Exchange
7.625% Series B Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock, par value $0.01 per share
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.
Yes           o           No           x

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.
Yes           o           No           x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
Yes           x           No           o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).
Yes           x           No           o




Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
o
Accelerated filer
x
Non-accelerated filer
o (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company
o
 
 
Emerging growth company
o
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Yes           o           No           x

As of June 30, 2017, the aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $334,762,891 based on the closing sales price on the New York Stock Exchange of $7.10.

On February 28, 2018, the registrant had 55,788,414 shares outstanding of common stock, $0.01 par value, which is the registrant’s only class of common stock.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Definitive Proxy Statement for the registrant’s 2018 annual meeting of shareholders, expected to be filed pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days from December 31, 2017, are incorporated by reference into Part III.
 




DYNEX CAPITAL, INC.
FORM 10-K
TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
 
 
Page
 
 
 
Item 1.
Business
 
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
 
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
 
Item 2.
Properties
 
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
 
Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
 
 
 
 
PART II.
 
 
 
Item 5.
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
 
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
 
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
 
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
 
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
 
Item 9B.
Other Information
 
 
 
 
PART III.
 
 
 
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
 
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
 
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
 
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
 
Item 14.
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
 
 
 
 
PART IV.
 
 
 
Item 15.
Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules
 
Item 16.
Form 10-K Summary
 
 
 
 
SIGNATURES
 




i


CAUTIONARY STATEMENT – This Annual Report on Form 10-K may contain “forward-looking” statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (or “1933 Act”), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (or “Exchange Act”). We caution that any such forward-looking statements made by us are not guarantees of future performance, and actual results may differ materially from those expressed or implied in such forward-looking statements.  Some of the factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from estimates expressed or implied in our forward-looking statements are set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2017. See Item 1A. “Risk Factors” as well as “Forward-Looking Statements” set forth in Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, we refer to Dynex Capital, Inc. and its subsidiaries as “the Company,” “we,” “us,” or “our,” unless we specifically state otherwise or the context indicates otherwise.  


PART I.

ITEM 1.
BUSINESS


COMPANY OVERVIEW

We are an internally managed mortgage real estate investment trust, or mortgage REIT, which primarily invests in residential and commercial mortgage-backed securities. We finance our investments principally with borrowings under repurchase agreements. Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) under the symbol “DX”. Our objective is to provide attractive risk-adjusted returns to our shareholders over the long term that are reflective of a leveraged, high quality fixed income portfolio with a focus on capital preservation. We seek to provide returns to our shareholders primarily through regular quarterly dividends and also through capital appreciation.

We also have two series of preferred stock outstanding, our 8.50% Series A Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock (the "Series A Preferred Stock") which is traded on the NYSE under the symbol "DXPRA", and our 7.625% Series B Cumulative Redeemable Preferred Stock (the "Series B Preferred Stock") which is traded on the NYSE under the symbol "DXPRB".

Investment Philosophy and Strategy
    
Our investments consist principally of Agency mortgage-backed securities (“MBS”) including residential MBS (“RMBS”) and commercial MBS (“CMBS”). Agency MBS have a guaranty of principal payment by an agency of the U.S. government or a U.S. government-sponsored entity (“GSE”) such as Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. We also invest in CMBS interest-only (“IO”) securities issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and in non-Agency MBS issued by non-governmental enterprises which have no guaranty of principal payment. Our investments in non-Agency MBS are generally higher quality senior or mezzanine classes (typically rated ‘A’ or better by one or more of the nationally recognized statistical rating organizations) that are more liquid (i.e., they are more easily converted into cash either through sales or pledges as collateral for repurchase agreement borrowings) and have less exposure to credit losses than lower-rated non-Agency MBS. We may also invest in debt securities issued by the United States Department of the Treasury (“the Treasury” and such securities, “U.S. Treasuries”).

Our investment philosophy encompasses a macroeconomic, top-down approach that focuses on the expected risk-adjusted outcome of any investment. Key points of our investment philosophy include the following:

understanding macroeconomic conditions including the current state of the U.S. and global economies;
understanding the regulatory environment, competition for assets, and the terms and availability of financing;
sector analysis including understanding absolute returns, relative returns and risk-adjusted returns;
security and financing analysis including sensitivity analysis on credit, interest rate volatility, and market value risk; and
managing performance and portfolio risks, including but not limited to interest rate, credit, prepayment, and liquidity risks.
    

1


Our investment philosophy will dictate our investment strategy and our allocation of our investment capital. We regularly review our existing operations to determine whether our investment strategy or business model should change, including through capital reallocation, changing our targeted investments, and shifting our risk position. At various times during the last 10 years, based on market conditions, we have allocated capital to a variety of investments including adjustable-rate and fixed-rate Agency RMBS, Agency CMBS, investment grade and unrated non-Agency RMBS and CMBS, Agency and non-Agency CMBS IO, and residual interests in securitized mortgage loans. In allocating our capital and executing our strategy, we seek to balance the risks of owning specific types of mortgage assets and other investments with the earnings opportunity on the investment. From time to time, we also consider expanding our capital base as well as merger, acquisition or divestiture opportunities. We analyze and evaluate potential business opportunities that we identify or are presented to us, including possible merger, acquisition, or divestiture transactions, that might be a strategic fit for our investment strategy or asset allocation or otherwise maximize value for our shareholders. Pursuing such an opportunity or transaction could require us to issue additional equity or debt securities.

RMBS. As of December 31, 2017, the majority of our RMBS are Agency issued securities collateralized primarily by fixed-rate single family mortgage loans. The remainder of our RMBS portfolio is collateralized by adjustable-rate mortgage loans (“ARMs”), which have interest rates that generally adjust at least annually to an increment over a specified interest rate index, and hybrid ARMs, which are loans that have a fixed rate of interest for a specified period (typically three to ten years) and then adjust their interest rate at least annually to an increment over a specified interest rate index (primarily one-year LIBOR). During 2017, we shifted capital away from adjustable-rate Agency RMBS and significantly increased our investment in fixed-rate assets which management believes offer better risk-adjusted returns in the current flattening yield curve environment.

We also purchase to-be-announced securities (“TBAs” or “TBA securities”) as a means of investing in and financing non-specified fixed-rate Agency RMBS. A TBA security is a forward contract (“TBA contract”) for the purchase (“long position”) or sale (“short position”) of a fixed-rate Agency MBS at a predetermined price with certain principal and interest terms and certain types of collateral, but the particular Agency securities to be delivered are not identified until shortly before the settlement date. Our purchases of TBAs are financed by executing a series of transactions which effectively delay the settlement of a forward purchase of a non-specified Agency RMBS by entering into an offsetting TBA short position, net settling the paired-off positions in cash, and simultaneously entering into an identical TBA long position with a later settlement date. We refer to these net long positions in TBAs as “dollar roll positions” and view them as economically equivalent to investing in and financing Agency RMBS using short-term repurchase agreements. TBAs purchased for a forward settlement month are generally priced at a discount relative to TBAs sold for settlement in the current month. This discount, often referred to as “drop income”, represents the economic equivalent of net interest income (interest income less implied financing cost) on the underlying Agency security from trade date to settlement date. We may also enter into short positions in TBAs as economic hedges as discussed below under “Hedging Strategy”. We account for all TBAs (whether dollar roll positions or economic hedges) as derivative instruments because we cannot assert that it is probable at inception and throughout the term of an individual TBA transaction that its settlement will result in physical delivery of the underlying Agency RMBS, or the individual TBA transaction will not settle in the shortest period possible.

CMBS. As of December 31, 2017, the majority of our CMBS investments are fixed-rate Agency-issued securities backed by multifamily housing loans. The remainder of our CMBS portfolio contains non-Agency issued securities backed by multifamily housing as well as other commercial real estate property types such as office building, retail, hospitality, and health care. Loans underlying CMBS are generally fixed-rate, mature in eight to eighteen years, have amortization terms of up to 30 years, and are geographically dispersed. These loans typically have some form of prepayment protection provisions (such as prepayment lock-out) or prepayment compensation provisions (such as yield maintenance or prepayment penalty). Yield maintenance and prepayment penalty requirements are intended to create an economic disincentive for the loans to prepay.

CMBS IO. CMBS IO are interest-only securities issued as part of a CMBS securitization and represent the right to receive a portion of the monthly interest payments (but not principal cash flows) on the unpaid principal balance of the underlying pool of commercial mortgage loans. We invest in both Agency-issued and non-Agency issued CMBS IO. The loans collateralizing CMBS IO pools are very similar in composition to the pools of loans that collateralize CMBS as discussed above. Since CMBS IO securities have no principal associated with them, the interest payments received are based on the unpaid principal balance of the underlying pool of mortgage loans, which is often referred to as the notional amount. Most loans in these securities have some form of prepayment protection from early repayment including absolute loan prepayment lock-outs, loan prepayment penalties, or yield maintenance requirements similar to CMBS described above. There are no prepayment protections, however, if the loan defaults and is partially or wholly repaid earlier because of loss mitigation actions taken by the underlying loan

2


servicer, and therefore yields on CMBS IO investments are dependent upon the underlying loan performance. Because Agency-issued MBS generally contain higher credit quality loans, Agency CMBS IO are expected to have a lower risk of default than non-Agency CMBS IO. Our CMBS IO investments are investment grade-rated with the majority rated ‘AAA’ by at least one of the nationally recognized statistical rating organizations.

The performance of our investment portfolio will depend on many factors including but not limited to interest rates, trends of interest rates, the steepness of interest rate curves, prepayment rates on our investments, demand for our investments, general market liquidity, and economic conditions and their impact on the credit performance of our investments. In addition, our business model may be impacted by other factors such as the state of the overall credit markets, which could impact the availability and costs of financing. See “Factors that Affect Our Results of Operations and Financial Condition” below and "Risk Factors-Risks Related to Our Business" in Item 1A of Part I of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for further discussion.

Financing Strategy

We use leverage to enhance the returns on our invested capital by pledging our investments as collateral for borrowings primarily through the use of uncommitted repurchase agreements with major financial institutions and broker-dealers. These repurchase agreements generally have original terms to maturity of overnight to six months, though in some instances we may enter into longer-dated maturities depending on market conditions. We pay interest on our repurchase agreement borrowings at a rate usually based on a spread to a short-term interest rate such as LIBOR and fixed for the term of the borrowing. Borrowings under these repurchase agreements are renewable at the discretion of our lenders and do not contain guaranteed roll-over terms. One of our repurchase agreement lenders provides a committed repurchase agreement financing facility to us with an aggregate borrowing capacity of $400 million that expires in May 2019.

Repurchase agreement financing is provided principally by major financial institutions and broker-dealers acting as financial intermediaries for money market funds and securities lenders that provide funds for the repurchase agreement markets. Repurchase agreement financing exposes us to counterparty risk to such financial intermediaries, principally related to the excess of our collateral pledged over the amount borrowed. To mitigate this risk, we enter into repurchase agreement financings with multiple lenders. In limited instances, a money market fund or securities lender has directly provided funds to us without the involvement of a financial intermediary typically at a lower cost than we would incur borrowing from the financial intermediary. Borrowing directly from these sources also reduces our risk to the financial intermediaries.

Please refer to "Risk Factors-Risks Related to Our Business" in Item 1A of Part I of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding significant risks related to repurchase agreement financing.

Hedging Strategy
    
We use derivative instruments to attempt to mitigate our exposure to adverse changes in interest rates. Such exposure results from our ownership of investments which are primarily fixed-rate and financed with repurchase agreements which have adjustable rates and significantly shorter maturities than the weighted average life of our investments. Changes in interest rates can impact net interest income, the market value of our investments, and book value per common share. In a period of rising interest rates, our earnings and cash flow may be negatively impacted by borrowing costs increasing faster than interest income from our assets, and our book value may decline as a result of declining market values of our MBS. We primarily utilize interest rate swaps to hedge our interest rate risk. An interest rate swap is a contractual agreement between two counterparties under which each agrees to make periodic interest payments to the other for an agreed upon period based upon a notional amount. The majority of our interest rate swap agreements are “pay-fixed” whereby we pay a fixed interest rate and receive a floating interest rate based on one or three-month LIBOR, although we may from time to time also enter into “receive-fixed” interest rate swap agreements. Interest rate swap agreements with a forward starting date do not have an exchange of these interest costs until the effective date of such agreement. To a lesser extent, we may also use Eurodollar futures and short positions in TBAs to hedge interest rate risk. Unlike our long positions in TBAs for which we execute dollar roll transactions, which are described earlier under “Investment Philosophy and Strategy”, we do not simultaneously enter into an identical TBA short position with a later settlement date when we pair off the original short position. We may also utilize interest rate cap or floor agreements, put and call options on securities or securities underlying futures contracts, forward rate agreements, or swaptions. Our hedging activity is in large part driven by our views of macroeconomic fundamentals, though we may occasionally manage our hedging instruments based on market activities.

3



In conducting our hedging activities, we intend to comply with REIT and tax limitations on our hedging instruments which could limit our activities and the instruments that we may use. We also intend to enter into derivative contracts only with the counterparties that we believe have a strong credit rating to help mitigate the risk of counterparty default or insolvency.
Operating Policies and Risk Management

We invest and manage our capital pursuant to Operating Policies approved by our Board of Directors. Our Operating Policies set forth investment and risk limitations as they relate to the Company's investment activities and set parameters for the Company's investment and capital allocation decisions. They require that we manage our operations and investments to comply with various REIT limitations (as discussed further below in “Federal Income Tax Considerations”) and to avoid qualifying as an investment company as such term is defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the "1940 Act") or as a commodity pool operator under the Commodity Exchange Act.

Our Operating Policies place limits on certain risks to which we are exposed, such as interest rate and convexity risk, earnings at risk, and shareholders’ equity at risk from changes in fair value of our investment securities as a result of changes in interest rates, prepayment rates, investment prices and spreads, and other items. As part of our risk management process, our Operating Policies require us to perform a variety of stress tests to model the effect of adverse market conditions on our investment portfolio value and our liquidity.

Our Operating Policies limit our investment in non-Agency MBS that are rated BBB+ or lower at the time of purchase by any of the nationally recognized statistical ratings organizations to $250 million in market value and limit our shareholders’ equity at risk to a maximum of $50 million. We also conduct our own independent evaluation of the credit risk on any non-Agency MBS, such that we do not rely solely on the security’s credit rating. In addition, our purchases of non-rated MBS in recent years have been shorter duration securities which we believe to have less credit risk than typical non-rated MBS. Our Operating Policies also set forth limits for the Company’s overall leverage which is discussed further in “Liquidity and Capital Resources” within Part II, Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Within the overall limits established by our Operating Policies, our investment and capital allocation decisions depend on prevailing market conditions and other factors and may change over time in response to opportunities available in different economic and capital market environments. The Board may adjust the Operating Policies of the Company from time to time based on macroeconomic expectations, market conditions, and risk tolerances.

Factors that Affect Our Results of Operations and Financial Condition

Our financial performance is driven by the performance of our investment portfolio and related financing and hedging activity. Management focuses on net interest income, net income, comprehensive income, book value per common share, and core net operating income to common shareholders (a non-GAAP measure) as measures of our financial performance. Our financial performance may be impacted by multiple factors, many of which are related to or influenced by macroeconomic conditions, geopolitical conditions, policies of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (the “Federal Reserve”), U.S. fiscal and regulatory policy and foreign central bank and government policy. Other factors that may impact our financial performance include, but are not limited to, the absolute level of interest rates, the relative slope of interest rate curves, changes in interest rates and market expectations of future interest rates, actual and estimated future prepayment rates on our investments, competition for investments, economic conditions and their impact on the credit performance of our investments, and market required yields as reflected by market spreads. These factors are influenced by market forces beyond our control and could be negatively influenced by market volatility.

Our business model may also be impacted by the availability and cost of financing and the state of the overall credit markets. Reductions or limitations in the availability of financing for our investments could significantly impact our business or force us to sell assets, potentially at losses. Repurchase agreement lending markets have been stable for the last several years, but lending by larger U.S. domiciled banks has declined in recent years due to increased regulation and changes to regulatory capital requirements. Their repurchase market participation has been replaced by smaller independent broker dealers that are generally less regulated and by U.S. domiciled broker dealer subsidiaries of foreign financial institutions. It is uncertain how these relatively new participants will react during periods of market stress. Other factors that could also impact our business

4


include changes in regulatory requirements, including requirements to qualify for registration under the 1940 Act, and REIT requirements.

We believe that regulatory impacts on financial institutions, many of which are our trading and financing counterparties, continue to pose a threat to the overall liquidity in the capital markets. There remains uncertainty as to the ultimate impact or outcome of certain regulations under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the "Dodd-Frank Act") and restrictions on market-making activities of large U.S. financial institutions could result in reduced liquidity in times of market stress. In 2017 the Federal Reserve began curtailing its reinvestment of principal payments received on its Agency RMBS portfolio, which may result in price volatility as the Federal Reserve further reduces principal reinvestments. Finally, the market liquidity of our investments and the financing markets could be negatively impacted if the Federal Reserve's Federal Open Market Committee (or "FOMC") suddenly changes market expectations of the target Federal Funds Rate or takes other actions which have the effect of tightening monetary policy.

As discussed above, investing in mortgage-related securities (including on a leveraged basis) subjects us to many risks including interest rate risk, prepayment and reinvestment risk, credit risk, spread risk, and liquidity risk. Please refer to Part I, Item 1A, "Risk Factors" as well as Part II, Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and Item 7A, "Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk" of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for a detailed discussion of these factors and others that have the potential to impact our results of operations and financial condition.


COMPETITION

The business models of mortgage REITs range from investing only in Agency MBS to investing substantially in non-investment grade MBS and originating and securitizing mortgage loans and investing in mortgage servicing rights. Some mortgage REITs will invest in RMBS and related investments only, some in CMBS and related investments only, and some in a mix. Each mortgage REIT will assume various types and degrees of risk in its investment strategy.

The financial services industry in which we compete is a highly competitive market. In purchasing investments and obtaining financing, we compete with other mortgage REITs, broker dealers and investment banking firms, mutual funds, banks, hedge funds, mortgage bankers, insurance companies, governmental bodies, and other entities, many of which have greater financial resources and a lower cost of capital than we do. Increased competition in the market may reduce the available supply of investments and may drive prices of investments to unacceptable levels which would negatively impact our ability to earn an acceptable amount of income from these investments. Competition can also reduce the availability of borrowing capacity at our repurchase agreement counterparties as such capacity is not unlimited, and many of our repurchase agreement counterparties limit the amount of financing they offer to the mortgage REIT industry.


FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

As a REIT, we are required to abide by certain requirements for qualification as a REIT under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). To retain our REIT status, the REIT rules generally require that we invest primarily in real estate-related assets, that our activities be passive rather than active and that we distribute annually to our shareholders substantially all of our taxable income, after certain deductions, including deductions for our tax net operating loss (“NOL”) carryforward. We could be subject to income tax if we failed to satisfy those requirements. We use the calendar year for both tax and financial reporting purposes.

We may utilize our NOL carryforward to offset our taxable earnings after taking the REIT distribution requirements into account. As a result of our public offering of common stock in February 2012, we incurred an "ownership change" as such term is defined in Section 382 of the Code. Because of this ownership change, the amount of the NOL carryforward that we may use each year is limited to approximately $13.5 million, and portions of this amount not utilized are accumulated and rolled forward to the following year. Our NOL carryforward begins to expire substantially in 2020. The following table provides a rollforward of our NOL carryforward for the periods indicated:

5


 
NOL Available for Use
 
Total NOL
As of December 31, 2014:
$
11,739

 
$
89,775

NOL limitation release for the years ended:
 
 
 
December 31, 2015
13,451

 
 
December 31, 2016
13,451

 
 
December 31, 2017
13,451

 
 
NOL used for the years ended:
 
 
 
December 31, 2015

 

December 31, 2016

 

December 31, 2017 (1)

 

As of December 31, 2017
$
52,092

 
$
89,775

(1) Subject to completion of our 2017 federal income tax return.

There may be differences between taxable income and net income computed in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). These differences primarily arise from timing differences in the recognition of revenue and expense for tax and GAAP purposes.

Failure to satisfy certain Code requirements could cause us to lose our status as a REIT. If we failed to qualify as a REIT for any taxable year, we may be subject to federal income tax (including any applicable alternative minimum tax) at regular corporate rates and would not receive deductions for dividends paid to shareholders. We could, however, utilize our NOL carryforward to offset all or part of our taxable income to the extent the NOL is available to us based on the limitations described above. If we lost or otherwise surrendered our status as a REIT, we could not elect REIT status again for five years. Several of our investments in securitized mortgage loans have ownership restrictions limiting their ownership to REITs. Therefore, if we fail to maintain our REIT status, we would have to sell these investments or otherwise provide for REIT ownership of these investments. In addition, many of our repurchase agreement lenders and interest rate swap counterparties require us to maintain our REIT status. If we were to lose our REIT status, these lenders would have the right to terminate any repurchase agreement borrowings and interest rate swaps outstanding at that time.

Qualification as a REIT

Qualification as a REIT requires that we satisfy a variety of tests relating to our income, assets, distributions and ownership. The significant tests are summarized below.

Sources of Income. To continue qualifying as a REIT, we must satisfy two distinct tests with respect to the sources of our income: the “75% income test” and the “95% income test.” The 75% income test requires that we derive at least 75% of our gross income (excluding gross income from prohibited transactions) from certain real estate-related sources. In order to satisfy the 95% income test, 95% of our gross income for the taxable year must consist of either income that qualifies under the 75% income test or certain other types of passive income.

If we fail to meet either the 75% income test or the 95% income test, or both, in a taxable year, we might nonetheless continue to qualify as a REIT, if our failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect and the nature and amounts of our items of gross income were properly disclosed to the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”). However, in such a case we would be required to pay a tax equal to 100% of any excess non-qualifying income.

Nature and Diversification of Assets. At the end of each calendar quarter, we must meet multiple asset tests. Under the “75% asset test”, at least 75% of the value of our total assets must represent cash or cash items (including receivables), government securities or real estate assets. Under the “10% asset test,” we may not own more than 10% of the outstanding voting power or value of securities of any single non-governmental issuer, provided such securities do not qualify under the 75% asset test or

6


relate to taxable REIT subsidiaries. Under the “5% asset test,” ownership of any stocks or securities that do not qualify under the 75% asset test must be limited, in respect of any single non-governmental issuer, to an amount not greater than 5% of the value of our total assets (excluding ownership of any taxable REIT subsidiaries).

If we inadvertently fail to satisfy one or more of the asset tests at the end of a calendar quarter, such failure would not cause us to lose our REIT status, provided that (i) we satisfied all of the asset tests at the close of the preceding calendar quarter and (ii) the discrepancy between the values of our assets and the standards imposed by the asset tests either did not exist immediately after the acquisition of any particular asset or was not wholly or partially caused by such an acquisition. If the condition described in clause (ii) of the preceding sentence was not satisfied, we still could avoid disqualification by eliminating any discrepancy within 30 days after the close of the calendar quarter in which it arose.

Ownership. In order to maintain our REIT status, we must not be deemed to be closely held and must have more than 100 shareholders. The closely held prohibition requires that not more than 50% of the value of our outstanding shares be owned by five or fewer persons at any time during the last half of our taxable year. The "more than 100 shareholders" rule requires that we have at least 100 shareholders for 335 days of a twelve-month taxable year. If we failed to satisfy the ownership requirements, we would be subject to fines and be required to take curative action to meet the ownership requirements in order to maintain our REIT status.

Recent Tax Legislation

The recently passed Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “TCJA”) made significant changes to the U.S. federal income tax laws applicable to businesses and their owners, including REITs and their stockholders, and may lessen the relative competitive advantage of operating as a REIT rather than as a C corporation. Pursuant to this legislation, among other items, as of January 1, 2018, (1) the federal income tax rate applicable to corporations is reduced to 21%, (2) the highest marginal individual income tax rate is reduced to 37%, (3) the corporate alternative minimum tax is repealed and (4) the backup withholding rate for domestic owners is reduced to 24%. In addition, individuals, estates and trusts may deduct up to 20% of certain pass-through income, including ordinary REIT dividends that are not “capital gain dividends” or “qualified dividend income,” subject to certain limitations. For taxpayers qualifying for the full deduction, the effective maximum tax rate on ordinary REIT dividends would be 29.6% (plus the 3.8% surtax on net investment income, if applicable). The maximum rate of withholding with respect to our distributions to certain foreign owners that are treated as attributable to gains from the sale or exchange of U.S. real property interests is also reduced from 35% to 21%. The deductibility of net interest expense is limited for all businesses; however, certain businesses, including certain real estate businesses, may elect to not be subject to such limitations, in which case they would be required to depreciate their real property-related assets over longer depreciable lives. To the extent that a taxable REIT subsidiary has interest expense that exceeds its interest income, the net interest expense limitation could potentially apply to such taxable REIT subsidiary. The reduced corporate tax rate will apply to our taxable REIT subsidiaries.

The individual and collective impact of these changes on REITs and their security holders is uncertain, and may not become evident for some period. Prospective and current investors should consult their tax advisors regarding the implications of the TCJA on their investment.


EMPLOYEES

As of December 31, 2017, we have 17 employees and one corporate office in Glen Allen, Virginia. None of our employees are covered by any collective bargaining agreements, and we are not aware of any union organizing activity relating to our employees.


7


Executive Officers of the Company
Name (Age)
 
Current Title
 
Business Experience
Byron L. Boston (59)
 
Chief Executive Officer, President, Co-Chief Investment Officer, and Director
 
Chief Executive Officer and Co-Chief Investment Officer effective January 1, 2014; President and Director since 2012; Chief Investment Officer since 2008.
Stephen J. Benedetti (55)
 
Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer, and Chief Operating Officer
 
Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer since 2005; Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer from 2001 to 2005 and beginning again in 2008.

Smriti L. Popenoe (49)
 
Executive Vice President and Co-Chief Investment Officer
 
Executive Vice President and Co-Chief Investment Officer effective January 1, 2014; Chief Risk Officer of PHH Corporation between 2010 and 2013; Senior Vice President, Balance Sheet Management, of Wachovia Bank, from 2006 to 2009.


AVAILABLE INFORMATION

We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act and its rules and regulations. The Exchange Act requires us to file reports, proxy statements, and other information with the Securities Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). Copies of these reports, proxy statements, and other information can be read and copied at:

SEC Public Reference Room
100 F Street, N.E.
Washington, D.C. 20549

Information on the operation of the Public Reference Room may be obtained by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. The SEC maintains a website that contains reports, proxy statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. These materials may be obtained electronically by accessing the SEC’s home page at www.sec.gov.

Our website can be found at www.dynexcapital.com. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, our current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports, filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, are made available free of charge through our website as soon as reasonably practicable after such material is electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC.

We have adopted a Code of Business Conduct and Ethics (“Code of Conduct”) that applies to all of our employees, officers and directors. Our Code of Conduct is also available free of charge on our website, along with our Audit Committee Charter, our Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee Charter, and our Compensation Committee Charter. We will post on our website amendments to the Code of Conduct or waivers from its provisions, if any, which are applicable to any of our directors or executive officers in accordance with SEC or NYSE requirements.


ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS

The following is a summary of the risk factors that we believe are most relevant to our business. These are factors which, individually or in the aggregate, we think could cause our actual results to differ significantly from anticipated or historical results. In addition to understanding the key risks described below, investors should understand that it is not possible to predict or identify all risk factors, and consequently, the following is not a complete discussion of all potential risks or uncertainties.



8


RISKS RELATED TO OUR BUSINESS

We use leverage in order to enhance returns to our shareholders which increases the risk of volatility in our results and could lead to material decreases in net interest income, net income, dividends, book value per common share, and liquidity.

The use of leverage in our business increases the risk of volatility in returns to our shareholders and increases the risk of a material decline in our shareholders’ equity, book value per common share and liquidity. Leverage increases returns on our invested capital if we can earn a greater return on investments than our cost of borrowing, but can decrease returns if borrowing costs increase and we have not adequately hedged against such an increase. In addition, using leverage magnifies the potential losses to shareholders' equity and book value per common share if the market value of our investments declines and if we have not adequately hedged against this risk. We also have increased liquidity risk stemming from the potential for margin calls by our lenders for fluctuations in investment collateral values, or if the lender fails to renew or roll over the financing.

Our ability to access leverage in the conduct of our operations is impacted by the following:

market conditions and overall market volatility and liquidity;
regulation of our lenders;
the liquidity of our investments;
the market value of our investments;
the advance rates by our lenders on investment collateral pledged, and;
the willingness of our lenders to finance the types of investments we choose.

Many of these factors are beyond our control and are difficult to predict, which could lead to sudden and material adverse effects on our results of operations, financial condition, business, liquidity, and ability to make distributions to shareholders, and could force us to sell assets at significantly depressed prices to maintain adequate liquidity.

For more information about our operating policies regarding leverage and historic leverage levels, please see “Liquidity and Capital Resources” within Part II, Item 7, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation.”

Risks related to the market value of our investments could negatively impact our net income, comprehensive income, shareholders' equity, book value per common share, and liquidity.

Our investments fluctuate in value due to changes in credit spreads, spot and forward interest rates, actual and anticipated prepayments, and other factors. Our investments may also fluctuate in value due to increased or reduced demand for the types of investments we own which could be impacted by, among other things, interest rates, capital flows, and government and regulatory policies. Changes in the market values of our investments are reflected in our consolidated financial statements in other comprehensive income, shareholders' equity and book value per common share. Changes in credit spreads represent the market's valuation of the perceived riskiness of assets relative to risk-free rates, and widening credit spreads reduce the market value of our investments as market participants require additional yield to hold riskier assets. Credit spreads could change based on macro-economic or systemic factors specific to a particular security such as prepayment performance or credit performance. Other factors that could impact credit spreads include technical issues such as supply and demand for a particular type of security, market psychology, and FOMC monetary policy. In addition, most of our investments are fixed rate or reset in rate over a period of time, and as interest rates rise, the market value of these investments will decrease. If market values decrease significantly, we may be forced to sell assets at losses in order to maintain liquidity and repay or renew repurchase agreements at maturity.

Fluctuations in interest rates may have various negative effects on us and could lead to reduced net interest income, comprehensive income, and a lower book value per common share.

Fluctuations in interest rates impact us in a number of ways. For example, in a period of rising rates, particularly increases in the targeted Federal Funds Rate, we may experience a decline in our profitability from borrowing rates increasing faster than interest coupons on our investments reset or our investments mature. We may also experience a decline in profitability from our investments adjusting less frequently or relative to a different index (e.g., six month or one-year LIBOR) from our borrowings (repurchase agreements are typically based on short-term rates like one-month or three-month LIBOR). Once the

9


Federal Reserve announces a higher targeted range or if markets determine that the Federal Reserve is likely to announce a higher targeted range for the Federal Funds Rate, our borrowing costs are likely to immediately increase, thereby negatively impacting our results of operations, financial condition, and book value per common share.
 
The mortgage loans collateralizing ARMs typically have periodic (or interim) and lifetime interest rate caps. Periodic interest rate caps limit the amount interest rates can adjust on a loan during any given period. Lifetime interest rate caps limit the amount interest rates can adjust from inception through maturity of a loan. Because of these caps, the amount of gross interest income earned by ARMs may become limited in a sustained period of rising interest rates or in any period in which interest rates rise rapidly. We may also experience price volatility as ARMs approach their interest rate caps. In addition, we could experience additional declines in net interest income as the repurchase agreements financing ARMs do not have periodic or lifetime interest rate caps.

Fluctuations in interest rates may also negatively affect the market value of our securities. Since our MBS are fixed rate or adjust generally over longer-term periods, rising interest rates will reduce the market value of our MBS as a result of higher yield requirements by the market for these types of securities. In some instances, increases in short-term interest rates are rapid enough that short-term interest rates equal or exceed medium/long-term interest rates, resulting in a flat or inverted yield curve. Any fixed-rate or hybrid ARM investment will generally be more negatively affected by these increases than ARMs (which have interest-rates that adjust more frequently). Reductions in the market value of our MBS could result in margin calls from our lenders, potentially forcing us to sell securities at a loss. Conversely, while declining interest rates are more favorable for us, we may experience increasing prepayments, resulting in reduced profitability due to reinvestment of our capital in lower yielding investments.

Our use of hedging strategies to mitigate our interest rate exposure may not be effective and may adversely affect our income, liquidity and book value.

We use or may use interest rate swap agreements, Eurodollar futures, interest rate caps, options, forward contracts and other derivative transactions (collectively, “hedging instruments”) to help mitigate increased financing costs and volatility in book value from adverse changes in interest rates. Our hedging activity will vary in scope based on our portfolio construction and objectives, the actual and implied level and volatility of interest rates, our forecast of future interest rates, and financing sources used. No hedging strategy can completely insulate us from the interest rate risks to which we are exposed, and there can be no assurance that the implementation of any hedging strategy will have the desired impact on our results of operations or financial condition. Hedging instruments we use may adversely affect our results of operations and book value (particularly if interest rates decline) as the fair value of hedging instruments fluctuates with changes in rates (and require us to post margin to counterparties) and also involve an expense that we will incur regardless of the effectiveness of the hedging activity. In periods of rapidly changing interest rates, particularly declining interest rates, our liquidity could be negatively impacted if declines in the value of the hedges is greater than the increase in fair value of the hedged investments.

Our hedging instruments can be traded on an exchange or administered through a clearing house, or are administered under bilateral agreements between us and a counterparty. Bilateral agreements expose us to increased counterparty risk, and we may be at risk of loss of any collateral held by a hedging counterparty if the counterparty becomes insolvent or files for bankruptcy.

Interest rate hedging may fail to protect or could adversely affect us because, among other things:

The performance of instruments used to hedge may not completely correlate with the performance of the assets or liabilities being hedged;
Interest rate hedging can be expensive, particularly during periods of volatile interest rates;
Available hedging instruments may not correspond directly with the interest rate risk from which we seek protection;
The duration of the hedge may not match the duration of the related asset or liability given management's expectation of future changes in interest rates or a result of the inaccuracies of models in forecasting cash flows on the asset being hedged;

10


The value of derivatives used for hedging will be adjusted from time to time in accordance with GAAP to reflect changes in fair value, and downward adjustments, or “mark-to-market losses,” would reduce our earnings, shareholders’ equity, and book value;
The amount of income that a REIT may earn from hedging transactions (other than through taxable REIT subsidiaries) to offset interest rate losses may be limited by U.S. federal income tax provisions governing REITs;
The credit quality of the party owing money on the hedge may be downgraded to such an extent that it impairs our ability to sell or assign our side of the hedging transaction; and
The party owing money in the hedging transaction may default on its obligation to pay.

Our hedging transactions, which are intended to limit losses, may actually adversely affect our earnings, which could reduce our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders.

Repurchase agreements are generally uncommitted short-term financings and changes to terms of such financing may adversely affect our profitability and our liquidity.

The majority of our repurchase agreements are uncommitted financings from lenders with an average term of ninety days or less. Because repurchase agreements are short-term financing commitments, changes in conditions in the repurchase markets may make it more difficult for us to secure continued financing particularly in periods of high volatility. Additionally, regulatory capital requirements imposed on our lenders by financial and banking regulators have changed significantly in recent years, and as a result, the cost of financing has increased and may continue to increase. In addition, many lenders may find it unprofitable to lend against certain collateral types due to higher regulatory costs and regulatory capital requirements, and thus restrict their lending against such collateral. Because we rely heavily on borrowings under repurchase agreements to finance our investments, our ability to achieve our investment and profitability objectives can depend on our ability to access repurchase agreement financing in sufficient amounts and on favorable terms, and to renew or replace maturing financings on a continuing basis. If the terms on which we borrow change in a meaningful way, or if borrowings are not available, we may be forced to sell assets or our borrowing costs could increase, potentially reducing our profitability and dividends to our shareholders.

We invest in to-be-announced, or TBA, securities which are forward contracts for the purchase of non-specified Agency RMBS and execute TBA dollar roll transactions. It could be uneconomical to roll our TBA contracts or we may be unable to meet margin calls on our TBA contracts, which could negatively affect our financial condition and results of operations.

The Company executes TBA dollar roll transactions which effectively delay the settlement of a forward purchase of a TBA by entering into an offsetting TBA short position, net settling the paired-off positions in cash, and simultaneously entering an identical TBA long position with a later settlement date. Under certain market conditions, TBA dollar roll transactions may result in negative net interest income whereby the Agency RMBS purchased for forward settlement under a TBA contract are priced at a premium to Agency RMBS for settlement in the current month. Market conditions could also adversely impact the TBA dollar roll market. In particular, the announced reduction in the Federal Reserve’s reinvestment of principal payments on Agency RMBS could adversely impact the TBA dollar roll market as this reduction is implemented. Under such conditions, it may be uneconomical to roll our TBA positions prior to the settlement date, and we could have to take physical delivery of the underlying securities and settle our obligations for cash. We may not have sufficient funds or alternative financing sources available to settle such obligations. In addition, pursuant to the margin provisions established by the Mortgage-Backed Securities Division ("MBSD") of the Fixed Income Clearing Corporation we are subject to margin calls on our TBA contracts and our trading counterparties may require us to post additional margin above the levels established by the MBSD. Negative income on TBA dollar roll transactions or failure to procure adequate financing to settle our obligations or meet margin calls under our TBA contracts could result in defaults or force us to sell assets under adverse market conditions or through foreclosure and adversely affect our financial condition and results of operations.

We invest in assets that are traded in over-the-counter (“OTC”) markets which are less liquid and have less price transparency than securities exchanges. Owning securities that are traded in OTC markets may increase our liquidity risk, particularly in a volatile market environment, because our assets may be more difficult to borrow against or sell in a prompt manner and on terms acceptable to us, and we may not realize the full value at which we previously recorded the investments and/or may incur additional losses upon sale.


11


Though Agency MBS are generally deemed to be very liquid securities, turbulent market conditions in the past have at times significantly and negatively impacted the liquidity of these assets, resulting in reductions in their market value. Non-Agency MBS are typically more difficult to value, less liquid, and experience greater price volatility than Agency MBS. In addition, market values for non-Agency MBS are typically more subjective than Agency MBS. Because of these factors, the number of lenders willing to provide financing for non-Agency MBS or accept them as collateral has generally been limited compared to Agency MBS. Given the trading of our investments in OTC markets, in an extreme case of market stress, a market may not exist for certain of our assets at any price. If the MBS market were to experience a severe or extended period of illiquidity, lenders may refuse to accept our assets as collateral for repurchase agreement financing, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial condition and business. A sudden reduction in the liquidity of our investments could limit our ability to finance or could make it difficult to sell investments if the need arises. If we are required to liquidate all or a portion of our portfolio quickly, we may realize significantly less than the fair value at which we have previously recorded our investments which would result in lower than anticipated gains or higher losses.

Purchases and sales of Agency RMBS by the Federal Reserve may adversely affect the price and return associated with Agency RMBS, which could negatively impact the value of our investments, comprehensive income, book value per common share, and liquidity.
The Federal Reserve owns approximately $1.8 trillion of Agency RMBS as of December 31, 2017. In October 2017, the Federal Reserve began reducing reinvestment of principal payments from its holdings of Agency RMBS into new Agency RMBS purchases, thereby causing a decline in Federal Reserve security holdings over time. While it is very difficult to predict the impact of the Federal Reserve portfolio runoff on the prices and liquidity of Agency RMBS, returns on Agency RMBS may be adversely affected as private investors seek higher yields. This in turn could reduce our comprehensive income, book value per common share, and our liquidity.
Our repurchase agreements and agreements governing certain interest rate swaps may contain financial and non-financial covenants. Our inability to meet these covenants could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.

In connection with certain of our repurchase agreements and interest rate swap agreements, we are required to maintain certain financial and non-financial covenants. As of January 31, 2018, the most restrictive financial covenants require that we have a minimum of $30 million of liquidity and declines in shareholders' equity no greater than 25% in any quarter and 35% in any year. In addition, virtually all of our repurchase agreements and interest rate swap agreements require us to maintain our status as a REIT and to be exempted from the provisions of the 1940 Act. Compliance with these covenants depends on market factors and the strength of our business and operating results. Various risks, uncertainties and events beyond our control, including significant fluctuations in interest rates and changes in market conditions, could affect our ability to comply with these covenants. Failure to comply with these covenants could result in an event of default, termination of an agreement, acceleration of all amounts owed under an agreement, and generally would give the counterparty the right to exercise certain other remedies under the repurchase agreement, including the sale of the asset subject to repurchase at the time of default, unless we were able to negotiate a waiver in connection with any such default related to failure to comply with a covenant. Any such waiver could be conditioned on an amendment to the underlying agreement and any related guaranty agreement on terms that may be unfavorable to us. If we are unable to negotiate a covenant waiver or replace or refinance our assets under a new repurchase facility on favorable terms or at all, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows could be adversely affected. Further, certain of our repurchase agreements and interest rate swap agreements have cross-default, cross-acceleration or similar provisions, such that if we were to violate a covenant under one agreement, that violation could lead to defaults, accelerations, or other adverse events under other agreements, as well.

Prepayment rates on the mortgage loans underlying our investments may adversely affect our profitability and the market value of our investments. Changes in prepayment rates may also subject us to reinvestment risk.

We are subject to prepayment risk to the extent that we own investments at premiums to their par value or at yields at a premium to current market yields. Our investment portfolio consists substantially of RMBS and CMBS owned at premiums, and CMBS IO securities which have no principal amounts outstanding and consist only of the right to receive interest payments on the underlying pools of CMBS loans included in the securitization trust. We amortize the premiums we pay on a security using the effective yield method, which is impacted by actual and projected borrower prepayments of principal on the loans.

12


Prepayments on our investments can occur both on a voluntary and involuntary (i.e., a loan default and subsequent foreclosure and liquidation) basis. Voluntary prepayments tend to increase when interest rates are declining or, in the case of ARMs or hybrid ARMs, based on the shape of the yield curve. CMBS and CMBS IO are generally protected from voluntary prepayment for a portion of their expected lives either by an absolute prepayment lock-out on the loan or by yield maintenance or prepayment penalty provisions which serve as full or partial compensation for future lost interest income on the loan. RMBS provide no specific protection from voluntary prepayment. The actual level of prepayments on our investments will be impacted by economic and market conditions, the absolute levels of interest rates and relative levels of interest rates versus our investments, the general availability of mortgage credit, and other factors. We have no protection from involuntary prepayments which tend to increase in periods of economic stress and may occur for any of our investment types. If we experience actual prepayments in excess of our projections or increase our expectations of future prepayment activity, we will amortize investment premiums at an accelerated rate which will reduce our interest income. In addition, we may reinvest prepayments in lower yielding investments which could lead to lower net interest income and reduced profitability.

Increases in actual prepayment rates or market expectations of prepayment rates could also negatively impact the market value of our investments. Faster prepayments generally negatively impact the market value of RMBS due to less predictability of payments on the underlying mortgage loans and will increase the required market yield on such security. Faster prepayments will also negatively impact the market value of CMBS IO, depending on the amount of prepayment protection for a given security. Increasing prepayments will typically reduce the value of our securities owned at premiums which will negatively impact our book value. We are also more likely to experience margin calls from our lenders as a result of the decline in value of our securities.

In certain circumstances, compensation for voluntary prepayment on CMBS IO securities may not be sufficient to compensate us for the loss of future excess interest as a result of the prepayment, thereby adversely affecting our results of operations. Also, the amount of prepayment penalties on loans underlying CMBS and CMBS IO decline over time, and as loans age, interest rates decline, or market values of the collateral supporting the loan increase, prepayment penalties may not serve as a sufficient economic disincentive to prevent the borrower from prepaying.

Prepayments on large balance, single loan Agency CMBS could result in margin calls by lenders in excess of our available liquidity. As such, we may be at risk of defaulting on a repurchase agreement which could force us to sell assets at a loss.

We may own large balance Agency CMBS which are collateralized by a single-loan. While these Agency CMBS have some form of prepayment protection such as yield maintenance which would compensate us for the prepayment, these securities are collateralizing repurchase agreements. If the single loan CMBS prepays, typically there is a 20-day delay between the announcement of such prepayment and the receipt of cash from the prepayment; however, the repurchase agreement lender may initiate a margin call when the prepayment is announced. If the margin call were large enough, we might not be able to meet such margin call from available liquidity, and we could be forced to sell assets quickly and on terms unfavorable to us to meet the margin call. If we cannot meet the margin call, we may be in default under the repurchase agreement until we receive the cash from the prepayment. Because some of our repurchase agreement borrowings contain cross-default provisions, such default could trigger defaults on and margin calls with respect to other of our repurchase agreement borrowings.

Provisions requiring yield maintenance charges, prepayment penalties, defeasance, or lock-outs in CMBS IO securities may not be enforceable.

Provisions in loan documents for mortgages in CMBS IO securities in which we invest requiring yield maintenance charges, prepayment penalties, defeasance, or lock-out periods may not be enforceable in some states and under federal bankruptcy law. Provisions in the loan documents requiring yield maintenance charges and prepayment penalties may also be interpreted as constituting the collection of interest for usury purposes. Accordingly, we cannot be assured that the obligation of a borrower to pay any yield maintenance charge or prepayment penalty under a loan document in a CMBS IO security will be enforceable. Also, we cannot be assured that foreclosure proceeds under a loan document in a CMBS IO security will be sufficient to pay an enforceable yield maintenance charge. If yield maintenance charges and prepayment penalties are not collected, or if a lock-out period is not enforced, we may incur losses to write-down the value of the CMBS IO security for the present value of the amounts not collected, and we will experience lower yields and lower interest income. This would also likely cause margin calls from any lender on the CMBS IO impacted which could have a material adverse effect on our liquidity.


13


We invest in securities guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac which are currently under conservatorship by the Federal Housing Finance Administration (the “FHFA”). As conservator, the FHFA has assumed all the powers of the shareholders, directors and officers of the GSEs with the goal of preserving and conserving their assets. Both Fannie Mae's and Freddie Mac's solvency is being supported by the Treasury through their committed purchases of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac preferred stock. The ultimate impact on the operations of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac from the conservatorships and the support they receive from the U.S. government is not determinable and could affect Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in such a way that our business, operations and financial condition may be adversely affected.

In 2008, the FHFA placed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac under federal conservatorship. As its conservator, the FHFA has broad regulatory powers over Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and has entered into Preferred Stock Purchase Agreements, as amended, (“PSPAs”) pursuant to which the Treasury ensures that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac will separately maintain a positive net worth by committing to purchase preferred stock of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The FHFA as the regulator of the GSEs has proposed several reforms including, among other things, building a common, single, securitization platform between the two entities and gradually contracting their presence in the mortgage marketplace. In addition, the U.S. Congress at various times has considered structural changes to the GSEs, including winding down the GSEs and replacing them with a privately capitalized system that is intended to preserve market liquidity and protect taxpayers from future GSE losses due to economic downturns.

The outcome of the conservatorship and the scope and nature of actions that may ultimately be taken by the U.S. Congress to reform the GSEs and the housing finance system, are not predictable at this point. Actions limiting the guarantee on future Agency MBS could impact the amount of Agency MBS available to be purchased which could lead to increased competition and reduced returns from these assets. It could also negatively impact our ability to comply with the provisions of the 1940 Act (see further discussion below regarding the 1940 Act). On the other hand, actions expanding the guarantee on future Agency MBS could make Agency MBS more expensive and could impact potential returns on these investments.

Fannie Mae’s and Freddie Mac’s long-term financial viability is highly dependent on governmental support. If the Treasury withdraws its support, the value of Agency MBS could significantly decline, which would make it difficult for us to obtain repurchase agreement financing and could force us to sell assets at substantial losses. In addition, future policies that change the relationship between Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac and the U.S. government, including those that result in their winding down, release from conservatorship, nationalization, privatization, or elimination, may create market uncertainty and have the effect of reducing the actual or perceived credit quality of securities issued or guaranteed by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. As a result, such policies could increase the risk of loss on investments in Agency MBS. It also is possible that such policies could adversely impact the market for such securities and spreads at which they trade, and thereby adversely impact the profitability of our investments.

All of the foregoing could materially adversely affect the availability, pricing, liquidity, market value and financing of our assets and materially adversely affect our business, operations and financial condition.

Our investment strategy includes investing in non-Agency MBS with credit risk. Many of these securities have some form of subordinate credit enhancement within the security structure. The performance of these securities is dependent in large part on the performance of the underlying mortgage loans relative to the amount of the subordinate credit enhancement within the security structure. These mortgage loans are subject to defaults, foreclosure timeline extension, fraud, price depreciation, and unfavorable modification of loan principal amount, interest rate, and premium, any of which could result in losses to us.
 
Non-Agency MBS are secured by mortgage loans (generally single family residential properties for RMBS and pools of commercial mortgage loans for CMBS) that have no guarantee of repayment. Typically, non-Agency MBS have non-rated or low rated tranches or classes that are subordinate to principal payments to higher rated classes and absorb losses on the liquidation of the underlying loans. We own securities that generally have some form of credit subordination to our investment with respect to credit losses on the underlying mortgage loans. We bear a risk of loss of principal on our security to the extent losses experienced on the loans in these securities are in excess of such subordination.

Commercial mortgage loans that collateralize CMBS and CMBS IO generally have a higher principal balance, and the ability of a borrower to repay a loan secured by an income-producing property typically is dependent upon the successful

14


operation of the property rather than upon the existence of independent income or assets of the borrower. If the net operating income of a commercial property is reduced, the borrower's ability to repay the loan may be impaired. Net operating income of an income-producing property can be affected by, among other things, economic conditions, tenancy, location and condition, property management decisions, competition, regulations, environmental conditions, occupancy rates, interest rates and real estate tax rates and other operating expenses. Losses on underlying commercial mortgage loans will potentially impact the yield on the CMBS and CMBS IO securities we own and could also negatively impact their market value. Negative impacts on yields will reduce our net income and reductions in market values could lead to margin calls by our lenders which, if significant, could force us to sell assets possibly at losses to meet margin calls.

RMBS securities are generally collateralized by pools of single family mortgage loans which have less idiosyncratic risk than CMBS and CMBS IO. The ability of a borrower to repay a mortgage loan secured by a residential property is dependent upon the income or assets of the borrower. Many factors may impair borrowers’ abilities to repay their loans, including among other things, their employment situation, economic conditions, and the availability of refinancing. In the event of defaults on the residential mortgage loans that underlie our investments in RMBS and the exhaustion of any underlying or any additional credit support, we may not realize our anticipated return on our investments and we may incur a loss on these investments.
     
We may change our investment strategy, operating policies, dividend policy, and/or asset allocations without shareholder consent and/or in a manner in which shareholders, analysts, and capital markets may not agree, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations, the market price of our common stock, and our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders.

A change in our investment strategy or asset allocation may materially change our exposure to interest rate and/or credit risk, default risk and real estate market fluctuations. These changes could have a material impact on our ability to continue to pay a dividend at a level that we had previously paid before the change in strategy. Furthermore, if any change in investment strategy, asset allocation, operating or dividend policy is perceived negatively by the markets or analysts covering our stock, our stock price may decline.

Competition may prevent us from acquiring new investments at favorable yields, and we may not be able to achieve our investment objectives which may potentially have a negative impact on our profitability.

Our net income will largely depend on our ability to acquire mortgage-related assets with acceptable risk-return profiles at favorable spreads over our borrowing costs. The availability of mortgage-related assets meeting our investment criteria depends upon, among other things, the level of activity in the real estate market and the quality of and demand for securities in the mortgage securitization and secondary markets. The size and level of activity in real estate lending markets depends on various factors, including interest rates, regional and national economic conditions, and real estate values. In acquiring investments, we may compete with other purchasers of these types of investments, including but not limited to other mortgage REITs, broker-dealers, hedge funds, banks, insurance companies, mutual funds, and other entities that purchase assets similar to ours, many of which have greater financial resources than we do. As a result of these factors, we may not be able to acquire sufficient assets at acceptable spreads to our borrowing costs, which would adversely affect our profitability.

In order to maintain our portfolio size and our earnings, we must reinvest the cash flows we receive from our existing investment portfolio, including monthly principal and interest payments and proceeds from sales. If the assets we acquire in the future earn lower yields than the assets we currently own, our reported earnings per share will likely decline over time as the older assets pay down or are sold. In addition, based on market conditions, our leverage, and our liquidity profile, we may decide to not reinvest the cash flows we receive from our investment portfolio. If we retain, rather than reinvest, these cash flows, the size of our investment portfolio and the amount of net interest income generated by our investment portfolio will likely decline.

Clearing facilities or exchanges may increase the margin requirements we are required to post when entering into derivative instruments, which may negatively impact our ability to hedge and our liquidity.

We are required to post margin when entering into a hedging instrument which is traded on an exchange or administered through a clearing house. The amount of margin is set for each derivative by the exchange or clearinghouse and in prior periods, exchanges have required additional margin in response to events having or expected to have adverse economic consequences. In the event that future adverse economic developments or market uncertainty (including those due to governmental, regulatory,

15


or legislative action or inaction) result in increased margin requirements for our hedging instruments, it could materially adversely affect our liquidity position, business, financial condition and results of operations.

We may be subject to the risks associated with inadequate or untimely services from third-party service providers, which may negatively impact our results of operations. We also rely on corporate trustees to act on behalf of us and other holders of securities in enforcing our rights.

Loans underlying non-Agency MBS we own are serviced by third-party service providers. These servicers provide for the primary and special servicing of these securities. In that capacity these service providers control all aspects of loan collection, loss mitigation, default management and ultimate resolution of a defaulted loan including as applicable the foreclosure and sale of the real estate owned. The servicer has a fiduciary obligation to act in the best interest of the securitization trust, but significant latitude exists with respect to certain of its servicing activities. We have no contractual rights with respect to these servicers, and our risk management operations may not be successful in limiting future delinquencies, defaults, and losses. If a third party servicer fails to perform its duties under the securitization documents, this may result in a material increase in delinquencies or losses to the securities. As a result, the value of the securities may be impacted, and we may incur losses on our investment.

In addition, should a servicer experience financial difficulties, it may not be able to perform its obligations. Due to application of provisions of bankruptcy law, servicers who have sought bankruptcy protection may not be required to make advance payments required under the terms of the agreements governing the securities of amounts due from loan borrowers. Even if a servicer were able to advance amounts in respect of delinquent loans, its obligation to make the advances may be limited to the extent that is does not expect to recover the advances due to the deteriorating credit of the delinquent loans.

We also rely on corporate trustees to act on behalf of us and other holders of securities in enforcing our rights. Under the terms of most securities we hold we do not have the right to directly enforce remedies against the issuer of the security, but instead must rely on a trustee to act on behalf of us and other security holders. Should a trustee not be required to take action under the terms of the securities, or fail to take action, we could experience losses.

Credit ratings assigned to debt securities by the credit rating agencies may not accurately reflect the risks associated with those securities. Changes in credit ratings for securities we own or for similar securities might negatively impact the market value of these securities.

Rating agencies rate securities based upon their assessment of the safety of the receipt of principal and interest payments on the securities. Rating agencies do not consider the risks of fluctuations in fair value or other factors that may influence the value of securities and, therefore, the assigned credit rating may not fully reflect the true risks of an investment in securities. Also, rating agencies may fail to make timely adjustments to credit ratings based on available data or changes in economic outlook or may otherwise fail to make changes in credit ratings in response to subsequent events, so the credit quality of our investments may be better or worse than the ratings indicate. We attempt to reduce the impact of the risk that a credit rating may not accurately reflect the risks associated with a particular debt security by not relying solely on credit ratings as the indicator of the quality of an investment. We make our acquisition decisions after factoring in other information that we have obtained about the loans underlying the security and the credit subordination structure of the security. Despite these efforts, our assessment of the quality of an investment may also prove to be inaccurate and we may incur credit losses in excess of our initial expectations.

Credit rating agencies may change their methods of evaluating credit risk and determining ratings on securities backed by real estate loans and securities. These changes may occur quickly and often. The market’s ability to understand and absorb these changes, and the impact to the securitization market in general, are difficult to predict. Such changes may have a negative impact on the value of securities that we own.

If a lender to us in a repurchase transaction defaults on its obligation to resell the underlying security back to us at the end of the transaction term, or if we default on our obligations under a repurchase agreement, we will incur losses.

Repurchase agreement transactions are legally structured as the sale of a security to a lender in return for cash from the lender. These transactions are accounted for as financing agreements because the lenders are obligated to resell the same securities back to us at the end of the transaction term. Because the cash we receive from the lender when we initially sell the

16


securities to the lender is less than the value of those securities, if the lender defaults on its obligation to resell the same securities back to us, we would incur a loss on the transaction equal to the difference between the value of the securities sold and the amount borrowed from the lender. The lender may default on its obligation to resell if it experiences financial difficulty or if the lender has re-hypothecated the security to another party who fails to transfer the security back to the lender. Additionally, if we default on one of our obligations under a repurchase agreement, the lender can terminate the transaction, sell the underlying collateral and cease entering into any other repurchase transactions with us. Any losses we incur on our repurchase transactions could adversely affect our earnings and reduce our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders.

In the event of bankruptcy either by ourselves or one or more of our third party lenders, under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code, assets pledged as collateral under repurchase agreements may not be recoverable by us. We may incur losses equal to the excess of the collateral pledged over the amount of the associated repurchase agreement borrowing.

In the event that one of our lenders under a repurchase agreement files for bankruptcy, it may be difficult for us to recover our assets pledged as collateral to such lender. In addition, if we ever file for bankruptcy, lenders under our repurchase agreements may be able to avoid the automatic stay provisions of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and take possession of and liquidate our collateral under our repurchase agreements without delay. In the event of a bankruptcy by one of our lenders, or us, we may incur losses in amounts equal to the excess of our collateral pledged over the amount of repurchase agreement borrowing due to the lender.

If we fail to properly conduct our operations, we could become subject to regulation under the 1940 Act. Conducting our business in a manner so that we are exempt from registration under and compliance with the 1940 Act may reduce our flexibility and could limit our ability to pursue certain opportunities.

We seek to conduct our operations to avoid falling under the definition of an investment company pursuant to the 1940 Act. Specifically, we seek to conduct our operations under the exemption provided under Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the 1940 Act, a provision available to companies primarily engaged in the business of purchasing and otherwise acquiring mortgages and other liens on and interests in real estate. According to SEC no-action letters, companies relying on this exemption must ensure that at least 55% of their assets are mortgage loans and other qualifying assets, and at least 80% of their assets are real estate-related. The 1940 Act requires that we and each of our subsidiaries evaluate our qualification for exemption under the Act. Our subsidiaries will rely either on Section 3(c)(5)(C) or other sections that provide exemptions from registering under the 1940 Act, including Sections 3(a)(1)(C) and 3(c)(7). The SEC issued a concept release in 2011 announcing that it was reviewing the Section 3(c)(5)(C) exemption, particularly as it relates to mortgage REITs, but has not taken any action or issued any interpretive guidance since that time. We believe that we are operating our business in accordance with the exemption requirements of Section 3(c)(5)(C).

Under the 1940 Act, an investment company is required to register with the SEC and is subject to extensive restrictive and potentially adverse regulations relating to, among other things, operating methods, management, capital structure, leverage, dividends, and transactions with affiliates. If we were determined to be an investment company, our ability to use leverage and conduct business as we do today would be substantially impaired.

If we fail to abide by certain Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”) rules and regulations, we may be subject enforcement action by the CFTC.

On December 7, 2012, the CFTC’s Division of Swap Dealer and Intermediary Oversight (the “Division”) issued no-action relief from commodity pool operator (“CPO”) registration to mortgage REITs that use CFTC-regulated products (“commodity interests”) and that satisfy certain enumerated criteria. Pursuant to the no-action letter, the Division will not recommend that the CFTC take enforcement action against a mortgage REIT if its operator fails to register as a CPO, provided that the mortgage REIT (i) submits a claim to take advantage of the relief and (ii) the mortgage REIT: (a) limits the initial margin and premiums required to establish its commodity interest positions to no greater than 5 percent of the fair market value of the mortgage REIT’s total assets; (b) limits the net income derived annually from its commodity interest positions, excluding the income from commodity interest positions that are “qualifying hedging transactions,” to less than 5 percent of its annual gross income; (c) does not market interests in the mortgage REIT to the public as interests in a commodity pool or otherwise in a vehicle for trading in the commodity futures, commodity options or swaps markets; and (d) either: (A) identified itself as a “mortgage REIT” in Item G of its last U.S. income tax return on Form 1120-REIT; or (B) if it has not yet filed its first U.S.

17


income tax return on Form 1120-REIT, it discloses to its shareholders that it intends to identify itself as a “mortgage REIT” in its first U.S. income tax return on Form 1120-REIT.

We believe that we have complied with all of the requirements set forth above as of and for the year ended December 31, 2017. If we fail to satisfy the criteria set forth above, or if the criteria change, we may become subject to CFTC regulation or enforcement action, the consequences of which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations.


RISKS RELATED TO REGULATORY POLICY

The effects of legislative and regulatory changes on our business, the housing finance industry, and the markets in which we invest and borrow are uncertain and may be adverse to our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

As a result of the financial crisis in 2007 to 2008, Congress passed the Dodd-Frank Act in July 2010 which significantly increased the regulation of, and as a result significantly reduced certain activities of affected financial institutions. It also created agencies such as the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau ("CFPB") and expanded certain powers of government regulatory agencies in an effort to enhance oversight of the financial services industry, including the housing finance industry. Although much of the Dodd-Frank Act has been implemented, there are some key aspects of the legislation not yet implemented. There is significant uncertainty regarding the legislative and regulatory changes that will be implemented or proposed by the administration of President Trump and the current U.S. Congress, particularly regarding the possible repeal of portions of the Dodd-Frank Act, housing policy and housing finance reform in the U.S., and the future roles of regulatory agencies such as the CFPB. Due to this uncertainty, it is not possible for us to predict how legislative or regulatory changes will affect our business, and there can be no assurance that these regulations will not have an adverse impact on our business, results of operations, or financial condition.

In addition, there is an ongoing debate over the degree and kind of regulation that should be applied to entities that participate in what is popularly referred to as “shadow banking.” While there is no authoritative definition of what “shadow banking” is, it generally refers to financial intermediation involving entities and activities outside of the traditional depositary banking system, such as mortgage REITs, repurchase agreement financing, securitizations, private equity funds and hedge funds. A general policy concern is that an aspect or component of shadow banking that is not subject to banking regulation - such as safety and soundness regulation and capital requirements - or other government oversight could be a source of financial instability or pose systemic risk to the broader banking and financial markets. Several organizations, including the Financial Stability Board (an international organization comprised of representatives from national financial authorities, central banks and international finance organizations primarily from the Group of Twenty Nations) and the Financial Stability Oversight Council (established by the Dodd-Frank Act) have issued policy recommendations to strengthen oversight and regulation of shadow banking. While at this stage it is difficult to predict the type and scope of any new regulations that may be adopted, if such regulations were to extend the regulatory and supervisory requirements currently applicable to banks, such as capital and liquidity standards, to our business or that of our financing counterparties or mortgage originators, or were to otherwise classify all or a portion of our business (including financing strategy) as shadow banking, our regulatory and operating costs, particularly borrowing costs, could increase, which may have a material adverse effect on our business.

U.S. regulators have adopted capitalization standards for U.S. domiciled broker dealers of foreign banks. When fully implemented, these regulations and capitalization standards may impact the future availability of repurchase agreement financing which could impact our business model and adversely affect our financial conditions and results of operations.
    
The Federal Reserve has adopted rules that will require foreign bank holding companies with combined U.S. assets of more than $50 billion to establish an intermediate holding company (“IHC”) that is headquartered in the U.S. over the company’s U.S. subsidiaries. Any such IHC will be subject to U.S. regulatory capital and leverage requirements, subject to meeting relevant asset thresholds, as well as regulatory capital planning and stress testing requirements. This increased regulatory oversight could further limit the repurchase agreement financing made available by these foreign IHCs and their subsidiaries and affiliates, which could further increase our cost of financing. If the increased regulatory oversight causes the availability of repurchase agreement financing to decline, we may have fewer financing options in the future which could lead to lower profitability and could adversely affect our financial condition.

18



During 2015, U.S. federal banking regulators adopted final rules to impose a capital surcharge on U.S. banks that are global systemically important banks. This capital surcharge began in 2016 and will continue being phased in until 2019 and requires these institutions to hold from 1.0% to 4.5% additional common equity Tier 1 capital, depending on the institution’s systemic importance calculated as provided in the final rules, over the minimum risk-based capital requirements. During 2016, U.S. federal banking regulators adopted final rules to impose loss absorbency requirements, or a measure of combined eligible Tier 1 capital and eligible long-term debt, on U.S. banks that are global systemically important banks. These rules also require these institutions to maintain an outstanding amount of eligible long-term debt based on either risk-weighted assets or average total consolidated assets. These final rules aim to increase covered institutions’ capital and leverage ratios and to increase the capital available to support or resolve these institutions in periods of severe market stress or in the event of resolution. Application of the capital surcharge and loss absorbency requirements may change the leverage and funding profiles of the largest U.S. banks and their affiliates and counterparties, including entities from which we obtain financing, and could lead to a reduction in the amount of repurchase financing made available to the financing markets.


RISKS RELATED TO OUR TAXATION AS A REIT AND OTHER TAX RELATED MATTERS

Qualifying as a REIT involves highly technical and complex provisions of the Code, and a technical or inadvertent violation could jeopardize our REIT qualification. Maintaining our REIT status may reduce our flexibility to manage our operations.

Qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex Code provisions for which only limited judicial and administrative authorities exist. Even a technical or inadvertent violation could jeopardize our REIT qualification. Our qualification as a REIT will depend on our satisfaction of certain asset, income, organizational, distribution, stockholder ownership and other requirements on a continuing basis. Our operations and use of leverage also subjects us to interpretations of the Code, and technical or inadvertent violations of the relevant requirements under the Code could cause us to lose our REIT status or to pay significant penalties and interest. In addition, our ability to satisfy the requirements to qualify as a REIT depends in part on the actions of third parties over which we have no control or only limited influence, including in cases where we own an equity interest in an entity that is classified as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

Maintaining our REIT status may limit flexibility in managing our operations. For instance:

If we make frequent asset sales from our REIT entities to persons deemed customers, we could be viewed as a “dealer,” and thus subject to 100% prohibited transaction taxes or other entity level taxes on income from such transactions.
Compliance with the REIT income and asset requirements may limit the type or extent of hedging that we can undertake and could limit our ability to invest in TBA securities.
Our ability to own non-real estate related assets and earn non-real estate related income is limited. Our ability to own equity interests in other entities is limited. If we fail to comply with these limits, we may be forced to liquidate attractive assets on short notice on unfavorable terms in order to maintain our REIT status.
Our ability to invest in taxable subsidiaries is limited under the REIT rules. Maintaining compliance with this limitation could require us to constrain the growth of future taxable REIT affiliates.
Notwithstanding our NOL carryforward, meeting minimum REIT dividend distribution requirements could reduce our liquidity. Earning non-cash REIT taxable income could necessitate our selling assets, incurring debt, or raising new equity in order to fund dividend distributions.
Stock ownership tests may limit our ability to raise significant amounts of equity capital from one source.

If we do not qualify as a REIT or fail to remain qualified as a REIT, we may be subject to tax as a regular corporation and could face a tax liability, which would reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to our shareholders.

We intend to operate in a manner that will allow us to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes. Our qualification as a REIT will depend on our satisfaction of certain asset, income, organizational, distribution, stockholder ownership and other requirements on a continuing basis. Our ability to satisfy the asset tests depends upon our analysis of the characterization and fair market values of our assets, some of which are not susceptible to a precise determination, and for which we will not obtain

19


independent appraisals. Our compliance with the REIT income and quarterly asset requirements also depends upon our ability to successfully manage the composition of our income and assets on an ongoing basis.

If we were to fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we would be subject to federal income tax, after consideration of our NOL carryforward but not considering any dividends paid to our shareholders during the respective tax year. If we could not otherwise offset this taxable income with our NOL carryforward, the resulting corporate tax liability could be material to our results and would reduce the amount of cash available for distribution to our shareholders, which in turn could have an adverse impact on the value of our common stock. Unless we were entitled to relief under certain Code provisions, we also would be disqualified from taxation as a REIT until the fifth taxable year following the year for which we failed to qualify as a REIT.

The recent passage of the TCJA may adversely affect the U.S. residential housing market, which could adversely affect our business.

The TCJA includes changes that could have an adverse impact on the U.S. residential housing and housing finance markets and potentially impact the market value of our investments. Among other items, the TCJA imposes new restrictions on the deductibility of interest on mortgage debt, state and local income taxes, and sales and property taxes, which may reduce home affordability and/or demand for residential real estate and adversely affect home prices. In addition, such changes may increase taxes payable by certain borrowers, thereby reducing their available cash and adversely impacting their ability to make payments on their residential mortgages, which in turn, could cause losses on our investments.

Dividends payable by REITs do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for some dividends.

The maximum tax rate applicable to "qualified dividend income" payable to U.S. stockholders that are taxed at individual rates is lower than corresponding maximum ordinary income tax rates. Dividends payable by REITs, however, are generally not eligible for the reduced rates on qualified dividend income. Rather, under the recently enacted TCJA, qualified REIT dividends constitute "qualified business income" and thus a 20% deduction is available to individual taxpayers with respect to such dividends, resulting in a 29.6% maximum federal tax rate (plus the 3.8% surtax on net investment income, if applicable) for individual U.S. stockholders. Additionally, without further legislative action, the 20% deduction applicable to qualified REIT dividends will expire on January 1, 2026. The more favorable rates applicable to regular corporate qualified dividends could cause investors who are taxed at individual rates to perceive investments in REITs to be relatively less attractive than investments in the stocks of non-REIT corporations that pay dividends, which could adversely affect the value of the shares of REITs, including our common stock.

Legislative or other actions affecting REITs could materially and adversely affect us and our stockholders.

The rules dealing with U.S. federal income taxation are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process and by the IRS and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. Changes to the tax laws, with or without retroactive application, could materially and adversely affect us and our stockholders. We cannot predict how changes in the tax laws might affect us or our stockholders. New legislation, U.S. Treasury regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions could significantly and negatively affect our ability to qualify as a REIT or the U.S. federal income tax consequences of such qualification.

In addition, the effect of substantive changes made by the TCJA is highly uncertain, both in terms of their direct effect on the taxation of an investment in our common stock and their indirect effect on the value of our assets. Furthermore, many of the provisions of the TCJA will require guidance through the issuance of U.S. Treasury regulations in order to assess their effect. There may be a substantial delay before such regulations are promulgated, increasing the uncertainty as to the ultimate effect of the statutory amendments on us. It is also likely that there will be technical corrections legislation proposed with respect to the TCJA, the timing and effect of which cannot be predicted and may be adverse to us or our stockholders.

Our future use of our tax NOL carryforward is limited under Section 382 of the Code, which could result in higher taxable income and greater distribution requirements in order to maintain our REIT status. Further, if we unknowingly undergo another ownership change pursuant to Section 382, or miscalculate the limitations imposed by a known ownership change,

20


and utilize an impermissible amount of the NOL, we may fail to meet the distribution requirements of a REIT and therefore we could lose our REIT status.

We can use our tax NOL carryforward to offset our taxable earnings after taking the REIT distribution requirements into account. Section 382 of the Code limits the amount of NOL that could be used to offset taxable earnings after an “ownership change” occurs. A Section 382 ownership change generally occurs if one or more shareholders who own at least 5% of our stock, or certain groups of shareholders, increase their aggregate ownership by more than 50 percentage points over their lowest ownership percentage within a rolling three-year period.

In 2012, we experienced an ownership change under Section 382 and based on management's analysis and expert third-party advice, which necessarily includes certain assumptions regarding the application of Section 382, we determined that the ownership change under Section 382 will limit our ability to use our NOL carryforward to offset our taxable income to an estimated maximum amount of $13.5 million per year. Because NOLs generally may be carried forward for up to 20 years, this annual limitation may effectively limit the cumulative amount of pre-ownership change losses and certain recognized built-in losses that we may utilize. This would result in higher taxable income and greater distribution requirements in order to maintain REIT qualification than if such limitation were not in effect.

We may incur additional ownership changes under Section 382 in the future, in which case the use of our NOL could be further limited. If further ownership changes occur, Section 382 would impose stricter annual limits on the amount of pre-ownership change NOLs and other losses we could use to reduce our taxable income.

If we unknowingly undergo another ownership change under Section 382, or miscalculate the limitations imposed by a known ownership change, the use of the NOL could be limited more than we have determined and we may utilize (or may have utilized) more of the NOL than we otherwise may have been allowed. In such an instance we may be required to pay taxes, penalties and interest on the excess amount of NOL used, or we may be required to declare a deficiency dividend to our shareholders for the excess amount. In addition, if any impermissible use of the NOL led to a failure to comply with the REIT distribution requirements, we could fail to qualify as a REIT.

We have not established a minimum dividend payment level and we cannot assure you of our ability to pay dividends in the future.

We intend to pay quarterly dividends to our common stockholders and to make distributions to our shareholders in amounts such that all or substantially all of our taxable income, subject to certain adjustments including utilization of our NOL, is distributed. However, we have not established a minimum dividend payment level, and the amount of our dividend will fluctuate. Our ability to pay dividends may be adversely affected by the risk factors described herein. All distributions will be made at the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend on our GAAP and tax earnings, our financial condition, the requirements for REIT qualification and such other factors as our Board of Directors may deem relevant from time to time. We may not be able to make distributions, or our Board of Directors may change our dividend policy in the future. To the extent that we decide to pay dividends in excess of our current and accumulated tax earnings and profits, such distributions would generally be considered a return of capital for federal income tax purposes. A return of capital reduces the basis of a stockholder's investment in our common stock to the extent of such basis and is treated as capital gain thereafter.

Our ability to invest in and dispose of TBA securities could be limited by our REIT status, and we could lose our REIT status as a result of these investments.

The Code is unclear regarding whether TBA securities are qualifying assets for the 75% asset test and whether income and gains from dispositions of TBA securities are qualifying income for the 75% gross income test. In addition, there is uncertainty under the Code pursuant to the “5% asset test,” whereby ownership of any stocks or securities that do not qualify under the 75% asset test must be limited, in respect of any single non-governmental issuer, to an amount not greater than 5% of the value of our total assets (excluding ownership of any taxable REIT subsidiaries). Given the uncertainty regarding the tax treatment of TBAs, we will seek to limit our investment in TBAs and any other non-qualifying assets to no more than 25% of our assets at the end of any calendar quarter and will limit our investments in TBAs with a single counterparty to no more than 5% of our total assets at the end of any calendar quarter. Further, we will attempt to limit our gains from TBA transactions and any other non-qualifying income to no more than 25% of our gross income for each calendar year. Accordingly, our ability to invest in

21


TBAs utilizing dollar roll transactions could be limited. If at some point in the future we receive a written opinion that TBAs are more likely than not to be qualifying assets for the 75% asset test and to generate qualifying income for the 75% gross income test, we may subsequently increase our investment in TBAs.

Moreover, even if we receive an opinion that TBAs and the related transactions should be treated as qualifying assets or that income and gains from dispositions of TBAs should be treated as qualifying income, the IRS could successfully challenge that position. In that event, we could be subject to a penalty tax or we could fail to qualify as a REIT if (i) the value of our TBAs, together with our other non-qualifying assets for the 75% asset test, exceeded 25% of our gross assets at the end of any calendar quarter or if the value of our investments in TBAs with a single counterparty exceeded 5% of our total assets at the end of any calendar quarter or (ii) our income and gains from the disposition of TBAs, together with our other non-qualifying income for the 75% gross income test, exceeded 25% of our gross income for any taxable year. Any such penalty tax or failure to qualify as a REIT could adversely affect our business operations, financial condition or results of operations.

The failure of investments subject to repurchase agreements to qualify as real estate assets could adversely affect our ability to qualify as a REIT.

Repurchase agreement financing arrangements are structured legally as a sale and repurchase whereby we sell certain of our investments to a counterparty and simultaneously enter into an agreement to repurchase these securities at a later date in exchange for a purchase price. Economically, these agreements are financings which are secured by the investments sold pursuant thereto. We believe that we would be treated for REIT asset and income test purposes as the owner of the securities that are the subject of any such sale and repurchase agreement, notwithstanding that such agreement may legally transfer record ownership of the securities to the counterparty during the term of the agreement. It is possible, however, that the IRS could assert that we did not own the securities during the term of the sale and repurchase agreement, in which case we could fail to qualify as a REIT.

Even if we remain qualified as a REIT, we may face other tax liabilities that reduce our cash flow and our profitability.

Even if we remain qualified for taxation as a REIT, we may be subject to certain federal, state and local taxes on our income and assets, including taxes on any undistributed income, tax on income from some activities conducted as a result of a foreclosure or considered prohibited transactions under the Code, and state or local income taxes. Any of these taxes would decrease cash available for distribution to our shareholders. In addition, in order to meet the REIT qualification requirements, or to avert the imposition of a 100% tax that applies to certain gains derived by a REIT from prohibited transactions, we may hold some of our assets through a taxable REIT subsidiary (“TRS”) or other subsidiary corporations that will be subject to corporate-level income tax at regular rates to the extent that such TRS does not have an NOL carryforward. Any of these taxes would decrease cash available for distribution to our shareholders.

Recognition of excess inclusion income by us could have adverse consequences to us or our shareholders.

Certain of our securities have historically generated excess inclusion income and may continue to do so in the future. Certain categories of shareholders, such as foreign shareholders eligible for treaty or other benefits, shareholders with NOLs, and certain tax-exempt shareholders that are subject to unrelated business income tax, could be subject to increased taxes on a portion of their dividend income from us that is attributable to excess inclusion income. In addition, to the extent that our stock is owned by tax-exempt “disqualified organizations,” such as certain government-related entities and charitable remainder trusts that are not subject to tax on unrelated business income, we may incur a corporate level tax on a portion of our income. In that case, we may reduce the amount of our distributions to any disqualified organization whose stock ownership gave rise to the tax.

RISKS RELATED TO OUR CORPORATE STRUCTURE

The stock ownership limit imposed by the Code for REITs and our Articles of Incorporation may restrict our business combination opportunities. The stock ownership limitation may also result in reduced liquidity in our stock and may result in losses to an acquiring shareholder.

To qualify as a REIT under the Code, not more than 50% in value of our outstanding stock may be owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer individuals (as defined in the Code to include certain entities) at any time during the last half of each

22


taxable year. Our Articles of Incorporation, with certain exceptions, authorize our Board of Directors to take the actions that are necessary and desirable to qualify as a REIT. Pursuant to our Articles of Incorporation, no person may beneficially or constructively own more than 9.8% of our capital stock (including our common stock, Series A Preferred Stock, and Series B Preferred Stock). Our Board of Directors may grant an exemption from this 9.8% stock ownership limitation, in its sole discretion, subject to such conditions, representations and undertakings as it may determine are reasonably necessary.

Whether we would waive the ownership limitation for any other shareholder will be determined by our Board of Directors on a case by case basis. Our Articles of Incorporation’s constructive ownership rules are complex and may cause the outstanding stock owned by a group of related individuals or entities to be deemed as constructively owned by one individual or entity. As a result, the acquisition of less than these percentages of the outstanding stock by an individual or entity could cause that individual or entity to own constructively in excess of these percentages of the outstanding stock and thus be subject to the ownership limit. The Board of Directors has the right to refuse to transfer any shares of our capital stock in a transaction that would result in ownership in excess of the ownership limit. In addition, we have the right to redeem shares of our capital stock held in excess of the ownership limit.

The ownership limits imposed by the tax law are based upon direct or indirect ownership by “individuals,” but only during the last half of a tax year. The ownership limits contained in our Articles of Incorporation apply to the ownership at any time by any “person,” which includes entities, and are intended to assist us in complying with the tax law requirements and to minimize administrative burdens. However, these ownership limits might also delay or prevent a transaction or a change in our control that might involve a premium price for our stock or otherwise be in the best interest of our shareholders.

The stock ownership limit imposed by the Code for REITs and our Articles of Incorporation may impair the ability of holders to convert shares of our Series A Preferred Stock or Series B Preferred Stock into shares of our common stock upon a change of control.

The terms of our Series A Preferred Stock and Series B Preferred Stock provide that, upon occurrence of a change of control (as defined in the Articles of Incorporation), each holder of Series A Preferred Stock or Series B Preferred Stock will potentially have the right to convert in conjunction with a change in control all or part of the Series A Preferred Stock and Series B Preferred Stock held by such holder into a number of shares of our common stock per share of Series A Preferred Stock or Series B Preferred Stock, respectively, based on formulas set forth in our Articles of Incorporation. However, the stock ownership restrictions in our Articles of Incorporation also restrict ownership of shares of our Series A Preferred Stock and Series B Preferred Stock. As a result, no holder of Series A Preferred Stock or Series B Preferred Stock will be entitled to convert such stock into our common stock to the extent that receipt of our common stock would cause the holder to exceed the ownership limitations contained in our Articles of Incorporation, endanger the tax status of one or more real estate mortgage investment conduits ("REMICs") in which we have or plan to have an interest, or result in the imposition of a direct or indirect penalty tax on us. These provisions may limit the ability of a holder of Series A Preferred Stock or Series B Preferred Stock to convert shares of Series A Preferred Stock or Series B Preferred Stock into our common stock upon a change of control, which could adversely affect the market price of shares of our Series A Preferred Stock or of our Series B Preferred Stock.


ITEM 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
There are no unresolved comments from the SEC Staff.

ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES
We lease one facility located at 4991 Lake Brook Drive, Suite 100, Glen Allen, Virginia 23060 which provides 9,350 square feet of office space for our executive officers and employees. The term of the lease expires in March 2020, but may be renewed at our option for four additional periods of one year each at a rental rate 2.5% greater than the rate in effect during the preceding 12-month period or for one additional five-year period at the fair market rental rate for the time period such determination is being made for office space of comparable condition and location.


23


ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
As previously disclosed, the Company and DCI Commercial, Inc. (“DCI”), a former affiliate of the Company and formerly known as Dynex Commercial, Inc., were defendants in litigation filed by Basic Capital Management, Inc., American Realty Trust, Inc., and Transcontinental Realty Investors, Inc. (together, the “DCI Plaintiffs”) in 1999 regarding the activities of DCI while it was an operating subsidiary of an affiliate of the Company (the “DCI Litigation”). The DCI Litigation concluded in 2004 and, after various appeals by the Plaintiffs, no judgment or damages were entered against the Company. Final judgment in the principal amount of $46.5 million, including damages of $25.6 million and attorneys' fees and post-judgment interest of $20.9 million, was entered in the DCI Litigation against DCI (the “DCI Judgment”). In 2014, third parties were awarded a judgment against certain of the DCI Plaintiffs in a matter not involving the Company or DCI. Those parties are now pursuing a garnishment action against the DCI Judgment which does not directly involve the Company other than requests from such third parties that the Company provide certain information related to DCI while it was an affiliate of the Company. On April 26, 2017, the DCI Plaintiffs filed a suit, case no. DC-17-04848 (the “Suit”), in the 191st District Court of Dallas County, Texas, (the “Dallas County District Court”) naming the Company and DCI as co-defendants. The case has been removed to the United States District Court for the Northern District of Texas. The Suit represents the DCI Plaintiffs’ attempt to enforce the DCI Judgment against the Company and alleges that the Company and DCI cooperated to fraudulently transfer DCI assets to the Company and to commit related acts to defraud the Plaintiffs with respect to recovery on the DCI Judgment. The Suit also alleges that the Company and DCI are a single business enterprise. The Suit seeks monetary and exemplary damages, attorneys’ fees, and other relief.

The Company believes that the Suit against it is baseless and without merit and intends to defend itself vigorously in this action. The Company believes, based upon information currently available, that the Suit will be resolved without a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements as a whole. The outcome, however, of any legal proceeding, including the Suit, cannot be predicted with certainty. As such, no assurances can be given that the Company will be successful in its defense of this action on the merits or otherwise.  If the Company is not successful in its defense efforts, the resolution of this matter could have a material adverse effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements as a whole in a given future reporting period.

Other than as described above, to the Company’s knowledge, there are no pending or threatened legal proceedings, which, in management’s opinion, individually or in the aggregate, would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s results of operations or financial condition.


ITEM 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
None.


24


PART II.

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS, AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the trading symbol “DX”. The common stock was held by approximately 19,407 holders of record as of February 27, 2018. On that date, the closing price of our common stock on the New York Stock Exchange was $6.20 per share. The high and low common stock prices and cash dividends declared on our common stock, our Series A Preferred Stock, and our Series B Preferred Stock for each quarter during the last two years were as follows:
 
 
 
 
 
Dividends Declared
 
High
 
Low
 
Common Stock
 
Series A Preferred Stock
 
Series B Preferred Stock
2017:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First quarter
$7.11
 
$6.58
 
$0.18
 
$0.53125
 
$0.4765625
Second quarter
$7.37
 
$6.69
 
$0.18
 
$0.53125
 
$0.4765625
Third quarter
$7.41
 
$6.76
 
$0.18
 
$0.53125
 
$0.4765625
Fourth quarter
$7.40
 
$6.86
 
$0.18
 
$0.53125
 
$0.4765625
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
First quarter
$6.92
 
$5.22
 
$0.21
 
$0.53125
 
$0.4765625
Second quarter
$7.00
 
$6.33
 
$0.21
 
$0.53125
 
$0.4765625
Third quarter
$7.61
 
$6.56
 
$0.21
 
$0.53125
 
$0.4765625
Fourth quarter
$7.21
 
$6.49
 
$0.21
 
$0.53125
 
$0.4765625

When declaring dividends, the Board of Directors considers the requirements for maintaining our REIT status and maintaining compliance with dividend requirements of the Series A Preferred Stock and Series B Preferred Stock. In addition, the Board considers, among other things, the Company's long-term outlook, the Company’s financial conditions and results of operations during recent financial periods, and trends in the investment and financing markets.

The following table summarizes dividends declared per share and their related tax characterization for the years ended December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016:
 
Tax Characterization
 
Total Dividends Declared Per Share
 
Ordinary
 
Capital Gain
 
Return of Capital
 
Common dividends declared:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year ended December 31, 2017
$
0.2151908

 
$

 
$
0.5048092

 
$
0.7200

Year ended December 31, 2016
$
0.2572877

 
$

 
$
0.5827123

 
$
0.8400

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Preferred Series A dividends declared:
 
 
 
 

 
 
Year ended December 31, 2017
$
2.1250000

 
$

 
$

 
$
2.1250

Year ended December 31, 2016
$
2.1250000

 
$

 
$

 
$
2.1250

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Preferred Series B dividends declared:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year ended December 31, 2017
$
1.9062500

 
$

 
$

 
$
1.9063

Year ended December 31, 2016
$
1.9062500

 
$

 
$

 
$
1.9063


25



The following graph is a five year comparison of cumulative total returns for the shares of our common stock, the Standard & Poor’s 500 Stock Index (“S&P 500”), the Bloomberg Mortgage REIT Index, and the SNL U.S. Finance REIT Index. The table below assumes $100 was invested at the close of trading on December 31, 2012 in each of our common stock, the S&P 500, the Bloomberg Mortgage REIT Index, and the SNL U.S. Finance REIT Index and assumes reinvestment of dividends.

chart-e82d207c46deb1d5f9aa04.jpg

 
Cumulative Total Stockholder Returns as of December 31,
Index
2012
2013
2014
2015
2016
2017
Dynex Capital, Inc. Common Stock
$
100.00

$
95.44

$
110.69

$
97.44

$
118.12

$
134.46

S&P 500
$
100.00

$
132.36

$
150.43

$
152.51

$
170.70

$
207.92

Bloomberg Mortgage REIT Index
$
100.00

$
97.61

$
116.56

$
105.15

$
128.39

$
154.43

SNL U.S. Finance REIT Index
$
100.00

$
96.58

$
110.61

$
101.43

$
124.94

$
145.78

  
The sources of this information are Bloomberg, SNL Financial, and Standard & Poor’s, which management believes to be reliable sources. The historical information set forth above is not necessarily indicative of future performance. Accordingly, we do not make or endorse any predictions as to future share performance.

The Company has been authorized by its Board of Directors to repurchase up to $40 million of its outstanding shares of common stock through December 31, 2018. Subject to applicable securities laws and the terms of the Series A Preferred Stock designation and the Series B Preferred Stock designation, both of which are contained in our Articles of Incorporation, future repurchases of common stock will be made at times and in amounts as the Company deems appropriate, provided that the repurchase price per share is less than the Company's estimate of the current net book value of a share of common stock. Repurchases may be suspended or discontinued at any time. The Company did not repurchase any shares during the three months ended December 31, 2017.


26


ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
Our selected financial data presented below is derived from our audited financial statements and should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes included under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
 
As of/For the Year Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Balance Sheet Data:
($ in thousands except per share data)
Mortgage-backed securities
$
3,026,989

 
$
3,212,084

 
$
3,493,701

 
$
3,516,239

 
$
4,018,161

U.S. Treasuries
146,530

 

 

 

 

Total assets
3,305,778

 
3,397,731

 
3,670,048

 
3,688,311

 
4,217,137

Repurchase agreements
2,565,902

 
2,898,952

 
2,589,420

 
3,013,110

 
3,580,754

Total liabilities
2,748,720

 
2,930,547

 
3,178,023

 
3,081,009

 
3,631,261

Shareholders’ equity
557,058

 
467,184

 
492,025

 
607,302

 
585,876

Common shares outstanding
55,831,549

 
49,153,463

 
49,047,335

 
54,739,111

 
54,310,484

Book value per common share
$
7.34

 
$
7.18

 
$
7.71

 
$
9.02

 
$
8.69

Leverage (1)
6.4

 
6.3

 
6.5

 
5.1

 
6.2

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Statement of Comprehensive Income Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interest income
$
94,502

 
$
91,898

 
$
100,244

 
$
105,644

 
$
127,132

Interest expense (2)
36,178

 
25,231

 
22,605

 
25,915

 
39,028

Net interest income (2)
58,324

 
66,667

 
77,639

 
79,729

 
88,104

(Loss) gain on sale of investments, net
(11,530
)
 
(4,238
)
 
(978
)
 
16,223

 
3,354

Gain (loss) on derivative instruments, net (2)
3,044

 
(5,606
)
 
(43,128
)
 
(53,393
)
 
(10,076
)
General and administrative expenses
(15,819
)
 
(14,707
)
 
(17,668
)
 
(16,007
)
 
(13,058
)
Net income to common shareholders (2)
23,099

 
33,914

 
7,368

 
18,630

 
60,167

Comprehensive income (loss) to common shareholders
47,011

 
14,073

 
(26,716
)
 
73,762

 
(26,160
)
Average common shares outstanding
50,416,520

 
49,114,497

 
52,847,197

 
54,701,485

 
54,647,643

Net income per common share-basic and diluted
$
0.46

 
$
0.69

 
$
0.14

 
$
0.34

 
$
1.10

Comprehensive income (loss) per common share-basic and diluted
$
0.93

 
$
0.29

 
$
(0.51
)
 
$
1.35

 
$
(0.48
)
Dividends declared per share:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Common
$
0.72

 
$
0.84

 
$
0.96

 
$
1.00

 
$
1.12

Series A Preferred
$
2.13

 
$
2.13

 
$
2.13

 
$
2.13

 
$
2.13

Series B Preferred
$
1.91

 
$
1.91

 
$
1.91

 
$
1.91

 
$
0.94

(1)
Leverage is calculated by dividing total liabilities by total shareholders’ equity as of each period end except for December 31, 2017 which includes TBA long positions at cost (as if settled) of $829.4 million within total liabilities.
(2)
Results for these amounts for the year ended December 31, 2013 are not directly comparable to other periods presented because the Company discontinued cash flow hedge accounting for its derivative instruments effective June 30, 2013.


27


 
For the Year Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Other Data Including Non-GAAP Financial Measures:
($ in thousands except per share data)
Adjusted interest expense (1)
$
39,863

 
$
27,943

 
$
24,836

 
$
27,345

 
$
42,783

Adjusted net interest income (1)
63,817

 
63,955

 
75,408

 
78,299

 
84,349

Core net operating income to common shareholders (1)
37,003

 
40,943

 
49,174

 
54,162

 
63,786

Core net operating income per common share(1)
$
0.73

 
$
0.83

 
$
0.93

 
$
0.99

 
$
1.17

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Average interest earning assets
$
3,052,372

 
$
3,236,903

 
$
3,685,936

 
$
3,822,870

 
$
4,290,073

Average balance of borrowings
2,697,601

 
2,912,426

 
3,269,711

 
3,347,701

 
3,797,845

Effective yield (2)
3.06
%
 
2.82
%
 
2.71
%
 
2.76
%
 
2.96
%
Cost of funds (2)
1.32
%
 
0.85
%
 
0.68
%
 
0.76
%
 
1.01
%
Net interest spread
1.74
%
 
1.97
%
 
2.03
%
 
2.00
%
 
1.95
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjusted cost of funds (1)
1.46
%
 
0.94
%
 
0.75
%
 
0.81
%
 
1.10
%
Adjusted net interest spread (3)
1.64
%
 
1.88
%
 
1.96
%
 
1.95
%
 
1.86
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Effective yield by MBS type:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Agency RMBS
1.98
%
 
1.71
%
 
1.71
%
 
1.81
%
 
1.99
%
Non-Agency RMBS
3.94
%
 
3.61
%
 
3.64
%
 
6.93
%
 
5.22
%
Agency CMBS
2.80
%
 
2.95
%
 
3.08
%
 
3.62
%
 
3.59
%
Non-Agency CMBS
12.03
%
 
6.43
%
 
5.74
%
 
5.44
%
 
5.63
%
Agency CMBS IO
4.41
%
 
4.21
%
 
3.88
%
 
4.35
%
 
4.95
%
Non-Agency CMBS IO
4.32
%
 
4.11
%
 
3.98
%
 
4.08
%
 
4.82
%
(1) Represents a non-GAAP financial measure. See reconciliations provided below.
(2) Recalculation of weighted average effective yields using interest income and cost of funds using interest expense may not be possible because certain income and expense items are based on a 360-day year for the calculation while others are based on actual number of days in the year.
(3) Adjusted net interest spread is calculated by adding the impact of drop income from TBA dollar roll positions to effective yield and deducting adjusted cost of funds.


Non-GAAP Financial Measures

In addition to the Company's operating results presented in accordance with GAAP, the information presented above and within Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" of this Annual Report on Form 10-K contains the following non-GAAP financial measures: core net operating income to common shareholders (including per common share), adjusted interest expense, adjusted net interest income, and the related metrics adjusted cost of funds and adjusted net interest spread. Because these measures are used in the Company's internal analysis of financial and operating performance, management believes that they provide greater transparency to our investors of management's view of our economic performance. Management also believes the presentation of these measures, when analyzed in conjunction with the Company's GAAP operating results, allows investors to more effectively evaluate and compare the performance of the Company to that of its peers, although the Company's presentation of its non-GAAP measures may not be comparable to other similarly-titled measures of other companies. Schedules reconciling core net operating income to common shareholders, adjusted interest expense, and adjusted net interest income to GAAP financial measures are provided below.

28


Management views core net operating income to common shareholders as an estimate of the Company’s financial performance excluding changes in fair value of its investments and derivatives. In addition to the non-GAAP reconciliation set forth below, which derives core net operating income to common shareholders from GAAP net income to common shareholders as the nearest GAAP equivalent measure, core net operating income to common shareholders can also be determined by adjusting net interest income to include interest rate swap periodic interest costs, drop income on TBA dollar roll positions, general and administrative expenses, and preferred dividends. Management includes drop income, which is included in "gain (loss) on derivatives instruments, net" on the Company's consolidated statements of comprehensive income, in core net operating income and in adjusted net interest income because TBA dollar roll positions are viewed by management as economically equivalent to holding and financing Agency RMBS using short-term repurchase agreements. Management also includes periodic interest costs from its interest rate swaps, which are also included in "gain (loss) on derivatives instruments, net", in adjusted net interest expense, and in adjusted net interest income because interest rate swaps are used by the Company to economically hedge the impact of changing interest rates on its borrowing costs from repurchase agreements, and including periodic interest costs from interest rate swaps is a helpful indicator of the Company’s total cost of financing in addition to GAAP interest expense. However, these non-GAAP measures do not provide a full perspective on our results of operations, and therefore, their usefulness is limited. For example, these non-GAAP measures do not include gains or losses from available-for-sale investments, changes in fair value of and costs of terminating interest rate swaps, as well as realized and unrealized gains or losses from any instrument used by management to economically hedge the impact of changing interest rates on its portfolio and book value per common share, such as Eurodollar futures and TBA short positions. As a result, these non-GAAP measures should be considered as a supplement to, and not as a substitute for, the Company's GAAP results as reported on its consolidated statements of comprehensive income.


29


 
For the Year Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Reconciliations of GAAP to Non-GAAP Financial Measures:
($ in thousands except per share data)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
GAAP net income to common shareholders
$
23,099

 
$
33,914

 
$
7,368

 
$
18,630

 
$
60,167

Less:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Accretion) amortization of de-designated cash flow hedges (1)
(268
)
 
(251
)
 
3,499

 
6,788

 
5,193

Change in fair value of derivative instruments, net (2)
2,717

 
3,145

 
37,398

 
45,175

 
1,128

Loss (gain) on sale of investments, net
11,530

 
4,238

 
978

 
(16,223
)
 
(3,354
)
Fair value adjustments, net
(75
)
 
(103
)
 
(69
)
 
(208
)
 
652

Core net operating income to common shareholders
$
37,003

 
$
40,943

 
$
49,174

 
$
54,162

 
$
63,786

Average common shares outstanding
50,416,520

 
49,114,497

 
52,847,197

 
54,701,485

 
54,647,643

Core net operating income per common share
$
0.73

 
$
0.83

 
$
0.93

 
$
0.99

 
$
1.17

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
GAAP interest expense
$
36,178

 
$
25,231

 
$
22,605

 
$
25,915

 
$
39,028

Add: net periodic interest costs of derivative instruments
3,417

 
2,461

 
5,730

 
8,218

 
8,948

Less: accretion (amortization) of de-designated cash flow hedges (1)
268

 
251

 
(3,499
)
 
(6,788
)
 
(5,193
)
Adjusted interest expense
$
39,863

 
$
27,943

 
$
24,836

 
$
27,345

 
$
42,783

Average balance of borrowings
2,697,601

 
2,912,426

 
3,269,711

 
3,347,701

 
3,797,845

Adjusted cost of funds
1.46
%
 
0.94
%
 
0.75
%
 
0.81
%
 
1.10
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
GAAP net interest income
$
58,324

 
$
66,667

 
$
77,639

 
$
79,729

 
$
88,104

Add:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
TBA drop income
9,178

 

 

 

 

Net periodic interest costs of derivative instruments
(3,417
)
 
(2,461
)
 
(5,730
)
 
(8,218
)
 
(8,948
)
Less: accretion (amortization) of de-designated cash flow hedges (1)
(268
)
 
(251
)
 
3,499

 
6,788

 
5,193

Adjusted net interest income
$
63,817

 
$
63,955

 
$
75,408

 
$
78,299

 
$
84,349

Adjusted net interest spread
1.64
%
 
1.88
%
 
1.96
%
 
1.95
%
 
1.86
%
(1)
Amount recorded as a portion of "interest expense" in accordance with GAAP related to the amortization (accretion) of the balance remaining in accumulated other comprehensive loss as a result of the Company's discontinuation of cash flow hedge accounting effective June 30, 2013.
(2)
Amount includes unrealized gains and losses from changes in fair value of derivatives and realized gains and losses on terminated derivatives and excludes net periodic interest costs incurred on effective interest rate swaps outstanding during the period.



30


ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and the related notes included in Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
This discussion contains forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. Our actual results could differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of various factors including, but not limited to, those disclosed in Item 1A, “Risk Factors” elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and in other documents filed with the SEC and otherwise publicly disclosed. Please refer to “Forward-Looking Statements” contained within this Item 7 for additional information. This discussion also contains non-GAAP financial measures. Please refer to Item 6 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for reconciliations of these non-GAAP measures and additional information.
For a complete description of our business including our operating policies, investment philosophy and strategy, financing and hedging strategies, and other important information, please refer to Item 1 of Part I of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW

Market volatility maintained a steady decline during 2017 despite the year starting with enormous fiscal policy uncertainty. Longer-term interest rates were range bound during 2017 as inflationary pressures remained muted, while short interest rates rose in response to monetary policy changes. The FOMC increased the Federal Funds Rate three times in 2017 to a targeted range of 1.25% - 1.50% as the FOMC continued to withdraw monetary policy accommodation from the markets. Overall credit spreads on MBS continued their tightening trend during the year, and asset prices generally improved as demand for yield remained strong amid the lower volatility environment. Many market participants believe the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “TCJA”) enacted into law during the fourth quarter will lead to a boost in economic activity and higher inflation. In addition, many market participants believe there will be an increase the supply of U.S. Treasuries which may put upward pressure interest rates. Given the market’s perception of the potential boost in economic activity and inflation, markets ended 2017 decidedly more bearish on interest rates heading into 2018.

The chart below shows the highest and lowest rates during the year ended December 31, 2017 as well as the rates as of December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016 for the indicated U.S. Treasury securities:

31


     chart-474ed65b797e5e3581ca04.jpg
Similar to U.S. Treasury rates, the interest rate swap curve rose higher during 2017 at a modest pace with reasonably muted volatility relative to 2016. The chart below shows the highest and lowest swap rates during the year ended December 31, 2017 as well as the swap rates as of December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016:
chart-9e5256b607e15f96978a04.jpg

The table below shows examples of credit spreads in basis points for certain investment types in our MBS portfolio as of the end of each quarter since December 31, 2016:

32


Investment Type:
 
12/31/2016
 
3/31/2017
 
6/30/2017
 
9/30/2017
 
12/31/2017
Fixed 30 year FN 3% (Fixed-rate Agency RMBS)
 
36

 
34

 
36

 
29

 
26

Fixed 30 year FN 4% (Fixed-rate Agency RMBS)
 
33

 
27

 
31

 
29

 
26

Agency ARM 5/1 (Adjustable-rate Agency RMBS)
 
19

 
24

 
21

 
20

 
16

Agency DUS (Agency CMBS)
 
76

 
67

 
68

 
64

 
56

Freddie K AAA IO (Agency CMBS IO)
 
200

 
150

 
145

 
120

 
100

AAA CMBS IO (Non-Agency CMBS IO)
 
195

 
145

 
110

 
120

 
100

Freddie K B (Non-Agency CMBS)
 
295

 
220

 
165

 
170

 
165

    
Market expectations regarding real and anticipated shifts in government and regulatory policy as well as the steady decline in market volatility during 2017 presented us with opportunities to strategically invest capital during 2017. We were able to maintain our diversified investment strategy with a focus on high credit quality, highly liquid assets in both residential and commercial sectors by selling our lower yielding adjustable-rate Agency RMBS and reinvesting in 30-year fixed rate TBAs and specified pools of Agency RMBS while remaining active in multifamily CMBS to the extent we were able to find attractive risk-adjusted returns. Our results for 2017 also benefited significantly from the CMBS IO portion of our investment portfolio. As the regulatory environment became more favorable, we were able to diversify our funding sources, manage terms with our counterparties, and reposition our hedging portfolio to minimize the impact of additional hikes in the Federal Funds Rate, though increases in the Federal Funds Rate pressured our net interest income and net interest spread throughout 2017. Our continued commitment to disciplined risk management and capital allocation decisions that maximize flexibility helped to generate a total economic return on our book value of 12.3% for 2017 despite higher financing costs while maintaining stable leverage and improving the overall liquidity of our investment portfolio.

Management Outlook for 2018

Since the end of 2017, interest rates have continued to increase as markets adjust to the TCJA, anticipated increases in U.S. Treasury debt, and the potential for higher inflation. Interest rates in the U.S. appear to be reacting to higher interest rates in the Eurozone, and markets appear to be pricing in a higher probability of more increases by the Federal Reserve to the Federal Funds Rate than had previously been estimated. We believe that markets are transitioning to an improved environment for the marginal investment of capital in MBS. We also believe that the probability of higher interest rates and a steeper yield curve has increased for several reasons. First, U.S. tax cuts will provide a significant short-term stimulus to the economy. Second, increased issuances of U.S. Treasury securities and the fact that foreign central banks are seeking to reduce and eventually withdraw monetary stimulus could push interest rates even higher. Third, the Trump Administration has signaled that it intends to continue pursuing fiscal policies that will expand the federal deficit. And finally, the Federal Reserve is withdrawing monetary stimulus as it reduces its investment in Agency MBS and U.S. Treasury securities over time. This most likely would result in marginal returns on MBS improving versus where they were at the beginning of 2018.

The transition, however, is not guaranteed and is likely to take a long time. The transition period is also likely to be marked by periods of high volatility such as what was experienced in the beginning of 2018. Further, there are significant risks to actually moving to a higher interest rate environment. The continued rapid growth in global debt creates a drag on global economic growth and could exacerbate any sudden drop in aggregate demand. Additionally, sudden or large increases in interest rates could have a negative impact on equity valuations and economic activity, especially given the absolute amount of global debt outstanding. These factors could negatively impact economic growth which could eventually cause interest rates to decline. And lastly, market sentiment is very bearish on interest rates and short positions in U.S. Treasury notes are at an all-time high which could serve as a headwind, at least temporarily, for interest rates to rise.

Given our view, subsequent to December 31, 2017, we have added hedges to reduce our duration risk, and we will continue to actively manage our duration and our leverage as the market environment shifts. We expect to invest principally in Agency MBS and CMBS IO in order to maintain a highly liquid investment portfolio and give us the flexibility to increase or reduce leverage quickly.


33


On a longer-term basis, we continue to believe that favorable secular trends should support our business model. Global demand for yield should continue as populations age and seek the safety of yield versus capital appreciation. In addition, investment opportunities in U.S. housing finance should improve as the GSE and Federal Reserve footprints wane. And finally, reduced regulations should have a more favorable impact on our ability to finance our portfolios.

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES

The discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based in large part upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with GAAP. The preparation of our consolidated financial statements requires management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. We base these estimates and judgments on historical experience and assumptions believed to be reasonable under current facts and circumstances. Actual results, however, may differ from the estimated amounts we have recorded.
Critical accounting policies are defined as those that require management's most difficult, subjective or complex judgments, and which may result in materially different results under different assumptions and conditions. The following discussion provides information on our accounting policies that require the most significant management estimates, judgments, or assumptions, or that management believes includes the most significant uncertainties, and are considered most critical to our results of operations or financial position.

Fair Value Measurements. Our Agency MBS, as well a majority of our non-Agency MBS, are substantially similar to securities that either are actively traded or have been recently traded in their respective market. Pricing services and brokers have access to observable market information through trading desks and various information services. We receive a price evaluation for each of our MBS from a primary pricing service selected by the Company. To determine each security's valuation, the primary pricing service uses either a market approach or income approach, both of which rely on observable market data. The market approach uses prices and other relevant information that is generated by market transactions of identical or similar securities, while the income approach uses valuation techniques to convert estimated future cash flows to a discounted present value. Management reviews the assumptions and inputs utilized in the valuation techniques. Examples of these observable inputs and assumptions include market interest rates, credit spreads, and projected prepayment speeds, among other things. The Company compares the price received from its primary pricing service to other prices received from additional third party pricing services and multiple broker quotes for reasonableness.
We typically receive a total of three to six bid-side prices from pricing services and brokers for each of our securities; prices obtained from brokers are not binding on either the broker or us. Management does not adjust the prices received, but, for securities on which we receive five or more prices, the high and low prices are excluded from the calculation of the average price. In addition, management reviews the prices received for each security by comparing those prices to actual purchase and sale transactions, our internally modeled prices that are calculated based on observable market rates and credit spreads, and the prices that our borrowing counterparties use in financing our securities. Management reviews prices which vary significantly from the pricing service and may exclude such prices from its calculation of fair value. The decision to exclude any price from use in the calculation of the fair values used in our consolidated financial statements is reviewed and approved by management independent of the pricing process. The average of the remaining prices received is used for the fair values included in our consolidated financial statements. If the price of a security is obtained from quoted prices for similar instruments or model-derived valuations whose inputs are observable, the security is classified as a level 2 security. The security is classified as a level 3 security if the inputs are unobservable, resulting in an estimate of fair value based primarily on management's judgment. As of December 31, 2017, less than 0.3% of our MBS are level 3 securities. Please refer to Note 5 of the Notes to our Consolidated Financial Statements contained within Part II, Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information on fair value measurements.
Amortization of Investment Premiums. We amortize premiums and accrete discounts associated with the purchase of our adjustable-rate Agency RMBS into interest income over the projected lives of our securities, including contractual payments and estimated prepayments, using the effective yield method. If prepayments increase (or are expected to increase), we will accelerate the rate of amortization (accretion) on the premiums (discounts). Conversely, if prepayments decrease (or are expected to decrease), we will decelerate the rate of amortization (accretion) on the premiums (discounts). Estimates and judgments related to future levels of prepayments are critical to the determination of how much premium or discount to amortize or accrete, and

34


the determination of the rate of amortization or accretion and future levels of prepayment are difficult for management to predict. With respect to both RMBS and CMBS, mortgage prepayment expectations can change based on how changes in current and projected interest rates impact a borrower's likelihood of refinancing as well as other factors, including but not limited to real estate prices, borrowers' credit quality, changes in the stringency of loan underwriting practices, and lending industry capacity constraints. With respect to RMBS, modifications to existing government refinance programs, or the implementation of new programs can have a significant impact on the rate of prepayments. Further, GSE buyouts of loans in imminent risk of default, loans that have been modified, or loans that have defaulted will generally be reflected as prepayments on our securities and increase the uncertainty around management's estimates. We utilize various third party services to assist in estimating projected prepayments on our MBS. We review these estimates monthly and compare the results to any available market consensus prepayment speeds. We also consider historical prepayment rates and current market conditions to assess the reasonableness of the prepayment rates estimated by the third party service. Actual and anticipated prepayment experience is reviewed monthly and effective yields are adjusted for differences between the previously estimated future prepayments and the amounts actually received as well as changes in estimated future prepayments.

Other-than-Temporary Impairments. When the fair value of an available-for-sale security is less than its amortized cost as of the reporting date, the security is considered impaired. We assess our securities for impairment on at least a quarterly basis and determine if the impairments are either temporary or other-than-temporary. We assess our ability to hold any Agency MBS or non-Agency MBS with an unrealized loss until the recovery in its value. Our ability to hold any such MBS is based on our current investment strategy and significance of the related investment as well as our current leverage and anticipated liquidity. Although Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are not explicitly backed by the full faith and credit of the United States, given their guarantee and commitments for support received from the Treasury as well as the credit quality inherent in Agency MBS, we do not typically consider any of the unrealized losses on our Agency MBS to be credit-related. For our non-Agency MBS, we review the credit ratings of these MBS and the seasoning of the mortgage loans collateralizing these securities as well as the estimated future cash flows, which include any projected losses, in order to evaluate whether we believe any portion of the unrealized loss at the reporting date is related to credit losses.
The determination as to whether an other-than-temporary impairment ("OTTI") exists, as well as its amount, is subjective, as such determinations are based not only on factual information available at the time of assessment but also on management’s estimates of future performance and cash flow projections. As a result, the timing and amount of any OTTI may constitute a material estimate that is susceptible to significant change. Our expectations with respect to our securities in an unrealized loss position may change over time, given, among other things, the dynamic nature of markets and other variables. For example, although we believe that the conservatorship of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac has further strengthened their creditworthiness, there can be no assurance that these actions will be adequate for their needs. Accordingly, if these government actions are inadequate and the GSEs suffer losses or cease to exist, our view of the credit worthiness of our Agency MBS could materially change, which may affect our assessment of OTTI for Agency MBS in future periods. Future sales or changes in our expectations with respect to Agency or non-Agency securities in an unrealized loss position could result in us recognizing other-than-temporary impairment charges or realizing losses on sales of MBS in the future.

FINANCIAL CONDITION

During 2017, we shifted away from adjustable-rate Agency RMBS in favor of fixed-rate Agency RMBS and also continued to invest in Agency CMBS. Fixed-rate Agency MBS had more attractive yields and a better return profile relative to adjustable-rate Agency MBS . In addition, prepayments on fixed-rate Agency RMBS are more predictable than adjustable-rate Agency RMBS, which have a higher risk of prepayment in a flatter yield curve environment. We also began investing in U.S. Treasury securities during the fourth quarter of 2017 as these highly liquid securities allow us to earn a return on available cash at low financing costs while reducing credit spread risk. The following charts compare our investment portfolio as of December 31, 2017 to December 31, 2016:


35


chart-10aa52600f445520809a04.jpgchart-1171d6c138985e729fba04.jpg
(1)
Includes securities pending settlement as of December 31, 2017.
(2)
Includes long positions in TBAs used for investment purposes at their implied market value as if settled and excludes short positions in TBAs used for economic hedging purposes. All TBAs are accounted for as “derivative assets (liabilities)” on our consolidated balance sheet.

    
The following table provides a summary of the amortized cost and fair value of our MBS portfolio and includes TBA dollar roll positions used for investment purposes as of the periods indicated:
 
 
December 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
($ in thousands)
 
Amortized Cost
 
Fair Value
 
Amortized Cost
 
Fair Value
RMBS:
 
 
 

 
 
 
 
Agency RMBS, 30 year fixed-rate (1)
 
$
903,270

 
$
898,678

 
$

 
$

TBAs, 30 year fixed-rate (2)
 
829,425

 
830,908

 

 

Agency RMBS - adjustable rate
 
289,304

 
285,583

 
1,214,324

 
1,201,205

Non-Agency RMBS
 
1,070

 
1,091

 
33,548

 
33,562

 
 
2,023,069

 
2,016,260

 
1,247,872

 
1,234,767

CMBS and CMBS IO:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fixed-rate Agency CMBS
 
$
1,134,409

 
$
1,124,351

 
$
1,166,454

 
$
1,144,555

Non-Agency CMBS
 
22,466

 
24,764

 
72,749

 
78,216

Agency CMBS IO
 
375,361

 
380,306

 
411,737

 
411,898

Non-Agency CMBS IO
 
308,472

 
312,216

 
346,155

 
342,648

 
 
1,840,708

 
1,841,637

 
1,997,095

 
1,977,317

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total MBS portfolio including TBA dollar roll positions
 
$
3,863,777

 
$
3,857,897

 
$
3,244,967

 
$
3,212,084

(1)
Includes securities pending settlement as of December 31, 2017.
(2)
Consists of long positions in TBAs used for investment purposes at their implied cost basis and implied market value, respectively, as if settled and excludes short positions in TBAs used for economic hedging purposes. All TBAs are accounted for as “derivative assets (liabilities)” on our consolidated balance sheet.


36


The following table details the activity related to our MBS portfolio including TBA dollar roll positions during the year ended December 31, 2017:
 
Agency CMBS
 
Agency RMBS
 
CMBS IO
(3)
 
Non-Agency Other (4)
 
Total
($ in thousands)
 
30-Year Fixed Rate (1) (2)
 
Adjustable Rate
 
 
 
Balance as of December 31, 2016
$
1,144,555

 
$

 
$
1,201,205

 
$
754,546

 
$
111,778

 
$
3,212,084

Purchases
286,275

 
1,745,684

 

 
72,017

 

 
2,103,976

Principal payments
(61,610
)
 
(11,106
)
 
(188,018
)
 

 
(34,586
)
 
(295,320
)
Sales
(252,759
)
 
(1,111
)
 
(727,841
)
 

 
(50,871
)
 
(1,032,582
)
(Amortization) accretion
(4,347
)
 
(773
)
 
(9,161
)
 
(146,075
)
 
2,696

 
(157,660
)
Change in fair value
12,237

 
(3,108
)
 
9,398

 
12,034

 
(3,162
)
 
27,399

Balance as of December 31, 2017
$
1,124,351

 
$
1,729,586

 
$
285,583

 
$
692,522

 
$
25,855

 
$
3,857,897

(1)
Includes securities pending settlement as of December 31, 2017.
(2)
Includes long positions in TBAs used for investment purposes at their implied market value as if settled and excludes short positions in TBAs used for economic hedging purposes. All TBAs are accounted for as “derivative assets (liabilities)” on our consolidated balance sheet.
(3)
Includes Agency and non-Agency issued CMBS IO.
(4)
Includes non-Agency CMBS and RMBS.

We sold the majority of our investments in adjustable-rate Agency RMBS during 2017 as we expect these assets to underperform other asset classes in the current flat yield curve environment. We also sold certain Agency CMBS that were nearing their maturities, had lower coupons, or had higher liquidity risk due to the potential for significant margin calls that could occur in the event of a prepayment. During the same period, we also sold lower-yielding non-Agency CMBS investments and redeployed capital in Agency RMBS and sold most of our non-Agency RMBS because these investments were generally within a year of their expected maturity.


37


RMBS

The following table provides information on our Agency RMBS investments including securities pending settlement and TBA dollar roll positions as of December 31, 2017:
 
 
December 31, 2017
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted Average Based on Par
Coupon
 
Par
 
Amortized Cost/Implied Cost Basis (1)(3)
 
Fair
Value (2)(3)
 
Average Original Loan
Balance (4)
 
Loan Age
(in months)
 (4)
 
3 Month
CPR (4)(5)
 
Duration (6)
($ in thousands)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30-year fixed-rate:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3.0%
 
$
244,374

 
$
246,155

 
$
244,818

 
$
233,584

 
13

 
5.0
%
 
6.30

4.0%
 
623,293

 
657,114

 
653,860

 
274,965

 
4

 
4.0
%
 
3.91

TBA 4.0%
 
795,000

 
829,425

 
830,908

 
n/a

 
n/a

 
n/a

 
2.95

Total 30-year fixed-rate
 
$
1,662,667

 
$
1,732,694

 
$
1,729,586

 
$
263,310

 
6

 
4.3
%
 
3.80

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adjustable-rate:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3.1% (7)
 
$
278,886

 
$
289,305

 
$
285,583

 
$
271,516

 
74

 
16.0
%
 
2.28

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total Agency RMBS (including TBA dollar roll positions)
 
$
1,941,553

 
$
2,021,999

 
$
2,015,169

 
$
265,306

 
23

 
7.1
%
 
3.58

(1)
Implied cost basis of TBA dollar roll positions represents the forward price to be paid for the underlying Agency MBS as if settled.
(2)
Fair value of TBA dollar roll positions is the implied market value of the underlying Agency security as of the end of the period if settled.
(3)
The net carrying value of TBA dollar roll positions, which is the difference between their implied market value and implied cost basis, was $1.5 million as of December 31, 2017 and is included on the consolidated balance sheet within “derivative assets”.
(4)
TBA dollar roll positions are excluded from this calculation as they do not have a defined weighted-average loan balance or age until mortgages have been assigned to the pool.
(5)
Constant prepayment rate (“CPR”) represents the 3-month CPR of Agency RMBS held as of date indicated. Securities with no prepayment history are excluded from this calculation.
(6)
Duration measures the sensitivity of a security's price to the change in interest rates and represents the percent change in price of a security for a 100 basis point increase in interest rates. We calculate duration using third-party financial models and empirical data. Different models and methodologies can produce different estimates of duration for the same securities.
(7)
Coupon of adjustable-rate Agency RMBS represents the weighted average coupon based on amortized cost.

We did not have any investments in specified or non-specified pools of fixed-rate Agency RMBS as of December 31, 2016.

38


    
As mentioned previously, we have been reallocating capital away from adjustable-rate RMBS given the likelihood these investments will underperform in the current flat yield curve environment. We have been allowing and will continue to allow this portion of our portfolio to liquidate either on its own through payoffs or by selling when attractive bids are available. The following table provides information on our adjustable-rate RMBS by months to interest rate reset as of the dates indicated:
 
December 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
($ in thousands)
Par Value
 
Amortized Cost
 
Fair Value
 
Par Value
 
Amortized Cost
 
Fair Value
Adjustable-rate Agency RMBS by MTR:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
0-12 MTR
$
43,218

 
$
44,450

 
$
45,504

 
$
335,476

 
$
355,069

 
$
353,887

13-36 MTR
2,026

 
2,167

 
2,117

 
225,272

 
237,642

 
235,137

37-60 MTR
168,980

 
176,258

 
172,903

 
151,578

 
160,948

 
157,945

Greater than 60 MTR
64,662

 
66,430

 
65,059

 
444,932

 
460,665

 
454,236

Total adjustable-rate Agency RMBS
$
278,886

 
$
289,305

 
$
285,583

 
$
1,157,258

 
$
1,214,324

 
$
1,201,205


CMBS

Because Agency CMBS are guaranteed by the GSEs with respect to return of principal, our credit exposure is limited to any unamortized premium remaining on those securities. Non-Agency CMBS are not guaranteed and therefore our entire investment is exposed to credit losses from the underlying loans collateralizing the CMBS. The following table presents the par value, amortized cost, and weighted average months to estimated maturity of our CMBS investments as of the dates indicated by year of origination:
 
December 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
($ in thousands)
Par Value
 
Amortized Cost
 
Months to Estimated Maturity (1)
 
Par Value
 
Amortized Cost
 
Months to Estimated Maturity (1)
Year of Origination:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2008 and prior
$
34,065

 
$
31,026

 
41
 
$
57,771

 
$
53,161

 
34
2009 to 2012
106,619

 
109,234

 
27
 
193,061

 
198,916

 
33
2013 to 2014
20,237

 
20,600

 
82
 
42,760

 
43,176

 
95
2015
468,296

 
469,657

 
103
 
683,680

 
687,214

 
111
2016
239,139

 
240,831

 
110
 
254,781

 
256,736

 
122
2017
282,112

 
285,527

 
118
 

 

 

 
$
1,150,468

 
$
1,156,875

 
99
 
$
1,232,053

 
$
1,239,203

 
97
(1)
Months to estimated maturity is an average weighted by the amortized cost of the investment.

As of December 31, 2017, the majority of the collateral underlying our non-Agency CMBS is comprised of multifamily properties. We sold our non-Agency CMBS collateralized with single-family rental properties during the second quarter of 2017. The collateral underlying our non-Agency CMBS investments is geographically dispersed in order to mitigate exposure to any particular region of the country. The U.S. state with the largest percentage of collateral underlying our non-Agency CMBS was Texas as of December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016 at 19% and 16%, respectively.


39


CMBS IO

Income earned from CMBS IO is based on interest payments received on the underlying commercial mortgage loan pools. Our return on these investments may be negatively impacted by any change in scheduled cash flows such as modifications of the mortgage loans or involuntary prepayments including defaults, foreclosures, and liquidations on or of the underlying mortgage loans prior to its contractual maturity date. In order to manage our exposure to credit performance, we generally invest in senior tranches of these securities and where we have evaluated the credit profile of the underlying loan pool and can monitor credit performance. In addition, to address changes in market fundamentals and the composition of mortgage loans collateralizing an investment, we consider the year of origination of the loans underlying CMBS IO in our selection of investments. The following table presents our CMBS IO investments as of December 31, 2017 by year of origination:
 
December 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
($ in thousands)
Amortized Cost
 
Fair Value
 
Remaining WAL  (1)
 
Amortized Cost
 
Fair Value
 
Remaining WAL  (1)
Year of Origination:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2010
$
6,421

 
$
6,554

 
13

 
$
9,456

 
$
9,858

 
19

2011
25,652

 
26,720

 
18

 
35,130

 
36,897

 
23

2012
71,615

 
72,913

 
22

 
102,378

 
103,675

 
27

2013
103,730

 
104,568

 
28

 
128,891

 
129,011

 
33

2014
171,285

 
173,043

 
34

 
201,802

 
200,260

 
39

2015
170,663

 
172,974

 
40

 
198,016

 
194,886

 
45

2016
82,698

 
83,444

 
47

 
82,219

 
79,959

 
87

2017
51,769

 
52,306

 
53

 

 

 

 
$
683,833

 
$
692,522

 
36

 
$
757,892

 
$
754,546

 
42

(1) Remaining weighted average life (“WAL”) represents an estimate of the number of months of interest earnings remaining for the investments by year of origination.

Approximately 67% of the collateral underlying our non-Agency CMBS IO is comprised of retail, office, and multifamily properties as of December 31, 2017, and there have been no material changes to the characteristics or distribution of collateral type underlying these securities since December 31, 2016. The collateral underlying our non-Agency CMBS IO investments is geographically dispersed in order to mitigate exposure to any particular region of the country. The U.S. state with the largest percentage of collateral underlying our non-Agency CMBS IO was California at 14% as of December 31, 2017, unchanged from December 31, 2016.

Derivative Assets and Liabilities
    
We regularly monitor and adjust our hedging portfolio in response to many factors including, but not limited to, changes in our investment portfolio, shifts in the yield curve, and our expectations with respect to the future path of interest rates and interest rate volatility. Please refer to “Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk” in Part II, Item 7A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for more information.

Interest rate swaps and Eurodollar futures. As of December 31, 2017, we used interest rate swaps to hedge a portion of our earnings and book value exposure to fluctuations in interest rates as well as Eurodollar futures primarily to hedge a portion of our book value exposure to fluctuations in interest rates. The following graphs present the effective notional balance outstanding and weighted average net pay-fixed rate for our interest rate swaps for the periods indicated:


40


chart-d80651bb941f5551ba9a04.jpg
chart-08d3723fd18c57568a4a04.jpg

During the year ended December 31, 2017, we added interest rate swaps with a combined notional of $3.9 billion at a weighted average net pay-fixed rate of 1.64% and terminated $1.7 billion in interest rate swaps with a weighted average net pay-fixed rate of 1.35%. We had $0.2 billion of interest rate swaps mature during the year ended December 31, 2017 with a weighted average net pay-fixed rate 0.92%. Additionally, we added Eurodollar futures with a combined notional of $2.6 billion at a weighted average rate of 1.71%. The Eurodollar futures aggregate notional amount represents the total notional amount of the 3-month contracts with expiration dates in 2018. The maximum notional amount outstanding for any future 3-month period did not exceed $650 million as of December 31, 2017. The Eurodollar futures replaced certain existing hedges, allowing us to shift hedging costs beyond 2018 in order to better match timing of expected interest rate increases without impacting the Company’s overall risk position or current effective borrowing costs.

41


TBAs. We hold short and long positions in TBA securities which are accounted for as derivative instruments because the Company cannot assert that it is probable at inception and throughout the term of an individual TBA transaction that its settlement will result in physical delivery of the underlying Agency RMBS or the individual TBA transaction will not settle in the shortest time period possible. Please refer to Part I, Item 1 and “RMBS” above in this section for additional information about long positions in TBAs, or TBA dollar roll positions, which are used as a means of investing in and financing fixed-rate Agency RMBS.

We periodically enter into short positions in TBAs to partially hedge the impact of adverse changes in interest rates on the fair value of our fixed-rate Agency RMBS. As of December 31, 2017, we held one TBA short position with a coupon of 3.5% and implied cost basis (if settled) of $(153.8) million, which is included in our derivative liabilities on our consolidated balance sheet at its net carrying value $(0.3) million. Please refer to “Gain (Loss) on Derivative Instruments, Net” in “Results of Operations - Year Ended December 31, 2017 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2016” of this Part II, Item 7 for additional information on TBAs.

Repurchase Agreements
 
The majority of our repurchase agreement borrowings are collateralized with Agency MBS which have historically had lower liquidity risk than non-Agency MBS as discussed in “Risk Factors” in Part1, Item 1A of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The following table presents the amount pledged and leverage against the fair value of our non-Agency MBS investments by credit rating as of December 31, 2017 and December 31, 2016:
 
December 31, 2017
 
December 31, 2016
($ in thousands)
Fair Value
 
Amount Pledged
 
Related Borrowings
 
Fair Value
 
Amount Pledged
 
Related Borrowings
Non-Agency CMBS:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AAA
$

 
$

 
$

 
$
35,405

 
$
35,313

 
$
32,266

AA

 

 

 
14,127

 
14,105

 
11,665

A
18,212

 
18,212

 
15,508

 
18,614

 
18,549

 
15,831

Below A/Not Rated
6,552

 

 

 
10,070

 
9,873

 
7,119

   
$
24,764

 
$
18,212

 
$
15,508

 
$
78,216

 
$
77,840

 
$
66,881

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-Agency CMBS IO:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
AAA
$
259,155

 
$
259,151

 
$
218,995

 
$
290,092

 
$
289,608

 
$
246,412

AA
42,486

 

 

 
46,986

 
45,995

 
40,026

A
735

 
735

 
641

 

 

 

Below A/Not Rated
9,840

 
51,685

 
44,058

 
5,570

 
5,536

 
4,761

 
$
312,216


$
311,571

 
$
263,694

 
$
342,648

 
$
341,139

 
$
291,199

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Non-Agency RMBS: