10-K 1 odp-10k_20181229.htm 10-K odp-10k_20181229.htm

Table of Content

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, DC 20549

FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 29, 2018

Or

Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15 (d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from                                      to                                     

Commission file number 1-10948

Office Depot, Inc.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

59-2663954

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification No.)

 

 

 

6600 North Military Trail, Boca Raton, Florida

 

33496

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip Code)

(561) 438-4800

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of each class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, par value $0.01 per share

 

NASDAQ Stock Market

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes No

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days: Yes No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files): Yes No

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§ 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.:

 

Large accelerated filer

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer

Smaller reporting company

Emerging growth company

 

 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act). Yes No

The aggregate market value of common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of July 1, 2018 (based on the closing market price of the common stock on the Composite Tape on June 29, 2018) was approximately $1,397,561,637 (determined by subtracting from the number of shares outstanding on that date the number of shares held by affiliates of the registrant).

The number of shares outstanding of the registrant’s common stock, as of the latest practicable date: At February 18, 2019, there were 540,977,359 outstanding shares of Office Depot, Inc. Common Stock, $0.01 par value.

Documents Incorporated by Reference:

Certain information required for Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K is incorporated by reference to the Office Depot, Inc. definitive Proxy Statement for the registrant’s 2019 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after close of the registrant’s fiscal year.

 

 

 


Table of Content

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

PART I.

 

 

Item 1. Business

 

1

Item 1A. Risk Factors

 

8

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

16

Item 2. Properties

 

17

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

 

18

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

 

18

PART II

 

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity
Securities

 

19

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

 

21

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 

23

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

 

40

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 

40

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 

40

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures

 

40

Item 9B. Other Information

 

41

PART III

 

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 

44

Item 11. Executive Compensation

 

44

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 

44

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 

44

Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 

44

PART IV

 

 

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 

45

Item 16. Form 10-K Summary

 

50

SIGNATURES

 

51

 

 

 

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PART I

Forward-Looking Statements

This Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 29, 2018 (“Annual Report”) contains forward-looking statements, within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Reform Act”), that involve risks and uncertainties. These forward-looking statements include both historical information and other information that can be used to infer future performance. Examples of historical information include annual financial statements and the commentary on past performance contained in Part II — Item 7. “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” (“MD&A”). While certain information has specifically been identified as being forward-looking in the context of its presentation, we caution you that, with the exception of information that is historical, all the information contained in this Annual Report should be considered to be “forward-looking statements” as referred to in the Reform Act. Without limiting the generality of the preceding sentence, any time we use the words “estimate,” “project,” “intend,” “expect,” “believe,” “anticipate,” “continue” and similar expressions, we intend to clearly express that the information deals with possible future events and is forward-looking in nature. Certain information in our MD&A is clearly forward-looking in nature, and without limiting the generality of the preceding cautionary statements, we specifically advise you to consider all of our MD&A in the light of the cautionary statements set forth herein.

Much of the information in this Annual Report that looks towards future performance of Office Depot, Inc. and its subsidiaries is based on various factors and important assumptions about future events that may or may not actually come true. As a result, our operations and financial results in the future could differ materially and substantially from those we have discussed in this Annual Report. Significant factors that could impact our future results are provided in Part I — Item 1A. “Risk Factors” included in this Annual Report. Other risk factors are incorporated into the text of our MD&A, which should itself be considered a statement of future risks and uncertainties, as well as management’s view of our businesses. We assume no obligation (and specifically disclaim any such obligation) to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

In this Annual Report, unless the context otherwise requires, the “Company,” “Office Depot,” “we,” “us,” and “our” refer to Office Depot, Inc. and its subsidiaries.

Item 1. Business

The Company

We were incorporated in the state of Delaware in 1986 and opened our first retail store in Fort Lauderdale, Florida on October 9, 1986. Since then, we have become a leading provider of business services and supplies, products and technology solutions through our fully integrated business-to-business (“B2B”) distribution platform of 1,361 retail stores, online presence, and dedicated sales professionals and technicians to retail consumers and small, medium and enterprise businesses, all supported by our world-class supply chain facilities and delivery operations. Through our banner brands Office Depot®, OfficeMax®, CompuCom® and Grand & Toy®, we offer our customers the tools and resources they need to focus on their passion of starting, growing and running their businesses.

Our long-term strategy to deliver customer-focused value through our integrated B2B distribution platform is founded on three strategic pillars:

 

TRANSFORM

 

STRENGTHEN

 

DISRUPT

our business

 

our core

 

for our future

 

 

 

 

 

Acquisition of CompuCom

 

Value-added services growth

 

Retail transformation

 

Superior customer experience

 

Low cost business model

 

Product innovation

 

E2E Business Services Platform

 

New routes to market

 

Analytics Excellence / AI

 

At December 29, 2018, our operations are organized into three reportable segments (or “Divisions”): Business Solutions Division, which we also refer to as BSD, Retail Division and the CompuCom Division. The CompuCom Division was formed after the acquisition of CompuCom Systems, Inc. (“CompuCom”) on November 8, 2017. Additional information regarding our Divisions and operations in geographic areas is presented in Part II — Item 7. “MD&A” and in Note 5. “Segment Information” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements located in Part IV — Item 15. “Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules” of this Annual Report.

 

Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the ticker symbol ODP.

 

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Acquisitions

 

Over the last two years, we have been undergoing a strategic transformation to pivot Office Depot into an integrated B2B distribution platform, with the objective of expanding our product offerings to include value-added services for our customers and capture greater market share. As part of this transformation, we acquired CompuCom in 2017, as further described herein, and an enterprise IT solutions integrator and managed services provider in 2018. The latter gives us access to a platform for selling or providing Internet of Things (“IoT”) related hardware and projects to the education market. IoT refers to the connection of intelligent systems and devices to allow them to automatically share information so that systems and devices work intelligently together to develop and enhance solutions and reduce human intervention.

 

To strengthen our core operations, over the last two years we have also expanded the reach of our distribution network by identifying and acquiring profitable regional office supply distribution businesses serving small and mid-market customers in geographic areas that were previously underserved by our network. This has allowed, and will continue to allow, for an effective and accretive means to expand our distribution reach, target new business customers and grow our offerings beyond traditional office supplies.

The operating results of these companies are combined with our operating results subsequent to their purchase dates. The operating results of the acquired businesses are included in the Business Solutions Division, whereas the operating results of CompuCom and the enterprise IT solutions integrator and managed services provider are included in the CompuCom Division. Refer to Note 2. “Acquisitions” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Fiscal Year

Our fiscal year results are based on a 52- or 53-week calendar ending on the last Saturday in December. Fiscal year 2018 had 52 weeks and ended on December 29, 2018. Fiscal year 2017 had 52 weeks and ended on December 30, 2017. Fiscal year 2016 had 53 weeks and ended on December 31, 2016. Certain subsidiaries, including CompuCom, operate on a calendar year basis; however, the reporting difference did not have a material impact on 2018 and the other periods presented.

Business Solutions Division

Our Business Solutions Division provides its customers with nationally branded and our private branded office supply and adjacency products and services in the United States, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Canada. Our customers are served through a dedicated sales force, catalogs, telesales, and electronically through our Internet websites. Adjacency products primarily include cleaning and breakroom supplies, technology and furniture and our service offerings are comprised of copy and print services, product subscriptions, and managed print and fulfillment services.

The Business Solutions Division is comprised of two main sales channels: contract and direct.

Our contract sales channel serves business customers including small, medium, and enterprise businesses as well as schools and local, state and national governmental agencies. We also enter into agreements with consortiums to sell to entities across many industries, including government and non-profit entities, in non-exclusive buying arrangements.

Our direct sales channel primarily serves small to medium-sized customers. Direct customers can order products through our Internet website, from our catalogs, or by phone. Website functionality provides customers the convenience of using the loyalty program and offers suggestions by product ratings, pricing, and brand, among other features. Customer orders are fulfilled through our common supply chain. See “Supply Chain” section below for additional information on our supply chain network.

Beginning 2017, we have implemented several initiatives to strengthen the core of our Business Solutions Division, including the following:

 

expanding through strategic acquisitions that increase selling resources in the field, stretch our geographical reach, grow our small and medium customer segments, and increase our sales in the aforementioned adjacency categories

 

focus on demand-generation via a shift to digital marketing and investment in our eCommerce presence

 

realignment of our sales organization aimed at improving customer acquisition and retention trends

 

adding dedicated selling and operational resources to drive sales in our adjacency categories

 

partnering with key vendors to add new products to our assortment of offerings

 

capturing cross-selling opportunities with CompuCom

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increasing our focus on services, including growing current offerings in technology and print, and identifying new services that complement our existing product and fulfillment capabilities

Retail Division

The Retail Division markets a broad assortment of merchandise through our chain of retail stores throughout the United States, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The retail stores operate under both the Office Depot or OfficeMax brands, though systems, processes and offerings have converged. We currently offer products in three categories: supplies, technology, and furniture and other. See “Merchandising and Services” section below for additional information on our product categories. In addition, our Retail Division offers a range of business-related services targeted to small businesses, technology support services as well as printing, copying, mailing and shipping services. In addition, the print needs for retail and business customers are also facilitated through our regional print production centers.

 

At the end of 2018, the Retail Division operated 1,361 retail stores which includes locations temporarily closed for remodeling. We have a broad representation across North America with the largest concentration of our retail stores in Texas, California, and Florida. Most of our retail stores are located in leased facilities that currently average over 20,000 square feet. Beginning 2016, we have redesigned the layout of 106 stores to enhance our in-store experience through a curated assortment of products, better product adjacencies, easier navigation and signage, and increased space dedicated to expanded service offerings. To better serve our customers any way they choose to shop, we have a Buy Online-Pickup in Store offering in all locations and offer same-day store delivery in selected markets. Sales under these programs are serviced by store employees and fulfilled with store inventory and therefore are reported in the Retail Division results.

 

In May 2018, we introduced Workonomy™, a variety of business services married with “human touch” expertise to small and medium-sized businesses. The new Workonomy offering provides customers with enhanced tools and services as well as access to remote and in-person advisors and technical support, including tech services kiosks across 200 retail stores. Our Workonomy solutions also include payroll support, bookkeeping, storage and shredding, shipping and printing, and workspace planning and assembly services. We offer Workonomy business services on our eCommerce platform, in store, and through a dedicated sales team. In 2018, we also launched our first ever Workonomy integrated co-working space within one of our retail locations in Los Gatos, California.

In 2016, we announced the results of a comprehensive business review (the “Comprehensive Business Review”), which included the closure of up to 300 stores in North America over a three-year period, and the reduction of operating and general and administrative expenses through efficiencies and organizational optimization. Under the Comprehensive Business Review, we closed a total of 154 stores (19 in 2018, 63 in 2017 and 72 in 2016). We expect to close approximately 50 additional stores through the end of the program in 2019.

CompuCom Division

The CompuCom Division was formed after our acquisition of CompuCom Systems, Inc. on November 8, 2017. CompuCom provides information technology (“IT”) outsourcing services and products to enterprise organizations in the United States and Canada, and offers a broad range of solutions including end user computing support, managed IT services, data center monitoring and management, service desk, network infrastructure, IT workforce solutions, mobile device management and cloud services.

CompuCom’s unique capabilities allow us to enhance our service offerings and attract new customers. The minimal overlap between CompuCom’s customer base and the customer base of our Business Solutions and Retail Divisions allows us to capture cross-selling opportunities by offering a full suite of products and services. We are leveraging our approximately 6,000 highly certified CompuCom technicians to serve our extensive small, medium-sized, and large enterprise business customers who require technical support.

Supply Chain

We operate a network of distribution centers (or “DCs”) and crossdock facilities across the United States, Puerto Rico, and Canada, including two DCs which support the operations of CompuCom. Our DCs fulfill customer orders while crossdocks are smaller flow-through facilities where merchandise is sorted for distribution and shipped to fulfill the inventory needs of our retail locations. Our supply chain operations are also supported by a dedicated fleet of over 1,000 transportation vehicles. With our network of DCs, crossdocks, and vehicles, we are capable of providing next-day delivery services for approximately 98.5% of the population in the United States.

 

We continue to invest in our supply chain network, focusing on further enhancing our capabilities, increasing efficiency and lowering our costs. For example, we have grown our private fleet of transportation vehicles and introduced automated technology and robotics into our DCs and crossdock facilities. We have also installed new software that optimizes our network and allows us greater insight to our supply chain costs, providing us the ability to make better decisions and improve profitability. These investments position us to pursue opportunities beyond our traditional business, including utilizing our supply chain as a logistics service for third parties, including customers.

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Excluding the two DCs supporting the CompuCom operations, DC and crossdock facilities’ costs, such as real estate, technology, labor, depreciation and inventory are allocated to the Retail and Business Solutions Divisions based on the relative services provided. For the two DCs supporting the CompuCom operations, these costs are included within the CompuCom Division.

We believe that inventory held in our DCs is at levels sufficient to meet current and anticipated customer needs. Certain purchases are sent directly from the manufacturer to our customers or retail stores. Some supply chain facilities and some retail locations also house sales offices, showrooms, and administrative offices supporting our contract sales channel.

As of December 29, 2018, we operated a total of 56 DCs and crossdock facilities in the United States and Canada. Refer to Item 2. “Properties” for further information.

Out-bound delivery and inbound direct import operations are currently provided by third-party carriers along with our own vehicles.

Merchandising and Services

Our merchandising and services strategy is to meet our customers’ needs by offering a broad selection of nationally branded office supply and adjacency products, as well as our own private branded products and services. The selection of our private branded products has increased in breadth and level of sophistication over time. We currently offer products under such labels, including Office Depot®, OfficeMax®, Foray®, Ativa®, TUL®, Realspace®, WorkPro®, Brenton Studio®, Highmark®, and Grand & Toy®.

 

We generally classify our product offerings into three categories: (1) supplies, (2) technology, and (3) furniture and other. The supplies category includes products such as paper, writing instruments, office supplies, and cleaning and breakroom supplies. The technology category includes products such as toner and ink, printers, computers, tablets and accessories, and electronic storage. The furniture and other category includes products such as desks, seating, and luggage.

 

We classify our service offerings into two categories: (1) technology and (2) copy, print, and other. The technology category includes the technology service offerings provided through our CompuCom Division, such as end user computing support, managed IT services, data center monitoring and management, service desk, network infrastructure, IT workforce solutions, mobile device management and cloud services, as well as technology service offerings provided in our retail stores, such as equipment installation and repair. The copy, print, and other category includes offerings such as printing of business cards, banners, documents and promotional products, copying and photo services, managed print and fulfillment services, product and service subscriptions, and sales of third party software, gift cards, warranties, remote support as well as rental income on operating lease arrangements where the Company conveys to its customers the right to use devices and other equipment for a stated period.

Total Company sales by offering were as follows:

 

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Major products and services categories

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Products

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Supplies

 

 

42.7

%

 

 

45.0

%

 

 

46.1

%

Technology**

 

 

31.5

%

 

 

34.7

%

 

 

35.8

%

Furniture and other

 

 

10.4

%

 

 

11.3

%

 

 

10.0

%

Services

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Technology**

 

 

7.9

%

 

 

1.5

%

 

 

0.6

%

Copy, print, and other

 

 

7.5

%

 

 

7.5

%

 

 

7.5

%

Total

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

 

 

100.0

%

** 2017 includes technology product and services sales of CompuCom subsequent to the acquisition date of November 8, 2017.

We buy substantially all of our merchandise directly from manufacturers, industry wholesalers, and other primary suppliers, and includes direct sourcing of our private branded products from domestic and offshore sources. We enter into arrangements with vendors that can lower our unit product costs if certain volume thresholds or other criteria are met. For additional discussion regarding these arrangements, refer to “Critical Accounting Policies” in Part II — Item 7. “MD&A.”

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We operate separate merchandising functions in the United States and Canada. Each function is responsible for selecting, purchasing, managing the product life cycle of our inventory, and managing pricing primarily for retail and direct selling channels. Organizationally, they are aligned under the same Corporate leadership. In recent years, we have increasingly used global offerings across the regions to further reduce our product cost while maintaining product quality.

We operate a global sourcing office in Shenzhen, China, which allows us to better manage our product sourcing, logistics and quality assurance. This office consolidates our purchasing power with Asian factories and, in turn, helps us to increase the scope of our own branded offerings.

Sales and Marketing

We regularly assess consumer shopping behaviors in order to refine our strategy and identify the desired product assortment, shopping environment and purchasing methods. Identifying the most desirable and effective way to reach our customers and allowing them to shop through whichever channel they prefer will continue to be a priority. These efforts have impacted the extent, format and vehicles we use to advertise to and reach customers, our web page design, promotions and product offerings.

Our marketing programs are designed to attract and retain customers, drive frequency of customer visits, and increase customer spend in our stores and websites. We regularly advertise in major newspapers in most of our North American markets. We advertise through local and national radio, network and cable television advertising campaigns, and direct marketing efforts, such as the internet and social networking. We have shifted a meaningful amount of our marketing efforts in recent periods to digital programs that enhance personalized offerings and promote customer satisfaction.

Our customer loyalty and other incentive programs provide our customers with rewards that can be applied towards future purchases or other incentives. These programs enable us to effectively market to our customers and may change as customer preferences shift.

We perform periodic competitive pricing analyses to monitor each market, and prices are adjusted as necessary to further our competitive positioning. We generally target our pricing to be competitive with other resellers of office products and providers of business services and technology solutions.

Our customer acquisition efforts regularly shift to vehicles and formats found to be most productive for reaching the targeted class of customer. We acquire customers through e-mail and social media campaigns, online affiliate connections, on-premises sales calls, outbound sales calls, and catalogs, among others. No single customer accounted for more than 10% of total consolidated sales or receivables in 2018, 2017 or 2016. Additionally, we believe that none of our business segments is dependent upon a single customer or a few customers, the loss of which would have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations.

Seasonality

Our business experiences a certain level of seasonality, with sales generally trending lower in the second quarter, following the “back-to-business” sales cycle in the first quarter and preceding the “back-to-school” sales cycle in the third quarter and the holiday sales cycle in the fourth quarter for the Retail and Business Solutions Divisions. The CompuCom Division generally does not experience notable seasonality. Certain working capital components may build and recede during the year reflecting established selling cycles. Business cycles can and have impacted our operations and financial position when compared to other periods.

Intellectual Property

We currently operate under the brand names Office Depot®, OfficeMax®, CompuCom®, Grand & Toy®, as well as others. We hold trademark registrations domestically and worldwide and have numerous other applications pending worldwide for the names “Office Depot,” “OfficeMax,” “Workonomy”, “TUL,” “Ativa,” “Foray,” “Realspace,” “WorkPro,” “Brenton Studio,” “Highmark” and others. As with all domestic trademarks, our trademark registrations in the United States are for a ten-year period and are renewable prior to their respective expirations, as long as the trademarks are used in the regular course of trade. We also hold issued patents and pending patent applications domestically for certain private brand products, such as shredders, office chairs and writing instruments.

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Industry and Competition

We operate in a highly competitive environment. Our Business Solutions and Retail Divisions compete with office supply stores, wholesale clubs, discount stores, mass merchandisers, online retailers, food and drug stores, computer and electronics superstores and direct marketing companies. These companies compete with us in substantially all of our current markets. Increased competition in the office products markets, together with increased advertising, and internet-based search tools, has heightened price awareness among end-users. Such heightened price awareness has led to sales and margin pressure on our sales of office products and has negatively impacted our results. In addition to price, we also compete based on customer service, the quality and extent of product selection and convenience. Other office supply retail companies market similarly to us in terms of store format, pricing strategy, product selection and product availability in the markets where we operate. Some of our competitors are larger than us and have greater financial resources, which provide them with greater purchasing power, increased financial flexibility and more capital resources for expansion and improvement, which may enable them to compete more effectively. We anticipate that in the future we will continue to face high levels of competition from these companies.

We believe our robust field sales forces, dedicated customer service associates and the efficiency and convenience for our customers from our combined contract and direct sales distribution channels position our Business Solutions Division well to compete with other business-to-business office products distributors.

We believe our Retail Division competes favorably against competitors based on convenience, location, the quality of our customer service, our store layouts, the range and depth of our merchandise offering and our pricing.

The CompuCom Division operates in an environment that is highly competitive, rapidly evolving and subject to shifting client needs and expectations. We compete with companies that provide IT services and outsourcing, as well as companies that sell IT related products. We believe that the principal competitive factors in our business include technical expertise and industry knowledge, a breadth of service offerings to provide one-stop solutions to clients, a well-developed recruiting, training and retention model, responsiveness to clients’ business needs, and quality of services. We believe our CompuCom Division successfully competes based on the quality of our customer service, the range and depth of our merchandise offering and our pricing.

Employees

As of January 26, 2019, we had approximately 44,000 employees.

Environmental Matters

As both a significant user and seller of paper products, we have developed environmental practices that are values-based and market-driven. Our environmental initiatives center on three guiding principles: (1) recycling and pollution reduction; (2) sustainable forest management; and (3) issue awareness and market development for environmentally preferable products. We offer thousands of different products containing recycled content and technology recycling services.

Office Depot continues to implement environmental programs in line with our stated environmental vision to “increasingly buy green, be green and sell green” — including environmental sensitivity in our packaging, operations and sales offerings. We have been commended for our leadership position for our facility design, recycling efforts, and ‘green’ product offerings. Additional information on our green product offerings can be found at www.officedepot.com/buygreen.

We are subject to a variety of environmental laws and regulations related to historical OfficeMax operations of paper and forest products businesses and timberland assets. We record environmental and asbestos liabilities, and accrue losses associated with these obligations, when probable and reasonably estimable. We record a separate insurance recovery receivable when considered probable. Refer to Item 3. “Legal Proceedings” for additional information.

Available Information

We make available, free of charge, on the “Investor Relations” section of our website www.officedepot.com, our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file or furnish such materials to the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). The SEC maintains an internet site that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers, such as the Company, that file electronically with the SEC. The address of that website is http://www.sec.gov.

Additionally, our corporate governance materials, including our bylaws, corporate governance guidelines, charters of the Audit, Compensation, and Corporate Governance and Nominating Committees, and our code of ethical behavior may be found under the “Investor Relations” section of our website, www.officedepot.com.

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Our Executive Officers

The following information is provided regarding the executive officers of Office Depot.

N. David Bleisch — Age: 59

Mr. Bleisch was appointed as our Executive Vice President, Chief Legal & Administrative Officer and Corporate Secretary in August 2018. Previously he served as Executive Vice President, Chief Legal Officer and Corporate Secretary from September 2017 to August 2018. Prior to joining us, Mr. Bleisch was Senior Vice President and Chief Legal Officer for The ADT Corporation (“ADT”) from September 2012 through May 2016, where he managed the legal, environmental, health and safety, government affairs and corporate governance matters. Prior to assuming this role, Mr. Bleisch served in several leadership roles at Tyco International before being appointed Vice President and General Counsel of Tyco Security Solutions. Before joining Tyco, Mr. Bleisch was Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of The LTV Corporation. Before LTV, Mr. Bleisch was a partner with Jackson Walker LLP. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for the Education Foundation of Palm Beach County.

Stephen R. Calkins — Age: 48

Mr. Calkins was appointed as our President, Business Solutions Division in May 2017. Mr. Calkins previously served as Executive Vice President, Chief Legal Officer and Corporate Secretary from August 2016 to September 2017, and as our Executive Vice President, Contract Sales from December 2013 to August 2016, during which time he was responsible for our contract business, Canadian operations, print and services and customer service. Mr. Calkins also served as Senior Vice President, Business Solutions from April 2011 to December 2013, Vice President, Deputy General Counsel from March 2010 to April 2011, and Vice President, Associate General Counsel from February 2007 to March 2010. Between 2003 and 2007, Mr. Calkins held various leadership positions in our legal department. Before Office Depot, Mr. Calkins was an attorney with Kilpatrick Townsend & Stockton LLP.

Jerri L. DeVard — Age: 60

Ms. DeVard was named our Executive Vice President and Chief Customer Officer in January 2018. In this role, Ms. DeVard leads Customer Service, Marketing and Communications functions, as well as oversees our eCommerce activities. Ms. DeVard joined us in September 2017 as Executive Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer. Prior to joining us, she was Senior Vice President and Chief Marketing Officer for ADT from April 2014 to June 2016,. Prior to ADT, Ms. DeVard held various marketing leadership positions for Nokia, Verizon and Citigroup. She currently serves on the Board of Directors for Under Armour, Inc. and Cars.com.

John W. Gannfors — Age: 53

Mr. Gannfors was appointed as our Executive Vice President, Chief Merchandising and Supply Chain Officer in August 2018. Previously he served as Executive Vice President, Transformation, Strategic Sourcing and Supply Chain from July 2017 to August 2018, and as our Executive Vice President, Transformation and Strategic Sourcing when he joined the Company in April 2017. Prior to joining us, Mr. Gannfors served as Chief Procurement Officer at Lenovo Group Limited, where he spent nearly ten years. Prior to assuming this role, Mr. Gannfors served in various leadership roles at Dell. Mr. Gannfors began his career in Product Management at Lockheed Martin’s Calcomp division, as well as Definicon Systems.

Todd Hale — Age: 46

Mr. Hale was appointed as our Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer in August 2016. Previously, Mr. Hale served as our Senior Vice President, North American Chief Information Officer. Mr. Hale joined us in 2004 where he held several positions of increasing responsibility such as Director, IT Supply Chain Systems; Senior Director, Merchandising, Marketing and Inventory Management Systems; and Vice President, North American Chief Information Officer and Vice President of Applications Development. Prior to joining us, Mr. Hale held various IT leadership positions with the Eckerd Corporation. He began his career in retail consulting for Proctor & Gamble and Walmart.

Joseph T. Lower — Age: 52

Mr. Lower was appointed as our Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer in January 2018. Prior to joining us, Mr. Lower served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer at B/E Aerospace, Inc. between November 2014 and April 2017, where he oversaw the financial related matters for the company. Prior to joining B/E Aerospace, Mr. Lower was Vice President of Business Development and Strategy for The Boeing Company, where he spent 12 years. Among other finance positions, Mr. Lower spent six years with Credit Suisse in various investment banking roles including positions in mergers and acquisitions and corporate finance. He currently serves on the Board of Directors for Forming and Machining Industries Inc.

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Kevin Moffitt — Age: 45

Mr. Moffitt was appointed as our Executive Vice President, Chief Retail Officer in November 2018. Previously, he served as our Senior Vice President, Chief Retail Officer from January 2018 to November 2018; Chief Digital Officer in 2017; Senior Vice President, eCommerce & Direct Business Unit Leader from 2016 to 2017; and as our Vice President, eCommerce Product Management and Customer Experience from 2012 to 2016. Prior to joining us, he held several leadership roles at Dillards and Crossview.

Gerry P. Smith — Age: 55

Mr. Smith was appointed to serve as our Chief Executive Officer and a Director effective February 27, 2017. Prior to joining us, Mr. Smith was at Lenovo Group Limited (“Lenovo”) since 2006, most recently as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Lenovo since 2016 where he was responsible for all operations across Lenovo’s global product portfolio. Prior to assuming this role, also in 2016, Mr. Smith was Executive Vice President and President, Data Center Group. From 2015 to 2016, he served as Chief Operating Officer of the Personal Computing Group and Enterprise Business Group, and from 2013 to 2015 he served as President of the Americas. In these roles, Mr. Smith oversaw Lenovo’s fast-growing enterprise business worldwide and Lenovo’s overall business in the America’s region. Prior to that, Mr. Smith was President, North America and Senior Vice President, Global Operations of Lenovo from 2012 to 2013, and Senior Vice President of Global Supply Chain of Lenovo from 2006 until 2012 where he was responsible for end-to-end supply chain management. Prior to Lenovo, Mr. Smith held a number of executive positions at Dell Inc. from 1994 until 2006, as the company became a global leader in personal computers.

Greg Hoogerland — Age: 60

Mr. Hoogerland was appointed as our President, CompuCom Division in June 2018. Prior to joining us, Mr. Hoogerland held the roles of Chief Customer Officer and Chief Strategy Officer of CompuCom. Prior to joining CompuCom, Mr. Hoogerland served as Executive Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer of Systems Maintenance Services (SMS). Previously, Mr. Hoogerland served as the Vice President of Product Development at SunGard Availability Services, and prior to that, as the Vice President of Central Engineering and Enterprise Management for SunGard Global Services. Mr. Hoogerland began his career in public accounting with BDO Seidman.

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

In addition to risks and uncertainties in the ordinary course of business that are common to all businesses, important factors that are specific to us and our industry could materially impact our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flows and future performance and results. You should carefully consider the risks described below in our subsequent periodic filings with the SEC. The following risk factors should be read in conjunction with the MD&A and Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements in the Annual Report.

Risks related to our business

Our business is highly competitive and failure to adequately differentiate ourselves or respond to the decline in general office supplies sales or to shifting consumer demands could continue to adversely impact our financial performance.

The office products market is highly competitive and we compete locally, domestically and internationally with office supply resellers, including Staples, Internet-based companies such as Amazon.com, mass merchandisers such as Wal-Mart and Target, wholesale clubs such as Costco, Sam’s Club and BJs, computer and electronics superstores such as Best Buy, food and drug stores, discount stores, and direct marketing companies. Many competitors have also increased their presence by broadening their assortments or broadening from retail into the delivery and e-commerce channels, while others have substantially greater financial resources to devote to sourcing, marketing and selling their products. Product pricing is also becoming ever more competitive, particularly among competitors on the Internet. In addition, consumers are utilizing more technology and purchasing less paper, ink and toner, physical file storage and general office supplies. In order to achieve and maintain expected profitability levels, we must continue to grow by adding new customers and taking market share from competitors.

Our business strategy includes making acquisitions and investments that complement our existing business. These acquisitions and investments could be unsuccessful or consume significant resources, which could adversely affect our operating results.

Our ability to achieve the benefits we anticipate from acquisitions we make will depend in large part upon whether we are able to leverage the capabilities of the acquired companies to grow revenue across our combined organization, manage the acquired company’s business, execute our strategy in an efficient and effective manner and realize anticipated cost synergies. In addition, private companies recently acquired which were previously not subject to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (“SOX”), may lack certain internal controls, which could ultimately affect our ability to ensure compliance with the requirements of SOX.

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Because our business and the business of acquired companies may differ operationally, we may not be able to effectively manage or oversee the operations of the acquired company’s business smoothly or successfully and the process of achieving expected revenue growth and cost synergies may take longer than expected. If we are unable to successfully manage the operations of the acquired company’s business, we may be unable to realize the revenue growth, cost synergies and other anticipated benefits we expect to achieve as a result of the acquisition.

Our focus on services as a strategic priority exposes us to certain risks that could have a material adverse impact on our revenue and profitability as well as our reputation.

Our transformation into a more business services-driven platform that delivers a full range of services complements our product offerings, including consultation, design, delivery, installation, set-up, protection plans, repair, and technical support. These services can differentiate us from many of our competitors and provide an opportunity to deliver superior customer service while generating additional revenue and profit. However, designing, marketing and executing these services successfully and consistently is subject to incremental risks. These risks include, for example:

 

increased labor expense to fulfill our customer promises, which may be higher than the related revenue;

 

unpredictable warranty failure rates and related expenses;

 

employees in transit using company vehicles to deliver products or services to customers; these factors may increase our scope of liability related to our employees’ actions; and

 

employees having access to customer devices, including the information held on those devices, which may increase our responsibility for the security of those devices and the data they hold.

As customers increasingly migrate to websites and mobile applications to initiate transactions, it is inherently more difficult to demonstrate and explain the features and benefits of our service offerings, which can lead to a lower revenue mix of these services. Our ability to compete successfully depends on our ability to ensure a continuing and timely introduction of innovative new products, services and technologies to the marketplace. If we are unable to pivot into a more business services-driven platform and sell innovative new products, our ability to gain a competitive advantage could be adversely affected.

In addition, the CompuCom Division operates in an environment that is highly competitive, rapidly evolving and subject to shifting client needs and expectations. We compete with companies that provide IT services and outsourcing, as well as companies that sell IT related products. If we are unable to: (i) provide technology solutions and services that meet consumer needs; (ii) continuously stock products that are up-to-date and among the latest trends in the rapidly changing technological environment; (iii) differentiate ourselves from other retailers who sell similar products; and (iv) effectively compete, our sales and financial performance could be negatively impacted.

Failure to execute effective advertising efforts may adversely impact our financial performance.

Effective advertising and marketing efforts play a crucial role in maintaining high customer traffic. We focus on developing new marketing initiatives and maintaining effective promotional strategies that target further growth in our business. Failure to execute effective advertising efforts to attract new customers or retain existing customers may adversely impact our financial performance.

If we are unable to successfully maintain a relevant omni-channel experience for our customers, our results of operations could be adversely affected.

With the increasing use of computers, tablets, mobile phones and other devices to shop in our stores and online, we offer full and mobile versions of our website and applications for mobile phones and tablets. In addition, we are increasing the use of social media as a means of interacting with our customers and enhancing their shopping experiences. Omni-channel retailing is rapidly evolving and we must keep pace with the changing expectations of our customers and new developments by our competitors. If we are unable to attract and retain team members or contract third parties with the specialized skills needed to support our omni-channel platforms, or are unable to implement improvements to our customer-facing technology in a timely manner, our ability to compete and our results of operations could be adversely affected. In addition, if our website and our other customer-facing technology systems do not function as designed, the customer experience could be negatively affected, resulting in a loss of customer confidence and satisfaction, and lost sales, which could adversely affect our reputation and results of operations.

Failure to attract and retain qualified personnel could have an adverse impact on our business.

Our performance is highly dependent on attracting, retaining and engaging appropriately qualified employees in our stores, service centers, distribution centers, field and corporate offices. The market for qualified employees, with the right talent and competencies, is highly competitive. Factors that affect our ability to maintain sufficient numbers of qualified employees include employee morale, our reputation, unemployment rates, competition from other employers, availability of qualified personnel and our ability to offer appropriate compensation packages. We operate in a competitive labor market and there is a risk that market increases in compensation could have a material adverse effect on our profitability. Failure to recruit or retain qualified employees in the future

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may impair our efficiency and effectiveness and our ability to pursue growth opportunities. In addition, a significant amount of turnover of our executive team or other employees in key positions with specific knowledge relating to us, our operations and our industry, may negatively impact our operations.

We depend on our executive management team and other key personnel, and the recruitment and retention of certain personnel could adversely affect our performance and result in the loss of management continuity and institutional knowledge.

Although certain members of our executive team have entered into agreements relating to their employment with us, most of our key personnel are not bound by employment agreements, and those with employment or retention agreements are bound only for a limited period of time. If we are unable to retain our key personnel, we may be unable to successfully develop and implement our business plans, which may have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Disruptions of our computer systems could adversely affect our operations.

We rely heavily on computer systems to process transactions, manage our inventory and supply-chain and to summarize and analyze our global business. If our systems are damaged or fail to function properly, or, if we do not replace or upgrade certain systems, we may incur substantial costs to repair or replace them and may experience an interruption of our normal business activities or loss of critical data. We are undertaking certain system enhancements and conversions to increase productivity and efficiency, that, if not done properly, could divert the attention of our workforce and constrain for some time our ability to provide the level of service our customers demand. Also, once implemented, the new systems and technology may not provide the intended efficiencies or anticipated benefits, and could add costs and complications to our ongoing operations.

A breach of our information technology systems could adversely affect our reputation, business partner and customer relationships and operations and result in high costs.

Through our sales, marketing activities, and use of third-party information, we collect and store certain personally identifiable information that our customers provide to purchase products or services, enroll in promotional programs, register on our website, or otherwise communicate and interact with us. This may include, but is not limited to, names, addresses, phone numbers, driver license numbers, e-mail addresses, contact preferences, personally identifiable information stored on electronic devices, and payment account information, including credit and debit card information. We also gather and retain information about our employees in the normal course of business. We may share information about such persons with vendors that assist with certain aspects of our business. In addition, our online operations depend upon the secure transmission of confidential information over public networks, such as information permitting cashless payments.

We have instituted safeguards for the protection of such information and invested considerable resources, including insurance to cover cyber liabilities, in protecting our systems. These security measures may be compromised as a result of third-party security breaches, burglaries, cyber-attack, errors by employees or employees of third-party vendors, faulty password management, misappropriation of data by employees, vendors or unaffiliated third-parties, or other irregularity, and result in persons obtaining unauthorized access to our data or accounts. Despite instituted safeguards for the protection of such information, we cannot be certain that all of our systems and those of our vendors and unaffiliated third-parties are entirely free from vulnerability to attack or compromise given that the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access, disable or degrade service, or sabotage systems change frequently. During the normal course of our business, we have experienced and we expect to continue to experience attempts to breach our systems, none of which has been material to the Company to date, and we may be unable to protect sensitive data and the integrity of our systems or to prevent fraudulent purchases. We are also subject to data privacy and security laws and regulations, the number and complexity of which are increasing globally, and despite compliance efforts may be the subject of enforcement or other legal actions. Moreover, an alleged or actual security breach that affects our systems or results in the unauthorized release of personally identifiable information could:

 

materially damage our reputation and brand, negatively affect customer satisfaction and loyalty, expose us to negative publicity, individual claims or consumer class actions, administrative, civil or criminal investigations or actions, and infringe on proprietary information; and

 

cause us to incur substantial costs, including but not limited to costs associated with remediation for stolen assets or information, payments of customer incentives for the maintenance of business relationships after an attack, litigation costs, lost revenues resulting from unauthorized use of proprietary information or the failure to retain or attract customers following an attack, and increased cyber security protection costs. While we maintain insurance coverage that may, subject to policy terms and conditions, cover certain aspects of our cyber risks, such insurance coverage may be unavailable or insufficient to cover our losses or all types of claims that may arise in the continually evolving area of cyber risk.

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We do a significant amount of business with government entities, various purchasing consortiums, and through sole- or limited- source distribution arrangements, and loss of this business could negatively impact our results.

One of our largest customer groups consists of various governmental entities, government agencies and non-profit organizations, such as purchasing consortiums. Contracting with U.S. state and local governments is highly competitive, subject to federal and state procurement laws, requires more restrictive contract terms and can be expensive and time-consuming. Bidding such contracts often requires that we incur significant upfront time and expense without any assurance that we will win a contract. Our ability to compete successfully for and retain business with federal, state and local governments is highly dependent on cost-effective performance. Our business with governmental entities and agencies is also sensitive to changes in national and international priorities and their respective budgets, which in the current economy continue to decrease. We also service a substantial amount of business through agreements with purchasing consortiums and other sole- or limited-source distribution arrangements. If we are unsuccessful in retaining these customers, or if there is a significant reduction in sales under any of these arrangements, it could adversely impact our business and results of operations.

Macroeconomic conditions have had and may continue to adversely affect our business and financial performance.

Our operating results and performance depend significantly on economic conditions and their impact on business and consumer spending. In the past, the decline in business and consumer spending has caused our comparable retail store sales to decline from prior periods. Our business and financial performance may continue to be adversely affected by current and future economic conditions, including, without limitation, the level of consumer debt, high levels of unemployment, higher interest rates and the ability of our customers to obtain credit, which may cause a continued or further decline in business and consumer spending.

Product safety and quality concerns could have a material adverse impact on our revenue and profitability.

If the products we sell fail to meet applicable safety standards or our customers' expectations regarding safety and quality, we could be exposed to increased legal risk and our reputation may be damaged. Failure to take appropriate actions in relation to product recalls could lead to breaches in laws and regulations and leave us susceptible to government enforcement actions or private litigation. Recalls of products, particularly when combined with lack of available alternatives or our difficulty in sourcing sufficient volumes of replacement products, could also have a material adverse impact on our revenue and profitability.

Increases in fuel and other commodity prices could have an adverse impact on our earnings.

We operate a large network of retail stores, delivery centers, and delivery vehicles. As such, we purchase significant amounts of fuel needed to transport products to our stores and customers as well as shipping costs to import products from overseas. While we may hedge our anticipated fuel purchases, the underlying commodity costs associated with this transport activity may be volatile and disruptions in availability of fuel could cause our operating costs to rise significantly to the extent not covered by our hedges. Additionally, other commodity prices, such as paper, may increase and we may not be able to pass along such costs to our customers. Fluctuations in the availability or cost of our energy and other commodity prices could have a material adverse effect on our profitability.

Our business may be adversely affected by the actions of and risks related to the activities of our third-party vendors.

We purchase products for resale under credit arrangements with our vendors and have been able to negotiate payment terms that are approximately equal in length to the time it takes to sell the vendor’s products. When the global economy is experiencing weakness as it has in the past, vendors may seek credit insurance to protect against non-payment of amounts due to them. If we experience declining operating performance and severe liquidity challenges, vendors may demand that we accelerate our payment for their products or require cash on delivery, which could have an adverse impact on our operating cash flow and result in severe stress on our liquidity. Borrowings under our existing credit facility could reach maximum levels under such circumstances, causing us to seek alternative liquidity measures, but we may not be able to meet our obligations as they become due until we secure such alternative measures.

We use and resell many manufacturers’ branded items and services. As a result, we are dependent on the availability and pricing of key products and services, including ink, toner, paper and technology products. As a reseller, we cannot control the supply, design, function, cost or vendor-required conditions of sale of many of the products we offer for sale. Disruptions in the availability of these products or the products and services we provide to our customers may adversely affect our sales and result in customer dissatisfaction. Further, we cannot control the cost of manufacturers’ products, and cost increases must either be passed along to our customers or will result in erosion of our earnings.

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Failure to identify desirable products and make them available to our customers when desired and at attractive prices could have an adverse effect on our business and our results of operations. In addition, a material interruption in service by the carriers that ship goods within our supply chain may adversely affect our sales. Many of our vendors are small or medium sized businesses which are impacted by current macroeconomic conditions, both in the U.S., Asia and other locations. We may have no warning before a vendor fails, which may have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

We also engage key third-party business partners to support various functions of our business, including but not limited to, information technology, web hosting and cloud-based services, human resource operations, customer loyalty programs, gift cards, customer warranty, delivery and installation, technical support, transportation and insurance programs. Any material disruption in our relationship with key third-party business partners or any disruption in the services or systems provided or managed by third parties could impact our revenues and cost structure and hinder our operations, particularly if a disruption occurs during peak revenue periods.

Disruption of global sourcing activities, evolving foreign trade policy (including tariffs imposed on certain foreign made goods) and our own brands’ quality concerns could negatively impact brand reputation and earnings.

Economic and civil unrest in areas of the world where we source products, as well as shipping and dockage issues, could adversely impact the availability or cost of our products, or both. Most of our goods imported to the U.S. arrive from Asia through ports located on the U.S. west coast and we are therefore subject to potential disruption due to labor unrest, security issues or natural disasters affecting any or all of these ports. In addition, in recent years, we have substantially increased the number and types of products that we sell under our own brands including Office Depot®, OfficeMax® and other proprietary brands. While we have focused on the quality of our proprietary branded products, we rely on third parties to manufacture these products. Such third-party manufacturers may prove to be unreliable, the quality of our globally sourced products may vary from our expectations and standards, such products may not meet applicable regulatory requirements which may require us to recall those products, or such products may infringe upon the intellectual property rights of third parties. Moreover, as we seek indemnities from the manufacturers of these products, the uncertainty of realization of any such indemnity and the lack of understanding of U.S. product liability laws in certain foreign jurisdictions make it more likely that we may have to respond to claims or complaints from our customers.

We purchase and source products from a wide variety of suppliers, including from suppliers overseas, particularly in China. As a consequence, trade restrictions, including new or increased tariffs, quotas, embargoes, sanctions, safeguards and customs restrictions, could increase our cost of goods sold or reduce the supply of the products available to us. There is no assurance that any such increased costs could be passed on to our customers, or that we could find alternative products from other sources at comparable prices. To the extent that we are subject to more challenging regulatory environments and enhanced legal and regulatory requirements, such exposure could have a material adverse effect on our business, including the added cost of increased compliance measures that we may determine to be necessary.

On September 18, 2018, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced that the current U.S. Administration would impose a 10% tariff on approximately $200 billion worth of imports from China into the U.S. effective September 24, 2018, which was expected to increase to 25% starting January 1, 2019. On December 19, 2018, the U.S. Trade representative announced a modification to the effective date of the 25% tariffs on China goods from January 1, 2019 to March 2, 2019. We are evaluating the potential impact of the effective and proposed tariffs as well as other recent changes in foreign trade policy on our supply chain, costs, sales and profitability and are considering strategies to mitigate such impact, including reviewing sourcing options and working with our vendors and merchants. While it is too early to predict how these changes in foreign trade policy and any recently enacted, proposed and future tariffs on products imported by us from China will affect our business, these changes could negatively impact our business and results of operations if they seriously disrupt the movement of products through our supply chain or increase their cost. In addition, while we may be able to shift our sourcing options, executing such a shift would be time consuming and would be difficult or impracticable for many products and may result in an increase in our manufacturing costs. Substantial regulatory uncertainty exists regarding foreign trade and trade policy, both in the United States and abroad. The adoption and expansion of trade restrictions, retaliatory tariffs, or other governmental action related to tariffs or international trade agreements or policies has the potential to adversely impact demand for our products, our costs, our customers, our suppliers, and/or the U.S. economy, which in turn could adversely impact our results of operations and business.

A downgrade in our credit ratings or a general disruption in the credit markets could make it more difficult for us to access funds, refinance indebtedness, obtain new funding or issue securities.

While merger- and restructuring-related costs have been significant between 2013 and 2018, historically, we have generated positive cash flow from operating activities and have had access to broad financial markets that provide the liquidity we need to operate our business. Together, these sources have been used to fund operating and working capital needs, as well as invest in business expansion through capital improvements and acquisitions. Deterioration in our financial results or the impact of significant merger, integration and restructuring costs could negatively impact our credit ratings, our liquidity and our access to the capital markets. If we need to refinance all or a portion of that indebtedness, there is no assurance that we will be able to secure such refinancing at the same or more favorable terms than the terms of our existing indebtedness.

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Covenants in our credit facility and term loan could adversely impact our operations.

Our asset-based credit facility contains a fixed charge coverage ratio covenant that is operative only when borrowing availability is below $125 million or prior to a restricted transaction, such as incurring additional indebtedness, acquisitions, dispositions, dividends, or share repurchases if we do not have the required liquidity. The agreement governing our credit facility (the “Amended Credit Agreement” as defined in Note 11, “Debt,” of the Consolidated Financial Statements) also contains representations, warranties, affirmative and negative covenants, and default provisions. A breach of any of these covenants could result in a default under our Amended Credit Agreement. Upon the occurrence of an event of default under our Amended Credit Agreement, the lenders could elect to declare all amounts outstanding to be immediately due and payable and terminate all commitments to extend further credit. If the lenders were to accelerate the repayment of borrowings, we may not have sufficient assets to repay our asset based credit facility and our other indebtedness. Also, should there be an event of default, or a need to obtain waivers following an event of default, we may be subject to higher borrowing costs and/or more restrictive covenants in future periods. Acceleration of our obligations under our credit facilities would permit the holders of our other material debt to accelerate their obligations.

In addition, the CompuCom acquisition was funded, in part, with a $750 million term loan facility. In November 2018, we executed the First Amendment to the Term Loan Credit Agreement to reduce the applicable interest rate from LIBOR plus 7.00% to LIBOR plus 5.25%. In connection with the applicable interest rate reduction, we made a voluntary repayment under the Term Loan Credit Agreement of $194 million. This Term Loan Credit Agreement (as defined in Note 11, “Debt,” of the Consolidated Financial Statements) contains representations and warranties, events of default, and affirmative and negative covenants that are customary for similar financings and which include, among other things and subject to certain significant exceptions, restrictions on the ability to declare or pay dividends subject to compliance with an annual limit, repurchase common stock, create liens, incur additional indebtedness, make investments, dispose of assets, and merge or consolidate with any other person. In addition, a minimum liquidity maintenance covenant, requiring us and our restricted subsidiaries to retain unrestricted cash, cash equivalents, and availability under our Amended Credit Agreement in an aggregate amount of at least $400 million, will apply at any time that our senior secured leverage ratio under the agreement is greater than 1.50:1.00 as calculated quarterly. At December 29, 2018, our senior secured leverage ratio was 0.99:1.00 and the Company was in compliance with the agreement.

We have incurred significant impairment charges and we continue to incur impairment charges.

We regularly assess past performance and make estimates and projections of future performance at an individual store level. Reduced sales, our shift in strategy to be less price promotional, as well as competitive factors and changes in consumer spending habits resulted in a downward adjustment of anticipated future cash flows for the individual stores that resulted in the impairment. We foresee challenges in the market and economy that could adversely impact our operations. To the extent that forward-looking sales and operating assumptions are not achieved and are subsequently reduced, or if we commit to a more aggressive store downsizing strategy, including allocating capital to further modify store formats, additional impairment charges may result. We have also recognized non-cash asset impairment charges from the abandonment of assets identified as not to be used in the post-OfficeMax merger organization and from certain lease-related intangible assets that were deemed unrecoverable based on the Comprehensive Business Review. Additional asset impairments may be recognized based on future decisions and conditions.

Changes in the numerous variables associated with the judgments, assumptions and estimates we make, in assessing the appropriate valuation of our goodwill and other intangible assets of our reporting units, including changes resulting from macroeconomic, or disposition of components within reporting units, could in the future require a reduction of goodwill and recognition of related non-cash impairment charges. If we were required to further impair our store assets, our goodwill or intangible assets of our reporting units, it could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Our quarterly operating results are subject to fluctuation due to the seasonality of our business.

Our business experiences a certain level of seasonality with sales generally trending lower in the second quarter, following the “back-to-business” sales cycle in the first quarter and preceding the “back-to-school” sales cycle in the third quarter and the holiday sales cycle in the fourth quarter. As a result, our operating results have fluctuated from quarter to quarter in the past, with sales and profitability being generally stronger in the second half of our fiscal year than the first half of our fiscal year. Factors that could also cause these quarterly fluctuations include: the pricing behavior of our competitors; the types and mix of products sold; the level of advertising and promotional expenses; severe weather; macroeconomic factors that affect consumer confidence and spending; and the other risk factors described in this section. Most of our operating expenses, such as occupancy costs and associate salaries, are not variable, and so short term adjustments to reflect quarterly results are difficult. As a result, if sales in certain quarters are significantly below expectations, we may not be able to proportionately reduce operating expenses for that quarter, and therefore such a sales shortfall would have an adverse effect on our net income for the quarter.

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We have retained responsibility for liabilities of acquired companies that may adversely affect our financial results.

OfficeMax sponsors defined benefit pension plans covering certain terminated employees, vested employees, retirees, and some active employees (the “Pension Plans”). The Pension Plans are frozen and do not allow new entrants, however, they are under-funded and we may be required to make contributions in subsequent years in order to maintain required funding levels. Required future contributions could have an adverse impact on our cash flows and our financial results. Additional future contributions to the Pension Plans, financial market performance and Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”) funding requirements could materially change these expected payments.

As part of the sale of our business in Europe, we have retained responsibility for the defined benefit plan covering certain employees in the United Kingdom. While the plan was in a net asset position at the end of 2018, changes in assumptions and actual experience could result in that plan being considered underfunded in the future. Additionally, we have agreed to make contributions to the plan as required by the trustees. Financial performance of the plan and future valuation assumptions could materially change the expected payments. In addition, as part of the sale transaction, the purchaser shall indemnify and hold us harmless in connection with any guarantees in place as of September 23, 2016, and given by us in respect of the liabilities or obligations of the European business. Further, if the purchaser wishes to terminate any such guarantee or cease to comply with any underlying obligation which is subject to such a guarantee, the purchaser shall obtain an unconditional and irrevocable release of the guarantee. However, we are contingently liable in the event of a breach by the purchaser of any such obligation.

In connection with OfficeMax’s sale of its paper, forest products and timberland assets in 2004, OfficeMax agreed to assume responsibility for certain liabilities of the businesses sold. These obligations include liabilities related to environmental, asbestos, health and safety, tax, litigation and employee benefit matters. Some of these retained liabilities could turn out to be significant, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations. Our exposure to these liabilities could harm our ability to compete with other office products distributors who would not typically be subject to similar liabilities.

Changes in tax laws in any of the jurisdictions in which we operate can cause fluctuations in our overall tax rate impacting our reported earnings.

Our tax rate is derived from a combination of applicable tax rates in the various domestic and international jurisdictions in which we operate. While we have disposed of the majority of our international businesses, we remain subject to international taxes in other businesses. Depending upon the sources of our income, any agreements we may have with taxing authorities in various jurisdictions, and the tax filing positions we take in these jurisdictions, our overall tax rate may fluctuate significantly from other companies or even our own past tax rates. In addition, changes in applicable U.S. or foreign tax laws and regulations, including the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017, or their interpretation and application, including the possibility of retroactive effect, could affect our tax expense and profitability. At any given point in time, we base our estimate of an annual effective tax rate upon a calculated mix of the tax rates applicable to us and to estimates of the amount of income likely to be generated in any given geography. The loss of or modification to one or more agreements with taxing jurisdictions, whether as a result of a third party challenge, negotiation, or otherwise, a change in the mix of our business from year to year and from country to country, changes in rules related to accounting for income taxes, changes in tax laws in any of the multiple jurisdictions in which we operate, changes in valuation allowances, or adverse outcomes from the tax audits that regularly are in process in any of the jurisdictions in which we operate could result in substantial volatility, including an unfavorable change in our overall tax rate and/or our effective tax rate.

We are subject to legal proceedings and legal compliance risks.

We are involved in various legal proceedings, which from time to time may involve class action lawsuits, state and federal governmental inquiries, audits and investigations, environmental matters, employment, tort, state false claims act, consumer litigation and intellectual property litigation. At times, such matters may involve directors and/or executive officers. Certain of these legal proceedings, including government investigations, may be a significant distraction to management and could expose our Company to significant liability, including settlement expenses, damages, fines, penalties, attorneys’ fees and costs, and non-monetary sanctions, including suspensions and debarments from doing business with certain government agencies, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. For a description of our legal proceedings, refer to Note 17, “Commitments and Contingencies,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Our international operations subject us to risks as foreign currency fluctuations, potential unfavorable foreign trade policies or unstable political and economic conditions.

We have operations in Canada, Mexico, India, Costa Rica and certain global sourcing operations in Asia. In fiscal year 2018, sales from our operations in Canada represented approximately 4% of our total sales, and sales from our operations in the other foreign countries represented less than 1% of our total sales in the aggregate. Sales from our operations in these countries are denominated in local currency, which must be translated into U.S. dollars for reporting purposes and therefore our consolidated earnings can be impacted by fluctuations in world currency markets. We are required to comply with laws and regulations in Canada, Mexico, India, Costa Rica and Asia that may differ substantially from country to country, requiring significant management attention and cost.

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Changes in the regulatory environment and violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar worldwide anti-bribery laws may negatively impact our business.

We are subject to regulations relating to our corporate conduct and the conduct of our business, including securities laws, consumer protection laws, trade regulations, advertising regulations, privacy and cybersecurity laws, and wage and hour regulations and anti-corruption legislation. Certain jurisdictions have taken a particularly aggressive stance with respect to such matters and have implemented new initiatives and reforms, including more stringent regulations, disclosure and compliance requirements.

The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.K. Bribery Act and similar anti-bribery laws in other jurisdictions generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Recent years have seen a substantial increase in anti-bribery law enforcement activity with more frequent and aggressive investigations and enforcement proceedings by both the Department of Justice and the SEC, increased enforcement activity by non-U.S. regulators and increases in criminal and civil proceedings brought against companies and individuals. Our policies mandate compliance with all anti-bribery laws. However, we operate in certain countries that are recognized as having governmental and commercial corruption. Our internal control policies and procedures may not always protect us from reckless or criminal acts committed by our employees or third-party intermediaries. Violations of these anti-bribery laws may result in criminal or civil sanctions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Increases in wage and benefit costs, changes in laws and other labor regulations could impact our financial results and cash flow.

Our expenses relating to employee labor, including employee health benefits, are significant. Our ability to control our employee and related labor costs is generally subject to numerous external factors, including prevailing wage rates, recent legislative and private sector initiatives regarding healthcare reform, and adoption of new or revised employment and labor laws and regulations. Unfavorable changes in employee and related labor costs could have a material adverse effect on our financial results and cash flow.

We have a large employee base and while our management believes that our employee relations are good, we cannot be assured that we will not experience organization efforts from labor unions. The potential for unionization could increase if federal legislation is passed that would facilitate labor organization. Significant union representation would require us to negotiate wages, salaries, benefits and other terms with many of our employees collectively and could adversely affect our results of operations by significantly increasing our labor costs or otherwise restricting our ability to maximize the efficiency of our operations.

Catastrophic events could adversely affect our operating results.

The risk or actual occurrence of various catastrophic events could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance. Such events may be caused by, for example:

 

natural disasters or extreme weather events;

 

diseases or epidemics that may affect our employees, customers or partners;

 

floods, fire or other catastrophes affecting our properties; or

 

terrorism, civil unrest or other conflicts.

Such events can adversely affect our work force and prevent employees and customers from reaching our stores and properties and can disrupt or disable portions of our supply chain and distribution network.  They can also affect our information systems, resulting in disruption to various aspects of our operations, including our ability to transact with customers and fulfill orders. As a consequence of these or other catastrophic events, we may endure interruption to our operations or losses of property, equipment or inventory, which would adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

Our failure to effectively manage our real estate portfolio may negatively impact our operating results.

Effective management of our real estate portfolio is critical to our omni-channel strategy. Most of our properties are subject to long term leases. As such, it is essential that we effectively evaluate a range of factors that may influence the success of our long term real estate strategy. Such factors include but are not limited to:

 

changing patterns of customer consumption and behavior, particularly in light of an evolving omni-channel environment;

 

the appropriate number of stores in our portfolio;

 

the formats and sizes of our stores;

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the locations of our stores;

 

the interior layouts of our stores;

 

the trade area demographics and economic data of each of our stores;

 

the local competitive positioning in and around our stores;

 

the primary term lease commitment for each store;

 

the long-term lease option coverage for each store;

 

the occupancy cost of our stores relative to market rents;

 

our supply chain network strategy; and

 

our ongoing network of service locations.

If we fail to effectively evaluate these factors or negotiate appropriate terms or if unforeseen changes arise, the consequences could include, for example:

 

having to close stores and abandon the related assets, while retaining the financial commitments of the leases;

 

incurring significant costs to remodel or transform our stores;

 

having stores, supply chain or service locations that no longer meet the needs of our business; and

 

bearing excessive lease expenses.

These consequences could have a materially adverse impact on our profitability, cash flows and liquidity.

For leased property, the financial impact of exiting a location can vary greatly depending on, among other factors, the terms of the lease, the condition of the local real estate market, demand for the specific property, our relationship with the landlord and the availability of potential sub-lease tenants. It is difficult for us to influence some of these factors, and the costs of exiting a property can be significant. In addition to rent, we are still responsible for the maintenance, taxes, insurance and common area maintenance charges for vacant properties until the lease commitment expires or is terminated. Similarly, when we enter into a contract with a tenant to sub-lease property, we usually retain our obligations as the master lessor. This leaves us at risk for any remaining liability in the event of default by the sub-lease tenant.

There can be no assurance that we will pay cash dividends.

Decisions regarding dividends are within the discretion of the Board of Directors, and depend on a number of factors, including general business and economic conditions, our financial condition, operating results and restrictions imposed by our debt agreements, the emergence of alternative investment or acquisition opportunities, changes in business strategy and other factors. Changes in, or the elimination of dividends could have an adverse effect on the price of our common stock.

Our common stock price has been and may continue to be subject to volatility, and shareholders could incur substantial losses of any investment in our common stock.

Our common stock price has experienced volatility over time and this volatility may continue, in part due to factors mentioned in this Item 1A. As a result of these and other factors, investors in our common stock may not be able to resell their shares at or above their original purchase price.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments.

None.

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Item 2. Properties.

As of December 29, 2018, our wholly-owned entities operated, as part of continuing operations, in the following locations:

STORES

Retail and CompuCom Divisions (United States)

 

State

 

#

 

State

 

#

 

Alabama

 

27

 

Montana

 

4

 

Alaska

 

5

 

Nebraska

 

9

 

Arizona

 

34

 

Nevada

 

21

 

Arkansas

 

12

 

New Jersey

 

4

 

California

 

138

 

New Mexico

 

11

 

Colorado

 

45

 

New York

 

17

 

District of Columbia

 

1

 

North Carolina

 

47

 

Florida

 

142

 

North Dakota

 

4

 

Georgia

 

60

 

Ohio

 

47

 

Hawaii

 

8

 

Oklahoma

 

16

 

Idaho

 

8

 

Oregon

 

21

 

Illinois

 

56

 

Pennsylvania

 

17

 

Indiana

 

24

 

Puerto Rico

 

11

 

Iowa

 

8

 

South Carolina

 

20

 

Kansas

 

11

 

South Dakota

 

3

 

Kentucky

 

15

 

Tennessee

 

33

 

Louisiana

 

37

 

Texas

 

167

 

Maine

 

1

 

Utah

 

12

 

Maryland

 

18

 

U.S. Virgin Islands

 

2

 

Massachusetts

 

5

 

Virginia

 

38

 

Michigan

 

36

 

Washington

 

38

 

Minnesota

 

34

 

West Virginia

 

5

 

Mississippi

 

19

 

Wisconsin

 

34

 

Missouri

 

34

 

Wyoming

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

Total Retail

 

 

1,361

 

 

 

 

 

CompuCom

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

 

1,364

 

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The supply chain facilities which we operate in the continental United States and Puerto Rico support our Retail, Business Solutions and CompuCom Divisions and the facilities in Canada support our Business Solutions and CompuCom Divisions. The following tables set forth the locations of our principal supply chain facilities as of December 29, 2018.

DCs and Crossdock Facilities

 

State

 

#

 

State

 

#

Arizona

 

1

 

New Jersey

 

1

California

 

4

 

New Mexico

 

1

Colorado

 

1

 

North Carolina

 

1

Florida

 

3

 

North Dakota

 

1

Georgia

 

3

 

Ohio

 

2

Hawaii

 

6

 

Oklahoma

 

1

Idaho

 

1

 

Pennsylvania

 

2

Illinois

 

3

 

Puerto Rico

 

1

Kansas

 

1

 

Texas

 

3

Maine

 

1

 

Washington

 

2

Minnesota

 

1

 

Wisconsin

 

4

Mississippi

 

1

 

Total United States

 

45

 

 

 

 

Canada

 

11

 

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

56

 

Our principal corporate headquarters in Boca Raton, FL consists of three interconnected buildings of approximately 625,000 square feet and our corporate office in Fort Mill, SC consists of approximately 152,000 square feet of office space. These facilities are considered to be in good condition, adequate for their purpose and suitably utilized according to the individual nature and requirements of the relevant operations. Although we currently own our corporate office in Boca Raton, FL, as well as a small number of our retail store locations, most of our facilities are leased or subleased. Additional information regarding our operating leases and leasing arrangements is available in Note 1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies and Note 12. Leases of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.

For a description of our legal proceedings, refer to Note 17, “Commitments and Contingencies,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures.

Not applicable.

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PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities.

Our common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global Select Market under the ticker symbol ODP.

 

Holders

As of the close of business on February 18, 2019, there were 7,939 holders of record of our common stock.

Cash Dividend

Prior to July 2016, we had never declared or paid cash dividends on our common stock. Beginning in the third quarter of fiscal 2016, our Board of Directors declared and paid cash dividends on our common stock.

The timing, declaration and payment of future dividends to holders of our common stock fall within the discretion of our Board of Directors and will depend on our operating results, earnings, financial condition, the capital requirements of our business and other factors. Payment of dividends are permitted under our existing term loan facility up to the lesser of $70 million or $0.10 per share per calendar year, and are also permitted under our existing credit facilities if we continue to meet the minimum liquidity or fixed charge ratio but may be limited if we do not meet the necessary requirements.

For additional information about cash dividends declared and paid in 2018, refer to “Liquidity and Capital Resources” in Part II — Item 7. “MD&A” of this Annual Report.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

In May 2016, our Board of Directors authorized a stock repurchase program of up to $100 million of our outstanding common stock. The stock repurchase authorization permits us to repurchase stock from time-to-time through a combination of open market repurchases, privately negotiated transactions, 10b5-1 trading plans, accelerated stock repurchase transactions and/or other derivative transactions. In July 2016, the Board of Directors authorized an increase to the current stock repurchase program from $100 million to $250 million. The current authorization expired on December 31, 2018. In November 2018, the Board of Directors approved a new stock repurchase program of up to $100 million of our outstanding common stock effective January 1, 2019, which extends until the end of 2020 and may be suspended or discontinued at any time. Our ability to repurchase our common stock is subject to terms of our Term Loan Credit Agreement.

The following table summarizes our common stock repurchases during the fourth quarter of 2018.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approximate Dollar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Value of Shares that

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total Number of

 

 

May Yet Be

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shares Purchased as

 

 

Purchased Under

 

 

 

Number

 

 

 

 

 

 

Part of a Publicly

 

 

the Repurchase

 

 

 

of Shares

 

 

Average

 

 

Announced Plan or

 

 

Programs

 

 

 

Purchased

 

 

Price Paid

 

 

Program

 

 

(In millions)

 

Period

 

(In thousands)

 

 

per Share

 

 

(In thousands)

 

 

(a)

 

September 30 — October 27, 2018

 

 

2,614

 

 

$

2.89

 

 

 

2,614

 

 

$

34

 

October 28 — November 24, 2018

 

 

1,622

 

 

$

2.89

 

 

 

1,622

 

 

$

29

 

November 25 — December 29, 2018

 

 

1,620

 

 

$

2.93

 

 

 

1,620

 

 

$

24

 

Total

 

 

5,856

 

 

$

2.90

 

 

 

5,856

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a)

On December 31, 2018, the current stock repurchase authorization expired. The Board of Directors authorized $100 million for additional purchases under the new stock repurchase program effective January 1, 2019.

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The exact number and timing of share repurchases will depend on market conditions and other factors, and will be funded through available cash balances.

We made no repurchases of common stock during the first quarter of fiscal 2018. We purchased approximately 3 million, 5 million and 6 million shares during the second, third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2018, respectively, at an average weighted price of $2.79 per common share. For the year 2018, we purchased approximately 14 million common shares for total consideration of $39 million. On December 31, 2018, the current stock repurchase authorization expired. The Board of Directors authorized $100 million for additional purchases under the new stock repurchase program effective January 1, 2019.

Office Depot Stock Comparative Performance Graph

The information contained in this Office Depot Comparative Performance Graph section shall not be deemed to be filed as part of this Annual Report and does not constitute soliciting material and should not be deemed filed or incorporated by reference into any other filing of the Company under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Exchange Act, except to the extent we specifically incorporate the graph by reference.

The following graph compares the five-year cumulative total shareholder return on our common stock with the cumulative total returns of the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index (“S&P 500”) and the Standard & Poor’s Specialty Stores Index (“S&P Specialty Stores”) of which we are a component of each Index.

The graph assumes an investment of $100 at the close of trading on December 28, 2013 the last trading day of fiscal year 2013, in our common stock, the S&P 500 and the S&P Specialty Stores.

COMPARISON OF 5 YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN*

Among Office Depot, Inc., the S&P 500 Index

and the S&P Specialty Stores Index

 

 

 

*$100 invested on 12/28/13 in stock or 12/31/13 in index, including reinvestment of dividends. Indexes calculated on month-end basis.

Copyright© 2019 Standard & Poor’s, a division of S&P Global. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

12/28/13

 

 

12/27/14

 

 

12/26/15

 

 

12/31/16

 

 

12/30/17

 

 

12/29/18

 

Office Depot, Inc.

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

170.33

 

 

 

107.90

 

 

 

88.14

 

 

 

70.71

 

 

 

52.20

 

S&P 500

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

113.69

 

 

 

115.26

 

 

 

129.05

 

 

 

157.22

 

 

 

150.33

 

S&P Specialty Stores

 

 

100.00

 

 

 

110.94

 

 

 

93.27

 

 

 

93.78

 

 

 

94.00

 

 

 

91.74

 

 

The stock price performance included in this graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.

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Item 6. Selected Financial Data.

The following table sets forth selected consolidated financial data at and for each of the five fiscal years in the period ended December 29, 2018. It should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto in Part IV — Item 15. “Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules” and Part II — Item 7. “MD&A” of this Annual Report.

We have accounted for the disposition of substantially all of the business formerly presented as the International Division as discontinued operations in all periods. The disposition is complete in 2018, and there are no further discontinued operations at December 29, 2018. We have included the amounts associated with our acquired businesses from their dates of acquisition.

 

(In millions, except per share amounts and statistical data)

 

2018 (1)(2)

 

 

2017 (3)

 

 

2016 (4)

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

Statements of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sales (1)

 

$

11,015

 

 

$

10,240

 

 

$

11,021

 

 

$

11,727

 

 

$

12,710

 

Net income (loss) from continuing operations (2)(3)(5)(6)(7)

 

$

99

 

 

$

146

 

 

$

679

 

 

$

92

 

 

$

(293

)

Discontinued operations, net of tax

 

$

5

 

 

$

35

 

 

$

(150

)

 

$

(84

)

 

$

(59

)

Net income (loss)

 

$

104

 

 

$

181

 

 

$

529

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

(352

)

Net income (loss) attributable to Office Depot, Inc. (2)(3)(5)(6)(7)

 

$

104

 

 

$

181

 

 

$

529

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

(354

)

Net income (loss) available to common shareholders (2)(3)(5)(6)(7)

 

$

104

 

 

$

181

 

 

$

529

 

 

$

8

 

 

$

(354

)

Net earnings (loss) per share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Basic earnings (loss) per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing Operations

 

$

0.18

 

 

$

0.28

 

 

$

1.26

 

 

$

0.17

 

 

$

(0.55

)

Discontinued Operations

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

0.07

 

 

$

(0.28

)

 

$

(0.15

)

 

$

(0.11

)

Net basic earnings (loss) per share

 

$

0.19

 

 

$

0.35

 

 

$

0.98

 

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

(0.66

)

Diluted earnings (loss) per common share:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Continuing Operations

 

$

0.18

 

 

$

0.27

 

 

$

1.24

 

 

$

0.16

 

 

$

(0.55

)

Discontinued Operations

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

0.06

 

 

$

(0.27

)

 

$

(0.15

)

 

$

(0.11

)

Net diluted earnings (loss) per share

 

$

0.19

 

 

$

0.34

 

 

$

0.96

 

 

$

0.01

 

 

$

(0.66

)

Cash dividends declared per common share

 

$

0.10

 

 

$

0.10

 

 

$

0.05

 

 

$

 

 

$

 

Statistical Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facilities open at end of period:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

United States:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Retail and technology stores

 

 

1,364

 

 

 

1,394

 

 

 

1,441

 

 

 

1,564

 

 

 

1,745

 

Distribution centers and crossdock facilities

 

 

45

 

 

 

40

 

 

 

28

 

 

 

33

 

 

 

66

 

Other (8):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Distribution centers and crossdock facilities

 

 

11

 

 

 

11

 

 

 

10

 

 

 

12

 

 

 

12

 

Total square footage — Retail and CompuCom Divisions

   (in millions)

 

 

30.3

 

 

 

31.1

 

 

 

32.4

 

 

 

35.4

 

 

 

39.6

 

Percentage of sales by segment:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Business Solutions Division

 

 

48.0

%

 

 

49.9

%

 

 

49.0

%

 

 

48.7

%

 

 

47.9

%

Retail Division

 

 

42.1

%

 

 

48.5

%

 

 

50.8

%

 

 

51.2

%

 

 

52.0

%

CompuCom Division (3)

 

 

9.9

%

 

 

1.5

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other

 

 

0.1

%

 

 

0.1

%

 

 

0.2

%

 

 

0.1

%

 

 

0.1

%

Balance Sheet Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

6,166

 

 

$

6,323

 

 

$

5,540

 

 

$

6,442

 

 

$

6,757

 

Long-term debt, net of current maturities

 

 

690

 

 

 

936

 

 

 

358

 

 

 

628

 

 

 

662

 

 

(1)

We adopted the new revenue standard on the first day of fiscal 2018. The adoption of the new revenue standard resulted in a reduction in our total sales of $53 million in 2018. Refer to Refer to Part II — Item 7. “MD&A” and Note 1. “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies,” of the Consolidated Financial Statements located in Part IV — Item 15. “Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules” of this Annual Report for additional information.

(2)

During fiscal year 2018, we completed seven business acquisitions, six of which consist of small independent regional office supply distribution businesses in the United States, and one is an enterprise IT solutions integrator and managed services provider. The operating results of these companies are combined with our operating results subsequent to their purchase dates. Sales in our Business Solutions and CompuCom Divisions in 2018 include $80 million and $25 million, respectively, from these acquisitions. Additionally, fiscal year 2018 Net income, Net income attributable to Office Depot, Inc., and Net income available to common shareholders include $7 million of asset impairment charges, $72 million of Merger and restructuring expenses, net, $25 million of legal expense accrual, and $15 million of loss on modification of debt. Refer to Part II — Item 7. “MD&A” and Note 2. “Acquisitions,” of the Consolidated Financial Statements located in Part IV — Item 15. “Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules” of this Annual Report for additional information.

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(3)

In 2017, we acquired CompuCom and four small independent regional office supply distribution businesses in the United States. The operating results of these companies are combined with our operating results subsequent to their purchase dates. Sales in our Business Solutions and CompuCom Divisions in 2017 include $49 million and $156 million, respectively, from these acquisitions. Additionally, fiscal year 2017 Net income, Net income attributable to Office Depot, Inc., and Net income available to common shareholders include $4 million of asset impairment charges and $94 million of Merger and restructuring expenses, net. Refer to Part II — Item 7. “MD&A” and Note 2. “Acquisitions,” of the Consolidated Financial Statements located in Part IV — Item 15. “Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules” of this Annual Report for additional information.

(4)

Includes 53 weeks in accordance with our 52 — 53 week reporting convention. All other years presented in the table consisted of 52 weeks.

(5)

Fiscal year 2016 Net income (loss), Net income attributable to Office Depot, Inc., and Net income available to common shareholders include $15 million of asset impairment charges, $80 million of Merger and restructuring income, net, including $250 million received from Staples as the Termination Fee, $15 million of loss on extinguishment of debt, and the reversal of $382 million of valuation allowances on deferred tax assets. Refer to Part II — Item 7. “MD&A” for additional information.

(6)

Fiscal year 2015 Net income (loss), Net income attributable to Office Depot, Inc., and Net income available to common shareholders include $13 million of asset impairment charges and $242 million of Merger and restructuring expenses, net.

(7)

Fiscal year 2014 Net income (loss), Net income attributable to Office Depot, Inc., and Net income available to common shareholders include $56 million of asset impairment charges, $334 million of Merger and restructuring expenses, net, and $81 million of Legal expense accrual.

(8)

Includes Canadian distribution centers and crossdock facilities.

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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) is intended to provide information to assist readers in better understanding and evaluating our financial condition and results of operations. We recommend reading this MD&A in conjunction with our Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto included in this Form 10-K.

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

OVERVIEW

The Company

We are a leading provider of business services and supplies, products and technology solutions through our fully integrated business-to-business (“B2B”) distribution platform of 1,361 retail stores, online presence, and dedicated sales professionals and technicians to retail consumers and small, medium and enterprise businesses. Through our banner brands Office Depot®, OfficeMax®, CompuCom® and Grand&Toy®, we offer our customers the tools and resources they need to focus on their passion of starting, growing and running their business.

At December 29, 2018, our operations are organized into three reportable segments (or “Divisions”):  Business Solutions Division, Retail Division and CompuCom Division.

The Business Solutions Division or BSD provides customers with office supply products and services in the United States, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Canada through dedicated sales forces, catalogs, telesales, and electronically through our Internet websites.

The Retail Division includes our chain of retail stores in the United States, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands where we sell office supplies, technology products and solutions, business machines and related supplies, print, cleaning, breakroom supplies and facilities products, and furniture. In addition, our Retail Division offers a range of business-related services targeted to small businesses, technology support services as well as printing, copying, mailing and shipping services.

The CompuCom Division was formed during the fourth quarter of 2017 as a result of the acquisition of CompuCom Systems, Inc. (“CompuCom”). The CompuCom Division provides information technology (“IT”) outsourcing services and products to enterprise organizations in the United States and Canada, and offers a broad range of solutions including end user computing support, managed IT services, data center monitoring and management, service desk, network infrastructure, IT workforce solutions, mobile device management and cloud services.

Acquisitions

 

Over the last two years, we have been undergoing a strategic transformation to pivot Office Depot into an integrated B2B distribution platform, with the objective of expanding our product offerings to include value-added services for our customers and capture greater market share.

 

As part of this transformation, we acquired CompuCom in 2017 and an enterprise IT solutions integrator and managed services provider in 2018. The latter gives us access to a platform for selling or providing Internet of Things (“IoT”) related hardware and projects to the education market. IoT refers to the connection of intelligent systems and devices to allow them to automatically share information so that systems and devices work intelligently together to develop and enhance solutions and reduce human intervention.

 

To strengthen our core operations, over the last two years we have also expanded the reach of our distribution network by identifying and acquiring profitable regional office supply distribution businesses serving small and mid-market customers in geographic areas that were previously underserved by our network. This has allowed, and will continue to allow, for an effective and accretive means to expand our distribution reach, target new business customers and grow our offerings beyond traditional office supplies.

The aggregate total purchase consideration, including contingent consideration, for the seven acquisitions completed in 2018 was approximately $114 million, subject to certain customary post-closing adjustments. The aggregate purchase price was primarily funded with cash on hand, with the remainder consisting of contingent consideration estimated to be $28 million, the majority of which will be paid in the first quarter of 2019.

The operating results of these companies are combined with our operating results subsequent to their purchase dates. The operating results of the office supply distribution businesses we acquired are included in the Business Solutions Division segment, whereas the operating results of CompuCom and the enterprise IT solutions integrator and managed services provider are included in the CompuCom Division. Refer to Note 2. “Acquisitions” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

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Disposition of the International Division — Discontinued Operations

In September 2016, our Board of Directors approved a plan to sell substantially all of our international operations, formerly reported as the International Division through four disposal groups (Europe, South Korea, Australia and New Zealand (“Oceania”) and mainland China).

On December 31, 2016, we completed the sale of our business in Europe (the “European Business”) to The AURELIUS Group (the “Purchaser”) and recorded a pre-tax loss on sale of $108 million in 2016. We recorded approximately $8 million of additional costs associated with the sale during 2017. We retained the assets and obligations of a frozen defined benefit pension plan in the United Kingdom.

We completed the sale of our business in South Korea on April 26, 2017, and recognized a pre-tax gain on the sale of $12 million. Additionally, we completed the sale of our business in mainland China on July 28, 2017, and recognized a cumulative loss of $9 million associated with the sale, of which $10 million was recognized in the first half of 2017 and was partially offset by a $1 million gain recognized at the time of sale. We retained the sourcing and trading operations of the former International Division, which are presented as Other in Note 5. “Segment Information” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

We completed the sale of our businesses in Australia on February 5, 2018, and recognized a pre-tax loss on the sale of $1 million. Additionally, we completed the sale of our business in New Zealand on May 4, 2018, and recognized a pre-tax loss on the sale of $3 million. With the sale of this last disposal group, the sale of the International Operations is complete, and there are no further discontinued operations at December 29, 2018.

Refer to Note 18. “Discontinued Operations” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

Overview of 2018 Consolidated Results from Continuing Operations and Liquidity

The following summarizes the more significant factors impacting our operating results from continuing operations for the 52-week period ended December 29, 2018 (also referred to as “2018”) and the 52-week period ended December 30, 2017 (also referred to as “2017”) as well as our liquidity in 2018 and 2017.

Our consolidated sales were 8% higher in 2018 compared to 2017 mostly as a result of including our CompuCom Division’s sales for the full year in 2018. Our Business Solutions Division also contributed higher sales of $174 million, which represented an improvement from the prior year of 3% primarily from acquisitions. These revenue increases were partially offset by lower sales in our Retail Division, which decreased 6% year-over-year from lower comparable store sales and store closures.

 

(In millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

Change

 

Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Business Solutions Division

 

$

5,282

 

 

$

5,108

 

 

 

3

%

Retail Division

 

 

4,641

 

 

 

4,962

 

 

 

(6

)%

Change in comparable store sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(4

)%

CompuCom Division **

 

 

1,086

 

 

 

156

 

 

N/A

 

Other

 

 

6

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

(57

)%

Total

 

$

11,015

 

 

$

10,240

 

 

 

8

%

 

**

We formed the CompuCom Division as a result of our acquisition of CompuCom on November 8, 2017. The 2017 amount represents sales from the acquisition date of November 8, 2017 through the end of fiscal 2017.

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Product sales remained flat in 2018 compared to 2017, while service revenues grew 84%. Higher service revenues were driven primarily by the acquisition of CompuCom. Service revenues in 2018 were also impacted by the adoption of the new revenue recognition accounting standard, which negatively affected the comparability of service revenues by $57 million year-over-year. Refer to Note 1. “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information. Excluding our CompuCom Division and the impact of adopting the new revenue recognition accounting standard, service revenues grew 13% as a result of our strategic efforts to expand the array of enterprise and consumer service offerings. The primary drivers of our year-over-year growth in service revenues, excluding the CompuCom acquisition, include higher demand for our managed print and fulfillment services, and the expansion of our service and product subscriptions, with more than one million new subscriptions in 2018 generating over $100 million in sales. On a consolidated basis, services represent approximately 15% and 9% of our total sales in 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

(In millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

Change

 

Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Products

 

$

9,322

 

 

$

9,320

 

 

 

0

%

Services

 

 

1,693

 

 

 

920

 

 

 

84

%

Total

 

$

11,015

 

 

$

10,240

 

 

 

8

%

Other Significant Factors Impacting Total Company Results and Liquidity

 

Total gross profit increased by $90 million or 4% in 2018 compared to 2017 primarily due to acquisitions, partially offset by a decrease in gross profit from lower sales in our retail stores. Total gross margin was approximately 80 basis points lower in 2018 compared to 2017 primarily attributable to store and supply chain deleverage.

 

Total selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $157 million in 2018 compared to 2017. The increase reflects $286 million associated with the acquired businesses, partially offset by $129 million related to retail stores closures, lower payroll expenses, operational efficiencies and synergies. As a percentage of sales, total selling, general and administrative expenses remained flat in 2018 when compared to 2017.

 

We recorded $72 million of Merger and restructuring expenses, net in 2018 compared to $94 million in 2017. Merger and restructuring expense in 2018 includes $46 million of severance, retention, transaction and integration costs associated with our acquisition of CompuCom and the other businesses, $10 million of expenses related to OfficeMax merger activities, which were completed in 2018, $11 million of expenses associated with our strategic transformation plan, and $5 million of expenses associated with our Comprehensive Business Review program. Refer to Note 3. “Merger and Restructuring Activity” in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

 

We recorded a $25 million legal expense accrual in the fourth quarter of 2018 in connection with certain settlement discussions we have undertaken with the Federal Trade Commission in the quarter. Refer to Note 17, “Commitments and Contingencies,” of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

 

Our effective tax rate of 37% in 2018 reflects the lowered Federal marginal tax rate of 21% as well as a mix of income and losses across US and non-US jurisdictions.  In addition, our rate was impacted by several discrete items in the quarter including the impact of the potential nondeductible legal settlement and the impact of excess tax deficiencies associated with stock-based compensation awards, state taxes, and certain other nondeductible items. In addition, we completed several acquisitions and dispositions, some of which resulted in the recognition of a gain or loss for tax purposes that differed from the amount recognized for GAAP purposes. Our effective tax rate for 2017 was 51%, primarily impacted by the reduction in the statutory effective Federal rate from 35% to 21% which caused a non-cash charge of $68 million, partially offset by the reversal of $42 million of our U.S. federal and state valuation allowance on deferred tax assets, as we concluded that it was more likely than not that a benefit from the related deferred tax assets would be realizable.

 

Diluted earnings per share from continuing operations was $0.18 in 2018 compared to $0.27 in 2017.

 

Diluted earnings per share from discontinued operations was $0.01 in 2018 compared to $0.06 in 2017.

 

Including diluted earnings per share from discontinued operations, net diluted earnings per share was $0.19 in 2018 compared to $0.34 in 2017. As disclosed in Note 18 “Discontinued Operations” to the Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements, we completed the sale of our former International Operations in the first half of 2018.

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At December 29, 2018, we had $658 million in cash and cash equivalents and $947 million available under the Amended Credit Agreement. Cash provided by operating activities of continuing operations was $616 million for 2018 compared to $467 million for 2017. Refer to the Liquidity and Capital Resources section of this Item 7 for more information on cash flows.

 

In 2017, we entered into a $750 million Term Loan Credit Agreement in connection with our acquisition of CompuCom. In November 2018, we executed the First Amendment to the Term Loan Credit Agreement (the “First Amendment”) to reduce the applicable interest rate from LIBOR plus 7.00% to LIBOR plus 5.25%. In connection with the applicable interest rate reduction, we made a voluntary repayment under the Term Loan Credit Agreement of $194 million. As a result, in the fourth quarter of 2018 we recognized a $15 million loss on modification of debt, which is comprised of a 1% prepayment premium and the write-off of unamortized deferred financing costs and original issue discount in an amount proportional to the term loan repaid.

 

During 2018 and 2017, we paid quarterly cash dividends on our common stock of $0.025 per share for a total annual dividend distribution of $55 million and $53 million, respectively. In addition, under our share repurchase program we bought back approximately 14 million shares of our common stock in each of the last two fiscal years, returning another  $39 million in 2018 and $56 million in 2017 to our shareholders.

OPERATING RESULTS

Discussion of additional income and expense items, including material charges and credits and changes in interest and income taxes follows our review of segment results. Fiscal years 2018 and 2017 includes 52 weeks, while fiscal year 2016 includes 53 weeks, with a 14-week fourth quarter.

BUSINESS SOLUTIONS DIVISION

 

(In millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Products

 

$

4,974

 

 

$

4,843

 

 

$

5,143

 

Services

 

 

308

 

 

 

265

 

 

 

257

 

Total

 

$

5,282

 

 

$

5,108

 

 

$

5,400

 

% change

 

 

3

%

 

 

(5

)%

 

 

(5

)%

Division operating income

 

$

243

 

 

$

262

 

 

$

265

 

% of sales

 

 

5

%

 

 

5

%

 

 

5

%

 

Prior to 2018, we also reported changes in sales for our Business Solutions Division on a constant currency basis given the span of our former international operations. As disclosed in Note 18 “Discontinued Operations” in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements, between the third quarter of 2016 and the second quarter of 2018, we sold substantially all of our international operations. As a result, over the last two years the Business Solutions Division’s exposure to foreign currency exchange rates has been primarily limited to our Canadian operations, and the fluctuation of the Canadian dollar against the U.S. dollar has had an immaterial impact to the changes in sales for the Division for all periods herein presented.

 

Product sales from our Business Solutions Division increased 3% in 2018 compared to 2017, primarily due to acquisitions, higher online sales and growth in adjacency categories, such as cleaning/breakroom supplies and furniture, partially offset by lower sales of other product categories including paper, toner and ink. Improved sales from the omni-channel programs that we report under our Retail Division partially offset the growth in product sales from our Business Solutions Division – see discussion on order online for pick up in stores or ship from stores within the Retail Division analysis. Product sales declined 6% from 2016 to 2017 mainly due to competitive pressures, customer losses in the contract sales channel, lower catalog sales through our call centers and the impact of increasing levels of sales from the omni-channel programs. The Business Solutions Division sales in 2017 were also affected by one less selling week compared to 2016, resulting in approximately $56 million of lower sales, and the impact of three powerful hurricanes that disrupted our retail and contract operations.

 

Sales of services in our Business Solutions Division increased 16% in 2018 compared to 2017, and 3% in 2017 compared to 2016. This positive trend is the reflection of increased sales of our managed print and fulfillment services, and the expansion of our product subscriptions for toner and software.

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Business Solutions Division operating income declined 7% in 2018 compared to 2017, and 1% in 2017 compared to 2016. As a percentage of sales operating income declined 53 basis points in 2018 compared to 2017, and increased 22 basis points in 2017 compared to 2016. Higher selling, general and administrative expenses from investments in our eCommerce platform, demand generation activities and acquisitions costs impacted operating income in 2018. However, these expenses were partially offset by an increase in gross profit primarily from acquisitions. Operating income in our Business Solutions Division was also negatively impacted by the migration of legacy OfficeMax customers to our current systems, which was completed in 2018. The decrease in operating income in 2017 was largely the result of having one less reporting week compared to fiscal 2016.

RETAIL DIVISION

 

(In millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Sales

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Products

 

$

4,105

 

 

$

4,429

 

 

$

4,975

 

Services

 

 

536

 

 

 

533

 

 

 

628

 

Total

 

$

4,641

 

 

$

4,962

 

 

$

5,603

 

% change

 

 

(6

)%

 

 

(11

)%

 

 

(7

)%

Division operating income

 

$

193

 

 

$

254

 

 

$

299

 

% of sales

 

 

4

%

 

 

5

%

 

 

5

%

Change in comparable store sales

 

 

(4

)%

 

 

(5

)%

 

 

(2

)%

 

Products sales in our Retail Division decreased 7% and 11% in 2018 and 2017, respectively, compared to the corresponding prior-year periods. This was primarily the result of closing underperforming stores coupled with fewer transactions in the existing locations, a trend that we have partially offset by gradually increasing the volume of omni-channel transactions, whereby our Business Solutions Division customers order online for pick up in our stores. These transactions are included in our Retail Division’s sales as they are fulfilled with store inventory and serviced by Retail Division employees.

 

(In millions)

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

Buy Online-Pickup in Store

 

$

189

 

 

$

152

 

 

$

115

 

% change

 

 

24