485APOS 1 d740852d485apos.htm FORM 485APOS Form 485APOS
Table of Contents
As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 5, 2019
File No. 33-5852
File No. 811-4676


SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM N-1A
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
Post-Effective Amendment No. 151
and
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER
THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940
Amendment No. 153

HARBOR FUNDS
(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in Charter)

111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor, Chicago, Illinois 60606
(Address of Principal Executive Offices)
(312) 443-4400
(Registrant’s Telephone Number, including Area Code)

CHARLES F. MCCAIN, ESQ.
Harbor Funds
111 South Wacker Drive – 34th Floor
Chicago, Illinois 60606
CHRISTOPHER P. HARVEY, ESQ.
Dechert LLP
One International Place – 40th Floor
100 Oliver Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02110
(Name and address of Agents for Service)

It is proposed that this filing will become effective (check appropriate box)
immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)
on     pursuant to paragraph (b)
60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
on     pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)
on December 1, 2019 pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of rule 485
If appropriate, check the following box:
this post-effective amendment designates a new effective date for a previously filed post-effective amendment.



Table of Contents
The information in this Prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This Prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
Prospectus
December 1, 2019
Harbor Mid Cap Fund
  Retirement
Class
Institutional
Class
Administrative
Class
Investor
Class
Harbor Mid Cap Fund [TO COME] [TO COME] [TO COME] [TO COME]
Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the Fund’s annual and semi-annual shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports. Instead, the reports will be made available on the Fund’s website (harborfunds.com), and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the Fund electronically anytime by contacting your financial intermediary (such as a broker-dealer or bank) or, if you invest directly with Harbor Funds, by calling 800-422-1050.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. If you invest through a financial intermediary (such as a broker-dealer or bank), you can contact your financial intermediary to request that you continue to receive paper copies of the Fund’s shareholder reports. If you invest directly, you can call 800-422-1050 to request that you continue to receive paper copies of the Fund’s shareholder reports. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all Harbor Funds held in your account.
The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved the Fund’s shares as an investment or determined whether this Prospectus is accurate or complete. Anyone who tells you otherwise is committing a crime.

 


 

Table of Contents

Fund Summary
1
Additional Information about the Fund’s Investments
3

3

3

3

3

4

4
The Adviser and Subadviser
5

6
Your Harbor Funds Account
8

10

12

14

16
Shareholder and Account Policies
18

18

18

19

20

22

22

22

22

22

23

24

25
Investor Services
26

26

26

27

27

27

27

27
For More Information
28
........................ Back Cover
............................................... Back Cover

 

Harbor Mid Cap Fund

Fund Summary
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks long-term total return.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the Fund. The table does not reflect brokerage commissions you may pay when buying or selling shares of the Fund.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
  Retirement
Class
Institutional
Class
Administrative
Class
Investor
Class
Management Fees 0.75% 0.75% 0.75% 0.75%
Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees None None None None
Other Expenses1 [___]% [___]% [___]% [___]%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses [___]% [___]% [___]% [___]%
Expense Reimbursement2 [(___)%] [(___)%] [(___)%] [(___)%]
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Expense Reimbursement2 0.80% 0.88% 1.13% 1.25%
1  Based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
2  The Adviser has contractually agreed to limit the Fund’s operating expenses, excluding interest expense (if any), to 0.80%, 0.88%, 1.13%, and 1.25% for the Retirement Class, Institutional Class, Administrative Class, and Investor Class, respectively, through November 30, 2020. Only the Fund’s Board of Trustees may modify or terminate this agreement.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same. The Example does not reflect brokerage commissions you may pay when buying or selling shares of the Fund. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, under these assumptions, your costs would be:
  One
Year
Three
Years
Five
Years
Ten
Years
Retirement [___] [___] [___] [___]
Institutional [___] [___] [___] [___]
Administrative [___] [___] [___] [___]
Investor [___] [___] [___] [___]
    
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when shares of the Fund are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in the Annual Fund Operating Expenses or in the Expense Example, do affect the Fund’s performance. The Fund commenced operations on
December 1, 2019 and no portfolio turnover rate existed at the time of this publication.
Principal Investment Strategy
The Fund invests primarily in equity securities, principally common and preferred stocks, of mid cap companies. Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities of mid cap companies.
The Fund defines mid cap companies as those with market capitalizations that fall within the range of the Russell Midcap® Index, provided that if the upper end of the capitalization range of that Index falls below $15 billion, the Fund will continue to define those companies with market capitalizations between the upper end of the range of the Index and $15 billion as mid cap companies. As of September 30, 2019, the range of the Index was [$X million to $X.X billion], but it is expected to change frequently.
The Subadviser employs a disciplined investment approach that seeks to identify companies that, in the Subadviser’s view, demonstrate strong business fundamentals and earnings prospects that are not fully captured in the companies’ current market valuations. The Subadviser uses a bottom-up investment process, employing fundamental and qualitative criteria to identify individual companies for potential investment in the Fund’s portfolio. The Subadviser employs statistical analysis, which is designed to limit certain risks in the Fund’s portfolio versus the Fund’s benchmark. The Fund’s sector weightings are a result of, and secondary to, individual stock selections.
The Fund expects to invest in approximately 50 to 70 companies.
Principal Risks
There is no guarantee that the investment objective of the Fund will be achieved. Stocks fluctuate in price and the value of your investment in the Fund may go down. This means that you could lose money on your investment in the Fund or the Fund may not perform as well as other investment options. Principal risks impacting the Fund include:
Equity Risk: The values of equity or equity-related securities may decline due to general market conditions that are not specifically related to a particular company, such as real or perceived adverse economic conditions, changes in the general outlook for corporate earnings, changes in interest or currency rates or adverse investor sentiment generally. They may also decline due to factors that affect a particular industry or industries, such as labor shortages or increased production costs and competitive conditions within an industry. Equity securities generally have greater price volatility than fixed income securities.
Market and Issuer Risk: Securities markets are volatile and can decline significantly in response to adverse market, economic, political, regulatory or other developments, which may lower the value of securities held by the Fund, sometimes rapidly or unpredictably. Additionally, an adverse event, such as an unfavorable earnings report, may depress the value of a particular issuer’s stock.
Mid Cap Risk: The Fund’s performance may be more volatile because it invests primarily in mid cap stocks. Mid cap companies may have limited product lines, markets and financial resources. Securities of mid cap companies are usually less stable in price and less liquid than those of larger, more established companies. Additionally, mid cap stocks may fall out of favor relative to small or large cap stocks, which may cause the Fund to underperform other equity funds that focus on small or large cap stocks.
 
1

 

Fund Summary
Harbor Mid Cap Fund

Preferred Stock Risk: Preferred stocks in which the Fund may invest are sensitive to interest rate changes, and are also subject to equity risk, which is the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. The rights of preferred stocks on the distribution of a company’s assets in the event of a liquidation are generally subordinate to the rights associated with a company’s debt securities.
Selection Risk: The Subadviser’s judgment about the attractiveness, value and growth potential of a particular security may be incorrect. The Subadviser potentially will be prevented from executing investment decisions at an advantageous time or price as a result of domestic or global market disruptions, particularly disruptions causing heightened market volatility and reduced market liquidity, as well as increased or changing regulations.  Thus, investments that the Subadviser believes represent an attractive opportunity or in which the Fund seeks to obtain exposure may be unavailable entirely or in the specific quantities or prices sought by the Subadviser and the Fund may need to obtain the exposure through less advantageous or indirect investments or forgo the investment at the time.
Performance
Because the Fund is newly organized and does not yet have a complete calendar year of performance history, the bar chart and total return tables are not provided. To obtain performance information, please visit the Fund’s website at harborfunds.com or call 800-422-1050.
Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser
Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.
Subadviser
EARNEST Partners LLC (“EARNEST Partners”) has subadvised the Fund since 2019.
Portfolio Manager
Paul E. Viera
EARNEST Partners LLC
Mr. Viera is the Chief Executive Officer, a Portfolio Manager and the founder of EARNEST Partners and has managed the Fund since 2019.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Shareholders may purchase or sell (redeem) Fund shares on any business day (normally any day the New York Stock Exchange is open). You may conduct transactions by mail, by telephone or through our website.
By Mail Harbor Funds
P.O. Box 804660
Chicago, IL 60680-4108
By Telephone 800-422-1050
By Visiting Our Website harborfunds.com
Investors who wish to purchase, exchange or redeem shares held through a financial intermediary should contact the financial intermediary directly.
The minimum initial investment amounts are shown below. The minimums may be reduced or waived in some cases. There are no minimums for subsequent investments.
Type of Account Retirement
Class1
Institutional
Class
Administrative
Class2
Investor
Class
Regular $1,000,000 $50,000 $50,000 $2,500
Individual Retirement
Account (IRA)
$1,000,000 $50,000 N/A $1,000
Custodial
(UGMA/UTMA)
$1,000,000 $50,000 N/A $1,000
1  There is no minimum investment for (1) employer-sponsored group retirement or benefit plans (with more than one participant) that maintain accounts with Harbor Funds at an omnibus or plan level, including: (i) plans established under Internal Revenue Code Sections 401(a), 403(b) or 457, (ii) profit-sharing plans, cash balance plans and money purchase pension plans, (iii) non-qualified deferred compensation plans, and (iv) retiree health benefit plans; and (2) certain wrap or model-driven asset allocation program accounts for the benefit of clients of financial intermediaries, as approved by the Distributor.
2  Limited only to employer-sponsored retirement or benefit plans and financial intermediaries. There is no minimum investment for employer-sponsored retirement or benefit plans.
Tax Information
Distributions you receive from the Fund are subject to federal income tax and may also be subject to state and local taxes. These distributions will generally be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred retirement account, such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. Investments in tax-deferred accounts may be subject to tax when they are withdrawn.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary, the Fund and/or its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your sales representative to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your sales representative or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
 
2

 

Additional Information about the Fund’s Investments

Investment Objective
Harbor Funds’ Board of Trustees (the “Board of Trustees”) may change the Fund’s investment objective without shareholder approval.

Investment Policies
The Fund’s 80% investment policy may be changed by the Fund upon 60 days’ advance notice to the shareholders.

Principal Investments
The Fund’s principal investment strategies are described in the Fund Summary section.

Equity Securities
Equity securities represent an ownership interest, or the right to acquire an ownership interest, in an issuer. In addition to exchange-traded and over-the-counter common and preferred stocks, equity securities include warrants, rights, security futures, convertible securities, depositary receipts and shares, trust certificates, limited partnership interests, shares of other investment companies, real estate investment trusts and equity participations. Equity investments also may include investments in initial public offerings or secondary offerings.

Non-Principal Investments
Derivative Instruments
The Fund may use derivatives for any of the following purposes:
To hedge against adverse changes in the market value of securities held by or to be bought for the Fund. These changes may be caused by changing stock market prices or currency exchange rates.
As a substitute for purchasing or selling securities or foreign currencies.
In non-hedging situations, to attempt to profit from anticipated market developments.
In general, a derivative instrument will obligate or entitle the Fund to deliver or receive an asset or a cash payment that is based on the change in value of a designated security, index, or other asset. Examples of derivatives are futures contracts, options, forward contracts, hybrid instruments, swaps, caps, collars and floors.
Even a small investment in certain types of derivatives can have a big impact on the Fund’s portfolio interest rate, stock market or currency exposure. Therefore, using derivatives can disproportionately increase the Fund’s portfolio losses and reduce opportunities for gains when interest rates, stock prices or currency rates are changing. The Fund may not fully benefit from or may lose money on derivatives if changes in their value do not correspond as expected to changes in the value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. If the Fund invests in a derivative instrument, it seeks to manage its derivative position by segregating enough cash or liquid securities that when combined with the value of the position will equal the value of the asset it represents.
Counterparties to over-the-counter derivative contracts present the same types of credit risk as issuers of fixed income securities. Derivatives also can make the Fund’s portfolio less liquid and harder to value, especially in declining markets. In addition, government legislation or regulation may make derivatives more costly, may limit the availability of derivatives, or may otherwise adversely affect the use, value or performance of derivatives.
TEMPORARY DEFENSIVE POSITIONS
The Fund may temporarily depart from its normal investment policies and strategies when the Subadviser believes that doing so is in the Fund‘s best interest, so long as the strategy or policy employed is consistent with the Fund‘s investment objective. For instance, the Fund may invest beyond its normal limits in derivatives or exchange traded funds that are consistent with the Fund‘s investment objective when those instruments are more favorably priced or provide needed liquidity, as might be the case if the Fund is transitioning assets from one Subadviser to another or receives large cash flows that it cannot prudently invest immediately.
In addition, the Fund may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with its normal investment policies and strategies—for instance, by allocating substantial assets to cash equivalent investments or other less volatile instruments— in response to adverse or unusual market, economic, political, or other conditions. In doing so, the Fund may succeed in avoiding losses but may otherwise fail to achieve its investment objective.
3

 

Additional Information about the Fund’s Investments

Principal Risks of Investing
The main risks associated with investing in the Fund are summarized in the Fund Summary section at the front of this prospectus.
For additional risk factors that are not discussed in this Prospectus because they are not considered main risk factors, see Harbor Funds’ Statement of Additional Information.
An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. The Fund’s shares will go up and down in price, meaning that you could lose money by investing in the Fund. Many factors influence a mutual fund’s performance and the Fund’s investment strategy may not produce the intended results.
More detailed descriptions of certain of the main risks and additional risks of the Fund are described below.
OPERATIONAL RISKS
An investment in the Fund, like any fund, can involve operational risks arising from factors such as processing errors, inadequate or failed processes, failure in systems and technology, cybersecurity breaches, changes in personnel and errors caused by third-party service providers. These errors or failures as well as other technological issues may adversely affect the Fund’s ability to calculate their net asset values in a timely manner, including over a potentially extended period, or may otherwise adversely affect the Fund and its shareholders. While the Fund seek to minimize such events through controls and oversight, there may still be failures that could causes losses to the Fund. In addition, similar incidents affecting issuers of securities held by the Fund may negatively impact Fund performance.

Portfolio Turnover
The Fund does not expect to engage in frequent trading to achieve its principal investment strategies. Active and frequent trading in a Fund’s portfolio may lead to the realization and distribution to shareholders of higher capital gains, which would increase the shareholders’ tax liability. Frequent trading also increases transaction costs, which could detract from the Fund’s performance. A portfolio turnover rate greater than 100% would indicate that the Fund sold and replaced the entire value of its securities holdings during the previous one-year period.

Portfolio Holdings Disclosure Policy
The Fund’s full portfolio holdings are published quarterly on the 15th day following quarter end on harborfunds.com. In addition, the Fund’s top ten portfolio holdings as a percent of its total net assets will be published quarterly on the 10th day following quarter end on harborfunds.com. This information is available on Harbor Funds’ website for the entire quarter.
Additional information about Harbor Funds’ portfolio holdings disclosure policy is available in the Statement of Additional Information.
4

 

The Adviser and Subadviser

The Adviser
Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc. (the “Adviser”) is the investment adviser to Harbor Funds. The Adviser, located at 111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor, Chicago, Illinois 60606-4302, is a wholly-owned subsidiary of ORIX Corporation (“ORIX”), a global financial services company based in Tokyo, Japan. ORIX provides a range of financial services to corporate and retail customers around the world, including financing, leasing, real estate and investment banking services. The stock of ORIX trades publicly on both the New York (through American Depositary Receipts) and Tokyo Stock Exchanges.
The combined assets of Harbor Funds and the pension plans managed by the Adviser were approximately $[___] billion as of September 30, 2019.
The Adviser employs a “manager-of-managers” approach in selecting and overseeing Subadvisers responsible for the day-to-day management of the assets of the Harbor funds. Subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees, the Adviser establishes, and may modify whenever deemed appropriate, the investment strategies of the Fund. The Adviser also is responsible for overseeing each Subadviser and recommending the selection, termination and replacement of Subadvisers. The Adviser evaluates and allocates the Fund’s assets to one or more Subadvisers.
The Adviser also:
Seeks to ensure quality control in the Subadviser’s investment process with the objective of adding value compared with returns of an appropriate risk and return benchmark.
Monitors and measures risk and return results against appropriate benchmarks and recommends whether a Subadviser should be retained or changed.
Focuses on cost control.
In order to more effectively manage the Fund, Harbor Funds and the Adviser have been granted an order from the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) permitting the Adviser, subject to the approval of the Board of Trustees, to select Subadvisers not affiliated with the Adviser to serve as portfolio managers for the Harbor funds, and to enter into new subadvisory agreements and to materially modify existing subadvisory agreements with such unaffiliated subadvisers, all without obtaining shareholder approval.
In addition to its investment management services, the Adviser administers Harbor Funds’ business affairs. [As disclosed in the “Fund Summary” section, the Adviser has contractually agreed to limit the Fund’s operating expenses, excluding interest expense (if any), until November 30, 2020.] The Adviser pays a subadvisory fee to the Subadviser out of its own assets. The Fund is not responsible for paying any portion of the subadvisory fee to the Subadviser.
Annual Advisory Fee Rates
(annual rate based on the Fund’s average net assets)
  Actual
Advisory
Fee Paid
Contractual
Advisory
Fee
Harbor Mid Cap Fund

N/A 1 0.75%
1 Commenced operations December 1, 2019
A discussion of the factors considered by the Board of Trustees when approving the investment advisory and investment subadvisory agreements of the Fund will be available in Harbor Fund’s semi-annual report to shareholders (for the 6-month period ended April 30, 2020).
From time to time, the Adviser or its affiliates may invest “seed” capital in a Fund, typically to enable a Fund to commence investment operations and/or achieve sufficient scale. The Adviser and its affiliates may hedge such seed capital exposure through offsetting positions.
5

 

The Adviser and Subadviser

The Subadviser and Portfolio Manager
The Fund’s investments are selected by a Subadviser that is unaffiliated with the Adviser. The Statement of Additional Information provides additional information about the portfolio manager’s compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio manager and the portfolio manager’s ownership of shares in the Fund.
Harbor Mid Cap Fund
EARNEST Partners LLC (“EARNEST Partners”), located at 1180 Peachtree Street NE, Suite 2300, Atlanta, GA 30309, serves as Subadviser to Harbor Mid Cap Fund. The portfolio manager is primarily responsible for the day-to-day investment decision making for the Fund.
PORTFOLIO MANAGER SINCE PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE
Paul E. Viera 2019 Mr. Viera founded EARNEST Partners in 1998 and is the Chief Executive Officer and a Portfolio Manager. He conceived and developed Return Pattern Recognition®, the investment methodology used to screen equities at EARNEST Partners. Prior to forming EARNEST Partners he was a Global Partner at Invesco Advisers, Inc. and a senior member of its Investment Team. Mr. Viera began his investment career in 1985 at Bankers Trust.
6

 

The Adviser and Subadviser

EARNEST Partners Mid Capitalization Core Composite Performance Information
The following table presents the past performance of a composite of certain accounts managed by EARNEST Partners, the Subadviser to Harbor Mid Cap Fund. The EARNEST Partners Mid Capitalization Core Composite (the “EARNEST Composite”) is comprised of all fee-paying accounts under fully discretionary management by EARNEST Partners that have investment objectives, policies and strategies substantially similar to those of the Fund. Returns are presented in U.S. dollars. Except to the extent net performance has been adjusted to reflect the operating costs of the Fund, EARNEST Partners has prepared and presented the historical performance shown for the EARNEST Composite in compliance with the Global Investment Performance Standards (GIPS®). Returns include the reinvestment of interest, dividends and any other distributions. The GIPS method for computing historical performance differs from the SEC’s method. Because the gross performance data shown in the table does not reflect the deduction of investment advisory fees paid by the accounts comprising the EARNEST Composite and certain other expenses that would be applicable to mutual funds, the net performance data may be more relevant to potential investors in the Fund in their analysis of the historical experience of EARNEST in managing portfolios with substantially similar investment strategies and techniques to those of the Fund. To calculate the performance of the EARNEST Composite net of all operating expenses, the estimated net Fund operating expenses payable by the Retirement, Institutional, Administrative, and Investor Classes of shares of the Fund for the fiscal year ending October 31, 2020, as applicable, were used.
The historical performance of the EARNEST Composite is not that of Harbor Mid Cap Fund and is not necessarily indicative of the Fund’s future results. The Fund’s actual performance may vary significantly from the past performance of the EARNEST Composite. While the accounts comprising the EARNEST Composite incur inflows and outflows of cash from clients, there can be no assurance that the continuous offering of the Fund’s shares and the Fund’s obligation to redeem its shares will not adversely impact the Fund’s performance. Also, not all of the accounts currently comprising the EARNEST Composite are subject to certain investment limitations, diversification requirements and other restrictions imposed by the Investment Company Act of 1940 and the Internal Revenue Code. If these limitations, requirements and restrictions were applicable to all accounts in the EARNEST Composite, they may have had an adverse effect on the performance results of the EARNEST Composite. However, EARNEST does not believe that such accounts would have been managed in a significantly different manner had they been subject to such investment limitations, diversification requirements and other restrictions.

EARNEST composite*
  Average Annual Total Returns for the Periods Ended June 30, 2019:  
  1 Year   3 Years   5 Years   Since
Inception
(10-01-2003)
 
Composite net of all Retirement Class operating expenses

10.82%   15.96%   10.80%   11.69%  
Composite net of all Institutional Class operating expenses

10.73   15.86   10.72   11.60  
Composite net of all Administrative Class operating expenses

10.46   15.58   10.44   11.32  
Composite net of all Investor Class operating expenses

10.32   15.44   10.31   11.19  
Composite gross of all operating expenses

11.70   16.88   11.69   12.58  
Russell Midcap® Index**

7.83   12.16   8.63   10.70  
    
  Calendar Year Total Returns for the Periods Ended December 31:
2009   2010   2011   2012   2013   2014   2015   2016   2017   2018
Composite net of all Retirement Class operating expenses

41.62%   26.63%   -1.17%   15.52%   30.56%   9.67%   0.45%   15.59%   25.18%   -10.84%
Composite net of all Institutional Class operating expenses

41.51   26.53   -1.24   15.43   30.46   9.59   0.37   15.50   25.08   -10.91
Composite net of all Administrative Class operating expenses

41.16   26.22   -1.49   15.14   30.14   9.31   0.12   15.22   24.77   -11.14
Composite net of all Investor Class operating expenses

41.00   26.07   -1.61   15.01   29.99   9.18   0.00   15.08   24.63   -11.24
Composite gross of all operating expenses

42.73   27.63   -0.37   16.44   31.59   10.55   1.26   16.51   26.16   -10.11
Russell Midcap® Index**

40.48   25.48   -1.55   17.28   34.76   13.22   -2.44   13.80   18.52   -9.06

* This is not the performance of Harbor Mid Cap Fund. As of June 30, 2019, the EARNEST Composite was composed of X accounts, totaling approximately $XX million. The inception date of the EARNEST Composite was October 3, 2003.
** The Russell Midcap® Index is an unmanaged index generally representative of the U.S. market for medium capitalization stocks. This unmanaged index does not reflect fees and expenses and is not available for direct investment. The Russell Midcap® Index and Russell® are trademarks of Frank Russell Company
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Your Harbor Funds Account
Choosing a Share Class

Other Harbor funds managed by the Adviser are offered by means of separate prospectuses. To obtain a prospectus for any of the Harbor Funds call 800-422-1050 or visit our website at harborfunds.com.
The Fund has multiple classes of shares, with each class representing an interest in the same portfolio of investments. However, the Fund’s separate share classes have different expenses and, as a result, their investment performances will differ. Harbor Funds, the Adviser, Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc. (the “Distributor”) and Harbor Services Group, Inc. (“Shareholder Services”) do not provide investment advice or recommendations or any form of tax or legal advice to existing or potential shareholders with respect to investment transactions involving the Fund. When choosing a share class, you should consider the factors below:
Retirement Class Retirement Class shares are available to individual and institutional investors.
   No 12b-1 fee and no intermediary fee of any kind paid by the Fund
   Transfer agent fee of up to 0.02% of average daily net assets
   $1,000,000 minimum investment in the Fund
   The Harbor Target Retirement Funds are not eligible to invest in the Retirement Class.
Institutional Class Institutional Class shares are available to individual and institutional investors.
   No 12b-1 fee
   Transfer agent fee of up to 0.10% of average daily net assets
   $50,000 minimum investment in the Fund
Administrative Class Administrative Class shares are available only to employer-sponsored retirement or benefit plans and other non-retirement accounts maintained by financial intermediaries. Employer-sponsored retirement and benefit plans include: (i) plans established under Internal Revenue Code Sections 401(a), 403(b) or 457, (ii) profit-sharing plans, cash balance plans and money purchase pension plans, (iii) non-qualified deferred compensation plans, and (iv) retiree health benefit plans. Administrative Class shares are not available through personal plans, such as individual retirement accounts (IRAs), SEP IRAs, Simple IRAs or individual 403(b) plans, unless investing through an account maintained by a financial intermediary.
   12b-1 fee of up to 0.25% of average daily net assets
   Transfer agent fee of up to 0.10% of average daily net assets
   $50,000 minimum investment in the Fund for accounts maintained by financial intermediaries
   No minimum investment for employer-sponsored retirement or benefit plans
Investor Class Investor Class shares are available to individual and institutional investors.
   12b-1 fee of up to 0.25% of average daily net assets
   Transfer agent fee of up to 0.22% of average daily net assets
   $2,500 minimum investment in the Fund for regular accounts
   $1,000 minimum investment in the Fund for IRA and UTMA/UGMA accounts
Meeting the minimum investment for a share class means you have purchased and maintained shares with a value at the time of purchase that is at least equal to that minimum investment amount. Redemptions out of your account can cause your account to fail to meet the minimum investment amount requirement. Changes in the market value of your account alone will not cause your account to either meet the minimum investment amount or fall below the minimum investment amount. See “Accounts Below Share Class Minimums.”

Distribution and Service (12b-1) Fees
Harbor Funds has adopted a distribution plan for the Fund’s Administrative and Investor Classes of shares in accordance with Rule 12b-1 under the Investment Company Act. Under the plan, the Fund pay distribution and service fees to the Distributor for the sale, distribution and servicing of the Administrative and Investor Class shares. All or a substantial portion of these fees are paid to financial intermediaries, such as broker-dealers, banks and trust companies, that maintain accounts in Harbor Funds for their customers. Because the Fund pay these fees out of the Administrative and Investor Class assets on an ongoing basis, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment in Administrative and Investor Class shares and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges.
8

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
Choosing a Share Class

Transfer Agent Fees
The Fund pay Shareholder Services transfer agent fees (specified above) on a per-class basis for its services as shareholder servicing agent for the Fund. For each class except for the Retirement Class of shares, Shareholder Services uses a portion of these fees to pay unaffiliated financial intermediaries for providing certain recordkeeping, subaccounting and/or similar services to shareholders who hold their shares through accounts that are maintained by the financial intermediaries. These fees may consist of per fund or per sub-account charges that are assessed on a periodic basis (i.e., quarterly) and/or an asset based fee that is determined based upon the value of the assets maintained by the financial intermediary.

Investing Through a Financial Intermediary
You may purchase Fund shares through an intermediary, such as a broker-dealer, bank or other financial institution, or an organization that provides recordkeeping and consulting services to 401(k) plans or other employee benefit plans. These intermediaries may charge you a fee for this service and may require different minimum initial and subsequent investments than Harbor Funds. They may also impose other charges or restrictions in addition to those applicable to shareholders who invest in the Fund directly.
The Distributor and Shareholder Services have contracted with certain intermediaries to accept and forward purchase orders to the Fund on your behalf. These contracts may permit a financial intermediary to forward the purchase order and transmit the funds for the purchase order to Harbor Funds by the next business day. Your purchase order must be received in good order by these intermediaries before the close of regular trading on the NYSE to receive that day’s share price.
The Distributor, Shareholder Services and/or the Adviser or their affiliates may compensate, out of their own assets, certain unaffiliated financial intermediaries for distribution of Institutional, Administrative and/or Investor Classes of shares of the Fund and for providing shareholder recordkeeping, subaccounting and other similar services to shareholders who hold their Institutional, Administrative and/or Investor Classes of shares of the Fund through accounts that are maintained by the financial intermediaries. The Adviser and/or its affiliates may also make payments, out of their own assets and not as an expense to the Fund, to unaffiliated financial intermediaries to offset certain expenses of financial intermediaries related to the maintenance of an intermediary’s investment platform and/or the setup and maintenance of the Fund or share class on an intermediary’s system. As a result, these financial intermediaries could be incentivized to recommend shares of Harbor Funds over shares of another mutual fund that either does not compensate the financial intermediary or compensates the intermediary at lower levels.
Harbor Funds, the Adviser, the Distributor, Shareholder Services and their respective trustees, directors, officers, employees and agents are not responsible for the failure of any intermediary to carry out its obligations to its customers, including any errors made by the intermediary when submitting purchase, redemption and exchange orders to Harbor Funds. Harbor Funds will not correct transactions that are submitted to Harbor Funds in error by the intermediary unless the intermediary has notified Harbor Funds of the error by 9:00 a.m. Eastern time on the following business day or prior to the deadline established between Harbor and the intermediary (i.e., on a trade date plus one [T+1] basis).
9

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
Minimum Investment Exceptions

Retirement Class
You may purchase Retirement Class shares, notwithstanding the $1,000,000 minimum investment amount, if you qualify for any of the exceptions discussed below. You may be required to provide written confirmation of your eligibility.
(a) Employer-sponsored group retirement or benefit plans (with more than one participant) that maintain accounts with Harbor Funds at an omnibus or plan level, including: (i) plans established under Internal Revenue Code Sections 401(a), 403(b) or 457, (ii) profit-sharing plans, cash balance plans and money purchase pension plans, (iii) non-qualified deferred compensation plans, and (iv) retiree health benefit plans.
(b) Certain wrap or model-driven asset allocation program accounts for the benefit of clients of financial intermediaries, as approved by the Distributor.

Institutional Class
You may purchase Institutional Class shares, notwithstanding the $50,000 minimum investment amount, if you qualify for any of the exceptions discussed below. You may be required to provide written confirmation of your eligibility.
(a) Shareholders who held shares of Harbor Funds on October 31, 2002 and have maintained a balance in a Harbor Funds account (hereinafter referred to as “original shareholders” or “grandfathered shareholders”). You will lose your “grandfathered” status if you deplete your account to a zero balance.
(b) Shareholders who received all or a portion of a grandfathered account due to death, divorce, a partnership dissolution, or as a gift of shares to a charitable organization.
(c) Current officers, partners, employees or registered representatives of financial intermediaries which have entered into sales agreements with the Distributor.
(d) Members of the immediate family living in the same household of any of the persons included in items (a), (b) or (c).
(e) Current trustees and officers of Harbor Funds.
(f) Current partners and employees of legal counsel to Harbor Funds.
(g) Current directors, officers or employees of the Adviser and its affiliates.
(h) Current directors, officers, or employees of any Subadviser to any Harbor Funds.
(i) Members of the immediate family of any of the persons included in items (e), (f), (g) or (h).
(j) Any trust, custodian, pension, profit-sharing or other benefit plan of the foregoing persons.
(k) Employer-sponsored retirement plan participants that transfer into a separate account with Harbor Funds within 60 days from withdrawal out of their employer-sponsored retirement plan account at Harbor Funds.
(l) Individuals that transfer directly into a separate account with Harbor Funds from an omnibus account at Harbor Funds, provided those individuals beneficially owned shares of the same Harbor fund through the omnibus account for a reasonable period of time, as determined by the Distributor, prior to the transfer.
(m) Certain wrap and other types of fee-based accounts for the benefit of clients of investment professionals or other financial intermediaries adhering to standards established by the Distributor.
(n) Employer-sponsored retirement plans and omnibus accounts established by financial intermediaries where the investment in each Fund is expected to meet the minimum investment amount within a reasonable time period, as determined by the Distributor.
(o) Participants in an employer-sponsored retirement plan or 403(b) plan or 457 plan if (i) their employer has made special arrangements for the plan to operate as a group with other plans through a single broker, dealer or financial intermediary; and (ii) all participants in the plan purchase shares of a Harbor fund through that single broker, dealer or other financial intermediary.
(p) Certain family trust accounts adhering to standards established by the Distributor.
10

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
Minimum Investment Exceptions

Administrative Class
You may purchase Administrative Class shares, notwithstanding the $50,000 minimum investment amount, if you qualify for any of the exceptions discussed below. You may be required to provide written confirmation of your eligibility.
(a) Employer-sponsored retirement or benefit plans, including: qualified retirement plans, plans established under Internal Revenue Code Sections 401(a), 403(b) or 457, profit-sharing plans, cash balance plans, money purchase pension plans, nonqualified deferred compensation plans and retiree health benefit plans.
(b) Omnibus accounts established by financial intermediaries where the investment in the Fund is expected to meet the investment minimum amount within a reasonable period of time as determined by the Distributor.

Investor Class
Harbor Funds may, in its discretion, waive or lower the investment minimum for the Investor Class of any Harbor fund.
11

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
How to Purchase Shares

Harbor Funds will not accept cash, money orders, cashier’s checks, official checks, starter checks, third-party checks, credit card convenience checks, traveler’s checks or checks drawn on banks outside the U.S.
Harbor Funds does not issue share certificates.
All orders to purchase shares received in good order by Harbor Funds or its agent before the close of regular trading on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), usually 4:00 p.m. Eastern time, will receive that day’s share price. Orders received in good order after the close of the NYSE will receive the next business day’s share price. All purchase orders are subject to acceptance by Harbor Funds. Checks and funds sent by wire or Automated Clearing House (“ACH”) for direct purchases must be received by Harbor Funds prior to the close of regular trading of the NYSE to receive that day’s share price. See “Investing Through a Financial Intermediary” if you are purchasing shares through a financial intermediary.
Harbor Funds at all times reserves the right to reject any purchase for any reason without prior notice, including if Harbor Funds determines that a shareholder or client of an intermediary has engaged in excessive short-term trading that Harbor Funds believes may be harmful to the Fund involved. For more information about Harbor Funds’ policy on excessive trading, see “Excessive Trading/Market Timing.”
Harbor Funds reserves the right to verify the accuracy of the submitted banking information (ACH, wire) prior to activation of the banking instructions on your account. The verification may take as long as 10 business days.
The Funds are available for sale in all 50 United States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the U.S. Virgin Islands and Guam.

By Mail
First class mail to:
Harbor Funds
P.O. Box 804660
Chicago, IL 60680-4108
Express or
registered mail to:
Harbor Funds
111 South Wacker Drive
34th Floor
Chicago, IL 60606-4302
Open a new account Add to an existing account
Complete and sign the appropriate new account application. If you are an institution, include a certified copy of a corporate resolution identifying authorized signers. Mail a completed Letter of Instruction or an Additional Investments form (available from harborfunds.com/forms). The Additional Investments form may also be included with your most recent confirmation statement.
Make your check payable to: “Harbor Funds.”
Shares purchased by check may be sold on any business day, subject to any applicable redemption fee, but the proceeds may not be available for up to 10 business days after the purchase of such shares to make sure the funds from your account have cleared.
If your check does not clear for any reason, your purchase will be cancelled and $25 may be deducted from your account. You may also be prohibited from future purchases.
Harbor Funds and Shareholder Services are not responsible for any mail that is lost or misdirected by the U.S. Postal Service or any other delivery service.

By Telephone
Call Harbor Funds at:
800-422-1050
Please make note of your confirmation number when transacting via the telephone.
Add to an existing account
You may submit orders for the purchase of shares by contacting a Shareholder Services Representative during our normal business hours, Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Eastern time. If your order is submitted on a day that the NYSE is not open for regular trading, or if it is submitted after the close of regular trading on the NYSE, it will be effected, subject to acceptance, with the next business day’s share price.
Payment for purchase of shares via the telephone may be made only through an ACH debit of your bank account. If your ACH transaction does not clear, your purchase will be cancelled and $25 may be deducted from your account. You may be prohibited from future telephone purchases.
Shares purchased via the telephone may be sold on any business day, subject to any applicable redemption fee, but the proceeds may not be available for up to 3 business days after the purchase of such shares to make sure the funds from your account have cleared.
If you are unable to reach a Shareholder Services Representative by telephone (for example, during unusual market activity), you may send the purchase request by mail or via our website.
You must establish banking instructions on your account to purchase shares via the telephone. If banking instructions were not established at the time you opened your account, a Shareholder Services Representative can assist you. You may also download the Account Services form from our website at harborfunds.com or establish banking instructions online if you are registered for online access.
12

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
How to Purchase Shares

By Wire
Wire to:
State Street Bank and
Trust Company
Boston, MA
ABA#: 0110 0002 8
Acct: DDA #3018-065-7 Supply Fund name, Fund number, account registration and account number
Open a new account Add to an existing account
Send the completed account application to Shareholder Services at the address listed under “By Mail.” Instruct your bank to wire the amount of the additional investment to State Street Bank and Trust Company.
Instruct your bank to wire the purchase amount to State Street Bank and Trust Company.  
Call a Shareholder Services Representative at 800-422-1050 if you are sending a wire of $100,000 or more.

Online Access
Visit our website:
harborfunds.com
Please make note of your confirmation number when transacting online.
Add to an existing account
If you have established online access for your account, you may submit an order to purchase shares via our website 24 hours a day. If your order is submitted on a day that the NYSE is not open for regular trading, or if it is submitted after the close of regular trading on the NYSE, it will be effected, subject to acceptance, with the next business day’s share price.
Payment for purchase of shares through online access may be made only through an ACH debit of your bank account. If your ACH transaction does not clear, your purchase will be cancelled and $25 may be deducted from your account. You may be prohibited from future online purchases.
Shares purchased through online access may be sold on any business day, subject to any applicable redemption fee, but the proceeds may not be available for up to 3 business days after the purchase of such shares to ensure the funds from your account have cleared.
If you are unable to access our website (for example, during unusual market activity), you may call a Shareholder Services Representative during normal business hours or send the purchase request by mail.
You must establish banking instructions on your account to purchase shares through the online account access system. If banking instructions were not established at the time you opened your account, you may add them to your account via the online account access system, by calling a Shareholder Services Representative at 800-422-1050 during our normal business hours, or you may download the Account Services form from our website at harborfunds.com and send it by mail.
13

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
How to Exchange Shares

An exchange is a redemption of shares from one Harbor fund and a purchase of shares into another Harbor fund and may be subject to a redemption fee.
Exchanges are taxable transactions for shareholders that are subject to tax, and you may realize a gain or a loss.
Class-to-class exchanges within the same Fund, however, are generally not taxable.
All orders to exchange shares received in good order by Harbor Funds or its agent before the close of regular trading on the NYSE, usually 4:00 p.m. Eastern time, will receive that day’s share price. Orders received in good order after the close of the NYSE will receive the next day’s share price. All exchanges are subject to acceptance by Harbor Funds.
The exchange privilege is not intended as a means for short-term or excessive trading. Harbor Funds at all times reserves the right to reject the purchase portion of any exchange transaction for any reason without prior notice if Harbor Funds determines that a shareholder or client of an intermediary has engaged in excessive short-term trading that Harbor Funds believes may be harmful to the Fund. For more information about Harbor Funds’ policy on excessive trading, see “Excessive Trading/Market Timing.”
Exchanges must meet the applicable minimum initial investment amounts for each class of shares of each Harbor fund. You should consider the differences in investment objectives and expenses of a Harbor fund before making an exchange.
Harbor Funds may change or terminate its exchange policy on 60 days’ prior notice.
Retirement CLASS SHAREHOLDERS
The Retirement Class of shares is available to both individual and institutional investors who meet the minimum investment and other eligibility requirements.
You may exchange your shares of the Retirement Class for Retirement Class shares of any other Harbor fund. In addition, you may exchange your shares of the Retirement Class for shares of the Institutional, Administrative or Investor Class of another Harbor fund subject to the eligibility and minimum investment requirements for the Fund and class to be acquired.
Institutional CLASS SHAREHOLDERS
This class of shares is available to both individual and institutional investors who meet the minimum investment requirement.
If you are an original shareholder (a shareholder of any Harbor fund as of October 31, 2002), you may exchange your Institutional Class shares for Institutional Class shares of any Harbor fund.
If you are not an original shareholder or do not qualify for another exception, you must meet the minimum initial investment requirements for each Fund.
You may exchange your shares of the Institutional Class for shares of the Retirement Class of another Harbor fund subject to the eligibility and minimum investment requirements for the Fund to be acquired.
Administrative CLASS SHAREHOLDERS
You may exchange your shares of the Administrative Class for Administrative Class shares of any other Harbor fund available through your retirement plan or financial intermediary. In addition, you may exchange your shares of the Administrative Class for shares of either the Institutional or Investor Class of another Harbor fund if such class of shares is available through your retirement plan or financial intermediary.
Investor CLASS SHAREHOLDERS
If you are an Investor Class shareholder, you may exchange your shares for Investor Class shares of another Harbor fund and for Institutional Class shares of any Harbor fund that does not currently offer Investor Class shares. Your exchanges out of any Harbor fund that does not currently offer Investor Class shares into another Harbor fund would be subject to the eligibility and minimum investment requirements for the Fund and class to be acquired.

By Mail
First class mail to:
Harbor Funds
P.O. Box 804660
Chicago, IL 60680-4108
Express or
registered mail to:
Harbor Funds
111 South Wacker Drive
34th Floor
Chicago, IL 60606-4302
You may mail an exchange request to Shareholder Services. Indicate the Fund name, the Fund number, the number of shares or dollar amount to be exchanged and the account number. Sign the request exactly as the account holder’s name(s) appear on the account registration.
Harbor Funds and Shareholder Services are not responsible for any mail that is lost or misdirected by the U.S. Postal Service or any other delivery service.
14

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
How to Exchange Shares

By Telephone
Call Harbor Funds at:
800-422-1050
Please make note of your confirmation number when transacting via the telephone.
If your account has telephone exchange privileges, you may contact a Shareholder Services Representative during our normal business hours, Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Eastern time. If your order is submitted on a day that the NYSE is not open for regular trading, or if it is submitted after the close of regular trading on the NYSE, it will be effected, subject to acceptance, with the next business day’s share price.
If you are unable to reach a Shareholder Services Representative by telephone (for example, during unusual market activity), you may send the exchange request by mail or via our website.

Online Access
Visit our website:
harborfunds.com
Please make note of your confirmation number when transacting online.
If you have established online access, you may submit an order to exchange shares via our website 24 hours a day. If your order is submitted on a day that the NYSE is not open for regular trading, or if it is submitted after the close of regular trading on the NYSE, it will be effected, subject to acceptance, with the next business day’s share price.
If you are unable to access our website (for example, during unusual market activity), you may call a Shareholder Services Representative during normal business hours or send the exchange request by mail.
15

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
How to Sell Shares

Redemptions are taxable transactions for shareholders that are subject to tax, and you may realize a gain or a loss. Certain shareholders may be subject to backup withholding.
A Medallion signature guarantee may be required. See “Shareholder and Account Policies” for more information.
All orders to sell shares received in good order by Harbor Funds or its agent before the close of regular trading on the NYSE, usually 4:00 p.m. Eastern time, will receive that day’s share price. Orders received in good order after the close of the NYSE will receive the next business day’s share price. Harbor Funds has the right to suspend redemptions of shares and to postpone payment of proceeds for up to seven days, as permitted by law. Proceeds of the redemption (reduced by the amount of any tax withholding, if applicable) will be mailed by check payable to the shareholder of record at the address of record, wired or sent via ACH to the current banking instructions already on file.
The length of time Harbor Funds typically expects to pay proceeds from redemption requests varies based on the method by which you elect to receive the proceeds. Harbor Funds typically expects to pay redemption proceeds as follows: (i) for proceeds by check, Harbor Funds typically expects to mail the check by the next business day following the receipt of a redemption request that is in good order; (ii) for proceeds by wire, Harbor Funds typically expects to pay proceeds by the next business day following the receipt of a redemption request that is in good order; and (iii) for proceeds by ACH, Harbor Funds typically expects to transfer the proceeds to the shareholder’s bank on the next business day following the receipt of the redemption request which will be made available to the redeeming shareholder on the second business day. For redemption requests settled through the National Securities Clearing Corporation, Harbor Funds typically expects the redemption transaction to settle (and proceeds to be paid) the next business day following the receipt of the redemption request in good order. For redemptions through an intermediary, Harbor Funds typically expects to pay redemption proceeds to the intermediary in accordance with the preceding statement. As previously noted, payments of redemption proceeds may take up to seven days, as permitted by law.
If withholding information on IRA redemption requests is not specified, Harbor Funds will withhold the mandatory federal amount (currently 10%) and any applicable state amount.
For information about Harbor Funds’ policy on excessive trading, see “Excessive Trading/Market Timing.”
Harbor Funds and Shareholder Services do not pay interest on redemption proceeds.
Redemption proceeds, except for IRA redemption proceeds, sent by check that are not cashed within 180 days may be reinvested (without interest), in your account in the same Fund from which they were redeemed at the current day’s net asset value (“NAV”). Redemption proceeds that are reinvested are subject to the risk of loss like any Fund investment. Additionally, if redemption checks are not cashed within 180 days, your account options will be changed to have future dividend and capital gains distributions reinvested.

By Mail
First class mail to:
Harbor Funds
P.O. Box 804660
Chicago, IL 60680-4108
Express or
registered mail to:
Harbor Funds
111 South Wacker Drive
34th Floor
Chicago, IL 60606-4302
You may mail a written redemption request to Shareholder Services. State the Fund name, the Fund number, the number of shares or dollar amount to be sold and the account number. Sign the request exactly as the name or names (if more than one name) appear on the account registration.
Harbor Funds and Shareholder Services are not responsible for any mail that is lost or misdirected by the U.S. Postal Service or any other delivery service.

By Telephone
Call Harbor Funds at:
800-422-1050
Please make note of your confirmation number when transacting via the telephone.
If your account has telephone redemption privileges, you may contact a Shareholder Services Representative during our normal business hours, Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Eastern time. If your order is submitted on a day that the NYSE is not open for regular trading, or if it is submitted after the close of regular trading on the NYSE, it will be effected, subject to acceptance, with the next business day’s share price.
Redemptions via the telephone will be paid by check, wire or ACH transfer only to the address or bank account of record.
Shares purchased via the telephone may be sold on any business day, subject to any applicable redemption fee, but the proceeds may not be available for up to 3 business days after the purchase of such shares to make sure the funds from your account have cleared.
If you are unable to reach a Shareholder Services Representative by telephone (for example, during unusual market activity), you may send the redemption request by mail or via our website.
16

 

Your Harbor Funds Account
How to Sell Shares

Online Access
Visit our website:
harborfunds.com
Please make note of your confirmation number when transacting online.
If you have established online access, you may submit an order to redeem shares via our website 24 hours a day. If your order is submitted on a day that the NYSE is not open for regular trading, or if it is submitted after the close of regular trading on the NYSE, it will be effected, subject to acceptance, with the next business day’s share price.
Redemptions through online access will be paid by check, wire or ACH transfer only to the address or bank account of record.
Shares purchased through online access may be sold on any business day, subject to any applicable redemption fee, but the proceeds may not be available for up to 3 business days after the purchase of such shares to ensure the funds from your account have cleared.
If you are unable to access our website (for example, during unusual market activity), you may call a Shareholder Services Representative during normal business hours or send the redemption request by mail.
17

 

Shareholder and Account Policies

Transaction and Account Policies
Important Information About Opening an Account
To help the government fight the funding of terrorism and money laundering activities, federal law requires all financial institutions, including Harbor Funds, to obtain, verify and record information that identifies each person who opens an account and to determine whether such person’s name appears on government lists of known or suspected terrorists and terrorist organizations. As a result, unless this information is collected by the broker/dealer or other financial intermediary pursuant to an agreement, Harbor Funds must obtain the following information for each person that opens a new account:
Name;
Date of birth (for individuals);
Residential or business street address (although post office boxes may be used as a mailing address); and
Social Security number, taxpayer identification number or other identifying number.
You may also be asked for a copy of your driver’s license, passport or other identifying document in order to verify your identity. In addition, it may be necessary to verify your identity by cross-referencing your identification information with a consumer report or other electronic database. Additional information may be required to open accounts for corporations and other legal entities.
Legal entity customers are required to provide the name, date of birth, address and social security number (or other government identification number such as a passport number or other similar information in the case of foreign persons) of individual(s), referred to as “beneficial owner(s)”, who own 25% or more of the equity interest of the legal entity, as applicable, and an individual with significant responsibility to control, manage or direct the legal entity at the time that a new account is opened.
Federal law prohibits Harbor Funds and other financial institutions from opening a new account unless they receive the minimum identifying information listed above. After an account is opened, Harbor Funds may restrict your ability to purchase additional shares until your identity is verified. Harbor Funds may close your account or take other appropriate action if they are unable to verify your identity within a reasonable time. If your account is closed for this reason, your shares will be redeemed at the NAV next calculated after the account is closed. If the NAV on the redemption date is lower than the NAV on your original purchase date, you will receive less than your original investment amount when the account is closed.

Rights Reserved by Harbor Funds
Harbor Funds reserves the following rights: (1) to accept initial purchases by telephone, online access, or mail; (2) to refuse any purchase or exchange order for any reason; (3) to cancel or rescind a purchase order for non-payment; (4) to cease offering the Fund’s shares at any time to all or certain groups of investors; (5) to freeze any account and suspend account services when notice has been received of a dispute between the registered or beneficial account owners, or there is reason to believe a fraudulent transaction may occur; (6) to otherwise modify the conditions of purchases and any services at any time; (7) to act on instructions reasonably believed to be genuine; and (8) to involuntarily redeem your account at the net asset value calculated the day the account is redeemed if the Fund or its agent is unable to verify the identity of the person(s) or entity opening an account or becomes aware of information regarding a shareholder or shareholder’s account, which indicates that the identity of the shareholder can no longer be verified.
These actions will be taken when, in the sole discretion of management, they are deemed to be in the best interest of the Fund or if required by law.
If the NYSE is closed because of inclement weather, technology problems or any other reason on a day it would normally be open for business, or the NYSE has an unscheduled early closing on a day it has opened for business, Harbor Funds reserves the right to treat such day as a business day and accept purchase and redemption orders until (and calculate the Fund’s NAV as of) the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day.

Important Information Regarding State Escheatment Laws
Mutual fund accounts can be considered abandoned property. States are looking at inactive mutual fund accounts as possible abandoned or unclaimed property. Under certain circumstances determined by the state, Harbor Funds may be legally obligated to escheat (or transfer) an investor’s account to the appropriate state’s unclaimed property administrator. Harbor Funds will not be liable to investors or their representatives for good faith compliance with state unclaimed or abandoned property (escheatment) laws. If you invest in the Fund through a financial intermediary, we encourage you to contact the financial intermediary regarding applicable state escheatment laws.
Escheatment laws vary by state, and states have different criteria for defining inactivity and abandoned property. Generally, a mutual fund account may be subject to “escheatment” (i.e., considered to be abandoned or unclaimed property) if the account owner has not initiated any activity in the account or established
18

 

Shareholder and Account Policies

contact with the Fund for an “inactivity period” as specified in applicable state laws. If the Fund is unable to establish contact with an investor, the Fund will determine whether the investor’s account must legally be considered abandoned and whether the assets in the account must be transferred to the appropriate state’s unclaimed property administrator. Typically, an investor’s last known address of record determines the state that has jurisdiction.
Shareholders that reside in the state of Texas may designate a representative to receive escheatment notifications by completing and submitting a designation form that can be found on the website of the Texas Comptroller. Other states may provide similar processes for shareholders.
We strongly encourage you to contact us at least once every year to review your account information. Below are ways in which you can assist us in safeguarding your Fund investments.
If you have established online access for your account, log in to your account at harborfunds.com to view your account information. Please note, simply visiting our public website does not establish contact with us under state escheatment laws.
Call one of our Shareholder Services Representatives at 800-422-1050, Monday through Friday, between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Eastern time.
Take action on letters received in the mail from Harbor Funds concerning account inactivity, outstanding checks and/or escheatment or abandoned property and follow the directions in these letters. To avoid escheatment, we advise that you promptly respond to any such letters.

Excessive Trading/Market-Timing
Some investors try to profit from a strategy called market-timing — moving money into mutual funds for the short-term when they expect prices to rise and taking money out when they expect prices to fall. The Harbor funds are intended for long-term investment purposes only. Harbor Funds has taken reasonable steps to identify and seek to discourage excessive short-term trading.
Excessive short-term trading into and out of a Fund can disrupt portfolio investment strategies, increase expenses, and negatively impact investment returns for all shareholders, including long-term shareholders who do not generate these costs. Certain Funds invest a significant portion of their assets in small cap stocks, stocks of emerging market companies or high-yield bonds. Some of these holdings may not trade every day or may not trade frequently throughout a trading day. As a result, these Funds may be more susceptible to a short-term trading strategy by which an investor seeks to profit based upon the investor’s belief that the values of a Fund’s portfolio securities, as reflected by the Fund’s net asset value on any given day, do not fully reflect the current fair market value of such securities. In the case of Funds that invest primarily in foreign securities, some investors may also seek to profit from the fact that foreign markets or exchanges normally close earlier in the day than U.S. markets or exchanges. These investors may seek to take advantage of information that becomes available after the close of the foreign markets or exchanges, but before a Fund prices its shares, which may affect the prices of the foreign securities held by the Fund. If those investors are successful, long-term shareholders could experience dilution in the value of their shares.
The Board of Trustees has adopted policies and procedures and has authorized Harbor Funds to take the following actions to discourage excessive short-term trading activity in the Funds.
You may make no more than four round trips in the same Fund in any 12-month period. A “round trip” is a purchase into a Fund followed by a redemption out of the same Fund (including by exchange) or a redemption out of a Fund (including by exchange) followed by a purchase into the same Fund within a 30-day period. When a purchase or redemption transaction is paired with another transaction to make one round trip, neither of those transactions is paired with a third transaction to make a second round trip. For example, if a shareholder purchases shares of a Fund on May 1, redeems those shares of the same Fund on May 15 and then purchases shares in the same Fund again on June 5, the shareholder would have engaged in one round trip. The purchase on May 1 would be paired with the redemption on May 15 because the transactions occurred within a 30-day period. However, the redemption on May 15 would not be paired with the purchase on June 5 to create a second round trip because the May 15 redemption already constituted part of the earlier round trip. Different restrictions may apply if you invest through an intermediary.
Harbor Funds will limit, for a period of 60 days, future purchases into a Fund by any investor who makes more than four round trips in the same Fund in a 12-month period. Harbor Funds monitors trading activity in all accounts maintained directly with Harbor Funds. If Harbor Funds discovers what it believes to be excessive trading or market timing activity in any Fund, it may limit future purchases or terminate the exchange privilege for a shareholder on a temporary or permanent basis at any time, including after one round trip. Harbor Funds may also prohibit a shareholder from opening new accounts or adding to existing accounts in any Harbor fund. The trading history of accounts under common ownership or control within any of the Harbor funds may be considered in enforcing these policies. As described under “Pricing of Fund Shares,” Harbor Funds has also implemented fair value pricing procedures, which may have the
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Shareholder and Account Policies

effect of reducing market timing activity in some Funds. In addition, the Funds reserve the right to reject any purchase request (including the purchase portion of any exchange) by any investor or group of investors for any reason without prior notice, including, if they believe the trading activity in the account(s) would be harmful or disruptive to a Fund. For example, a Fund may refuse a purchase order if the Fund’s portfolio manager believes he or she would be unable to invest the money effectively in accordance with the Fund’s investment policies or the Fund would otherwise be adversely affected due to the size of the transaction, frequency of trading or other factors. Purchases placed (directly or through a financial intermediary) in violation of the Funds’ exchange limits or excessive trading policy may be rejected by a Fund.
The four round trip limitation imposed under the excessive trading policy does not apply to (i) minimum required distributions from retirement accounts; (ii) return of excess contributions in retirement accounts where the excess is reinvested into the same Funds; (iii) purchases of shares in retirement accounts with participant payroll or employer contributions or loan repayments; (iv) transaction requests submitted by mail to Harbor Funds from shareholders who hold their accounts directly with Harbor Funds (transactions submitted by fax or wire are not considered mail transactions); (v) transactions involving the reinvestment of dividend and capital gains distributions; (vi) transactions initiated through an automatic investment, exchange or withdrawal plan; (vii) transactions pursuant to an automatic rebalancing or asset allocation program established with Harbor Funds; (viii) transactions involving the transfer of shares from one account to another account of the same shareholder in the same Fund and the conversion of shares from one class to another class in the same Fund; (ix) transactions initiated by a plan sponsor; (x) Section 529 College Savings Plans; (xi) Harbor funds that invest in other Harbor funds; (xii) involuntary redemptions of shares to pay Fund or account fees; (xiii) transactions below a dollar amount applicable to all accounts in a Fund that Harbor has determined, in its sole discretion, are not likely to adversely affect the management of the Fund; and (xiv) omnibus accounts maintained by financial intermediaries.
When financial intermediaries establish omnibus accounts with Harbor Funds, Harbor Funds monitors trading activity in the account at the omnibus level. Because activity in the omnibus account represents the aggregate trading activity of the intermediary’s underlying customers, Harbor Funds monitors trading activity in omnibus accounts in a different manner than it does in accounts which Harbor Funds believes are owned directly by the investor. If Harbor Funds detects what it believes may be excessive short-term trading or market timing activity in an omnibus account, Harbor Funds will seek to investigate and take appropriate action. This may include requesting that the intermediary provide its customers’ underlying transaction information so that Harbor Funds can assess whether an underlying customer’s transaction activity was reflective of excessive short-term trading or market timing activity. If necessary, Harbor Funds may limit or prohibit additional purchases of Fund shares by an intermediary or by certain of the intermediary’s customers. Because Harbor Funds normally monitors trading activity at the omnibus account level, Harbor Funds may not be able to detect or prevent excessive short-term trading or market timing activity at the underlying customer level.
In addition, certain financial intermediaries may impose restrictions on short-term trading that may differ from those of Harbor Funds. Harbor Funds may choose to rely on the intermediary’s restrictions on short-term trading in place of its own if Harbor Funds determines, in its discretion, that the intermediary’s restrictions provide reasonable protection for the Funds from excessive short-term trading activity.
Certain Funds may charge redemption fees, subject to certain exceptions, as described in the respective Fund’s prospectus under “Redemption Fees.” For the purposes of determining whether the redemption fee applies, Harbor Funds will redeem your shares on a “first-in, first-out” (FIFO) basis, which means that shares with the longest holding period will be redeemed first and shares with the shortest holding period will be redeemed last.

Pricing of Fund Shares
The Fund’s share price, called its net asset value (NAV) per share, is generally calculated each day the NYSE is open for trading as of the close of regular trading on the NYSE, generally 4:00 p.m. Eastern time. The NAV per share for each class of shares outstanding is computed by dividing the net assets of the Fund attributable to that class by the number of Fund shares outstanding for that class. On holidays or other days when the NYSE is closed, the NAV is generally not calculated and the Fund generally do not transact purchase or redemption requests. However, on those days the value of a Fund’s assets may be affected to the extent that the Fund holds foreign securities that trade on foreign markets that are open.
If the NYSE is closed because of inclement weather, technology problems or any other reason on a day it would normally be open for business, or the NYSE has an unscheduled early closing on a day it has opened for business, Harbor Funds reserves the right to treat such day as a business day and accept purchase and redemption orders until, and calculate the Fund’s NAV as of, the normally scheduled close of regular trading on the NYSE for that day, so long as the Adviser believes there generally remains an adequate market to obtain reliable and accurate market quotations. Harbor Funds may elect to remain open and
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Shareholder and Account Policies

price Fund shares on days when the NYSE is closed but the primary securities markets on which the Fund’s securities trade remain open.
Harbor Funds’ valuation procedures permit the Fund to use a variety of valuation methodologies, consider a number of subjective factors, analyze applicable facts and circumstances and, in general, exercise judgment, when valuing Fund investments.  The methodology used for a specific type of investment may vary based on the circumstances and relevant considerations, including available market data. As a general matter, accurately fair valuing investments is difficult and can be based on inputs and assumptions that may not always be correct.
The Fund generally values portfolio securities and other assets for which market quotes are readily available at market value for purposes of calculating the Fund’s NAV. In the case of equity securities, market value is generally determined on the basis of last reported sales prices, or if no sales are reported, on quotes obtained from a quotation reporting system, established market makers, or independent pricing vendors. In the case of fixed income securities and non-exchange traded derivative instruments, market value is generally determined using prices provided by independent pricing vendors. The prices provided by independent pricing vendors reflect the pricing vendor’s assessment using various market inputs of what it believes are the fair market values of the securities at the time of pricing. Those market inputs include recent transaction prices and dealer quotations for the securities, transaction prices for what the independent pricing vendor believes are similar securities and various relationships between factors such as interest rate changes and security prices that are believed to affect the prices of individual securities. Because many fixed income securities trade infrequently, the independent pricing vendor often does not have as a market input, current transaction price information when determining a price for a particular security on any given day. When current transaction price information is available, it is one input into the independent pricing vendor’s evaluation process, which means that the price supplied by the pricing vendor may differ from that transaction price. Short-term fixed income investments having a maturity of 60 days or less are generally valued at amortized cost, which approximates fair value. Exchange-traded options, futures and options on futures are generally valued at the settlement price determined by the relevant exchange.
Investments initially valued in currencies other than the U.S. dollar are converted to the U.S. dollar using exchange rates obtained from independent pricing vendors. As a result, the NAV of the Fund’s shares may be affected by changes in the value of currencies in relation to the U.S. dollar. The value of securities traded in markets outside the United States or denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar may be affected significantly on a day that the NYSE is closed and an investor is not able to purchase, redeem or exchange shares.
When reliable market quotations or prices supplied by an independent pricing vendor are not readily available or are not believed to accurately reflect fair value, securities are generally priced at their fair value, determined according to fair value pricing procedures adopted by the Board of Trustees. The Fund may also use fair value pricing if the value of some or all of the Fund’s securities have been materially affected by events occurring before the Fund’s pricing time but after the close of the primary markets or exchanges on which the security is traded. This most commonly occurs with foreign securities, but may occur with other securities as well. When fair value pricing is employed, the prices of securities used by the Fund to calculate its NAV may differ from market quotations, official closing prices or prices supplied by an independent pricing vendor for the same securities. This means the Fund may value those securities higher or lower than another given fund that uses market quotations, official closing prices or prices supplied by an independent pricing vendor. The fair value prices used by the Fund may also differ from the prices that the Fund could obtain for those securities if the Fund were to sell those securities at the time the Fund determines its NAV.
Current day share prices are normally available after 7:00 p.m. Eastern time at harborfunds.com.
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Shareholder and Account Policies

Paying for Shares by Check
If you purchase Fund shares by check:
Make your check payable to: “Harbor Funds.”
No third-party checks, starter checks, money orders, cashier’s checks, official checks, credit card convenience checks, traveler’s checks or checks drawn on banks outside the U.S. are accepted.
If your check does not clear for any reason, your purchase will be cancelled and $25 may be deducted from your Harbor Funds account. You also may be prohibited from future purchases.
Although you can redeem shares at any time, proceeds may not be made available to you until the Fund collects payment for your purchase. This may take up to 10 business days for shares purchased by check, up to 3 business days for shares purchased by ACH or up to 1 business day for shares purchased by wire.

In-Kind Redemptions
Harbor Funds agrees to redeem shares of the Fund solely in cash up to the lesser of $250,000 or 1% of the NAV of the Fund during any 90-day period for any one shareholder. Harbor Funds reserves the right to pay redemptions exceeding $250,000 or 1% of the NAV of the redeeming Fund, either totally or partially, by an in-kind redemption of securities (instead of cash) from the applicable Fund. The securities redeemed in-kind would be valued for this purpose by the same method as is used to calculate the Fund’s NAV per share. Redemptions, whether made in cash or in-kind, are taxable transactions for those shareholders who are subject to tax. If you receive an in-kind redemption, you should expect to incur transaction costs. You also may incur an additional tax liability upon the disposition of the securities received in the redemption.

Methods to Meet Redemption Requests
In order to meet redemption requests, Harbor Funds typically expects to use holdings of cash or cash equivalents and/or proceeds from the sale of portfolio holdings. On a less regular basis, the Fund may meet redemption requests by accessing a custodian overdraft facility, borrowing through Harbor Funds’ interfund lending program, or borrowing through other sources. These methods may be used during both normal and stressed conditions. In addition, Harbor Funds reserves the right to pay redemption proceeds in-kind as described above.

Accounts Below Share Class Minimums
If your account balance falls below the required minimum investment due to redemptions and/or exchanges out of the class of shares in which you are invested, Shareholder Services may request that the account balance be increased. If your account balance is not increased within 60 days, Harbor Funds reserves the right to redeem your account in full at the then-current NAV or the account may be moved into a share class that has a lower minimum investment. If you are an Institutional Class investor and do not maintain the required $50,000 minimum investment, Harbor Funds reserves the right to exchange your Institutional Class shares at the then-current NAV for shares of that Fund’s Investor Class.  If you are a Retirement Class investor and do not maintain the required $1,000,000 minimum investment, Harbor Funds reserves the right to exchange your Retirement Class shares at the then-current NAV for shares of that Fund’s Institutional Class. 
Shareholders seeking to establish accounts with amounts that are below the $50,000 Institutional Class required minimum investment for the applicable Harbor fund and who are not eligible for an exemption or waiver of this minimum will automatically be invested in the Investor Class shares for that Fund.

Statements and Reports
You will receive a confirmation statement from Harbor Funds after each transaction affecting your account unless your account is maintained by a financial intermediary. Shareholders participating in an automatic plan, however, will receive only quarterly confirmations for all transactions occurring during the relevant quarter. Dividend information will be confirmed quarterly. You should verify the accuracy of your confirmation statements immediately after you receive them and contact a Shareholder Services Representative regarding any errors or discrepancies.
The Fund produces financial reports, which includes a list of the Fund’s portfolio holdings semi-annually, and updates its prospectus at least annually.
Unless you instruct Harbor Funds otherwise by contacting a Shareholder Services Representative, Harbor Funds will mail only one financial report, prospectus or proxy statement to shareholders with the same last name in your household, even if more than one person in your household has a Harbor Funds account. This process is known as “householding.” Please call a Shareholder Services Representative at 800-422-1050 if you would like to receive additional copies of these documents. Individual copies will be sent within 30 days after Shareholder Services receives your instructions. Your consent to householding is considered valid until revoked.
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Shareholder and Account Policies

Signature Guarantees
Harbor Funds believes that certain redemption instructions may involve a greater risk of potential fraud. In seeking to ensure that the redemption instructions are genuine, Harbor Funds requires that the shareholder obtain and provide a Medallion signature guarantee to Harbor Funds with the instructions. A Medallion signature guarantee assures that a signature is genuine and protects shareholders from unauthorized account transfers.
A Medallion signature guarantee is required if any of the following are applicable:
You would like a check made payable to anyone other than the shareholder(s) of record.
You would like a check mailed to an address that has been changed within 10 business days of the redemption request.
You would like a check mailed to an address other than the address of record.
You would like your redemption proceeds sent by wire or ACH to a bank account that has been changed on Harbor Funds’ records within 10 business days of the redemption request or to an account other than a bank account of record.
Harbor Funds may waive or require a Medallion signature guarantee under certain circumstances at Harbor Funds’ sole discretion. Harbor Funds may also accept or require a Signature Validation stamp (SVP) under certain circumstances at Harbor Funds’ sole discretion.
A Medallion signature guarantee may be refused if any of the following are applicable:
It does not appear valid or in good form.
The transaction amount exceeds the surety bond limit of the Medallion guarantee.
The guarantee stamp has been reported as stolen, missing or counterfeit.
How to Obtain a Medallion Signature Guarantee
A Medallion signature guarantee may be obtained from a domestic bank or trust company, broker, dealer, clearing agency, savings association, or other financial institution which participates in a Medallion program recognized by the Securities Transfer Association. Signature guarantees from financial institutions that do not participate in a Medallion program will not be accepted. A signature guarantee cannot be provided by a notary public.
If you are a Harbor Funds shareholder and are visiting outside the United States, a foreign bank properly authorized to do business in that country or a U.S. consulate may be able to authenticate your signature. In its discretion, Shareholder Services may accept such an authentication in lieu of a Medallion signature guarantee.
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Shareholder and Account Policies

You may receive dividends and capital gains distributions in cash or reinvest them. Dividends and capital gains distributions will be reinvested in additional shares of the Fund unless you elect otherwise.
This Prospectus provides general tax information only. You should consult your tax adviser about particular federal, state, local or foreign taxes that may apply to you. If you are investing through a tax-deferred retirement account, such as an IRA, special tax rules apply.
Dividends, Distributions and Taxes
The Fund expects to distribute all or substantially all of its net investment income and realized capital gains, if any, each year. The Fund declares and pays any dividends from net investment income and capital gains at least annually in December. The Fund may also pay dividends and capital gain distributions at other times if necessary to avoid federal income or excise tax. The Fund expects distributions, if any, to be from capital gains and/or net investment income.
For U.S. federal income tax purposes, distributions of net long-term capital gains are taxable as long-term capital gains which may be taxable at different rates depending on their source and other factors. Distributions of net short-term capital gains are taxable as ordinary income. Dividends from net investment income are taxable either as ordinary income or, if so reported by the Fund and certain other conditions (including holding period requirements) are met by the Fund and the shareholder, as “qualified dividend income” (“QDI”). QDI is taxable to individual shareholders at a maximum 15% or 20% for U.S. federal income tax purposes (depending on whether the individual’s income exceeds certain threshold amounts). More information about QDI is included in the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information. Dividends and capital gains distributions are taxable whether you receive them in cash or reinvest them in additional Fund shares.
Generally, you should avoid investing in the Fund shortly before an anticipated dividend or capital gain distribution. If you purchase shares of the Fund just before the distribution, you will pay the full price for the shares and receive a portion of the purchase price back as a taxable distribution. Dividends paid to you may be included in your gross income for tax purposes, even though you may not have participated in the increase in the NAV of the Fund. This is referred to as “buying a dividend.” For example: On December 15, you invest $5,000, buying 250 shares for $20 each. If the Fund pays a distribution of $1 per share on December 16, the Fund’s share price will drop to $19 (excluding any market value change). You would still have an investment worth only $5,000 (250 shares x $19 = $4,750 in share value, plus 250 shares x $1 = $250 in distributions), but you would owe tax on the $250 distribution you received — even if you reinvest the distribution in more shares.
When you sell or exchange Fund shares, you generally will realize a capital gain or capital loss in an amount equal to the difference between the net amount of the sale proceeds (or in the case of an exchange, the fair market value of the shares) you receive and your tax basis for the shares that you sell or exchange. Early each year, the Fund will send you information about the Fund’s dividends and distributions and any shares you sold during the previous calendar year unless your account is maintained by a financial intermediary.
An additional 3.8% Medicare tax is imposed on certain net investment income (including ordinary dividends and capital gains distributions received from the Fund and net gains from redemptions or other taxable dispositions of Fund shares) earned by U.S. individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person’s “modified adjusted gross income” (in the case of an individual) or “adjusted gross income” (in the case of an estate or trust) exceeds a threshold amount.
If you do not provide Harbor Funds with your correct social security number or other taxpayer identification number, along with certifications required by the Internal Revenue Service (“IRS”), you may be subject to a backup withholding tax, currently at a rate of 24%, on any dividends and capital gain distributions, redemptions, exchanges and any other payments to you. Investors other than U.S. persons may be subject to different U.S. federal income tax treatment, including withholding tax at the rate of 30% on amounts treated as ordinary dividends or otherwise “withholdable payments” from the Fund, as discussed in more detail in the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information.
The Fund will send dividends and capital gain distributions elected to be received as cash to the address of record or bank of record on the account. Your distribution option will automatically be converted to having all dividends and other distributions reinvested in additional shares if any of the following occur:
Postal or other delivery service is unable to deliver checks to the address of record;
Dividends and capital gains distributions are not cashed within 180 days; or
Bank account of record is no longer valid.
Dividends and capital gains distribution checks that are not cashed within 180 days may be reinvested in your account in the same Fund that was the source of the payments at the current day’s NAV. When reinvested, those amounts are subject to the risk of loss like any investment.
Harbor Funds and Shareholder Services do not have any obligation, under any circumstances, to pay interest on dividends or capital gains distributions sent to a shareholder.
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Shareholder and Account Policies

Cost Basis
Shares acquired after January 1, 2012 are referred to as “covered” shares, while shares acquired prior to January 1, 2012 are referred to as “non-covered” shares. For covered shares, Harbor Funds is required to report cost basis information to you as well as the IRS on Form 1099-B. The cost basis information provided to you for non-covered shares will not be reported to the IRS. Both covered and non-covered shares will each receive their own individual cost basis calculation.
Harbor Funds offers average cost basis information, if available, to shareholders for noncovered shares on quarterly statements in addition to the required cost basis information for covered shares. Cost basis information on taxable transactions that represent noncovered shares will be noted on Form 1099-B, but not reported to the IRS.
Under cost basis regulations that began in 2012, you can select a different cost basis method for the covered shares in your Harbor Funds account. You can do this in one of three ways: (1) log into your Harbor Funds account online and follow the menu steps to select a different cost basis method, (2) download the Cost Basis Election Form and return that form to Harbor Funds by mail or by fax, or (3) contact Shareholder Services at 800-422-1050 to request that a copy of the Cost Basis Election Form be mailed to you for completion and return to Harbor Funds by mail or fax.
If you do not elect a cost basis method, Harbor Funds will use the average cost method for calculating cost basis of your covered shares.
For more information on cost basis and which method is right for you, please contact your tax advisor.
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Investor Services

Harbor Funds provides a variety of services to manage your account.
If you already have a Harbor Funds account, call a Shareholder Services Representative at 800-422-1050 to request an Account Services form to add these features or you may download the form from our website at harborfunds.com.
Online Services
harborfunds.com
Our website is normally available 24 hours a day. It provides you with the ability to access your account information, submit transactions, request forms and applications, and obtain additional information on each of the Harbor funds.
When you establish an account, you will automatically be granted online transaction privileges.
To perform transactions via our website, you must first register for online access in order to authorize us to transmit account information online and to accept online instructions. Go to harborfunds.com to register for online access.
Online transactions are subject to the same minimums and terms as other transactions.
Shareholder Services uses procedures designed to confirm that instructions communicated via online access are genuine, including requiring that certain identifying information be provided, prior to acting upon instructions and sending written confirmation of online transactions. To the extent that Shareholder Services uses reasonable procedures to confirm that instructions received through our website are genuine, Harbor Funds, Shareholder Services and the Distributor are not liable for acting on these instructions.

Telephone Services
800-422-1050
You may contact a Shareholder Services Representative during our normal business hours, Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 6:00 p.m. Eastern time. When you establish an account, you will be granted telephone transaction privileges unless you specifically instruct us otherwise in writing.
Telephone transactions are subject to the same minimums and terms as other transactions.
Procedures designed to confirm that instructions communicated by telephone are genuine, including requiring that certain identifying information be provided prior to acting upon instructions, recording all telephone instructions and sending written confirmation of telephone instructions, are used by Shareholder Services. To the extent that reasonable procedures are used to confirm that instructions given by telephone are genuine, Harbor Funds, Shareholder Services, or the Distributor will not be liable for acting in accordance with these instructions.

Retirement Accounts
For information on establishing retirement accounts, please call 800-422-1050 or visit our website at harborfunds.com.
Traditional IRA — An individual retirement account. You may make contributions up until the year you reach age 70½ and you may be able to deduct the contribution from taxable income, thereby reducing your current income taxes. Taxes on investment earnings are deferred until the money is withdrawn. Withdrawals are taxed as additional ordinary income when received. Non-deductible contributions, if any, are withdrawn tax-free. Withdrawals before age 59½ are assessed a 10% premature withdrawal penalty in addition to income tax, unless an exception applies. You are required to begin taking withdrawals from your Traditional IRA after you reach age 70½.
Roth IRA — An individual retirement account. Your contributions are never tax deductible; however, all earnings in the account are tax-free. You do not pay income taxes on qualified withdrawals from your Roth IRA if certain requirements are met. There is no age limitation on making contributions to Roth IRAs and there is no requirement that you begin making minimum withdrawals at any age.
SEP IRA — A type of Traditional IRA funded by employer contributions. A Harbor Funds Traditional IRA may be used in connection with a Simplified Employee Pension (SEP) plan maintained by your employer. Assets grow tax-deferred and distributions are taxable as income.
Other Retirement Plans — Harbor funds may be used as an investment option in many other kinds of employer-sponsored retirement plans. All of these accounts need to be established by the trustee of the plan.
SIMPLE IRA — A Savings Incentive Match Plan for Employees IRA (SIMPLE IRA) is a plan that certain small employers can set up for the benefit of their employees. Harbor Funds does not offer SIMPLE IRAs.
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Investor Services

Shareholders participating in an automatic investment, exchange or withdrawal plan, or dividend exchange plan will receive only quarterly confirmations of all transactions.
Harbor Funds may amend or terminate the automatic plans without notice to participating shareholders.
Your automatic investment plan, automatic exchange plan, automatic withdrawal plan, or dividend exchange plan may be suspended if postal or other delivery services are unable to deliver the transaction confirmation statements to you at the address of record. In case of a suspended dividend exchange plan, your distributions will be reinvested in the current Fund, and shares represented by such reinvested dividends will not be exchanged.
Automatic Investment Plan
You may direct Harbor Funds to purchase a specific dollar amount of the Fund on a scheduled basis through an ACH transaction by providing valid banking instructions on your account application or Automatic Transactions form.
If your ACH transaction does not clear, your purchase will be cancelled and $25 may be deducted from your account. You may also be prohibited from future automatic investment plan purchases.
If you already have a Harbor Funds account, you may call a Shareholder Services Representative at 800-422-1050 to request an Automatic Transactions form or download the form from our website at harborfunds.com. In addition, an automatic investment plan may be established over the phone by contacting a Shareholder Services Representative. Alternatively, you may establish an automatic investment plan through our website by logging in to your account at harborfunds.com.
By using the automatic investment or exchange plans, you are purchasing shares of the Fund on a scheduled basis without regard to fluctuations in NAV per share. Over time, your average cost per share may be higher or lower than if you tried to time the market. While regular investment plans do not guarantee a profit and will not protect you against loss in a declining market, they can be an effective way to invest for retirement, a home, educational expenses, and other long-term financial goals. See “Dividends, Distributions and Taxes” regarding the potential adverse tax consequences of purchasing shares shortly before an anticipated dividend or capital gains distribution.
Payroll Deduction Purchase Allocations
You may direct your employer to automatically deduct a specific dollar amount from your paycheck(s) and allocate the deducted amounts to one or more Harbor funds on a scheduled basis by completing the Payroll Deduction form. A payroll deduction must first be implemented by your employer before Harbor Funds can establish the purchase allocations.
Automatic Exchange Plan
You may direct Harbor Funds to automatically exchange between Harbor funds on a scheduled basis. The Harbor fund being exchanged out of and the Harbor fund being exchanged into must already be established with an account balance greater than zero and must continue to meet the minimum requirements for its respective class of shares. Exchanges may be taxable transactions depending on the type of account and you may realize a gain or a loss.
Automatic Withdrawal Plan
You may direct Harbor Funds to withdraw a specific dollar amount on a scheduled basis during the year.
If automatic withdrawals continuously exceed reinvested dividends and capital gain distributions, the account will eventually be depleted. Withdrawals are redemptions of shares and therefore may be taxable transactions depending on the type of account, and you may realize a gain or a loss. To understand how such withdrawals will affect you, you should consult your tax adviser.
Dividend Exchange Plan
You may invest dividends and capital gain distributions from one Harbor fund in shares of another Harbor fund, provided you have opened an account in the other Harbor fund with a balance greater than zero and have satisfied the applicable minimum investment requirements. When dividends and/or capital gain distributions from one Harbor fund are used to purchase shares in another Harbor fund, the shares are purchased on the date the dividends and/or capital gains would have otherwise been paid to you (the “ex-dividend date”) at the share price in effect as of the ex-dividend date. Purchases are credited to your account on the ex-dividend date.
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Harbor Mid Cap Fund Details

Share prices are available on our website at harborfunds.com after 7:00 p.m. Eastern time or by calling 800-422-1050 during normal business hours.
Other Harbor funds managed by the Adviser are offered by means of separate prospectuses. To obtain a prospectus for any of the Harbor funds visit our website at harborfunds.com or call 800-422-1050 during normal business hours.
  NUMBER TICKER SYMBOL CUSIP NUMBER
Harbor Mid Cap Fund      
Retirement Class 2546 [TO COME] [TO COME]
Institutional Class 2046 [TO COME] [TO COME]
Administrative Class 2246 [TO COME] [TO COME]
Investor Class 2446 [TO COME] [TO COME]
       

Updates Available
For updates on the Harbor Funds following the end of each calendar quarter, please visit our website at harborfunds.com.
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111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor Chicago, IL 60606-4302 800-422-1050
harborfunds.com
For more information
For investors who would like more information about the Fund, the following documents are available upon request:
Annual/Semi-Annual Reports
Additional information about the Fund’s investments will be available in the Fund’s annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders. The annual report contains a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.
Statement of Additional Information (SAI)
The SAI provides more detailed information about the Fund and is incorporated into this prospectus by reference and therefore is legally part of this prospectus.
Free copies of the annual and semi-annual reports , the SAI, and other information about the Fund are available:
On our Website: harborfunds.com
By Telephone: 800-422-1050
By Mail: Harbor Funds
P.O. Box 804660
Chicago, IL 60680-4108
 
Investors may get text-only copies:
On the Internet: sec.gov
By Email (for a fee): publicinfo@sec.gov
 
This prospectus is not an offer to sell securities in places other than the United States, its territories, and those countries where shares of the Fund are registered for sale.
Investment Company Act File No. 811-4676 FD.P.DE.MC.1219
Trustees & Officers
Charles F. McCain
Chairman, President & Trustee
Scott M. Amero
Trustee
Raymond J. Ball
Trustee
Donna J. Dean
Trustee
Joseph L. Dowling, III
Trustee
Randall A. Hack
Trustee
Robert Kasdin
Trustee
Kathryn L. Quirk
Trustee
Ann M. Spruill
Trustee
Erik D. Ojala
Chief Compliance Officer
Anmarie S. Kolinski
Treasurer
Brian L. Collins
Vice President
Kristof M. Gleich
Vice President
Gregg M. Boland
Vice President
Diana R. Podgorny
Secretary
Jodie L. Crotteau
Assistant Secretary
Lana M. Lewandowski
AML Compliance Officer
& Assistant Secretary
Lora A. Kmieciak
Assistant Treasurer
John M. Paral
Assistant Treasurer
Investment Adviser
Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.
111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor
Chicago, IL 60606-4302
312-443-4400
Distributor
Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc.
111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor
Chicago, IL 60606-4302
312-443-4600
Shareholder Services
Harbor Services Group, Inc.
P.O. Box 804660
Chicago, IL 60680-4108
800-422-1050


Table of Contents
The information in this Prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This Prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor
Chicago, IL 60606-4302
harborfunds.com

STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION – December 1, 2019

Harbor Funds (“Harbor” or the “Trust”) is an open-end management investment company (or mutual fund) registered under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Company Act”), and includes the following series (individually or collectively referred to as a “Fund” or the “Funds”); the Funds may also be referred to collectively within the asset classes listed below:
   
  Retirement
Class
Institutional
Class
Administrative
Class
Investor
Class
DOMESTIC EQUITY FUNDS
Harbor Capital Appreciation Fund HNACX HACAX HRCAX HCAIX
Harbor Strategic Growth Fund HNGSX MVSGX HSRGX HISWX
Harbor Large Cap Value Fund HNLVX HAVLX HRLVX HILVX
Harbor Mid Cap Growth Fund HNMGX HAMGX HRMGX HIMGX
Harbor Mid Cap Fund [TO COME] [TO COME] [TO COME] [TO COME]
Harbor Mid Cap Value Fund HNMVX HAMVX HRMVX HIMVX
Harbor Small Cap Growth Fund HNSGX HASGX HRSGX HISGX
Harbor Small Cap Growth Opportunities Fund HNSOX HASOX HRSOX HISOX
Harbor Small Cap Value Opportunities Fund HSRVX HSOVX HSAVX HSIVX
Harbor Small Cap Value Fund HNVRX HASCX HSVRX HISVX
INTERNATIONAL & GLOBAL FUNDS
Harbor International Fund HNINX HAINX HRINX HIINX
Harbor Diversified International All Cap Fund HNIDX HAIDX HRIDX HIIDX
Harbor Overseas Fund HAORX HAOSX HAOAX HAONX
Harbor Focused International Fund HNFRX HNFSX HNFDX HNFIX
Harbor International Growth Fund HNGFX HAIGX HRIGX HIIGX
Harbor International Small Cap Fund HNISX HAISX HRISX HIISX
Harbor Global Leaders Fund HNGIX HGGAX HRGAX HGGIX
Harbor Emerging Markets Equity Fund HNEMX HAEMX HREMX HIEEX
FIXED INCOME FUNDS
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund HNCVX HACSX HRCSX HICSX
Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund HNHYX HYFAX HYFRX HYFIX
Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund HHYRX HHYNX HHYAX HHYVX
Harbor Core Bond Fund HCBRX HACBX -- --
Harbor Bond Fund HBFRX HABDX HRBDX --
MONEY MARKET FUNDS
Harbor Money Market Fund -- HARXX HRMXX --
    

 

   
  Retirement
Class
Institutional
Class
Administrative
Class
Investor
Class
TARGET RETIREMENT FUNDS
Harbor Target Retirement Income Fund -- HARAX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2020 Fund -- HARJX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2025 Fund -- HARMX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2030 Fund -- HARPX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2035 Fund -- HARUX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2040 Fund -- HARYX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2045 Fund -- HACCX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2050 Fund -- HAFFX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2055 Fund -- HATRX -- --
Harbor Target Retirement 2060 Fund -- [TO COME] -- --
Additional funds may be created by the Funds’ Board of Trustees (the “Board of Trustees” or the “Trustees”) from time to time. With the exception of the Target Retirement Funds, the assets of each Fund are managed by one or more subadvisers (each, a “Subadviser”) under the supervision of Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc., the Funds’ investment adviser (the “Adviser”). The Target Retirement Funds are managed directly by the Adviser.
This Statement of Additional Information is not a prospectus, but provides additional information that should be read in conjunction with the Prospectus of the respective Harbor Funds dated November 1, 2019 for the Target Retirement Funds, June 1, 2019 for Harbor Focused International Fund, and March 1, 2019 for all other Harbor Funds, as amended or supplemented from time to time. Additional information about each Fund’s investments is available at harborfunds.com or in the respective Fund’s Annual and Semi-Annual reports to shareholders. Investors can obtain free copies of the Prospectuses and the Statement of Additional Information, the Annual Reports, which contain the Funds’ audited financial statements, the Semi-Annual Reports, request other information and discuss their questions about the Funds by calling 800-422-1050, by writing to Harbor Funds at 111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4302 or by visiting our website at harborfunds.com.

 

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ADDITIONAL POLICIES AND INVESTMENT TECHNIQUES

Each Fund is a diversified management investment company that has a different investment objective that it pursues through separate investment policies, as described in the Prospectus and below. The following discussion elaborates on the presentation of certain of the Funds’ investment policies contained in the Prospectus.
A Fund may temporarily depart from its normal investment policies and strategies when the Subadviser believes that doing so is in the Fund‘s best interest, so long as the strategy or policy employed is consistent with the Fund‘s investment objective. For instance, a Fund may invest beyond its normal limits in derivatives or exchange traded funds that are consistent with the Fund‘s investment objective when those instruments are more favorably priced or provide needed liquidity, as might be the case if the Fund is transitioning assets from one Subadviser to another or receives large cash flows that it cannot prudently invest immediately.
In addition, a Fund may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with its normal investment policies and strategies—for instance, by allocating substantial assets to cash equivalent investments or other less volatile instruments— in response to adverse or unusual market, economic, political, or other conditions. In doing so, the Fund may succeed in avoiding losses but may otherwise fail to achieve its investment objective.


80% Requirement
Certain Funds are subject to a policy, applied at the time of each purchase, of investing 80% of the Fund’s net assets, plus borrowings for investment purposes, in securities suggested by the Fund’s name, as set forth in its prospectus. Such a Fund need not sell non-qualifying securities that appreciated in value in order to bring its investments in compliance with the 80% requirement. However, any future investments must be made in a manner to bring the Fund’s investments in compliance with the 80% requirement. This policy may be changed by the Fund upon 60 days’ advanced notice to the shareholders.


99.5% Requirement
Harbor Money Market Fund has adopted a policy to invest 99.5% or more of the Fund’s total assets in cash, “government securities” and/or repurchase agreements that are “collateralized fully” (i.e., collateralized by cash or government securities) so as to qualify as a “government money market fund” under Rule 2a-7 of the Investment Company Act. This policy may be changed by the Fund upon 60 days’ advanced notice to the shareholders.
Harbor Money Market Fund may invest up to 0.5% of its total assets in investments other than: (i) cash; (ii) “government securities”; and/or (iii) repurchase agreements that are “collateralized fully,” provided that such investments also otherwise comply with the requirements of Rule 2a-7.
“Government securities,” generally refers to securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or certain U.S. government agencies or instrumentalities.


Harbor Target
Retirement Funds
Shares of the Target Retirement Funds are currently available for sale only through retirement plans sponsored by Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc. and Owens-Illinois, Inc. Shares of the Target Retirement Funds may in the future be made available for broader distribution. The Target Retirement Funds reserve the right to reject any offer to purchase shares.
1

 

Investment Policies

Asset-Backed Securities
Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may invest in asset-backed securities and in securities that represent individual interests in pools of consumer loans and trade receivables similar in structure to mortgage-backed securities. The assets are securitized either in a pass-through structure (similar to a mortgage pass-through structure) or in a pay-through structure (similar to a collateralized mortgage obligation (“CMO”) structure). Although the collateral supporting asset-backed securities generally is of a shorter maturity than mortgage loans and historically has been less likely to experience substantial prepayments, no assurance can be given as to the actual maturity of an asset-backed security because prepayments of principal may be made at any time. Payments of principal and interest typically are supported by some form of credit enhancement, such as a letter of credit, surety bond, limited guarantee by another entity or having a priority to certain of the borrower’s other securities. The degree of credit enhancement varies, and generally applies to only a fraction of the asset-backed security’s par value until exhausted. If the credit enhancement of an asset-backed security held by a Fund has been exhausted, and if any required payments of principal and interest are not made with respect to the underlying loans, a Fund may experience losses or delays in receiving payment.
Other types of mortgage-backed and asset-backed securities may be developed in the future, and a Fund may invest in them if the relevant Subadviser determines they are consistent with the Fund’s investment objectives and policies.
Asset-backed securities entail certain risks not presented by mortgage-backed securities. Asset-backed securities do not have the benefit of the same type of security interest in the related collateral. Asset-backed securities are often subject to more rapid repayment than their stated maturity date would indicate as a result of the pass-through of prepayments of principal on the underlying loans. During periods of declining interest rates, prepayment of loans underlying asset-backed securities can be expected to accelerate. Accordingly, a Fund’s ability to maintain positions in these securities will be affected by reductions in the principal amount of such securities resulting from prepayments, and its ability to reinvest the returns of principal at comparable yields is subject to generally prevailing interest rates at that time.
In a rising interest rate environment, a declining prepayment rate will extend the average life of many mortgage-backed securities. This possibility is often referred to as extension risk. Extending the average life of a mortgage-backed security increases the risk of depreciation due to future increases in market interest rates.
Credit card receivables are generally unsecured and the debtors on such receivables are entitled to the protection of a number of state and federal consumer credit laws, many of which give such debtors the right to set-off certain amounts owed on the credit cards, thereby reducing the balance due. Automobile receivables generally are secured, but by automobiles rather than residential real property. Most issuers of automobile receivables permit the loan servicers to retain possession of the underlying obligations. If the servicer were to sell these obligations to another party, there is a risk that the purchaser would acquire an interest superior to that of the holders of the asset-backed securities. In addition, because of the large number of vehicles involved in a typical issuance and technical requirements under state laws, the trustee for the holders of the automobile receivables may not have a proper security interest in the underlying automobiles. Therefore, there is the possibility that, in some cases, recoveries on repossessed collateral may not be available to support payments on these securities.


Below Investment-Grade Fixed Income Securities
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, and Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund invest primarily in below investment-grade securities. Harbor Global Leaders Fund, Harbor Core Bond Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may invest up to 5%, 20%, and 20%, respectively, of their assets in below investment-grade securities, commonly referred to as “high-yield” or “junk” bonds. For mortgage-related securities, these Funds may invest in securities of any credit quality, including those rated below B.
Below investment-grade fixed income securities are considered predominantly speculative by traditional investment standards. In some cases, these securities may be highly speculative and have poor prospects for reaching investment-grade standing. Below investment-grade fixed income securities and unrated securities of comparable credit quality are subject to the increased risk of an issuer’s inability to meet principal and interest obligations. These securities may be subject to greater price volatility due to such factors as corporate developments, interest rate sensitivity, negative perceptions of the high-yield markets generally and limited secondary market liquidity. Such securities are also issued by less-established corporations desiring to expand. Risks associated with acquiring the securities of such issuers generally are greater than is the case with higher rated securities because such issuers are often less creditworthy companies or are highly leveraged and generally less able than more established or less leveraged entities to make scheduled payments of principal and interest.
The market values of high-yield, fixed income securities tend to reflect individual corporate developments to a greater extent than do those of higher rated securities, which react primarily to fluctuations in the general level of interest rates. Issuers of such high-yield securities may not be able to make use of more traditional methods of financing and their ability to service debt obligations may be more
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Investment Policies

Below Investment-Grade Fixed Income Securities — Continued
adversely affected than issuers of higher rated securities by economic downturns, specific corporate developments or the issuers’ inability to meet specific projected business forecasts. These below investment-grade securities also tend to be more sensitive to economic conditions than higher-rated securities. Negative publicity about the high-yield bond market and investor perceptions regarding lower rated securities, whether or not based on the Funds’ fundamental analysis, may depress the prices for such securities.
Since investors generally perceive that there are greater risks associated with below investment-grade securities of the type in which the Funds invest, the yields and prices of such securities may tend to fluctuate more than those for higher rated securities. In the lower quality segments of the fixed income securities market, changes in perceptions of issuers’ creditworthiness tend to occur more frequently and in a more pronounced manner than do changes in higher quality segments of the fixed income securities market, resulting in greater yield and price volatility.
Another factor which causes fluctuations in the prices of fixed income securities is the supply and demand for similarly rated securities. In addition, the prices of fixed income securities fluctuate in response to the general level of interest rates. Fluctuations in the prices of portfolio securities subsequent to their acquisition will not affect cash income from such securities but will be reflected in a Fund’s net asset value.
The risk of loss from default for the holders of high-yield, fixed income securities is significantly greater than is the case for holders of other debt securities because such high-yield, fixed income securities are generally unsecured and are often subordinated to the rights of other creditors of the issuers of such securities.
The secondary market for high-yield, fixed income securities is dominated by institutional investors, including mutual fund portfolios, insurance companies and other financial institutions. Accordingly, the secondary market for such securities is not as liquid as and is more volatile than the secondary market for higher rated securities. In addition, the trading volume for high-yield, fixed income securities is generally lower than that of higher rated securities and the secondary market for high-yield, fixed income securities could contract under adverse market or economic conditions independent of any specific adverse changes in the condition of a particular issuer. These factors may have an adverse effect on a Fund’s ability to dispose of particular portfolio investments. Prices realized upon the sale of such lower rated or unrated securities, under these circumstances, may be less than the prices used in calculating a Fund’s net asset value. A less liquid secondary market may also make it more difficult for a Fund to obtain precise valuations of the high-yield securities in its portfolio.
Federal legislation could adversely affect the secondary market for high-yield securities and the financial condition of issuers of these securities. The form of any proposed legislation and the probability of such legislation being enacted is uncertain.
Below investment-grade or high-yield, fixed income securities also present risks based on payment expectations. High-yield, fixed income securities frequently contain “call” or buy-back features, which permit the issuer to call or repurchase the security from its holder. If an issuer exercises such a “call option” and redeems the security, a Fund may have to replace such security with a lower yielding security, resulting in a decreased return for investors. A Fund may also incur additional expenses to the extent that it is required to seek recovery upon default in the payment of principal or interest on a portfolio security.
Credit ratings issued by credit rating agencies are designed to evaluate the safety of principal and interest payments of rated securities. They do not, however, evaluate the market value risk of below investment-grade securities and, therefore, may not fully reflect the true risks of an investment. In addition, credit rating agencies may or may not make timely changes in a rating to reflect changes in the economy or in the conditions of the issuer that affect the market value of the security. Consequently, credit ratings are used only as preliminary indicators of investment quality. Investments in below investment-grade and comparable unrated obligations will be more dependent on the Subadviser’s credit analysis than would be the case with investments in investment-grade debt obligations. The Subadvisers employ their own credit research and analysis, which includes a study of an issuer’s existing debt, capital structure, ability to service debt and to pay dividends, the issuer’s sensitivity to economic conditions, its operating history and the current trend of earnings. The Subadvisers continually monitor the investments in each Fund’s portfolio and evaluate whether to dispose of or to retain below investment-grade and comparable unrated securities whose credit ratings or credit quality may have changed.
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Investment Policies

Below Investment-Grade Fixed Income Securities — Continued
There are special tax considerations associated with investing in bonds, including high-yield bonds, structured as zero coupon or payment-in-kind securities. For example, a Fund is required to report the accrued interest on these securities as current income each year even though it may receive no cash interest until the security’s maturity or payment date. The Fund may be required to sell some of its assets to obtain cash to distribute to shareholders in order to satisfy the distribution requirements of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”), with respect to such accrued interest. These actions are likely to reduce the Fund’s assets and may thereby increase its expense ratio and decrease its rate of return.


Borrowing
Each Fund may borrow for temporary administrative or emergency purposes and this borrowing may be unsecured. Harbor Bond Fund may borrow from banks and broker-dealers and engage in reverse repurchase agreements for purposes of investing the borrowed funds. The Fund maintains continuous asset coverage (that is, total assets including borrowings, less liabilities exclusive of borrowings) of 300% of the amount borrowed. If the 300% asset coverage should decline as a result of market fluctuations or other reasons, the Fund may be required to sell some of its portfolio holdings within three days to reduce its borrowings and restore the 300% asset coverage, even though it may be disadvantageous from an investment standpoint to sell securities at that time. The percentage of Harbor Bond Fund’s total assets that may be leveraged because of reverse repurchase agreements will vary during the fiscal year depending on the portfolio management strategies of the Subadviser. Borrowing may exaggerate the effect on net asset value of any increase or decrease in the market value of the portfolio. Money borrowed will be subject to interest costs, which may or may not be recovered by appreciation of the securities purchased. The Fund also may be required to maintain minimum average balances in connection with such borrowing or to pay a commitment or other fee to maintain a line of credit; either of these requirements would increase the cost of borrowing over the stated interest rate.


Brady Bonds
Harbor Bond Fund may invest in Brady Bonds, which are securities created through the exchange of existing commercial bank loans to sovereign entities for new obligations in connection with debt restructurings under a debt restructuring plan introduced by Nicholas P. Brady, former U.S. Secretary of the Treasury. Brady Bonds may be collateralized or uncollateralized, are issued in various currencies (but primarily the U.S. dollar), and are traded in the over-the-counter secondary market. Brady Bonds are not considered to be U.S. government securities. In light of the residual risk of Brady Bonds and, among other factors, the history of defaults with respect to commercial bank loans by public and private entities in countries issuing Brady Bonds, investments in Brady Bonds may be viewed as speculative. There can be no assurance that Brady Bonds acquired by a Fund will not be subject to restructuring arrangements or to requests for new credit, which may cause the Fund to suffer a loss of interest or principal on any of its holdings.


Cash Equivalents
Each Fund may invest in cash equivalents, which include short-term obligations issued or guaranteed as to interest and principal by the U.S. government or any agency or instrumentality thereof (including repurchase agreements collateralized by such securities). Each Fund may also invest in obligations of domestic and/or foreign banks, which include certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances and fixed time deposits. Each Fund may also invest in obligations of other banks or savings and loan associations if such obligations are insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”). Certificates of deposit are negotiable certificates issued against funds deposited in a commercial bank for a definite period of time and earning a specified return. Bankers’ acceptances are negotiable drafts or bills of exchange, normally drawn by an importer or exporter to pay for specific merchandise, which are “accepted” by a bank, meaning, in effect, that the bank unconditionally agrees to pay the face value of the instrument on maturity. Fixed time deposits are bank obligations payable at a stated maturity date and bearing interest at a fixed rate. Fixed time deposits may be withdrawn on demand by the investor, but may be subject to early withdrawal penalties which vary depending upon market conditions and the remaining maturity of the obligation. There are no contractual restrictions on the right to transfer a beneficial interest in a fixed time deposit to a third party, although there is no market for such deposits.
Obligations of foreign banks involve somewhat different investment risks than those affecting obligations of U.S. banks, including the possibilities that their liquidity could be impaired because of further political and economic developments, that their obligations may be less marketable than comparable obligations of U.S. banks, that a foreign jurisdiction might impose withholding taxes on interest income payable on those obligations, that foreign deposits may be seized or nationalized, that foreign governmental restrictions such as exchange controls may be adopted which might adversely affect the payment of principal and interest on those obligations and that the selection of those obligations may be more difficult because there may be less publicly available information concerning foreign banks or the accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards, practices and requirements applicable to foreign banks may differ from those applicable to U.S. banks. Foreign banks are not generally subject to examination by any U.S. government agency or instrumentality.
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Investment Policies

Cash Equivalents — Continued
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may also invest in commercial paper that at the date of investment is rated at least A-1 by S&P, P-1 by Moody’s or F-1 by Fitch Ratings (P-3 for Harbor Bond Fund) or, if not rated, is issued or guaranteed as to payment of principal and interest by companies that at the date of investment have an outstanding debt issue rated AA or better by S&P or equivalently rated by Moody’s or Fitch Ratings; short-term corporate obligations that at the date of investment are rated AA or better by S&P or equivalently rated by Moody’s or Fitch Ratings, and other debt instruments, including unrated instruments, determined to be of comparable high quality and liquidity.
Each Fund may hold cash and invest in cash equivalents pending investment of proceeds from new sales or to meet ordinary daily cash needs.


Collateralized Debt Obligations
Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may invest in each of collateralized debt obligations (“CDOs”), which include collateralized bond obligations (“CBOs”), collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) and other similarly structured securities. CBOs and CLOs are types of asset-backed securities. A CBO is a security issued by a trust that is backed by a diversified pool of high risk, below investment-grade fixed income securities. A CLO is a security issued by a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment-grade or equivalent unrated loans.
For both CBOs and CLOs, the cash flows from the trust are split into two or more portions, called tranches, varying in risk and yield. The riskiest portion is the “equity” tranche, which bears the bulk of defaults from the bonds or loans in the trust and serves to protect the other, more senior tranches from default in all but the most severe circumstances. Since it is partially protected from defaults, a senior tranche from a CBO trust or CLO trust typically has higher ratings and lower yields than their underlying securities and can be rated investment-grade. Despite the protection from the equity tranche, CBO or CLO tranches can experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, increased sensitivity to defaults due to collateral default and disappearance of protecting tranches, market anticipation of defaults, and aversion to CBO or CLO securities as a class.
The risks of an investment in a CDO depend largely on the type of the collateral securities and the class of the CDO in which a Fund invests. Normally, CBOs, CLOs and other CDOs are privately offered and sold, and thus, are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, investments in CDOs may be characterized by the Funds as illiquid securities. However, an active dealer market may exist for CDOs allowing a CDO to qualify for transactions under Rule 144A of the 1933 Act. In addition to the normal risks associated with fixed income securities discussed elsewhere in this SAI and the Funds’ prospectuses (i.e., interest rate risk and default risk), CDOs carry additional risks including, but are not limited to, the possibility that: (i) distributions from collateral securities will not be adequate to make interest or other payments; (ii) the quality of the collateral may decline in value or default; (iii) the Funds may invest in CDOs that are subordinate to other classes; and (iv) the complex structure of the security may not be fully understood at the time of investment and may produce disputes with the issuer or unexpected investment results. These risks have recently led to actual defaults and market losses on CDOs known as “structured investment vehicles” or “SIVs.”


Common Stocks
Each equity Fund (includes all Domestic Equity Funds and International & Global Funds) may purchase common stocks. Harbor Bond Fund may invest up to 20%, of its total assets in equity securities, including common stocks, of U.S. and foreign companies. Also, each of Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, and Harbor Core Bond Fund may each invest up to 10% of its total assets in common stock issued by U.S. companies.
Common stocks are shares of a corporation or other entity that entitle the holder to a pro rata share of the profits of the corporation, if any, without preference over any other shareholder or class of shareholders, including holders of the entity’s preferred stock and other senior equity. Common stock usually carries with it the right to vote and frequently, an exclusive right to do so.


Convertible Securities
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may invest in convertible securities. Convertible securities are bonds, preferred stocks and other securities that normally pay a fixed rate of interest or dividend and give the owner the option to convert the security into common stock. While the value of convertible securities depends in part on interest rate changes and the credit quality of the issuer, the price will also change based on the price of the underlying stock. While convertible securities generally have less potential for gain than common stock, their income provides a cushion against the stock price’s decline. They generally pay less income than non-convertible bonds.
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Investment Policies

Convertible Securities — Continued
CONTINGENT CONVERTIBLE INSTRUMENTS
Contingent convertible securities (“CoCos”) are a form of hybrid debt security that are intended to either convert into equity or have their principal written down upon the occurrence of certain “triggers.” The triggers are generally linked to regulatory capital thresholds or regulatory actions calling into question the issuing banking institution’s continued viability as a going-concern. CoCos’ unique equity conversion or principal write-down features are tailored to the issuing banking institution and its regulatory requirements. Some additional risks associated with CoCos include, but are not limited to:
Loss absorption risk. CoCos have fully discretionary coupons. This means coupons can potentially be cancelled at the banking institution’s discretion or at the request of the relevant regulatory authority in order to help the bank absorb losses.
Subordinated instruments. CoCos will, in the majority of circumstances, be issued in the form of subordinated debt instruments in order to provide the appropriate regulatory capital treatment prior to a conversion. Accordingly, in the event of liquidation, dissolution or winding-up of an issuer prior to a conversion having occurred, the rights and claims of the holders of the CoCos (such as the Funds) against the issuer with respect to or arising under the terms of the CoCos shall generally rank junior to the claims of all holders of unsubordinated obligations of the issuer. In addition, if the CoCos are converted into the issuer’s underlying equity securities following a trigger, each holder will be subordinated due to their conversion from being the holder of a debt instrument to being the holder of an equity instrument.
Market value will fluctuate based on unpredictable factors. The value of CoCos is unpredictable and will be influenced by many factors including, without limitation: (i) the creditworthiness of the issuer and/or fluctuations in such issuer’s applicable capital ratios; (ii) supply and demand for the CoCos; (iii) general market conditions and available liquidity; and (iv) economic, financial and political events that affect the issuer, its particular market or the financial markets in general.


Cybersecurity Risks
As the use of technology increases, a Fund may be more susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cybersecurity. A breach in cybersecurity refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause a Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption, or lose operational capacity. Cyber attacks include, among other things, stealing or corrupting confidential information and other data that is maintained online or digitally for financial gain, denial-of-service attacks on websites causing operational disruption, and the unauthorized release of confidential information and other data.
Cybersecurity breaches affecting a Fund or the Adviser, the Subadvisers, custodian, transfer agent, other third-party service providers, intermediaries and others may adversely impact a Fund and its shareholders. A cybersecurity breach may cause disruptions and impact the Funds’ business operations, which could potentially result in financial losses, inability to determine a Fund’s net asset value, impediments to trading, reputational damage, the inability of shareholders to transact business, violation of applicable law, regulatory penalties and/or fines, and compliance and other costs. Indirect cybersecurity breaches at third-party service providers, intermediaries, trading counterparties, governmental and other regulatory authorities, and exchange and other financial market operators may subject a Fund’s shareholders to the same risks associated with direct cybersecurity breaches. Further, indirect cybersecurity breaches at an issuer of securities in which a Fund invests may similarly negatively impact a Fund’s shareholders because of a decrease in the value of these securities.
The Funds have established policies and procedures designed to reduce the risks associated with cybersecurity breaches and other operational disruptions. However, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially since the Funds do not directly control the cybersecurity systems of issuers or third-party service providers. There is a risk that cybersecurity breaches will not be detected. In addition, there are inherent limitations to these policies and procedures and certain risks may not yet be identified and new risks may emerge in the future. The Funds and their shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result of any cybersecurity breaches or operational disruptions.


Delayed Funding and Revolving Credit Facilities
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, Harbor Core Bond Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may enter into, or acquire participations in, delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are borrowing arrangements in which the lender agrees to make loans up to a maximum amount upon demand by the borrower during a specified term. A revolving credit facility differs from a delayed funding loan in that as the borrower repays the loan, an amount equal to the repayment may be borrowed again during the term of the revolving credit facility. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities usually provide for floating or variable rates of interest. These commitments may have the effect of requiring a Fund to increase its investment in a company at a time when it might not otherwise decide to do so (including at a time when the company’s financial condition
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Investment Policies

Delayed Funding and Revolving Credit Facilities — Continued
makes it unlikely that such amounts will be repaid). To the extent that a Fund is committed to advance additional funds, it will segregate cash or liquid securities with the Fund’s custodian, or set aside or restrict in the Fund’s or Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund, cash or liquid assets in an amount sufficient to meet such commitments that are marked-to-market daily.
The Funds may invest in delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities with credit quality comparable to that of issuers of its securities investments. Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities may be subject to restrictions on transfer, and only limited opportunities may exist to resell such instruments. As a result, a Fund may be unable to sell such investments at an opportune time or may have to resell them at less than fair market value. The Funds currently intend to treat delayed funding loans, and revolving credit facilities for which there is no readily available market, as illiquid for purposes of the Funds’ limitation on illiquid investments. Participation interests in revolving credit facilities will be subject to the limitations discussed in “Loan Participations and Assignments.” Delayed funding loans and revolving credit facilities are considered to be debt obligations for purposes of each Fund’s investment restriction relating to the lending of funds or assets by a Fund.


Derivative Instruments
In accordance with its investment policies, each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may invest in certain derivative instruments, which are securities or contracts that provide for payments based on or “derived” from the performance of an underlying asset, index or other economic benchmark. Essentially, a derivative instrument is a financial arrangement or a contract either entered into between two parties (unlike a stock or a bond) or traded on an exchange and subject to central clearing. Transactions in derivative instruments can be, but are not necessarily, riskier than investments in conventional stocks, bonds and money market instruments.
A derivative instrument is more accurately viewed as a way of reallocating risk among different parties or substituting one type of risk for another. Every investment by a Fund, including an investment in conventional securities, reflects an implicit prediction about future changes in the value of that investment. Every Fund investment also involves a risk that the portfolio manager’s expectations will be wrong. Transactions in derivative instruments often enable a Fund to take investment positions that more precisely reflect the portfolio manager’s expectations concerning the future performance of the various investments available to the Fund. Derivative instruments can be a legitimate and often cost-effective method of accomplishing the same investment goals as could be achieved through other investments in conventional securities.
Derivative securities may include collateralized mortgage obligations (“CMOs”), stripped mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, structured notes and floating interest rate securities (described below). Derivative contracts include options, futures contracts and swap agreements (described below). The principal risks associated with derivative instruments are:
MARKET RISK
The risk that the instrument will decline in value or that an alternative investment would have appreciated more, but this is similar to the risk of investing in conventional securities.
LEVERAGE AND ASSOCIATED PRICE VOLATILITY
Leverage causes increased volatility in the price of the derivative and magnifies the impact of adverse market changes, but this risk may be consistent with the investment objective of even a conservative fund in order to achieve an average portfolio volatility that is within the expected range for that type of fund. The SEC has taken the position that it is not appropriate for a money market fund to incur leverage risk.
COUNTERPARTY CREDIT RISK
The use of an over-the-counter derivative instrument involves the risk that a loss may be sustained as a result of the failure of another party to the contract (usually referred to as a “counterparty”) to make required payments or otherwise comply with the contract’s terms. For example, in an option contract, this involves the risk to the option buyer that the writer will not buy or sell the underlying asset as agreed. In general, counterparty risk can be reduced by having an organization with extremely good credit act as an intermediary between the two parties. Currently, some derivatives such as certain interest rate swaps and certain credit default index swaps are subject to central clearing. Central clearing is expected to reduce counterparty credit risk, but central clearing does not make derivatives risk-free.
LIQUIDITY AND VALUATION RISK
Many derivative instruments are traded in institutional markets rather than on an exchange. Nevertheless, many derivative instruments are actively traded and can be priced generally with as much accuracy as conventional securities. Derivative instruments that are custom designed to meet the specialized investment needs of a relatively narrow group of institutional investors, such as the Funds, are not readily marketable and are subject to a Fund’s restrictions on illiquid investments.
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Investment Policies

Derivative Instruments — Continued
CORRELATION RISK
There may be imperfect correlation between the price of the derivative and the underlying asset. For example, there may be price disparities between the trading markets for the derivative contract and the underlying asset.
Each derivative instrument purchased for a Fund’s portfolio is reviewed and analyzed by the Fund’s portfolio manager to assess the risk and reward of each such instrument in relation to the Fund’s portfolio investment strategy. The decision to invest in derivative instruments or conventional securities is made by measuring the respective instrument’s ability to provide value to the Fund and its shareholders.
RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH SPECIFIC TYPES OF DERIVATIVE DEBT SECURITIES
Different types of derivative debt securities are subject to different combinations of prepayment, extension and/or interest rate risk. Conventional mortgage pass-through securities and sequential pay CMOs are subject to all of these risks, but are typically not leveraged. Thus, the magnitude of exposure may be less than for more leveraged mortgage-backed securities.
The risk of early prepayments is the primary risk associated with interest-only debt securities (“IOs”), leveraged floating rate securities whose yield changes in the same direction as, rather than inversely to, a referenced interest rate (“superfloaters”), other leveraged floating rate instruments and mortgage-backed securities purchased at a premium to their par value. In some instances, early prepayments may result in a complete loss of investment in certain of these securities.
The primary risks associated with certain other derivative debt securities are the potential extension of average life and/or depreciation due to rising interest rates. These securities include floating rate securities based on the Cost of Funds Index (“COFI floaters”), other “lagging rate” floating rate securities, floating rate securities that are subject to a maximum interest rate (“capped floaters”), mortgage-backed securities purchased at a discount, leveraged inverse floating rate securities (“inverse floaters”), principal-only debt securities (“POs”), certain residual or support tranches of CMOs and index amortizing notes. Index amortizing notes are not mortgage-backed securities, but are subject to extension risk resulting from the issuer’s failure to exercise its option to call or redeem the notes before their stated maturity date. Leveraged inverse IOs combine several elements of the mortgage-backed securities described above and thus present an especially intense combination of prepayment, extension and interest rate risks.
Planned amortization class (“PAC”) and target amortization class (“TAC”) CMO bonds involve less exposure to prepayment, extension and interest rate risks than other mortgage-backed securities, provided that prepayment rates remain within expected prepayment ranges or “collars.” To the extent that the prepayment rates remain within these prepayment ranges, the residual or support tranches of PAC and TAC CMOs assume the extra prepayment, extension and interest rate risks associated with the underlying mortgage assets.
Other types of floating rate derivative debt securities present more complex types of interest rate risks. For example, range floaters are subject to the risk that the coupon will be reduced to below market rates if a designated interest rate floats outside of a specified interest rate band or collar. Dual index or yield curve floaters are subject to depreciation in the event of an unfavorable change in the spread between two designated interest rates. X-reset floaters have a coupon that remains fixed for more than one accrual period. Thus, the type of risk involved in these securities depends on the terms of each individual X-reset floater.


Duration
Duration is a measure of average maturity that was developed to incorporate a bond’s yield, coupons, final maturity and call features into one measure. Duration is one of the characteristics used in security selection for each fixed income fund, except that Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, and Harbor Core Bond Fund do not focus on securities with a particular duration.
Most debt obligations provide interest (“coupon”) payments in addition to a final (“par”) payment at maturity. Some obligations also feature call provisions. Depending on the relative magnitude of these payments, debt obligations may respond differently to changes in the level and structure of interest rates. Traditionally, a debt security’s “term-to-maturity” has been used as a proxy for the sensitivity of the security’s price to changes in interest rates (which is the “interest rate risk” or “volatility” of the security). However, “term-to-maturity” measures only the time until a debt security provides its final payment and doesn’t take into account the pattern of the security’s payments prior to maturity. Duration is a measure of the average life of a fixed income security on a present value basis. Duration is computed by calculating the length of the time intervals between the present time and the time that the interest and principal payments are scheduled (or in the case of a callable bond, expected to be received), and weighing them by the present values of the cash to be received at each future
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Investment Policies

Duration — Continued
point in time. For any fixed income security with interest payments occurring prior to the payment of principal, duration is always less than maturity. In general, the lower the stated or coupon rate of interest of a fixed income security, the longer the duration of the security. Conversely, the higher the stated or coupon rate of interest of a fixed income security, the shorter the duration of the security.
Generally speaking, if interest rates move up by 100 basis points, the value of a fixed income security with a five-year duration will decline by five points. If the fixed income security’s duration was three years, it would decline by three points; two years — two points; and so on. To the extent a Fund is invested in fixed income securities, the value of the Fund’s portfolio will decrease in a similar manner given the conditions illustrated above.
Futures, options and options on futures have durations that, in general, are closely related to the duration of the securities that underlie them. Holding long futures or call option positions will lengthen the portfolio duration by approximately the same amount that holding an equivalent amount of the underlying securities would. Short futures or put option positions have durations roughly equal to the negative duration of the securities that underlie those positions, and have the effect of reducing portfolio duration by approximately the same amount that selling an equivalent amount of the underlying securities would.


Event-Linked Exposure
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may obtain event-linked exposure by investing in “event-linked bonds” or “event-linked swaps,” or implement “event-linked strategies.” Event-linked exposure results in gains that typically are contingent on the nonoccurrence of a specific “trigger” event, such as a hurricane, earthquake, or other physical or weather-related phenomena. Some event-linked bonds are commonly referred to as “catastrophe bonds.” They may be issued by government agencies, insurance companies, reinsurers, special purpose corporations or other on-shore or off-shore entities (such special purpose entities are created to accomplish a narrow and well-defined objective, such as the issuance of a note in connection with a reinsurance transaction). If a trigger event causes losses exceeding a specific amount in the geographic region and time period specified in a bond, a Fund investing in the bond may lose all or a portion of its entire principal invested in the bond. If no trigger event occurs, the Fund will recover its principal plus interest. For some event-linked bonds, the trigger event or losses may be based on company-wide losses, index-portfolio losses, industry indices, or readings of scientific instruments rather than specified actual losses. Often the event-linked bonds provide for extensions of maturity that are mandatory or optional at the discretion of the issuer in order to process and audit loss claims in those cases where a trigger event has, or possibly has, occurred. An extension of maturity may increase volatility. In addition to the specified trigger events, event-linked bonds may also expose the Fund to certain unanticipated risks including, but not limited to, issuer risk, credit risk, counterparty risk, adverse regulatory or jurisdictional interpretations, and adverse tax consequences.
Event-linked bonds are a relatively new type of financial instrument. As such, there is no significant trading history of these securities, and there can be no assurance that a liquid market in these instruments will develop. Lack of a liquid market may impose the risk of higher transaction costs and the possibility that a Fund may be forced to liquidate positions when it would not be advantageous to do so. Event-linked bonds are typically rated, and a Fund will only invest in catastrophe bonds that meet the credit quality requirements for the Fund.


Fixed Income Securities
Each Fund may invest in fixed income securities. Corporate and foreign governmental debt securities are subject to the risk of the issuer’s inability to meet principal and interest payments on the obligations (credit risk) and may also be subject to price volatility due to such factors as interest rate sensitivity, market perception of the creditworthiness of the issuer and general market liquidity (market risk). Except to the extent that values are independently affected by currency exchange rate fluctuations, when interest rates decline, the value of fixed income securities can generally be expected to rise. Conversely, when interest rates rise, the value of fixed income securities can be expected to decline. The Subadviser will consider both credit risk and market risk in making investment decisions for a Fund.


Foreign Currency Transactions
Each Fund, except Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, Harbor Core Bond Fund, and Harbor Money Market Fund, may purchase securities denominated in foreign currencies. The value of investments in these securities and the value of dividends and interest earned may be significantly affected by changes in currency exchange rates. Some foreign currency values may be volatile, and there is the possibility of governmental controls on currency exchange or governmental intervention in currency markets, which could adversely affect a Fund. Foreign currency exchange transactions will be conducted either on a spot (i.e., cash) basis at the spot rate prevailing in the foreign currency exchange market or through entering into forward contracts to purchase or sell foreign currencies. Currency positions are not considered to be an investment in a foreign government for industry concentration purposes.
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Investment Policies

Foreign Currency Transactions — Continued
Each Fund may enter into forward foreign currency exchange contracts in order to protect against uncertainty in the level of future foreign currency exchange rates. A forward foreign currency exchange contract involves an obligation to purchase or sell a specific currency at a future date, which may be any fixed number of days (usually less than one year) from the date of the contract agreed upon by the parties, at a price set at the time of the contract. These contracts are traded in the interbank market conducted directly between traders (usually large commercial banks) and their customers. A forward contract generally has no deposit requirement, and commissions are not typically charged for trades. Although foreign exchange dealers do not generally charge a fee for conversion, they do realize a profit based on the difference (the spread) between the price at which they are buying and selling various currencies.
Harbor International Small Cap Fund, Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may enter into forward foreign currency exchange contracts for non-hedging purposes, such as to increase exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one country to another.
A Fund may enter into a contract for the purchase or sale of a security denominated in a foreign currency to “lock in” the U.S. dollar price of the security. By entering into a forward contract for the purchase or sale, for a fixed amount of U.S. dollars, of the amount of foreign currency involved in the underlying security transactions, the Fund will be able to protect itself against a possible loss. Such loss would result from an adverse change in the relationship between the U.S. dollar and the foreign currency during the period between the date on which the security is purchased or sold and the date on which payment is made or received.
When a Subadviser believes that the currency of a particular foreign country may suffer a substantial decline against the U.S. dollar, it may also enter into a forward contract to sell the amount of foreign currency for a fixed amount of dollars that approximates the value of some or all of the relevant Fund’s portfolio securities denominated in such foreign currency. The precise matching of the forward contract amounts and the value of the securities involved will not generally be possible, since the future value of such securities in foreign currencies will change as a consequence of market movements in the value of those securities between the date the forward contract is entered into and the date it matures.
Harbor International Small Cap Fund, Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may engage in cross-hedging by using foreign contracts in one currency to hedge against fluctuations in the value of securities denominated in a different currency if the Fund’s Subadviser determines, for example, that there is a pattern of correlation between the two currencies. These practices may be limited by the requirements for qualification of the Fund as a regulated investment company for tax purposes. Harbor International Small Cap Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may also purchase and sell forward contracts for non-hedging purposes when its Subadviser anticipates that the foreign currency will appreciate or depreciate in value but that securities in that currency do not present attractive investment opportunities and are not held in the Fund’s portfolio.
When a Fund enters into foreign currency exchange contracts for hedging purposes, it will not enter into forward contracts to sell currency or maintain a net exposure to such contracts if their consummation would obligate the Fund to deliver an amount of foreign currency in excess of the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities or other assets denominated in that currency. At the consummation of the forward contract, the Fund may either make delivery of the foreign currency or terminate its contractual obligation to deliver by purchasing an offsetting contract obligating it to purchase the same amount of such foreign currency at the same maturity date. If the Fund chooses to make delivery of the foreign currency, it may be required to obtain such currency through the sale of portfolio securities denominated in such currency or through conversion of other assets of the Fund into such currency. If the Fund engages in an offsetting transaction, it will incur a gain or a loss to the extent that there has been a change in forward contract prices. Closing purchase transactions with respect to forward contracts are usually made with the currency trader who is a party to the original forward contract.
A Fund will only enter into transactions in forward contracts when deemed appropriate by its Subadviser. The Funds generally will not enter into a forward contract with a term of greater than one year. Each Fund may experience delays in the settlement of its foreign currency transactions.
A Fund will place cash that is not available for investment, or liquid securities (denominated in the foreign currency subject to the forward contract), in a separate account with the Funds’ custodian or will set aside or restrict that cash in the Subadviser’s records or systems. The amounts in such separate account, or set aside or restricted, will equal the value of the Fund’s total assets that are committed to the consummation of foreign currency exchange contracts entered into as a hedge against a decline in the value of a particular foreign currency. If the value of the securities placed in the separate account declines, the Fund will place in the account, or will set aside or restrict, additional cash or securities on a daily basis so that the value of the account or amount set aside or restricted will equal the amount of the Fund’s commitments with respect to such contracts.
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Investment Policies

Foreign Currency Transactions — Continued
Using forward contracts to protect the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities against a decline in the value of a currency does not eliminate fluctuations in the underlying prices of the securities. It simply establishes a rate of exchange that can be achieved at some future point in time. The precise projection of short-term currency market movements is not possible, and short-term hedging provides a means of fixing the dollar value of only a portion of a Fund’s foreign assets.
While a Fund may enter into forward foreign currency exchange contracts to reduce currency exchange rate risks, transactions in such contracts involve certain other risks. Unanticipated changes in currency prices may result in a poorer overall performance for the Fund than if it had not engaged in any such transactions. Certain strategies could minimize the risk of loss due to a decline in the value of the hedged foreign currency, but they could also limit any potential gain that might result from an increase in the value of the currency. Moreover, there may be imperfect correlation between a Fund’s portfolio holdings of securities denominated in a particular currency and forward contracts entered into by the Fund. Such imperfect correlation may cause a Fund to sustain losses that will prevent the Fund from achieving a complete hedge or expose the Fund to risk of foreign exchange loss.
An issuer of fixed income securities purchased by Harbor International Small Cap Fund, Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may be domiciled in a country other than the country in whose currency the instrument is denominated. The Fund may also invest in debt securities denominated in the European Currency Unit (“ECU”), which is a “basket” consisting of a specified amount, in the currencies of certain of the member states of the European Community. The specific amounts of currencies comprising the ECU may be adjusted by the Council of Ministers of the European Community from time to time to reflect changes in relative values of the underlying currencies. In addition, the Fund may invest in securities denominated in other currency “baskets.”
A Fund’s activities in foreign currency contracts, currency futures contracts and related options and currency options may be limited by the requirements of Subchapter M of the Code for qualification as a regulated investment company.


Foreign Securities
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) is permitted to invest in foreign securities, which are securities issued by foreign issuers, and certain Funds are permitted to invest in emerging market securities. The only foreign securities that Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, and Harbor Core Bond Fund may purchase are U.S. dollar-denominated foreign securities. Harbor Emerging Markets Equity Fund invests primarily in equity securities, including common and preferred stocks, of emerging market companies.
Each Subadviser is responsible for determining, with respect to the Fund(s) that it manages, whether a particular issuer would be considered a foreign or emerging market issuer. Normally, foreign or emerging market governments and their agencies and instrumentalities are considered foreign or emerging market issuers, respectively. In the case of non-governmental issuers, the Subadvisers generally may consider one or more of the following factors in determining an issuer is a foreign or emerging market issuer:
whether the equity securities of the company principally trade on stock exchanges in one or more foreign or emerging market countries;
the extent to which a company’s total revenue is derived from goods produced, sales made or services performed in one or more foreign or emerging market countries or the extent to which its assets are located in one or more foreign or emerging market countries;
whether the company is organized under the laws of a foreign or emerging market country or its principal executive offices are located in a foreign or emerging market country; and/or
any other factors relevant to a particular issuer.
Each Subadviser may weigh those factors differently when making a classification decision. Because the global nature of many companies can make the classification of those companies difficult and because the Subadvisers do not consult with one another with respect to the management of the Funds, the Subadvisers may, on occasion, classify the same issuer differently. Certain companies which are organized under the laws of a foreign or emerging market country may nevertheless be classified by a Subadviser as a domestic issuer. This may occur when the company’s economic fortunes and risks are primarily linked to the U.S. and the company’s principal operations are conducted from the U.S. or when the company’s equity securities trade principally on a U.S. stock exchange.
With respect to Harbor Emerging Markets Equity Fund, emerging market companies are defined as those that are located in, or economically tied to, emerging market countries or that maintain securities that principally trade on exchanges located in emerging market countries. This Fund considers a company “economically tied to” an emerging market country if such company derives at least 50% of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed, or has at least 50% of its assets, in an emerging market country.
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Investment Policies

Foreign Securities — Continued
FOREIGN SECURITIES RISKS
Investing in securities of foreign companies and governments may involve risks which are not ordinarily associated with investing in domestic securities. These risks include changes in currency exchange rates and currency exchange control regulations or other foreign or U.S. laws or restrictions applicable to such investments. A decline in the exchange rate may also reduce the value of certain portfolio securities. Even though the securities are denominated in U.S. dollars, exchange rate changes may adversely affect the company’s operations or financial health.
Fixed commissions on foreign securities exchanges are generally higher than negotiated commissions on U.S. exchanges, although each Fund endeavors to achieve the most favorable net results on portfolio transactions. There is generally less government supervision and regulation of securities exchanges, brokers, dealers and listed companies than in the U.S. Mail service between the U.S. and foreign countries may be slower or less reliable than within the U.S., thus increasing the risk of delayed settlements of portfolio transactions or loss of certificates for portfolio securities. Individual foreign economies may also differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as growth of gross national product, rate of inflation, capital reinvestment, resource self-sufficiency and balance of payments position.
In addition, investments in foreign countries could be affected by other factors generally not thought to be present in the U.S. Such factors include the unavailability of financial information or the difficulty of interpreting financial information prepared under foreign accounting standards; less liquidity and more volatility in foreign securities markets; the possibility of expropriation; the imposition of foreign withholding and other taxes; the impact of political, social or diplomatic developments; limitations on the movement of funds or other assets of a Fund between different countries; difficulties in invoking legal process abroad and enforcing contractual obligations; and the difficulty of assessing economic trends in foreign countries.
Foreign markets also have different clearance and settlement procedures, and in certain markets there have been times when settlements have been unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions. These delays in settlement could result in temporary periods when a portion of the assets of a Fund is uninvested and no return is earned thereon. The inability of a Fund to make intended security purchases due to settlement problems could cause a Fund to miss attractive investment opportunities. An inability to dispose of portfolio securities due to settlement problems could result either in losses to a Fund due to subsequent declines in value of the portfolio securities or, if a Fund has entered into a contract to sell the securities, could result in possible liability to the purchaser.
The Funds’ custodian, State Street Bank and Trust Company, has established and monitors subcustodial relationships with banks and certain other financial institutions in the foreign countries in which the Funds invest to permit the Funds’ assets to be held in those foreign countries. These relationships have been established pursuant to Rule 17f-5 of the Investment Company Act, which governs the establishment of foreign subcustodial arrangements for mutual funds. The Funds’ subcustodial arrangements may be subject to certain risks including: (i) the inability of the Funds to recover assets in the event of the subcustodian’s bankruptcy; (ii) legal restrictions on the Funds’ ability to recover assets lost while under the care of the subcustodian; (iii) the likelihood of expropriation, confiscation or a freeze of the Funds’ assets; and (iv) difficulties in converting the Funds’ cash and cash equivalents to U.S. dollars. The Adviser and the respective Subadvisers have evaluated the political risk associated with an investment in a particular country.
Investing in securities of non-U.S. companies may entail additional risks especially in emerging countries due to the potential political and economic instability of certain countries. These risks include expropriation, nationalization, confiscation or the imposition of restrictions on foreign investment and on repatriation of capital invested. Should one of these events occur, a Fund could lose its entire investment in any such country. A Fund’s investments would similarly be adversely affected by exchange control regulation in any of those countries.
Even though opportunities for investment may exist in foreign countries, any changes in the leadership or policies of the governments of those countries, or in any other government that exercises a significant influence over those countries, may halt the expansion of or reverse the liberalization of foreign investment policies and thereby eliminate any investment opportunities that may currently exist. This is particularly true of emerging markets.
Certain countries in which the Funds may invest may have minority groups that advocate religious or revolutionary philosophies or support ethnic independence. Any action on the part of such individuals could carry the potential for destruction or confiscation of property owned by individuals and entities foreign to such country and could cause the loss of a Fund’s investment in those countries.
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Investment Policies

Foreign Securities — Continued
Certain countries prohibit or impose substantial restrictions on investments in their capital and equity markets by foreign entities like the Funds. Certain countries require governmental approval prior to foreign investments or limit the amount of foreign investment in a particular company or limit the investment to only a specific class of securities of a company that may have less advantageous terms than securities of the company available for purchase by nationals. Moreover, the national policies of certain countries may restrict investment opportunities in issuers or industries deemed sensitive to national interests. In addition, some countries require governmental approval for the repatriation of investment income, capital or the proceeds of securities sales by foreign investors. A Fund could be adversely affected by delays in, or a refusal to grant, any required governmental approval for repatriation, as well as by the application to it of other restrictions on investments. In particular, restrictions on repatriation could make it more difficult for a Fund to obtain cash necessary to satisfy the tax distribution requirements that must be satisfied in order for the Fund to avoid federal income or excise tax.
Global economies and financial markets are becoming increasingly interconnected and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. In June 2016, citizens of the United Kingdom voted to withdraw from the EU (referred to as “Brexit”). In March 2017, the United Kingdom formally notified the European Council of its intention to withdraw from the EU.  Brexit has resulted in volatility in European and global markets and could have significant negative impacts on financial markets in the United Kingdom and throughout Europe. The longer term economic, legal, political and social framework to be put in place between the United Kingdom and the EU is unclear at this stage and is likely to lead to ongoing political and economic uncertainty and periods of exacerbated volatility in both the United Kingdom and in wider European markets for some time. This mid-to long-term uncertainty may have an adverse effect on the economy generally and on the value of a Fund’s investments.  On November 25, 2018, EU leaders approved the terms of the United Kingdom’s withdrawal from the EU. On January 15, 2019, the United Kingdom’s Parliament voted to reject the terms of the withdrawal agreement.  As a result, the manner of the withdrawal remains uncertain. It is not presently possible to determine the extent of the impact on a Fund’s investments in the United Kingdom, and continued uncertainty with respect to the withdrawal negotiations could negatively impact a Fund’s investments.
EMERGING MARKETS
Investments in emerging markets involve risks in addition to those generally associated with investments in foreign securities.
Political and economic structures in many emerging markets may be undergoing significant evolution and rapid development, and such countries may lack the social, political and economic stability characteristic of more developed countries. As a result, the risks described above relating to investments in foreign securities, including the risks of nationalization or expropriation of assets, would be heightened. In addition, unanticipated political or social developments may affect the values of a Fund’s investments and the availability to the Fund of additional investments in such emerging markets. The small size and inexperience of the securities markets in certain emerging markets and the limited volume of trading in securities in those markets may make a Fund’s investments in such countries less liquid and more volatile than investments in countries with more developed securities markets (such as the U.S., Japan and most Western European countries).
In addition, the U.S. and other nations and international organizations may impose economic sanctions or take other actions that may adversely affect issuers located in certain countries. In particular, the U.S. and other countries have imposed economic sanctions on certain Russian individuals and corporate entities. The U.S. or other countries could also institute broader sanctions on Russia. Such sanctions, any future sanctions or other actions, or even the threat of further sanctions or other actions, may negatively affect the value and liquidity of a Fund’s portfolio. For example, a Fund may be prohibited from investing in securities issued by companies subject to such sanctions. In addition, the sanctions may require a Fund to freeze its existing investments in companies located in certain countries, prohibiting the Fund from buying, selling or otherwise transacting in these investments. Countries subject to sanctions may undertake countermeasures or retaliatory actions which may further impair the value and liquidity of a Fund’s portfolio and potentially disrupt its operations. Such events may have an adverse impact on the economies and debts of other emerging markets as well.
INVESTING THROUGH STOCK CONNECT
Harbor Overseas Fund, Harbor Focused International Fund, Harbor International Growth Fund, and Harbor Emerging Markets Equity Fund may invest in eligible securities, such as China A-Shares (“Stock Connect Securities”) that are listed and traded on the Shanghai and Shenzhen Stock Exchanges through the China–Hong Kong Stock Connect program (“Stock Connect”). Stock Connect is a mutual market access program that allows Chinese investors to trade securities listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange via Chinese brokers and non-Chinese investors (such as the Funds) to purchase certain Shanghai- and Shenzhen-listed securities through brokers in Hong Kong without obtaining
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Investment Policies

Foreign Securities — Continued
a special license. Purchases of securities through Stock Connect are subject to a number of restrictions, including market-wide trading volume and market cap quota limitations. Although individual investment quotas do not apply, participants in Stock Connect are subject to daily and aggregate investment quotas, which could restrict a Fund’s ability to invest in Stock Connect Securities.
Investments in Stock Connect Securities are generally subject to regulation by both Hong Kong and China and Shanghai Stock Exchange or Shenzhen Stock Exchange listing rules, which are subject to change by these regulators. Investors may not sell, purchase or transfer Stock Connect Securities except through Stock Connect. Regulators may suspend or terminate Stock Connect trading in certain circumstances, which may adversely affect a Fund’s ability to trade Stock Connect Securities. A Fund may also be prohibited from trading Stock Connect Securities during local holidays.
Stock Connect transactions are not subject to the investor protection programs of the Hong Kong, Shanghai or Shenzhen Stock Exchanges. Although Chinese regulators have indicated that ultimate investors hold a beneficial interest in Stock Connect Securities, the Chinese law surrounding the rights of beneficial owners of securities and the legal mechanisms available to beneficial owners for enforcing their rights are underdeveloped and untested. As the law evolves, there is a risk that a Fund’s ability to enforce its ownership rights may be uncertain, which could subject the Fund to significant losses. Trading in Stock Connect Securities may be subject to various fees, taxes and market charges imposed by Chinese market participants and regulatory authorities and may result in greater trading expenses borne by a Fund.
ADRs, EDRs, IDRs AND GDRs
Each equity Fund, Harbor Core Bond Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may invest in American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”), European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”), International Depositary Receipts (“IDRs”), and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”). ADRs (sponsored or unsponsored) are receipts typically issued by a U.S. bank or trust company evidencing ownership of the underlying foreign securities. Most ADRs are traded on a U.S. stock exchange. Issuers of unsponsored ADRs are not contractually obligated to disclose material information in the U.S., so there may not be a correlation between such information and the market value of the unsponsored ADR. EDRs and IDRs are receipts typically issued by a European bank or trust company evidencing ownership of the underlying foreign securities. GDRs are receipts issued by either a U.S. or non-U.S. banking institution evidencing ownership of the underlying foreign securities.
PARTICIPATORY NOTES (“P-NOTES”)
Harbor International Fund, Harbor Diversified International All Cap Fund, Harbor Overseas Fund, Harbor Focused International Fund, Harbor International Small Cap Fund, Harbor Global Leaders Fund, and Harbor Emerging Markets Equity Fund may invest in P-Notes, to seek to gain economic exposure to markets where holding an underlying security is not feasible. Harbor Global Leaders Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in P-Notes. P-Notes are participation interest notes that are issued by banks or broker-dealers and are designed to offer a return linked to a particular underlying equity, debt, currency or market. When purchasing a P-Note, the posting of margin is not required because the full cost of the P-Note (plus commission) is paid at the time of purchase. When the P-Note matures, the issuer will pay to, or receive from, the purchaser the difference between the minimal value of the underlying instrument at the time of purchase and that instrument’s value at maturity. Investments in P-Notes involve the same risks associated with a direct investment in the underlying foreign companies or foreign securities markets that they seek to replicate.
In addition, there can be no assurance that the trading price of P-Notes will equal the underlying value of the foreign companies or foreign securities markets that they seek to replicate. The holder of a P-Note that is linked to a particular underlying security is entitled to receive any dividends paid in connection with an underlying security or instrument. However, the holder of a P-Note does not receive the same voting rights as it would if it directly owned the underlying security or instrument. P-Notes are generally traded over-the-counter. P-Notes constitute general unsecured contractual obligations of the banks or broker-dealers that issue them. There is also counterparty risk associated with these investments because the Fund is relying on the creditworthiness of such counterparty and has no rights under a P-Note against the issuer of the underlying security. In addition, a Fund will incur transaction costs as a result of investment in P-Notes.


Forward Commitments and When-Issued Securities
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may purchase securities on a when-issued or purchase or sell securities on a forward commitment basis including “TBA” (to be announced) purchase and sale commitments. Purchasing securities on a when-issued or forward commitment basis involves a risk of loss if the value of the security to be purchased declines prior to the settlement date. This risk is in addition to the risk of decline in value of the Fund’s other assets. Although a Fund would generally purchase securities on a when-issued or forward commitment basis with the intention of acquiring securities for its portfolio, the Fund may dispose of a when-issued security or forward commitment prior to settlement if the Subadviser deems it appropriate to do so. A Fund may enter into a
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Investment Policies

Forward Commitments and When-Issued Securities — Continued
forward-commitment sale to hedge its portfolio positions or to sell securities it owned under a delayed delivery arrangement. Proceeds of such a sale are not received until the contractual settlement date. While such a contract is outstanding, the Fund must segregate equivalent deliverable securities or hold an offsetting purchase commitment. A Fund may realize short-term gains or losses upon such purchases and sales. These transactions involve a commitment by the Fund to purchase or sell securities at a future date (ordinarily one or two months later). The price of the underlying securities (usually expressed in terms of yield) and the date when the securities will be delivered and paid for (the settlement date) are fixed at the time the transaction is negotiated. When-issued purchases and forward commitment transactions are negotiated directly with the other party, and such commitments are not traded on exchanges.
When-issued purchases and forward commitment transactions enable a Fund to lock in what is believed to be an attractive price or yield on a particular security for a period of time, regardless of future changes in interest rates. For instance, in periods of rising interest rates and falling prices, the Fund might sell securities it owns on a forward commitment basis to limit its exposure to falling prices. In periods of falling interest rates and rising prices, the Fund might sell securities it owns and purchase the same or a similar security on a when-issued or forward commitment basis, thereby obtaining the benefit of currently higher yields.
The value of securities purchased on a when-issued or forward commitment basis and any subsequent fluctuations in their value are reflected in the computation of the Fund’s net asset value starting on the date of the agreement to purchase the securities. The Fund does not earn interest on the securities it has committed to purchase until they are paid for and delivered on the settlement date. When the Fund makes a forward commitment to sell securities it owns, the proceeds to be received upon settlement are included in the Fund’s assets. Fluctuations in the market value of the underlying securities are not reflected in the Fund’s net asset value as long as the commitment to sell remains in effect. Settlement of when-issued purchases and forward commitment transactions generally takes place within two months after the date of the transaction, but the Fund may agree to a longer settlement period.
A Fund will purchase securities on a when-issued basis or purchase or sell securities on a forward commitment basis only with the intention of completing the transaction and actually purchasing or selling the securities. If deemed advisable as a matter of investment strategy, however, the Fund may dispose of or renegotiate a commitment after it is entered into. The Fund also may sell securities it has committed to purchase before those securities are delivered to the Fund on the settlement date. The Fund may realize a capital gain or loss in connection with these transactions.
When a Fund purchases securities on a when-issued or forward commitment basis, the Fund will maintain in a segregated account with the Funds’ custodian, or set aside or restrict in the Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund, cash or liquid assets having a value (determined daily) at least equal to the amount of the Fund’s purchase commitments. In the case of a forward commitment to sell portfolio securities, portfolio holdings will be held in a segregated account with the Fund’s custodian or set aside or restricted in the Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund while the commitment is outstanding. These procedures are designed to ensure that the Fund will maintain sufficient assets at all times to cover its obligations under when-issued purchases and forward commitments.
Recently finalized Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”) rules include mandatory margin requirements that will require a Fund to post collateral in connection with its TBA transactions, which could increase the cost of TBA transactions to the Fund and impose added operational complexity.


Futures Contracts and Options on Futures Contracts
Harbor Large Cap Value Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, and Harbor Core Bond Fund are not authorized to enter into currency futures contracts and options on such contracts. Harbor International Fund and Harbor International Growth Fund are not authorized to enter into futures contracts on currencies or engage in options transactions with respect to futures contracts for speculative purposes. Harbor Money Market Fund is not authorized to enter into futures contracts or engage in options transactions with respect to futures contracts. Otherwise, to seek to increase total return or hedge against changes in interest rates, securities prices or currency exchange rates, each Fund may purchase and sell various kinds of futures contracts, and purchase and write call and put options on these futures contracts. Each Fund may also enter into closing purchase and sale transactions with respect to any of these contracts and options. The futures contracts may be based on various securities (such as U.S. government securities), securities indices, foreign currencies, commodities and commodity indices and any other financial instruments and indices. All futures contracts entered into by the Funds are traded on U.S. or foreign exchanges or boards of trade that are licensed, regulated or approved by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (“CFTC”).
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Investment Policies

Futures Contracts and Options on Futures Contracts — Continued
The Adviser has claimed exclusion from the definition of the term “commodity pool operator” under the Commodity Exchange Act (CEA), pursuant to Rule 4.5 under the CEA (the “exclusion”). Accordingly, neither the Adviser, nor the Funds, are subject to registration or regulation as a “commodity pool operator” or “commodity pools,” respectively, under the CEA. Because the Adviser intends to operate the Funds in a manner that would permit it to continue to remain eligible for the exclusion, each of the Funds will be limited in its ability to use certain financial instruments regulated under the CEA, including futures contracts and options on futures contracts, which may adversely impact a Fund’s return. In the event the Adviser becomes unable to rely on the exclusion and is required to register with the CFTC as a commodity pool operator with respect to a Fund and operate the Fund subject to CFTC regulation, the Fund may incur additional expenses.
FUTURES CONTRACTS
A futures contract may generally be described as an agreement between two parties to buy and sell particular financial instruments, currencies, commodities or indices for an agreed price for a designated period (or to deliver the final cash settlement price, in the case of a contract relating to an index or otherwise not calling for physical delivery at the end of trading in the contract). A futures contract on an index is an agreement in which two parties agree to take or make delivery of an amount of cash equal to the difference between the value of the index at the close of the last trading day of the contract and the price at which the index contract was originally written. Although the value of an index might be a function of the value of certain specified securities, no physical delivery of these securities is made. A commodity futures contract is an agreement between two parties, in which one party agrees to buy a commodity, such as an energy, agricultural or metal commodity from the other party at a later date at a price and quantity agreed-upon when the contract is made.
Positions taken in the futures markets are not normally held to maturity but are instead liquidated through offsetting transactions (same exchange, underlying security or index, and delivery months) that may result in a profit or a loss. While futures contracts on securities, currency or commodities will usually be liquidated in this manner, a Fund may instead make, or take, delivery of the underlying securities, currency or commodities whenever it appears economically advantageous to do so. A clearing corporation associated with the exchange on which futures contracts are traded guarantees that, if still open, the sale or purchase will be performed on the settlement date. A Fund may suffer losses if it is unable to close out its position because of an illiquid secondary market and there is no assurance that a portfolio manager will be able to close out its position when the portfolio manager considers it appropriate or desirable to do so. In the event of adverse price movements, a Fund may be required to continue making daily cash payments to maintain its required margin. If the Fund has insufficient cash, it may have to sell portfolio securities to meet daily margin requirements at a time when the portfolio manager would not otherwise elect to do so. In addition, a Fund may be required to deliver or take delivery of instruments underlying futures contracts it holds.
With respect to futures contracts that are not legally required to “cash settle,” a Fund may cover the open position by setting aside or restricting in the Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund, liquid assets in an amount equal to the market value of the futures contract. With respect to futures that are required to “cash settle,” however, a Fund is permitted to set aside or restrict liquid assets in an amount equal to the Fund’s daily marked to market (net) obligation, if any, (in other words, the Fund’s daily net liability, if any) rather than the market value of the futures contract. By setting aside assets equal to only its net obligation under cash-settled futures, a Fund will have the ability to employ leverage to a greater extent than if the Fund were required to segregate assets equal to the full market value of the futures contract.
HEDGING AND OTHER STRATEGIES
Hedging is an attempt to establish with more certainty than would otherwise be possible the effective price or rate of return on portfolio securities or securities that a Fund proposes to acquire or the exchange rate of currencies in which portfolio securities are quoted or denominated. When interest rates are rising or securities prices are falling, a Fund can seek to offset a decline in the value of its current portfolio securities through the sale of futures contracts. When interest rates are falling or securities prices are rising, a Fund, through the purchase of futures contracts, can attempt to secure better rates or prices than might later be available in the market when it effects anticipated purchases. A Fund may seek to offset anticipated changes in the value of a currency in which its portfolio securities, or securities that it intends to purchase, are quoted or denominated by purchasing and selling futures contracts on such currencies.
A Fund may, for example, take a “short” position in the futures market by selling futures contracts in an attempt to hedge against an anticipated rise in interest rates or a decline in market prices or foreign currency rates that would adversely affect the dollar value of the Fund’s portfolio securities. Such futures contracts may include contracts for the future delivery of securities held by the Fund
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Investment Policies

Futures Contracts and Options on Futures Contracts — Continued
or securities with characteristics similar to those of the Fund’s portfolio securities. Similarly, a Fund may sell futures contracts on any currencies in which its portfolio securities are quoted or denominated or in one currency to hedge against fluctuations in the value of securities denominated in a different currency if, among other reasons, there is an established historical pattern of correlation between the two currencies.
If, in the opinion of the Subadviser, there is a sufficient degree of correlation between price trends for a Fund’s portfolio securities and futures contracts based on other financial instruments, commodities or commodity indices securities indices or other indices, the Fund may also enter into such futures contracts as part of its hedging strategy. Although under some circumstances prices of securities in a Fund’s portfolio may be more or less volatile than prices of such futures contracts, the Subadviser will attempt to estimate the extent of this volatility difference based on historical patterns and compensate for any differential by having the Fund enter into a greater or lesser number of futures contracts or by attempting to achieve only a partial hedge against price changes affecting the Fund’s portfolio securities.
When a short hedging position is successful, any depreciation in the value of portfolio securities will be substantially offset by appreciation in the value of the futures position. On the other hand, any unanticipated appreciation in the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities would be substantially offset by a decline in the value of the futures position.
On other occasions, a Fund may take a “long” position by purchasing futures contracts. This would be done, for example, when the Fund anticipates the subsequent purchase of particular securities when it has the necessary cash, but expects the prices or currency exchange rates then available in the applicable market to be less favorable than prices that are currently available. A Fund may also purchase futures contracts as a substitute for transactions in securities, commodities or foreign currency, to alter the investment characteristics of or currency exposure associated with portfolio securities or to gain or increase its exposure to a particular securities or commodities market or currency.
OPTIONS ON FUTURES CONTRACTS
Except as noted above, under the caption “Futures Contracts and Options on Futures Contracts,” each Fund may purchase and write options on futures for the same purposes as its transactions in futures contracts. The purchase of put and call options on futures contracts will give a Fund the right (but not the obligation) for a specified price to sell or to purchase, respectively, the underlying futures contract at any time during the option period. As the purchaser of an option on a futures contract, a Fund obtains the benefit of the futures position if prices move in a favorable direction but limits its risk of loss in the event of an unfavorable price movement to the loss of the premium and transaction costs.
The writing of a call option on a futures contract generates a premium which may partially offset a decline in the value of a Fund’s assets. By writing a call option, a Fund becomes obligated, in exchange for the premium (upon exercise of the option) to sell a futures contract if the option is exercised, which may have a value higher than the exercise price. Conversely, the writing of a put option on a futures contract generates a premium that may partially offset an increase in the price of securities that a Fund intends to purchase. However, the Fund becomes obligated (upon exercise of the option) to purchase a futures contract if the option is exercised, which may have a value lower than the exercise price. The loss incurred by a Fund in writing options on futures is potentially unlimited and may exceed the amount of the premium received.
The holder or writer of an option on a futures contract may terminate its position by selling or purchasing an offsetting option of the same type. There is no guarantee that such closing transactions can be effected. A Fund’s ability to establish and close out positions on such options will be subject to the development and maintenance of a liquid market.
OTHER CONSIDERATIONS
A Fund will engage in futures and related options transactions either for bona fide hedging purposes or to seek to increase total return. To the extent that a Fund is using futures and related options for hedging purposes, futures contracts will be sold to protect against a decline in the price of commodities or securities (or the currency in which they are quoted or denominated) that the Fund owns or futures contracts will be purchased to protect the Fund against an increase in the price of commodities or securities (or the currency in which they are quoted or denominated) it intends to purchase. Each Fund will determine that the price fluctuations in the futures contracts and options on futures used for hedging purposes are substantially related to price fluctuations in securities held by the Fund or securities or instruments which it expects to purchase.
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Investment Policies

Futures Contracts and Options on Futures Contracts — Continued
Transactions in futures contracts and options on futures involve brokerage costs, require margin deposits and, in the case of contracts and options obligating a Fund to purchase securities, commodities or currencies, require the Fund to maintain with the Funds’ custodian in a segregated account, or to set aside or restrict in the Subadviser’s records or systems, cash or liquid securities in an amount equal to the value of such underlying securities, commodities or currencies.
While transactions in futures contracts and options on futures may reduce certain risks, these transactions themselves entail certain other risks. For example, unanticipated changes in interest rates, securities prices or currency exchange rates, among other things, may result in a poorer overall performance for a Fund than if it had not entered into any futures contracts or options transactions.
Perfect correlation between a Fund’s futures positions and portfolio positions may be impossible to achieve. In the event of an imperfect correlation between a futures position and the portfolio position that is intended to be protected, the desired protection may not be obtained and a Fund may be exposed to risk of loss. In addition, it is not possible to hedge fully or protect against currency fluctuations affecting the value of securities denominated in foreign currencies because the value of such securities is likely to fluctuate as a result of independent factors not related to currency fluctuations.
Some futures contracts or options on futures may become illiquid under adverse market conditions. In addition, during periods of market volatility, a commodity exchange may suspend or limit trading in a futures contract or related option, which may make the instrument temporarily illiquid and difficult to price. Commodity exchanges may also establish daily limits on the amount that the price of a futures contract or related option can vary from the previous day’s settlement price. Once the daily limit is reached, no trades may be made that day at a price beyond the limit. This may prevent a Fund from closing out positions and limiting its losses. Position limits adopted by the CFTC may limit the Funds’ ability to obtain indirect exposure to commodities through commodity futures contracts and related options or may increase the cost of such exposure.
RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH COMMODITY FUTURES CONTRACTS
There are several additional risks associated with transactions in commodity futures contracts.
Storage Risk. Unlike the financial futures markets, in the commodity futures markets there are costs of physical storage associated with purchasing the underlying commodity. The price of the commodity futures contract will reflect the storage costs of purchasing the physical commodity, including the time value of money invested in the physical commodity. To the extent that the storage costs for an underlying commodity change while a Fund is invested in futures contracts on that commodity, the value of the futures contract may change proportionately.
Reinvestment Risk. In the commodity futures markets, producers of the underlying commodity may decide to hedge the price risk of selling the commodity by selling futures contracts today to lock in the price of the commodity at delivery tomorrow. In order to induce speculators to purchase the other side of the same futures contract, the commodity producer generally must sell the futures contract at a lower price than the expected future spot price. Conversely, if most hedgers in the futures market are purchasing futures contracts to hedge against a rise in prices, then speculators will only sell the other side of the futures contract at a higher futures price than the expected future spot price of the commodity. The changing nature of the hedgers and speculators in the commodity markets will influence whether futures prices are above or below the expected future spot price, which can have significant implications for a Fund. If the nature of hedgers and speculators in futures markets has shifted when it is time for a Fund to reinvest the proceeds of a maturing contract in a new futures contract, the Fund might reinvest at higher or lower futures prices, or choose to pursue other investments.
Other Economic Factors. The commodities that underlie commodity futures contracts may be subject to additional economic and non-economic variables, such as drought, floods, weather, livestock disease, embargoes, tariffs, and international economic, political and regulatory developments. These factors may have a larger impact on commodity prices and commodity-linked instruments, including futures contracts, than on traditional securities. Certain commodities are also subject to limited pricing flexibility because of supply and demand factors. Others are subject to broad price fluctuations as a result of the volatility of the prices for certain raw materials and the instability of supplies of other materials. These additional variables may create additional investment risks which subject a Fund’s investments to greater volatility than investments in traditional securities.


Hybrid Instruments
Harbor Bond Fund may invest in hybrid instruments. The Fund will not invest more than 5% of its total assets in hybrid instruments. A hybrid instrument is a type of potentially high-risk derivative that combines a traditional stock, bond, or commodity with an option or forward contract. Generally, the principal amount, amount payable upon maturity or redemption, or interest rate of a hybrid is tied (positively or negatively) to the price of some commodity, currency or securities index or another interest rate or some other economic factor (each a “benchmark”). The interest rate or (unlike most fixed income securities) the principal amount payable at maturity of a hybrid security may be increased
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Investment Policies

Hybrid Instruments — Continued
or decreased, depending on changes in the value of the benchmark. An example of a hybrid could be a bond issued by an oil company that pays a small base level of interest with additional interest that accrues in correlation to the extent to which oil prices exceed a certain predetermined level. Such a hybrid instrument would be a combination of a bond and a call option on oil.
Hybrids can be used as an efficient means of pursuing a variety of investment goals, including currency hedging, duration management, and increased total return. Certain hybrids may not bear interest or pay dividends. The value of a hybrid or its interest rate may be a multiple of a benchmark and, as a result, may be leveraged and move (up or down) more steeply and rapidly than the benchmark. These benchmarks may be sensitive to economic and political events, such as commodity shortages and currency devaluations, which cannot be readily foreseen by the purchaser of a hybrid. Under certain conditions, the redemption value of a hybrid could be zero. Thus, an investment in a hybrid may entail significant market risks that are not associated with a similar investment in a traditional, U.S. dollar-denominated bond that has a fixed principal amount and pays a fixed rate or floating rate of interest. The purchase of hybrids also exposes a Fund to the credit risk of the issuer of the hybrids. These risks may cause significant fluctuations in the net asset value of the Fund.
Certain hybrid instruments may provide exposure to the commodities markets. These are derivative securities with one or more commodity-linked components that have payment features similar to commodity futures contracts, commodity options, or similar instruments. Commodity-linked hybrid instruments may be either equity or debt securities and are considered hybrid instruments because they have both security and commodity-like characteristics. A portion of the value of these instruments may be derived from the value of a commodity, futures contract, index or other economic variable. The Fund will only invest in commodity-linked hybrid instruments that qualify under applicable rules of the CFTC for an exemption from the provisions of the CEA. Position limits adopted by the CFTC may in the future limit the Funds’ ability to obtain indirect exposure to commodities through commodity-linked hybrid instruments or may increase the cost of such exposure.
Certain issuers of structured products such as hybrid instruments may be deemed to be investment companies as defined in the Investment Company Act. As a result, the Fund’s investments in these products may be subject to limits applicable to investments in investment companies and may be subject to restrictions contained in the Investment Company Act.


Illiquid Securities
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) will not invest more than 15% of its net assets in illiquid investments, as defined in Rule 22e-4 under the Investment Company Act. Fund investments will be considered illiquid if the Fund reasonably expects that such investments cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions within seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market values of the investments. The Trust, on behalf of each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) has established a liquidity risk management program in accordance with Rule 22e-4 under the Investment Company Act, which provides for the assessment, management and periodic review of each Fund’s liquidity risk, the classification and monthly review of each Fund’s portfolio investments, the determination and periodic review of, and procedures to address a shortfall in, a Fund’s highly liquid investment minimum, if applicable, and limiting a Fund’s illiquid investments to 15% of the Fund’s net assets. The various provisions of the liquidity risk management program for the Funds will be subject to staggered compliance dates, starting with December 1, 2018, as provided under Rule 22e-4 and related guidance.
Harbor Money Market Fund will not invest more than 5% of its net assets in illiquid investments, as defined in Rule 2a-7 under the Investment Company Act.  Harbor Money Market Fund’s investments will be considered illiquid if they cannot be sold or disposed of in the ordinary course of business within seven calendar days at approximately the value that Harbor Money Market Fund assigned to such investments.
The Board of Trustees has adopted procedures for determining the liquidity of Fund investments that apply to all Funds. The Board of Trustees has delegated to the Adviser and Subadvisers the daily function of determining and monitoring the liquidity of Fund investments in accordance with procedures adopted by the Board of Trustees. The Board of Trustees retains oversight of the liquidity determination process.


Inflation-Indexed Bonds
Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may invest in inflation-indexed bonds. Inflation-indexed bonds are fixed income securities whose principal value is periodically adjusted according to the rate of inflation. Two structures are common. The U.S. Treasury and some other issuers use a structure that accrues inflation into the principal value of the bond. Most other issuers pay out the Consumer Price Index accruals as part of a semiannual coupon.
Inflation-indexed securities issued by the U.S. Treasury have maturities of five, ten or twenty years, although it is possible that securities with other maturities will be issued in the future. The U.S. Treasury securities pay interest on a semiannual basis, equal to a fixed percentage of the inflation-adjusted principal amount. For example, if a Fund purchased an inflation-indexed bond with a par value of
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Investment Policies

Inflation-Indexed Bonds — Continued
$1,000 and a 3% real rate of return coupon (payable 1.5% semi-annually), and inflation over the first six months were 1%, the mid-year par value of the bond would be $1,010 and the first semi-annual interest payment would be $15.15 ($1,010 times 1.5%). If inflation during the second half of the year resulted in the whole years’ inflation equaling 3%, the end-of-year par value of the bond would be $1,030 and the second semi-annual interest payment would be $15.45 ($1,030 times 1.5%).
If the periodic adjustment rate measuring inflation falls, the principal value of inflation-indexed bonds will be adjusted downward, and consequently, the interest payable on these securities (calculated with respect to a smaller principal amount) will be reduced. Repayment of the original bond principal upon maturity (as adjusted for inflation) is guaranteed in the case of U.S. Treasury inflation-indexed bonds, even during a period of deflation. However, the current market value of the bonds is not guaranteed and will fluctuate. The Funds may also invest in other inflation-related bonds, which may or may not provide a similar guarantee. If a guarantee of principal is not provided, the adjusted principal value of the bond repaid at maturity may be less than the original principal. The value of inflation-indexed bonds is expected to change in response to changes in real interest rates. Real interest rates in turn are tied to the relationship between nominal interest rates and the rate of inflation.
Therefore, if inflation was to rise at a faster rate than nominal interest rates, real interest rates might decline, leading to an increase in value of inflation indexed bonds. In contrast, if nominal interest rates increased at a faster rate than inflation, real interest rates might rise, leading to a decrease in value of inflation-indexed bonds.
While these securities are expected to be protected from long-term inflationary trends, short-term increases in inflation may lead to a decline in value. If interest rates rise due to reasons other than inflation (for example, due to changes in currency exchange rates), investors in these securities may not be protected to the extent that the increase is not reflected in the bond’s inflation measure.
The periodic adjustment of U.S. inflation-indexed bonds is tied to the Consumer Price Index for Urban Consumers (“CPI-U”), which is calculated monthly by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. The CPI-U is a measurement of changes in the cost of living, made up of components such as housing, food, transportation and energy. Inflation-indexed bonds issued by a foreign government are generally adjusted by that government to reflect a comparable inflation index. There can be no assurance that the CPI-U or any foreign inflation index will accurately measure the real rate of inflation in the prices of goods and services. Moreover, there can be no assurance that the rate of inflation in a foreign country will be correlated to the rate of inflation in the U.S.
Any increase in the principal amount of an inflation-indexed bond will be considered taxable ordinary income, even though investors do not receive their principal until maturity.


Interfund Lending
The SEC has granted the Trust and the Adviser an exemptive order permitting the Funds to participate in an interfund lending program whereby the Funds may directly lend to and borrow money from each other for temporary or emergency purposes, such as to satisfy redemption requests or to cover unanticipated cash shortfalls, subject to the terms and conditions of the exemptive order. Although Harbor Money Market Fund may rely on the exemptive order to participate in the interfund lending program, it will not participate as a borrower because the Fund rarely needs to borrow cash to meet redemptions.
Any interfund loan made would be preferable to borrowing from a bank from the perspective of the borrowing Fund and more beneficial than an alternative short-term investment from the perspective of a lending Fund. In accordance with the exemptive order, no Fund may lend its uninvested cash to another Fund if the loan would cause the lending Fund’s aggregate outstanding loans through the interfund lending program to exceed 15% of its current net assets at the time of the loan. In addition, a Fund’s loans to another Fund may not exceed 5% of the lending Fund’s net assets. The duration of each interfund loan will be limited to the time required to obtain cash sufficient to repay such loan, but the duration of the loan may not exceed seven days. Each interfund loan may be called on one business day’s notice by the lending Fund and may be repaid on any day by a borrowing Fund.
A Fund may borrow on an unsecured basis (i.e., without posting collateral) through the interfund lending program only if the borrowing Fund’s outstanding borrowings from all sources immediately after the interfund borrowing total 10% or less of its total assets, provided, that if the borrowing Fund has a secured loan outstanding from any other lender, including another Fund, the lending Fund’s interfund loan will be secured on at least an equal priority basis with at least an equivalent percentage of collateral to loan value as any outstanding loan that requires collateral. If a Fund’s aggregate borrowings from all sources immediately after the interfund borrowing would exceed 10% of the Fund’s total assets, the Fund may borrow through the interfund lending program only on a secured basis. A Fund may not borrow through the interfund lending program nor from any other source if its total outstanding borrowings immediately after the borrowing would exceed 33⅓% of its total assets or any limits provided for by the Fund’s investment policies or restrictions.
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Investment Policies

Interfund Lending — Continued
The limitations discussed above and the other conditions of the SEC exemptive order are designed to minimize the risks associated with interfund lending for both borrowing Funds and lending Funds. However, no borrowing or lending activity is without risk. When a Fund borrows money from another Fund, there is a risk that the loan could be called on one business day’s notice or not renewed, in which case the Fund may need to borrow from a bank at higher rates if an interfund loan were not available from another Fund. Furthermore, a delay in repayment to a lending Fund could result in a lost investment opportunity or additional lending costs.


Investments in Other Investment Companies
Each Fund (except the Target Retirement Funds) is permitted to invest up to 10% of its assets in securities of other investment companies and up to 5% of its assets in any one other investment company as long as that investment does not represent more than 3% of the total voting stock of the acquired investment company.  There is no limit on the amount the Target Retirement Funds may own of the total outstanding voting securities of the other series of Harbor Funds. The Target Retirement Funds, in accordance with their prospectus, may invest more than 5% of their total assets in any one or more of the Harbor funds. The Target Retirement Funds may invest more than 10% of their total assets in other series of Harbor Funds. A Target Retirement Fund may also hold more than 3% of the total voting stock of other series of the Harbor funds. Securities of other investment companies, including shares of closed-end investment companies, unit investment trusts and open-end investment companies, represent interests in professionally managed portfolios that may invest in any type of security. These investment companies often seek to perform in a similar fashion to a broad-based securities index. Investing in other investment companies involves substantially the same risks as investing directly in the underlying securities but may involve additional expenses at the investment company level, such as portfolio management fees and operating expenses. In addition, these types of investments involve the risk that they will not perform in exactly the same fashion, or in response to the same factors, as the index or underlying instruments. Certain types of investment companies, such as closed-end investment companies and exchange traded funds (commonly known as “ETFs”), issue a fixed number of shares that trade on a stock exchange or over-the-counter at a premium or a discount to their net asset value. Others are continuously offered at net asset value but may also be traded in the secondary market. Certain ETFs have received exemptive relief permitting other funds to invest in such ETFs in amounts in excess of the limits set forth above, subject to satisfaction of certain conditions by the ETF and the acquiring fund. One or more of the Funds may rely on such orders to make investments in ETFs in excess of these limits.
For purposes of Harbor Money Market Fund’s policy to invest 99.5% or more of the Fund’s total assets in cash, “government securities” and/or repurchase agreements that are “collateralized fully” so as to qualify as a “government money market fund,” the Fund may categorize, as appropriate, investments in other “government money market funds” as within the 99.5% basket.
The Target Retirement Funds may invest in two or more series of Harbor Funds that do not make consistent investment decisions. One series may buy the same security that another series is selling. An investor in a Target Retirement Fund would indirectly bear the costs of both trades without achieving any investment purpose. Conversely, the Target Retirement Funds may invest in two or more series of Harbor Funds that hold common portfolio positions, reducing the diversification benefits of an asset allocation style.


Liquidation of Funds
The Board of Trustees may determine to close and/or liquidate a Fund at any time, which may have adverse tax consequences to shareholders. In the event of the liquidation of a Fund, shareholders will receive a liquidating distribution in cash or in-kind equal to their proportionate interest in the Fund. A liquidating distribution would generally be a taxable event to shareholders, resulting in a gain or loss for tax purposes, depending upon a shareholder’s basis in his or her shares of the Fund. A shareholder of a liquidating Fund will not be entitled to any refund or reimbursement of expenses borne, directly or indirectly, by the shareholder (such as Fund operating expenses), and a shareholder may receive an amount in liquidation less than the shareholder’s original investment.
It is the intention of any Fund expecting to close or liquidate to retain its qualification as a regulated investment company (“RIC”) under the Code during the liquidation period and, therefore, not to be taxed on any of its net capital gains realized from the sale of its assets or ordinary income earned that it timely distributes to shareholders. In the unlikely event that a Fund should lose its status as a RIC during the liquidation process, the Fund would be subject to taxes which would reduce any or all of the types of liquidating distributions.


Loan Originations, Participations and Assignments
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, Harbor Core Bond Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may invest in loan originations, participations and assignments of portions of such loans. Additionally, these Funds may participate directly in lending syndicates to corporate borrowers. When a Fund is one of the original lenders, it will have a direct contractual relationship with the borrower and can enforce compliance by the borrower with the terms of the relevant credit agreement. Original lenders also negotiate voting and consent rights
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Investment Policies

Loan Originations, Participations and Assignments — Continued
under the credit agreement. Actions subject to lender vote or consent generally require the vote or consent of the holders of some specified percentage of the outstanding principal amount. Participations, originations and assignments involve special types of risk, including credit risk, interest rate risk, liquidity risk, and the risks of being a lender. If a Fund purchases a participation, it may be able to enforce its rights only through the lender and may assume the credit risk of the lender in addition to the borrower.
The Funds may purchase participations in commercial loans, which may be secured or unsecured. Loan participations typically represent direct participation in a loan owed by a corporate borrower, and generally are offered by banks, other financial institutions or lending syndicates. The Funds may participate in lending syndications, or can buy part of a loan, becoming a co-lender. When purchasing loan participations, a Fund assumes the credit risk associated with the corporate borrower and may assume the credit risk associated with an offering bank or other financial intermediary. The participation interests in which a Fund invests may not be rated by any nationally recognized rating service.
A loan is often administered by an agent bank acting as agent for all holders. The agent bank administers the terms of the loan, as specified in the loan agreement. In addition, the agent bank is normally responsible for the collection of principal and interest payments from the corporate borrower and the apportionment of these payments to the institutions that are parties to the loan agreement. Unless a Fund has direct recourse against the corporate borrower, under the terms of the loan or other indebtedness, the Fund may have to rely on the agent bank or other financial intermediary to apply appropriate credit remedies against a corporate borrower.
A financial institution’s employment as agent bank might be terminated in the event that it fails to observe a requisite standard of care or becomes insolvent. A successor agent bank would generally be appointed to replace the terminated agent bank, and assets held by the agent bank under the loan agreement should remain available to holders of such indebtedness. However, if assets held by the agent bank for the benefit of a Fund were determined to be subject to the claims of the agent bank’s general creditors, the Fund might incur certain costs and delays in realizing payment on a loan or loan participation and could suffer a loss of principal and/or interest. In situations involving other interposed financial institutions (i.e., an insurance company or governmental agency) similar risks may arise.
Lenders and purchasers of loans and other forms of direct indebtedness depend primarily upon the creditworthiness of the corporate borrower for payment of principal and interest. If a Fund does not receive scheduled interest or principal payments on such indebtedness, the Fund’s share price and yield could be adversely affected. Loans that are fully secured offer a Fund more protection than an unsecured loan in the event of non-payment of scheduled interest or principal. However, the collateral may be difficult to liquidate, decline in value or be insufficient or unavailable to satisfy a borrower’s obligation. As a result, the Fund may not receive money or payment to which it is entitled under the loan.
The Funds may invest in loan participations with credit quality comparable to that of issuers of its securities investments. Indebtedness of companies whose creditworthiness is poor involves substantially greater risks and may be highly speculative. Some companies may never pay off their indebtedness or may pay only a small fraction of the amount owed. Consequently, when investing in indebtedness of companies with poor credit, a Fund bears a substantial risk of losing the entire amount invested.
Each Fund, in applying its investment restrictions, generally will treat the corporate borrower as the “issuer” of indebtedness held by the Fund. In the case of loan participations where a bank or other lending institution serves as a financial intermediary between a Fund and the corporate borrower, and where the participation does not shift the direct debtor-creditor relationship with the corporate borrower to the Fund, SEC interpretations require the Fund to treat both the lending bank or other lending institution and the corporate borrower as “issuers” for the purposes of applying diversification restrictions. Treating a financial intermediary as an issuer of indebtedness may restrict a Fund’s ability to invest in indebtedness related to a single financial intermediary, or a group of intermediaries engaged in the same industry, even if the underlying borrowers represent many different companies and industries.
Loans and other types of direct indebtedness may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. In some cases, negotiations involved in disposing of indebtedness may require weeks to complete and transactions in loans are typically subject to long settlement periods (often longer than seven days). Consequently, some indebtedness may be difficult or impossible to dispose of readily at what the Subadviser believes to be a fair price and, as a result, a Fund’s ability to meet redemption obligations may be impaired. Thus, a Fund may be adversely affected by selling other, more liquid, investments at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions, by having to engage in borrowing transactions, such as borrowing against a credit facility, or by taking other actions to raise cash to meet redemption obligations or pursue other investment opportunities. In addition, valuation of illiquid indebtedness involves a greater degree of judgment in determining a Fund’s net asset value than if that value were based on available market quotations and could result in significant
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Investment Policies

Loan Originations, Participations and Assignments — Continued
variations in the Fund’s daily share price. Nevertheless, some loan interests are traded among certain financial institutions and accordingly may be deemed liquid. As the market for different types of indebtedness develops, the liquidity of these instruments is expected to improve. In addition, the Funds currently intend to treat indebtedness for which there is no readily available market as illiquid for purposes of the Funds’ limitation on illiquid investments. Investments in loan participations are considered to be debt obligations for purposes of the Funds’ investment restrictions relating to the lending of funds or assets by a Fund.
Investments in loans through a direct assignment of the financial institution’s interests with respect to the loan may involve additional risks to the Funds. For example, if a loan is foreclosed, a Fund could become part owner of any collateral, and would bear the costs and liabilities associated with owning and disposing of the collateral. In addition, it is conceivable that under emerging legal theories of lender liability, a Fund could be held liable as co-lender. In certain circumstances, loans may not be deemed to be securities. As a result, as an investor in such loans, a Fund may not have the protection of the anti-fraud provisions of the federal securities laws. In such cases, the Fund generally must rely on the contractual provisions in the loan agreement and any anti-fraud protections available under applicable state law. In the absence of definitive regulatory guidance, the Funds rely on the Subadvisers’ research in an attempt to avoid situations where fraud or misrepresentation could adversely affect the Funds.


Mortgage “Dollar Roll” Transactions
Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may enter into mortgage “dollar roll” transactions with selected banks and broker-dealers. In a dollar roll, the Fund sells mortgage-backed securities and simultaneously contracts to repurchase substantially similar (same type, coupon and maturity) securities on a specified future day. A Fund will only enter into covered rolls. A “covered roll” is a specific type of dollar roll for which there is an offsetting cash or cash equivalent security position that matures on or before the forward settlement date of the dollar roll transaction. Covered rolls are not treated as a borrowing or other senior security and will be excluded from the calculation of a Fund’s borrowings and other senior securities. For financial reporting and tax purposes, a Fund treats mortgage dollar rolls as two separate transactions: one involving the purchase of a security and a separate transaction involving a sale. The Funds do not currently intend to enter into mortgage dollar roll transactions that are accounted for as financing.


Mortgage-Backed Securities
Harbor Core Bond Fund, Harbor Bond Fund, and Harbor Money Market Fund may invest in mortgage-backed securities. Harbor Money Market Fund may invest in mortgage-backed securities that meet the quality, liquidity and maturity standards applicable to money market funds and that do not contain embedded leverage. The Subadvisers will monitor regularly the ratings of securities held by the Funds that they manage and the creditworthiness of their issuers.
Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may invest in mortgage pass-through certificates and multiple-class pass-through securities, such as real estate mortgage investment conduits (“REMIC”) pass-through certificates, CMOs and stripped mortgage-backed securities (“SMBS”), and other types of “mortgage-backed securities” that may be available in the future. A mortgage-backed security may be an obligation of the issuer backed by a mortgage or pool of mortgages or a direct interest in an underlying pool of mortgages. Some mortgage-backed securities, such as CMOs, make payments of both principal and interest at a variety of intervals; others make semiannual interest payments at a predetermined rate and repay principal at maturity (like a typical bond). Mortgage-backed securities are based on different types of mortgages, including those on commercial real estate or residential properties. Mortgage-backed securities often have stated maturities of up to thirty years when they are issued, depending upon the length of the mortgages underlying the securities. In practice, however, unscheduled or early payments of principal and interest on the underlying mortgages may make the securities’ effective maturity shorter than this, and the prevailing interest rates may be higher or lower than the current yield of a Fund’s portfolio at the time the Fund receives the payments for reinvestment. Mortgage-backed securities may have less potential for capital appreciation than comparable fixed income securities, due to the likelihood of increased prepayments of mortgages as interest rates decline. If a Fund buys mortgage-backed securities at a premium, mortgage foreclosures and prepayments of principal by mortgagors (which may be made at any time without penalty) may result in some loss of the Fund’s principal investment to the extent of the premium paid.
The values of mortgage-backed securities may also change due to shifts in the market’s perception of issuers. In addition, regulatory or tax changes may adversely affect the mortgage securities markets as a whole. Non-governmental mortgage-backed securities may offer higher yields than those issued by government entities, but also may be subject to greater price changes than governmental issues.
Mortgage-related securities that are backed by pools of subprime mortgages are generally subject to a greater level of non-payment risk than mortgage-related securities that are not backed by pools of subprime mortgages. Subprime mortgages are loans made to borrowers with lower credit ratings and/or a shorter credit history and such borrowers are more likely to default on their obligations
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Investment Policies

Mortgage-Backed Securities — Continued
under the loan than more creditworthy borrowers. As a result, subprime mortgages underlying a mortgage-related security can experience a significant rate of non-payment. To the extent a Fund invests in mortgage-related securities backed by subprime mortgages, the Fund’s investment will be particularly susceptible to non-payment risk and the risks generally associated with investments in mortgage-related securities. Thus, the value of the Fund’s investment may be adversely affected by borrower non-payments, changes in interest rates, developments in the real estate market and other market and economic developments.
GUARANTEED MORTGAGE PASS-THROUGH SECURITIES
Guaranteed mortgage pass-through securities represent participation interests in pools of residential mortgage loans and are issued by U.S. governmental or private lenders and guaranteed by the U.S. government or one of its agencies or instrumentalities, including but not limited to the Government National Mortgage Association (“GNMA” or “Ginnie Mae”), the Federal National Mortgage Association (“FNMA” or “Fannie Mae”) and the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation (“FHLMC” or “Freddie Mac”). Ginnie Mae certificates are guaranteed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government for timely payment of principal and interest on the certificates. Fannie Mae certificates are guaranteed by Fannie Mae, a federally chartered and privately owned corporation, for full and timely payment of principal and interest on the certificates. Freddie Mac certificates are guaranteed by Freddie Mac, a corporate instrumentality of the U.S. government, for timely payment of interest and the ultimate collection of all principal of the related mortgage loans. Securities issued or guaranteed by entities such as Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac are not issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government.
Commercial banks, savings and loan institutions, private mortgage insurance companies, mortgage bankers and other secondary market issuers also create pass-through pools of conventional residential mortgage loans. Such issuers may, in addition, be the originators and/or servicers of the underlying mortgage loans as well as the guarantors of the mortgage-related securities. Holders of privately issued mortgage-backed securities are dependent on, yet may have limited access to information enabling them to evaluate, the competence and integrity of these private originators and institutions. Because there are no direct or indirect government or agency guarantees of payments in pools created by such non-governmental issuers, they generally offer a higher rate of interest than government and government-related pools. Timely payment of interest and principal of these pools may be supported by insurance or guarantees, including individual loan, title, pool and hazard insurance and letters of credit. The insurance and guarantees are issued by governmental entities, private insurers and the mortgage poolers. There can be no assurance that the private insurers or guarantors can meet their obligations under the insurance policies or guarantee arrangements, and the protection afforded by insurance or guarantees may be insufficient to cover all losses if underlying mortgage borrowers default at a greater than expected rate.
Mortgage-related securities without insurance or guarantees may be purchased if the Subadviser determines that the securities meet a Fund’s quality standards. Mortgage-related securities issued by certain private organizations may not be readily marketable.
MULTIPLE-CLASS PASS-THROUGH SECURITIES AND COLLATERALIZED MORTGAGE OBLIGATIONS
CMOs and REMIC pass-through or participation certificates may be issued by, among others, U.S. government agencies and instrumentalities as well as private issuers. REMICs are CMO vehicles that qualify for special tax treatment under the Code and invest in mortgages principally secured by interests in real property and other investments permitted by the Code. CMOs and REMIC certificates are issued in multiple classes and the principal of and interest on the mortgage assets may be allocated among the several classes of CMOs or REMIC certificates in various ways. Each class of CMOs or REMIC certificates, often referred to as a “tranche,” is issued at a specific adjustable or fixed interest rate and must be fully retired no later than its final distribution date. Generally, interest is paid or accrues on all classes of CMOs or REMIC certificates on a monthly basis.
Typically, CMOs are collateralized by Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac certificates but also may be collateralized by other mortgage assets, such as whole loans or private mortgage pass-through securities. Debt service on CMOs is provided from payments of principal and interest on collateral of mortgaged assets and any reinvestment income thereon.
STRIPPED MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES
SMBS are derivative multiple-class mortgage-backed securities that are created when a U.S. government agency or a financial institution separates the interest and principal components of a mortgage-backed security and sells them as individual securities. SMBS are usually structured with two classes that receive different proportions of interest and principal distributions on a pool of mortgage assets. A typical SMBS will have one class receiving some of the interest and most of the principal, while the other class will receive most of the interest and the remaining principal. The holder of the “principal-only” security (“PO”) receives the principal payments made by the underlying mortgage-backed security,
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Investment Policies

Mortgage-Backed Securities — Continued
while the holder of the “interest-only” security (“IO”) receives interest payments from the same underlying security. The prices of stripped mortgage-backed securities may be particularly affected by changes in interest rates. As interest rates fall, prepayment rates tend to increase, which tends to reduce prices of IOs and increase prices of POs. Rising interest rates can have the opposite effect. Although the market for these securities is increasingly liquid, the relevant Subadviser may determine that certain stripped mortgage-backed securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities are not readily marketable. If so, these securities, together with privately-issued stripped mortgage-backed securities, will be considered illiquid for purposes of the Funds’ limitation on investments in illiquid securities. The yields and market risk of interest only and principal only SMBS, respectively, may be more volatile than those of other fixed income securities. The staff of the SEC considers privately issued SMBS to be illiquid.
REVERSE MORTGAGES
Mortgage-related securities include, among other things, securities that reflect an interest in reverse mortgages. In a reverse mortgage, a lender makes a loan to a homeowner based on the homeowner’s equity in his or her home. While a homeowner must be age 62 or older to qualify for a reverse mortgage, reverse mortgages may have no income restrictions. Repayment of the interest or principal for the loan is generally not required until the homeowner dies, sells the home, or ceases to use the home as his or her primary residence.
There are three general types of reverse mortgages: (1) single-purpose reverse mortgages, which are offered by certain state and local government agencies and nonprofit organizations; (2) federally-insured reverse mortgages, which are backed by the U. S. Department of Housing and Urban Development; and (3) proprietary reverse mortgages, which are privately offered loans. A mortgage-related security may be backed by a single type of reverse mortgage. Reverse mortgage-related securities include agency and privately issued mortgage-related securities. The principal government guarantor of reverse mortgage-related securities is Ginnie Mae.
Reverse mortgage-related securities may be subject to risks different than other types of mortgage-related securities due to the unique nature of the underlying loans. The date of repayment for such loans is uncertain and may occur sooner or later than anticipated. The timing of payments for the corresponding mortgage-related security may be uncertain. Because reverse mortgages are offered only to persons 62 and older and there may be no income restrictions, the loans may react differently than traditional home loans to market events.
RISK FACTORS ASSOCIATED WITH MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES
Investing in mortgage-backed securities involves certain risks, including the failure of a counterparty to meet its commitments, adverse interest rate changes and the effects of prepayments on mortgage cash flows. In addition, investing in the lowest tranche of CMOs and REMIC certificates involves risks similar to those associated with investing in equity securities. However, due to adverse tax consequences under current tax laws, the Funds do not intend to acquire “residual” interests in REMICs. Further, the yield characteristics of mortgage-backed securities differ from those of traditional fixed income securities. The major differences typically include more frequent interest and principal payments (usually monthly), the adjustability of interest rates, and the possibility that prepayments of principal may be made substantially earlier than the final distribution date.
Prepayment rates are influenced by changes in current interest rates and a variety of economic, geographic, social and other factors and cannot be predicted with certainty. Both adjustable rate mortgage loans and fixed rate mortgage loans may be subject to a greater rate of principal prepayments in a declining interest rate environment and to a lesser rate of principal prepayments in an increasing interest rate environment. Under certain interest rate and prepayment rate scenarios, a Fund may fail to recoup fully its investment in mortgage-backed securities notwithstanding any direct or indirect governmental, agency or other guarantee. When a Fund reinvests amounts representing payments and unscheduled prepayments of principal, it may obtain a rate of interest that is lower than the rate on existing adjustable rate mortgage pass-through securities. Thus, mortgage-backed securities, and adjustable rate mortgage pass-through securities in particular, may be less effective than other types of U.S. government securities as a means of “locking in” interest rates.


Municipal Bonds
Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may invest in securities issued by states, municipalities and other political subdivisions, agencies, authorities and instrumentalities of states and multistate agencies or authorities. Municipal bonds share the attributes of fixed income securities in general, but are generally issued by states, municipalities and other political subdivisions, agencies, authorities and instrumentalities of states and multi-state agencies or authorities. The municipal bonds that a Fund may purchase include general obligation bonds and limited obligation bonds (or revenue bonds), including industrial development bonds issued pursuant to former federal tax law. General obligation bonds are obligations involving the credit of an issuer possessing taxing power and are payable from such issuer’s general revenues and not from any particular source. Limited obligation bonds are payable
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Investment Policies

Municipal Bonds — Continued
only from the revenues derived from a particular facility or class of facilities or, in some cases, from the proceeds of a special excise or other specific revenue source. Tax exempt private activity bonds and industrial development bonds generally also are revenue bonds and thus are not payable from the issuer’s general revenues. The credit and quality of private activity bonds and industrial development bonds are usually related to the credit of the corporate user of the facilities. Payment of interest on and repayment of principal of such bonds is the responsibility of the corporate user (and/or any guarantor).
Under the Code, certain limited obligation bonds are considered “private activity bonds” and interest paid on such bonds is treated as an item of tax preference for purposes of calculating federal alternative minimum tax liability.
These Funds may invest up to 5% of their net assets in municipal warrants, which are essentially call options on municipal bonds. In exchange for a premium, municipal warrants give the purchaser the right, but not the obligation, to purchase a municipal bond in the future. The Funds may purchase custodial receipts representing the right to receive either the principal amount or the periodic interest payments or both with respect to specific underlying municipal bonds. The Funds may invest in municipal bonds with credit enhancements such as letters of credit, municipal bond insurance and Standby Bond Purchase Agreements (“SBPAs”). The Funds may invest in Residual Interest Bonds (“RIBs”), which brokers create by depositing a municipal bond in a trust. The trust in turn issues a variable rate security and RIBs.
Municipal bonds are subject to credit and market risk. Generally, prices of higher quality issues tend to fluctuate less with changes in market interest rates than prices of lower quality issues and prices of longer maturity issues tend to fluctuate more than prices of shorter maturity issues.
Prices and yields on municipal bonds are dependent on a variety of factors, including general money market conditions, the financial condition of the issuer, general conditions of the municipal bond market, the size of a particular offering, the maturity of the obligation and the rating of the issue. A number of these factors, including the ratings of particular issues, are subject to change from time to time. Information about the financial condition of an issuer of municipal bonds may not be as extensive as information made available by corporations whose securities are publicly traded.
Obligations of issuers of municipal bonds are subject to the provisions of bankruptcy, insolvency and other laws affecting the rights and remedies of creditors. Congress or state legislatures may seek to extend the time for payment of principal or interest, or both, or to impose other constraints upon enforcement of such obligations. There is also the possibility that as a result of litigation or other conditions, the power or ability of issuers to meet their obligations for the payment of interest and principal on their municipal bonds may be materially affected or their obligations may be found to be invalid or unenforceable. Such litigation or conditions may from time to time have the effect of introducing uncertainties in the market for municipal bonds or certain segments thereof, or of materially affecting the credit risk with respect to particular bonds. Adverse economic, business, legal or political developments might affect all or a substantial portion of a Fund’s municipal bonds in the same manner.
The bankruptcy of a large city is rare, making its consequences difficult to predict. A Fund’s investments in securities affected by a city’s bankruptcy may decline in value and could reduce the Fund’s performance. In addition, difficulties in the municipal securities markets could result in increased illiquidity, volatility and credit risk, and a decrease in the number of municipal securities investment opportunities. The value of municipal securities may also be affected by uncertainties involving the taxation of municipal securities or the rights of municipal securities holders in the event of a bankruptcy. Proposals to restrict or eliminate the federal income tax exemption for interest on municipal securities are introduced before Congress from time to time. These legal uncertainties could affect the municipal securities market generally, certain specific segments of the market, or the relative credit quality of particular securities.
The secondary market for municipal bonds typically has been less liquid than that for taxable fixed income securities, and this may affect a Fund’s ability to sell particular municipal bonds at then-current market prices, especially in periods when other investors are attempting to sell the same securities. Additionally, municipal bonds rated below investment-grade (i.e., high-yield municipal bonds) may not be as liquid as higher-rated municipal bonds. Reduced liquidity in the secondary market may have an adverse impact on the market price of a municipal bond and on a Fund’s ability to sell a municipal bond in response to changes or anticipated changes in economic conditions or to meet the Fund’s cash needs. Reduced liquidity may also make it more difficult to obtain market quotations based on actual trades for purposes of valuing a Fund’s portfolio.
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Investment Policies

Options and Futures Transactions
Except as described under “Options on Securities, Securities Indices and Currency” and “Futures Contracts and Options on Futures Contracts,” each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may buy and sell options contracts, financial futures contracts and options on futures contracts, and may purchase and sell options and futures based on securities, indices, currencies, commodities and other assets, including options and futures traded on foreign exchanges and options not traded on any exchange. Options and futures contracts are bought and sold to manage a Fund’s exposure to changing interest rates, security prices, and currency exchange rates. Some options and futures strategies, including selling futures, buying puts, and writing calls, tend to hedge a Fund’s investment against price fluctuations. Other strategies, including buying futures, writing puts, and buying calls, tend to increase market exposure. Options and futures may be combined with each other or with forward contracts in order to adjust the risk and return characteristics of the overall strategy.
Options and futures can be volatile investments and involve certain risks. If the Subadviser applies a hedge at an inappropriate time or judges market conditions incorrectly, options and futures strategies may lower a Fund’s return. A Fund can also experience losses if the prices of its options and futures positions are poorly correlated with those of its other investments or if it cannot close out its positions because of an illiquid secondary market. Options and futures do not pay interest but may produce income, gains or losses.
The loss incurred by a Fund investing in futures contracts and in writing options on futures is potentially unlimited and may exceed the amount of any margin paid or premium received. The Funds’ transactions in options and futures contracts may be limited by the requirements of the Code for qualification as a regulated investment company.
RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH OPTIONS TRANSACTIONS
There is no assurance that a liquid secondary market on a domestic or foreign options exchange will exist for any particular exchange-traded option or at any particular time. If a Fund is unable to effect a closing purchase transaction with respect to covered options it has written, the Fund will not be able to sell the underlying securities or currencies or dispose of assets held in a segregated account until the options expire or are exercised.
Similarly, if the Fund is unable to effect a closing sale transaction with respect to options it has purchased, it would have to exercise the options in order to realize any profit and will incur transaction costs upon the purchase or sale of underlying securities or currencies.
Reasons for the absence of a liquid secondary market on an exchange include the following: (i) there may be insufficient trading interest in certain options; (ii) restrictions may be imposed by an exchange on opening transactions or closing transactions or both; (iii) trading halts, suspensions or other restrictions may be imposed with respect to particular classes or series of options; (iv) unusual or unforeseen circumstances may interrupt normal operations on an exchange; (v) the facilities of an exchange or the Options Clearing Corporation may not at all times be adequate to handle current trading volume; or (vi) one or more exchanges could, for economic or other reasons, decide or be compelled at some future date to discontinue the trading of options (or a particular class or series of options). If trading were discontinued, the secondary market on that exchange (or in that class or series of options) would cease to exist. However, outstanding options on that exchange that had been issued by the Options Clearing Corporation as a result of trades on that exchange would continue to be exercisable in accordance with their terms.
A Fund’s ability to terminate over-the-counter options is more limited than with exchange-traded options and may involve the risk that broker-dealers participating in such transactions will not fulfill their obligations. The Subadviser will determine the liquidity of each over-the-counter option in accordance with guidelines adopted by the Trustees.
The writing and purchase of options is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The successful use of options depends in part on the Subadviser’s ability to predict future price fluctuations and, for hedging transactions, the degree of correlation between the options and securities or currency markets.


Options on Securities, Securities Indices and Currency
Harbor Large Cap Value Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, and Harbor Core Bond Fund are not authorized to engage in options transactions on currency. Harbor International Fund and Harbor International Growth Fund are not authorized to engage in options transactions on currencies for speculative purposes. Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may use options on currencies for cross-hedging purposes and to increase exposure to a foreign currency or to shift exposure to foreign currency fluctuations from one country to another. Harbor Money Market Fund is not authorized to engage in any options transactions.  A Fund may purchase and write (sell) call and put options on any securities in which it may invest, on any securities index based on securities in which it may invest or on any currency in which Fund investments may be denominated. These options may be listed on national domestic securities exchanges
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Investment Policies

Options on Securities, Securities Indices and Currency — Continued
or foreign securities exchanges or traded in the over-the-counter market. Each Fund may write covered put and call options and purchase put and call options to enhance total return, as a substitute for the purchase or sale of securities or currency, or to protect against declines in the value of portfolio securities and against increases in the cost of securities to be acquired.
WRITING COVERED OPTIONS
A call option on securities or currency written by a Fund obligates the Fund to sell specified securities or currency to the holder of the option at a specified price if the option is exercised at any time before the expiration date. A put option on securities or currency written by a Fund obligates the Fund to purchase specified securities or currency from the option holder at a specified price if the option is exercised at any time before the expiration date. Options on securities indices are similar to options on securities, except that the exercise of securities index options requires cash settlement payments and does not involve the actual purchase or sale of securities. In addition, securities index options are designed to reflect price fluctuations in a group of securities or segment of the securities market rather than price fluctuations in a single security. Writing covered call options may deprive a Fund of the opportunity to profit from an increase in the market price of the securities or foreign currency assets in its portfolio. Writing covered put options may deprive a Fund of the opportunity to profit from a decrease in the market price of the securities or foreign currency assets to be acquired for its portfolio.
All call and put options written by the Funds are covered. A written call option or put option may be covered by (i) maintaining cash or liquid securities, either of which may be quoted or denominated in any currency, in a segregated account maintained by the Fund’s custodian or set aside or restricted in the Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund, with a value at least equal to the Fund’s obligation under the option, (ii) entering into an offsetting forward commitment, and/or (iii) purchasing an offsetting option or any other option that, by virtue of its exercise price or otherwise, reduces the Fund’s net exposure on its written option position. A written call option on securities is typically covered by maintaining the securities that are subject to the option in a segregated account with the Funds’ custodian or by setting them aside or restricting them in the Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund. A Fund may cover call options on a securities index by owning securities whose price changes are expected to be similar to those of the underlying index.
A Fund may terminate its obligations under an exchange traded call or put option by purchasing an option identical to the one it has written. Obligations under over-the-counter options may be terminated only by entering into an offsetting transaction with the counterparty to such option. Such purchases are referred to as “closing purchase transactions.”
PURCHASING OPTIONS
A Fund would normally purchase call options in anticipation of an increase, or put options in anticipation of a decrease (“protective puts”), in the market value of securities or currencies of the type in which it may invest. A Fund may also sell call and put options to close out its purchased options.
The purchase of a call option would entitle a Fund, in return for the premium paid, to purchase specified securities or currency at a specified price during the option period. A Fund would ordinarily realize a gain on the purchase of a call option if, during the option period, the value of such securities or currency exceeded the sum of the exercise price, the premium paid and transaction costs; otherwise, the Fund would realize either no gain or a loss on the purchase of the call option.
The purchase of a put option would entitle a Fund, in exchange for the premium paid, to sell specified securities or currency at a specified price during the option period. The purchase of protective puts is designed to offset or hedge against a decline in the market value of a Fund’s portfolio securities or the currencies in which they are denominated. Put options may also be purchased by a Fund for the purpose of affirmatively benefiting from a decline in the price of securities or currencies that it does not own. A Fund would ordinarily realize a gain if, during the option period, the value of the underlying securities or currency decreased below the exercise price sufficiently to cover the premium and transaction costs; otherwise, the Fund would realize either no gain or a loss on the purchase of the put option. Gains and losses on the purchase of put options may be offset by countervailing changes in the value of a Fund’s portfolio securities.
Each Fund’s options transactions will be subject to limitations established by each of the exchanges, boards of trade or other trading facilities on which such options are traded. These limitations govern the maximum number of options in each class which may be written or purchased by a single investor or group of investors acting in concert, regardless of whether the options are written or purchased on the same or different exchanges, boards of trade or other trading facilities or are held or written
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Investment Policies

Options on Securities, Securities Indices and Currency — Continued
in one or more accounts or through one or more brokers. Thus, the number of options that a Fund may write or purchase may be affected by options written or purchased by other investment advisory clients of the Subadviser. An exchange, board of trade or other trading facility may order the liquidation of positions found to be in excess of these limits, and it may impose certain other sanctions.


Partnership Securities
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may invest in securities issued by publicly traded partnerships or master limited partnerships or limited liability companies (together referred to as “PTPs/MLPs”). These entities may be publicly traded on stock exchanges or markets such as the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”), the NYSE Alternext US LLC (“NYSE Alternext”) and NASDAQ. PTPs/MLPs often own businesses or properties relating to energy, natural resources or real estate, or may be involved in the film industry or research and development activities. Generally, PTPs/MLPs are operated under the supervision of one or more managing partners or members. Limited partners, unit holders, or members (such as a Fund, if it invests in a partnership) are not involved in the day-to-day management of the company. Limited partners, unit holders, or members are allocated income and capital gains associated with the partnership project in accordance with the terms of the partnership or limited liability company agreement.
At times PTPs/MLPs may potentially offer relatively high yields compared to common stocks. Because PTPs/MLPs are generally treated as partnerships or similar limited liability “pass-through” entities for tax purposes, they do not ordinarily pay income taxes, but pass their earnings on to unit holders (except in the case of some publicly-traded firms that may be taxed as corporations). For tax purposes, limited partners, unit holders, or members may be allocated taxable income with respect to only a portion of the distributions attributed to them because certain other portions may be attributed to the repayment of initial investments and may thereby lower the cost basis of the units or shares owned by unit or share holders. As a result, unit holders may effectively defer taxation on the receipt of some distributions until they sell their units. These tax consequences may differ for different types of entities.
Although the high yields potentially offered by these investments may be attractive, PTPs/MLPs have some disadvantages and present some risks. Investors in a partnership or limited liability company may have fewer protections under state law than investors in a corporation. Distribution and management fees may be substantial. Losses are generally considered passive and cannot offset income other than income or gains relating to the same entity. These tax consequences may differ for different types of entities. Many PTPs/MLPs may operate in certain limited sectors such as, without limitation, energy, natural resources, and real estate, which may be volatile or subject to periodic downturns. Growth may be limited because most cash is paid out to limited partners, unit holders, or members rather than retained to finance growth. The performance of PTPs/MLPs may be partly tied to interest rates. Rising interest rates, a poor economy, or weak cash flows are among the factors that can pose significant risks for investments in PTPs/MLPs. Investments in PTPs/MLPs also may be illiquid at times.
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may also invest in relatively illiquid securities issued by limited partnerships or limited liability companies that are not publicly traded. These securities, which may represent investments in certain areas such as real estate or private equity, may present many of the same risks of PTPs/MLPs. In addition, they may present other risks including higher management and distribution fees, uncertain cash flows, potential calls for additional capital, and very limited liquidity.


Preferred Stocks
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may invest in preferred stocks. In the case of Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund, investments in preferred stocks are limited to 10% of each Fund’s total assets. Preferred stock generally has a preference as to dividends and upon liquidation over an issuer’s common stock but ranks junior to debt securities in an issuer’s capital structure. Preferred stock generally pays dividends in cash or in additional shares of preferred stock at a defined rate. Unlike interest payments on debt securities, preferred stock dividends are payable only if declared by the issuer’s board of directors. Dividends on preferred stock may be cumulative, meaning that, in the event the issuer fails to make one or more dividend payments on the preferred stock, no dividends may be paid on the issuer’s common stock until all unpaid preferred stock dividends have been paid. Preferred stock also may be subject to optional or mandatory redemption provisions.


Regulatory Risk
Financial entities, such as investment companies and investment advisers, are generally subject to extensive government regulation and intervention. Government regulation and/or intervention may change the way a Fund is regulated, affect the expenses incurred directly by the Fund and the value of its investments, and limit and/or preclude a Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. Government regulation may change frequently and may have significant adverse consequences. Moreover, government regulation may have unpredictable and unintended effects. Legislative or administrative changes or court decisions relating to the Code may adversely affect a Fund and/or the issuers of securities held by a Fund.
29

 

Investment Policies

Repurchase Agreements
Each Fund may enter into repurchase agreements with domestic or foreign banks or with any member firm of FINRA, or any affiliate of a member firm that is a primary dealer in U.S. government securities. Each repurchase agreement counterparty must meet the minimum credit quality requirements applicable to the respective Fund generally and meet any other appropriate counterparty criteria as determined by the Fund’s Subadviser. The minimum credit quality requirements are those applicable to a Fund’s purchase of securities generally such that if a Fund is permitted to only purchase securities which are rated investment-grade (or the equivalent if unrated), that Fund could only enter into repurchase agreements with counterparties that have debt outstanding that is rated investment-grade (or the equivalent if unrated). In a repurchase agreement, a Fund buys a security at one price and simultaneously agrees to sell it back at a higher price. Such agreements must be adequately collateralized to cover the counterparty’s obligation to the Fund to close out the repurchase agreement. The securities will be regularly monitored to ensure that the collateral is adequate. In the event of the bankruptcy of the seller or the failure of the seller to repurchase the securities as agreed, the Fund could suffer losses, including loss of interest on or principal of the securities and costs associated with delay and enforcement of the repurchase agreement.


Restricted Securities
Each Fund may purchase and sell restricted securities. Restricted securities are securities acquired in an unregistered, private sale from the issuing company or from an affiliate of the issuer. Restricted securities would be required to be registered under the Securities Act of 1933 (the “1933 Act”) prior to distribution to the general public, but they may be eligible for resale to “qualified institutional buyers” under Rule 144A under the 1933 Act. It may be expensive or difficult for a Fund to dispose of restricted securities in the event that registration is required or an eligible purchaser cannot be found. Although certain of these securities may be readily sold, others may be illiquid, and their sale may involve substantial delays and additional costs.


Reverse Repurchase Agreements
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, and Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements with banks for temporary or emergency purposes. Harbor Bond Fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements with banks and broker-dealers to the extent permitted by the Fund’s restrictions on borrowing. A reverse repurchase agreement involves the sale of a portfolio security by the Fund, coupled with an agreement to repurchase the security at a specified time and price. During the reverse repurchase agreement, the Fund continues to receive principal and interest payments on the underlying securities. Each Fund will segregate cash or liquid securities, which are marked-to-market daily, with the Funds’ custodian, or set aside or restrict assets in the Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund, to cover its obligations under reverse repurchase agreements.
While not considered senior securities, reverse repurchase agreements are considered borrowings and as such are subject to the same risks associated with borrowing by the Fund. When the Fund engages in borrowing for investment purposes, also known as financial leverage, the Fund is required to maintain continuous asset coverage (i.e., total assets including borrowings, less liabilities exclusive of borrowings) of 300% of the amount borrowed. If the 300% asset coverage should decline as a result of market fluctuations or other reasons, the Fund may be required to sell some of its portfolio holdings within three days to reduce the debt and restore the 300% asset coverage, even though it may be disadvantageous from an investment standpoint to sell securities at that time. Leveraging may exaggerate the effect on the Fund’s net asset value of any increase or decrease in the market value of the Fund’s portfolio. Money borrowed for leveraging will be subject to interest costs, which may or may not be recovered by appreciation of the securities purchased; and in certain cases, interest costs may exceed the return received on the securities purchased. An increase in interest rates could reduce or eliminate the benefits of leverage and could reduce the net asset value of the Fund’s shares.


Securities Lending
Each Fund (other than Harbor Money Market Fund and each of the Target Retirement Funds) may seek to increase its income by lending portfolio securities. Under present regulatory policies, loans may be made only to financial institutions, such as broker-dealers, and are required to be secured continuously by collateral in cash or liquid assets. Such collateral will be maintained on a current basis at an amount at least equal to the market value of the securities loaned. The Fund would have the right to call a loan and obtain the securities loaned at any time on five days’ notice. For the duration of a loan, the Fund would continue to receive the equivalent of the interest or dividends paid by the issuer on the securities loaned and would also receive compensation from the investment of the collateral. The Fund would not, however, have the right to vote any securities having voting rights during the existence of the loan. In the event of an important vote to be taken among holders of the securities or of the giving or withholding of their consent on a material matter affecting the investment, the Fund would call the loan. As with other extensions of credit, there are risks of delay in recovery or loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower of the securities fail financially.
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Investment Policies

Securities Lending — Continued
However, the loans would be made only to firms deemed by the Adviser to be of good standing, and when, in the judgment of the Adviser, the consideration that can be earned currently from securities loans of this type justifies the attendant risk. If the Adviser decides to make securities loans, it is intended that the value of the securities loaned would not exceed 33⅓% of the value of the total assets of the Fund.


Short Sales
Each Fund (other than Harbor International Fund, Harbor Diversified International All Cap Fund, Harbor International Growth Fund, Harbor Emerging Markets Equity Fund and Harbor Money Market Fund) may engage in short sales of securities to: (i) offset potential declines in long positions in similar securities, (ii) increase the flexibility of the Fund; (iii) for investment return; (iv) as part of a risk arbitrage strategy; and (v) as part of its overall portfolio management strategies involving the use of derivative instruments. A short sale is a transaction in which a Fund sells a security it does not own in anticipation that the market price of that security will decline.
When a Fund makes a short sale, it will often borrow the security sold short and deliver it to the broker-dealer through which it made the short sale as collateral for its obligation to deliver the security upon conclusion of the sale. In connection with short sales of securities, the Fund may pay a fee to borrow securities or maintain an arrangement with a broker to borrow securities and is often obligated to pay over any accrued interest and dividends on such borrowed securities.
If the price of the security sold short increases between the time of the short sale and the time that the Fund replaces the borrowed security, the Fund will incur a loss; conversely, if the price declines, the Fund will realize a capital gain. Any gain will be decreased, and any loss increased, by the transaction costs described above. The successful use of short selling may be adversely affected by imperfect correlation between movements in the price of the security sold short and the securities being hedged.
The Funds may invest pursuant to a risk arbitrage strategy to take advantage of a perceived relationship between the value of two securities. Frequently, a risk arbitrage strategy involves the short sale of a security.
To the extent that a Fund engages in short sales, it will provide collateral to the broker-dealer and (except in the case of short sales “against the box”) will maintain additional asset coverage by segregating cash or liquid securities with the Fund’s custodian, or setting aside or restricting in the Subadviser’s records or systems related to the Fund, cash or liquid securities that the Subadviser determines to be liquid and that are equal to the current market value of the securities sold short, or will ensure that such positions are covered by “offsetting” positions, until the Fund replaces the borrowed security. A short sale is “against the box” to the extent that the Fund contemporaneously owns, or has the right to obtain at no added cost, securities identical to those sold short. The Funds will engage in short selling to the extent permitted by the federal securities laws and rules and interpretations thereunder. To the extent a Fund engages in short selling in foreign (non-U.S.) jurisdictions, the Fund will do so to the extent permitted by the laws and regulations of such jurisdiction.


Small to Mid Companies
Each equity Fund, as well as Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, and Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, may invest in equity securities of small to mid-sized companies. Smaller companies may (i) be subject to more volatile market movements than securities of larger, more established companies; (ii) have limited product lines, markets or financial resources; and (iii) depend upon a limited or less experienced management group. The securities of smaller companies may be traded only on the over-the-counter market or on a regional securities exchange and may not be traded daily or in the volume typical of trading on a national securities exchange. Disposition by the Fund of a smaller company’s securities in order to meet redemptions may require the Fund to sell these securities at a discount from market prices, over a longer period of time or during periods when disposition is not desirable. These risks are more significant in the context of smaller companies.


Sovereign Debt Obligations
Each Fund (except Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, and Harbor Money Market Fund) may invest in sovereign debt obligations. Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Money Market Fund may only invest in U.S. dollar denominated sovereign debt obligations. Sovereign debt obligations, such as foreign government debt or foreign treasury bills, involve special risks that are not present in corporate debt obligations. The foreign issuer of the sovereign debt or the foreign governmental authorities that control the repayment of the debt may be unable or unwilling to repay principal or interest when due, and a fund may have limited or no recourse in the event of a default. For example, there may be no bankruptcy or similar proceedings through which all or part of the sovereign debt that a governmental entity has not repaid may be collected. During periods of economic uncertainty, the market prices of sovereign debt, and the Fund’s net asset value, to the extent it invests in such securities, may be more volatile than prices of debt obligations of U.S. issuers, and may result in illiquidity. In the past, certain foreign countries have encountered difficulties in servicing their debt obligations, withheld payments of principal and interest and declared moratoria on the payment of principal
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Investment Policies

Sovereign Debt Obligations — Continued
and interest on their sovereign debt. As a holder of government sovereign debt, a Fund may be requested to participate in the restructuring of sovereign indebtedness, including the rescheduling of debt payments and the extension of further loans to government debtors, which may adversely affect the Fund. There can be no assurance that such restructuring will result in the repayment of all or part of the debt. Certain emerging market countries have experienced difficulty in servicing their sovereign debt on a timely basis, which has led to defaults and the restructuring of certain indebtedness.
A sovereign debtor’s willingness or ability to repay principal and pay interest in a timely manner may be affected by, among other factors, its cash flow situation, the extent of its foreign currency reserves, the availability of sufficient foreign exchange, the relative size of the debt service burden, the sovereign debtor’s policy toward principal international lenders and local political constraints. Sovereign debtors may also be dependent on expected disbursements from foreign governments, multilateral agencies and other entities to reduce principal and interest arrearages on their debt. The failure of a sovereign debtor to implement economic reforms, achieve specified levels of economic performance or repay principal or interest when due may result in the cancellation of third party commitments to lend funds to the sovereign debtor, which may further impair such debtor’s ability or willingness to service its debts.
The recent global economic crisis brought several European economies close to bankruptcy and many other economies into recession and weakened the banking and financial sectors of many countries. For example, in the past several years the governments of countries in the European Union experienced large public budget deficits, the effects of which remain unknown and may slow the overall recovery of European economies from the recent global economic crisis. In addition, due to large public deficits, some European countries may be dependent on assistance from other European governments and institutions or multilateral agencies and offices. Such assistance may require a country to implement reforms or reach a certain level of performance. If a country receiving assistance fails to reach certain objectives or receives an insufficient level of assistance it could cause a deep economic downturn and could significantly affect the value of a Fund’s investments in that country’s sovereign debt obligations.


Structured Products
Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may invest in structured products, including instruments such as credit-linked securities, commodity-linked notes and structured notes, which are potentially high-risk derivatives. For example, a structured product may combine a traditional stock, bond, or commodity with an option or forward contract. Generally, the principal amount, amount payable upon maturity or redemption, or interest rate of a structured product is tied (positively or negatively) to the price of some commodity, currency or securities index or another interest rate or some other economic factor (each a “benchmark”). The interest rate or (unlike most fixed income securities) the principal amount payable at maturity of a structured product may be increased or decreased, depending on changes in the value of the benchmark. An example of a structured product could be a bond issued by an oil company that pays a small base level of interest with additional interest that accrues in correlation to the extent to which oil prices exceed a certain predetermined level. Such a structured product would be a combination of a bond and a call option on oil.
Structured products can be used as an efficient means of pursuing a variety of investment goals, including currency hedging, duration management, and increased total return. Structured products may not bear interest or pay dividends. The value of a structured product or its interest rate may be a multiple of a benchmark and, as a result, may be leveraged and move (up or down) more steeply and rapidly than the benchmark. These benchmarks may be sensitive to economic and political events, such as commodity shortages and currency devaluations, which cannot be readily foreseen by the purchaser of a structured product. Under certain conditions, the redemption value of a structured product could be zero. Thus, an investment in a structured product may entail significant market risks that are not associated with a similar investment in a traditional, U.S. dollar-denominated bond that has a fixed principal amount and pays a fixed rate or floating rate of interest. The purchase of structured products also exposes a Fund to the credit risk of the issuer of the structured product. These risks may cause significant fluctuations in the net asset value of the Fund. Harbor Core Bond Fund and Harbor Bond Fund will not invest more than 5% of their respective total assets in a combination of credit-linked securities or commodity-linked notes.
CREDIT-LINKED SECURITIES
Credit-linked securities are issued by a limited purpose trust or other vehicle that, in turn, invests in a basket of derivative instruments, such as credit default swaps, interest rate swaps and other securities, in order to provide exposure to certain high yield or other fixed income markets. For example, a Fund may invest in credit-linked securities as a cash management tool in order to gain exposure to the high yield markets and/or to remain fully invested when more traditional income producing securities are not available. Like an investment in a bond, investments in credit-linked securities represent the right to receive periodic income payments (in the form of distributions) and payment of principal at the end of the term of the security. However, these payments are conditioned on the trust’s receipt of payments from, and the trust’s potential obligations to, the counterparties to the
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Investment Policies

Structured Products — Continued
derivative instruments and other securities in which the trust invests. For instance, the trust may sell one or more credit default swaps, under which the trust would receive a stream of payments over the term of the swap agreements provided that no event of default has occurred with respect to the referenced debt obligation upon which the swap is based. If a default occurs, the stream of payments may stop and the trust would be obligated to pay the counterparty the par (or other agreed upon) value of the referenced debt obligation. This, in turn, would reduce the amount of income and principal that a Fund would receive as an investor in the trust. A Fund’s investments in these instruments are indirectly subject to the risks associated with derivative instruments, including, among others, credit risk, default or similar event risk, counterparty risk, interest rate risk, leverage risk and management risk. It is expected that the securities will be exempt from registration under the 1933 Act. Accordingly, there may be no established trading market for the securities and they may constitute illiquid investments.
STRUCTURED NOTES AND INDEXED SECURITIES
Structured notes are derivative debt instruments, the interest rate or principal of which is determined by an unrelated indicator (for example, a currency, security, commodity or index thereof). The terms of the instrument may be “structured” by the purchaser and the borrower issuing the note. Indexed securities may include structured notes as well as 50 securities other than debt securities, the interest rate or principal of which is determined by an unrelated indicator. Indexed securities may include a multiplier that multiplies the indexed element by a specified factor and, therefore, the value of such securities may be very volatile. The terms of structured notes and indexed securities may provide that in certain circumstances no principal is due at maturity, which may result in a loss of invested capital. Structured notes and indexed securities may be positively or negatively indexed, so that appreciation of the unrelated indicator may produce an increase or a decrease in the interest rate or the value of the structured note or indexed security at maturity may be calculated as a specified multiple of the change in the value of the unrelated indicator. Therefore, the value of such notes and securities may be very volatile. Structured notes and indexed securities may entail a greater degree of market risk than other types of debt securities because the investor bears the risk of the unrelated indicator. Structured notes or indexed securities also may be more volatile, less liquid, and more difficult to accurately price than less complex securities and instruments or more traditional debt securities. To the extent a Fund invests in these notes and securities, however, the Subadviser will analyze these notes and securities in its overall assessment of the effective duration of the Fund’s holdings in an effort to monitor the Fund’s interest rate risk.
Certain issuers of structured products may be deemed to be investment companies as defined in the Investment Company Act. As a result, a Fund’s investments in these structured products may be subject to limits applicable to investments in investment companies and may be subject to restrictions contained in the Investment Company Act.
EQUITY-LINKED SECURITIES AND EQUITY-LINKED NOTES
Harbor Global Leaders Fund and Harbor Bond Fund may invest a portion of their respective assets in equity-linked securities. Equity-linked securities are privately issued derivative securities that have a return component based on the performance of a single stock, a basket of stocks, or a stock index. Equity-linked securities are often used for many of the same purposes as, and share many of the same risks with, other derivative instruments.
An equity-linked note is a note, typically issued by a company or financial institution, whose performance is tied to a single stock, a basket of stocks, or a stock index. Generally, upon the maturity of the note, the holder receives a return of principal based on the capital appreciation of the linked securities. The terms of an equity-linked note may also provide for the periodic interest payments to holders at either a fixed or floating rate. Because the notes are equity linked, they may return a lower amount at maturity due to a decline in value of the linked security or securities. To the extent a Fund invests in equity-linked notes issued by foreign issuers, it will be subject to the risks associated with the debt securities of foreign issuers and with securities denominated in foreign currencies. Equity-linked notes are also subject to default risk and counterparty risk.


Swaps, Caps, Floors and Collars
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor Core Bond Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may enter into swaps, caps, floors, and collars for hedging purposes or to seek to increase total return. For purposes of other investment policies and restrictions, the Funds may value derivative instruments at market value, notional value or full exposure value (i.e., the sum of the notional amount for the contract plus the market value). For example, a Fund may value credit default swaps at full exposure value for purposes of the Fund’s credit quality guidelines because such value reflects the Fund’s actual economic exposure during the term of the credit default swap agreement. In this context, both the
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Investment Policies

Swaps, Caps, Floors and Collars — Continued
notional amount and the market value may be positive or negative depending on whether the Fund is selling or buying protection through the credit default swap. The manner in which certain securities or other instruments are valued by the Funds for purposes of applying investment policies and restrictions may differ from the manner in which those investments are valued by other types of investors.
Most types of over-the-counter swap agreements entered into by the Funds will calculate the obligations of the parties to the agreement on a “net basis.” Consequently, a Fund’s current obligations (or rights) under an over-the-counter swap agreement will generally be equal only to the net amount to be paid or received under the agreement based on the relative values of the positions held by each party to the agreement (the “net amount”). Certain types of swaps are exchange-traded and subject to clearing. Additionally, applicable regulators have adopted rules imposing certain margin requirements, including minimums, on OTC swaps, which may result in a Fund and its counterparties posting higher margin amounts for OTC swaps.
These Funds may from time to time combine swaps with options. Interest rate swaps involve the exchange of respective commitments to pay or receive interest, such as an exchange of fixed rate payments for floating rate payments. Mortgage swaps are similar to interest rate swaps in that they represent commitments to pay and receive interest. The notional principal amount, however, is tied to a reference pool or pools of mortgages. Currency swaps involve the exchange of their respective rights to make or receive payments in specified currencies. The purchase of an interest rate cap entitles the purchaser, to the extent that a specified index exceeds a predetermined interest rate, to receive payment of interest on a notional principal amount from the party selling such interest rate cap. The purchase of an interest rate floor entitles the purchaser, to the extent that a specified index falls below a predetermined interest rate, to receive payments of interest on a notional principal amount from the party selling the interest rate floor.
These Funds will enter into interest rate and mortgage swaps only on a net basis, which means that the two payment streams are netted out, with the Fund receiving or paying, as the case may be, only the net amount of the two payments. Interest rate and mortgage swaps do not involve the delivery of securities, other underlying assets or principal.
Accordingly, the risk of loss with respect to interest rate and mortgage swaps is limited to the net amount of interest payments that the Fund is contractually obligated to make. If the other party to an interest rate or mortgage swap defaults, the Fund’s risk of loss consists of the net amount of interest payments that the Fund is contractually entitled to receive. In contrast, currency swaps usually involve the delivery of a gross payment stream in one designated currency in exchange for the gross payment stream in another designated currency. Therefore, the entire payment stream under a currency swap is subject to the risk that the other party to the swap will default on its contractual delivery obligations. To the extent that the net amount payable by the Fund under an interest rate or mortgage swap and the entire amount of the payment stream payable by the Fund under a currency swap or an interest rate floor, cap or collar are held in a segregated account consisting of, or are set aside or restricted in the Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund in the form of, cash or liquid assets, the Fund and the Subadviser believe that swaps do not constitute senior securities under the Investment Company Act and, accordingly, will not treat them as being subject to the Fund’s borrowing restriction.
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund and Harbor Bond Fund will only enter into currency swap, interest rate swap, mortgage swap, cap or floor transactions with counterparties to such transactions that meet the minimum credit quality requirements applicable to the respective Fund generally and meets any other appropriate counterparty criteria as determined by the Fund’s Subadviser. The minimum credit quality requirements for Harbor Convertible Securities Fund and Harbor Bond Fund are those applicable to a Fund’s purchase of securities generally such that if the Fund is permitted to only purchase securities which are rated investment-grade (or the equivalent if unrated), the Fund could only enter into one of the above referenced transactions with counterparties that have debt outstanding that is rated investment-grade (or the equivalent if unrated).
Each equity Fund may enter into swap transactions for the purpose of achieving the approximate economic equivalent of a purchase or sale of foreign equity securities (to the extent the investment policies for such fund otherwise permits it to purchase foreign equity securities) when the Fund is not able to purchase or sell foreign equity securities directly because of administrative or other similar restrictions, such as the need to establish an account with a local sub-custodian prior to purchase or sale, applicable to U.S. mutual funds in that local market. A swap transaction for the purpose of achieving the approximate economic equivalent of a purchase or sale of foreign equity securities means the counterparty would be obligated to pay the Fund a return based on the market price of the foreign equity security and the Fund would be obligated to pay the counterparty a return based upon a fixed or floating interest rate. As used above, “sale” means a sale to close out the purchase of a foreign equity security through a swap transaction as opposed to a short sale.
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Investment Policies

Swaps, Caps, Floors and Collars — Continued
Each Fund’s current obligations under a swap agreement are accrued daily (offset against any amounts owed by the counterparty to the Fund) and any accrued but unpaid net amounts owed to a counterparty are covered by segregating or earmarking Fund assets determined to be liquid by the Fund’s Subadviser, in accordance with liquidity procedures established by the Funds’ Board of Trustees. Obligations under swap agreements that are covered in this manner are not considered “senior securities” for purposes of a Fund’s investment restriction regarding senior securities, in accordance with prior staff guidance.
Each Fund may invest in loan originations, participations or assignments; mortgage- and asset-backed securities; options, futures contracts and options on futures contracts; foreign currency transactions; or other derivative instruments, to the extent permitted in each Fund’s prospectus or this Statement of Additional Information, notwithstanding that such securities and/or instruments may be considered swaps under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.
CREDIT DEFAULT SWAPS
Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, Harbor High-Yield Bond Fund, Harbor High-Yield Opportunities Fund, Harbor Core Bond Fund, and Harbor Bond Fund may enter into credit default swap agreements. The “buyer” in a credit default contract is obligated to pay the “seller” a periodic stream of payments over the term of the contract provided that no event of default on an underlying reference obligation has occurred. If an event of default occurs, the seller must pay the buyer the full notional value, or “par value,” of the reference obligation in exchange for the reference obligation or the net cash-settlement amount. A Fund may be either the buyer or seller in a credit default swap transaction. If a Fund is a buyer and no event of default occurs, the Fund will lose its investment and recover nothing. However, if an event of default occurs, the Fund (if the buyer) will receive the full notional value of the reference obligation that may have little or no value. As a seller, a Fund receives a fixed rate of income throughout the term of the contract, which typically is between six months and three years, provided that there is no default event. If an event of default occurs, the seller must pay the buyer the full notional value of the reference obligation or a net cash-settlement amount. As a seller, during the term of the contract, the Fund will place cash that is not available for investment or liquid securities, equal to the full notional value of the reference obligation, in a separate account with the Fund’s custodian or will set aside or restrict cash or liquid securities in the Subadviser’s records or systems relating to the Fund. Credit default swap transactions involve greater risks than if a Fund had invested in the reference obligation directly.


Trust-Preferred Securities
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may also invest in trust-preferred securities. These securities, also known as trust-issued securities, are securities that have characteristics of both debt and equity instruments. Generally, trust-preferred securities are cumulative preferred stocks issued by a trust that is created by a financial institution, such as a bank holding company. The financial institution typically creates the trust with the objective of increasing its capital by issuing subordinated debt to the trust in return for cash proceeds that are reflected on its balance sheet. The primary asset owned by the trust is the subordinated debt issued to the trust by the financial institution. The financial institution makes periodic interest payments on the debt as discussed further below. The financial institution will subsequently own the trust’s common securities, which may typically represent a small percentage of the trust’s capital structure. The remainder of the trust’s capital structure typically consists of trust-preferred securities that are sold to investors. The trust uses the sales proceeds to purchase the subordinated debt issued by the financial institution. The financial institution uses the proceeds from the subordinated debt sale to increase its capital, while the trust receives periodic interest payments from the financial institution for holding the subordinated debt. The trust uses the interest received to make dividend payments to the holders of the trust-preferred securities. The dividends are generally paid on a quarterly basis and are often higher than other dividends potentially available on the financial institution’s common stocks. The interests of the holders of the trust-preferred securities are senior to those of common stockholders in the event that the financial institution is liquidated, although their interests are typically subordinated to those of holders of other debt issued by the institution.
The primary benefit for the financial institution in using this particular structure is that the trust-preferred securities issued by the trust are treated by the financial institution as debt securities for tax purposes (as a consequence of which the expense of paying interest on the securities is tax deductible), but are treated as more desirable equity securities for purposes of the calculation of capital requirements. In certain instances, the structure involves more than one financial institution and thus, more than one trust. In such a pooled offering, an additional separate trust may be created. This trust will issue securities to investors and use the proceeds to purchase the trust-preferred securities issued by other trust subsidiaries of the participating financial institutions. In such a structure, the trust-preferred securities held by the investors are backed by other trust-preferred securities issued by the trust subsidiaries.
35

 

Investment Policies

Trust-Preferred Securities — Continued
The risks associated with trust-preferred securities typically include the financial condition of the financial institution(s), as the trust typically has no business operations other than holding the subordinated debt issued by the financial institution(s) and issuing the trust-preferred securities and common stock backed by the subordinated debt. If a financial institution is financially unsound and defaults on interest payments to the trust, the trust will not be able to make dividend payments to holders of the trust-preferred securities such as the Funds.


U.S. Government Securities
Each Fund may invest in U.S. government securities. Total U.S. public debt as a percentage of gross domestic product has grown since the beginning of the 2008 financial downturn. U.S. government agencies project that the U.S. will continue to maintain high debt levels in the near future. Although high debt levels do not necessarily indicate or cause economic problems, they may create certain systemic risks if sound debt management practices are not implemented.
A high national debt level may increase market pressures to meet government funding needs, which may drive debt cost higher and cause the U.S. Treasury to sell additional debt with shorter maturity periods, thereby increasing refinancing risk. A high national debt also raises concerns that the U.S. government will be unable to pay investors at maturity. Unsustainable debt levels could cause declines in currency valuations and prevent the U.S. government from implementing effective fiscal policy.
On August 5, 2011, S&P lowered its long-term sovereign credit rating on the U.S. In explaining the downgrade, the S&P cited, among other reasons, controversy over raising the statutory debt ceiling and growth in public spending. The market prices and yields of securities supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government may be adversely affected by any actual or potential downgrade in the rating of U.S. long-term sovereign debt and such a downgrade may lead to increased interest rates and volatility.
Securities issued by U.S. government agencies or government-sponsored enterprises may not be guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury. Ginnie Mae, a wholly owned U.S. government corporation, is authorized to guarantee, with the full faith and credit of the U.S. government, the timely payment of principal and interest on securities issued by institutions approved by Ginnie Mae and backed by pools of mortgages insured by the Federal Housing Administration or guaranteed by the Department of Veterans Affairs. Government-related guarantors (i.e., not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government) include Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. On September 7, 2008, the Federal Housing Finance Agency (“FHFA”) placed Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac in conservatorship, while the Treasury agreed to purchase preferred stock as needed to ensure that both Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac maintain a positive net worth (guaranteeing up to $100 billion for each entity). As a consequence, certain fixed-income securities of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac have more explicit U.S. government support. No assurance can be given as to whether the U.S. government will continue to support Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. In addition, the future of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac is uncertain because Congress has been considering proposals as to whether Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac should be nationalized, privatized, restructured or eliminated altogether. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are also the subject of continuing legal actions and investigations which may have an adverse effect on these entities.
In addition to securities issued by Ginnie Mae, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, and FHFA, U.S. government securities include obligations of federal home loan banks and federal land banks, Federal Farm Credit Banks Consolidated Systemwide Bonds and Notes, securities issued or guaranteed as to principal or interest by Tennessee Valley Authority and other similar securities as may be interpreted from time to time.


Variable and Floating Rate Securities
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may invest in variable and floating rate securities. Variable and floating rate securities provide for a periodic adjustment in the interest rate paid on the obligations. The terms of such obligations must provide that interest rates are adjusted periodically based upon some appropriate interest rate adjustment index as provided in the respective obligations. The adjustment intervals may be regular, and range from daily up to annually, or may be event based, such as a change in the prime rate. Variable and floating rate securities that cannot be disposed of promptly within seven days and in the usual course of business without taking a reduced price will be treated as illiquid and subject to the limitation on investments in illiquid securities.


Warrants and Rights
Each Fund (except Harbor Money Market Fund) may invest in warrants and rights. Warrants are options to buy a stated number of shares of common stock at a specified price at any time during the life of the warrant. Rights represent a privilege offered to holders of record of issued securities to subscribe (usually on a pro rata basis) for additional securities of the same class, of a different class or of a different issuer. The holders of warrants and rights have no voting rights, receive no dividends and have no ownership rights with respect to the assets of the issuer. The value of a warrant or right may not necessarily change with the value of the underlying securities. Warrants and rights cease to have value if they are not exercised prior to their expiration date. Investments in warrants and rights are thus speculative and may result in a total loss of the money invested.
36

 

Investment Policies

Warrants and Rights — Continued
LOW EXERCISE PRICE WARRANT (“LEPW”)
Harbor Global Leaders Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in LEPWs, to seek to gain economic exposure to markets where holding an underlying security is not feasible. A LEPW is a type of warrant with an exercise price that is very low relative to the market price of the underlying instrument at the time of issue (e.g., one cent or less). The buyer of a LEPW effectively pays the full value of the underlying common stock at the outset. As in the case of any exercise of warrants, there may be a time delay between the time a holder of LEPWs gives instructions to exercise and the time the price of the common stock relating to exercise or the settlement date is determined, during which time the price of the underlying security could change significantly. In addition, the exercise or settlement date of the warrants may be affected by certain market disruption events, such as difficulties relating to the exchange of a local currency into U.S. Dollars, the imposition of capital controls by a local jurisdiction or changes in the laws relating to foreign investments. These events could lead to a change in the exercise date or settlement currency of the warrants, or postponement of the settlement date. In some cases, if the market disruption events continue for a certain period of time, the warrants may become worthless resulting in a total loss of the purchase price of the warrants.
Because of its low exercise price, a LEPW is virtually certain to be exercised and the value and performance of its intrinsic value is effectively identical to that of the underlying security. These features are designed to allow participation in the performance of a security where there are legal or financial obstacles to purchasing the underlying security directly. If the LEPW is cash-settled, the buyer profits to the same extent as with a direct holding in the underlying security, but without having to transact in it.
37

 

Investment Restrictions

Fundamental Investment Restrictions
The following restrictions may not be changed with respect to any Fund without the approval of the majority of outstanding voting securities of that Fund (which, under the Investment Company Act and the rules thereunder and as used in the Prospectuses and this Statement of Additional Information, means the lesser of (1) 67% of the shares of that Fund present at a meeting if the holders of more than 50% of the outstanding shares of that Fund are present in person or by proxy, or (2) more than 50% of the outstanding shares of that Fund). Investment restrictions that involve a maximum percentage of securities or assets shall not be considered to be violated unless an excess over the percentage occurs immediately after, and is caused by, an acquisition or encumbrance of securities or assets of, or borrowings by or on behalf of, a Fund with the exception of borrowings permitted by Investment Restriction (2) listed below.
A Fund may not:
(1) with respect to 75% of the total assets of the Fund, purchase the securities of any issuer if such purchase would cause more than 5% of the Fund’s total assets (taken at market value) to be invested in the securities of such issuer, or purchase securities of any issuer if such purchase would cause more than 10% of the total voting securities of such issuer to be held by the Fund, except obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities and with respect to the Target Retirement Funds and Harbor Convertible Securities Fund, shares of other investment companies;
(2) borrow money, except to the extent permitted by, or to the extent not prohibited by, applicable law and any applicable exemptive relief;
(3) act as underwriter of the securities issued by others, except to the extent that the purchase of securities in accordance with a Fund’s investment objective and policies directly from the issuer thereof and the later disposition thereof may be deemed to be underwriting;
(4) invest 25% or more of its total assets in the securities of one or more issuers conducting their principal business activities in the same industry (excluding the U.S. government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities). Harbor Money Market Fund may invest more than 25% of its total assets in the securities of domestic banks and bank holding companies, including certificates of deposit and bankers’ acceptances (provided that investments in other investment companies shall not be considered an investment in any particular industry for purposes of this investment limitation);
(5) issue senior securities, except as permitted under the Investment Company Act, and except that Harbor Funds may issue shares of beneficial interest in multiple series or classes;
(6) purchase, hold or deal in real estate, although the Fund may purchase and sell securities that are secured by real estate or interests therein, securities of real estate investment trusts and mortgage-related securities and may hold and sell real estate acquired by the Fund as a result of the ownership of securities;
(7) (except for Harbor Convertible Securities Fund),  invest in commodities or commodity contracts, except that a Fund may invest in currency and financial instruments and contracts that are commodities or commodity contracts that are not deemed to be prohibited commodities or commodities contracts for the purpose of this restriction. Harbor Convertible Securities Fund may not purchase or sell physical commodities unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments; provided that this restriction shall not prohibit the Fund from purchasing or selling options, futures contracts and related options thereon, forward contracts, swaps, caps, floors, collars and any other financial instruments or from investing in securities or other instruments backed by physical commodities or as otherwise permitted by (i) the Investment Company Act, (ii) the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC under the Investment Company Act, or (iii) an exemption or other relief applicable to the Fund from the provisions of the Investment Company Act; or
(8) make loans to other persons, except to the extent permitted by, or to the extent not prohibited by, applicable law and any applicable exemptive relief.
Notwithstanding the investment policies and restrictions of a Fund, the Fund may invest its assets in an open-end management investment company with substantially the same investment objective, policies and restrictions as the Fund.
For purposes of fundamental investment restriction no. 4, each Fund will consider concentration to be the investment of more than 25% of the value of its total assets in any one industry. To conform to the current view of the SEC that only domestic bank instruments may be excluded from industry concentration limitations, the Fund will not exclude foreign bank instruments from industry concentration limits as long as the policy of the SEC remains in effect. In addition, telephone companies are considered to be in a separate industry from water, gas or electric utilities; personal credit finance companies and business credit finance companies are deemed to be in separate industries; banks and insurance
38

 

Investment Restrictions

Fundamental Investment Restrictions — Continued
companies are deemed to be in separate industries; wholly owned finance companies are considered to be in the industry of their parents if their activities are primarily related to financing the activities of their parents; and privately issued mortgage-backed securities collateralized by mortgages insured or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies or instrumentalities do not represent interests in any industry.
Harbor Money Market Fund invests its assets in the manner necessary to qualify as a “government money market fund” under Rule 2a-7 of the Investment Company Act. Accordingly, for purposes of fundamental investment restriction no. 4, Harbor Money Market Fund will not invest more than 25% of its total assets in the securities of banks and bank holding companies, including certificates of deposit and bankers’ acceptances, for so long as the Fund intends to qualify as a “government money market fund.”
For purposes of fundamental investment restriction no. 7, each Fund interprets its policy with respect to the investment in commodities or commodity contracts to permit the Fund, subject to the Fund’s investment objectives and general investment policies (as stated in the Fund’s Prospectus and elsewhere in this Statement of Additional Information), to invest in commodity futures contracts and options thereon, commodity-related swap agreements, hybrid instruments, and other commodity-related derivative instruments.
From time to time, a Fund may voluntarily participate in actions (for example, rights offerings, conversion privileges, exchange offers, credit event settlements, etc.) where the issuer or counterparty offers securities or instruments to holders or counterparties, such as a Fund, and the acquisition is determined to be beneficial to Fund shareholders (“Voluntary Action”). Notwithstanding any percentage investment limitation listed above or any percentage investment limitation of the Investment Company Act or rules thereunder, if a Fund has the opportunity to acquire a permitted security or instrument through a Voluntary Action, and the Fund will exceed a percentage investment limitation following the acquisition, it will not constitute a violation if, prior to the receipt of the securities or instruments and after announcement of the offering, the Fund sells an offsetting amount of assets that are subject to the investment limitation in question at least equal to the value of the securities or instruments to be acquired. Unless otherwise indicated, all percentage limitations on Fund investments (as stated throughout this Statement of Additional Information or in the Prospectuses) that are not (i) specifically included in the above section or (ii) imposed by the Investment Company Act, rules thereunder, the Code or related regulations (the “Elective Investment Restrictions”), will apply only at the time a transaction is entered into unless the transaction is a Voluntary Action. In addition and notwithstanding the foregoing, for purposes of this policy, certain Non-Fundamental Investment Restrictions, as noted below, are also considered Elective Investment Restrictions. The percentage limitations and absolute prohibitions with respect to Elective Investment Restrictions are not applicable to a Fund’s acquisition of securities or instruments through a Voluntary Action.


Non-Fundamental Investment Restrictions
In addition to the investment restrictions and policies mentioned above, the Trustees of Harbor Funds have voluntarily adopted the following policies and restrictions, which are observed in the conduct of the affairs of the Funds. These represent intentions of the Trustees based upon current circumstances. They differ from fundamental investment policies because they may be changed or amended by action of the Trustees without prior notice to or approval of shareholders. Accordingly, a Fund may not:
(a) purchase securities on margin, except for use of short-term credit necessary for clearance of purchases and sales of portfolio securities, but it may make margin deposits in connection with covered transactions in options, futures, options on futures and short positions. For purposes of this restriction, the posting of margin deposits or other forms of collateral in connection with swap agreements is not considered purchasing securities on margin;
(b) make short sales of securities, except as permitted under the Investment Company Act;
(c) invest more than 15% (5% in the case of Harbor Money Market Fund) of the Fund’s net assets in illiquid investments;
(d) invest in other companies for the purpose of exercising control or management; or
(e) with respect to those Funds that are underlying Funds of the Target Retirement Funds, acquire any securities of registered open-end investment companies or registered unit investment trusts in reliance on Section 12(d)(1)(F) or Section 12(d)(1)(G) of the Investment Company Act.
39

 

Trustees and Officers

The business and affairs of the Trust shall be managed by or under the direction of the Trustees, and they shall have all powers necessary or desirable to carry out that responsibility. The Trustees shall have full power and authority to take or refrain from taking any action and to execute any contracts and instruments that they may consider necessary or desirable in the management of the Trust. Any determination made by the Trustees in good faith as to what is in the interests of the Trust shall be conclusive. Information pertaining to the Trustees and Officers of Harbor Funds is set forth below. The address of each Trustee and Officer is: [Name of Trustee or Officer] c/o Harbor Funds, 111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4302.
Name (Age)
Position(s) with Fund
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served1
Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
Number of
Portfolios
In Fund
Complex
Overseen By
Trustee
Other Directorships
Of Public Companies
and Other Registered
Investment Companies
Held by Trustee During
Past Five Years

INDEPENDENT TRUSTEES
Scott M. Amero (56)
.................
Trustee
Since 2014 Chairman (2015-Present) and Trustee (2011-2015), Rare (conservation nonprofit); Trustee, Berkshire School (2014-Present); Trustee, The Nature Conservancy, Massachusetts Chapter (2018-Present); Vice Chairman and Global Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income (2010), Vice Chairman and Global Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, and Co-Head, Fixed Income Portfolio Management (2007-2010), BlackRock, Inc., (publicly traded investment management firm). 34 None
Raymond J. Ball (75)
................
Trustee
Since 2006 Sidney Davidson Distinguished Service Professor of Accounting, University of Chicago Booth School of Business (2000-Present); Academic Affiliate, Analysis Group (litigation consulting firm) (2000-Present); Financial Reporting Faculty Advisory Group of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (2008-Present); and Advisory Board of the Center for Accounting Research & Education at University of Notre Dame (2006-Present). 34 None
Donna J. Dean (67)
...................
Trustee
Since 2010 Chief Investment Officer of the Rockefeller Foundation (a private foundation) (1995-Present). 34 None
Joseph L. Dowling III (55)
.......
Trustee
Since 2017 Chief Executive Officer (2018-Present) and Chief Investment Officer, Brown University Investment Office (2013-2018); Advisory Board Member, Stage Point Capital (private mortgage specialist) (2016-2017); Advisory Board Member, Harbor Funds (2016-2017); and Founder and Managing Member, Narragansett Asset Management (private investment management firm) (1998-2013). 34 Director of Integrated Electrical Services (2012-Present).
Randall A. Hack (72)
.................
Trustee
Since 2010 Founder and Senior Managing Director of Capstone Capital LLC (private investment firm) (2003-Present); Director of Tower Development Corporation (cell tower developer) (2009-2016); Advisory Director of Berkshire Partners (private equity firm) (2002-2013); Founder and Senior Managing Director of Nassau Capital, LLC (private investment firm, investing solely on behalf of the Princeton Endowment) (1995-2001); and President of The Princeton University Investment Company (1990-1994). 34 None
Robert Kasdin (61)
....................
Trustee
Since 2014 Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer (2015-Present) and Chief Financial Officer (2018-Present), Johns Hopkins Medicine; Senior Executive Vice President, Columbia University (2002-2015); Trustee and Member of the Finance Committee, National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center (2005-Present); Director, Apollo Commercial Real Estate Finance, Inc. (2014-Present); Director and Executive Committee Member, The Y in Central Maryland (2018-Present); and Director, Noranda Aluminum Holdings Corp. (2007-2014). 34 Director of Noranda Aluminum Holdings Corporation (2007-2014); and Director of Apollo Commercial Real Estate Finance, Inc. (2014-Present).
Kathryn L. Quirk (66)
.................
Trustee
Since 2017 Retired; Vice President, Senior Compliance Officer and Head, U.S. Regulatory Compliance, Goldman Sachs Asset Management (2013-2017); Deputy Chief Legal Officer, Asset Management, and Vice President and Corporate Counsel, Prudential Insurance Company of America (2010-2012); Co-Chief Legal Officer, Prudential Investment Management, Inc., and Chief Legal Officer, Prudential Investments and Prudential Mutual Funds (2008-2012); Vice President and Corporate Counsel and Chief Legal Officer, Mutual Funds, Prudential Insurance Company of America, and Chief Legal Officer, Prudential Investments (2005-2008); Vice President and Corporate Counsel and Chief Legal Officer, Mutual Funds, Prudential Insurance Company of America (2004-2005); Member, Management Committee (2000-2002), General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer, Zurich Scudder Investments, Inc. (1997-2002). 34 None
Ann M. Spruill (65)
....................
Trustee
Since 2014 Partner (1993-2008), member of Executive Committee (1996-2008), Member Board of Directors (2002-2008), Grantham, Mayo, Van Otterloo & Co, LLC (private investment management firm) (with the firm since 1990); Member Investment Committee and Chair of Global Public Equities, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (2000-Present); and Trustee, Financial Accounting Foundation (2014-Present). 34 None
40

 

Trustees and Officers

Name (Age)
Position(s) with Fund
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served1
Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years
Number of
Portfolios
In Fund
Complex
Overseen By
Trustee
Other Directorships
Of Public Companies
and Other Registered
Investment Companies
Held by Trustee During
Past Five Years

INTERESTED TRUSTEE
Charles F. McCain (50)*
...........
Chairman, Trustee
and President
Since 2017 Chief Executive Officer (2017-Present), Director (2007-Present), President and Chief Operating Officer (2017), Executive Vice President and General Counsel (2004-2017), and Chief Compliance Officer (2004-2014), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.; Director (2007-Present) and Chief Compliance Officer (2004-2017), Harbor Services Group, Inc.; Chief Executive Officer (2017-Present), Director (2007-Present), Chief Compliance Officer and Executive Vice President (2007-2017), Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc.; and Chief Compliance Officer, Harbor Funds (2004-2017). 34 None
    
Name (Age)
Position(s) with Fund
Term of
Office and
Length of
Time Served1
Principal Occupation(s)
During Past Five Years

FUND OFFICERS NOT LISTED ABOVE**
Erik D. Ojala (44)
.......................
Chief Compliance Officer

Since 2017
Executive Vice President and General Counsel (2017-Present) and Secretary (2010-Present); Senior Vice President and Associate General Counsel (2007-2017), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.; Director, Executive Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer (2017-Present), Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc.; Director (2017-Present) and Assistant Secretary (2014-Present), Harbor Services Group, Inc.; and AML Compliance Officer (2010-2017) and Vice President and Secretary (2007-2017), Harbor Funds.
Anmarie S. Kolinski (48)
..........
Treasurer
Since 2007 Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (2007-Present), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.; Chief Financial Officer (2007-Present), Harbor Services Group, Inc.; and Chief Financial Officer (2015-Present) and Treasurer (2012-Present), Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc.
Brian L. Collins (51)
..................
Vice President
Since 2005 Executive Vice President and Chief Investment Officer (2004-Present), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.
Kristof M. Gleich (39)
...............
Vice President
Since 2019 President (2018-Present), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.; and Managing Director, Global Head of Manager Selection (2010-2018), JP Morgan Chase & Co.
Gregg M. Boland (55)
...............
Vice President
Since 2019 Vice President (2019-President), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.; President (2019-Present), Senior Vice President – Operations (2016-2019), and Vice President – Operations (2007-2015), Harbor Services Group, Inc.; and Senior Vice President, AML Compliance Officer, and OFAC Officer (2019-Present), Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc.
Diana R. Podgorny (40)
............
Secretary
Since 2018 Vice President and Assistant General Counsel, Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc. (2017-Present); Vice President and Counsel, AMG Funds LLC (2016-2017); Assistant Secretary, AMG Funds, AMG Funds I, AMG Funds II and AMG Funds III (2016-2017); Assistant Secretary, AMG Funds IV (2010-2017); and Vice President and Counsel, Aston Asset Management, LLC (2010-2016).
Jodie L. Crotteau (47)
...............
Assistant Secretary
Since 2014 Senior Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer, Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc. (2014-Present); Chief Compliance Officer and Secretary (2017-present) and Assistant Secretary (2015-2016), Harbor Services Group, Inc.; Assistant Secretary (2016-present), Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc.; Vice President and Chief Compliance Officer, Grosvenor Registered Funds (2011-2014); and Vice President, Grosvenor Capital Management, L.P. (2010-2014).
Lana M. Lewandowski (39)
.....
AML Compliance Officer
and Assistant Secretary
Since 2017 Legal & Compliance Manager (2016-Present) and Legal Specialist (2012-2015), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.
Lora A. Kmieciak (55)
...............
Assistant Treasurer
Since 2017 Senior Vice President – Fund Administration and Analysis (2017-Present) and Senior Vice President - Business Analysis (2015-2017), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.; and Assurance Executive Director, Ernst & Young LLP (1999-2015).
John M. Paral (50)
....................
Assistant Treasurer
Since 2013 Director of Fund Administration and Analysis (2017-Present), Vice President (2012-Present) and Financial Reporting Manager (2007-2017), Harbor Capital Advisors, Inc.

1 Each Trustee serves for an indefinite term, until his successor is elected. Each Officer is elected annually.
* Mr. McCain is deemed an “Interested Trustee” due to his affiliation with the Adviser and Distributor of Harbor Funds.
** Officers of the Funds are “interested persons” as defined in the Investment Company Act.


Additional Information About the Trustees
The following sets forth information about each Trustee’s specific experience, qualifications, attributes and/or skills that serve as the basis for the person’s continued service in that capacity. These encompass a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, their financial and investment experience, academic background, willingness to devote the time and attention needed to serve, and past experience as Trustees of the Trust, other investment companies, operating companies or other types of entities. No one factor is controlling, either with respect to the group or any individual. As discussed further below, the evaluation of the qualities and ultimate selection of persons to serve as Independent Trustees is the responsibility of the Trust’s Nominating Committee, consisting solely of Independent Trustees. The inclusion of a particular factor below does not constitute an assertion by the Board of Trustees or any individual Trustee that a Trustee has any special expertise that would impose any greater responsibility or liability on such Trustee than would exist otherwise.
41

 

Trustees and Officers

Additional Information About the Trustees — Continued
Scott M. Amero.  Mr. Amero retired in 2010 after a 20-year career at BlackRock, Inc., where he was then Vice Chairman and Global Chief Investment Officer, Fixed Income, and Co-Head of Fixed Income Portfolio Management. He currently serves as Chairman of the Board of Trustees for Rare, a conservation nonprofit, a Trustee for Berkshire School, a Trustee of the Massachusetts chapter of The Nature Conservancy, and a member of the Advisory Board of the Mossavar-Rahmani Center for Business and Government at the Harvard Kennedy School. Mr. Amero has extensive investment experience and has served as a Trustee of Harbor Funds since 2014.
Raymond J. Ball.  Mr. Ball is the Sidney Davidson Distinguished Service Professor of Accounting at The University of Chicago Booth School of Business, and a frequent lecturer and researcher on accounting, financial market and related business matters. Mr. Ball joined the University of Chicago Business School’s faculty in 2000 from the William E. Simon Graduate School of Business at the University of Rochester, where he served as the Wesray Professor in Business Administration. Mr. Ball’s teaching and research has a particular focus on corporate disclosure, earnings and stock prices, international accounting and finance, market efficiency and investment strategies. Mr. Ball serves on the Advisory Group for the Financial Reporting Faculty of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales. He is a Fellow and CPA of the Australian Society of Certified Practising Accountants. From time to time, he serves as an expert witness and litigation consultant with respect to accounting, economic and financial market issues. Mr. Ball has served on the Financial Accounting Standards Advisory Council of the Financial Accounting Standards Board and the Shadow Financial Regulation Committee. Mr. Ball is the Board of Trustees’ “audit committee financial expert” and Chairman of the Audit Committee and has served as a Trustee since 2006.
Donna J. Dean.  Ms. Dean serves as the Chief Investment Officer of the Rockefeller Foundation. The Rockefeller Foundation is a philanthropic organization established by the Rockefeller family in 1913 to promote the well-being of humanity. The Rockefeller Foundation supports this mission by funding a portfolio of initiatives that are intended to revalue ecosystems, advance health, secure livelihoods and transform cities. As Chief Investment Officer, Ms. Dean is responsible for leading a team of investment professionals in managing the Rockefeller Foundation’s endowment. Ms. Dean is responsible for establishing strategy for the endowment’s investment program, including diversifying the endowment’s portfolio of investments across a range of asset classes, including public and private equities, fixed income, emerging markets, real assets (such as resources and real estate), hedge funds and distressed debt. Prior to joining the Rockefeller Foundation in 1995, Ms. Dean spent seven years at Yale University, where she served as Director of Investments, with responsibility for real estate as well as oversight of the New Haven Initiative community investment program. Ms. Dean has significant investment experience and has served as a Trustee since 2010.
Joseph L. Dowling III.  Mr. Dowling is the Chief Executive Officer of the Brown Investment Office. From June 2013 through June 2018, he was the Chief Investment Officer of Brown’s $3.9 billion endowment. He has served on the Board of Directors at Integrated Electrical Services (IES) since 2012. From 1998 to 2013, he served as the founder and managing member of Narragansett Asset Management, LLC, a private investment partnership located in Stamford, Connecticut. From its formation in 1998 through 2006, Narragansett managed funds for institutions, pension funds and college endowments. After 2006, Narragansett focused on managing Mr. Dowling’s personal capital and that of a select group of strategic investors. Prior to forming Narragansett, Mr. Dowling worked at The First Boston Corporation, Tudor Investments and Oracle Partners, L.P. He has extensive experience with financial reporting and corporate finance and was elected as an Advisory Board Member in December 2016.  He has served as a Trustee since 2017.
Randall A. Hack.  Mr. Hack is the Senior Managing Director and Founder of Capstone Capital LLC. Capstone Capital holds investments in private companies, with a special focus on the telecommunications and health care industries. He served as an Advisory Director of Berkshire Partners, a private equity firm, from 2002 to 2013. In that capacity he assisted Berkshire Partners in identifying and assessing private companies in which to invest, participated in those investments through Capstone Capital, and served on the boards of selected Berkshire Partners portfolio companies. In 1995, Mr. Hack founded Nassau Capital, LLC, a private investment firm that invested in privately held companies and assets solely on behalf of Princeton University’s endowment and Nassau Capital’s principals. Nassau Capital, which grew to manage approximately $2.5 billion in assets at the peak of its investment program, focused its investments in alternative asset classes such as venture capital, leveraged buy-outs, real estate, timber and energy. From 1990 to 1994, Mr. Hack served as the President of The Princeton University Investment Company, which oversees the management of Princeton University’s endowment. In that role, Mr. Hack led a team of investment professionals who devised and implemented a series of global investment initiatives in areas such as domestic and international equities, hedge funds, real estate, oil and gas holdings and other private market asset classes. He previously served on the board of Tower Development Corporation, a private company, and currently serves on the boards of several non-profit organizations. Mr. Hack previously served on the boards of Fiber Tower Corporation and Crown Castle International Corp. Mr. Hack has served as a Trustee since 2010.
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Additional Information About the Trustees — Continued
Robert Kasdin.   Mr. Kasdin has served as the Senior Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine since 2015 and as Chief Financial Officer of Johns Hopkins Medicine since 2018. Prior to joining Johns Hopkins Medicine, he served as Senior Executive Vice President of Columbia University from 2002 to 2015. Prior to joining Columbia University, he served as the Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of the University of Michigan, Treasurer and Chief Investment Officer for The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, and Vice President and General Counsel for Princeton University Investment Company. He started his career as a corporate attorney at Davis Polk & Wardwell. Mr. Kasdin also serves on the boards of trustees of several non-profit entities, including the Y of Central Maryland and the National September 11 Memorial & Museum at the World Trade Center Foundation, Inc., as well as on the Board of Directors of Apollo Commercial Real Estate Finance, Inc. He is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Mr. Kasdin has significant business experience and has served as a Trustee since 2014.
Kathryn L. Quirk. Ms. Quirk retired in March 2017 after nearly thirty-five years of serving in various legal, compliance and senior management roles in the asset management industry as well as serving as an officer of several investment companies. Prior to her retirement, she served at Goldman Sachs Asset Management as Head of U.S. Regulatory Compliance from 2013-2017. Prior to joining Goldman Sachs, she was Vice President and Corporate Counsel at Prudential Insurance Company of America, a subsidiary of Prudential Financial Inc., an insurance and financial services company. During that time, she also served as Deputy Chief Legal Officer, Asset Management at Prudential Insurance Company of America; Co-Chief Legal Officer at Prudential Investment Management, Inc.; Chief Legal Officer at Prudential Investments LLC; and Chief Legal Officer of the Prudential Mutual Funds. Prior to joining Prudential, Ms. Quirk worked at Zurich Scudder Investments, Inc., an asset management company, where she held several senior management positions, including General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer, Chief Risk Officer, Corporate Secretary, Managing Director, and served on the management committee. She started her career as an attorney at Debevoise & Plimpton LLP. Ms. Quirk has extensive investment management industry and legal experience and has served as a Trustee since 2017.
Ann M. Spruill.  Ms. Spruill retired in 2008 after an 18-year career at GMO & Co. LLC, where she was a partner, portfolio manager and the Head of International Active Equities Division. She also served as a member of the Executive Committee and the Board of Directors of that firm. GMO & Co. LLC is a privately owned global investment management firm. Ms. Spruill currently serves as a Trustee for the Financial Accounting Foundation, as a member of the Investment Committee and Chair of Global Public Equities for the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and as a Trustee of the University of Rhode Island. Ms. Spruill has significant investment experience and has served as a Trustee since 2014.
Charles F. McCain. Mr. McCain has served as Chief Executive Officer of Harbor Capital Advisors since 2017 and as a Director since 2007. Mr. McCain previously served as President and Chief Operating Officer of Harbor Capital Advisors during 2017, Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Harbor Capital Advisors from 2004-2017 and as Chief Compliance Officer of Harbor Capital Advisors from 2004-2014. He served as the Funds’ Chief Compliance Officer from 2004-2017. He also has served as a Director of Harbor Services Group, Inc., the transfer agent to the Funds, since 2007, and as the Chief Compliance Officer of Harbor Services Group, Inc. from 2004-2017. He has also served as a Director of Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc., the distributor and principal underwriter to the Funds, since 2007, and as the Chief Compliance Officer and Executive Vice President of Harbor Funds Distributors, Inc. from 2007-2017. Prior to joining Harbor Capital Advisors in 2004, Mr. McCain was a Junior Partner at the law firm of Wilmer Cutler Pickering Hale and Dorr LLP. Mr. McCain has extensive business, investment, legal and compliance experience and has served as a Trustee and Chairman of the Board of the Trust since 2017.


Board Leadership Structure
As indicated above, the business and affairs of the Trust shall be managed by or under the direction of the Trustees. The Trustees have delegated day-to-day management of the affairs of the Trust to the Adviser, subject to the Trustees’ oversight. The Board of Trustees is currently comprised of nine Trustees, eight of whom are Independent Trustees. All Independent Trustees serve on the Audit Committee and Nominating Committee, as discussed below. The Chairman of the Board of Trustees is an Interested Trustee.
The Independent Trustees determined that it was appropriate to appoint a Lead Independent Trustee to facilitate communication among the Independent Trustees and with management. Accordingly, the Independent Trustees have appointed Mr. Hack to serve as Lead Independent Trustee. Among other responsibilities, the Lead Independent Trustee coordinates with management and the other Independent Trustees regarding review of agendas for board meetings; serves as chair of meetings of the Independent Trustees; and, in consultation with the other Independent Trustees and as requested or appropriate, communicates with management, counsel, third party service providers and others on behalf of the Independent Trustees.
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Board Leadership Structure — Continued
The Trustees believe that this leadership structure is appropriate given, among other things, the size and number of funds offered by the Trust; the size and committee structure of the Board of Trustees; management’s accessibility to the Independent Trustees, both individually and collectively through the Lead Independent Trustee; and the active and engaged role played by each Trustee with respect to oversight responsibilities.


Board Committees
Mses. Dean, Quirk and Spruill and Messrs. Amero, Ball, Dowling, Hack and Kasdin serve on the Audit Committee and the Nominating Committee. The functions of the Audit Committee include recommending an independent registered public accounting firm to the Trustees, monitoring the independent registered public accounting firm’s performance, reviewing the results of audits and responding to certain other matters deemed appropriate by the Trustees. The Nominating Committee is responsible for the selection and nomination of candidates to serve as Independent Trustees. The Nominating Committee will also consider nominees recommended by shareholders to serve as Trustees provided that shareholders submit such recommendations in writing to Harbor Funds Nominating Committee, c/o Harbor Funds, 111 South Wacker Drive, 34th Floor, Chicago, IL 60606-4302 within a reasonable time before any meeting. The Valuation Committee is comprised of Brian L. Collins, Jodie L. Crotteau, Lora A. Kmieciak, Anmarie S. Kolinski, Charles F. McCain, Linda M. Molenda, Erik D. Ojala, John M. Paral and Diana R. Podgorny. The functions of the Valuation Committee include evaluating the liquidity of certain portfolio securities and determining the fair value of portfolio securities when necessary.
During Harbor Funds fiscal year ended October 31, 2018, the Board of Trustees held 8 meetings, the Valuation Committee held 225 meetings, the Audit Committee held 3 meetings and the Nominating Committee did not hold any meetings. All of the current Trustees and Audit Committee members then serving, attended 100% of the meetings of the Board of Trustees and applicable committees, if any, held during the fiscal year. The Board of Trustees does not have a compensation committee.


Risk Oversight
The Board of Trustees considers its role with respect to risk management to be one of oversight rather than active management. The Trust faces a number of types of risks, including investment risk, legal and compliance risk, operational risk (including business continuity risk), reputational and business risk. The Board of Trustees recognizes that not all risks potentially affecting the Trust can be identified in advance, and that it may not be possible or practicable to eliminate certain identifiable risks. As part of the Trustees’ oversight responsibilities, the Trustees generally oversee the Funds’ risk management policies and processes, as these are formulated and implemented by the Trust’s management. These policies and processes seek to identify relevant risks and, where practicable, lessen the possibility of their occurrence and/or mitigate the impact of such risks if they were to occur. Various parties, including management of the Trust, the Trust’s independent registered public accounting firm and other service providers provide regular reports to the Board of Trustees on various operations of the Trust and related risks and their management. In particular, the Funds’ Chief Compliance Officer regularly reports to the Trustees with respect to legal and compliance risk management, the Chief Financial Officer reports on financial operations, and a variety of other management personnel report on other risk management areas, including the operations of certain affiliated and unaffiliated service providers to the Trust. The Audit Committee maintains an open and active communication channel with both the Trust’s personnel and its independent auditor, largely, but not exclusively, through its chair.
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Trustee Compensation
For the fiscal year ended
October 31, 2018
Name of Person, Position Aggregate
Compensation
From Harbor Funds
Pension or
Retirement
Benefits Accrued
As Part of Fund
Expenses
Total
Compensation
From Harbor Funds
Paid to Trustees
Charles F. McCain, Chairman, President and Trustee

-0- -0- -0-
Scott M. Amero, Trustee

$255,000 -0- $255,000
Raymond J. Ball, Trustee1

$275,000 -0- $275,000
Donna J. Dean, Trustee

$255,000 -0-