EX-13 5 d642821dex13.htm EX-13 EX-13

Exhibit 13

 

  

 

    FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS      

 

    

 

       3       

 

 

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS     

 

(dollar and share amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

     

 

2013

 

    

 

2012

 

    

 

% CHANGE

 

   

  FOR THE YEAR

          

 

  Net sales

     $19,052,046         $19,429,273       -2%  

 

  Earnings:

          

 

  Earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests

     791,123         852,940       -7%  

 

  Provision for income taxes

            205,594                259,814       -21%  

 

  Net earnings

     585,529         593,126       -1%  

 

  Earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests

              97,504                  88,507       10%  

 

  Net earnings attributable to Nucor stockholders

     488,025         504,619       -3%  

 

  Per share:

          

 

  Basic

     1.52         1.58       -4%  

 

  Diluted

     1.52         1.58       -4%  

 

  Dividends declared per share

     1.4725         1.4625       1%  

 

  Percentage of net earnings to net sales

     2.6%         2.6%      

 

  Return on average stockholders’ equity

     6.4%         6.7%      

 

  Capital expenditures

     1,230,418         1,019,334       21%  

 

  Depreciation

     535,852         534,010       —  

 

  Acquisitions (net of cash acquired)

             760,833       not meaningful  

 

  Sales per employee

 

    

 

859

 

  

 

    

 

906

 

  

 

  

-5%  

 

  AT YEAR END

          

 

  Working capital

     $  4,449,830         $  3,631,796       23%  

 

  Property, plant and equipment, net

     4,917,024         4,283,056       15%  

 

  Long-term debt (including current maturities)

     4,380,200         3,630,200       21%  

 

  Total Nucor stockholders’ equity

     7,645,769         7,641,571       —  

 

  Per share

     24.02         24.06       —  

 

  Shares outstanding

     318,328         317,663       —  

 

  Employees

 

    

 

22,300

 

  

 

    

 

22,200

 

  

 

  

—  

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS Certain statements made in this annual report are forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. The words “believe,” “expect,” “project,” “will,” “should,” “could” and similar expressions are intended to identify those forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements reflect the Company’s best judgment based on current information, and although we base these statements on circumstances that we believe to be reasonable when made, there can be no assurance that future events will not affect the accuracy of such forward-looking information. As such, the forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance, and actual results may vary materially from the projected results and expectations discussed in this report. Factors that might cause the Company’s actual results to differ materially from those anticipated in forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: (1) the sensitivity of the results of our operations to prevailing steel prices and changes in the supply and cost of raw materials, including pig iron, iron ore and scrap steel; (2) availability and cost of electricity and natural gas which could negatively affect our cost of steel production or could result in a delay or cancelation of existing or future drilling within our natural gas working interest drilling programs; (3) critical equipment failures and business interruptions; (4) market demand for steel products, which, in the case of many of our products, is driven by the level of nonresidential construction activity in the U.S.; (5) competitive pressure on sales and pricing, including pressure from imports and substitute materials; (6) impairment in the recorded value of inventory, equity investments, fixed assets, goodwill or other long-lived assets; (7) uncertainties surrounding the global economy, including the severe economic downturn in construction markets and excess world capacity for steel production; (8) fluctuations in currency conversion rates; (9) U.S. and foreign trade policies affecting steel imports or exports; (10) significant changes in laws or government regulations affecting environmental compliance, including legislation and regulations that result in greater regulation of greenhouse gas emissions that could increase our energy costs and our capital expenditures and operating costs or cause one or more of our permits to be revoked or make it more difficult to obtain permit modifications; (11) the cyclical nature of the steel industry; (12) capital investments and their impact on our performance; and (13) our safety performance.


 

      22      

 

     

 

    MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF

    OPERATIONS

 

     
     

 

 

OVERVIEW

MACROECONOMIC CONDITIONS

After five years of recession, the worst the United States has experienced in decades, we still do not see any real and sustained signs of a full recovery. Our nation’s unemployment rate remains high due to the loss of millions of jobs during the recession, the slow pace of the recovery and the uncertainty surrounding domestic fiscal policies. In the face of these economic headwinds, the pace and degree of recovery has been weak and uneven at best, and it has been experienced in fits and starts. While there has been some recent traction gained in single-family housing starts, nonresidential construction (the sector to which we are most closely tied) has continued to languish. Even though there has been some recent improvement in the U.S. Labor Department’s U-6 unemployment figures, which include not only unemployed workers but also discouraged workers and those who are working part-time but would like to work full-time, those rates remain historically high and employment is not expected to regain the peak reached during the most recent economic cycle for several more years. Until a stronger job recovery takes hold, consumer confidence and spending will be inconsistent, indirectly diminishing demand for our products. Macro-level uncertainties in world markets will almost certainly continue to weigh on global and domestic growth in 2014. We believe our net sales and financial results will be stronger in 2014 than in 2013, but they will continue to be adversely affected by these general economic factors as well as by the conditions specific to the steel industry that are described below.

CONDITIONS IN THE STEEL INDUSTRY

The steel industry has always been cyclical in nature, but North American producers of steel and steel products have been facing and are continuing to face some of the most challenging market conditions they have experienced in decades. The average capacity utilization rate of U.S. steel mills was at a historically unprecedented low of 52% in 2009. Since then, the average capacity utilization rate increased to approximately 76% in 2013 and 75% in 2012. These rates, though improved, still compare unfavorably to capacity utilization rates of 81% and 87% in 2008 and 2007, respectively. As domestic demand for steel and steel products is expected to improve only slightly in 2014, it is unlikely that average capacity utilization rates will increase significantly. The average utilization rates of all operating facilities in our steel mills, steel products and raw materials segments were approximately 74%, 58% and 62%, respectively, in 2013, compared with 74%, 60% and 63% respectively, in 2012.

The steel industry has also historically been characterized by global overcapacity and intense competition for sales among producers. This aspect of the industry remains true today despite the bankruptcies of numerous domestic steel companies and ongoing global steel industry consolidation. The recent addition of new production capacity in the United States, as well as the very rapid and extraordinary increase in China’s total production of steel in the last decade, has exacerbated this overcapacity issue domestically as well as globally.

Foreign imports of steel continued to significantly affect our domestic markets. Imported steel and steel products continue to present unique challenges for us because foreign producers often benefit from government subsidies, either directly through government-owned enterprises or indirectly through government-owned or controlled financial institutions. Foreign imports of finished and semi-finished steel accounted for approximately 30% of the U.S. steel market in 2013 despite significant unused domestic capacity. Rebar and hot-rolled bar were impacted especially hard by imports in 2013 as imports of these products increased by 23% and 15%, respectively, over 2012 levels. Increased imports of bar have translated into even lower domestic utilization rates for that product – utilization in the mid-60% range – and significant decreases in domestic bar pricing in 2013. Competition from China, the world’s largest producer and exporter of steel, which produces more than 45% of the steel produced globally, is a major challenge in particular. We believe that Chinese producers, many of which are government-owned in whole or in part, benefit from their government’s manipulation of foreign currency exchange rates and from the receipt of government subsidies, which allow them to sell steel into our markets at artificially low prices.

China is not only selling steel at artificially low prices into our domestic market but also across the globe. When they do so, steel products which would otherwise have been consumed by the local steel customers in other countries are displaced into global markets, which compounds the issue. In a more indirect manner, but still significant, is the import of fabricated steel products, such as oil country tubular goods, wind towers and other construction components that were produced in China.

OUR CHALLENGES AND RISKS

Sales of many of our products are dependent upon capital spending in the nonresidential construction markets in the United States, including in the industrial and commercial sectors, as well as capital spending on infrastructure that is publicly funded such as bridges, schools, prisons and hospitals. Unlike recoveries from past recessions, the recovery from the recession of 2008-2009 has not included a strong recovery in the severely depressed nonresidential construction market. In fact, while capital spending on nonresidential construction projects is slowly improving, it continues to lack sustained momentum, which is posing a significant challenge to our business. We do not expect to see strong growth in our net sales until we see a sustained increase in capital spending on these types of construction projects.


 

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Artificially cheap exports by some of our major foreign competitors to the United States and elsewhere reduce our net sales and adversely impact our financial results. Aggressive enforcement of trade rules by the World Trade Organization to limit unfairly traded imports remains uncertain, although it is critical to our ability to remain competitive. We have been encouraged by recent actions the United States International Trade Commission has taken on existing antidumping and countervailing duty orders on hot-rolled sheet steel as well as on imports of rebar that threaten domestic rebar producers. We continue to believe that assertive enforcement of world trade rules must be one of the highest priorities of the United States government.

A major uncertainty we continue to face in our business is the price of our principal raw material, ferrous scrap, which is volatile and often increases rapidly in response to changes in domestic demand, unanticipated events that decrease the flow of scrap into scrap yards and increased foreign demand for scrap. In periods of rapidly increasing raw material prices in the industry, which is often also associated with periods of strong or rapidly improving steel market conditions, being able to increase our prices for the products we sell quickly enough to offset increases in the prices we pay for ferrous scrap is challenging but critical to maintaining our profitability. We attempt to manage this risk via a raw material surcharge mechanism, which our customers understand is a necessary response by us to the market forces of supply and demand for our raw materials. The surcharge mechanism functions to offset changes in prices of our raw materials and is based upon widely available market indices for prices of scrap and other raw materials. We monitor changes in those indices closely and make adjustments as needed, generally on a monthly basis, to our surcharges and sometimes directly to the selling prices for our products. The surcharges are determined from a base scrap price and can differ by product. To further help mitigate the scrap price risk, we also aim to manage scrap inventory levels at the steel mills to match the anticipated demand over a period of the next several weeks for various steel products. Certain scrap substitutes, including pig iron, have longer lead times for delivery than scrap.

During periods of stronger or improving steel market conditions, the surcharge is generally an effective mechanism that facilitates Nucor’s ability to pass through, relatively quickly, the increased costs of ferrous scrap and scrap substitutes and to protect our gross margins from significant erosion. During weaker or rapidly deteriorating steel market conditions, including the steel market environment of the past several years, weak steel demand, low industry utilization rates and the impact of imports create an even more intensified competitive environment. All of those factors, to some degree, impact base pricing, which increases the likelihood that Nucor will experience lower gross margins. During these periods, the surcharge mechanism is less effective at protecting our gross margins; however, there are typically less frequent and smaller raw material cost increases.

Although the majority of our steel sales are to spot market customers who place their orders each month based on their business needs and our pricing competitiveness compared to both domestic and global producers and trading companies, we also sell contract tons, primarily in our sheet operations. Approximately 65% of our sheet sales was to contract customers in 2013 (65% in 2012), with the balance in the spot market at the prevailing prices at the time of sale. Steel contract sales outside of our sheet operations are not significant. The amount of tons sold to contract customers depends on the overall market conditions at the time, how the end-use customers see the market moving forward and the strategy that Nucor management believes is appropriate to the upcoming period. Nucor management considerations include maintaining an appropriate balance of spot and contract tons based on market projections and appropriately supporting our diversified customer base. The percentage of tons that is placed under contract also depends on the overall market dynamics and customer negotiations. In years of strengthening demand, we typically see an increase in the percentage of sheet sales sold under contract as our customers have an expectation that transaction prices will rapidly rise and available capacity will quickly be sold out. To mitigate this risk, customers prefer to enter into contracts in order to obtain committed volumes of supply from the mills. Our contracts include a method of adjusting prices on a periodic basis to reflect changes in the market pricing for steel and/ or scrap. Market indices for steel generally trend with scrap pricing changes but during periods of steel market weakness, including the market conditions of the past several years, the more intensified competitive steel market environment can cause the sales price indices to result in reduced gross margins and profitability. Furthermore, since the selling price adjustments are not immediate, there will always be a timing difference between changes in the prices we pay for raw materials and the adjustments we make to our contract selling prices. Generally, in periods of increasing scrap prices, we experience a short-term margin contraction on contract tons. Conversely, in periods of decreasing scrap prices, we typically experience a short-term margin expansion. Contract sales typically have terms ranging from six to twelve months.

Another significant uncertainty we face is the cost of energy. The availability and prices of electricity and natural gas are influenced today by many factors including changes in supply and demand, advances in drilling technology and, increasingly, by changes in public policy relating to energy production and use. Proposed regulation of greenhouse gas emissions from new and refurbished power plants could increase our cost of electricity in future years, particularly if they are adopted in a form that requires deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. Adopting these regulations in an onerous form could lead to foreign producers that are not affected by them gaining a competitive advantage over us. We are monitoring these regulatory developments closely and will seek to educate public policy makers during the adoption process about their potential impact on our business.


 

    24    

 

 

Finally, due to our natural gas working interest drilling programs with Encana, a substantial or extended decline in natural gas prices could have a material adverse effect on these programs and, by extension, us. In order to mitigate this risk, we announced a joint decision with Encana in the fourth quarter of 2013 to temporarily suspend drilling new wells until there is a sustained improvement in natural gas pricing. A substantial or extended decline in the price of natural gas could result in further delays or cancellation of existing or future drilling programs or curtailment in production at some properties, all of which could have an adverse effect on our revenues, profitability and cash flows. In addition, natural gas drilling and production are subject to intense federal and state regulation as well as to public interest in environmental protection. Such regulation and interest, when coupled, could result in these drilling programs being forced to comply with certain future regulations, resulting in unknown impacts on the programs’ ability to achieve the cost and hedge benefits we expect from the programs.

OUR STRENGTHS AND OPPORTUNITIES

We are North America’s most diversified steel producer. As a result, our short-term performance is not tied to any one market. The pie chart below shows the diversity of our product mix by total tons sold to outside customers in 2013.

 

LOGO

Our highly variable cost structure, combined with our financial strength and liquidity, has allowed us to succeed during cyclical severely depressed steel industry market conditions in the past. In such times, our incentive-based pay system reduces our payroll costs, both hourly and salary, which helps to offset lower selling prices. Our pay-for-performance system, which is closely tied to our levels of production, also allows us to keep our work force intact and to continue operating our facilities when some of our competitors with greater fixed costs are forced to shut down some of their facilities. Because we use electric arc furnaces to produce our steel, we can easily vary our production levels to match short-term changes in demand, unlike our integrated competitors. We believe these strengths also give us opportunities to gain market share during such times.

EVALUATING OUR OPERATING PERFORMANCE

We report our results of operations in three segments: steel mills, steel products and raw materials. Most of the steel we produce in our mills is sold to outside customers, but a significant percentage is used internally by many of the facilities in our steel products segment.

We begin measuring our performance by comparing our net sales, both in total and by individual segment, during a reporting period with our net sales in the corresponding period in the prior year. In doing so, we focus on changes in and the reasons for such changes in the two key variables that have the greatest influence on our net sales: average sales price per ton during the period and total tons shipped to outside customers.

We also focus on both dollar and percentage changes in gross margins, which are key drivers of our profitability, and the reasons for such changes. There are many factors from period to period that can affect our gross margins. One consistent area of focus for us is changes in “metal margins,” which is the difference between the selling price of steel and the cost of scrap and scrap substitutes. Increases in the cost of scrap and scrap substitutes that are not offset by increases in the selling price of steel can quickly compress our margins and reduce our profitability.

Another factor affecting our gross margins in any given period is the application of the last-in, first-out (LIFO) method of accounting to a substantial portion of our inventory (45% of total inventories as of December 31, 2013). LIFO charges or credits for interim periods are based on management’s interim period-end estimates, after considering current and anticipated market conditions, of both inventory costs and quantities at fiscal year end. The actual year end amounts may differ significantly from these estimated interim amounts. Annual LIFO charges or credits are largely based on the relative changes in cost and quantities year over year, primarily with raw material inventory in the steel mills segment.


 

    25    

 

 

Because we are such a large user of energy, material changes in energy costs per ton can significantly affect our gross margins as well. Lower energy costs per ton increase our gross margins. Generally, our energy costs per ton are lower when the average utilization rates of all operating facilities in our steel mills segment are higher.

Changes in marketing, administrative and other expenses, particularly profit sharing costs, can have a material effect on our results of operations for a reporting period as well. Profit sharing costs vary significantly from period to period as they are based upon changes in our pre-tax earnings and are a reflection of our pay-for-performance system that is closely tied to our levels of production.

EVALUATING OUR FINANCIAL CONDITION

We evaluate our financial condition each reporting period by focusing primarily on the amounts of and reasons for changes in cash provided by operating activities, our current ratio, the turnover rate of our accounts receivable and inventories, the amount and reasons for changes in cash used in investing activities, the amounts and reasons for changes in cash provided by or used in financing activities and our cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments position at period end. Our conservative financial practices have served us well in the past and are serving us well today. As a result, our financial position remains strong despite the negative effects on our business of the continued weakness in the domestic and global economies.

 

 

COMPARISON OF 2013 TO 2012

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

NET SALES

Net sales to external customers by segment for 2013 and 2012 were as follows:

 

                         (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        % Change  
   

  Steel mills

     $ 13,311,948         $ 13,781,797         -3%  

  Steel products

       3,607,333           3,738,381         -4%  

  Raw materials

       2,132,765           1,909,095         12%  
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

  Total net sales to external customers

     $ 19,052,046         $ 19,429,273         -2%  
                              

Net sales for 2013 decreased 2% from the prior year. The average sales price per ton decreased 5% from $841 in 2012 to $803 in 2013, while total tons shipped to outside customers increased 3% in 2013 as compared to 2012.

Net sales in the fourth quarter of 2013 increased 10% compared with the fourth quarter of 2012 due to a 10% increase in tons shipped to outside customers. The average sales price per ton was $813 in the fourth quarters of 2013 and 2012.

 

LOGO


 

    26    

 

 

In the steel mills segment, production and sales tons were as follows:

 

                                 (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        % Change  

 

  Steel production

         19,900             19,865         —  

 

  Outside steel shipments

         17,733             17,473         1%  

  Inside steel shipments

           2,917               2,769         5%  

  Total steel shipments

         20,650             20,242         2%  
                                      

Net sales to external customers in the steel mills segment decreased 3% due to a 5% decrease in the average sales price per ton from $792 in 2012 to $751 in 2013, partially offset by a 1% increase in tons sold to outside customers.

The average selling prices for our sheet, bar and plate products decreased in 2013 as compared to 2012 due to pressure from imports and excess domestic capacity. Though average selling prices for our sheet products were lower in 2013 than 2012, average selling prices for sheet products increased during the last half of 2013 due to pricing increases that began late in the second quarter that were supported by competitor supply disruptions and slightly improved demand. Average selling prices for our structural products group increased in 2013 as compared to 2012 because Skyline’s distribution business is included for the entire year in 2013. Skyline was only included in 2012 after its June 20, 2012 acquisition date. Skyline has higher average sales prices for its products because of the value-added functions it provides to its customers. Demand in nonresidential construction markets is slowly improving but continues to lack sustained momentum. The strongest end markets in 2013 continue to be in manufactured goods, including energy and automotive, much like they were in 2012.

Tonnage data for the steel products segment is as follows:

 

                         (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        % Change  

 

  Joist production

       342           291         18%  

  Deck sales

       334           308         8%  

  Cold finished sales

       474           492         -4%  

  Fabricated concrete reinforcing steel sales

 

      

 

1,065

 

  

 

      

 

1,180

 

  

 

    

-10%  

 

Net sales to external customers in the steel products segment decreased 4% from 2012 due to a 3% decrease in tons sold to outside customers and a 1% decrease in the average sales price per ton from $1,393 to $1,375. The 10% decrease in volume of our rebar fabricated products in 2013 as compared to 2012 was partially offset by a 3% increase in the average sales price per ton. Selling prices of our joist and deck products decreased in 2013 as compared to 2012, but these decreases were more than offset by increased sales volumes due to moderately improved demand in nonresidential construction. Pricing and volumes of cold finished bar products decreased from the prior year. Steel products segment shipments to external customers decreased 6% in the fourth quarter of 2013 from the third quarter of 2013 because of typical seasonality in the nonresidential construction market. Tons shipped to external customers in the fourth quarter of 2013 increased 3% over the fourth quarter of 2012. Though we have seen slow improvement in demand related to nonresidential construction, that improvement has lacked sustained momentum, causing net sales in the steel products segment to remain depressed.

Sales for the raw materials segment increased 12% from 2012 primarily due to increased volumes in DJJ’s brokerage and processing operations and increased volumes at our natural gas drilling working interests, partially offset by decreased pricing experienced by DJJ. Raw materials segment sales increased 25% in the fourth quarter of 2013 as compared to the fourth quarter of 2012, due mainly to increases in volumes at DJJ’s brokerage operations and at our natural gas drilling working interests. Approximately 83% of outside sales in the raw materials segment in 2013 were from brokerage operations of DJJ and approximately 12% of the outside sales were from the scrap processing facilities (85% and 13%, respectively, in 2012).


 

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GROSS MARGIN

In 2013, Nucor recorded gross margins of $1.41 billion (7%) compared to $1.51 billion (8%) in 2012. The year-over-year dollar and gross margin percentage decreases were primarily the result of the 5% decrease in the average sales price per ton, partially offset by the 3% increase in tons shipped to outside customers. Additionally, gross margins were impacted by the following factors:

 

• 

  In the steel mills segment, the average scrap and scrap substitute cost per ton used decreased 8% from $407 in 2012 to $376 in 2013; however, metal margins also decreased for our sheet, bar and plate products from 2012 due to the previously mentioned decreases in selling prices in those categories. Metal margin dollars for all of our steel mill products increased in the fourth quarter of 2013 as compared to the fourth quarter of 2012. Metal margins increased in the fourth quarter of 2013 as compared to the third quarter of 2013 due to increased metal margins from our sheet, structural and plate products.       
    
  Scrap prices are driven by global supply and demand for scrap and other iron-based raw materials used to make steel. We experienced less quarterly volatility in scrap costs during 2013 than in 2012. We expect that early 2014 conditions in the domestic scrap market will be very dependent on the region of the country where they are located. Some regions are experiencing less export demand while weather conditions in other regions are negatively impacting the flow of scrap into scrap yards. We anticipate low volatility in scrap costs going forward until we see stronger market demand either domestically or globally.      LOGO     

 

• 

 

 

Nucor’s gross margins are significantly impacted by the application of the LIFO method of accounting. LIFO charges or credits are largely based on the relative changes in cost and quantities year over year, primarily within raw material inventory in the steel mills segment. The average scrap and scrap substitute cost per ton in ending inventory within our steel mills segment at December 31, 2013 increased 3% as compared to December 31, 2012. Ending inventory quantities also increased as compared to December 31, 2012. As a result of these factors, Nucor recorded a LIFO charge of $17.4 million in 2013 (a LIFO credit of $155.9 million in 2012). The increases in cost per ton were driven by market conditions at the end of 2013, which experienced stronger demand for steel and raw materials than market conditions at the end of 2012.

  
 

 

In the fourth quarter of 2013, Nucor recorded a LIFO charge of $17.4 million compared with a LIFO credit of $71.9 million in the fourth quarter of 2012.

   

• 

  Nucor’s 2012 gross margins were negatively impacted by $48.8 million in inventory-related purchase accounting adjustments associated with our acquisition of Skyline (none in 2013). Purchase accounting adjustments related to Skyline were $12.0 million in the fourth quarter of 2012 with none being recorded in the fourth quarter of 2013.     

• 

  Gross margins at our rebar fabrication businesses increased significantly in 2013 as compared to 2012 due to higher average sales prices and the effects of management initiatives that have resulted in lower costs, better selling strategies and improved supplier relationships. With the exception of the fourth quarter, in which margins were down slightly from the prior year fourth quarter, the rebar fabrication businesses had higher gross margins in each quarter of 2013 than in the comparable quarter of 2012.      

• 

 

Total energy costs decreased approximately $1 per ton from 2012 to 2013, primarily due to the negative impact of natural gas hedge settlements on our overall natural gas costs in 2012. Due to the efficiency of Nucor’s steel mills, energy costs remained less than 6% of the sales dollar in 2013 and 2012.

 

    

  In the fourth quarter of 2013, total energy costs decreased approximately $2 per ton from the third quarter of 2013 due primarily to lower electricity unit costs, and decreased approximately $3 per ton from the fourth quarter of 2012 primarily due to natural gas hedge settlement costs in the fourth quarter of last year.     

• 

  Gross margins related to DJJ’s scrap processing operations decreased significantly during 2013 compared to 2012 due to excess shredding capacity increasing DJJ’s cost of scrap purchases and weather-related effects in the first quarter of 2013 that reduced the flow of scrap into our scrap processing operations.     


 

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MARKETING, ADMINISTRATIVE AND OTHER EXPENSES

A major component of marketing, administrative and other expenses is profit sharing and other incentive compensation costs. These costs, which are based upon and fluctuate with Nucor’s financial performance, decreased from 2012 to 2013. In 2013, profit sharing costs consisted of $71.7 million of contributions, including the Company’s matching contribution, made to the Company’s Profit Sharing and Retirement Savings Plan for qualified employees ($77.7 million in 2012). Other bonus costs also fluctuate based on Nucor’s achievement of certain financial performance goals, including comparisons of Nucor’s financial performance to peers in the steel industry and other companies. Stock-based compensation included in marketing, administrative and other expenses decreased by 8% to $22.9 million in 2013 compared with $25.0 million in 2012 and includes costs associated with vesting of stock awards granted in prior years.

Of the $27.0 million increase in marketing, administrative and other expenses in 2013 as compared to 2012, $15.3 million was due to the inclusion of Skyline’s results for the entire 2013 year as compared to only being included after its June 2012 acquisition date during 2012. Additionally, in the third quarter of 2013, a storage dome collapsed at Nucor Steel Louisiana in St. James Parish. As a result, Nucor recorded a partial write-down of assets at the facility, including $7.0 million of inventory and $21.0 million of property, plant and equipment, offset by a $14.0 million insurance receivable that was based on management’s estimate of probable insurance recoveries. Included in marketing, administrative and other expenses in 2012 was a $17.6 million loss on the sale of the assets of Nucor Wire Products Pennsylvania, Inc.

EQUITY IN (EARNINGS) LOSSES OF UNCONSOLIDATED AFFILIATES

Nucor recorded equity method investment earnings of $9.3 million in 2013 compared with losses of $13.3 million in 2012. The equity method investment results included amortization expense and other purchase accounting adjustments. The improvement in the equity method investment results in 2013 from 2012 is primarily due to greater equity method earnings at NuMit, a decrease in losses at Duferdofin Nucor and earnings at Hunter Ridge (acquired in November 2012). Equity in earnings of unconsolidated affiliates was $6.6 million in the fourth quarter of 2013 compared to losses of $4.2 million in the fourth quarter of 2012 and earnings of $2.3 million in the third quarter of 2013. The improvement in equity method earnings in the fourth quarter of 2013 from the fourth quarter of last year is mainly due to an increase in equity method earnings at NuMit as well as a decrease in losses at Duferdofin Nucor. The improvement in equity method earnings in the fourth quarter of 2013 from the previous quarter is primarily due to a decrease in losses at Duferdofin Nucor.

IMPAIRMENT OF NON-CURRENT ASSETS

In 2013, Nucor incurred no charges for impairment of non-current assets compared to $30.0 million in 2012. In the second quarter of 2012, Nucor recorded a $30.0 million impairment charge related to its equity method investment in Duferdofin Nucor (see Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements).

INTEREST EXPENSE (INCOME)

Net interest expense is detailed below:

 

                  (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012  

 

  Interest expense

     $ 151,986         $ 173,503   

  Interest income

       (5,091        (11,128
    

 

 

      

 

 

 

  Interest expense, net

     $ 146,895         $ 162,375   
                       

The 12% decrease in gross interest expense from 2012 is primarily attributable to a 6% decrease in average debt outstanding and a 2% decrease in the average interest rate. In 2013, Nucor issued $1.0 billion of new notes at a lower weighted average interest rate than the $900.0 million of debt that matured between the fourth quarter of 2012 and the second quarter of 2013. Gross interest income decreased 54% due to a 50% decrease in average investments and a 45% decrease in the average interest rate on investments.


 

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EARNINGS BEFORE INCOME TAXES AND NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

Earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests by segment for 2013 and 2012 are as follows:

 

                      (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,         2013           2012  

 

  Steel mills

     $ 1,156,715         $ 1,162,270   

  Steel products

       82,129           (17,140

  Raw materials

       13,686           55,264   

  Corporate/eliminations

       (461,407        (347,454
    

 

 

      

 

 

 

  Earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests

     $    791,123         $    852,940   
                           

Earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests in the steel mills segment in 2013 decreased slightly from 2012. Gross margin was negatively affected in 2013 by lower metal margin dollars resulting from factors discussed above. The profitability of the steel mills segment in 2013 benefited from improved results from the NuMit and Duferdofin Nucor equity method investments as compared to 2012. Other factors impacting the profitability of the steel mills segment in 2012 that did not occur in 2013 were the $30.0 million impairment charge related to Duferdofin Nucor and the $48.8 million of inventory-related purchase accounting adjustments related to Skyline. Earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests in the steel mills segment increased significantly in the fourth quarter of 2013 as compared to the fourth quarter of 2012 due to more favorable market conditions in our sheet mills resulting from competitor supply disruptions that began late in the second quarter and slightly improved demand. Although conditions are slowly improving from historically low levels, the nonresidential construction market continues to lack sustained momentum. The strongest end markets continue to be in manufactured goods, including energy and automotive.

The steel products segment had earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests in 2013 as compared to a loss in 2012. Although the average sales price and volume for the segment were lower in 2013 than 2012, profitability in our joist, cold finish and rebar fabrication businesses improved from 2012. The largest increase in profitability was in our rebar fabrication businesses, which experienced higher average sales prices and the effects of management initiatives that have resulted in lower costs, better selling strategies and improved supplier relationships. The steel products segment’s 2012 results were impacted by the $17.6 million loss on the sale of assets of Nucor Wire Products Pennsylvania, Inc. in the third quarter of 2012. In 2013, the steel products segment experienced its first profitable year since 2008. Though the profitability of the steel products segment has improved, conditions in the nonresidential construction markets continue to negatively impact the results of the segment.

The profitability of our raw materials segment decreased from 2012. Difficult conditions in the scrap processing industry have had a negative impact on the profitability of the scrap processing operations of DJJ since the first quarter of 2012. During this time, excess shredding capacity has increased competition and therefore the cost of raw materials while the selling price of scrap has decreased in 2013 as compared to 2012. Also negatively affecting profitability in the raw materials segment were the third quarter 2013 charges related to the net $14.0 million write-down of inventory and property, plant and equipment as a result of the dome collapse at Nucor Steel Louisiana. Nucor Steel Louisiana also had increased startup costs in 2013 as it began production in late December. An unplanned 18-day outage at our Trinidad DRI facility in early 2013 also contributed to lower profitability for the raw materials segment in 2013 as compared to 2012.

The decrease in results in Corporate/eliminations in 2013 was primarily due to a LIFO charge of $17.4 million in 2013 as compared to a $155.9 million LIFO credit in 2012.

NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

Noncontrolling interests represent the income attributable to the minority interest partners of Nucor’s joint ventures, primarily Nucor-Yamato Steel Company (NYS) of which Nucor owns 51%. The 10% increase in earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests in 2013 over the previous year was primarily due to increased margins as a result of a shift in product mix at NYS. Under the NYS limited partnership agreement, the minimum amount of cash to be distributed each year to the partners is the amount needed by each partner to pay applicable U.S. federal and state income taxes.

PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES

The effective tax rate in 2013 was 26.0% compared with 30.5% in 2012. The change in the rate between 2012 and 2013 was primarily due to a $21.3 million out-of-period adjustment to the deferred tax balances recorded in 2013. The out-of-period item did not have a material impact in the current or any previously reported period. Nucor has concluded U.S. federal income tax matters for years through 2009. The 2010 through 2013 tax years are open to examination by the Internal Revenue Service. The Canada Revenue Agency has completed an audit examination for the periods 2006 to 2008 for Harris Steel Group Inc. and subsidiaries with immaterial adjustments to the income tax returns. The tax years 2009 through 2013 remain open to examination by other major taxing jurisdictions to which Nucor is subject (primarily Canada and other state and local jurisdictions).


 

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NET EARNINGS AND RETURN ON EQUITY

Nucor reported net earnings of $488.0 million, or $1.52 per diluted share, in 2013 compared to net earnings of $504.6 million, or $1.58 per diluted share, in 2012. Net earnings attributable to Nucor stockholders as a percentage of net sales were 3% in both 2013 and 2012. Return on average stockholders’ equity was 6% and 7% in 2013 and 2012, respectively.

 

LOGO

 

 

COMPARISON OF 2012 TO 2011

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

NET SALES

Net sales to external customers by segment for 2012 and 2011 were as follows:

 

               (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,    2012      2011      % Change  

 

  Steel mills

   $ 13,781,797       $ 14,463,683         -5%   

  Steel products

     3,738,381         3,431,490         9%   

  Raw materials

     1,909,095         2,128,391         -10%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

  Total net sales to external customers

   $ 19,429,273       $ 20,023,564         -3%   
                            

Net sales for 2012 decreased 3% from the prior year. The average sales price per ton decreased 3% from $869 in 2011 to $841 in 2012, while total tons shipped to outside customers only slightly increased.

In the steel mills segment, production and sales tons were as follows:

 

               (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,            2012              2011      % Change  

 

  Steel production

     19,865         19,561         2%   

 

  Outside steel shipments

     17,473         16,796         4%   

  Inside steel shipments

       2,769           3,329         -17%   

  Total steel shipments

     20,242         20,125         1%   
                            


 

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Net sales to external customers in the steel mills segment decreased 5% in 2012 from 2011 due to a decrease in the average sales price per ton, partially offset by an increase in tons sold to outside customers.

Tonnage data for the steel products segment is as follows:

 

               (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,            2012              2011      % Change  

 

  Joist production

  

 

 

 

291

 

  

  

 

 

 

288

 

  

  

 

 

 

1%

 

  

  Deck sales

     308         312         -1%   

  Cold finished sales

     492         494           

  Fabricated concrete reinforcing steel sales

 

    

 

1,180

 

  

 

    

 

1,074

 

  

 

    

 

10%

 

  

 

                            

Net sales to external customers in the steel products segment increased 9% over 2011 due to a 4% increase in tons sold to outside customers and a 4% increase in the average sales price per ton from $1,335 to $1,393. Pricing of joists, deck, metal buildings and components and rebar fabricated products improved over the prior year as nonresidential construction activity showed modest improvement; however, sales in the steel products segment were depressed as demand in the nonresidential construction market remained well below historical averages. Pricing and volumes of cold finished bar products decreased slightly from 2011. Sales of rebar fabricated products contributed most significantly to the year-over-year increases in volumes and prices in the steel products segment due to the modest improvement in nonresidential construction activity.

Sales for the raw materials segment decreased 10% from 2011 primarily due to decreased pricing and decreased volumes in DJJ’s brokerage operations. Approximately 85% of outside sales in the raw materials segment in 2012 were from brokerage operations of DJJ and approximately 13% of the outside sales were from the scrap processing facilities (86% and 13%, respectively, in 2011).

GROSS MARGIN

In 2012, Nucor recorded gross margins of $1.51 billion (8%) compared to $1.88 billion (9%) in 2011. The year-over-year dollar and gross margin percentage decreases were primarily the result of the 3% decrease in the average sales price per ton. Additionally, gross margins were impacted by the following factors:

 

  In the steel mills segment, the average scrap and scrap substitute cost per ton used decreased 7% from $439 in 2011 to $407 in 2012; however, metal margins also decreased from 2011.

The average scrap and scrap substitute cost per ton used decreased each quarter during 2012. However, the average sales price per ton also decreased each quarter of 2012 for all of the products within our steel mills segment except for structural. The decrease in sales prices and the resulting decrease in metal margins is primarily the result of new domestic suppliers and very high import levels in 2012 that increased from 2011 levels.

 

  The average scrap and scrap substitute cost per ton in ending inventory within our steel mills segment at December 31, 2012 decreased 13% as compared to December 31, 2011, which was partially offset by increased quantities included in ending inventory. As a result of these factors, Nucor recorded a LIFO credit of $155.9 million (a LIFO charge of $142.8 million in 2011).

 

  Nucor’s 2012 gross margins were negatively impacted by $48.8 million in inventory-related purchase accounting adjustments associated with our acquisition of Skyline.

 

  Total energy costs decreased $2 per ton from 2011 to 2012 due primarily to lower natural gas unit costs. Due to the efficiency of Nucor’s steel mills, energy costs remained less than 6% of the sales dollar in 2012 and 2011.

 

  Gross margins related to DJJ’s scrap processing operations were significantly lower in 2012 compared to 2011. The decrease was due to conditions in the scrap processing industry, in which excess shredding capacity increased competition for raw materials. As scrap selling prices decreased throughout 2012, DJJ experienced severe downward pressure on margins.

 

  Gross margins were impacted in the fourth quarter of 2011 by a non-cash gain of $29.0 million as a result of the correction of an actuarial calculation related to the medical plan covering certain eligible early retirees.

 

  Gross margins in 2012 were positively affected by the improved performance of our steel products segment, which experienced gross margin improvement between the third and fourth quarters of 2012.


 

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MARKETING, ADMINISTRATIVE AND OTHER EXPENSES

Profit sharing costs decreased from 2011 to 2012. In 2012, profit sharing costs consisted of $77.7 million of contributions, including the Company’s matching contribution, made to the Company’s Profit Sharing and Retirement Savings Plan for qualified employees ($117.7 million in 2011). Stock-based compensation included in marketing, administrative and other expenses increased 1% to $25.0 million in 2012 compared with $24.7 million in 2011 and includes costs associated with vesting of stock awards granted in prior years.

In 2012, marketing, administrative and other expenses included a charge of $17.6 million for the loss on the sale of the assets of Nucor Wire Products Pennsylvania, Inc. Also contributing to the increase in marketing, administrative and other expenses in 2012 was the inclusion of Skyline’s results since the acquisition date and a general increase in the steel products segment related to increased shipments to outside customers.

EQUITY IN LOSSES OF UNCONSOLIDATED AFFILIATES

Nucor incurred equity method investment losses of $13.3 million and $10.0 million in 2012 and 2011, respectively. The increase in the equity method investment losses is primarily attributable to an increase in losses generated by Duferdofin Nucor S.r.l.

IMPAIRMENT OF NON-CURRENT ASSETS

In 2012, Nucor recorded $30.0 million in charges for impairment of non-current assets compared with $13.9 million in 2011. In the second quarter of 2012, Nucor incurred a $30.0 million charge related to its equity method investment in Duferdofin Nucor. The entire impairment charge recorded in 2011 relates to the impairment of Nucor’s investment in a dust recycling joint venture that has since been terminated (see Note 10 to the Consolidated Financial Statements).

INTEREST EXPENSE (INCOME)

Net interest expense is detailed below:

 

          (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,    2012     2011  

 

  Interest expense

  

 

 

 

    $173,503

 

  

 

 

 

 

    $178,812

 

  

  Interest income

        (11,128        (12,718

  Interest expense, net

     $162,375        $166,094   
                  

The 3% decrease in gross interest expense from 2011 is primarily attributable to a 3% decrease in average debt outstanding and a slight decrease in the average interest rate. Gross interest income decreased 13% due primarily to a decrease in average investments.

EARNINGS BEFORE INCOME TAXES AND NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

Earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests by segment for 2012 and 2011 are as follows:

 

          (in thousands)
  Year Ended December 31,    2012     2011  

 

  Steel mills

  

 

 

 

$1,162,270

 

  

 

 

 

 

$1,813,155

 

  

  Steel products

     (17,140     (60,282

  Raw materials

     55,264        156,180   

  Corporate/eliminations

         (347,454        (657,241

  Earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests

     $   852,940        $1,251,812   
                  

Earnings before income taxes and noncontrolling interests in the steel mills segment for 2012 decreased 36% from 2011. A major factor behind the decrease is that metal margin dollars decreased from 2011 resulting from the factors described above. Other factors impacting the profitability of the steel mills segment in 2012 were the $30.0 million impairment charge related to Duferdofin Nucor and the $48.8 million of inventory-related purchase accounting adjustments related to Skyline. The market conditions that impacted the steel mills segment include an import surge across most products that began late in 2011 and continued through 2012. In addition, U.S. sheet steel markets were negatively impacted by new domestic supply that began ramping up production in 2011. The strongest end markets were manufactured goods, including automotive, energy and heavy equipment.


 

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Losses before income taxes and noncontrolling interests in the steel products segment in 2012 decreased from 2011. The 2012 loss was impacted by the $17.6 million loss on the sale of assets of Nucor Wire Products Pennsylvania, Inc. At our rebar fabrication businesses, 2012 shipments to outside customers increased 10% over 2011, which led to improved profitability within the segment. Although the segment experienced market share gains, improved pricing and effective management of costs, the profitability of this segment was weak due to the continued challenging conditions in the nonresidential construction market.

The profitability of our raw materials segment, particularly DJJ, decreased significantly from 2011 primarily due to margin compression at the scrap processing operations resulting from falling scrap selling prices and excess shredding capacity.

The improvements in results in Corporate/eliminations in 2012 were primarily due to the change in LIFO from a charge to a credit and lower profit sharing and incentive compensation costs.

NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

The 7% increase in noncontrolling interests from 2011 to 2012 was primarily attributable to the increased earnings of NYS, which were primarily due to increases in volumes and changes in product mix.

PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES

The effective tax rate in 2012 was 30.5% compared with 31.2% in 2011. The change in the rate between 2011 and 2012 was primarily due to the change in relative proportions of net earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests to total pre-tax earnings, a greater benefit in 2012 from the domestic manufacturing deduction and the recognition of a deferred tax asset related to state tax credit carryforwards and the adjustment of tax expense to previously filed returns.

NET EARNINGS AND RETURN ON EQUITY

Nucor reported net earnings of $504.6 million, or $1.58 per diluted share, in 2012 compared to net earnings of $778.2 million, or $2.45 per diluted share, in 2011. Net earnings attributable to Nucor stockholders as a percentage of net sales were 3% in 2012 and 4% in 2011. Return on average stockholders’ equity was 7% and 11% in 2012 and 2011, respectively.

 

 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

Cash flows provided by operating activities provide us with a significant source of liquidity. When needed, we also have external short-term financing sources available, including the issuance of commercial paper and borrowings under our bank credit facilities. We also issue long-term debt from time to time.

In 2013, Nucor’s $1.5 billion revolving credit facility was amended and restated to extend the maturity date to August 2018. The revolving credit facility was undrawn and Nucor had no commercial paper outstanding at December 31, 2013. We believe our financial strength is a key strategic advantage among domestic steel producers, particularly during recessionary business cycles. We currently carry the highest credit ratings of any metals and mining company in North America with an A rating from Standard & Poor’s and a Baa1 rating from Moody’s. Based upon these factors, we expect to continue to have adequate access to the capital markets at a reasonable cost of funds for liquidity purposes when needed. Our credit ratings are dependent, however, upon a number of factors, both qualitative and quantitative, and are subject to change at any time. The disclosure of our credit ratings is made in order to enhance investors’ understanding of our sources of liquidity and the impact of our credit ratings on our cost of funds.

Nucor’s cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments position remains robust at $1.51 billion as of December 31, 2013. Approximately $173.2 million and $186.2 million of the cash and cash equivalents position at December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012, respectively, was held by our majority-owned joint ventures.

 

  Selected Measures of Liquidity   
     (dollars in thousands)
  December 31,    2013      2012  

 

  Cash and cash equivalents

  

 

$

 

1,483,252

 

  

  

 

$

 

1,052,862

 

  

  Short-term investments

     28,191         104,167   

  Restricted cash and investments

             275,163   

  Working capital

     4,449,830         3,631,796   

  Current ratio

 

    

 

3.3

 

  

 

    

 

2.8

 

  

 


 

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The current ratio was 3.3 at year end 2013 compared with 2.8 at year end 2012. The current ratio was positively impacted by a 31% increase from 2012 in cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments. The increase in cash and cash equivalents and short-term investments was primarily due to proceeds from the issuance of debt and cash generated by operations, partially offset by cash paid for capital expenditures and dividend payments. In addition, inventories increased by 12% due primarily to increases at the new DRI plant in Louisiana, as well as an 8% increase in inventory tons on hand and a 3% increase in scrap costs in inventory over the prior year. The current ratio was also positively impacted by an 88% decrease from 2012 in long-term debt due within one year and short-term debt, due primarily to the repayment of $250 million of debt in the second quarter of 2013. The next significant debt maturity is not until 2017.

Accounts receivable increased by 6% over 2012 due primarily to the 10% increase in net sales in the fourth quarter of 2013 compared with the prior year fourth quarter. This increase is the result of a 10% increase in outside shipments in the fourth quarter of 2013 as compared with the fourth quarter of 2012. In 2013, total accounts receivable turned approximately every five weeks and inventories turned approximately every seven weeks. This compares to turns of every five weeks for accounts receivable and every six weeks for inventory in 2012. Inventory turnover has slowed slightly from historical rates due mainly to the acquisition of Skyline which, as a distributor, must keep a larger supply of inventory on hand.

Funds provided by operations, cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments and new borrowings under existing credit facilities are expected to be adequate to meet future capital expenditure and working capital requirements for existing operations for at least the next 24 months.

 

We have a simple capital structure with no off-balance sheet arrangements or relationships with unconsolidated special purpose entities that we believe could have a material impact on our financial condition or liquidity.

 

OPERATING ACTIVITIES

Cash provided by operating activities was $1.08 billion in 2013 compared with $1.20 billion in 2012, a decrease of 10%. The change in operating assets and liabilities of ($235.2) million in 2013 compared with ($86.1) million in 2012 was partially offset by the increase in deferred income taxes over the prior year. The funding of working capital increased over the prior year due mainly to increases in accounts receivable and inventory, somewhat offset by a decrease in cash provided by the change in accounts payable. Accounts receivable increased due to increased outside shipments in the fourth quarter over the prior year fourth quarter. Inventory increased due to an increase in inventory on hand and an increase in scrap prices in inventory from year end 2012. The increase in scrap prices also drove the increase in the accounts payable balance.

 

INVESTING ACTIVITIES

Our business is capital intensive; therefore, cash used in investing activities primarily represents capital expenditures for new facilities, the expansion and upgrading of existing facilities and the acquisition of other companies. Nucor invested $1.20 billion in new facilities

    

 

LOGO  

 

  

 

or upgrading of existing facilities in 2013 compared with $947.6 million in 2012, an increase of 26%. This increase in capital expenditures was in large part due to the construction of our DRI facility in Louisiana and the funding of our natural gas working interest drilling program. Offsetting the increase in capital expenditures was the decrease in acquisitions. In 2012, Nucor invested $760.8 million in the acquisition of other companies (primarily Skyline); however, there were no acquisitions in 2013. Another factor contributing to the increase in cash used in investing activities was the net decrease of $1.22 billion in proceeds from the sale of investments and restricted investments (net of purchases) and changes in restricted cash from 2012.

FINANCING ACTIVITIES

Cash provided by financing activities was $196.0 million in 2013 compared with cash used in financing activities of $1.15 billion in 2012. The increase in cash provided by financing activities is primarily attributable to the issuance of debt in 2013 and a decrease in required debt repayments in 2013 than 2012. In the third quarter of 2013, Nucor issued $500.0 million of 4.0% notes due in 2023 and $500.0 million of 5.2% notes due in 2043. The bond offering effectively refinanced $900.0 million of debt that matured between the fourth quarter of 2012 ($650.0 million) and the second quarter of 2013 ($250.0 million). The weighted average interest rate of the new debt is 35 basis points lower than the retired debt, and the new debt also lengthens our debt maturity profile with its weighted average term to maturity of 20 years. Additionally, over 99% of our long-term debt matures in 2017 and beyond.

In 2013, Nucor increased its quarterly base dividend resulting in dividends paid of $471.0 million ($466.4 million in 2012).

Although there were no repurchases in 2013 or 2012, approximately 27.2 million shares remain authorized for repurchase under the Company’s stock repurchase program.


 

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Our credit facility includes only one financial covenant, which is a limit of 60% on the ratio of funded debt to total capitalization. In addition, the credit facility contains customary non-financial covenants, including a limit on Nucor’s ability to pledge the Company’s assets and a limit on consolidations, mergers and sales of assets. Our funded debt to total capital ratio was 36% and 32% at year-end 2013 and 2012, respectively, and we were in compliance with all other covenants under our credit facility.

MARKET RISK

Nucor’s largest exposure to market risk is in our steel mills and steel products segments. Our utilization rates for the steel mills and steel products facilities for the fourth quarter of 2013 were 75% and 58%, respectively. A significant portion of our steel and steel products segments sales are into the commercial, industrial and municipal construction markets, which continue to be depressed. Our largest single customer in 2013 represented approximately 5% of sales and consistently pays within terms. In the raw materials segment, we are exposed to price fluctuations related to the purchase of scrap steel and iron ore. Our exposure to market risk is mitigated by the fact that our steel mills use a significant portion of the products of this segment.

The majority of Nucor’s tax-exempt industrial revenue bonds (IDRBs), including the Gulf Opportunity Zone bonds, have variable interest rates that are adjusted weekly, with the rate of one IDRB adjusted annually. These IDRBs represent 24% of Nucor’s long-term debt outstanding at December 31, 2013. The remaining 76% of Nucor’s long-term debt is at fixed rates. Future changes in interest rates are not expected to significantly impact earnings. From time to time, Nucor makes use of interest rate swaps to manage interest rate risk. As of December 31, 2013, there were no such interest rate swap contracts outstanding. Nucor’s investment practice is to invest in securities that are highly liquid with short maturities. As a result, we do not expect changes in interest rates to have a significant impact on the value of our investment securities recorded as short-term investments.

Nucor also uses derivative financial instruments from time to time to partially manage its exposure to price risk related to natural gas purchases used in the production process as well as scrap, copper and aluminum purchased for resale to its customers. In addition, Nucor uses forward foreign exchange contracts from time to time to hedge cash flows associated with certain assets and liabilities, firm commitments and anticipated transactions. Nucor generally does not enter into derivative instruments for any purpose other than hedging the cash flows associated with specific volumes of commodities that will be purchased and processed or sold in future periods and hedging the exposures related to changes in the fair value of outstanding fixed rate debt instruments and foreign currency transactions. Nucor recognizes all material derivative instruments in the consolidated balance sheets at fair value.

The Company is exposed to foreign currency risk through its operations in Canada, Europe, Trinidad and Colombia. We periodically use derivative contracts to mitigate the risk of currency fluctuations.

CONTRACTUAL OBLIGATIONS AND OTHER COMMERCIAL COMMITMENTS

The following table sets forth our contractual obligations and other commercial commitments as of December 31, 2013 for the periods presented:

 

                         (in thousands)
      

 

Payments Due By Period

 

 
  Contractual Obligations      Total        2014        2015 - 2016        2017 - 2018      2019 and thereafter  

 

  Long-term debt

    

 

 

 

$  4,380,200

 

  

    

 

 

 

$       3,300

 

  

    

 

 

 

$     16,300

 

  

    

 

 

 

$1,100,000

 

  

  

 

 

 

$3,260,600

 

  

  Estimated interest on long-term debt(1)

       2,519,614           179,775           359,436           304,911         1,675,492   

  Capital leases

       34,200           3,420           6,840           6,840         17,100   

  Operating leases

       92,171           26,781           32,955           17,984         14,451   

  Raw material purchase commitments(2)

       4,595,800           1,246,713           2,021,166           1,072,757         255,164   

  Utility purchase commitments(2)

       1,093,797           325,193           235,216           113,923         419,465   

  Natural gas drilling commitments

       4,709,322           42,920           584,916           927,168         3,154,318   

  Other unconditional purchase obligations(3)

       166,106           147,563           3,441           3,356         11,746   

  Other long-term obligations(4)

             355,173               188,333                 60,690                 26,757              79,393   

  Total contractual obligations

       $17,946,383           $2,163,998           $3,320,960           $3,573,696         $8,887,729   
                                                      

 

    (1) Interest is estimated using applicable rates at December 31, 2013 for Nucor’s outstanding fixed and variable rate debt.
    (2) Nucor enters into contracts for the purchase of scrap and scrap substitutes, iron ore, electricity, natural gas and other raw materials and related services. These contracts include multi-year commitments and minimum annual purchase requirements and are valued at prices in effect on December 31, 2013, or according to the contract language. These contracts are part of normal operations and are reflected in historical operating cash flow trends. We do not believe such commitments will adversely affect our liquidity position.
    (3) Purchase obligations include commitments for capital expenditures on operating machinery and equipment.
    (4) Other long-term obligations include amounts associated with Nucor’s early-retiree medical benefits, management compensation and guarantees.
Note: In addition to the amounts shown in the table above, $66.0 million of unrecognized tax benefits have been recorded as liabilities, and we are uncertain as to if or when such amounts may be settled. Related to these unrecognized tax benefits, we have also recorded a liability for potential penalties and interest of $37.2 million at December 31, 2013.


 

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DIVIDENDS

Nucor has increased its base cash dividend every year since it began paying dividends in 1973. Nucor paid dividends of $1.47 per share in 2013 compared with $1.46 per share in 2012. In December 2013, the board of directors increased the base quarterly dividend to $0.37 per share. The base quarterly dividend has more than tripled since the end of 2007. In February 2014, the board of directors declared Nucor’s 164th consecutive quarterly cash dividend of $0.37 per share payable on May 12, 2014 to stockholders of record on March 31, 2014.

OUTLOOK

In 2014, we will continue to take advantage of our position of strength to grow Nucor’s long-term earnings power and shareholder value despite a U.S. economy burdened by a challenging regulatory and overall business environment. We have invested significant capital into our business since the last cyclical peak in 2008. We have done so over a broad range of strategic investments that will further enhance our key competitive strengths: low-cost production, diversified product mix and market leadership positions. With many of these capital projects completed and ready to yield results, we will focus on execution in order to generate strong returns on these investments.

Although macro-level uncertainties in world markets will almost certainly affect both global and domestic growth, we anticipate that our sales and profitability will strengthen somewhat in 2014. Utilization rates, which were flat when compared to 2012, have continued at a similar pace in early 2014 and we expect this trend to continue as we progress through the first quarter. We are encouraged by improvements in backlogs at our steel mills and steel products segments of approximately 21% and 9%, respectively, over year end 2012, and we believe several end-use markets such as automotive, energy and general manufacturing will experience some real demand improvement in 2014. However, the effect this improvement in demand will have on our operating rates will be challenged by excess global steel capacity and the threat of continued increases in imported steel. Nucor is most closely tied to the nonresidential construction sector, which is showing signs of improvement but still lacks sustained momentum. Our ability to achieve significant earnings and sales growth will be diminished until there is sustained improvement in nonresidential construction. Although we expect that we will continue to experience fluctuations in raw material costs in 2014, we have made great strides to manage our raw material costs more effectively with the completion and startup of our second DRI facility located in Louisiana.

We are committed to executing on the opportunities we see ahead to reward Nucor stockholders with very attractive long-term returns on their valuable capital invested in our company. Nucor is the only steel producer in North America with the extremely important competitive advantage of an investment grade credit rating. Our industry-leading financial strength allows us to support investments in our facilities that will prepare us for increased profitability as we enter into more favorable market conditions. In 2014, as we have in our past, we will allocate capital to investments that build our long-term earnings power. Capital expenditures are currently projected to be approximately $600 million in 2014, which is significantly lower than in 2013 mainly due to the joint agreement with Encana to temporarily suspend drilling new natural gas wells given current gas price expectations for 2014. Included in this $600 million total are residual expenditures for our Louisiana DRI facility and our natural gas related investments, capacity expansions in SBQ steel and in sheet piling production as well as other investments in our core operations to expand our product offerings and keep our facilities
state-of-the-art and globally competitive.

 

 

CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements, which have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at year end and the reported amount of revenues and expenses during the year. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those related to the valuation allowances for receivables, the carrying value of non-current assets, reserves for environmental obligations and income taxes. Our estimates are based on historical experience and various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Accordingly, actual costs could differ materially from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions. We believe the following critical accounting policies affect our significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.


 

    37    

 

 

ALLOWANCES FOR DOUBTFUL ACCOUNTS

We maintain allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of our customers to make required payments. If the financial condition of our customers were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, additional allowances may be required.

INVENTORIES

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market. All inventories held by the parent company and Nucor-Yamato Steel Company are valued using the LIFO method of accounting except for supplies that are consumed indirectly in the production process, which are valued using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method of accounting. All inventories held by the parent company’s other subsidiaries are valued using the FIFO method of accounting. The Company records any amount required to reduce the carrying value of inventory to net realizable value as a charge to cost of products sold.

If steel selling prices were to decline in future quarters, write-downs of inventory could result. Specifically, the valuation of raw material inventories purchased during periods of peak market pricing held by subsidiaries valued using the FIFO method of accounting would most likely be impacted. Low utilization rates at our steel mills could hinder our ability to work through high-priced scrap and scrap substitutes (particularly pig iron), leading to period-end exposure when comparing carrying value to net realizable value.

LONG-LIVED ASSET IMPAIRMENTS

We evaluate our property, plant and equipment and finite-lived intangible assets for potential impairment on an individual asset basis or at the lowest level asset grouping for which cash flows can be separately identified. Asset impairments are assessed whenever circumstances indicate that the carrying amounts of those productive assets could exceed their projected undiscounted cash flows. In developing estimated values for assets that we currently use in our operations, we utilize judgments and assumptions of future undiscounted cash flows that the assets will produce. When it is determined that an impairment exists, the related assets are written down to estimated fair market value.

Certain long-lived asset groupings were tested for impairment during the fourth quarter of 2013. Undiscounted cash flows for each asset grouping were estimated using management’s long-range estimates of market conditions associated with each asset grouping over the estimated useful life of the principal asset within the group. Our undiscounted cash flow analysis indicated that those long-lived asset groupings were recoverable as of December 31, 2013; however, if our projected cash flows are not realized, either because of an extended recessionary period or other unforeseen events, impairment charges may be required in future periods. A 20% decrease in the projected cash flows of each of our asset groupings would not result in an impairment, with the exception of one asset grouping included in the steel products segment that has $34.9 million of property, plant and equipment and $34.1 million of finite-lived intangible assets at December 31, 2013.

GOODWILL

Goodwill is tested annually for impairment and whenever events or circumstances change that would make it more likely than not that an impairment may have occurred. We perform our annual impairment analysis as of the first day of the fourth quarter each year. The evaluation of impairment involves comparing the current estimated fair value of each reporting unit to the recorded value, including goodwill.

When appropriate, Nucor performs a qualitative assessment to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. For certain reporting units it is necessary to perform a quantitative analysis. In these instances, a discounted cash flow model is used to determine the current estimated fair value of these reporting units. Key assumptions used to determine the fair value of each reporting unit as part of our annual testing (and any required interim testing) include: (a) expected cash flow for the five-year period following the testing date (including market share, sales volumes and prices, costs to produce and estimated capital needs); (b) an estimated terminal value using a terminal year growth rate determined based on the growth prospects of the reporting unit; (c) a discount rate based on management’s best estimate of the after-tax weighted average cost of capital; and (d) a probability-weighted scenario approach by which varying cash flows are assigned to certain scenarios based on the likelihood of occurrence. Management considers historical and anticipated future results, general economic and market conditions, the impact of planned business and operational strategies and all available information at the time the fair values of its reporting units are estimated.

Our fourth quarter 2013 annual goodwill impairment analysis did not result in an impairment charge. And, management does not currently believe that future impairment of these reporting units is probable. However, the performance of certain businesses that comprise our reporting units requires continued improvement. An increase of approximately 50 basis points in the discount rate, a critical assumption in which a minor change can have a significant impact on the estimated fair value, would not result in an impairment charge.


 

    38    

 

 

Nucor will continue to monitor operating results within all reporting units throughout the upcoming year in an effort to determine if events and circumstances warrant further interim impairment testing. Otherwise, all reporting units will again be subject to the required annual impairment test during our fourth quarter of 2014. Changes in the judgments and estimates underlying our analysis of goodwill for possible impairment, including expected future operating cash flows and discount rate, could decrease the estimated fair value of our reporting units in the future and could result in an impairment of goodwill.

EQUITY METHOD INVESTMENTS

Investments in joint ventures in which Nucor shares control over the financial and operating decisions but in which Nucor is not the primary beneficiary are accounted for under the equity method. Each of the Company’s equity method investments is subject to a review for impairment if, and when, circumstances indicate that an other-than-temporary decline in value below its carrying amount may have occurred. Examples of such circumstances include, but are not limited to, a significant deterioration in the earnings performance or business prospects of the investee; a significant adverse change in the regulatory, economic or technological environment of the investee; a significant adverse change in the general market condition of either the geographic area or the industry in which the investee operates; and recurring negative cash flows from operations. If management considers the decline to be other than temporary, the Company would write down the investment to its estimated fair market value. An other-than-temporary decline in carrying value is determined to have occurred when, in management’s judgment, a decline in fair value below carrying value is of such length of time and/or severity that it is considered permanent.

In the event that an impairment review is necessary, we calculate the estimated fair value of our equity method investments using a probability-weighted multiple scenario income approach. Management’s analysis includes three discounted cash flow scenarios (best case, base case and recessionary case), which contain forecasted near-term cash flows under each scenario. Generally, (i) the best case scenario contains estimates of future results ranging from slightly higher than recent operating performance to levels that are consistent with historical operating and financial performance (i.e., results experienced prior to the onset of the current recessionary period that began in 2008); (ii) the base case scenario has estimates of future results ranging from generally in line with recent operating performance to levels that are more conservative than historical operating and financial performance; and (iii) the worst case scenario has estimates of future results ranging from results relatively consistent with the operating and financial performance that we are experiencing in the current unprecedented recessionary state of the global steel industry to limited growth resulting only from slight improvements each year in utilization rates as an acknowledgement of where the industry is at the bottom of the economic cycle. Management determines the probability that each cash flow scenario will come to fruition based on the specific facts and circumstances of each of the preceding scenarios, with the base case typically receiving the majority of the weighting.

Key assumptions used to determine the fair value of our equity method investments include: (a) expected cash flow for the five-year period following the testing date (including market share, sales volumes and prices, costs to produce and estimated capital needs); (b) an estimated terminal value using a terminal year growth rate determined based on the growth prospects of the reporting unit; (c) a discount rate based on management’s best estimate of the after-tax weighted average cost of capital; and (d) a probability-weighted scenario approach by which varying cash flows are assigned to certain scenarios based on the likelihood of occurrence. While the assumptions that most significantly affect the fair value determination include projected revenues and discount rate, the assumptions are often interdependent and no single factor predominates in determining the estimated fair value. Management considers historical and anticipated future results, general economic and market conditions, the impact of planned business and operational strategies and all available information at the time the fair values of its investments are estimated. Those estimates and judgments may or may not ultimately prove appropriate.

In the second quarter of 2012, Nucor concluded that a triggering event occurred requiring assessment for impairment of its equity investment in Duferdofin Nucor due to the continued declines in the global demand for steel, the escalated economic and political turmoil in Europe and continued operating performance well below budgeted levels through the first half of 2012. Duferdofin Nucor’s updated unfavorable forecast of future operating performance was also a contributing factor. After completing its assessment, Nucor determined that the carrying amount exceeded its estimated fair value and recorded a $30.0 million impairment charge against the Company’s investment in Duferdofin Nucor in the second quarter of 2012. This charge is included in impairment of non-current assets in the consolidated statements of earnings.

Although the operating results of Duferdofin Nucor have improved since 2012 and there have been no significant deteriorations in
near-term financial projections or other key assumptions since the last impairment test performed in the fourth quarter of 2012, Nucor concluded that it was appropriate to reassess its equity investment in Duferdofin Nucor for impairment during the fourth quarter of 2013 due to the protracted challenging steel market conditions in Europe. The updated analysis included expected future cash flow assumptions that were developed by local management at Duferdofin Nucor and were reviewed in detail by Nucor senior management using the methodology outlined above. The base case scenario received the majority of the probability weighting, with equal weighting given to the other two scenarios. After completing its assessment, the Company determined that the estimated fair value exceeded its carrying amount by a sufficient amount and that there was no need for additional impairment charges.


 

    39    

 

 

It is reasonably possible that based on actual future performance the estimates used in our fourth quarter valuation could change and result in further impairment of our investment. Changes in management estimates to the unobservable inputs would change the valuation of the investment. The estimates for the projected revenue and discount rate are the assumptions that most significantly affect the fair value determination.

ENVIRONMENTAL REMEDIATION

We are subject to environmental laws and regulations established by federal, state and local authorities, and we make provisions for the estimated costs related to compliance. Undiscounted remediation liabilities are accrued based on estimates of known environmental exposures. The accruals are reviewed periodically and, as investigations and remediation proceed, adjustments are made as we believe are necessary. Our measurement of environmental liabilities is based on currently available facts, present laws and regulations and current technology.

INCOME TAXES

We utilize the liability method of accounting for income taxes. Under the liability method, deferred taxes are determined based on the temporary differences between the financial statement and tax basis of assets and liabilities using tax rates expected to be in effect during the years in which the basis differences reverse. A valuation allowance is recorded when it is more likely than not that some of the deferred tax assets will not be realized. We recognize the effect of income tax positions only if those positions are more likely than not of being sustained. Potential accrued interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits within operations are recognized as a component of interest expense.

 

 

RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS

See Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements for a discussion of new accounting pronouncements adopted by Nucor during 2013 and the expected financial impact of accounting pronouncements recently issued or proposed but not yet required to be adopted.

 

 

RECLASSIFICATIONS

In the first quarter of 2013, we began reporting the results of Nucor’s steel trading businesses and rebar distribution businesses in the steel mills segment. Previously these businesses were reported in an “All other” category. These businesses were reclassified to the steel mills segment as part of a realignment of Nucor’s reportable segments to better reflect the way in which they are managed. The segment data for the comparable periods has also been reclassified into the steel mills segment in order to conform to the current year presentation. The steel mills, steel products and raw materials segments are consistent with the way Nucor manages its business, which is primarily based upon the similarity of the types of products produced and sold by each segment. Additionally, the composition of assets by segment at December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 was reclassified to conform with the current presentation. This reclassification between segments did not have any impact on the consolidated asset balances.

In 2012, we began classifying internal fleet and some common carrier costs in cost of products sold in the consolidated statements of earnings. We made this change so that all freight costs will be recorded within the same financial statement line item to allow users of our financial statements to better understand our expense structure. This change resulted in the reclassification of $67.2 million of these costs from marketing, administrative and other expenses to cost of products sold for the year ended December 31, 2011 in order to conform to the current presentation.


  

 

FIVE-YEAR FINANCIAL REVIEW    

 

    

 

     43      

 

       
       

 

      (dollar and share amounts in thousands, except per share data)  
  

 

2013

 

   

 

2012

 

    

 

2011

 

    

 

2010

 

    

 

2009

 

 

 

  FOR THE YEAR

             

 

  Net sales

   $ 19,052,046      $ 19,429,273       $ 20,023,564       $ 15,844,627       $ 11,190,296   

 

  Costs, expenses and other:

             

 

Cost of products sold

     17,641,421        17,915,735         18,142,144         15,060,882         11,090,230   

 

Marketing, administrative and other expenses

  

 

 

 

481,904

 

  

 

 

 

 

454,900

 

  

  

 

 

 

439,528

 

  

  

 

 

 

331,455

 

  

  

 

 

 

296,951

 

  

 

Equity in (earnings) losses of unconsolidated affiliates

  

 

 

 

(9,297

 

 

 

 

 

13,323

 

  

  

 

 

 

10,043

 

  

  

 

 

 

32,082

 

  

  

 

 

 

82,341

 

  

 

Impairment of non-current assets

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

30,000

 

  

  

 

 

 

13,943

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

  

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

Interest expense, net

  

 

 

 

146,895

 

  

 

 

 

 

162,375

 

  

  

 

 

 

166,094

 

  

  

 

 

 

153,093

 

  

  

 

 

 

134,752

 

  

  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
  

 

 

 

18,260,923

 

  

 

 

 

 

18,576,333

 

  

  

 

 

 

18,771,752

 

  

  

 

 

 

15,577,512

 

  

  

 

 

 

11,604,274

 

  

 

  Earnings (loss) before income taxes and noncontrolling interests

  

 

 

 

791,123

 

  

 

 

 

 

852,940

 

  

  

 

 

 

1,251,812

 

  

  

 

 

 

267,115

 

  

  

 

 

 

(413,978

 

 

  Provision for (benefit from) income taxes

  

 

 

 

205,594

 

  

 

 

 

 

259,814

 

  

  

 

 

 

390,828

 

  

  

 

 

 

60,792

 

  

  

 

 

 

(176,800

 

  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

  Net earnings (loss)

  

 

 

 

585,529

 

  

 

 

 

 

593,126

 

  

  

 

 

 

860,984

 

  

  

 

 

 

206,323

 

  

  

 

 

 

(237,178

 

 

  Earnings attributable to noncontrolling interests

  

 

 

 

97,504

 

  

 

 

 

 

88,507

 

  

  

 

 

 

82,796

 

  

  

 

 

 

72,231

 

  

  

 

 

 

56,435

 

  

  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

  Net earnings (loss) attributable to Nucor stockholders

  

 

 

 

488,025

 

  

 

 

 

 

504,619

 

  

  

 

 

 

778,188

 

  

  

 

 

 

134,092

 

  

  

 

 

 

(293,613

 

 

  Net earnings (loss) per share:

             

 

Basic

     1.52        1.58         2.45         0.42         (0.94

 

Diluted

     1.52        1.58         2.45         0.42         (0.94

 

  Dividends declared per share

     1.4725        1.4625         1.4525         1.4425         1.41   

 

  Percentage of net earnings (loss) to net sales

     2.6%        2.6%         3.9%         0.8%         -2.6%   

 

  Return on average stockholders’ equity

     6.4%        6.7%         10.7%         1.8%         -3.8%   

 

  Capital expenditures

     1,230,418        1,019,334         450,627         345,294         390,500   

 

  Acquisitions (net of cash acquired)

            760,833         3,959         64,788         32,720   

 

  Depreciation

     535,852        534,010         522,571         512,147         494,035   

 

  Sales per employee

 

     859        906         974         777         539   

 

  AT YEAR END

             

 

  Current assets

   $ 6,410,046      $ 5,661,364       $ 6,708,081       $ 5,861,175       $ 5,182,248   

 

  Current liabilities

  

 

 

 

1,960,216

 

  

 

 

 

 

2,029,568

 

  

  

 

 

 

2,396,059

 

  

  

 

 

 

1,504,438

 

  

  

 

 

 

1,227,057

 

  

  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

  Working capital

  

 

 

 

4,449,830

 

  

 

 

 

 

3,631,796

 

  

  

 

 

 

4,312,022

 

  

  

 

 

 

4,356,737

 

  

  

 

 

 

3,955,191

 

  

 

  Cash provided by operating activities

  

 

 

 

1,077,949

 

  

 

 

 

 

1,200,385

 

  

  

 

 

 

1,031,053

 

  

  

 

 

 

866,794

 

  

  

 

 

 

1,173,194

 

  

 

  Current ratio

  

 

 

 

3.3

 

  

 

 

 

 

2.8

 

  

  

 

 

 

2.8

 

  

  

 

 

 

3.9

 

  

  

 

 

 

4.2

 

  

 

  Property, plant and equipment, net

  

 

 

 

4,917,024

 

  

 

 

 

 

4,283,056

 

  

  

 

 

 

3,755,604

 

  

  

 

 

 

3,852,118

 

  

  

 

 

 

4,013,836

 

  

 

  Total assets

  

 

 

 

15,203,283

 

  

 

 

 

 

14,152,059

 

  

  

 

 

 

14,570,350

 

  

  

 

 

 

13,921,910

 

  

  

 

 

 

12,571,904

 

  

 

  Long-term debt (including current maturities)

  

 

 

 

4,380,200

 

  

 

 

 

 

3,630,200

 

  

  

 

 

 

4,280,200

 

  

  

 

 

 

4,280,200

 

  

  

 

 

 

3,086,200

 

  

 

  Percentage of debt to capital(1)

  

 

 

 

35.6%

 

  

 

 

 

 

31.5%

 

  

  

 

 

 

35.7%

 

  

  

 

 

 

36.9%

 

  

  

 

 

 

28.9%

 

  

 

  Total Nucor stockholders’ equity

  

 

 

 

7,645,769

 

  

 

 

 

 

7,641,571

 

  

  

 

 

 

7,474,885

 

  

  

 

 

 

7,120,070

 

  

  

 

 

 

7,390,526

 

  

 

Per share

  

 

 

 

24.02

 

  

 

 

 

 

24.06

 

  

  

 

 

 

23.60

 

  

  

 

 

 

22.55

 

  

  

 

 

 

23.47

 

  

 

  Shares outstanding

  

 

 

 

318,328

 

  

 

 

 

 

317,663

 

  

  

 

 

 

316,749

 

  

  

 

 

 

315,791

 

  

  

 

 

 

314,856

 

  

 

  Employees

 

  

 

 

 

 

22,300

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

22,200

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

20,800

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

20,500

 

 

  

 

  

 

 

 

 

20,400

 

 

  

 

 

(1) Long-term debt divided by total equity plus long-term debt.


 

      44      

 

     

 

    MANAGEMENT’S REPORT

 

  
        
        

 

 

MANAGEMENTS  REPORT  on internal control over financial reporting

 

Nucor’s management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Exchange Act Rules 13a-15(f) and 15d-15(f) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

Management assessed the effectiveness of Nucor’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013. In making this assessment, management used criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (1992).

Based on its assessment, management concluded that Nucor’s internal control over financial reporting was effective as of December 31, 2013. PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, has audited the effectiveness of Nucor’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013 as stated in their report which is included herein.


  

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM     

 

    

 

     45      

 

       
       

 

 

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Stockholders and Board of Directors

Nucor Corporation:

In our opinion, the accompanying consolidated balance sheets and the related consolidated statements of earnings, comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity and cash flows present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Nucor Corporation and its subsidiaries at December 31, 2013 and 2012, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2013 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2013, based on criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (1992) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). The Company’s management is responsible for these financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express opinions on these financial statements and on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our integrated audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audits of the financial statements included examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements, assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, and evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

 

LOGO

PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP

Charlotte, NC

February 28, 2014


46         
          CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS   
        

 

  CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

         (in thousands)  

 

  December 31,

 

   2013     2012  

 

  ASSETS

    

 

  CURRENT ASSETS:

    

 

  Cash and cash equivalents (Note 15)

   $ 1,483,252      $ 1,052,862   

 

  Short-term investments (Notes 4 and 15)

     28,191        104,167   

 

  Accounts receivable, net (Note 5)

     1,810,987        1,707,317   

 

  Inventories, net (Note 6)

     2,605,609        2,323,641   

 

  Other current assets (Notes 10 and 20)

     482,007        473,377   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  Total current assets

     6,410,046        5,661,364   

 

  PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, NET (Note 7)

     4,917,024        4,283,056   

 

  RESTRICTED CASH AND INVESTMENTS (Notes 8 and 15)

            275,163   

 

  GOODWILL (Note 9)

     1,973,608        2,004,538   

 

  OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS, NET (Note 9)

     874,154        959,240   

 

  OTHER ASSETS (Note 10)

     1,028,451        968,698   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  TOTAL ASSETS

   $ 15,203,283      $ 14,152,059   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
                  

 

  LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

    

 

  CURRENT LIABILITIES:

    

 

  Short-term debt (Notes 12 and 15)

   $ 29,202      $ 29,912   

 

  Long-term debt due within one year (Notes 12 and 15)

     3,300        250,000   

 

  Accounts payable (Note 11)

     1,117,078        1,046,713   

 

  Salaries, wages and related accruals (Note 18)

     282,860        279,898   

 

  Accrued expenses and other current liabilities (Notes 11, 14, 16 and 20)

     527,776        423,045   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  Total current liabilities

     1,960,216        2,029,568   

 

  LONG-TERM DEBT DUE AFTER ONE YEAR (Notes 12 and 15)

     4,376,900        3,380,200   

 

  DEFERRED CREDITS AND OTHER LIABILITIES (Notes 16, 18 and 20)

     955,889        856,917   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  TOTAL LIABILITIES

     7,293,005        6,266,685   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES (Note 16)

    

 

  EQUITY

    

 

  NUCOR STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY (Notes 13 and 17):

    

 

  Common stock (800,000 shares authorized; 377,525 and 377,013 shares issued, respectively)

     151,010        150,805   

 

  Additional paid-in capital

     1,843,353        1,811,459   

 

  Retained earnings

     7,140,440        7,124,523   

 

  Accumulated other comprehensive income, net of income taxes (Notes 2, 14 and 21)

     9,080        56,761   

 

  Treasury stock (59,197 and 59,350 shares, respectively)

     (1,498,114     (1,501,977
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  Total Nucor stockholders’ equity

     7,645,769        7,641,571   

 

  NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

     264,509        243,803   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  TOTAL EQUITY

     7,910,278        7,885,374   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

   $ 15,203,283      $ 14,152,059   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
                  

  See notes to consolidated financial statements.


            47    
   CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS           
       

 

 

 

  CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF EARNINGS

 

    

(in thousands, except per share data)

 

 

 

  Year Ended December 31,

 

     2013      2012        2011  

 

  NET SALES

     $ 19,052,046       $ 19,429,273         $ 20,023,564   
    

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

  COSTS, EXPENSES AND OTHER:

              

 

  Cost of products sold (Notes 1, 6, 14 and 18)

       17,641,421         17,915,735           18,142,144   

 

  Marketing, administrative and other expenses (Notes 1, 3 and 7)

       481,904         454,900           439,528   

 

  Equity in (earnings) losses of unconsolidated affiliates (Note 10)

       (9,297      13,323           10,043   

 

  Impairment of non-current assets (Note 10)

               30,000           13,943   

 

  Interest expense, net (Notes 19 and 20)

       146,895         162,375           166,094   
    

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

 
    

 

 

 

18,260,923

 

  

  

 

 

 

18,576,333

 

  

    

 

 

 

18,771,752

 

  

    

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

  EARNINGS BEFORE INCOME TAXES AND

              

 

      NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

       791,123         852,940           1,251,812   

 

  PROVISION FOR INCOME TAXES (Note 20)

       205,594         259,814           390,828   
    

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

  NET EARNINGS

       585,529         593,126           860,984   

 

  EARNINGS ATTRIBUTABLE TO NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

       97,504         88,507           82,796   
    

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

  NET EARNINGS ATTRIBUTABLE TO NUCOR STOCKHOLDERS

     $ 488,025       $ 504,619         $ 778,188   
    

 

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

  NET EARNINGS PER SHARE (Note 22):

              

 

   Basic

       $1.52       $ 1.58           $2.45   

 

   Diluted

     $ 1.52       $ 1.58           $2.45   

  See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 


    48             
      CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME   
        

 

  CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 

              

(in thousands)

 

 

 

  Year Ended December 31,

 

     2013        2012        2011  

 

  NET EARNINGS

     $ 585,529         $ 593,126         $ 860,984   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

  OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS):

              

 

  Net unrealized loss on hedging derivatives, net of

    income taxes of $0, ($1,100) and ($4,700)

      for 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively

                 (2,264        (8,454

 

  Reclassification adjustment for loss on settlement of

    hedging derivatives included in net earnings, net of

      income taxes of $0, $25,000 and $21,800

        for 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively

                 42,515           37,093   

 

  Foreign currency translation gain (loss), net of

    income taxes of ($600), $0 and $100

      for 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively

       (53,619        58,626           (40,210

 

  Adjustment to early retiree medical plan, net of

    income taxes of $2,547, ($1,528) and $952

      for 2013, 2012 and 2011, respectively

       5,938           (3,646        1,165   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
    

 

 

 

(47,681

 

    

 

 

 

95,231

 

  

    

 

 

 

(10,406

 

    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
     

  COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

       537,848           688,357           850,578   

 

  COMPREHENSIVE INCOME ATTRIBUTABLE TO

  NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS

       (97,504        (88,512        (82,791
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

  COMPREHENSIVE INCOME ATTRIBUTABLE TO

  NUCOR STOCKHOLDERS

     $ 440,344         $ 599,845         $ 767,787   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
              
                                  

  See notes to consolidated financial statements.

 


              49      
   CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY         
       

 

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF STOCKHOLDERS’ EQUITY    (in thousands, except per share data)

 

            COMMON STOCK     ADDITIONAL
PAID-IN
    RETAINED    

ACCUMULATED

OTHER

COMPREHENSIVE

   

TREASURY STOCK

(AT COST)

   

TOTAL

NUCOR

STOCKHOLDERS’

   

NON-

CONTROLLING

 
     TOTAL     SHARES     AMOUNT     CAPITAL     EARNINGS     INCOME (LOSS)     SHARES     AMOUNT     EQUITY     INTERESTS  

 

BALANCES, December 31, 2010

 

    $7,330,694        375,451        $150,181        $1,711,518        $6,795,988        ($27,776)        59,660        ($1,509,841     $7,120,070        $210,624   

 

Net earnings in 2011

    860,984                    778,188                    778,188        82,796   

 

Other comprehensive income

    (10,406                     (10,401)                (10,401     (5

 

Stock options exercised

    8,097        387        155        7,942                        8,097     

 

Stock option expense

    9,850                9,850                        9,850     

 

Issuance of stock under award plans, net of forfeitures

    30,091        401        160        25,624                (170     4,307        30,091     

 

Amortization of unearned compensation

    1,600                1,600                        1,600     

 

Cash dividends ($1.4525 per share)

    (462,610                 (462,610                 (462,610  

 

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

    (61,720                                                                     (61,720

 

BALANCES, December 31, 2011

 

    7,706,580        376,239        150,496        1,756,534        7,111,566        (38,177)        59,490        (1,505,534     7,474,885        231,695   

 

Net earnings in 2012

    593,126                    504,619                    504,619        88,507   

 

Other comprehensive income

    95,231                        95,226                 95,226        5   

 

Stock options exercised

    10,515        354        142        10,373                        10,515     

 

Stock option expense

    9,850                9,850                        9,850     

 

Issuance of stock under award plans, net of forfeitures

    36,119        420        167        32,395                (140     3,557        36,119     

 

Amortization of unearned compensation

    800                800                        800     

 

Cash dividends ($1.4625 per share)

    (467,662                 (467,662                 (467,662  

 

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

    (74,848                                     (74,848

 

Other

    (24,337                     1,507        (24,000     (288)                        (22,781     (1,556

 

BALANCES, December 31, 2012

 

    7,885,374        377,013        150,805        1,811,459        7,124,523        56,761        59,350        (1,501,977     7,641,571        243,803   

 

Net earnings in 2013

    585,529                    488,025                    488,025        97,504   

 

Other comprehensive income

    (47,681                     (47,681)                (47,681  

 

Stock option expense

    8,576                8,576                        8,576     

 

Issuance of stock under award plans, net of forfeitures

    26,565        512        205        22,497                (153     3,863        26,565     

 

Amortization of unearned compensation

    821                821                        821     

 

Cash dividends ($1.4725 per share)

    (472,108                 (472,108                 (472,108  

 

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

    (76,798                                                                     (76,798

 

BALANCES, December 31, 2013

 

    $7,910,278        377,525        $151,010        $ 1,843,353        $ 7,140,440        $    9,080        59,197        ($1,498,114     $7,645,769        $264,509   

See notes to consolidated financial statements.


 

       50       

 

        
          CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS   
        

 

 

  CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

              

(in thousands)

 

 

 

  Year Ended December 31,

 

     2013        2012        2011  

 

OPERATING ACTIVITIES:

              

 

Net earnings

     $ 585,529         $ 593,126         $ 860,984   

 

Adjustments:

              

 

Depreciation

       535,852           534,010           522,571   

 

Amortization

       74,356           73,011           67,829   

 

Stock-based compensation

       47,450           50,733           49,003   

 

Deferred income taxes

       56,564           (25,274        58,051   

 

Distributions from affiliates

       8,708                       

 

Equity in (earnings) losses of unconsolidated affiliates

       (9,297        13,323           10,043   

 

Impairment of non-current assets

                 30,000           13,943   

 

Loss on assets

       14,000           17,563             

 

Changes in assets and liabilities (exclusive of acquisitions and dispositions):

              

 

Accounts receivable

       (103,649        148,113           (274,920

 

Inventories

       (298,074        (65,655        (433,696

 

Accounts payable

       39,489           (111,496        62,012   

 

Federal income taxes

       77,950           (28,022        930   

 

Salaries, wages and related accruals

       7,155           (60,363        129,340   

 

Other operating activities

       41,916           31,316           (35,037
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
     

Cash provided by operating activities

    

 

 

 

1,077,949

 

  

    

 

 

 

1,200,385

 

  

    

 

 

 

1,031,053

 

  

 

INVESTING ACTIVITIES:

              

 

Capital expenditures

       (1,196,952        (947,608        (438,943

 

Investment in and advances to affiliates

       (85,053        (180,472        (95,950

 

Repayment of advances to affiliates

       54,500           65,446           50,000   

 

Disposition of plant and equipment

       34,097           51,063           25,333   

 

Acquisitions (net of cash acquired)

                 (760,833        (3,959

 

Purchases of investments

       (19,349        (409,403        (1,494,782

 

Proceeds from the sale of investments

       92,761           1,667,142           1,285,763   

 

Purchases of restricted investments

                           (564,994

 

Proceeds from the sale of restricted investments

       148,725           359,295           47,479   

 

Changes in restricted cash

       126,438           (48,625        530,165   

 

Other investing activities

       4,863                       
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

Cash used in investing activities

    

 

 

 

(839,970

 

    

 

 

 

(203,995

 

    

 

 

 

(659,888

 

 

FINANCING ACTIVITIES:

              

 

Net change in short-term debt

       (671        27,945           (11,450

 

Repayment of long-term debt

       (250,000        (650,000          

 

Proceeds from issuance of long-term debt, net of discount

       999,100                       

 

Bond issuance costs

       (7,625                    

 

Issuance of common stock

                 10,515           8,097   

 

Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation

       2,955           4,700           1,000   

 

Distributions to noncontrolling interests

       (76,798        (74,848        (61,720

 

Cash dividends

       (471,028        (466,361        (461,518

 

Other financing activities

       111           1,172           30,569   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Cash provided by (used in) financing activities

    

 

 

 

196,044

 

  

    

 

 

 

(1,146,877

 

    

 

 

 

(495,022

 

 

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash

       (3,633        2,704           (904
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

INCREASE (DECREASE) IN CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS

       430,390           (147,783        (124,761

 

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS — BEGINNING OF YEAR

       1,052,862           1,200,645           1,325,406   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS — END OF YEAR

     $ 1,483,252         $ 1,052,862         $ 1,200,645   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
                                  

 

NON-CASH INVESTING ACTIVITY:

              

 

Change in accrued plant and equipment purchases

     $ 33,467         $ 71,726         $ 1,559   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
                                  

See notes to consolidated financial statements.


            51    
   NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS         
       

 

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2013, 2012 AND 2011

 

1. NATURE OF OPERATIONS AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

Nature of Operations Nucor is principally a manufacturer of steel and steel products, as well as a scrap broker and processor, with operating facilities and customers primarily located in North America.

Principles of Consolidation The consolidated financial statements include Nucor and its controlled subsidiaries, including Nucor-Yamato Steel Company, a limited partnership of which Nucor owns 51%. All significant intercompany transactions are eliminated.

Distributions are made to noncontrolling interest partners in Nucor-Yamato Steel Company in accordance with the limited partnership agreement by mutual agreement of the general partners. At a minimum, sufficient cash is distributed so that each partner may pay their U.S. federal and state income taxes.

Use of Estimates The preparation of financial statements in conformity with generally accepted accounting principles in the United States of America requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Actual results could differ from these estimates.

Reclassifications In the first quarter of 2013, we began reporting the results of Nucor’s steel trading businesses and rebar distribution businesses in the steel mills segment. Previously, these businesses were reported in an “All other” category. These businesses were reclassified to the steel mills segment as part of a realignment of Nucor’s reportable segments to better reflect the way in which they are managed. The segment data for the comparable periods has also been reclassified into the steel mills segment in order to conform to the current year presentation. The steel mills, steel products and raw materials segments are consistent with the way Nucor manages its business, which is based primarily upon the similarity of the types of products produced and sold by each segment. Additionally, the composition of assets by segment at December 31, 2012 and December 31, 2011 was reclassified to conform with the current presentation. This reclassification between segments did not have any impact on the consolidated asset balances.

In 2012, we began classifying internal fleet and some common carrier costs in cost of products sold in the consolidated statements of earnings. We made this change so that all freight costs will be recorded within the same financial statement line item to allow users of our financial statements to better understand our expense structure. This change resulted in the reclassification of $67.2 million of these costs from marketing, administrative and other expenses to cost of products sold for the year ended December 31, 2011 in order to conform to the 2012 presentation.

Additionally, certain other prior period amounts have been reclassified to conform to current period presentation. These reclassifications did not have an impact on net earnings for the current or any prior periods.

2. SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash equivalents are recorded at cost plus accrued interest, which approximates market, and have original maturities of three months or less at the date of purchase. Cash and cash equivalents are maintained primarily with a few high-credit quality financial institutions.

Short-term Investments Short-term investments are recorded at cost plus accrued interest, which approximates market. Unrealized gains and losses on investments classified as available-for-sale are recorded as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). Management determines the appropriate classification of its investments at the time of purchase and re-evaluates such determination at each balance sheet date.

Inventories Valuation Inventories are stated at the lower of cost or market. Inventories valued using the last-in, first-out (LIFO) method of accounting represent approximately 45% of total inventories as of December 31, 2013 (45% as of December 31, 2012). All inventories held by the parent company and Nucor-Yamato Steel Company are valued using the LIFO method of accounting except for supplies that are consumed indirectly in the production process, which are valued using the first-in, first-out (FIFO) method of accounting. All inventories held by other subsidiaries of the parent company are valued using the FIFO method of accounting. The Company records any amount required to reduce the carrying value of inventory to net realizable value as a charge to cost of products sold.

Property, Plant and Equipment Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost, except for property, plant and equipment acquired through acquisitions which are recorded at acquisition date fair value. With the exception of our natural gas wells, depreciation is provided on a straight-line basis over the estimated useful lives of the assets. Depletion of all capitalized costs associated with our natural gas producing properties is expensed on a unit-of-production basis by individual field as the gas from the proved developed reserves is produced. The costs of planned major maintenance activities are capitalized as part of other current assets and amortized over the period until the next scheduled major maintenance activity. All other repairs and maintenance activities are expensed when incurred.


 

    52    

 

 

Goodwill and Other Intangibles Goodwill is the excess of cost over the fair value of net assets of businesses acquired. Goodwill is not amortized but is tested annually for impairment and whenever events or circumstances change that would make it more likely than not that an impairment may have occurred. We perform our annual impairment analysis as of the first day of the fourth quarter each year. The evaluation of impairment involves comparing the current estimated fair value of each reporting unit, which is a level below the reportable segment, to the recorded value, including goodwill. When appropriate, Nucor performs a qualitative assessment to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount. For certain reporting units it is necessary to perform a quantitative analysis. In these instances, a discounted cash flow model is used to determine the current estimated fair value of these reporting units. A number of significant assumptions and estimates are involved in the application of the discounted cash flow model to forecast operating cash flows, including market growth and market share, sales volumes and prices, costs to produce, discount rate and estimated capital needs. Management considers historical experience and all available information at the time the fair values of its reporting units are estimated. Assumptions in estimating future cash flows are subject to a high degree of judgment and complexity. Changes in assumptions and estimates may affect the fair value of goodwill and could result in impairment charges in future periods.

Finite-lived intangible assets are amortized over their estimated useful lives.

Long-Lived Asset Impairments We evaluate our property, plant and equipment and finite-lived intangible assets for potential impairment on an individual asset basis or at the lowest level asset grouping for which cash flows can be separately identified. Asset impairments are assessed whenever circumstances indicate that the carrying amounts of those productive assets could exceed their projected undiscounted cash flows. When it is determined that impairment exists, the related assets are written down to estimated fair market value.

Equity Method Investments Investments in joint ventures in which Nucor shares control over the financial and operating decisions but in which Nucor is not the primary beneficiary are accounted for under the equity method. Each of the Company’s equity method investments is subject to a review for impairment if, and when, circumstances indicate that a decline in value below its carrying amount may have occurred. Examples of such circumstances include, but are not limited to, a significant deterioration in the earnings performance or business prospects of the investee; a significant adverse change in the regulatory, economic or technological environment of the investee; a significant adverse change in the general market condition of either the geographic area or the industry in which the investee operates; and recurring negative cash flows from operations. If management considers the decline to be other than temporary, the Company would write down the investment to its estimated fair market value.

Derivative Financial Instruments Nucor uses derivative financial instruments from time to time primarily to partially manage its exposure to price risk related to natural gas purchases used in the production process and to changes in interest rates on outstanding debt instruments. Nucor also uses derivatives to hedge a portion of our scrap, copper and aluminum purchases and sales. In addition, Nucor uses forward foreign exchange contracts to hedge cash flows associated with certain assets and liabilities, firm commitments and anticipated transactions.

Nucor recognizes all material derivative instruments in the consolidated balance sheets at fair value. Amounts included in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) related to cash flow hedges are reclassified into earnings when the underlying transaction is recognized in net earnings. Changes in fair value hedges are reported currently in earnings along with changes in the fair value of the hedged items. When cash flow and fair value hedges affect net earnings, they are included on the same financial statement line as the underlying transaction (cost of products sold or interest expense). If these instruments do not meet hedge accounting criteria or contain ineffectiveness, the change in fair value (or a portion thereof) is recognized immediately in earnings in the same financial statement line as the underlying transaction.

Revenue Recognition Nucor recognizes revenue when persuasive evidence of a contractual arrangement exists, delivery has occurred, the sales price is fixed or determinable and collection is reasonably assured. Product is considered delivered to the customer once it has been shipped and title and risk of loss has been transferred.

Income Taxes Nucor utilizes the liability method of accounting for income taxes. Under the liability method, deferred taxes are determined based on the temporary differences between the financial statement and tax basis of assets and liabilities using tax rates expected to be in effect during the years in which the basis differences reverse. A valuation allowance is recorded when it is more likely than not that some of the deferred tax assets will not be realized.

Nucor recognizes the effect of income tax positions only if those positions are more likely than not of being sustained. Potential accrued interest and penalties related to unrecognized tax benefits are recognized as a component of interest expense.

Nucor’s intention is to permanently reinvest the earnings of certain foreign investments. Accordingly, no provisions have been made for taxes that may be payable upon remittance of such earnings.


 

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Stock-Based Compensation The Company recognizes the cost of stock-based compensation as an expense using fair value measurement methods. The assumptions used to calculate the fair value of stock-based compensation granted are evaluated and revised, as necessary, to reflect market conditions and experience.

Foreign Currency Translation For Nucor’s operations where the functional currency is other than the U.S. dollar, assets and liabilities have been translated at year-end exchange rates, and income and expenses translated using average exchange rates for the respective periods. Adjustments resulting from the process of translating an entity’s financial statements into the U.S. dollar have been recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) and are included in net earnings only upon sale or liquidation of the underlying investments. Foreign currency transaction gains and losses are included in net earnings in the period they occur.

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements In the first quarter of 2013, Nucor adopted new accounting guidance requiring additional disclosures on reclassifications from accumulated other comprehensive income into net income. The new accounting guidance requires entities to report either parenthetically on the face of the financial statements or in the notes to the financial statements these reclassifications for each financial statement line item. Nucor elected to report this information within the notes to the financial statements (see Note 21). This new guidance only impacts disclosures and has no impact on Nucor’s consolidated financial position, results of operations or cash flows.

In the first quarter of 2014, Nucor will adopt new accounting guidance, which requires unrecognized tax benefits to be presented as a decrease in net operating loss, similar tax loss or tax credit carryforward if certain criteria are met. The new guidance may affect balance sheet classification of certain unrecognized tax benefits and will have no impact on Nucor’s consolidated results of operations or cash flows.

3. ACQUISITIONS AND DISPOSITIONS

On June 20, 2012, Nucor completed the acquisition of the entire equity interest in Skyline Steel LLC (Skyline) and its subsidiaries for the cash purchase price of approximately $675.4 million. No cash was received nor was any debt assumed as a result of the acquisition. Skyline’s financial results are included as part of the steel mills segment (see Note 23).

Skyline is a steel foundation manufacturer and distributor serving the U.S., Canada, Mexico and the Caribbean. Skyline’s steel products are used in marine construction, bridge and highway construction, heavy civil construction, storm protection, underground commercial parking and environmental containment projects in the infrastructure and construction industries. Skyline is a significant consumer of H-piling and sheet piling from Nucor-Yamato Steel Company.

We have allocated the purchase price for Skyline to its individual assets acquired and liabilities assumed.

The following table summarizes the estimated fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed of Skyline as of the date of acquisition:

 

      (in thousands)  

 

  Accounts receivable

  

 

 

 

$128,004

 

  

  Inventory

     260,473   

  Other current assets

     4,410   

  Property, plant and equipment

     70,100   

  Goodwill

     138,579   

  Other intangible assets

       215,600   

  Total assets acquired

       817,166   

 

  Current liabilities

  

 

 

 

137,654

 

  

  Deferred credits and other liabilities

           4,078   

  Total liabilities assumed

       141,732   

 

  Net assets acquired

  

 

 

 

$675,434

 

  

          


 

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The purchase price allocation to the identifiable intangible assets is as follows:

 

  As of the date of acquisition      (in thousands, except years)
                  Weighted-    
    Average Life    

Customer relationships

     $ 184,500     

 

17 years  

Trademarks and trade names

       28,500      20 years  

Other

       2,600      3 years  
      

 

 

   
       $ 215,600     
      

 

 

   
                

The goodwill of $138.6 million is primarily attributed to the synergies expected to arise after the acquisition and has been allocated to the steel mills segment (see Note 9). Approximately $128.2 million of the goodwill recognized is expected to be deductible for tax purposes.

In August 2012, Nucor sold the assets of Nucor Wire Products Pennsylvania, Inc., resulting in a loss of $17.6 million. This charge is included in marketing, administrative and other expenses in the consolidated statement of earnings.

In November 2012, Nucor acquired a 50% economic and voting interest in Hunter Ridge Energy Services LLC (Hunter Ridge). Hunter Ridge provides services for the gathering, separation and compression of energy products, including natural gas produced by Nucor’s working interest drilling program. Nucor accounts for the investment (on a one-month lag basis) under the equity method (see Note 10). As of December 31, 2013, Nucor’s investment in Hunter Ridge was $134.5 million ($95.4 million at December 31, 2012).

Other minor acquisitions, exclusive of purchase price adjustments of acquisitions made in prior years, totaled $85.4 million in 2012 and $4.0 million in 2011 (none in 2013).

4. SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS

Nucor’s short-term investments held as of December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012 were $28.2 million and $104.2 million, respectively. These investments consisted of certificates of deposit (CDs) and are classified as available-for-sale. The interest rates on the CDs are fixed at inception and interest income is recorded as earned.

No realized or unrealized gains or losses were incurred in 2013, 2012 or 2011.

The contractual maturities of all of the CDs outstanding at December 31, 2013 are in 2014.

5. ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

An allowance for doubtful accounts is maintained for estimated losses resulting from the inability of our customers to make required payments. Accounts receivable are stated net of the allowance for doubtful accounts of $58.3 million at December 31, 2013 ($57.4 million at December 31, 2012 and $54.3 million at December 31, 2011).

6. INVENTORIES

Inventories consist of approximately 40% raw materials and supplies and 60% finished and semi-finished products at December 31, 2013 (37% and 63%, respectively, at December 31, 2012). Nucor’s manufacturing process consists of a continuous, vertically integrated process from which products are sold to customers at various stages throughout the process. Since most steel products can be classified as either finished or semi-finished products, these two categories of inventory are combined.

If the FIFO method of accounting had been used, inventories would have been $624.7 million higher at December 31, 2013 ($607.2 million higher at December 31, 2012). There was no liquidation of LIFO inventory layers in 2013, 2012 or 2011. Use of the lower of cost or market method reduced inventories by $2.1 million at December 31, 2013 ($3.5 million at December 31, 2012).


 

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7. PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT

 

            (in thousands)  
  December 31,    2013     2012  

 

  Land and improvements

   $ 555,309      $ 546,234   

  Buildings and improvements

     941,379        899,944   

  Machinery and equipment

     9,159,151        8,136,206   

  Proved oil and gas properties

     487,033        203,959   

  Construction in process and equipment deposits

     400,373        652,230   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
     11,543,245        10,438,573   

  Less accumulated depreciation

     (6,626,221     (6,155,517
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
   $ 4,917,024      $ 4,283,056   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 
                  

The estimated useful lives primarily range from 5 to 25 years for land improvements, 4 to 40 years for buildings and improvements and 2 to 15 years for machinery and equipment. The useful life for proved oil and gas properties is based on the unit-of-production method and varies by well.

In the third quarter of 2013, a storage dome collapsed at Nucor Steel Louisiana in St. James Parish. As a result, Nucor recorded a partial write down of assets at the facility, including $21.0 million of property, plant and equipment and $7.0 million of inventory, offset by a $14.0 million insurance receivable that was based on management’s current estimate of probable insurance recoveries. The associated net charge of $14.0 million is included in marketing, administrative and other expenses in the consolidated statement of earnings. Nucor may receive additional insurance proceeds as it continues to investigate the cause or causes of the dome collapse.

Nucor capitalized $10.9 million of interest expense in 2013 ($4.7 million in 2012 and $3.5 million in 2011) related to the borrowing costs associated with various construction projects.

8. RESTRICTED CASH AND INVESTMENTS

There were no restricted cash or investments as of December 31, 2013 ($275.2 million at December 31, 2012). As of December 31, 2012, restricted cash and investments consisted of net proceeds from $600.0 million 30-year variable rate Gulf Opportunity Zone bonds issued in November 2010. The restricted cash and investments were held in a trust account and were used to partially fund the capital costs associated with the construction of Nucor’s direct reduced ironmaking facility in St. James Parish, Louisiana. Funds were disbursed as qualified expenditures for the construction of the facility were made ($275.3 million in 2013 and $311.8 million in 2012). Included in the December 31, 2012 restricted cash and investments balance was $149.8 million of restricted investments. The investments held at December 31, 2012 were in Federal Home Loan Bank (FHLB) obligations, which carried high credit ratings from both Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s. The interest rates on the FHLBs were fixed at inception and interest earned on the investments was subject to the same usage requirements as the bond proceeds. Since the restricted cash, investments and interest on investments must be used for the construction of the facility, the entire balance was classified as a non-current asset.


 

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9. GOODWILL AND OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS

The change in the net carrying amount of goodwill for the years ended December 31, 2013 and 2012 by segment is as follows:

 

                                   (in thousands)  
      Steel Mills      Steel
Products
    Raw
Materials
     All Other     Total  

 

Balance, December 31, 2011

   $ 268,466       $ 790,441      $ 682,902       $ 88,852      $ 1,830,661   

Acquisitions and dispositions

     138,579         (3,489     20,323                155,413   

Translation

                —         18,464                   —                    —        18,464   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, December 31, 2012

     407,045         805,416        703,225         88,852        2,004,538   

Reclassifications

     88,852                    —                (88,852                —   

Translation

             (26,067                    (26,067

Other

             (4,863                    (4,863
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 

Balance, December 31, 2013

   $ 495,897       $ 774,486      $ 703,225       $      $ 1,973,608   
  

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

 
                                            

The majority of goodwill is not tax deductible.

Previously, Nucor’s steel trading businesses and rebar distribution businesses were reported in the “All other” category. Beginning in the first quarter of 2013, these businesses were reclassified to the steel mills segment as part of a realignment of Nucor’s reportable segments to better reflect the way in which they are managed (see Note 1).

Intangible assets with estimated lives of 5 to 22 years are amortized on a straight-line or accelerated basis and are comprised of the following:

 

                            

(in thousands)

 

 
  December 31,    2013      2012  
     Gross
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
     Gross
Amount
     Accumulated
Amortization
 

 

  Customer relationships

   $ 1,147,786       $ 391,254       $ 1,156,979       $ 325,819   

  Trademarks and trade names

     151,332         40,397         152,869         32,653   

  Other

     21,869         15,182         28,610         20,746   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
   $ 1,320,987       $ 446,833       $ 1,338,458       $ 379,218   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
                                     

Intangible asset amortization expense was $74.4 million in 2013 ($73.0 million in 2012 and $67.8 million in 2011). Annual amortization expense is estimated to be $70.0 million in 2014; $68.2 million in 2015; $66.5 million in 2016; $64.8 million in 2017; and $61.1 million in 2018.

The Company completed its annual goodwill impairment testing as of the first days of the fourth quarters of 2013, 2012 and 2011 and concluded that as of such dates there was no impairment of goodwill for any of its reporting units. We do not believe there are currently any reporting units at risk of goodwill impairment in the near term. However, assumptions in estimating reporting unit fair values are subject to a high degree of judgment and complexity. Changes in assumptions and estimates may affect the estimated reporting unit fair values and could result in impairment charges in future periods.


 

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10. EQUITY INVESTMENTS

The carrying value of our equity investments in domestic and foreign companies was $936.0 million at December 31, 2013 ($855.9 million at December 31, 2012) and is recorded in other assets in the consolidated balance sheets.

Duferdofin Nucor Nucor owns a 50% economic and voting interest in Duferdofin Nucor S.r.l. (Duferdofin Nucor), an Italian steel manufacturer, and accounts for the investment (on a one-month lag basis) under the equity method, as control and risk of loss are shared equally between the members.

Nucor’s investment in Duferdofin Nucor at December 31, 2013 was $465.4 million ($454.1 million at December 31, 2012). Nucor’s 50% share of the total net assets of Duferdofin Nucor was $55.4 million at December 31, 2013, resulting in a basis difference of $410.0 million due to the step-up to fair value of certain assets and liabilities attributable to Duferdofin Nucor as well as the identification of goodwill ($332.9 million) and finite-lived intangible assets. This basis difference, excluding the portion attributable to goodwill, is being amortized based on the remaining estimated useful lives of the various underlying net assets, as appropriate. Amortization expense and other purchase accounting adjustments associated with the fair value step-up were $11.2 million in 2013 ($11.1 million in 2012 and $11.5 million in 2011).

As of December 31, 2013, Nucor had outstanding notes receivable of 35.0 million ($48.2 million) from Duferdofin Nucor (35.0 million as of December 31, 2012). The notes receivable bear interest at 1.539% and will reset annually on September 30 to the twelve-month Euro Interbank Offered Rate (Euribor) plus 1% per year. The principal amounts are due on January 31, 2016. As of December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012, the note receivable was classified in other assets.

Nucor has issued a guarantee for its ownership percentage (50%) of Duferdofin Nucor’s borrowings under Facility A of a Structured Trade Finance Facilities Agreement that matures on April 26, 2016. In the second quarter of 2013, Duferdofin Nucor amended the loan agreement, increasing the maximum amount that it can borrow under Facility A to 122.5 million ($168.9 million) as of December 31, 2013. As of December 31, 2013, it had 112.0 million ($154.4 million) outstanding under that facility (102.0 million, or $134.8 million, at December 31, 2012). If Duferdofin Nucor fails to pay when due any amounts for which it is obligated under Facility A, Nucor could be required to pay 50% of such amounts pursuant to and in accordance with the terms of its guarantee. Any indebtedness of Duferdofin Nucor to Nucor is effectively subordinated to the indebtedness of Duferdofin Nucor under the Structured Trade Finance Facilities Agreement. Nucor has not recorded any liability associated with the guarantee.

NuMit Nucor has a 50% economic and voting interest in NuMit LLC (NuMit). NuMit owns 100% of the equity interest in Steel Technologies LLC, an operator of 24 sheet processing facilities located throughout the U.S., Canada and Mexico. Nucor accounts for the investment in NuMit (on a one-month lag basis) under the equity method as control and risk of loss are shared equally between NuMit’s members.

Nucor’s investment in NuMit at December 31, 2013 was $318.4 million ($288.4 million as of December 31, 2012). The value of the investment is comprised of the purchase price of approximately $221.3 million plus subsequent additional capital contributions and equity method earnings less distributions since acquisition. Nucor also has recorded a $40.0 million note receivable from Steel Technologies LLC that bears interest at 1.15% and resets quarterly to the three-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) plus 90 basis points. The principal amount is due on October 21, 2014. In addition, Nucor has extended a $100.0 million line of credit (of which $17.0 million was outstanding at December 31, 2013) to Steel Technologies LLC. As of December 31, 2013, the amounts outstanding on the line of credit bear interest at 1.37% and mature on April 1, 2014. As of December 31, 2013 and December 31, 2012, the amount outstanding on the line of credit was classified in other current assets in the consolidated balance sheet. The note receivable was classified in other current assets as of December 31, 2013, but it was classified in other assets as of December 31, 2012.

Hunter Ridge In November 2012, Nucor acquired a 50% economic and voting interest in Hunter Ridge. Hunter Ridge provides services for the gathering, separation and compression of energy products including natural gas produced by Nucor’s working interest drilling program. Nucor accounts for the investment (on a one-month lag basis) under the equity method, as control and risk of loss are shared equally between Hunter Ridge’s members. Nucor’s investment in Hunter Ridge at December 31, 2013 was $134.5 million ($95.4 million at December 31, 2012). The acquisition did not result in a significant amount of goodwill or intangible assets.

All Equity Investments Nucor reviews its equity investments for impairment if and when circumstances indicate that a decline in value below their carrying amounts may have occurred. In the second quarter of 2012, Nucor concluded that a triggering event occurred requiring assessment for impairment of its equity investment in Duferdofin Nucor due to the continued declines in the global demand for steel, the escalated economic and political turmoil in Europe and continued operating performance well below budgeted levels through the first half of 2012. Another contributing factor was that Duferdofin Nucor had a recently updated unfavorable forecast of future operating performance. The diminished demand combined with the continued lower than budgeted levels of operating performance


 

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significantly impacted the financial results of Duferdofin Nucor through the first half of 2012. After completing its assessment, Nucor determined that the carrying amount exceeded its estimated fair value and recorded a $30.0 million impairment charge against the Company’s investment in Duferdofin Nucor. This charge is included in impairment of non-current assets in the consolidated statements of earnings.

Although the operating results of Duferdofin Nucor have improved since 2012 and there have been no significant deteriorations in near-term financial projections or other key assumptions since the last impairment test performed in the fourth quarter of 2012, Nucor concluded that it was appropriate to reassess its equity investment in Duferdofin Nucor for impairment during the fourth quarter of 2013 due to the protracted challenging steel market conditions in Europe. After completing its assessment, the Company determined that the estimated fair value exceeded its carrying amount by a sufficient amount and that there was no indication of impairment. The assumptions that most significantly affect the fair value determination include projected revenues and the discount rate. It is reasonably possible that material deviation of future performance from the estimates used in our most recent valuation could result in further impairment of our investment in Duferdofin Nucor.

In the third quarter of 2011, the Company concluded that an equity investment in a dust recycling project had been impaired, resulting in an impairment charge of $13.9 million. This charge is included in impairment of non-current assets in the consolidated statements of earnings.

11. CURRENT LIABILITIES

Book overdrafts, included in accounts payable in the consolidated balance sheets, were $81.6 million at December 31, 2013 ($53.8 million at December 31, 2012). Dividends payable, included in accrued expenses and other current liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets, were $118.7 million at December 31, 2013 ($117.6 million at December 31, 2012).

12. DEBT AND OTHER FINANCING ARRANGEMENTS

 

                (in thousands)  
  December 31,      2013        2012  

 

  Industrial revenue bonds:

           

0.20% to 1.5%, variable,

due from 2014 to 2040

     $ 1,030,200         $ 1,030,200   

  Notes, 5.0%, due 2013

                 250,000   

  Notes, 5.75%, due 2017

       600,000           600,000   

  Notes, 5.85%, due 2018

       500,000           500,000   

  Notes, 4.125%, due 2022

       600,000           600,000   

  Notes, 4.0%, due 2023

       500,000             

  Notes, 6.40%, due 2037

       650,000           650,000   

  Notes, 5.20%, due 2043

       500,000             
    

 

 

      

 

 

 
       4,380,200           3,630,200   

  Less current maturities

       (3,300        (250,000
    

 

 

      

 

 

 
     $ 4,376,900         $ 3,380,200   
    

 

 

      

 

 

 
                       

Annual aggregate long-term debt maturities are: $3.3 million in 2014; $16.3 million in 2015; none in 2016; $600.0 million in 2017; $500.0 million in 2018; and $3.261 billion thereafter.

In July 2013, Nucor issued $500.0 million of 4.00% notes due in 2023 and $500.0 million of 5.20% notes due in 2043. Net proceeds of the issuances were $991.5 million. Costs of $8.5 million associated with the issuances have been capitalized and will be amortized over the life of the notes.


 

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During the third quarter of 2013, Nucor amended its $1.50 billion unsecured revolving credit facility. The maturity date was extended from December 2016 to August 2018. Costs of $0.6 million associated with the amendment have been capitalized and are amortized over the life of the extension. The unsecured revolving credit facility provides up to $1.50 billion in revolving loans and allows up to $500.0 million in additional commitments at Nucor’s election in accordance with the terms set forth in the credit agreement. Up to the equivalent of $850.0 million of the credit facility is available for foreign currency loans, up to $500.0 million is available for the issuance of letters of credit, and up to $500.0 million is available for the issuance of revolving loans for Nucor subsidiaries in accordance with terms set forth in the credit agreement. The credit facility provides for a pricing grid based upon the credit rating of Nucor’s senior unsecured long-term debt and, alternatively, interest rates quoted by lenders in connection with competitive bidding. The credit facility includes customary financial and other covenants, including a limit on the ratio of funded debt to capital of 60%, a limit on Nucor’s ability to pledge the Company’s assets and a limit on consolidations, mergers and sales of assets. As of December 31, 2013, Nucor’s funded debt to total capital ratio was 36%, and Nucor was in compliance with all covenants under the credit facility. No borrowings were outstanding under the credit facility as of December 31, 2013 and 2012.

Harris Steel has credit facilities totaling approximately $33.0 million, with no borrowings outstanding at December 31, 2013. In addition, the business of Nucor Trading S.A. is financed by uncommitted trade credit arrangements with a number of European banking institutions. As of December 31, 2013, Nucor Trading S.A. had outstanding borrowings of $29.2 million ($27.1 million at December 31, 2012) and outstanding guarantees of $0.1 million. In addition, $29.1 million of the amount outstanding at December 31, 2013 ($21.5 million at December 31, 2012) was guaranteed by Nucor. If Nucor Trading S.A. fails to pay when due any amounts for which it is obligated, Nucor could be required to pay such amounts pursuant to and in accordance with the terms of the guarantee.

Letters of credit totaling $31.8 million were outstanding as of December 31, 2013 related to certain obligations, including workers’ compensation, utilities deposits and credit arrangements by Nucor Trading S.A. for commitments to purchase inventories.

13. CAPITAL STOCK

The par value of Nucor’s common stock is $0.40 per share and there are 800 million shares authorized. In addition, 250,000 shares of preferred stock, par value of $4.00 per share, are authorized, with preferences, rights and restrictions as may be fixed by Nucor’s board of directors. There are no shares of preferred stock issued or outstanding.


 

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14. DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS

The following tables summarize information regarding Nucor’s derivative instruments:

 

Fair Value of Derivative Instruments

     

 

                 (in thousands)  
           Fair Value  
  December 31,    Consolidated Balance Sheet Location    2013     2012  

 

  Liability derivatives not designated as hedging instruments:

         

  Commodity contracts

   Accrued expenses and other current liabilities      $     (553     $     (303

  Foreign exchange contracts

   Accrued expenses and other current liabilities                 (2 )               (15 ) 

  Total liability derivatives not designated as hedging instruments

        $     (555 )      $     (318 ) 
                       

 

The Effect of Derivative Instruments on the Consolidated Statements of  Earnings

  

 

Derivatives Designated as Hedging Instruments     

(in thousands)

 

Derivatives

in Cash

Flow Hedging

Relationships

  

Statement of

Earnings

Location

  

Amount of Gain or (Loss)

Recognized

in OCI on Derivatives

(Effective Portion)

   

Amount of Gain or (Loss)

Reclassified from Accumulated

OCI into Earnings

(Effective Portion)

   

Amount of Gain or (Loss)

Recognized

in Earnings on Derivatives

(Ineffective Portion)

 
            2013      2012     2011     2013      2012     2011     2013      2012      2011  
                                   

Commodity contracts

   Cost of
products sold
   $       $ (2,264   $ (8,454   $       $ (42,515   $ (37,093   $       $ 500       $ 600   
       

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 
                                                                                   

 

Derivatives Not Designated as Hedging Instruments    (in thousands)  

Derivatives Not Designated

as Hedging Instruments

  

Statement of Earnings

Location

   Amount of Gain or (Loss) Recognized
in Earnings on Derivatives
 
            2013      2012      2011  

 

Commodity contracts

   Cost of products sold      $4,622         $1,321         $11,757   

Foreign exchange contracts

   Cost of products sold           112              198               (665

Total

          $4,734         $1,519         $11,092   
                                 

During the first quarter of 2012, Nucor settled all of its open natural gas forward purchase contracts that were previously in place. These settlements affected earnings over the periods specified in the original agreements throughout the remainder of 2012.


 

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15. FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

The following table summarizes information regarding Nucor’s financial assets and financial liabilities that are measured at fair value as of December 31, 2013 and 2012. Nucor does not currently have any non-financial assets or liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis.

 

                             
                          (in thousands)  
             Fair Value Measurements at Reporting Date Using  
  December 31,  

Carrying

Amount in

Consolidated

Balance Sheets

   

Quoted Prices

in Active Markets

for Identical Assets

(Level 1)

   

Significant

Other Observable

Inputs

(Level 2)

   

Significant

Unobservable

Inputs

(Level 3)

 
 

2013

           
 

Assets:

           
 

Cash equivalents

    $1,269,465         $1,269,465         
 

Short-term investments

           28,191                28,191                                                   
 

Total assets

    $1,297,656         $1,297,656                     —                   —   
 

Liabilities:

           
 

Foreign exchange and

commodity contracts

    $         (555)                      —        $       (555                —   
                                   
 

2012

           
 

Assets:

           
 

Cash equivalents

    $   830,011         $   830,011         
 

Short-term investments

    104,167         104,167         
 

Restricted cash and investments

         275,163              275,163                                                   
 

Total assets

    $1,209,341         $1,209,341                     —                   —   
 

Liabilities:

           
 

Foreign exchange and

commodity contracts

    $         (318)                      —        $       (318                —   
                                   

Fair value measurements for Nucor’s cash equivalents, short-term investments and restricted cash and investments are classified under Level 1 because such measurements are based on quoted market prices in active markets for identical assets. Fair value measurements for Nucor’s derivatives are classified under Level 2 because such measurements are based on published market prices for similar assets or are estimated based on published market prices for similar assets or are estimated based on observable inputs such as interest rates, yield curves, credit risks, spot and future commodity prices and spot and future exchange rates.

The fair value of short-term and long-term debt, including current maturities, was approximately $4.61 billion at December 31, 2013 ($4.24 billion at December 31, 2012). The debt fair value estimates are classified under Level 2 because such estimates are based on readily available market prices of our debt at December 31, 2013 and 2012, or similar debt with the same maturities, rating and interest rates.

16. CONTINGENCIES

Nucor is subject to environmental laws and regulations established by federal, state and local authorities, and, accordingly, makes provision for the estimated costs of compliance. Of the undiscounted total of $22.9 million of accrued environmental costs at December 31, 2013 ($26.5 million at December 31, 2012), $6.9 million was classified in accrued expenses and other current liabilities ($9.5 million at December 31, 2012) and $16.0 million was classified in deferred credits and other liabilities ($17.0 million at December 31, 2012). Inherent uncertainties exist in these estimates primarily due to unknown conditions, evolving remediation technology and changing governmental regulations and legal standards.


 

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Nucor has been named, along with other major steel producers, as a co-defendant in several related antitrust class-action complaints filed by Standard Iron Works and other steel purchasers in the United States District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. The majority of these complaints were filed in September and October of 2008, with two additional complaints being filed in July and December of 2010. Two of these complaints have been voluntarily dismissed and are no longer pending. The plaintiffs allege that from April 1, 2005 through December 31, 2007, eight steel manufacturers, including Nucor, engaged in anticompetitive activities with respect to the production and sale of steel. The plaintiffs seek monetary and other relief. Although we believe the plaintiffs’ claims are without merit and will vigorously defend against them, we cannot at this time predict the outcome of this litigation or estimate the range of Nucor’s potential exposure.

We are from time to time a party to various lawsuits, claims and other legal proceedings that arise in the ordinary course of business. With respect to all such lawsuits, claims and proceedings, we record reserves when it is probable a liability has been incurred and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated. We do not believe that any of these proceedings, individually or in the aggregate, would be expected to have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, financial position or cash flows. Nucor maintains liability insurance for certain risks that is subject to certain self-insurance limits.

17. STOCK-BASED COMPENSATION

Stock Options Stock options may be granted to Nucor’s key employees, officers and non-employee directors with exercise prices at 100% of the market value on the date of the grant. The stock options granted since 2010 are generally exercisable at the end of three years and have a term of 10 years. All stock options granted prior to the beginning of 2010 were fully exercised as of December 31, 2013. New shares are issued upon exercise of stock options.

A summary of activity under Nucor’s stock option plans is as follows:

 

                           (shares in thousands)  
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        2011  
        Shares        Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
       Shares      Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
       Shares     Weighted-
Average
Exercise
Price
 
     

  Number of shares under option:

 

                              

Outstanding at beginning of year

       1,543           $39.03           1,156         $38.26           983        $29.14   

Granted

       546           $44.51           741         $35.76           560        $42.34   

Exercised

             —                —           (354      $29.67           (387     $20.96   

Canceled

             —                —                 —              —                 —             —   

Outstanding at end of year

       2,089           $40.47           1,543         $39.03           1,156        $38.26   

 

  Options exercisable at end of year

       1,012           $39.75                 —              —              354        $29.67   
                                                              


 

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The shares reserved for future grants as of December 31, 2013, 2012 and 2011 are reflected in the restricted stock units table below. The total intrinsic value of options (the amount by which the stock price exceeded the exercise price of the option on the date of exercise) that were exercised during 2012 and 2011 was $4.3 million and $7.6 million, respectively.

The following table summarizes information about stock options outstanding at December 31, 2013:

 

                         (shares in thousands)  
          Options Outstanding  
            Exercise Price                                         Options                      
    Outstanding            
    

        Options             

        Exercisable            

     Weighted-Average Remaining    
Contractual Life    
 
 

 

$35.76

     741                     391                 8.4 years       
 

$41.43

     242                         242                 6.4 years       
 

$42.34

     560                         299                 7.4 years       
 

$44.51

        546                          80                 9.4 years       
 

$35.76 – $44.51

     2,089                     1,012                 8.2 years       
                              

As of December 31, 2013, the total aggregate intrinsic value of options outstanding and options exercisable was $27.0 million and $13.8 million, respectively.

The grant date fair value of options granted was $15.03 in 2013 ($11.40 in 2012 and $15.37 in 2011). The fair value was estimated using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model with the following assumptions:

 

                      2013                          2012                          2011      

 

  Exercise price

     $44.51            $35.76            $42.34      

  Expected dividend yield

     3.30%         4.08%         3.42%   

  Expected stock price volatility

     46.94%         48.99%         49.40%   

  Risk-free interest rate

     1.51%         1.06%         2.39%   

  Expected life (in years)

     6.5            6.5            6.5      
                            

Compensation expense for stock options was $8.6 million in 2013 ($9.9 million in 2012 and $9.9 million in 2011). As of December 31, 2013, all expense related to options had been recognized as all options had vested as of December 31, 2013.

Restricted Stock Units Nucor annually grants restricted stock units (RSUs) to key employees, officers and non-employee directors. The RSUs typically vest and are converted to common stock in three equal installments on each of the first three anniversaries of the grant date. A portion of the RSUs awarded to senior officers vest upon the officer’s retirement. Retirement, for purposes of vesting in these units only, means termination of employment with approval of the Compensation and Executive Development Committee of the Board of Directors after satisfying age and years of service requirements. RSUs granted to non-employee directors are fully vested on the grant date and are payable to the non-employee director in the form of common stock after the termination of the director’s service on the board of directors.

RSUs granted to employees who are eligible for retirement on the date of grant are expensed immediately, and RSUs granted to employees who will become retirement-eligible prior to the end of the vesting term are expensed over the period through which the employee will become retirement-eligible since these awards vest upon retirement from the Company. Compensation expense for RSUs granted to employees who are not retirement-eligible is recognized on a straight-line basis over the vesting period.

Cash dividend equivalents are paid to participants each quarter. Dividend equivalents paid on units expected to vest are recognized as a reduction in retained earnings.

The fair value of the RSUs is determined based on the closing stock price of Nucor’s common stock on the day before the grant.


 

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A summary of Nucor’s restricted stock unit activity is as follows:

 

       (shares in thousands)  
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        2011  
        Shares      Grant Date
Fair Value
       Shares      Grant Date
Fair Value
       Shares      Grant Date
Fair Value
 

 

  Restricted stock units:

                             

 Unvested at beginning of year

       1,106         $40.80           962         $46.09           1,203         $49.96   

 Granted

       789         $44.51           1,101         $35.76           490         $42.34   

 Vested

       (762      $42.15           (915      $40.36           (713      $50.04   

 Canceled

             (11      $39.08                 (42      $39.41                 (18      $46.06   

 Unvested at end of year

         1,122         $42.51             1,106         $40.80                962         $46.09   

 

  Shares reserved for future grants
(stock options and RSUs)

       10,486              11,839              13,695      
                                                             

 

Compensation expense for RSUs was $32.6 million in 2013 ($34.2 million in 2012 and $31.6 million in 2011). The total fair value of shares vested during 2013 was $34.1 million ($33.1 million in 2012 and $29.3 million in 2011). As of December 31, 2013, unrecognized compensation expense related to unvested RSUs was $29.4 million, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of two years.

 

Restricted Stock Awards Nucor’s Senior Officers Long-Term Incentive Plan (the LTIP) and Annual Incentive Plan (the AIP) authorize the award of shares of common stock to officers subject to certain conditions and restrictions.

 

The LTIP provides for the award of shares of restricted common stock at the end of each LTIP performance measurement period at no cost to officers if certain financial performance goals are met during the period. One-third of the LTIP restricted stock award vests upon each of the first three anniversaries of the award date or, if earlier, upon the officer’s attainment of age 55 while employed by Nucor. Although participants are entitled to cash dividends and may vote such awarded shares, the sale or transfer of such shares is limited during the restricted period.

 

The AIP provides for the payment of annual cash incentive awards. An AIP participant may elect, however, to defer payment of up to one-half of an annual incentive award. In such event, the deferred AIP award is converted into common stock units and credited with a deferral incentive, in the form of additional common stock units, equal to 25% of the number of common stock units attributable to the deferred AIP award. Common stock units attributable to deferred AIP awards are fully vested. Common stock units credited as a deferral incentive vest upon the AIP participant’s attainment of age 55 while employed by Nucor. Vested common stock units are paid to AIP participants in the form of shares of common stock following their termination of employment with Nucor.

 

A summary of Nucor’s restricted stock activity under the AIP and LTIP is as follows:

 

     

   

      

       

  

       (shares in thousands)  
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        2011  
        Shares      Grant Date
Fair Value
       Shares      Grant Date
Fair Value
       Shares     

Grant Date

Fair Value

 

 

  Restricted stock awards and units:

                             

 Unvested at beginning of year

       72         $43.72           94         $42.46           141         $44.62   

 Granted

       122         $47.36           122         $42.20           118         $46.41   

 Vested

       (121      $46.32           (144      $41.62           (165      $47.13   

 Canceled

            —                        —                        —           

 Unvested at end of year

            73         $45.49                72         $43.72                94         $42.46   

 

  Shares reserved for future grants

       1,238              1,360              1,482      
                                                             


 

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Compensation expense for common stock and common stock units awarded under the AIP and LTIP is recorded over the performance measurement and vesting periods based on the anticipated number and market value of shares of common stock and common stock units to be awarded. Compensation expense for anticipated awards based upon Nucor’s financial performance, exclusive of amounts payable in cash, was $6.3 million in 2013 ($6.6 million in 2012 and $7.4 million in 2011). The total fair value of shares vested during 2013 was $5.7 million ($6.0 million in 2012 and $7.3 million in 2011). As of December 31, 2013, unrecognized compensation expense related to unvested restricted stock awards was $0.6 million, which is expected to be recognized over a weighted-average period of 1.7 years.

18. EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS

Nucor makes contributions to a Profit Sharing and Retirement Savings Plan for qualified employees based on the profitability of the Company. Nucor’s expense for these benefits totaled $71.7 million in 2013 ($77.7 million in 2012 and $117.7 million in 2011). The related liability for these benefits is included in salaries, wages and related accruals.

Nucor also has a medical plan covering certain eligible early retirees. The unfunded obligation, included in deferred credits and other liabilities in the consolidated balance sheets, totaled $9.9 million at December 31, 2013 ($13.5 million at December 31, 2012). The benefit associated with this early retiree medical plan totaled $0.6 million in 2013 (benefit of $1.9 million in 2012 and expense of $3.5 million in 2011). We also recorded a non-cash gain of $29.0 million in cost of products sold in 2011 as a result of a correction of an error in the actuarial calculation for the plan. The error also resulted in a $7.6 million reduction of other comprehensive income. This error did not have a material impact on that period or any previously reported periods.

The discount rate used was 4.6% in 2013 (3.7% in 2012 and 4.5% in 2011). The health care cost increase trend rate used was 6.6% in 2013 (6.6% in 2012 and 6.7% in 2011). The health care cost increase in the trend rate is projected to decline gradually to 4.5% by 2027.

19. INTEREST EXPENSE (INCOME)

The components of net interest expense are as follows:

 

       (in thousands)  
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        2011  

 

Interest expense

     $ 151,986         $ 173,503         $ 178,812   

Interest income

       (5,091        (11,128        (12,718
      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Interest expense, net

     $ 146,895         $ 162,375         $ 166,094   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
                                  

Interest paid was $141.2 million in 2013 ($178.0 million in 2012 and $177.6 million in 2011).

20. INCOME TAXES

Components of earnings from continuing operations before income taxes and noncontrolling interests are as follows:

 

       (in thousands)  
  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        2011  

 

United States

     $ 755,921         $ 854,705         $ 1,241,465   

Foreign

       35,202           (1,765        10,347   
      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
       $ 791,123         $ 852,940         $ 1,251,812   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
                                  


 

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The provision for income taxes consists of the following:

 

      

(in thousands)

 
 Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        2011  

 

 Current:

                  

Federal

     $ 138,343         $ 261,552         $ 329,076   

State

       223           20,337           1,685   

Foreign

       10,464           3,199           2,016   
      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Total current

       149,030           285,088           332,777   
      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 Deferred:

                  

Federal

       36,157           (23,052        55,124   

State

       (39        (10,440        10,400   

Foreign

       20,446           8,218           (7,473
      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

Total deferred

       56,564           (25,274        58,051   
      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

 Total provision for income taxes

     $ 205,594         $ 259,814         $ 390,828   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
                                  

A reconciliation of the federal statutory tax rate (35%) to the total provision is as follows:

 

  Year Ended December 31,      2013        2012        2011  

 

Taxes computed at statutory rate

       35.00        35.00        35.00

State income taxes, net of federal income tax benefit

       0.02           0.75           0.63   

Federal research credit

       (0.79                  (0.28

Domestic manufacturing deduction

       (1.74        (3.25        (2.21

Equity in losses of foreign joint ventures

       1.36           1.43           0.64   

Foreign rate differential

       (2.35        0.60           (0.92

Noncontrolling interests

       (4.32        (3.64        (2.32

Out of period correction to deferred taxes

       (2.57                    

Other, net

       1.38           (0.43        0.68   
    

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 

 

Provision for income taxes

       25.99        30.46        31.22
      

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

 
                                  


 

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The 2013 provision included a $21.3 million out-of-period non-cash gain related to a correction to the deferred tax balances. The out-of-period adjustment did not have a material impact in the current or any previously reported periods.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities resulted from the following:

 

       (in thousands)      
December 31,      2013        2012      

 

  Deferred tax assets:

             

Accrued liabilities and reserves

     $ 102,933         $ 108,287     

Allowance for doubtful accounts

       19,756           14,212     

Inventory

       206,826           174,499     

Post-retirement benefits

       6,268           11,119     

Natural gas hedges

                 221     

Net operating loss carryforward

       12,859           15,033     

Tax credit carryforwards

       56,185           28,600     
      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total deferred tax assets

       404,827           351,971     
      

 

 

      

 

 

   

 

  Deferred tax liabilities:

             

Holdbacks and amounts not due under contracts

       (16,582        (17,523  

Cumulative translation adjustments

       (1,403        (1,600  

Commodity hedges

       (805            

Intangibles

       (210,791        (233,413  

Property, plant and equipment

       (610,451        (475,176  
      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total deferred tax liabilities

       (840,032        (727,712  
      

 

 

      

 

 

   

 

  Total net deferred tax liabilities

    

 

$

 

(435,205

 

    

 

$

 

(375,741

 

 
      

 

 

      

 

 

   
                         

Current deferred tax assets included in other current assets were $255.5 million at December 31, 2013 ($190.4 million at December 31, 2012). Current deferred tax liabilities included in other current liabilities were $14.6 million at December 31, 2013 (none at December 31, 2012). Non-current deferred tax liabilities included in deferred credits and other liabilities were $676.2 million at December 31, 2013 ($566.1 million at December 31, 2012). Nucor paid $64.8 million in net federal, state and foreign income taxes in 2013 ($313.5 million and $322.4 million in 2012 and 2011, respectively).

Cumulative undistributed foreign earnings for which U.S. taxes have not been provided are included in consolidated retained earnings in the amount of $222.4 million at December 31, 2013 ($176.5 million at December 31, 2012). These earnings are considered to be indefinitely reinvested and, accordingly, no provisions for U.S. federal and state income taxes are required. It is not practicable to determine the amount of unrecognized deferred tax liability related to the unremitted earnings.

State net operating loss carryforwards were $824.0 million at December 31, 2013 ($606.4 million at December 31, 2012). If unused, they will expire between 2014 and 2033. Foreign net operating loss carryforwards were $50.5 million at December 31, 2013 ($59.2 million at December 31, 2012). If unused, they will expire between 2027 and 2033.

At December 31, 2013, Nucor had approximately $66.0 million of unrecognized tax benefits, of which $66.3 million would affect Nucor’s effective tax rate, if recognized. At December 31, 2012, Nucor had approximately $80.9 million of unrecognized tax benefits, of which $76.4 million would affect Nucor’s effective tax rate, if recognized.


 

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A reconciliation of the beginning and ending amounts of unrecognized tax benefits recorded in deferred credits and other liabilities is as follows:

           (in thousands)  
  Year Ended December 31,    2013     2012     2011  

 

  Balance at beginning of year

     $80,862        $80,897        $92,752   

 

  Additions based on tax positions related to current year

     4,849        9,456        6,733   

  Reductions based on tax positions related to current year

     (55     (132     (3,160

  Additions based on tax positions related to prior years

     2,307        5,821        937   

  Reductions based on tax positions related to prior years

     (6,248     (3,296     (2,169

  Reductions due to settlements with taxing authorities

            (764     (958

  Reductions due to statute of limitations lapse

      (15,740 )       (11,120 )       (13,238 ) 

 

  Balance at end of year

     $65,975        $80,862        $80,897   
                              

We estimate that in the next twelve months, our gross uncertain tax positions, exclusive of interest, could decrease by as much as $13.7 million, as a result of the expiration of the statute of limitations.

During 2013, Nucor recognized $0.9 million of expense in interest and penalties ($2.1 million of expense in 2012 and $3.6 million of expense in 2011). The interest and penalty expense is included in interest expense in the consolidated statements of earnings. As of December 31, 2013, Nucor had approximately $37.2 million of accrued interest and penalties related to uncertain tax positions ($36.4 million at December 31, 2012).

Nucor has concluded U.S. federal income tax matters for years through 2009. The 2010 to 2013 tax years are open to examination by the Internal Revenue Service. In 2011, the Canada Revenue Agency completed an audit examination for the periods 2006 to 2008 for Harris Steel Group Inc. and subsidiaries with immaterial adjustments to the income tax returns. The tax years 2009 through 2013 remain open to examination by other major taxing jurisdictions to which Nucor is subject (primarily Canada and other state and local jurisdictions).


 

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21. ACCUMULATED OTHER COMPREHENSIVE INCOME (LOSS)

The following tables reflect the changes in accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income by component:

 

    (in thousands)  
     Gains and Losses
on Hedging
Derivatives
    Foreign Currency  
Gain (Loss)
    Adjustment to
Early Retiree
Medical Plan
    Total  

 

  Balance, December 31, 2012

    $           —        $  46,181        $  10,580        $     56,761   

 

  Other comprehensive
  income (loss) before reclassifications

           (53,619     5,938        (47,681

 

  Amounts reclassified from accumulated other
  comprehensive income (loss) into earnings

                 —                    —                    —                      —   

 

  Net current-period other
  comprehensive income (loss)

                 —           (53,619           5,938             (47,681 ) 

 

  Balance, December 31, 2013

    $           —        $   (7,438 )      $  16,518        $      9,080   
                                 
   

(in thousands)

 
     Gains and Losses
on Hedging
Derivatives
    Foreign Currency  
Gain (Loss)
    Adjustment to
Early Retiree
Medical Plan
    Total  

 

  Balance, December 31, 2011

    $(40,250)        $(12,311)        $   14,384        $  (38,177

 

  Other comprehensive
  income (loss) before reclassifications

           58,785         (3,804     54,981   

 

  Amounts reclassified from accumulated other
  comprehensive income (loss) into earnings(1)

        40,250                   —                      —             40,250   

 

  Net current-period other comprehensive
  income (loss)

    40,250        58,785         (3,804     95,231   

 

  Other

                 —               (293)                     —                 (293

 

  Balance, December 31, 2012

    $           —        $ 46,181         $   10,580        $   56,761   
                                 

 

(1) Includes $40,250 net-of-tax impact of accumulated other comprehensive income reclassifications into Cost of Products Sold for net losses on commodity contracts. The tax impact of this reclassification was $23,900.


 

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22. EARNINGS PER SHARE

The computations of basic and diluted net earnings per share are as follows:

 

     (in thousands, except per share data)  
  Year Ended December 31,    2013     2012     2011  

 

  Basic net earnings per share:

          

Basic net earnings

   $ 488,025      $ 504,619      $ 778,188   

Earnings allocated to participating securities

     (1,919     (1,713     (2,653
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net earnings available to common stockholders

   $ 486,106      $ 502,906      $ 775,535   
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

Average shares outstanding

     319,077        318,172        316,997   
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

Basic net earnings per share

   $ 1.52      $ 1.58      $ 2.45   
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  Diluted net earnings per share:

          

Diluted net earnings

   $ 488,025      $ 504,619      $ 778,188   

Earnings allocated to participating securities

     (1,919     (1,714     (2,654
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

Net earnings available to common stockholders

   $ 486,106      $ 502,905      $ 775,534   
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

Diluted average shares outstanding:

          

Basic shares outstanding

     319,077        318,172        316,997   

Dilutive effect of stock options and other

     189        68        164   
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 
       319,266        318,240        317,161   
    

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

  Diluted net earnings per share