0001042167-15-000175.txt : 20151208 0001042167-15-000175.hdr.sgml : 20151208 20151207173710 ACCESSION NUMBER: 0001042167-15-000175 CONFORMED SUBMISSION TYPE: 10-K PUBLIC DOCUMENT COUNT: 14 CONFORMED PERIOD OF REPORT: 20151002 FILED AS OF DATE: 20151208 DATE AS OF CHANGE: 20151207 FILER: COMPANY DATA: COMPANY CONFORMED NAME: JOHNSON OUTDOORS INC CENTRAL INDEX KEY: 0000788329 STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION: [3949] IRS NUMBER: 391536083 STATE OF INCORPORATION: WI FISCAL YEAR END: 0930 FILING VALUES: FORM TYPE: 10-K SEC ACT: 1934 Act SEC FILE NUMBER: 000-16255 FILM NUMBER: 151273670 BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET 1: 555 MAIN STREET CITY: RACINE STATE: WI ZIP: 53403-1015 BUSINESS PHONE: 2626316600 MAIL ADDRESS: STREET 1: 555 MAIN STREET STREET 2: STE 023 CITY: RACINE STATE: WI ZIP: 53403-1015 FORMER COMPANY: FORMER CONFORMED NAME: JOHNSON WORLDWIDE ASSOCIATES INC DATE OF NAME CHANGE: 19920703 10-K 1 form10k.htm form10k.htm
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
 

[ X ]    ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended October 2, 2015
 
OR
 
[____]    TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from ______ to ______
 
Commission file number 0-16255
 
JOHNSON OUTDOORS INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Wisconsin
 
39-1536083
(State or other jurisdiction of  incorporation or organization)
 
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
 
555 Main Street, Racine, Wisconsin 53403
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)
 
(262) 631-6600
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class                         Name of Exchange on Which Registered
Class A Common Stock, $.05 par value per share                     NASDAQ Global MarketSM

Securities registered pursuant to section 12(g) of the Act:  None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  [    ] No  [ X ]
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.   Yes  [    ] No  [ X ]
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.   Yes  [ X ] No  [     ]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).     Yes  [ X   ] No  [     ]
 
 
 
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Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K, or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    [X ] 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer" and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (Check one):
 
Large Accelerated Filer  [     ]
Accelerated Filer [X]
Non-Accelerated Filer [     ] (do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller Reporting Company [     ]
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).    Yes  [    ] No  [ X ]
 
As of November 27, 2015,  8,770,612 shares of Class A and 1,212,382 shares of Class B common stock of the registrant were outstanding. The aggregate market value of voting and non-voting common stock of the registrant held by nonaffiliates of the registrant was approximately $139,000,000 on April 2, 2015 (the last business day preceding the registrant’s most recently completed fiscal second quarter) based on approximately 4,760,000 shares of Class A common stock held by nonaffiliates as of such date. For purposes of this calculation only, shares of all voting stock are deemed to have a market value of $34.66 per share, the closing price of the Class A common stock as reported on the NASDAQ Global MarketSM on April 2, 2015 (the last trading day preceding the registrant’s most recently completed fiscal second quarter). Shares of common stock held by any executive officer or director of the registrant (including all shares beneficially owned by the Johnson Family) have been excluded from this computation because such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. This determination of affiliate status is not a conclusive determination for other purposes.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of the Shareholders of the Registrant are incorporated by reference into Part III of this report.

As used in this report, the terms “we,” “us,” “our,” “Johnson Outdoors” and the “Company” mean Johnson Outdoors Inc. and its subsidiaries collectively, unless the context indicates another meaning.
 
 
 
 
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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Page
 
Business
    4  
Risk Factors
    10  
Unresolved Staff Comments
    16  
Properties
    16  
Legal Proceedings
    17  
Mine Safety Disclosures
    17  
Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
    18  
Selected Financial Data
    20  
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
    21  
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
    31  
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
    31  
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
    31  
Controls and Procedures
    31  
Other Information
    32  
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
    32  
Executive Compensation
    32  
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
    33  
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence
    33  
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
    33  
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
    34  
Signatures
    35  
Exhibit Index
    36  
Consolidated Financial Statements
    F-1  

 
 
Forward Looking Statements
Certain matters discussed in this Form 10-K are “forward-looking statements,” and the Company intends these forward-looking statements to be covered by the safe harbor provisions for forward-looking statements contained in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 and is including this statement for purposes of those safe harbor provisions.  These statements may be identified by the use of forward-looking words or phrases such as “anticipate,” “believe,” “confident,” “could,” “expect,” “intend,” “may,” “planned,” “potential,” “should,” “will,” “would” or the negative of those terms or other words of similar meaning. Such forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties, which could cause actual results or outcomes to differ materially from those currently anticipated.  Similarly, statements that describe the Company’s future plans, objectives or goals are also forward-looking statements.

Factors that could affect actual results or outcomes include the matters described under the caption “Risk Factors” in Item 1A of this report and the following:  changes in economic conditions, consumer confidence levels and discretionary spending patterns in key markets; the Company’s success in implementing its strategic plan, including its targeted sales growth platforms and focus on innovation; litigation costs related to actions of and disputes with third parties, including competitors; the Company’s continued success in working capital management and cost-structure reductions; the Company’s ongoing success in meeting financial covenants in its credit agreements with its lenders; the Company’s success in integrating strategic acquisitions; the risk of future writedowns of goodwill or other long-lived assets; the ability of the Company's customers to meet payment obligations; movements in foreign currencies, interest rates or commodity costs; fluctuations in the prices of raw materials or the availability of raw materials used by the Company; the success of the Company’s suppliers and customers; the ability of the Company to deploy its capital successfully; unanticipated outcomes related to outsourcing certain manufacturing processes; unanticipated outcomes related to litigation matters; and adverse weather conditions. Shareholders, potential investors and other readers are urged to consider these factors in evaluating the forward-looking statements and are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements included herein are only made as of the date of this filing. The Company assumes no obligation, and disclaims any obligation, to update such forward-looking statements to reflect subsequent events or circumstances.
 
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Trademarks
We have registered the following trademarks, which may be used in this report: Minn Kota®, Cannon®, Humminbird®, LakeMaster®, Silva®, Eureka!®, Jetboil®, Old Town®, Ocean Kayakä, Necky®, Extrasport®, Carlisle®, SCUBAPRO®, and SUBGEAR®.

PART I
ITEM 1.   BUSINESS
 
Johnson Outdoors is a leading global manufacturer and marketer of branded seasonal, outdoor recreation products used primarily for fishing from a boat, diving, paddling, hiking and camping. The Company’s portfolio of well-known consumer brands has attained leading market positions due to continuous innovation, marketing excellence, product performance and quality.  Company values and culture support innovation in all areas, promoting and leveraging best practices and synergies within and across its subsidiaries to advance the Company’s strategic vision set by executive management and approved by the Board of Directors.  The Company is controlled by Helen P. Johnson-Leipold (Chairman and Chief Executive Officer), members of her family and related entities.

The Company was incorporated in Wisconsin in 1987 as successor to various businesses.
 
 
Marine Electronics
 
The Company’s Marine Electronics segment key brands are: Minn Kota battery-powered fishing motors for quiet trolling or primary propulsion, marine battery chargers and shallow water anchors; Humminbird sonar and GPS equipment for fishfinding, navigation and marine cartography; and Cannon downriggers for controlled-depth fishing.

Marine Electronics’ brands and related accessories are sold across the globe, with the majority of sales coming from North America through large outdoor specialty retailers, such as Bass Pro Shops and Cabela’s; large retail store chains; marine products distributors; original equipment manufacturers (OEM) of boat brands such as Tracker, Skeeter and Ranger; and internet retailers and distributors.  Markets outside of North America are accessed through a network of international distributors.

Marine Electronics has achieved market share gains by focusing on product innovation, quality products and effective marketing.  Such consumer marketing and promotion activities include: product placements on fishing-related television shows; print advertising and editorial coverage in outdoor, general interest and sport magazines; professional angler and tournament sponsorships; packaging and point-of-purchase materials and offers to increase consumer appeal and sales; branded websites; social media networks; and online promotions.

 
Outdoor Equipment
 
The Company’s Outdoor Equipment segment key brands are:  Eureka! consumer, commercial and military tents and accessories, sleeping bags, camping furniture and other recreational camping products; Jetboil portable outdoor cooking systems; and Silva field compasses.

Eureka! consumer tents, sleeping bags, camping furniture and other recreational camping products are mid- to high-price range products sold in the U.S. and Canada through independent sales representatives, primarily to camping and backpacking specialty stores, sporting goods stores, catalog and mail order houses and through internet retailers. Marketing of the Company’s tents, sleeping bags and other recreational camping products is focused on building the Eureka! brand name and establishing the Company as a leader in tent design and innovation. The Company’s consumer camping tents and sleeping bags are produced by third party manufacturing sources in Asia.  Eureka! camping products are sold under license in Japan, Australia and Europe.

Eureka! commercial tents include party tents and accessories, sold primarily to general rental stores, and other commercial tents and accessories sold directly to tent erectors. The Company’s commercial tent products range from 10’x10’ canopies to 120’ wide pole tents and other large scale frame structures and are primarily manufactured by the Company at the Company’s Binghamton, New York location.
 
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Eureka! also designs and manufactures large, heavy-duty tents and lightweight backpacking tents for the military at its Binghamton, New York location. Tents produced for military use in the last twelve months include modular general purpose tents, rapid deployment shelters and various lightweight one and two person tents. The Company manufactures military tent accessories like fabric floors and insulated thermal liners and is also a subcontract manufacturer for other providers of military tents.

Jetboil portable outdoor cooking systems are sold in the U.S. and Canada through independent sales representatives, primarily to camping and backpacking specialty stores, sporting goods stores, catalog and mail order houses and through internet retailers.  Marketing of Jetboil systems is focused on building brand awareness and leadership in product features and innovation. Jetboil products are produced at both the Company’s operating location in Manchester, New Hampshire and by third party manufacturing sources in Asia.  Jetboil products are sold in approximately 30 countries around the world.

Silva field compasses are manufactured by the Company and marketed exclusively in North America where the Company owns Silva trademark rights.

 
Watercraft
 
The Company’s Watercraft segment designs and markets Necky high performance sea touring kayaks; sit on top Ocean Kayaks; and Old Town canoes and kayaks for family recreation, touring, angling and tripping.  With the exception of Necky fiberglass boats and Old Town wooden canoes, these brands are manufactured at the Company’s facility in Old Town, Maine.

The Company uses a rotational molding process for manufacturing mid- to high-end polyethylene kayaks and canoes. The Company uses a thermoform molding process in the manufacturing of lower priced models.  The Company’s United States warehouse and distribution center for all of its Watercraft brands is also located in Old Town, Maine.

Watercraft accessory brands, including Extrasport personal flotation devices and Carlisle branded paddles, are produced primarily by third party sources located in North America and Asia.

The Company’s kayaks, canoes and accessories are sold through multiple channels in the U.S., Europe and the Pacific Basin with an emphasis on independent specialty retailers and large outdoor retailers such as REI, L.L. Bean, Academy and Cabela’s.  The Company has a network of distributors who sell Company products outside of North America.

The Company’s Watercraft business competes in the mid- to high-end of the product category by introducing product innovations, creating quality products and by focusing on the product-specific needs of each marketing channel.  Consumer marketing and promotion activities include: print advertising and editorial coverage in outdoor, general interest and sport magazines; direct marketing; and using branded websites and social media networks.

 
Diving
 
The Company manufactures and markets underwater diving products for recreational divers, which it sells and distributes under the SCUBAPRO brand name.

The Company markets a complete line of underwater diving and snorkeling equipment, including regulators, buoyancy compensators, dive computers and gauges, wetsuits, masks, fins, snorkels and accessories. SCUBAPRO diving equipment is marketed to the premium segment and high performance technical diving market. Products are sold via select distribution to independent specialty dive stores worldwide. These specialty dive stores sell the Company’s products over the counter as well as through their own websites.  In addition, they generally provide a wide range of services to divers, including regular maintenance, product repair, diving education and travel programs.  The Company also sells diving gear to dive training centers, resorts, search and rescue units and armed forces around the world.
 
 
 
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The Company’s consumer communication focuses on building brand awareness and highlighting exclusive product features and consumer benefits of its product lines. The Company’s communication and distribution strategies reinforce the SCUBAPRO brand’s position as the industry’s quality and innovation leader. The Company markets its equipment in diving magazines, via websites, through social media and through information and displays in dive specialty stores.

The Company manufactures regulators, dive computers, gauges, and instruments at its Italian and Indonesian facilities.  The Company sources buoyancy compensators, neoprene goods, plastic products, proprietary materials, and other components from third parties.

 
Financial Information for Business Segments
 
As noted above, the Company has four reportable business segments. See Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report for financial information concerning each business segment.

 
International Operations
 
See Note 12 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report for financial information regarding the Company’s domestic and international operations. See Note 1, subheading “Foreign Operations and Related Derivative Financial Instruments,” to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report for information regarding risks related to the Company’s foreign operations.

 
Research and Development
 
The Company commits significant resources to new product research and development in each of its business segments.  Marine Electronics conducts its product research, design, engineering and software development activities at its locations in Mankato and Little Falls, Minnesota; Alpharetta, Georgia; and Eufaula, Alabama.  Diving maintains research and development facilities in Zurich, Switzerland and Casarza Ligure, Italy.  Research and development activities for Watercraft are performed in Old Town, Maine.  Product research, design and innovation for Outdoor Equipment products are conducted at the Company's Binghamton, New York and Manchester, New Hampshire locations.

The Company expenses research and development costs as incurred, except for software development for new electronics products and bathymetry data collection and processing.  These costs are capitalized once technological feasibility is established and then amortized over the expected useful life of the software or database. The amounts expensed by the Company in connection with research and development activities for each of the last three fiscal years are set forth in the Company’s Consolidated Statements of Operations included elsewhere in this report.

 
Industry and Competitive Environment
 
The Company believes its products compete favorably on the basis of product innovation, product performance and marketing support and, to a lesser extent, price.

Marine Electronics:  Minn Kota’s main competitors in the electric trolling motors business are Motor Guide®, owned by Brunswick Corporation, and private label branded motors sourced primarily from manufacturers in Asia.  Competition in this business is focused on technological innovation, product quality and durability as well as product benefits and features for fishing.

The primary competitors in the marine battery charging business are Dual Pro™, owned by Pro Charging Systems, and various Pro Mariner™ products, owned by Power Products, LLC.  Competition in this business is based on charging time, reliability and battery protection.  The primary competitor in shallow water anchors is Power Pole®, owned by JL Marine Systems.  Competition in this business is based on secure positioning, speed of deployment and quiet operation.
 
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Humminbird’s main competitors in the market for on-boat electronics are GarminTM, LowranceTM and Simrad, owned by Navico, and Raymarine®, owned by FLIR Systems.  Competition in this business is primarily focused on the quality of sonar imaging and display, easy to use graphical interfaces as well as the integration of mapping and GPS technology.  Humminbird products contain marine cartography features.  Competitors offering marine cartography products include Navionics®, and C-Map, owned by Jeppesen Marine Inc.  Competition in this business focuses primarily on quality of data and quantity of available charts for inland lakes and ocean shoreline.

Cannon’s main competitors in the downrigger market are Big Jon Sports®, Walker and Scotty®. Competition in this business primarily focuses on ease of operation, speed and durability.

Outdoor Equipment:  The Company’s outdoor equipment brands and products compete in the sporting goods and specialty segments of the outdoor equipment market. Competitive brands with a strong position in the sporting goods channel include Coleman® and private label brands. The Company also competes with specialty companies such as Kelty®, The North Face® and Marmot® on the basis of materials and innovative designs for consumers who want performance products priced at a value.

The Company’s portable outdoor cooking systems compete in the specialty and higher end performance backpacking and camping markets.  The primary competitor in portable outdoor cooking systems is MSR® which is owned by Cascade Designs®.  Competition in this market is based on product size and weight, ease of use, reliability and performance.

The Company’s competitors in the commercial tent market include Anchor Industries® and Aztec Tents for tension, frame and canopy tents.  Competition in the commercial tent business is based on price, quality, structure, styling, ease of installation and technical support.

The Company sells military tents to prime vendors and third party distributors who hold supply contracts primarily with the U.S. Government, as well as to international governments.  Such supply contracts can be for commercial off-the-shelf products in addition to products required to be built to unique specifications.  Competitors in the military tent business include HDT®, Alaska Structures®, Camel, Outdoor Venture, and Diamond Brand.

Watercraft:  The Company primarily competes in this segment in the kayak and canoe product categories of the paddlesports market. The Company’s main competitors in this market are Confluence Outdoor, Hobie Cat®, Wenonah Canoe, Jackson Kayak and Legacy Paddlesports™, each of which competes on the basis of their product’s design, performance, quality and price.

Diving:  The main competitors in the Diving segment include Aqua Lung®, Suunto®, Atomic Aquatics, Oceanic, Cressi and Mares®.  Competitive advantage in the life support product category of this segment, which consists of regulators, dive computers, and buoyancy compensators, is a function of product innovation, performance, quality and safety.

Competition in the general diving product category of fins, masks, snorkels and wetsuits is characterized by low barriers to entry and numerous competitors who compete on the basis of product innovation, performance, quality and price.
 
 
Backlog
 
Unfilled orders for future delivery of products totaled approximately $55 million at October 2, 2015.  For the majority of its products, the Company’s businesses do not receive significant orders in advance of expected shipment dates.

 
Employees
 
At October 2, 2015, the Company had approximately 1,200 regular, full-time employees. The Company considers its employee relations to be excellent. Temporary employees are utilized primarily to manage peaks in the seasonal manufacturing of products.
 
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Patents, Trademarks and Proprietary Rights
 
The Company holds various patents for sonar, diving products and electric trolling motors, amongst other products, and regularly files applications for patents.   The Company has numerous trademarks and trade names which it considers important to its business, many of which are noted in this report. Historically, the Company has vigorously defended its intellectual property rights and expects to continue to do so.

 
Supply Chain and Sourcing of Materials
 
The Company manufactures some products that use parts or materials that, due to geographical distance, limited supplier capacity or availability or competing demands for such parts or materials, are only available in a cost effective manner from a single vendor or require the Company to place orders several months in advance of required delivery.

The Company attempts to mitigate product availability and these supply chain risks when possible through the purchase of safety stock, use of forecast-based supply contracts, and, to a lesser extent, with just in time inventory deliveries or supplier-owned inventory located close to the Company’s manufacturing locations.  The Company strives to balance the businesses’ need to maintain adequate inventory levels with the cost of holding such inventory by manufacturing to forecast for high volume products, utilizing build-to-order strategies wherever possible, and by having contract-manufactured products delivered to customers directly from the supplier.  The Company also seeks to manage its inventory through on-going product design and logistical initiatives with its suppliers to reduce lead times.

As most military contracts require utilization of domestic suppliers, the Company is limited to key vendors for materials used in its military tent business.

A significant driver of the delivered cost of the Company’s Watercraft products is fuel prices.  The Company seeks to mitigate this cost through negotiated fuel surcharge rates with its shipping firms and by optimizing the loads and routing of its deliveries to customers.

 
Seasonality
 
The Company’s products are outdoor recreation-related, which results in seasonal variations in sales and profitability. This seasonal variability is due to customers’ increasing their inventories in the quarters ending March and June, the primary selling season for the Company’s outdoor recreation products, with lower inventory volumes during the quarters ending September and December. The Company mitigates the seasonality of its businesses somewhat by encouraging customers to purchase and take delivery of products more evenly through the year.  The following table shows, for the past three fiscal years, the total net sales and operating profit or loss of the Company for each quarter, as a percentage of the total year.
 
Fiscal Year  
   
2015
   
2014
   
2013
 
Quarter Ended
 
Net
Sales
   
Operating
Profit
   
Net
Sales
   
Operating
Profit
   
Net
Sales
   
Operating
Profit
 
December
    16 %     -41 %     19 %     -17 %     21 %     6 %
March
    31 %     43 %     29 %     69 %     31 %     49 %
June
    33 %     92 %     32 %     56 %     30 %     63 %
September
    20 %     6 %     20 %     -8 %     18 %     -18 %
      100 %     100 %     100 %     100 %     100 %     100 %
 
 

 
 
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Environment and Climate Change
 
The Company is subject to various supranational, federal, state and local environmental laws, ordinances, regulations, and other requirements of governmental authorities.  We believe we comply with such laws and regulations.  Expenditures on environmental compliance have not had, and we believe in the future, will not have, a material effect on the Company’s capital expenditures, earnings or competitive position.  We do not believe that any direct or indirect consequences of legislation related to climate change will have a material effect on our operating costs, facilities or products.

 
Available Information
 
The Company maintains a website at www.johnsonoutdoors.com. On its website, the Company makes available, free of charge, its Annual Report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports, as soon as reasonably practical after the reports have been electronically filed or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission. In addition, the Company makes available on its website, free of charge, its (a) proxy statement for its annual meeting of shareholders; (b) Code of Business Conduct; (c) Code of Ethics for its Chief Executive Officer and Senior Financial and Accounting Officers; and (d) the charters for the following committees of the Board of Directors: Audit; Compensation; Executive; and Nominating and Corporate Governance. Except as specifically provided herein, the Company is not including the information contained on or available through its website as a part of, or incorporating such information by reference into, this Annual Report on Form 10-K. This report includes all material information about the Company that is included on the Company’s website and is otherwise required to be included in this report.  Copies of any materials the Company files with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) can also be obtained free of charge through the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.  The SEC’s Public Reference Room can be contacted at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549, or by calling 1 (800) 732-0330.
 
 
 
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ITEM 1A.   RISK FACTORS
 
The risks described below are not the only risks we face. Additional risks that we do not yet know of or that we currently think are immaterial may also impair our future business operations. If any of the events or circumstances described in the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be materially adversely affected. In such cases, the trading price of our common stock could decline.

Our net sales and profitability depend on our ability to continue to conceive, design and market products that appeal to our consumers.

Our business depends on our ability to continue to conceive, design, manufacture and market new products and upon continued market acceptance of our product offering. Rapidly changing consumer preferences and trends make it difficult to predict how long consumer demand for our existing products will continue or what new products will be successful. A decline in consumer demand for our products, our failure to develop new products on a timely basis in anticipation of changing consumer preferences or the failure of our new products to achieve and sustain consumer acceptance could reduce our net sales and profitability.

Competition in our markets could reduce our net sales and profitability.

We operate in highly competitive markets. We compete with several large domestic and foreign companies such as Brunswick, Navico, Garmin, Confluence Outdoor and Aqua Lung International, with private label products sold by many of our retail customers and with other producers of outdoor recreation products. Some of our competitors have longer operating histories, stronger brand recognition and greater financial, technical, marketing and other resources than us. In addition, we may face competition from new participants in our markets because some of the outdoor recreation product industries have limited barriers to entry. We experience price competition for our products, and competition for shelf space at retailers, all of which may increase in the future. If we cannot compete in our product markets successfully in the future, our net sales and profitability will likely decline.

General economic conditions affect the Company’s results.

Our revenues are affected by economic conditions and consumer confidence worldwide, but especially in the United States and Europe.  In times of economic uncertainty, consumers tend to defer expenditures for discretionary items, which affects demand for our products.  Moreover, our businesses are cyclical in nature, and their success is impacted by general economic conditions and specific economic conditions affecting the regions and markets we serve, the overall level of consumer confidence in the economy and discretionary income levels.  Any substantial deterioration in general economic conditions that diminishes consumer confidence or discretionary income can reduce our sales and adversely affect our financial results.  Moreover, declining economic conditions create the potential for future impairments of goodwill and other intangible and long-lived assets that may negatively impact our financial condition and results of operations.  The impact of weak consumer credit markets, corporate restructurings, layoffs, prolonged high unemployment rates, declines in the value of investments and residential real estate, higher fuel prices and increases in federal and state taxation all can negatively affect our operating results.

Intellectual property disputes relating to our products could increase our costs.

Our industry is susceptible to litigation regarding patent infringement and infringement of other intellectual property rights. We could be either a plaintiff or a defendant in trademark, patent and/or other intellectual property infringement or misappropriation claims and claims of breach of license from time to time. The prosecution or defense of any intellectual property litigation is both costly and disruptive of the time and resources of our management and product development teams, even if the claim or defense against us is without merit. The scope of any patent or other intellectual property to which we have or may obtain rights also may not prevent others from developing and selling competing products.  The validity and breadth of claims covered in patents and other intellectual property involve complex legal and factual questions, and the resolution of such claims may be highly uncertain, lengthy and expensive.  In addition, our patents or other intellectual property may be held invalid upon challenge, or others may claim that we have improperly or invalidly sought patent or other intellectual property protection for our technology, thus exposing us to direct or counter claims in any patent or intellectual property proceeding. We could also be required to pay substantial damages or settlement costs to resolve intellectual property litigation.
 
 
 
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Furthermore, we may rely on trade secret law to protect technologies and proprietary information that we cannot or have chosen not to patent. Trade secrets, however, are difficult to protect. Although we attempt to maintain protection through confidentiality agreements with necessary personnel, contractors and consultants, we cannot guarantee that such contracts will not be breached. In the event of a breach of a confidentiality agreement or the divulgence of proprietary information, we may not have adequate legal remedies to maintain our trade secret protection. Litigation to determine the scope of intellectual property rights, even if ultimately successful, could be costly and could divert management’s attention away from the Company’s business.  Any of these negative events could adversely affect our profitability or operating results.

Product recalls and other claims could affect our financial position and results of operations.

As a manufacturer and distributor of consumer products, we could be required to repurchase or recall one or more of our products if they are found to be unsafe or defective.  A repurchase or recall of our products could be costly to us and could damage the reputation of our brands.  If we were required to remove, or we voluntarily removed, our products from the market, our reputation could be tarnished and we might have large quantities of finished products that we could not sell.  As a result, product recalls could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

Impairment charges could impact our future financial position and results of operations.

We test our goodwill and other long-lived assets for impairment on an annual basis or when an event occurs that might reduce the fair value of the reporting unit or applicable asset or group of assets below its carrying value. Various uncertainties, including significant adverse changes in business climate, adverse actions by regulators, unanticipated competition, loss of key customers, a downturn in the economy or in discretionary income levels or changes in consumer preferences could impact the expected cash flows to be generated by an asset or group of assets, and may result in an impairment of those assets.  Although any such impairment charge would be a non-cash expense, any impairment of our assets could materially increase our expenses and reduce our profitability.  We recorded impairment charges totaling $8,475 in the year ended October 3, 2014. 

Sales of our products are seasonal, which causes our operating results to vary from quarter to quarter.

Sales of our products are seasonal. Historically, our net sales and profitability have peaked in our second and third fiscal quarters due to the buying patterns of our customers for our products. Seasonal variations in operating results may also cause us to increase our debt levels and interest expense primarily in the second and third fiscal quarters as we fund our working capital requirements.

The trading price of shares of our common stock fluctuates and investors in our common stock may experience substantial losses.

The trading price of our common stock has been volatile and may continue to be volatile in the future. The trading price of our common stock could decline or fluctuate in response to a variety of factors, including:
  •   the timing of our announcements or those of our competitors concerning significant product developments, acquisitions or financial performance;
  •   fluctuation in our quarterly operating results;
  •   substantial sales of our common stock;
  •   general stock market conditions; or
  •   other economic or external factors.
You may be unable to sell your stock at or above your purchase price.

A limited number of our shareholders can exert significant influence over the Company.
 
11

 

As of November 27, 2015, Helen P. Johnson-Leipold, members of her family and related entities (hereinafter the Johnson Family), held approximately 77% of the voting power of both classes of our common stock taken as a whole. This voting power would permit these shareholders, if they chose to act together, to exert significant influence over the outcome of shareholder votes, including votes concerning the election of directors, by-law amendments, possible mergers, corporate control contests and other significant corporate transactions.  Moreover, certain members of the Johnson Family have entered into a voting trust agreement covering approximately 96% of our outstanding class B common shares.  This voting trust agreement permits these shareholders, if they continue to choose to act together, to exert significant influence over the outcome of shareholder votes, including votes concerning the election of directors, by-law amendments, possible mergers, corporate control contests and other significant corporate transactions.

We may experience difficulties in integrating strategic acquisitions.
 
We have, as part of our strategy, historically pursued strategic acquisitions.  The pursuit of future growth through acquisitions, involves significant risks that could have a material adverse effect on our business.  Risks associated with integrating strategic acquisitions include:
  •  the acquired business may experience losses which could adversely affect our profitability;
  •  unanticipated costs relating to the integration of acquired businesses may increase our expenses and reduce our profitability;
  •  the possible failure to obtain any necessary consents to the transfer of licenses or other material agreements of the acquired company;
  •  the possible failure to maintain customer, licensor and other relationships of the acquired company after the closing of the transaction with the acquired company;
  •  difficulties in achieving planned cost savings and synergies may increase our expenses;
  •  diversion of our management’s attention could impair their ability to effectively manage our other business operations;
  •  unanticipated management or operational problems or liabilities may adversely affect our profitability and financial condition; and/or
  •  breaches of the representations or warranties or other violations of the contractual obligations required by the acquisition agreement of other parties to the acquisition transaction and any contractual remedies related thereto may not adequately protect or compensate us.
We are dependent upon certain key members of management.

Our success will depend to a significant degree on the abilities and efforts of our senior management. Moreover, our success depends on our ability to attract, retain and motivate qualified management, marketing, technical and sales personnel. These people are in high demand and often have competing employment opportunities. The labor market for skilled employees is highly competitive and we may lose key employees or be forced to increase their compensation to retain these people. Employee turnover could significantly increase our recruitment, training and other related employee costs. The loss of key personnel, or the failure to attract qualified personnel, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.

Sources of and fluctuations in market prices of raw materials can affect our operating results.

The primary raw materials we use in manufacturing our products are metals, resins and packaging materials. These materials are generally available from a number of suppliers, but we have chosen to concentrate our sourcing with a limited number of vendors for each commodity or purchased component. We believe our sources of raw materials are reliable and adequate for our needs. However, the development of future sourcing issues related to the availability of these materials as well as significant fluctuations in the market prices of these materials may have an adverse effect on our financial results.

Our profitability is also affected by significant fluctuations in the prices of the raw materials we use in our products, including the effect of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates on raw materials and purchased components.  We may not be able to pass along any price increases in our raw materials or other component costs to our customers.  As a result, an increase in the cost of raw materials, labor or other costs associated with the manufacturing of our products could increase our costs of sales and reduce our gross margins.
 
 
 
12

 

Financial distress in supply chain and shortage of raw materials or components of supply.

Deteriorating industry conditions can adversely affect our supply base.  Lower production levels at our major suppliers and volatility in certain raw material and energy costs may result in severe financial distress among many companies within our supply base.  Financial distress within our supply base and/or our suppliers’ inability to obtain credit from lending institutions could lead to commercial disputes and possible supply chain interruptions to our business.  In addition, potential adverse industry conditions may require us to provide financial assistance or other measures to ensure uninterrupted production of key components or materials used in the production of our products which could have a material adverse effect on our existing and future revenues and net income.

Additionally, in the event of catastrophic acts of nature such as fires, tsunamis, hurricanes and earthquakes or a rapid increase in production demands, either we, or our suppliers may experience supply shortages of raw materials or components.  This could be caused by a number of factors, including a lack of production line capacity or manpower or working capital constraints.  In order to manage and reduce the costs of purchased goods and services, we, and others within our industry have been rationalizing and consolidating our supply base.  As a result, there is greater dependence on fewer sources of supply for certain components and materials used in our products, which could increase the possibility of a supply shortage of any particular component.  If we or one of our own suppliers experience a supply shortage, we may become unable to produce the affected products if we cannot procure the components from another source.  Such production interruptions could impede a ramp-up in production and could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

We consider the production capacities and financial condition of suppliers in our selection process, and expect that they will meet our delivery requirements.  However, there can be no assurance that strong demand, capacity limitations, shortages of raw materials, labor disputes or other problems will not result in any shortages or delays in the supply of components to us.

Currency exchange rate fluctuations could adversely affect the Company’s results.

We have significant foreign operations, for which the functional currencies are denominated primarily in euros, Swiss francs, Hong Kong dollars, Japanese yen and Canadian dollars. As the values of the currencies of the foreign countries in which we have operations increase or decrease relative to the U.S. dollar, the sales, expenses, profits, losses, assets and liabilities of our foreign operations, as reported in our consolidated financial statements, increase or decrease, accordingly. Approximately 18% of our revenues for the year ended October 2, 2015 were denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Approximately 8% were denominated in euros and approximately 6% were denominated in Canadian dollars with the remaining 4% denominated in various other foreign currencies. We may mitigate a portion of the impact of fluctuations in certain foreign currencies on our operations through the purchase of foreign currency swaps, forward contracts and options to hedge known commitments denominated in foreign currencies or to reduce the risk of changes in foreign currency exchange rates on foreign currency borrowings.

Because we rely on foreign suppliers and we sell products in foreign markets, we are susceptible to numerous international business risks that could increase our costs or disrupt the supply of our products.
 
Our international operations subject us to risks, including:
  •  economic and political instability;
  •  restrictive actions by foreign governments;
  •  opportunity costs and reputational damage related to the presence of counterfeit versions of the Company’s products in such foreign markets;
  •  greater difficulty enforcing intellectual property rights and weaker laws protecting intellectual property rights;
  •  changes in import duties or import or export restrictions;
  •  timely shipping of product and unloading of product, including the timely rail/truck delivery to our warehouses and/or a customer’s warehouse of our products;
  •  complications in complying with the laws and policies of the United States affecting the importation of goods, including duties, quotas and taxes;
  •  required compliance with U.S. laws that impact the Company’s operations in foreign jurisdictions that don’t impact local operating companies; and
  •  complications in complying with trade and foreign tax laws.
 
 
13

 
Any of these risks, including the cost of compliance with trade and foreign tax laws, could disrupt the supply of our products or increase our expenses.  In particular, the uncertainty regarding the ability of certain European countries to continue to service their sovereign debt obligations and the related financial restructuring efforts by European governments may cause the value of several European currencies, including the euro, to fluctuate, which may adversely affect our non-U.S. dollar sales and earnings.  As we have manufacturing operations in Italy, a significant disruption of the political or financial systems there could put these manufacturing operations at risk, which could ultimately adversely affect our profitability or operating results.

We may be subject to disruptions or failures in our information technology systems and network infrastructures that could have a material adverse effect on our business.

We rely on the efficient and uninterrupted operation of complex information technology systems and network infrastructures to operate our business. We also hold data in various data center facilities upon which our business depends. A disruption, infiltration or failure of our information technology systems or any of our data centers as a result of software or hardware malfunctions, system implementations or upgrades, computer viruses, third-party security breaches, employee error, theft or misuse, malfeasance, power disruptions, natural disasters or accidents could cause breaches of data security, loss of intellectual property and critical data and the release and misappropriation of sensitive competitive information. Any of these events could result in the loss of key information, impair our production and supply chain processes, harm our competitive position, damage our reputation with customers, cause us to incur significant costs to remedy any damages and ultimately materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. While we have implemented a number of protective measures, such measures may not be adequate or implemented properly to prevent or fully address the adverse effect of such events.

Our failure to adequately protect personal information could have a material adverse effect on our business.

A wide variety of local, state, national, and international laws, directives and regulations apply to the collection, use, retention, protection, disclosure, transfer, and other processing of personal data. These data protection and privacy-related laws and regulations continue to evolve and may result in ever-increasing regulatory and public scrutiny and escalating levels of enforcement and sanctions and increased costs of compliance. Certain safe-harbor exemptions upon which the Company relies for data transfers have been challenged and may no longer available to us in the future. Our failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations, or to protect such data, could result in enforcement actions against us, including fines, imprisonment of company officials and public censure, claims for damages by end-customers and other affected individuals, damage to our reputation and loss of goodwill (both in relation to existing end-customers and prospective end-customers), any of which could have a material adverse effect on our operations, financial performance, and business. Changing definitions of personal data and personal information, within the European Union, the United States, and elsewhere may limit or inhibit our ability to operate or expand our business, including limiting strategic partnerships that may involve the sharing of data. The evolving data protection regulatory environment may require significant management attention and financial resources to analyze and modify our information technology infrastructure to meet these changing requirements all of which could reduce our operating margins and impact our operating results and financial condition.

Future terror attacks, war, natural disasters or other catastrophic events beyond our control could negatively impact our business.

Terror attacks, war or other civil disturbances, natural disasters and other catastrophic events could lead to economic instability and decreased demand for our products, which could negatively impact our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.  In the past, terrorist attacks have caused instability in global financial markets and the industries in which we compete and have negatively affected spending on consumer discretionary products.  In addition, our facilities are located throughout the world and could be subject to damage from terrorism incidents or from fires, floods, earthquakes or other natural or man-made disasters.  Terrorist incidents could also lead to increased border security which could in turn negatively impact our global supply chain by causing shipping delays or shortages in key materials or components, increasing the cost of such goods or requiring us to keep greater inventories, any of which may adversely impact our business, results of operations, financial condition or cash flows.
 
 
 

 
 
14

 
The inability to successfully defend claims asserted by taxing authorities could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We conduct business in many countries, which requires us to interpret the income tax laws and rulings in each of those taxing jurisdictions. Due to the subjectivity of tax laws in or between those jurisdictions, as well as the subjectivity of factual interpretations, our estimates of income tax liabilities may differ from actual payments or assessments. Claims from taxing authorities related to these differences could have an adverse impact on our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.

We are subject to environmental, safety and human rights regulations.

We are subject to supranational, federal, state, local and foreign laws and other legal requirements related to the generation, storage, transport, treatment and disposal of materials as a result of our manufacturing and assembly operations. These laws include the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (as amended), the Clean Air Act (as amended) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (as amended).  Risk of environmental liability and changes associated with maintaining compliance with environmental laws is inherent in the nature of our business and there is no assurance that material liabilities or changes would not arise.

The Company is also subject to the requirement of Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and SEC rules related thereto to conduct due diligence and disclose and report on whether certain minerals and metals, known as “conflict minerals,” are contained in the Company’s products and whether they originate from the Democratic Republic of Congo (“DRC”) and adjoining countries. Among other things, compliance with this rule could adversely affect the sourcing, availability and pricing of such materials if they are found to be used in the manufacture of the Company’s products, and this in turn could affect the costs associated with the Company’s products. As there may be only a limited number of suppliers offering “conflict free” conflict minerals, we cannot be sure that going forward we will be able to obtain the necessary conflict minerals from such suppliers in sufficient quantities or at competitive prices.  Moreover, since the Company’s supply chain structure is complex, management may have difficulty verifying the origin of these materials and if they exist within the Company’s products and, as a result, the Company may be unable to certify that its products are DRC conflict mineral free.  Also, we may face reputational challenges if we determine that certain of our products contain minerals not determined to be conflict free or if we are unable to sufficiently verify the origins of all conflict minerals used in our products through the procedures we may implement.

We rely on our credit facilities to provide us with sufficient working capital to operate our business.

Historically, we have relied upon our existing credit facilities to provide us with adequate working capital to operate our business.  If our lenders reduce or terminate our access to amounts under our credit facilities, we may not have sufficient capital to fund our working capital needs and/or we may need to secure additional capital or financing to fund our working capital requirements or to repay outstanding debt under our credit facilities.  We can make no assurance that we will be successful in ensuring our availability of amounts under our credit facilities or in connection with raising additional capital and that any amount, if raised, will be sufficient to meet our cash flow requirements.  If we are not able to maintain our borrowing availability under our credit facilities and/or raise additional capital when needed, we may be forced to sharply curtail our efforts to manufacture and promote the sale of our products or to curtail our operations.  Ultimately, we may be forced to cease operations.

Our debt covenants may limit our ability to complete acquisitions, incur debt, make investments, sell assets, merge or complete other significant transactions.

Our credit facilities and certain other of our debt instruments include limitations on a number of our activities, including our ability to:
  •  incur additional debt;
  •  create liens on our assets or make guarantees;
  •  make certain investments or loans;
  •  pay dividends; or
  •  dispose of or sell assets, make acquisitions above certain amounts or enter into a merger or similar transaction.
 
15

 
 
Our credit facilities also contain a number of financial covenants.  The restrictive covenants in our credit facilities may limit our ability to engage in acts that may be in our best long term interests.  A breach of any of the restrictive covenants in our credit facilities could result in a default under these facilities.  If a default occurs, the lenders under our credit facilities may elect to declare all outstanding borrowings, together with accrued interest, to be immediately due and payable, to terminate any commitments they have to provide further borrowings and to exercise any other rights they have under the facilities or applicable law.

Our shares of common stock are thinly traded and our stock price may be volatile.

Because our common stock is thinly traded, its market price may fluctuate significantly more than the stock market in general or the stock prices of similar companies, which are exchanged, listed or quoted on NASDAQ. We believe there are approximately 4,760,000 shares of our Class A common stock held by non-affiliates as of November 27, 2015. Thus, our common stock will be less liquid than the stock of companies with broader public ownership, and as a result, the trading price for our shares of common stock may be more volatile. Among other things, trading of a relatively small volume of our common stock may have a greater impact on the trading price for our stock than would be the case if our public float were larger.
 
Our business is susceptible to adverse weather conditions or events.
 
Our success is in part affected by adverse weather conditions, including fires, floods, tornados, severe cold and other natural disasters. Such events have the tendency to create fluctuations in demand for our products which may impact our borrowing costs, increase our expenses and reduce our profitability.  Moreover, our profitability is affected by our ability to successfully manage our inventory levels and demand for our products, which, in part depends upon the efficient operation of our production and delivery systems. These systems are vulnerable to damage or interruption from the aforementioned natural disasters.  Such natural disasters could adversely impact our ability to meet delivery requirements of our customers, which may result in our need to incur extra costs to expedite production and delivery of product to meet customer demand. Any of these events could negatively impact our profitability.
 
 
ITEM 1A.   UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

Not Applicable
 
 
ITEM 2.   PROPERTIES
 
The Company maintains leased and owned manufacturing, warehousing, distribution and office facilities throughout the world. The Company believes that its facilities are well maintained and have capacity adequate to meet its current needs.

See Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report for a discussion of the Company’s lease obligations.

As of October 2, 2015, the Company’s principal manufacturing (identified with an asterisk) and other locations are:
 
Alpharetta, Georgia (Marine Electronics)
Antibes, France (Diving)
Barcelona, Spain (Diving)
Batam, Indonesia* (Diving and Outdoor Equipment)
Binghamton, New York* (Outdoor Equipment)
 
 
 
 
16

 
Brussels, Belgium (Diving)
Burlington, Ontario, Canada (Marine Electronics, Outdoor Equipment, Watercraft)
Casarza Ligure, Italy* (Diving)
Chai Wan, Hong Kong (Diving)
Chatswood, Australia (Diving)
El Cajon, California (Diving)
Eufaula, Alabama* (Marine Electronics)
Little Falls, Minnesota* (Marine Electronics)
Manchester, New Hampshire* (Outdoor Equipment)
Mankato, Minnesota* (Marine Electronics)
Mexicali, Mexico* (Marine Electronics)
Old Town, Maine* (Watercraft)
Wendelstein, Germany (Diving)
Yokahama, Japan (Diving)
Zurich, Switzerland (Diving)

The Company’s corporate headquarters is located in a leased facility in Racine, Wisconsin.
 
 
ITEM 3.   LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
 
In the normal course of business, we may be involved in various legal proceedings from time to time.  Except as noted below, we are not involved in any litigation involving amounts deemed to be material to the business or financial condition of the Company.

In the Matter of Certain Marine Sonar Imaging Systems, Products Containing the Same and Components Thereof (ITC Investigation No. 337-TA-926).

On July 18, 2014, the Company and Johnson Outdoors Marine Electronics, Inc. filed a complaint with the United States International Trade Commission (“ITC”), Investigation No. 337-TA-926, against Respondents Garmin International Inc., Garmin USA, Inc. and Garmin Corporation (collectively “Garmin”) alleging a violation of Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, to block the importation of one or more side scan imaging products that are believed to infringe U.S. Patents 7,652,952 (“the ‘952 patent”); 7,710,825 (“the ‘825 patent”); and 7,755,974 (“the ‘974 patent”).  The inventions of these asserted patents are used in certain Humminbird® fishfinders.

On July 13, 2015, an Administrative Law Judge (“ALJ”) at the ITC determined that Garmin violated Section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, by importing and selling SideVü sonars, which the judge found infringed the ‘974 patent.  The ALJ also found that all three of the asserted patents are valid and enforceable.

On November 18, 2015, the full ITC affirmed the initial determination by the ALJ.  The ITC affirmed that all three patents asserted by Johnson Outdoors are valid and enforceable and that numerous models of Garmin’s SideVü sonars directly infringe six Johnson Outdoors patent claims.  The ITC also issued a limited exclusion order barring Garmin’s infringing SideVü sonar systems and components thereof which are manufactured overseas from import into the United States and a cease and desist order prohibiting Garmin from selling or distributing any infringing product or component thereof from its inventory.  The orders will go into effect pending the mandatory review by the U.S. Trade Representative.

Johnson Outdoors Inc. and Johnson Outdoors Marine Electronics, Inc. v. Garmin International Inc. and Garmin USA, Inc. (Civil Action No.: 2:14-cv-683).
On July 1, 2014, the Company and Johnson Outdoors Marine Electronics, Inc. filed a parallel patent infringement lawsuit (similar in nature to the ITC proceeding noted above) against Garmin in the United States District Court for the Middle District of Alabama, Northern Division, Civil Action No.: 2:14-cv-683.  This lawsuit has been stayed by the District Court pending a final resolution of the above ITC proceeding.
 
 
ITEM 4.   MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
None.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
17

 
PART II
 
ITEM 5.   MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
 
Market Information
Certain information with respect to this item is included in Notes 9 and 10 to the Company's consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report. The Company’s Class A common stock is traded on the NASDAQ Global MarketSM under the symbol: JOUT. There is no public market for the Company’s Class B common stock. However, the Class B common stock is convertible at all times at the option of the holder into shares of Class A common stock on a share for share basis. As of November 27, 2015, the Company had 641 holders of record of its Class A common stock and 27 holders of record of its Class B common stock. We believe the number of beneficial owners of our Class A common stock on that date was substantially greater.

A summary of the high and low closing prices for the Company’s Class A common stock during each quarter of the years ended October 2, 2015, October 3, 2014 and September 27, 2013 is as follows:
 
   
 
First Quarter
 
Second Quarter
 
Third Quarter
 
Fourth Quarter
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
Stock prices:
                                                                       
High
  $ 31.74     $ 28.70     $ 21.75     $ 34.66     $ 28.37     $ 23.84     $ 34.86     $ 26.36     $ 25.03     $ 26.95     $ 27.10     $ 27.03  
Low
    25.60       25.26       18.63       28.35       21.57       19.92       20.43       19.82       22.43       20.50       22.47       24.75  
 
Dividends
The Company’s Articles of Incorporation provide that no dividend, other than a dividend payable in shares of the Company’s common stock, may be declared or paid upon the Class B common stock unless such dividend is declared or paid upon both classes of common stock. Whenever a dividend (other than a dividend payable in shares of Company common stock) is declared or paid upon any shares of Class B common stock, at the same time there must be declared and paid a dividend on the shares of Class A common stock equal in value to 110% of the amount per share of the dividend declared and paid on the shares of Class B common stock. Whenever a dividend is payable in shares of Company common stock, such dividend must be declared or paid at the same rate on the Class A common stock and the Class B common stock.
 
Pursuant to the Company’s revolving credit agreement dated September 16, 2013, the Company is limited in the amount of restricted payments (primarily dividends and repurchases of common stock) made during each fiscal year.  The Company may declare, and pay, dividends in accordance with historical practices, but in no event may the aggregate amount of all dividends or repurchases of common stock exceed $10 million in any fiscal year.
 
Quarterly dividends were $0.075 per share of Class A common stock and $0.068 per share of Class B common stock for each of the first three quarters of 2015.  Beginning with the dividend declared on October 1, 2015, the Company increased the dividend to $0.08 per share of Class A common stock and $0.073 per share of Class B common stock. Total dividends declared in 2015 were $3,016.  Cash dividends paid in 2015 totaled $2,966 and dividends payable of $790 was included in current liabilities at October 2, 2015.

While the Board of Directors of the Company presently intends to continue the payment of regular quarterly cash dividends on the Company’s common stock, they monitor and evaluate the Company’s dividend practice quarterly and may elect to increase, decrease or not pay a dividend at any time. The Company’s ability to pay dividends could be affected by future business performance, liquidity, capital needs, alternative investment opportunities and debt covenants in its loan agreements.
 
 
 
 
 
18

 
Total Shareholder Return
 
The graph below compares on a market cap weighted cumulative basis the yearly percentage change since October 1, 2010 in the total return (assuming reinvestment of dividends) to shareholders on the Class A common stock with (a) the total return (assuming reinvestment of dividends) on The NASDAQ Stock Market-U.S. Index; (b) the total return (assuming reinvestment of dividends) on the Russell 2000 Index; and (c) the total return (assuming reinvestment of dividends) on a self-constructed peer group index. The Company’s new peer group consists of Arctic Cat Inc., Black Diamond Inc., Brunswick Corporation, Callaway Golf Company, Escalade Inc., Garmin Ltd., Jarden Corp., Marine Products Corporation, and Nautilus, Inc.; Quiksilver Inc. has been removed.  The graph assumes $100 was invested on October 1, 2010 in the Company’s Class A common stock, The NASDAQ Stock Market-U.S. Index, the Russell 2000 Index and the peer group index.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
* $100 invested on October 1, 2010 in stock or index, including reinvestment of dividends.
   Indexes calculated on a mid-month basis.
 
                                     
   
10/1/2010
   
9/30/2011
   
9/28/2012
   
9/27/2013
   
10/3/2014
   
10/2/2015
 
Johnson Outdoors Inc.
  $ 100.0     $ 120.6     $ 167.8     $ 208.6     $ 204.8     $ 173.3  
NASDAQ Composite
    100.0       102.9       134.8       165.3       198.1       210.7  
Russell 2000 Index
    100.0       96.0       126.7       164.8       171.8       175.5  
New Peer Group
    100.0       100.5       155.7       203.2       230.9       229.6  
Old Peer Group
    100.0       99.2       151.7       202.0       220.0       216.1  
                                                 
                                                 
 
The information in this section titled “Total Shareholder Return” shall not be deemed to be “soliciting material” or “filed” with the Securities and Exchange Commission or subject to Regulation 14A or 14C promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission or subject to the liabilities of section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and this information shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
 
 
 
19

 
 
 
ITEM 6.   SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
 
 
The following table presents selected consolidated financial data, which should be read along with the Company’s consolidated financial statements and the notes to those statements and with “Item 7 – Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” included in or referred to elsewhere in this report.  The operating results for the years ended October 2, 2015, October 3, 2014 and September 27, 2013 and the balance sheet data as of October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014, are derived from the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere herein.  The operating results for the years ended September 28, 2012 and September 30, 2011, and the balance sheet data as of September 27, 2013, September 28, 2012 and September 30, 2011 are derived from the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements which are not included in this report.  The historical results are not necessarily indicative of results to be expected for future periods.


                               
   
October 2
   
October 3
   
September 27
   
September 28
   
September 30
 
(thousands, except per share data)
 
2015
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
   
2011
 
OPERATING RESULTS
                             
Net sales
  $ 430,489     $ 425,410     $ 426,461     $ 412,292     $ 407,422  
Gross profit
    171,733       168,613       171,049       164,322       163,135  
Impairment losses
    -       8,475       -       -       -  
Litigation settlement
    -       -       -       (3,500 )     -  
Operating expenses
    153,880       143,447       145,458       146,409       145,465  
Operating profit
    17,853       16,691       25,591       21,413       17,670  
Interest expense
    865       788       1,285       2,258       3,220  
Other expense (income), net
    1,235       (1,519 )     (354 )     (771 )     2,200  
Income before income taxes
    15,753       17,422       24,660       19,926       12,250  
Income tax expense (benefit)
    5,137       8,299       5,333       9,792       (20,394 )
Net income
  $ 10,616     $ 9,123     $ 19,327     $ 10,134     $ 32,644  
Weighted average common shares - Dilutive
    9,727       9,635       9,523       9,379       9,287  
Net income per common share - Diluted:
                                       
Class A
  $ 1.06     $ 0.90     $ 1.95     $ 1.03     $ 3.36  
Class B
    1.06       0.90       1.95       1.03       3.36  
Dividends declared, per common share*:
                                       
Class A
  $ 0.31     $ 0.38     $ -     $ -     $ -  
Class B
    0.28       0.34       -       -       -  
                                         
* There were five quarterly dividends declared in fiscal 2014 and four quarterly dividends declared in fiscal 2015.
 
                                         

 

                               
   
October 2
   
October 3
   
September 27
   
September 28
   
September 30
 
(thousands, except per share data)
 
2015
   
2014
   
2013
   
2012
   
2011
 
BALANCE SHEET DATA
                             
Current assets
  $ 209,370     $ 197,550     $ 188,572     $ 182,952     $ 176,445  
Total assets
    299,204       288,626       288,350       263,632       259,356  
Current liabilities
    69,554       60,232       63,372       58,967       65,000  
Long-term debt, less current maturities
    7,062       7,431       7,794       8,334       11,478  
Total debt
    7,430       7,791       8,333       8,860       14,972  
Shareholders' equity
    197,968       198,458       197,668       173,604       163,525  
 

 
20

 
 
ITEM 7.   MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
 
Unless otherwise stated, all monetary amounts in this Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, other than per share amounts, are stated in thousands.
 
Executive Overview
 
The Company designs, manufactures and markets high quality recreational products for the outdoor enthusiast. Through a combination of innovative products, strong marketing, a talented and passionate workforce and efficient distribution, the Company seeks to set itself apart from the competition. Its subsidiaries operate as a network that promotes innovation and leverages best practices and synergies, following the strategic vision set by executive management and approved by the Company’s Board of Directors.

Highlights
 
Despite a 2.5% unfavorable impact of foreign currency exchange on our net sales, the Company’s fiscal 2015 revenues increased by 1% versus the prior year driven largely by strong new product performance.   Operating profit grew 7% in the current year compared to last year and was impacted by the increase in sales volume as well as higher gross margins on sold products.  One time charges in fiscal 2014 of $6,875 ($8,475 of impairment charges related to certain intangible assets in the Outdoor Equipment segment, net of $1,600 of cash recoveries from the Jetboil indemnity escrow) were more than offset by non-recurring legal fees in the current year of $7,333 related to litigation brought by the Company against a competitor relating to infringement of its patented side scan sonar technology.  See “Item 3 – Legal Proceedings” included in or referred to elsewhere in this report for additional information on this litigation.
 
Results of Operations
 
Summary consolidated financial results from continuing operations for the fiscal years presented were as follows:


                   
(thousands, except per share data)
 
2015
   
2014
   
2013
 
Net sales
  $ 430,489     $ 425,410     $ 426,461  
Gross profit
    171,733       168,613       171,049  
Operating expenses
    153,880       151,922       145,458  
Operating profit
    17,853       16,691       25,591  
Interest expense
    865       788       1,285  
Other expense (income), net
    1,235       (1,519 )     (354 )
Income tax expense
    5,137       8,299       5,333  
Net income
    10,616       9,123       19,327  
 

The Company’s internal and external sales and operating profit (loss) by business segment for each of the three most recent completed fiscal years were as follows:


   
2015
   
2014
   
2013
 
Net sales
                     
Marine Electronics
  $ 262,518      $ 249,561      $ 247,744  
Outdoor Equipment
    47,573       47,443       44,223  
Watercraft
    48,961       49,492       50,858  
Diving
    72,125       79,559       84,536  
Other / Eliminations
    (688 )     (645 )     (900 )
    $ 430,489     $ 425,410     $ 426,461  
                         
      2015       2014       2013  
Operation profit (loss):
                       
Marine Electronics
  $ 26,055     $ 30,722     $ 32,172  
Outdoor Equipment
    3,847       (3,726 )     2,180  
Watercraft
    1,620       210       (2,116 )
Diving
    934       3,596       5,694  
Other / Eliminations
    (14,603 )     (14,111 )     (12,339 )
      17,853     $ 16,691     $ 25,591  


 


 


 


 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
 



 
 
 
 
 
 
 


 
 

 
 
21

 
See Note 12 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included elsewhere in this report for the definition of segment net sales and operating profit.
 
Fiscal 2015 vs. Fiscal 2014
 
Net Sales
 
Net sales in 2015 increased by 1% to $430,489 compared to $425,410 in 2014.  Strong demand for new products overcame a 2.5% unfavorable impact from foreign currency exchange on the current year’s sales levels.

Net sales for the Marine Electronics business increased by $12,957, or 5% during 2015.  The increase from fiscal 2014 was driven primarily by exceptional new product performance in the Minn Kota product line, particularly with regard to the new Ulterra automatic stow and deploy trolling motor.

Outdoor Equipment net sales increased $130, less than 1%, in 2015 over their levels in 2014.  A significant increase in sales of Jetboil products was nearly offset by declines in sales of tents year over year.

The Watercraft business experienced a decrease in net sales of $531, or 1%, due primarily to the decision to exit certain unprofitable international markets.

Net sales for the Diving business declined $7,434, or 9%, year over year, due primarily to a 9% unfavorable impact of foreign currency exchange.

Cost of Sales
Cost of sales was $258,756, or 60.1% of net sales, on a consolidated basis for the year ended October 2, 2015 compared to $256,797 or 60.4% of net sales, in the prior year.  Costs of raw materials and components increased only slightly over the prior year while modest increases in labor rates were nearly offset by process improvements in each of the business segments.

Gross Profit
Gross profit of $171,733 was 39.9% of net sales on a consolidated basis for the year ended October 2, 2015 compared to $168,613 or 39.6% of net sales in the prior year.

Gross profit in the Marine Electronics business increased by $7,076 from the prior year due primarily to the 5% increase in net sales.

Outdoor Equipment gross profit increased by $379 from 2014 due primarily to a favorable sales mix with the increase in sales of Jetboil products.
 
 
 
22

 

Gross profit in the Watercraft segment was $738 higher than 2014 levels due primarily to a more favorable sales mix occurring during 2015 as a result of the segment’s de-emphasis on selling low-margin products and selling in low-margin markets.

The 9% decrease in net sales in the Diving segment noted above was the primary driver of a $5,086 decrease in gross profit of that segment.  Foreign currency exchange had a $1,700 unfavorable impact on Diving’s gross profit year over year.

Operating Expenses
Operating expenses overall increased from the prior year by $1,958.  The increase was driven primarily by higher sales volume related expenses.  Non-recurring legal costs related to patent litigation described elsewhere herein recognized in the current year offset the $6,875 net effect of impairment charges on Jetboil intangible assets and the cash recovery from the Jetboil indemnity escrow, recognized in 2014.

Operating expenses for the Marine Electronics segment increased by $11,743 from fiscal 2014 levels.  The increase was due mainly to approximately $7,300 of patent litigation costs incurred in the current year as well as higher sales volume related costs.

Outdoor Equipment operating expenses decreased by $7,195 from the prior year due primarily to $8,475 of impairment charges recognized in fiscal 2014 on Jetboil intangible assets, which was partially offset by a $1,600 cash recovery from the Jetboil indemnity claim in that same year.

In the Watercraft segment, operating expenses decreased $673 from their levels in fiscal 2014 due primarily to lower operating costs as a result of our decision to exit certain unprofitable international markets.

Operating expenses for the Diving business decreased by $2,425 year over year due primarily to cost containment efforts in light of lower sales volumes in this segment.

Operating Results
The Company’s operating profit was $17,853 in fiscal 2015 compared to an operating profit of $16,691 in fiscal 2014.  Marine Electronics operating profit decreased by $4,667 to $26,055 from $30,722 in the prior year due primarily to $7,300 of patent litigation costs incurred in the current year.  Excluding the effect of these charges, operating profit for this segment would have been $2,666 higher than in the prior year.  The operating profit for Outdoor Equipment was $3,847 compared to an operating loss of $3,726 in the prior year due primarily to the Jetboil impairment charges noted above.  Excluding the effect of these charges, operating profit for this segment would have been $698 higher than in the prior year.  Operating profit for the Watercraft business increased by $1,410 in fiscal 2015.  Operating profit for the Diving business declined $2,662 from fiscal 2014 to $934 in fiscal 2015.

Other Income and Expenses
Interest expense of $865 increased from the prior year by $77. Interest income was less than $100 in both years.  Net other expense of $1,299 in fiscal 2015 compared to other income of $1,434 in fiscal 2014.  The current year other expense included currency losses of $1,196 and market losses, net of dividend income, of $106 on deferred compensation plan assets.  In the prior year, other income included $427 of currency gains as well as $965 of market gains and dividends on the deferred compensation plan assets.  The dividends and market gains and losses on deferred compensation plan assets recognized in the Consolidated Statement of Operations in “Other expense (income), net” are offset as deferred compensation expense in “Operating expenses.”

Pretax Income and Income Taxes
The Company realized pretax income of $15,753 in fiscal 2015 compared to $17,422 in fiscal 2014. The Company recorded income tax expense of $5,137 in 2015, which equated to an effective tax rate of 32.6%, compared to $8,299 in 2014, which equated to an effective tax rate of 47.6%.  The fiscal 2014 tax expense reflects the impact of impairment charges against goodwill which is discussed in Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report.
 
 
 
23

 
Net Income
The Company recognized net income of $10,616, or $1.06 per diluted common share, in fiscal 2015 compared to $9,123, or $0.90 per diluted common share, in fiscal 2014 based on the factors discussed above.

Fiscal 2014 vs. Fiscal 2013
 
Net Sales
 
Net sales in fiscal 2014 decreased by less than one half of one percent to $425,410 compared to $426,461 in 2013.  While the first half of 2014 lagged 2013 by 7%, due in large part to extreme cold weather conditions across much of North America, the second half of 2014 increased by 7% as the weather improved and the Company saw strong demand for its new products across most of its businesses.

Net sales for the Marine Electronics business increased by $1,817, or 1% during 2014.  The uptick from fiscal 2013 was driven primarily by exceptional new product performance in the latter part of the fiscal year and growth in the Minn Kota product line.

Outdoor Equipment net sales increased $3,220, or 7%, in fiscal 2014 as a result of a full twelve months of sales for Jetboil versus 10.5 months in the prior year as well as a 14% increase in military tent sales year over year.

The Watercraft business experienced a decrease in net sales of 3% during 2014 over 2013 levels, due primarily to our decision to exit unprofitable international markets.

Net sales for the Diving business declined $4,977, or 6%, year over year, due primarily to delays in new product shipments and weak diving markets in our key regions.

Cost of Sales
Cost of sales was $256,797, or 60.4% of net sales, on a consolidated basis for the year ended October 3, 2014 compared to $255,412 or 59.9% of net sales, in fiscal 2013.  With the exception of resin prices in the Watercraft segment, costs of raw materials and components increased only slightly in 2014 over the prior year while modest increases in labor rates were nearly offset by process improvements in each of the business segments.

Gross Profit
Gross profit of $168,613 was 39.6% of net sales on a consolidated basis for the year ended October 3, 2014 compared to $171,049 or 40.1% of net sales in fiscal 2013.
 
Gross profit in the Marine Electronics business decreased by $262 during 2014 from the prior year despite the 1% increase in net sales due primarily to new pricing strategies which were implemented to enhance the Company’s competitive position.

Outdoor Equipment gross profit increased by $1,464 during 2014 from 2013 due primarily to the increase in sales volume and improved efficiencies particularly related to the integration of Jetboil.

Gross profit in the Watercraft segment was $101 lower in 2014 than in 2013 due primarily to the increase in resin prices and lower sales volumes, which were nearly offset by a favorable sales mix due to the segment’s de-emphasis on low-margin products.

The $3,592 decrease in gross profit of the Diving segment from 2013 to 2014 was driven primarily by the 6% reduction in sales volume in 2014 as compared to 2013 as noted above.

Operating Expenses
Operating expenses during 2014 overall increased from the prior year by $6,464.  The increase was significantly driven by the $8,475 impairment charge related to Jetboil intangible assets as well as higher health care costs, offset in part by a $1,600 cash recovery from the Jetboil indemnity escrow, lower restructuring charges in the Watercraft segment and lower incentive compensation expense.
 
 

 
 
24

 
Operating expenses for the Marine Electronics segment increased by $1,188 during 2014 from 2013 levels.  The increase was due mainly to higher sales volume related costs and higher professional services expense in the current year.

Outdoor Equipment operating expenses increased by $7,371 in 2014 from the prior year due primarily to $8,475 of impairment charges recognized during 2014 on Jetboil intangible assets, which was partially offset by a $1,600 cash recovery from the Jetboil indemnity claim.  See further discussion of the valuation of the Jetboil intangible assets at Note 17 to our accompanying consolidated financial statements included elsewhere herein.

In the Watercraft segment, operating expenses decreased $2,427 during 2014 from fiscal 2013 due primarily to lower restructuring costs related to our decision to exit unprofitable international markets and lower infrastructure costs resulting from those efforts.

Operating expenses for the Diving business decreased by $1,494, or 4%, year over year due primarily to cost containment efforts in light of lower sales volumes.

Operating Results
The Company’s operating profit was $16,691 in 2014 compared to an operating profit of $25,591 in fiscal 2013.  Marine Electronics operating profit decreased by $1,450 during 2014 to $30,722 from $32,172 in the prior year.  The operating loss for Outdoor Equipment was $3,726 during 2014 compared to operating profit of $2,180 in the prior year due primarily to $6,875 of impairment charges on certain Jetboil intangible assets incurred during 2014, net of indemnity escrow recoveries during 2014 related to the acquisition, which were all recognized in the third quarter of 2014.  Excluding the effect of these charges, operating profit for this segment would have been $969 higher in 2014 than in fiscal 2013.  Despite a slight decline in net sales year over year, operating results for the Watercraft business increased by $2,326 to a profit of $210 in fiscal 2014.  Operating profit for the Diving business declined $2,098 from fiscal 2013 to $3,596 in fiscal 2014.

Other Income and Expenses
Interest expense of $788 during 2014 decreased from the prior year by $497, due largely to lower interest rates and lower principal balances. Interest income was approximately $100 in both 2014 and 2013.  Net other income of $1,434 in fiscal 2014 increased from fiscal 2013 by $1,171.  Other income during 2014 included currency gains of $427 and market gains and dividends of $965 on deferred compensation plan assets.  In 2013, this line item included $929 of currency losses which were more than offset by market gains and dividends of $1,265 on the deferred compensation plan assets.  The dividends and market gains and losses on deferred compensation plan assets recognized in the accompanying Consolidated Statement of Operations in Other (income) expense, net are offset as deferred compensation expense in our Operating expenses.

Pretax Income and Income Taxes
The Company realized pretax income of $17,422 in fiscal 2014 compared to $24,660 in fiscal 2013. The Company recorded income tax expense of $8,299 in 2014, which equated to an effective tax rate of 47.6%, compared to $5,333 in 2013, which equated to an effective tax rate of 21.6%.  The 2013 tax expense reflects the net reduction of the Company’s deferred tax asset valuation allowance.  See further discussion of the deferred tax asset valuation allowance in Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements found elsewhere in this report.
 
 
Net Income
The Company recognized net income of $9,123, or $0.90 per diluted common share in fiscal 2014 compared to $19,327 in fiscal 2013, or $1.95 per diluted common share, based on the factors discussed above.

 
Financial Condition, Liquidity and Capital Resources
 
The Company’s cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities, as reflected in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows, are summarized in the following table:

                   
   
Year Ended
 
(thousands)
 
October 2
2015
   
October 3
2014
   
September 27
2013
 
Cash provided by (used for):
 
 
             
Operating activities
  $ 18,056     $ 33,218     $ 30,003  
Investing activities
    (10,394 )     (11,887 )     (31,753 )
Financing activities
    (3,989 )     (3,498 )     (1,041 )
Effect of foreign currency rate changes on cash
    (5,307 )     (2,734 )     (419 )
(Decrease) Increase in cash and cash equivalents
  $ (1,634 )   $ 15,099     $ (3,210 )
 
 

 
 
25

 
 
Operating Activities
 
The following table sets forth the Company’s working capital position at the end of each of the years shown:

             
 
October 2
 
October 3
 
(thousands, except share data)
2015
 
2014
 
Current assets
  $ 209,370     $ 197,550  
Current liabilities
    69,554       60,232  
Working capital
  $ 139,816       137,318  
Current ratio
 
3:1
   
3.3:1
 
 
Cash flows provided by operations totaled $18,056, $33,218 and $30,003 in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. The decrease in operating cash flow over the prior year was driven largely by net changes in operating assets.  Additionally, the change in cash flows provided by operations year over year was significantly impacted by the nature of non-recurring expenses in each year.  Current year net income was impacted by the effect of $7,300 of cash charges related to litigation expense.  In the prior year, net income was impacted by $8,475 of non-recurring, non-cash impairment expense recognized on certain Jetboil intangible assets.

Depreciation and amortization charges were $11,824, $10,863 and $10,070 in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.
 
 
Investing Activities
 
Cash flows used for investing activities were $10,394, $11,887 and $31,753 in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.  The purchase of Jetboil in fiscal 2013 used cash of $15,420.  Expenditures for property, plant and equipment were $10,409, $13,263 and $16,333 in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. In general, the Company’s ongoing capital expenditures are primarily related to tooling for new products and facilities and information systems improvements.

Financing Activities
 
The following table sets forth the Company’s debt and capital structure at the end of the past two fiscal years:

             
(thousands, except share data)
 
2015
   
2014
 
Current debt
  $ 368     $ 360  
Long-term debt
    7,062       7,431  
Total debt
    7,430       7,791  
Shareholders' equity
    198,378       198,458  
Total capitalization
  $ 205,808       206,249  
Total debt to total capitalization
    4 %     4 %
 
 
 
 
 
 
26

 
 
Cash flows used for financing activities totaled $3,989 in fiscal 2015 compared to $3,498 in 2014 and $1,041 in 2013.  Dividend payments were $2,966, $2,955 and $0 in 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.  Payments on long-term debt were $360, $542 and $528 in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.  The Company had current maturities of its long-term debt of $368 and $360 as of October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014, respectively, and no outstanding borrowings on its revolving credit facilities as of the end of either fiscal year.  The Company had outstanding borrowings on long-term debt (net of current maturities) of $7,062 and $7,431 as of October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014, respectively.

The Company’s term loans have a maturity date of September 29, 2029.  Each term loan requires monthly payments of principal and interest. Interest on the aggregate outstanding amount of the term loans is based on the prime rate plus an applicable margin.  The interest rate in effect on the term loans was 5.25% at October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014.

The term loans are guaranteed in part under the United States Department of Agriculture Rural Development program and are secured with a first priority lien on land, buildings, machinery and equipment of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries and a second lien on working capital and certain patents and trademarks of the Company and its subsidiaries.  Any proceeds from the sale of secured property are first applied against the related term loans and then against the Revolvers (as defined below).

The aggregate term loan borrowings are subject to a pre-payment penalty.  The penalty is currently 4% of the pre-payment amount, and the penalty will decrease by 1% annually on the anniversary date of the effective date of the loan agreement.

On September 16, 2013, the Company and certain of its subsidiaries entered into a new credit facility with PNC Bank National Association and certain other lenders which terminated the Amended Revolving Credit and Security agreement with PNC Bank National Association and the other lenders named therein, dated as of November 16, 2010.  The new credit facility consists of a Revolving Credit Agreement dated September 16, 2013 among the Company, certain of the Company’s subsidiaries, PNC Bank, National Association, as lender and as administrative agent and the other lenders named therein (the “Revolving Credit Agreement” or “Revolver”).  The Revolver has a 60 month term and provides for borrowing of up to an aggregate principal amount not to exceed $90,000 with an accordion feature that gives the Company the option to increase the maximum seasonal financing availability subject to the conditions of the Revolving Credit Agreement and subject to the approval of the lenders.  The Revolver imposes a seasonal borrowing limit such that borrowings under the facility may not exceed $60,000 from the period June 30th through October 31st of each year under the agreement.

The interest rate on the Revolver is based on LIBOR plus an applicable margin.  The applicable margin resets each quarter and ranges from 1.25% to 2.00% and is dependent on the Company’s leverage ratio for the trailing twelve month period.  The interest rate on the Revolver at October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014 was approximately 1.4%.

The Revolver is secured with a first priority lien on working capital assets and certain patents and trademarks of the Company and its subsidiaries and a second priority lien on land, buildings, machinery and equipment of the Company’s domestic subsidiaries.  The Revolving Credit Agreement limits asset or stock acquisitions to no more than $20,000 in the event that the Company’s consolidated leverage ratio is greater than 2.5 times.  No limits are imposed if the Company’s consolidated leverage ratio is less than 2.5 times and the remaining borrowing availability under the Revolver is greater than $10,000 at the time of the acquisition.  The Revolving Credit Agreement limits the amount of restricted payments (primarily dividends and repurchases of common stock) made during each fiscal year.  The Company may declare, and pay, dividends in accordance with historical practices, but in no event may the aggregate amount of all dividends or repurchases of common stock exceed $10,000 in any fiscal year.  The Revolving Credit Agreement includes maximum leverage ratio and minimum interest coverage ratio limitations.

Concurrent with the execution of the Revolving Credit Agreement described above, Johnson Outdoors Canada Inc. repaid and terminated its Amended Revolving Credit and Security Agreement with PNC Bank Canada Branch dated as of November 16, 2010.

As of October 2, 2015, the Company held approximately $55,492 of cash and cash equivalents in bank accounts in foreign jurisdictions.
 
 
27

 
 
Contractual Obligations and Off Balance Sheet Arrangements
 
The Company has contractual obligations and commitments to make future payments under its existing credit facilities, including interest, operating leases and open purchase orders.  The following schedule details these significant contractual obligations at October 2, 2015.

                               
   
Total
   
Less than 1 year
   
2-3 years
   
4-5 years
   
After 5 years
 
Long-term debt
  $ 7,430     $ 368     $ 799     $ 887     $ 5,376  
Operating lease obligations
    27,858       5,868       8,204       7,104       6,682  
Open purchase orders
    72,014       72,014       -       -       -  
Contractually obligated interest payments
    3,654       382       702       615       1,955  
Total contractual obligations
  $ 110,956     $ 78,632     $ 9,705     $ 8,606     $ 14,013  

The Company utilizes letters of credit primarily as security for the payment of future claims under its workers’ compensation insurance. Letters of credit outstanding at October 2, 2015 were $684 compared to $691 on October 3, 2014 and were included in the Company’s total loan availability.  The Company had no unsecured revolving credit facilities at its foreign subsidiaries as of October 2, 2015 or October 3, 2014.

The Company has no other off-balance sheet arrangements.

The Company anticipates making contributions to its defined benefit pension plans of $476 through September 30, 2016.
 
 
Market Risk Management
 
Foreign Exchange Risk
 
The Company has significant foreign operations, for which the functional currencies are denominated primarily in euros, Swiss francs, Hong Kong dollars, Japanese yen and Canadian dollars. As the values of the currencies of the foreign countries in which the Company has operations increase or decrease relative to the U.S. dollar, the sales, expenses, profits, losses, assets and liabilities of the Company’s foreign operations, as reported in the Company’s consolidated financial statements, increase or decrease, accordingly.  Approximately 18% of the Company’s revenues for the fiscal year ended October 2, 2015 were denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar.  Approximately 8% were denominated in euros and approximately 6% were denominated in Canadian dollars, with the remaining 4% denominated in various other foreign currencies.  Changes in foreign currency exchange rates can cause unexpected financial losses or cash flow needs.
 
The Company may mitigate the impact on its operating results of a portion of the fluctuations in certain foreign currencies through the use of foreign currency forward contracts.  Foreign currency forward contracts enable the Company to lock in the foreign currency exchange rate for a fixed amount of currency to be paid or received on a specified date in the future. The Company may use such foreign currency forward contracts to mitigate the risk associated with changes in foreign currency exchange rates on financial instruments and known commitments denominated in foreign currencies.  As of October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014, the Company held no foreign currency forward contracts.
 
Interest Rate Risk
 
The Company operates in a seasonal business and experiences significant fluctuations in operating cash flow as working capital needs increase in advance of the Company’s primary selling and cash generation season, and decline as accounts receivable are collected and cash is accumulated or debt is repaid.  The Company’s goal in managing its interest rate risk is to maintain a mix of floating rate and fixed rate debt such that permanent non-equity capital needs are largely funded with long term fixed rate debt and seasonal working capital needs are funded with short term floating rate debt.
 
 
 
28

 
 
Commodities
 
Certain components used in the Company’s products are exposed to commodity price changes. The Company manages this risk through instruments such as purchase orders and non-cancelable supply contracts. Primary commodity price exposures include costs associated with metals, resins and packaging materials.
 
Impact of Inflation
 
The Company anticipates that changing costs of basic raw materials may impact future operating costs and, accordingly, the prices of its products. The Company is involved in continuing programs to mitigate the impact of cost increases through changes in product design and identification of sourcing and manufacturing efficiencies. Price increases and, in certain situations, price decreases are implemented for individual products, when appropriate.

The Company’s results of operations and financial condition are presented based on historical cost.  The Company does not believe that inflation has significantly affected its results of operations.

Sensitivity to Changes in Value
 
The estimates that follow are intended to measure the maximum potential fair value or earnings the Company could lose in one year from adverse changes in market interest rates. The calculations are not intended to represent actual losses in fair value or earnings that the Company expects to incur. The estimates do not consider favorable changes in market rates. The table below presents the estimated maximum potential loss in fair value and annual income before income taxes from a 100 basis point movement in interest rates on the Company's term loans outstanding at October 2, 2015:
 
 
             
 
Estimated Impact on
 
(thousands)
Fair Value
 
Income Before Income Taxes
 
Interest rate instruments
  $ -     $ 79  
 
Critical Accounting Estimates
 
The Company’s management discussion and analysis of its financial condition and results of operations are based upon the Company’s consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S.  The preparation of these financial statements requires the Company to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of its assets, liabilities, sales and expenses, and related footnote disclosures.  On an on-going basis, the Company evaluates its estimates for product returns, bad debts, inventories, long lived assets and goodwill, income taxes, warranty obligations, pensions and other post-retirement benefits, litigation and other subjective matters impacting the financial statements.  The Company bases its estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources.  Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

The Company believes the following critical accounting policies affect its more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of its consolidated financial statements.  Management has discussed these policies with the Audit Committee of the Company’s Board of Directors.
 
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
 
Allowances for doubtful accounts are estimated by the individual operating companies based on estimates of losses related to customer accounts receivable balances.  Estimates are developed by using standard quantitative measures based on historical losses, adjusting for current economic conditions and, in some cases, evaluating specific customer accounts for risk of loss. The establishment of reserves requires the use of judgment and assumptions regarding the potential for losses on receivable balances. Though the Company considers these balances adequate and proper, changes in economic conditions in specific markets in which the Company operates and any specific customer collection issues the Company identifies could have a favorable or unfavorable effect on required reserve balances.
 
 
29

 
Inventories
 
The Company values inventory at the lower of cost (determined using the first-in first-out method) or market. Management’s judgment is required to determine the reserve for obsolete or excess inventory. Inventory on hand may exceed future demand either because the product is outdated or because the amount on hand is more than will be used to meet future needs. Inventory reserves are estimated by the individual operating companies using standard quantitative measures based on criteria established by the Company. The Company also considers current forecast plans, as well as market and industry conditions in establishing reserve levels. Though the Company considers these reserve balances to be adequate, changes in economic conditions, customer inventory levels or competitive conditions could have a favorable or unfavorable effect on required reserve balances.

Deferred Taxes
 
The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce its deferred tax assets to the amount that is more likely than not to be realized. While the Company has considered future taxable income and ongoing prudent and feasible tax planning strategies in assessing the need for the valuation allowance, in the event the Company were to determine that it would not be able to realize all or part of its net deferred tax assets in the future, an adjustment to the deferred tax assets would be charged to income in the period such determination was made. Likewise, should the Company determine that it would be able to realize its deferred tax assets in the future in excess of its net recorded amount, an adjustment to the deferred tax assets would increase income in the period such determination was made.  See further discussion of the impact of the adjustment to the deferred tax asset valuation allowance at Note 6 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report.
 
Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets Impairment
 
Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are tested for impairment annually or more frequently if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the assets might be impaired.  Generally, annual impairment tests are performed by the Company in the fourth quarter of each fiscal year.

In assessing the recoverability of the Company's goodwill, the Company estimates the fair value of the businesses to which the goodwill relates.  Fair value is estimated using a discounted cash flow analysis.  If the fair value of a reporting unit exceeds its net book value, no impairment exists. When fair value is less than the carrying value of the net assets and related goodwill, an impairment test is performed to measure and recognize the amount of the impairment loss, if any.  The Company recognized goodwill impairment charges of $6,475 in 2014.  See further discussion at Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report.

The discounted cash flow analysis used to estimate fair value requires a number of key estimates and assumptions.  The Company estimates the future cash flows of the reporting units based on historical and forecasted revenues and operating costs and applies a discount rate to the estimated future cash flows for purposes of the valuation.  This discount rate is based on the estimated weighted average cost of capital, which includes certain assumptions made by management such as market capital structure, market betas, the risk-free rate of return and the estimated costs of borrowing.  Changes in these key estimates and assumptions, or in other assumptions used in this process, could materially affect our impairment analysis in a given year.

In assessing the recoverability of the Company's other indefinite lived intangible assets, the Company estimates the fair value of the various intangible assets.  The fair value of trademarks and patents is estimated using the relief from royalty method.  If the fair value of an intangible asset exceeds its net book value, no impairment exists. When fair value is less than the carrying value of the intangible asset, an impairment loss is recognized for the amount of the difference.  The Company recognized impairment charges of $2,000 on indefinite lived intangible assets in 2014.  See further discussion at Note 17 to the consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report.
 
 
 
30

 

A number of factors, many of which the Company has no ability to control, could affect its financial condition, operating results and business prospects and could cause actual results to differ from the estimates and assumptions that the Company uses in preparing its financial statements.  These factors include:  a prolonged global economic crisis, a significant decrease in demand for the Company’s products, a significant adverse change in legal factors or in the business climate, an adverse action or assessment by a regulator and successful efforts by the Company’s competitors to gain market share.
 
Impairment of Long-Lived Assets and Long-Lived Assets to be Disposed of
 
The Company evaluates long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances, such as unplanned negative cash flow indicate that the carrying amount of an asset group may not be recoverable. Recoverability of assets to be held and used is measured by a comparison of the carrying amount of an asset group to future undiscounted cash flows expected to be generated by the asset group. If such assets are determined to be impaired, the impairment to be recognized is measured by the amount by which the carrying amount of the assets exceeds the fair value of the assets. Assets to be disposed of are reported at the lower of the carrying amount or fair value less costs to sell. Application of alternative assumptions, such as changes in the estimate of future cash flows, could produce significantly different results. Because of the significance of the judgments and estimation processes, it is likely that materially different amounts could be recorded if we used different assumptions or if the underlying circumstances were to change.
 
Warranties
 
The Company accrues a warranty reserve for estimated costs to provide warranty services. Warranty reserves are estimated by the individual operating companies using standard quantitative measures based on criteria established by the Company. Estimates of costs to service its warranty obligations are based on historical experience, expectation of future conditions and known product issues. To the extent the Company experiences increased warranty claim activity or increased costs associated with servicing those claims, revisions to the estimated warranty reserve would be required. The Company engages in product quality programs and processes, including monitoring and evaluating the quality of its suppliers, to help minimize warranty obligations.
 
 
ITEM 7A.   QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
 
Information with respect to this item is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations under the heading “Market Risk Management.”
 

ITEM 8.   FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
 
Information with respect to this item is included in the Company’s consolidated financial statements attached to this report on pages F-1 to F-38.
 
 
ITEM 9.   CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
 
None.
 
 

ITEM 9A.   CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
 
(a)   Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
 
The Company maintains disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rules 13a-15(e) and 15d-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms, and that the information required to be disclosed by the Company in reports that it files or submits under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 is accumulated and communicated to its management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.  The Company carried out an evaluation as of October 2, 2015, under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures.  Based on such evaluation, the Company’s Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of October 2, 2015 at reaching a level of reasonable assurance.  In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, management recognized that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives, and management necessarily was required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures.  The Company has designed its disclosure controls and procedures to reach a level of reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives.
 
 
 
31

 
 
The report of management required under this Item 9A is included on page F-2 of the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements attached to this Report under the heading “Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting” and is incorporated herein by reference.
 
(b)  Changes in Internal Control over Financial Reporting.
 
There was no change in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting (as defined in Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended) that occurred during the Company’s most recently completed fiscal quarter that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.
 
(c)  Attestation Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
RSM US LLP, the independent registered public accounting firm who audited the Company’s consolidated financial statements, has issued an attestation report on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting, which is contained in the Company’s consolidated financial statements under the heading “Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm on Internal Control over Financial Reporting.”
 
ITEM 9B.   OTHER INFORMATION
 
None.

PART III
 
ITEM 10.   DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
 
Information with respect to this item is incorporated herein by reference to the discussion under the headings “Proposal 1:  Election of Directors,” “Executive Officers,” “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance,” “Corporate Governance-Director Nominations” and “Audit Committee Matters – Audit Committee Financial Expert” in the Company's Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or before January 30, 2016.  Information regarding the Company’s Code of Business Ethics is incorporated herein by reference to the discussion under “Corporate Governance Matters – Employee Code of Conduct and Code of Ethics and Procedures for Reporting of Accounting Concerns” in the Company's Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or before January 30, 2016.

The Audit Committee of the Company's Board of Directors is an “audit committee” for purposes of Section 3(a)(58)(A) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The members of the Audit Committee are Terry E. London (Chairman), Thomas F. Pyle, Jr., Edward F. Lang and Richard (“Casey”) Sheahan.
 
ITEM 11.   EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
 
Information with respect to this item is incorporated herein by reference to the discussion under the headings “Directors Compensation” and “Executive Compensation” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or before January 30, 2016.
 
 
 
 
32

 

The information incorporated by reference from “Report of the Compensation Committee” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or before January 30, 2016, shall not be deemed “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 nor shall it be deemed incorporated by reference in any filing under the Securities Act of 1933 or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, except as shall be expressly set forth by specific reference in such filing.
 
ITEM 12.   SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS
 
Information with respect to this item is incorporated herein by reference to the discussion under the heading “Stock Ownership of Management and Others” in the Company's Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or before January 30, 2016.

Equity Compensation Plan Information
The following table summarizes share information, as of October 2, 2015, for the Company’s equity compensation plans, including the Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2012 Non-Employee Director Stock Ownership Plans, the Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2010 Long-Term Stock Incentive Plan and the Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2009 Employee Stock Purchase Plan.  All of these plans have been approved by the Company’s shareholders.
                   
Plan Category
 
Number of Common Shares to Be Issued Upon Exercise of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights
 
Weighted-average Exercise Price of Outstanding Options, Warrants and Rights
 
Number of Common Shares Available for Future Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
 
2010 Long-Term Stock Incentive Plan
    -     $ -       659,866  
2012 Non-Employee Director Stock Ownership Plan
    7,336       -       25,272  
2009 Employee Stock Purchase Plan
    -       -       20,135  
Total All Plans
    7,336       -       705,273  
 
ITEM 13.   CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
 
Information with respect to this item is incorporated herein by reference to the discussion under the heading “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions” in the Company's Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or before January 30, 2016. Information regarding director independence is incorporated by reference to the discussions under “Corporate Governance Matters-Director Independence” in the Company’s Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or before January 30, 2016.
 
ITEM 14.   PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES
 
Information with respect to this item is incorporated herein by reference to the discussion under the heading “Audit Committee Matters – Fees of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” in the Company's Proxy Statement for the 2016 Annual Meeting of Shareholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or before January 30, 2016.
 
 
 
 
 
33

 
PART IV
 
ITEM 15.   EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES  
 
The following documents are filed as a part of this report:
 
Financial Statements
 
Included in Item 8 of Part II of this report are the following:
  • Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
  • Consolidated Balance Sheets – October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014
  • Consolidated Statements of Operations – Years ended October 2, 2015, October 3, 2014 and September 27, 2013
  • Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income - Years ended October 2, 2015, October 3, 2014 and September 27, 2013
  • Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity – Years ended October 2, 2015, October 3, 2014 and September 27, 2013
  • Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows – Years ended October 2, 2015, October 3, 2014 and September 27, 2013
  • Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
Exhibits
 
See Exhibit Index.
 
 
 
 
 
34

 
SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized, in the City of Racine and State of Wisconsin, on the 7th day of December 2015.

   
 JOHNSON OUTDOORS INC.
(Registrant)
 
   
   
By
   /s/ Helen P. Johnson-Leipold
 
 
   Helen P. Johnson-Leipold
   Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
 



Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities indicated on the 7th day of December 2015.

     
/s/Helen P. Johnson-Leipold
 
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
(Helen P. Johnson-Leipold)
 
and Director
   
(Principal Executive Officer)
     
/s/ Thomas F. Pyle, Jr.
 
Vice Chairman of the Board
(Thomas F. Pyle, Jr.)
 
and Lead Outside Director
     
/s/ Terry E. London
 
Director
(Terry E. London)
   
     
/s/ John M. Fahey, Jr.
 
Director
(John M. Fahey, Jr.)
   
     
/s/ W. Lee McCollum
 
Director
(W. Lee McCollum)
   
     
/s/ Edward F. Lang
 
Director
(Edward F. Lang)
   
     
/s/ Katherine Button Bell
 
Director
(Katherine Button Bell)
   
     
/s/ Richard Sheahan
 
Director
(Richard (“Casey”) Sheahan)
   
     
/s/ David W. Johnson
 
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
(David W. Johnson)
 
(Principal Financial and Accounting Officer)
 
 
 
 
 
 
35 
 

 

EXHIBIT INDEX
   
Exhibit
Title
2
Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated October 28, 2004, by and between JO Acquisition Corp. and Johnson Outdoors Inc. (Filed as Exhibit 2 to the Company’s Form 8-K dated October 28, 2004 and incorporated herein by reference.)
3.1
Articles of Incorporation of the Company as amended through February 17, 2000. (Filed as Exhibit 3.1(a) to the Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2000 and incorporated herein by reference.)
3.2
Bylaws of the Company as amended and restated through December 6, 2010. (Filed as Exhibit 3.2 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 1, 2010 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.1
Note Agreement dated October 1, 1995. (Filed as Exhibit 4.1 to the Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended December 29, 1995 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.2
First Amendment dated October 11, 1996 to Note Agreement dated October 1, 1995. (Filed as Exhibit 4.3 to the Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended December 27, 1996 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.3
Second Amendment dated September 30, 1997 to Note Agreement dated October 1, 1995. (Filed as Exhibit 4.8 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 1, 1997 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.4
Third Amendment dated October 1, 1997 to Note Agreement dated October 1, 1995. (Filed as Exhibit 4.9 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 1, 1997 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.5
Fourth Amendment dated January 10, 2000 to Note Agreement dated October 1, 1995. (Filed as Exhibit 4.9 to the Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2000 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.6
Fifth Amendment dated December 13, 2001 to Note Agreement dated October 1, 1995. (Filed as Exhibit 4.6 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 3, 2003 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.7
Consent and Amendment dated September 6, 2002 to Note Agreement dated October 1, 1995. (Filed as Exhibit 4.7 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 3, 2003 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.8
Note Agreement dated as of September 15, 1997. (Filed as Exhibit 4.15 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 1, 1997 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.9
First Amendment dated January 10, 2000 to Note Agreement dated September 15, 1997. (Filed as Exhibit 4.10 to the Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2000 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.10
Second Amendment dated December 13, 2001 to Note Agreement dated September 15, 1997. (Filed as Exhibit 4.9 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 3, 2003 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.11
Consent and Amendment dated as of September 6, 2002 to Note Agreement dated September 15, 1997. (Filed as Exhibit 4.11 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 3, 2003 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.12
Note Agreement dated as of December 13, 2001. (Filed as Exhibit 4.12 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 3, 2003 and incorporated herein by reference.)
4.13
Consent and Amendment dated of September 6, 2002 to Note Agreement dated as of December 13, 2001. (Filed as Exhibit 4.15 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 3, 2003 and incorporated herein by reference.)
9.1
Johnson Outdoors Inc. Class B common stock Amended and Restated Voting Trust Agreement, dated as of February 16, 2010 (Filed as Exhibit 1 to Amendment No. 13 to the Schedule 13D filed by Helen P. Johnson-Leipold on February 3, 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.1
Stock Purchase Agreement, dated as of January 12, 2000, by and between Johnson Outdoors Inc. and Berkley Inc. (Filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K dated March 31, 2000 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.2
Amendment to Stock Purchase Agreement, dated as of February 28, 2000, by and between Johnson Outdoors Inc. and Berkley Inc. (Filed as Exhibit 2.2 to the Company’s Form 8-K dated March 31, 2000 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.3+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. Amended and Restated 1986 Stock Option Plan. (Filed as Exhibit 10 to the Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended July 2, 1993 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.4
Registration Rights Agreement regarding Johnson Outdoors Inc. common stock issued to the Johnson family prior to the acquisition of Johnson Diversified, Inc. (Filed as Exhibit 10.6 to the Company’s Form S-1 Registration Statement No. 33-16998 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.5
Registration Rights Agreement regarding Johnson Outdoors Inc. Class A common stock held by Mr. Samuel C. Johnson. (Filed as Exhibit 28 to the Company’s Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 29, 1991 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.6+
Form of Restricted Stock Agreement. (Filed as Exhibit 10.8 to the Company’s Form S-1 Registration Statement No. 33-23299 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.7+
Form of Supplemental Retirement Agreement of Johnson Diversified, Inc. (Filed as Exhibit 10.9 to the Company’s Form S-1 Registration Statement No. 33-16998 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.8+
Johnson Outdoors Retirement and Savings Plan. (Filed as Exhibit 10.9 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended September 29, 1989 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.9+
Form of Agreement of Indemnity and Exoneration with Directors and Officers. (Filed as Exhibit 10.11 to the Company’s Form S-1 Registration Statement No. 33-16998 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.10
Consulting and administrative agreements with S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc. (Filed as Exhibit 10.12 to the Company’s Form S-1 Registration Statement No. 33-16998 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.11+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. 1994 Long-Term Stock Incentive Plan. (Filed as Exhibit 4 to the Company’s Form S-8 Registration Statement No. 333-88091 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.12+
Johnson Outdoors Economic Value Added Bonus Plan (Filed as Exhibit 10.15 to the Company’s Form 10-K for the year ended October 1, 1997 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.13+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2000 Long-Term Stock Incentive Plan. (Filed as Exhibit 99.1 to the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 29, 2005 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.14
Share Purchase and Transfer Agreement, dated as of August 28, 2002, by and between, among others, Johnson Outdoors Inc. and an affiliate of Bain Capital Fund VII-E (UK), Limited Partnership. (Filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Form 8-K dated September 9, 2002 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.15+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. Worldwide Key Executive Phantom Share Long-Term Incentive Plan (Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Company’s Form 10-Q dated March 28, 2003 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.16+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. Worldwide Key Executives’ Discretionary Bonus Plan. (Filed as Appendix A to the Company’s Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 13, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.17
Stock Purchase Agreement by and between Johnson Outdoors Inc. and TFX Equities Incorporated. (Filed as Exhibit 2.1 to the Company’s Form 10-Q dated April 2, 2004 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.18
Intellectual Property Purchase Agreement by and among Johnson Outdoors Inc., Technology Holding Company II and Teleflex Incorporated. (Filed as Exhibit 2.2 to the Company’s Form 10-Q dated April 2, 2004 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.19+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2003 Non-Employee Director Stock Ownership Plan. (Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Form 10-Q dated April 2, 2004 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.20+
Form of Restricted Stock Agreement under Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2003 Non-Employee Director Stock Ownership Plan. (Filed as Exhibit 4.2 to the Company’s Form S-8 Registration Statement No. 333-115298 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.21+
Form of Stock Option Agreement under Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2003 Non-Employee Director Stock Ownership Plan. (Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Company’s Form S-8 Registration Statement No. 333-115298 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.22
Revolving Credit and Security Agreement dated as of September 16, 2013 among Johnson Outdoors Inc., certain subsidiaries of Johnson Outdoors Inc., PNC Bank, National Association, as lender and administrative agent, and the other lenders named therein (filed as Exhibit 99.2 to the current report on Form 8-K dated and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 18, 2013).
10.23
Term Loan Agreement (loan number 15613) dated as of September 29, 2009 among Techsonic Industries Inc., Johnson Outdoors Marine Electronics LLC and Ridgestone Bank (filed as Exhibit 99.3 to the current report on Form 8-K dated and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 30, 2009).
10.24
Term Loan Agreement (loan number 15612) dated as of September 29, 2009 between Johnson Outdoors Gear LLC and Ridgestone Bank (filed as Exhibit 99.4 to the current report on Form 8-K dated and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 30, 2009).
10.25
Term Loan Agreement (loan number 15628) dated as of September 29, 2009 between Johnson Outdoors Watercraft Inc. and Ridgestone Bank (filed as Exhibit 99.5 to the current report on Form 8-K dated and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 30, 2009).
10.26
Term Loan Agreement (loan number 15614) dated as of September 29, 2009 between Johnson Outdoors Watercraft Inc. and Ridgestone Bank (filed as Exhibit 99.6 to the current report on Form 8-K dated and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 30, 2009).
10.27
Term Loan Agreement (loan number 15627) dated as of September 29, 2009 between Johnson Outdoors Watercraft Inc. and Ridgestone Bank (filed as Exhibit 99.7 to the current report on Form 8-K dated and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 30, 2009).
10.28+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2009 Employees’ Stock Purchase Plan. (Filed as Exhibit 99.2 to the current report on Form 8-K dated and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on March 8, 2010.)
10.29+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2010 Long Term Stock Incentive Plan. (Filed as Appendix A to the Company’s Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 15, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.30+
Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2012 Non-Employee Director Stock Ownership Plan.  (Filed as Appendix A to the Company’s Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on January 23, 2013 and incorporated herein by reference.)
10.31+
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement under Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2012 Non-Employee Director Stock Ownership Plan.  (Filed as Exhibit 10.31 to the annual report on Form 10-K dated and filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on December 5, 2014.)
10.32+
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement (Performance Based) under Johnson Outdoors Inc. 2012 Non-Employee Director Stock Ownership Plan.
21
Subsidiaries of the Company as of October 2, 2015.
23
Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.
31.1
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) or 15d-14(a).
31.2
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Rule 13a-14(a) or 15d-14(a).
32.1
Certifications of Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350. (1)
101
The following materials from Johnson Outdoors Inc.’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 2, 2015 formatted in XBRL (eXtensible Business Reporting Language) and furnished electronically herewith:  (i) Consolidated Statements of Operations; (ii) Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income, (iii) Consolidated Balance Sheets; (iv) Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity; (v) Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows; and (vi) Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

 
+       A management contract or compensatory plan or arrangement.
 
(1)  This certification is not “filed” for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or incorporated by reference into any filing under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, or the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.
 


 
37

 
 
CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

Table of Contents
 
Page
Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
F-2
 
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
 
F-3
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 
F-4
Consolidated Statements of Operations
 
F-5
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
 
F-6
Consolidated Balance Sheets
 
F-7
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity
 
F-8
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
 
F-9
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 
F-10




 
 
 

 
MANAGEMENT’S REPORT ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING
 

 
The management of Johnson Outdoors Inc. is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The Company’s internal control over financial reporting is designed to provide reasonable assurance to the Company’s management and board of directors regarding the preparation and fair presentation of published financial statements. The Company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:
 

(a)  pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the Company;
 
(b)     provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, and that
  receipts and expenditures of the Company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the Company; and
 
(c)  provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial
   statements.
 
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Therefore, even those systems determined to be effective can provide only reasonable assurance with respect to financial statement preparation and presentation. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
 
Management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of October 2, 2015. In making this assessment, management used the criteria established in Internal Control Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in 2013.  Based on our assessment, management believes that, as of October 2, 2015, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting was effective based on those criteria.
 
 
 

   
   
/s/ Helen P. Johnson-Leipold
/s/ David W. Johnson
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Vice President and Chief Financial Officer


 
F-2

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM ON INTERNAL CONTROL OVER FINANCIAL REPORTING


To the Board of Directors and Shareholders
Johnson Outdoors Inc.

We have audited Johnson Outdoors Inc.'s internal control over financial reporting as of October 2, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in 2013. Johnson Outdoors Inc.’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the company's internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company's internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company's internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (a) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (b) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (c) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company's assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, Johnson Outdoors Inc. maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of October 2, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in 2013.

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated financial statements of Johnson Outdoors Inc. and our report dated December 7, 2015 expressed an unqualified opinion.



/s/ RSM US LLP
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
December 7, 2015




 
F-3

 


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM



To the Board of Directors and Shareholders
Johnson Outdoors Inc.


We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Johnson Outdoors Inc. as of October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, shareholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended October 2, 2015. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Johnson Outdoors Inc. as of October 2, 2015 and October 3, 2014, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended October 2, 2015, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Johnson Outdoors Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting as of October 2, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission in 2013, and our report dated December 7, 2015 expressed an unqualified opinion on the effectiveness of Johnson Outdoors Inc.’s internal control over financial reporting.


/s/ RSM US LLP
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
December 7, 2015


 
F-4

 



 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

                   
   
Year Ended
 
   
October 2
   
October 3
   
September 27
 
(thousands, except per share data)
 
2015
   
2014
   
2013
 
Net sales
  $ 430,489     $ 425,410     $ 426,461  
Cost of sales
    258,756       256,797       255,412  
Gross profit
    171,733       168,613       171,049  
Operating expenses:
                       
Marketing and selling
    93,707       87,902       88,218  
Administrative management, finance and information systems
    43,690       39,078       41,894  
Goodwill and other intangible assets impairment
    -       8,475       -  
Research and development
    16,483       16,467       15,346  
Total operating expenses
    153,880       151,922       145,458  
Operating profit
    17,853       16,691       25,591  
Interest income
    (64 )     (85 )     (91 )
Interest expense
    865       788       1,285  
Other expense (income), net
    1,299       (1,434 )     (263 )
Profit before income taxes
    15,753       17,422       24,660  
Income tax expense
    5,137       8,299       5,333  
Net income
  $ 10,616     $ 9,123     $ 19,327  
                         
Weighted average common shares - Basic:
                       
Class A
    8,515       8,420       8,305  
Class B
    1,212       1,212       1,212  
Dilutive stock options and restricted stock units
    -       3       6  
Weighted average common shares - Dilutive
    9,727       9,635       9,523  
Net income per common share - Basic:
                       
Class A
  $ 1.08     $ 0.93     $ 1.98  
Class B
  $ 0.98     $ 0.84     $ 1.79  
Net income per common share - Diluted:
                       
Class A
  $ 1.06     $ 0.90     $ 1.95  
Class B
  $ 1.06     $ 0.90     $ 1.95  
Dividends declared per common share:
                       
Class A
  $ 0.31     $ 0.38     $ -  
Class B
  $ 0.28     $ 0.34     $ -  

The accompanying notes are an integral part of the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
 
F-5

 
 
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME


                   
   
Year Ended
 
   
October 2
   
October 3
   
September 27
 
(thousands, except per share data)
 
2015
   
2014
   
2013
 
Comprehensive income:
                 
Net income
  $ 10,616     $ 9,123     $ 19,327  
Other comprehensive (loss) income:
                       
Foreign currency translation (loss) gain
    (8,348 )     (5,500 )     (28 )
Write off of currency translation adjustment loss (gain)
    177       135       (84 )
Change in pension plans, net of tax of $541, $750 and $1,976, respectively
    (970 )     (1,223 )     3,223  
Amortization of unrealized loss on interest rate swap
    -       -       138  
Total other comprehensive (loss) income
    (9,141 )     (6,588 )     3,249  
Total comprehensive income
  $ 1,475     $ 2,535     $ 22,576  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
 
F-6

 

 CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

             
   
October 2
   
October 3
 
(thousands, except share data)
 
2015
   
2014
 
ASSETS
           
Current assets:
           
Cash and cash equivalents
  $ 69,159     $ 70,793  
Accounts receivable, net
    44,798       44,452  
Inventories
    79,919       66,341  
Deferred income taxes
    10,649       8,360  
Other current assets
    4,845       7,604  
Total current assets
    209,370       197,550  
Property, plant and equipment, net of accumulated
               
depreciation of $116,902 and $108,668, respectively
    45,287       46,100  
Deferred income taxes
    5,218       5,353  
Goodwill
    14,292       14,416  
Other intangible assets, net
    11,688       12,518  
Other assets
    13,349       12,689  
Total assets
  $ 299,204     $ 288,626  
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
               
Current liabilities:
               
Short-term debt
  $ -     $ -  
Current maturities of long-term debt
    368       360  
Accounts payable
    28,455       27,896  
Accrued liabilities:
               
Salaries, wages and benefits
    16,815       14,780  
Accrued warranty
    4,301       4,078  
Income taxes payable
    3,837       833  
Other
    15,778       12,285  
Total current liabilities
    69,554       60,232  
Long-term debt, less current maturities
    7,062       7,431  
Deferred income taxes
    1,182       1,133  
Retirement benefits
    10,118       7,804  
Other liabilities
    13,320       13,568  
Total liabilities
    101,236       90,168  
Shareholders' equity:
               
Preferred stock:  none issued
    -       -  
Common stock:
               
Class A shares issued and outstanding:
    441       439  
October 2, 2015:  8,770,612
               
October 3, 2014:  8,769,426
               
Class B shares issued and outstanding:
    61       61  
October 2, 2015:  1,212,382
               
October 3, 2014:  1,212,382
               
Capital in excess of par value
    69,545       67,882  
Retained earnings
    125,173       117,573  
Accumulated other comprehensive income
    3,637       12,778  
Treasury stock at cost, shares of Class A common
               
stock:  33,241 and 11,203, respectively
    (889 )     (275 )
Total shareholders' equity
    197,968       198,458  
Total liabilities and shareholders' equity
  $ 299,204     $ 288,626  
 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the Consolidated Financial Statements.
 
 
 
F-7

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

                                     
(thousands except for shares)
 
Shares
   
Common Stock
   
Capital in
Excess of Par Value
   
Retained
Earnings
   
Treasury
Stock
   
Accumulated
Other Comprehensive Income (Loss)
 
BALANCE AT SEPTEMBER 28, 2012
    9,892,461     $ 495     $ 64,184     $ 92,817     $ (9 )   $ 16,117  
Net income
    -       -       -       19,327       -       -  
Issuance of stock under employee stock purchase plan
    9,562       1       227       -       -       -  
Award of non-vested shares
    70,545       3       (3 )     -       -       -  
Stock-based compensation
    -       -       1,488       -       -       -  
Tax effects on stock based awards
    -       -       572               -       -  
Currency translation adjustment
    -       -       -       -       -       (28 )
Write off of currency translation adjustment gain
    -       -       -       -       -       (84 )
Change in pension plans, net of tax of $1,976
    -       -       -       -       -       3,223  
Purchase of treasury stock at cost
    (43,464 )     -       -       -       (886 )        
Reissue of treasury stock
    8,300       -       (94 )     -       180       -  
Amortization of unrealized loss on interest rate swaps
    -       -       -       -       -       138  
BALANCE AT SEPTEMBER 27, 2013
    9,937,404       499       66,374       112,144       (715 )     19,366  
Net income
    -       -       -       9,123       -       -  
Dividends declared
    -       -       -       (3,694 )     -       -  
Issuance of stock under employee stock purchase plan
    15,969       1       328       -       -       -  
Award of non-vested shares
    4,910       -       -       -       -       -  
Stock-based compensation
    -       -       1,688       -       -       -  
Tax effects on stock based awards
    -       -       493               -       -  
Currency translation adjustment
    -       -       -       -       -       (5,500 )
Write off of currency translation adjustment loss
    -       -       -       -       -       135  
Change in pension plans, net of tax of $750
    -       -       -       -       -       (1,223 )
Purchase of treasury stock at cost
    (23,399 )     -       -       -       (605 )        
Reissue of treasury stock
    46,924       -       (1,001 )     -       1,045