10-K 1 d949622d10k.htm FORM 10-K Form 10-K
Table of Contents

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D. C. 20549

 

 

FORM 10-K

 

 

(Mark one)

þ ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended July 31, 2015, Commission File Number 1-9235

or

¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from             to

Commission file number 1-9235

 

LOGO

THOR INDUSTRIES, INC.

 

 

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware      93-0768752

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

    

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

601 East Beardsley Ave., Elkhart, IN      46514-3305
(Address of principal executive offices)      (Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (574) 970-7460

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Exchange Act:

 

Title of each class:

  

Name of each exchange on which registered:

Common Stock (par value $.10 per share)

  

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Exchange Act: None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes  þ    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes  ¨    No    þ

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports); and (2) has been subject to the filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  þ    No   ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes  þ    No  ¨

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    Yes  ¨    No  þ

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See definitions, of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated Filer  þ

    

Accelerated Filer  ¨

Non-accelerated filer ¨    (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

    

Smaller reporting company ¨

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 126-2 of the Exchange Act.)

Yes  ¨    No  þ

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of January 31, 2015 was $2,513,605,014 based on the closing price of the registrant’s common shares on January 31, 2015, the last business day of the registrant’s most recently completed second fiscal quarter. Solely for the purpose of this calculation and for no other purpose, the non-affiliates of the registrant are assumed to be all shareholders of the registrant other than (i) directors of the registrant (ii) current executive officers of the registrant who are identified as “named executive officers” pursuant to Item 11 of the registrant’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2014 and (iii) any shareholder that beneficially owns 10% or more of the registrant’s common stock. Such exclusion is not intended, nor shall it be deemed, to be an admission that such persons are affiliates of the registrant. The number of common shares of registrant’s stock outstanding as of September 4, 2015 was 52,394,563.

Documents incorporated by reference:

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Stockholders to be held on December 8, 2015 are incorporated by reference in Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

 

 


Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

             Page       

  PART I

         
 

ITEM 1.

  BUSINESS      1      
 

ITEM 1A.

  RISK FACTORS      7      
 

ITEM 1B.

  UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS      13      
 

ITEM 2.

  PROPERTIES      14      
 

ITEM 3.

  LEGAL PROCEEDINGS      15      
 

ITEM 4.

  MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES      15      

  PART II

         
 

ITEM 5.

  MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES      16      
 

ITEM 6.

  SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA      17      
 

ITEM 7.

  MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS      18      
 

ITEM 7A.

  QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK      35      
 

ITEM 8.

  FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — SEE ITEM 15      36      
 

ITEM 9.

  CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE      37      
 

ITEM 9A.

  CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES      37      
 

ITEM 9B.

  OTHER INFORMATION      38      

  PART III

         
 

ITEM 10.

  DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE      39      
 

ITEM 11.

  EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION      39      
 

ITEM 12.

  SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS      39      
 

ITEM 13.

  CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE      40      
 

ITEM 14.

  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES      40      

  PART IV

         
 

ITEM 15.

  EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES      41      

SIGNATURES

         44      

EX-21.1

         

EX-23.1

         

EX-31.1

         

EX-31.2

         

EX-32.1

         

EX-32.2

         

 

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PART I

Unless otherwise indicated, all dollar amounts are presented in thousands except per share data.

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

The following discussion of our business solely relates to ongoing operations.

General Development of Business

Our company was founded in 1980 and, through its subsidiaries, manufactures a wide range of recreational vehicles (“RVs”) in the United States and sells those vehicles primarily in the United States and Canada. We are incorporated in Delaware and are the successor to a corporation of the same name which was incorporated in Nevada on July 29, 1980. Our principal executive office is located at 601 East Beardsley Avenue, Elkhart, Indiana 46514 and our telephone number is (574) 970-7460. Our Internet address is www.thorindustries.com. We maintain copies of our recent filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), available free of charge, on our web site. Unless the context otherwise requires or indicates, all references to “Thor”, the “Company”, “we”, “our” and “us” refer to Thor Industries, Inc. and its subsidiaries.

Our principal recreational vehicle and other operating subsidiaries are Airstream, Inc. (“Airstream”), CrossRoads RV (“CrossRoads”), Thor Motor Coach, Inc. (“Thor Motor Coach”), Keystone RV Company (“Keystone”), Heartland Recreational Vehicles, LLC (“Heartland”), Livin’ Lite RV, Inc. (“Livin’ Lite”), Bison Coach (“Bison”), K.Z., Inc. (“KZ”) and Postle Operating, LLC (“Postle”).

On June 3, 2013, Thor Wakarusa, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Thor, purchased a recreational vehicle production campus in Wakarusa, Indiana for $5,819. The purchase included land and production facilities, comprised of approximately one million square feet of total production space on more than 150 acres, along with certain related equipment, including more than 35 paint booths specifically designed for painting recreational vehicles. The Company uses the facilities primarily for motorized recreational vehicle production and to vertically integrate certain paint operations through one of its towable recreational vehicle subsidiaries.

On August 30, 2013, the Company acquired the assets of towable recreational vehicle manufacturer Livin’ Lite Corp., located in Wakarusa, Indiana, through a wholly-owned subsidiary for final cash consideration of $16,769, net of cash acquired. As a result of the purchase, the Company formed a new entity, Livin’ Lite. The Company purchased the assets to expand its recreational vehicle market share and complement its existing brands with Livin’ Lite’s advanced lightweight product offerings.

On October 31, 2013, the Company acquired the assets of towable recreational vehicle manufacturer Bison Coach, LLC, located in Milford, Indiana, for final cash consideration of $16,914. As a result of the purchase, the Company formed a new entity, Bison. The Company purchased the net assets of Bison to supplement its existing product offerings with Bison’s equestrian products with living quarters.

On May 1, 2014, the Company acquired all the outstanding capital stock of towable recreational vehicle manufacturer KZ for initial cash consideration paid in fiscal 2014 of $52,409, net of cash acquired, and a working capital adjustment of $2,915 paid in the first quarter of fiscal 2015, resulting in total net cash consideration of $55,324. The Company purchased KZ to expand its towable recreational vehicle market share and supplement its existing towable RV product offerings and dealer base.

On January 5, 2015, the Company closed on a Stock Purchase Agreement (“CRV/DRV SPA”) for the acquisition of all the outstanding membership units of towable recreational vehicle manufacturer Cruiser RV, LLC (“CRV”) and luxury fifth wheel towable recreational vehicle manufacturer DRV, LLC (“DRV”) by its Heartland Recreational Vehicles, LLC subsidiary (“Heartland”). In accordance with the CRV/DRV SPA, the closing was deemed effective as of January 1, 2015. As contemplated in the CRV/DRV SPA, the Company also acquired, in a series of integrated transactions, certain real estate used in the ongoing operations of CRV and DRV. Cash consideration paid for this acquisition was $47,523, net of cash acquired. The Company purchased CRV and DRV to expand its towable recreational vehicle market share and to supplement and expand its existing lightweight travel trailer and luxury fifth wheel product offerings and dealer base.

On May 1, 2015, the Company closed on a Membership Interest Purchase Agreement with Postle Aluminum Company, LLC for the acquisition of all the outstanding membership units of Postle Operating, LLC (“Postle”) for cash consideration paid in fiscal 2015 of $144,048, net of cash acquired. Postle is a manufacturer of aluminum extrusion and specialized component products for the RV and other markets, and will operate as an independent operation in the same manner as the Company’s other subsidiaries.

 

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On May 15, 2015, the Company entered into a repurchase agreement (the “May 15, 2015 Repurchase Agreement”), to purchase shares of its common stock from the Thompson Family Foundation (the “Foundation”) in a private transaction. Pursuant to the terms of the May 15, 2015 Repurchase Agreement, the Company purchased from the Foundation 1,000,000 shares of its common stock at a price of $60.00 per share, and held them as treasury stock, representing an aggregate purchase price of $60,000. The closing price of Thor common stock on May 15, 2015 was $61.29. The transaction was consummated on May 19, 2015, and the Company used available cash to purchase the shares. The number of shares repurchased by the Company represented 1.9% of the Company’s issued and outstanding common stock immediately prior to the repurchase.

Discontinued Operations

On July 31, 2013, we entered into a definitive Stock Purchase Agreement and sold our bus business to Allied Specialty Vehicles, Inc. (“ASV”) for final cash consideration of $105,043. The sale closed on October 20, 2013. Thor’s bus business included Champion Bus, Inc., General Coach America, Inc., Goshen Coach, Inc., El Dorado National (California), Inc., and El Dorado National (Kansas), Inc. As a result of the divestiture of the bus business, the results of operations of the bus business are reported as income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes on the Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income for the years ended July 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013. Discontinued operations also reflect the results of the ambulance product line through the date of its sale on April 30, 2013. See Note 3, “Discontinued Operations,” in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further information.

Recreational Vehicles

Thor, through its operating subsidiaries, is one of the largest manufacturers of RVs in North America, by units sold and revenue, based on retail statistics published by Statistical Surveys, Inc. and other reported data.

Airstream

Our Airstream subsidiary manufactures and sells premium quality travel trailers and motorhomes. Airstream travel trailers are distinguished by their rounded shape and bright aluminum finish and, in our opinion, constitute the most recognized product in the recreational vehicle industry. Airstream manufactures and sells travel trailers under the trade names Airstream International, Classic Limited, Sport, Flying Cloud, Land Yacht and Eddie Bauer. Airstream also sells the Interstate and Autobahn Class B motorhomes.

CrossRoads

Our CrossRoads subsidiary manufactures and sells conventional travel trailers and fifth wheels under trade names such as Sequoia, Cameo, Elevation, Cruiser, ReZerve, Sunset Trail and Zinger and luxury fifth wheels under the trade names Redwood and Carriage.

Thor Motor Coach

Thor Motor Coach manufactures and sells gasoline and diesel Class A and Class C motorhomes. Its products are sold under trade names such as Four Winds, Hurricane, Windsport, Chateau, Challenger, Tuscany, Outlaw, Axis, Vegas, Palazzo and A.C.E.

Keystone

Our Keystone subsidiary manufactures and sells conventional travel trailers and fifth wheels under trade names such as Montana, Springdale, Hideout, Sprinter, Outback, Laredo, Alpine, Bullet, Fuzion, Raptor, Passport, Cougar, Coleman, Kodiak, Aspen Trail and Voltage.

Heartland

Our Heartland subsidiary manufactures and sells conventional travel trailers and fifth wheels under trade names such as Landmark, Bighorn, Sundance, Elk Ridge, Trail Runner, Cyclone, Prowler, Wilderness, Shadow Cruiser and Fun Finder and luxury fifth wheels under the trade names D Mobile Suites and Fullhouse.

Livin’ Lite

Our Livin’ Lite subsidiary manufactures and sells advanced lightweight travel trailers and specialty products under trade names such as Camplite and Quicksilver as well as certain private label names.

Bison

Our Bison subsidiary manufactures and sells equestrian recreational vehicle products with living quarters under trade names such as Premiere, Silverado, Ranger, Laredo, Trail Boss and Trail Hand.

 

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KZ

Our KZ subsidiary manufactures and sells conventional travel trailers and fifth wheels under trade names such as Sportsmen, Vision, Spree, MXT, Venom, Durango, SportTrek and Sonic.

Postle

Our Postle subsidiary manufactures and sells aluminum extrusions and specialized component products to RV and other manufacturers.

Product Line Sales and Segment Information

The Company has two reportable segments: (1) towable recreational vehicles and (2) motorized recreational vehicles. The towable recreational vehicle reportable segment consists of the following operating segments that have been aggregated: Airstream (towable), Bison, CrossRoads, Heartland (including its wholly-owned subsidiaries CRV and DRV), Keystone, KZ and Livin’ Lite. The motorized recreational vehicle reportable segment consists of the following operating segments that have been aggregated: Airstream (motorized) and Thor Motor Coach.

The operations of the Company’s Postle subsidiary, which was acquired May 1, 2015, are included in Other, which is a non-reportable segment. Net sales included in Other mainly relate to the sale of aluminum extrusions and specialized component products. Intercompany eliminations adjust for Postle sales to the Company’s towables and motorized segments, which are consummated at established arm’s length transfer prices consistent with the selling prices of extrusion components to third party customers.

The table below sets forth the contribution of each of the Company’s reportable segments to net sales in each of the last three fiscal years:

 

     2015      2014      2013  
           Amount                  %                  Amount                  %                  Amount                  %        

Recreational vehicles:

                 

Towables

   $ 3,096,405         77       $ 2,721,625         77       $ 2,650,253         82   

Motorized

     870,799         22         803,831         23         591,542         18   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total recreational vehicles

     3,967,204         99         3,525,456         100         3,241,795         100   

Other

     56,594         1                                   

Intercompany eliminations

     (16,979                                        
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

   $ 4,006,819         100       $ 3,525,456         100       $ 3,241,795         100   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Recreational Vehicles

Overview

We manufacture a wide variety of recreational vehicles in the United States and sell those vehicles primarily throughout the United States and Canada, as well as related parts and accessories. Recreational vehicle classifications are based upon standards established by the Recreation Vehicle Industry Association (“RVIA”). The principal types of towable recreational vehicles that we produce include conventional travel trailers and fifth wheels. In addition, we also produce truck and folding campers and equestrian and other specialty towable recreational vehicles, as well as Class A, Class C and Class B motorhomes.

Travel trailers are non-motorized vehicles which are designed to be towed by passenger automobiles, pickup trucks, SUVs or vans. Travel trailers provide comfortable, self-contained living facilities for camping and vacationing purposes. We produce “conventional” and “fifth wheel” travel trailers. Conventional trailers are towed by means of a frame hitch attached to the towing vehicle. Fifth wheel trailers, designed to be towed by pickup trucks, are constructed with a raised forward section that is attached to a receiver in the bed area of the pickup truck.

A motorhome is a self-powered vehicle built on a motor vehicle chassis. Motorhomes are self-contained with their own lighting, heating, cooking, refrigeration, sewage holding and water storage facilities, so that they can be utilized without being attached to utilities.

Class A motorhomes, generally constructed on medium-duty truck chassis, are supplied complete with engine and drivetrain components by motor vehicle manufacturers such as Ford and Freightliner. We design, manufacture and install the living area and driver’s compartment of Class A motorhomes. Class C and Class B motorhomes are built on a Ford, General Motors or Mercedes Benz small truck or van chassis, which includes an engine, drivetrain components and a finished cab section. We construct a living area which has access to the driver’s compartment and attaches to the cab section. Although they are not designed for permanent or semi-permanent living, motorhomes can provide comfortable living facilities for camping and vacationing purposes.

 

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Production

In order to minimize finished inventory, our recreational vehicles generally are produced to dealer order. Our facilities are designed to provide efficient assembly line manufacturing of products. Capacity increases can be achieved quickly and at relatively low cost, largely by increasing the number of production employees or by acquiring or leasing additional facilities and equipment.

We purchase in finished form many of the components used in the production of our recreational vehicles. The principal raw materials used in the manufacturing processes for motorhomes and travel trailers are aluminum, lumber, plywood, plastic, fiberglass and steel purchased from numerous suppliers. We believe that, except for chassis and certain key towable RV components sourced from one major supplier, substitute sources for raw materials and components are available with no material impact on our operations.

Our relationship with our chassis suppliers is similar to our other RV vendor relationships in that no long-term contractual commitments are entered into by either party. Historically, chassis manufacturers resort to an industry-wide allocation system during periods when chassis supply is restricted. These allocations are based on the volume of chassis previously purchased. Sales of motorhomes rely on these chassis and are affected accordingly. We have not experienced any recent unusual cost increases from our chassis suppliers.

Generally, all of our operating subsidiaries introduce new or improved lines or models of recreational vehicles each year. Changes typically include new sizes and floor plans, different decors or design features and engineering improvements.

Seasonality

Since recreational vehicles are used primarily by vacationers and campers, our recreational vehicle sales are seasonal and, in most geographical areas, tend to be significantly lower during the winter months than in other periods. As a result, recreational vehicle sales are historically lowest during our second fiscal quarter, which ends on January 31 of each year.

Marketing and Distribution

We market our recreational vehicles through independent dealers located primarily throughout the United States and Canada. Each of our recreational vehicle operating subsidiaries maintains its own dealer organization, with some dealers carrying more than one of our product lines. As of July 31, 2015, there were approximately 2,100 dealerships carrying our products in the U.S. and Canada. We believe that close working relationships between our management and sales personnel and the many independent dealers with which we work provide us with valuable information on customer preferences and the quality and marketability of our products. Additionally, by maintaining substantially separate dealer networks for each of our subsidiaries, our products are targeted to be competing against competitors’ products in similar price ranges rather than against our other products.

Each of our recreational vehicle operating subsidiaries has an independent sales force to call on their dealers. Our most important sales promotions occur at the major recreational vehicle shows which take place throughout the year at different locations across the country. We benefit from the recreational vehicle awareness advertising and major marketing programs sponsored by the RVIA in national print media and television. We engage in a limited amount of consumer-oriented advertising for our recreational vehicles, primarily through industry magazines, product brochures, direct mail advertising campaigns and the internet.

In our selection of individual dealers, we emphasize the dealer’s ability to maintain a sufficient inventory of our products, as well as their financial stability, credit worthiness, reputation, experience and ability to provide service. Many of our dealers carry the recreational vehicle lines of one or more of our competitors. Generally, each of our operating subsidiaries has sales agreements with their dealers.

One of our dealers, FreedomRoads, LLC, accounted for 17% of our continuing consolidated net sales in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013. This dealer also accounted for 22% of the Company’s consolidated trade accounts receivable at July 31, 2015 and 21% at July 31, 2014.

We generally do not finance dealer purchases. Most dealers are financed on a “floor plan” basis by an unrelated bank or financing company which lends the dealer all or substantially all of the wholesale purchase price and retains a security interest in the vehicles purchased. As is customary in the recreational vehicle industry, we will execute a repurchase agreement with a lending institution financing a dealer’s purchase of our products upon the lending institution’s request. Repurchase agreements provide that, typically for a period of up to 18 months after a unit is financed, and in the event of default by the dealer and notification from the lending institution of the dealer default, we will repurchase all the dealer units repossessed by the lending institution for the amount then due, which is often less than 100% of the dealer’s cost. The risk of loss under repurchase agreements is spread over numerous dealers and is further reduced by the resale value of the units which we would be required to repurchase. We believe that any future losses under these agreements would not have a material adverse effect on our Company. The losses incurred due to repurchase were $1,265, $288 and $906 in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

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Backlog

As of July 31, 2015, the backlog for towable and motorized recreational vehicle orders was $304,005 and $269,961, respectively, compared to $296,828 and $241,246, respectively, at July 31, 2014. Backlog represents unfilled dealer orders on a particular day which can and do fluctuate on a seasonal basis. In the recreational vehicle business our manufacturing time is relatively short. The existing backlog of towable and motorized recreational vehicles is expected to be filled in fiscal 2016.

Historically, the amount of our current backlog compared to our backlog in previous periods reflects general economic and industry conditions and, together with other relevant factors such as continued acceptance of our products by the consumer, may be an indicator of our revenues in the near term.

Product Warranties

We generally provide retail purchasers of our recreational vehicles with a one-year limited warranty against defects in materials and workmanship with longer warranties on certain structural components. The chassis and engines of our motorhomes are generally warranted for various periods in excess of one year by their manufacturers.

Regulation

We are subject to the provisions of the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act (“NTMVSA”) and the safety standards for recreational vehicles and recreational vehicle components which have been promulgated thereunder by the U.S. Department of Transportation. Because of our sales in Canada, we are also governed by similar laws and regulations issued by the Canadian government.

We are a member of the RVIA, a voluntary association of recreational vehicle manufacturers which promulgates recreational vehicle safety standards. We place an RVIA seal on each of our recreational vehicles to certify that the RVIA’s standards have been met.

Both federal and state authorities have various environmental control standards relating to air, water and noise pollution which affect our business and operations. For example, these standards, which are generally applicable to all companies, control our choice of paints, our air compressor discharge, our waste water and the noise emitted by our factories. We rely upon certifications obtained by chassis manufacturers with respect to compliance by our vehicles with all applicable emission control standards.

We are also subject to the regulations promulgated by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”). Our plants are periodically inspected by federal agencies concerned with health and safety in the work place, and by the RVIA, to ensure that our plants and products comply with applicable governmental and industry standards.

We believe that our products and facilities comply in all material respects with applicable vehicle safety, environmental, RVIA and OSHA regulations.

We do not believe that ongoing compliance with the regulations discussed above will have a material effect on our capital expenditures, earnings or competitive position.

Competition

The recreational vehicle industry is generally characterized by ease of entry. The recreational vehicle market is intensely competitive with a number of other manufacturers selling products that compete directly with our products. Competition in the recreational vehicle industry is based upon price, design, value, quality and service. We believe that the quality, design and price of our products and the warranty coverage and service that we provide allow us to compete favorably for retail purchasers of recreational vehicles. There are approximately 70 RV manufacturers in the U.S. and Canada.

Our primary competitor within the towable segment is Forest River, Inc., while our primary competitors within the motorized segment are Winnebago Industries, Inc. and Forest River, Inc. We estimate that, in the aggregate, we are one of the largest recreational vehicle manufacturers in terms of both units produced and revenue. According to Statistical Surveys, Inc., for the six months ended June 30, 2015 our combined U.S. and Canadian market share for travel trailers and fifth wheels is approximately 37.1% and our combined U.S. and Canadian market share for motorhomes is approximately 24.6%.

Trademarks and Patents

We have registered United States trademarks, Canadian trademarks, certain international trademarks and licenses carrying the principal trade names and model lines under which our products are marketed. We hold and protect certain patents related to our business. We are not dependent upon any patents or technology licenses of others for the conduct of our business.

 

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Employee Relations

At July 31, 2015, we employed approximately 10,450 full-time employees in the United States, of which approximately 1,210 were salaried. None of our employees are represented by certified labor organizations. We believe that we maintain a good working relationship with our employees.

Information about Foreign and Domestic Operations and Export Sales

Export sales from our continuing operations, predominantly to Canada, were $465,642, $521,818 and $537,374 in fiscal 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively, with the fiscal 2015 total being adversely impacted by the current strength of the U.S. dollar.

Forward Looking Statements

This Annual Report on Form 10-K includes certain statements that are “forward looking” statements within the meaning of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. These forward looking statements are made based on management’s current expectations and beliefs regarding future and anticipated developments and their effects upon Thor Industries, Inc., and inherently involve uncertainties and risks. These forward looking statements are not a guarantee of future performance. We cannot assure you that actual results will not differ from our expectations. Factors which could cause materially different results include, among others, raw material and commodity price fluctuations, material or chassis supply restrictions, legislative and regulatory developments, the costs of compliance with increased governmental regulation, legal issues, the potential impact of increased tax burdens on our dealers and retail consumers, lower consumer confidence and the level of discretionary consumer spending, interest rate fluctuations and the potential economic impact of rising interest rates, restrictive lending practices, management changes, the success of new product introductions, the pace of obtaining and producing at new production facilities, the pace of acquisitions, the potential loss of existing customers of acquisitions, the integration of new acquisitions, the impact of the divestiture of the Company’s bus businesses, the availability of delivery personnel, asset impairment charges, cost structure changes, competition, the potential impact of the strengthening of the U.S. dollar on international demand, general economic, market and political conditions and the other risks and uncertainties discussed more fully in ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS below.

We disclaim any obligation or undertaking to disseminate any updates or revisions to any forward looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K or to reflect any change in our expectations after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K or any change in events, conditions or circumstances on which any statement is based, except as required by law.

Available Information

Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports and the Proxy Statement for our Annual Meeting of Stockholders are made available, free of charge, on our website, www.thorindustries.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after such reports have been filed with or furnished to the SEC. You may also read and copy any materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Room 1580, Washington, D.C. 20549. You may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. In addition, the SEC maintains a website that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information that is filed electronically with the SEC. The website can be accessed at www.sec.gov.

 

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ITEM  1A. RISK FACTORS

The following risk factors, which relate to our continuing operations, should be considered carefully in addition to the other information contained in this filing.

The risks and uncertainties described below are not the only ones we face and represent some of the risks that our management believes are material to our Company and our business. If any of the following risks actually occur, our business, financial condition or results of operations could be harmed.

Risks Relating To Our Business

The industry in which we operate is highly competitive.

The industry that we are engaged in is highly competitive, and we have numerous existing and potential competitors. The recreational vehicle industry is generally characterized by ease of entry. Competition is based upon price, design, value, quality, and service. Competitive pressures have, from time to time, resulted in a reduction of our profit margins and/or reduction in our market share. Sustained increases in these competitive pressures could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. We cannot assure you that existing or new competitors will not develop products that are superior to ours or that achieve better consumer acceptance, thereby adversely affecting our market share, sales volume and profit margins.

The industry in which we operate is centered in northern Indiana.

The majority of our operations are located in one region. The geographic centrality of the RV industry in northern Indiana creates certain risks, including:

 

   

Competition for workers skilled in the industry, especially during times of increasing RV production, may increase the cost of our labor or limit the speed at which we can expand production;

 

   

Employee retention and recruitment challenges, as employees with industry knowledge and experience are attracted to the most lucrative positions and their ability to change employers is relatively easy; and

 

   

Potential for greater adverse impact from natural disasters.

Our business is both seasonal and cyclical and this leads to fluctuations in sales, production and net income.

We have experienced, and expect to continue to experience, significant variability in sales, production and net income as a result of annual seasonality in our business. Since recreational vehicles are used primarily by vacationers and campers, demand in the recreational vehicle industry generally declines during the fall and winter months, while sales and profits are generally highest during the spring and summer months. Dealer demand and buying patterns may impact the timing of shipments from one quarter to another. In addition, severe weather conditions in some geographic areas may delay the timing of shipments from one quarter to another. Furthermore, from a longer-term perspective, the recreational vehicle industry is also cyclical in nature, and there can be substantial annual fluctuations in our production levels, shipments and operating results. Consequently, the results for any annual or quarterly prior period may not be indicative of results for any future annual or quarterly period.

Our business may be affected by certain external factors beyond our control.

Companies within the recreational vehicle industry are subject to volatility in operating results due to external factors such as general economic conditions, including credit availability, consumer confidence, employment rates, prevailing interest rates, inflation, other economic conditions affecting consumer attitudes and disposable consumer income, demographic changes and political changes. Specific factors affecting our business include:

 

   

Overall consumer confidence and the level of discretionary consumer spending;

 

   

Industry demand;

 

   

Retail and wholesale buying patterns;

 

   

Dealer confidence and stocking levels;

 

   

General economic, market and political conditions, including war, terrorism and military conflict;

 

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Demographics, such as the retirement of “baby boomers”;

 

   

Interest rates and the availability of credit;

 

   

Employment trends;

 

   

Global, domestic or regional financial turmoil;

 

   

Natural disasters;

 

   

Increases in raw material costs;

 

   

Relative or perceived cost, availability and comfort of recreational vehicle use versus other modes of travel, such as air travel, rail, etc.; and

 

   

Increases in real wages and disposable income of consumers and their willingness to make large discretionary purchases.

The loss of our largest dealer could have a significant effect on our business.

FreedomRoads, LLC accounted for 17% of our consolidated net sales for fiscal 2015. The loss of this dealer could have a significant adverse effect on our business. In addition, deterioration in the liquidity or credit worthiness of FreedomRoads, LLC could negatively impact our sales and accounts receivable and could trigger repurchase obligations under our repurchase agreements.

Fuel shortages, or high prices for fuel, could have a negative effect on sales of our recreational vehicles.

Gasoline or diesel fuel is required for the operation of our vehicles or the vehicles which tow our products. We cannot assure you that the supply of these petroleum products will continue uninterrupted, that rationing will not be imposed or that the price of or tax on these petroleum products will not significantly increase in the future. Shortages of gasoline and diesel fuel, and substantial increases in the price of fuel, have had a material adverse effect on the recreational vehicle industry as a whole in the past and could have a material adverse effect on our business in the future.

Our business depends on the performance of independent dealers and transportation carriers.

We distribute our products through a system of independent, authorized dealers, many of whom sell products from competing manufacturers. The geographic coverage of our dealers and their individual business conditions can affect the ability of our authorized dealers to sell our products to consumers. In addition, recent consolidation of dealers, as well as the growth of larger, multi-location dealers, may result in increased bargaining power on the part of dealers.

Most often, our products are delivered via a system of independent transportation contractors. The network of carriers is limited and, in times of high demand and limited availability, can create risk in, and disruption of, our distribution channel.

Our business is affected by the availability and terms of financing to dealers and retail purchasers.

Our business is affected by the availability and terms of financing to dealers and retail purchasers. Generally, recreational vehicle dealers finance their purchases of inventory with financing provided by lending institutions. A decrease in the availability of this type of wholesale financing, more restrictive lending practices or an increase in the cost of such wholesale financing can prevent dealers from carrying adequate levels of inventory, which limits product offerings and could lead to reduced demand. In addition, two major financial flooring institutions held approximately 80% of our portion of our dealers’ total floored dollars outstanding at July 31, 2015.

In April 2015, General Electric (“GE”), announced its intention to sell the majority of GE Capital, including GE Commercial Distribution Finance, a major provider of floorplan financing for RV dealers. The ultimate outcome and impact of a sale or divestiture of GE Capital by GE is currently unknown.

Substantial increases in interest rates and decreases in the general availability of credit have also had an adverse impact upon our business and results of operations in the past and may do so in the future. Further, a decrease in availability of consumer credit resulting from unfavorable economic conditions, or an increase in the cost of consumer credit, may cause consumers to reduce discretionary spending which could, in turn, reduce demand for our products and negatively affect our sales and profitability.

 

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Changes in consumer preferences for our products or our failure to gauge those preferences could lead to reduced sales and additional costs.

Our ability to remain competitive depends heavily on our ability to provide a continuing and timely introduction of innovative product offerings. We cannot be certain that historical consumer preferences for our products in general, and recreational vehicles in particular, will remain unchanged. We believe that the introduction of new features, designs and models will be critical to the future success of our recreational vehicle operations. Managing frequent product introductions and transitions poses inherent risks. Delays in the introduction or market acceptance of new models, designs or product features could have a material adverse effect on our business. Products may not be accepted for a number of reasons, including changes in consumer preferences or our failure to properly gauge consumer preferences. Further, we cannot be certain that new product introductions will not reduce revenues from existing models and adversely affect our results of operations. In addition, we cannot assure you that any of these new models or products will be introduced to the market on time or that they will be successful when introduced.

If the frequency and size of product liability and other claims against us increase, our business, results of operations and financial condition may be harmed.

We are subject, in the ordinary course of business, to litigation involving product liability and other claims against us, including, without limitation, wrongful death, personal injury and warranties. We generally self-insure our product liability and other claims and also purchase product liability and other insurance in the commercial insurance market. We cannot be certain that our insurance coverage will be sufficient to cover all future claims against us. We have a self-insured retention (“SIR”) for products liability and personal injury matters ranging from $500 to $7,500 depending on the product type and when the occurrence took place. Generally, any occurrence (as defined by our insurance policies) after March 31, 2015 is subject to the $500 SIR, while matters occurring after March 31, 2014 and through March 31, 2015 are subject to a $1,000 SIR.

Amounts above the SIR, up to a certain dollar amount, are covered by our excess insurance policy. Currently, we maintain excess liability insurance aggregating $50,000 with outside insurance carriers to minimize our risks related to catastrophic claims in excess of our self-insured positions for products liability and personal injury matters. Any material change in the aforementioned factors could have an adverse impact on our operating results. Any increase in the frequency and size of these claims, as compared to our experience in prior years, may cause the premium that we are required to pay for insurance to increase significantly and may negatively impact future SIR levels. It may also increase the amounts we pay in punitive damages, not all of which are covered by our insurance.

When we introduce new products into the marketplace, we may incur expenses that we did not anticipate, which, in turn, can result in reduced earnings.

The introduction of new models is critical to our future success. We may incur unexpected expenses, however, when we introduce new models. For example, we may experience unexpected engineering or design flaws that will force a recall of a new product or may cause increased warranty costs. The costs resulting from these types of problems could be substantial and could have a significant adverse effect on our earnings. Estimated warranty costs are provided at the time of product sale to reflect our best estimate of the amounts necessary to settle future and existing claims on products. An increase in actual warranty claims costs as compared to our estimates could result in increased warranty reserves and expense.

Our repurchase agreements with floor plan lenders could result in increased costs.

In accordance with customary practice in the recreational vehicle industry, upon the request of a lending institution financing a dealer’s purchase of our products, we will execute a repurchase agreement with the lending institution. Repurchase agreements provide that, typically for a period of up to 18 months after a recreational vehicle is financed and in the event of default by the dealer, we will repurchase the recreational vehicle repossessed by the lending institution for the amount then due, which is usually less than 100% of the dealer’s cost. In addition to the guarantee under these repurchase agreements, we may also be required to repurchase inventory relative to dealer terminations in certain states in accordance with state laws or regulatory requirements. The difference between the gross repurchase price and the price at which the repurchased product can then be resold, which is typically at a discount to the original sale price, is an expense to us. Thus, if we were obligated to repurchase a substantially greater number of recreational vehicles, or incurred substantially greater discounting to resell these units in the future, this would increase our costs. In difficult economic times this amount could increase significantly compared to recent years.

For some of our components, we depend on a small group of suppliers and the loss of any of these suppliers could affect our ability to obtain components at competitive prices which would decrease our margins. Some components are sourced from foreign sources and delays in obtaining these components could result in increased costs and decreased margins.

We depend on timely and sufficient delivery of components from our suppliers. Most components are readily available from a variety of sources. However, a few key components are currently produced by only a small group of quality suppliers that have the capacity to supply large quantities.

Primarily, this occurs in the case of 1) motorized chassis, where there are a limited number of chassis suppliers, and 2) windows and doors, towable chassis and slide-out mechanisms, axles and upholstered furniture for our recreational vehicles, where Drew Industries, Inc. (“Drew”) is a major supplier for these items within the RV industry.

 

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The recreational vehicle industry as a whole has, from time to time, experienced shortages of chassis due to the concentration or allocation of available resources by suppliers of chassis. Historically, in the event of an industry-wide restriction of supply, suppliers have generally allocated chassis among us and our competitors based on the volume of chassis previously purchased. If certain suppliers were to discontinue the manufacturing of motorhome chassis, or if, as a group, our chassis suppliers significantly reduced the availability of chassis to the industry, our business could be adversely affected. Similarly, shortages at, or production delays or work stoppages by the employees of chassis suppliers, could have a material adverse effect on our sales. If the condition of the U.S. auto industry were to significantly deteriorate, this could also result in supply interruptions and a decrease in our sales and earnings while we obtain replacement chassis from other sources.

Drew is a major supplier of a number of key components of our recreational vehicles such as windows and doors, towable chassis and slide-out mechanisms, axles and upholstered furniture. We have not experienced any significant shortages or delays in delivery related to these items; however, if industry demand were to increase faster than Drew can respond, or other factors impact their ability to continue to supply our needs for these key components, our business could be adversely affected.

In addition, certain RV components are sourced from foreign locations. Port, production or other delays could cause shortages of certain RV components or sub-components. This could result in increased cost related to alternative supplies or a potential decrease in our sales and earnings if alternatives are not readily available.

Finally, as is standard in the industry, arrangements with chassis and other suppliers are generally terminable at any time by either our Company or the supplier. If we cannot obtain an adequate supply of chassis or key components, this could result in a decrease in our sales and earnings.

Our products and services may experience quality problems from time to time that can result in decreased sales and gross margin and could harm our reputation.

Our products contain thousands of parts, many of which are supplied by a network of approved vendors. As with all of our competitors, defects may occur in our products, including those purchased from our vendors. We cannot assure you that we will detect all such defects prior to distribution of our products. In addition, although we endeavor to compel our suppliers to maintain appropriate levels of insurance coverage, we cannot assure you that if a defect in a vendor supplied part were to occur that the vendor would have the ability to financially rectify the defect. Failure to detect defects in our products, including vendor supplied parts, could result in lost revenue, increased warranty and related costs and could harm our reputation.

Our business is subject to numerous international, federal, state and local regulations.

We are subject to numerous federal, state and local regulations governing the manufacture and sale of our products, including the provisions of the National Traffic and Motor Vehicle Safety Act (“NTMVSA”) and the safety standards for vehicles and components which have been promulgated under the NTMVSA by the Department of Transportation. The NTMVSA authorizes the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration to require a manufacturer to recall and repair vehicles which contain certain hazards or defects. Sales into foreign countries may be subject to similar regulations. Any recalls of our vehicles, voluntary or involuntary, could have a material adverse effect on our Company.

We are also subject to federal and numerous state consumer protection and unfair trade practice laws and regulations relating to the sale, transportation and marketing of motor vehicles, including so-called “lemon laws”. Federal, state and foreign laws and regulations also impose upon vehicle operators various restrictions on the weight, length and width of motor vehicles that may be operated in certain jurisdictions or on certain roadways. Certain jurisdictions also prohibit the sale of vehicles exceeding length restrictions. Federal and state authorities also have various environmental control standards relating to air, water, noise pollution and hazardous waste generation and disposal which affect our business and operations.

Further, certain U.S. and foreign laws and regulations affect the Company’s activities. Areas of our business affected by such laws and regulations include, but are not limited to, labor, advertising, consumer protection, real estate, promotions, quality of services, intellectual property, tax, import and export duties, tariffs, anti-corruption, anti-competition, environmental, health and safety. Compliance with these laws and others may be onerous and costly, at times, and may be inconsistent from jurisdiction to jurisdiction which further complicates compliance efforts. Violations of these laws and regulations could lead to significant penalties, including restraints on our export or import privileges, monetary fines, criminal proceedings and regulatory or other actions that could materially adversely affect our results of operations. The Company has instituted various and comprehensive policies and procedures to ensure compliance. However, we cannot assure you that employees, contractors, vendors or our agents will not violate such laws and regulations or the Company’s policies and procedures.

The Company currently benefits from certain tariffs applied to aluminum imported from China. Were such import tariffs to be lifted or allowed to lapse, the impact to our business is unknown.

 

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As a publicly-traded company, we are subject to the regulations promulgated by the Securities and Exchange Commission and the rules of the New York Stock Exchange.

Failure to comply with any of the aforementioned laws or regulations could have an adverse impact on our business. Additionally, amendments to these regulations and the implementation of new regulations could increase the cost of manufacturing, purchasing, operating or selling our products and therefore could have an adverse impact on our business.

Interruption of information service or misappropriation or breach of our information systems could cause disruption and damage to our reputation.

Our business relies on information systems and other technology (“information systems”) to support our business operations, including but not limited to procurement, supply chain, manufacturing, design, distribution, invoicing and collection of payments. We use information systems to report and audit our operational results. Additionally, we rely upon information systems in our marketing and communication efforts. Due to our reliance on our information systems, we have established various levels of security, backup and disaster recovery procedures. Our business processes and operations may, however, be negatively impacted in the event of substantial disruption of service. Further, misuse, leakage, unauthorized access or falsification of information could result in a violation of privacy laws and damage to our reputation which could, in turn, have a negative impact on our results.

We may not be able to protect our intellectual property and may be subject to infringement claims.

Our intellectual property, including our patents, trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, and other proprietary rights constitutes a significant part of our value. Our success depends, in part, on our ability to protect our intellectual property against dilution, infringement, and competitive pressure by defending our intellectual property rights. To protect our property rights, we rely on intellectual property laws of the U.S., Canada, and other countries, as well as contractual and other legal rights. We seek to acquire rights to intellectual property necessary for our operations. However, we cannot assure you that these measures will be successful in any given instance, particularly in countries outside the U.S. We endeavor to protect our rights; however, third parties may infringe upon our intellectual property rights. We may be forced to take steps to protect our rights, including through litigation. This could result in a diversion of resources. The inability to protect our intellectual property rights could result in competitors diluting our brands or manufacturing and marketing similar products which could adversely affect our market share and results of operations. Competitors may challenge, invalidate or avoid the application of our existing or future intellectual property rights that we receive or license. The loss of protection for our intellectual property could reduce the market value of our brands and our products and services, lower our profits, and could otherwise have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, cash flows or results of operation.

We could incur asset impairment charges for goodwill, intangible assets or other long-lived assets.

We have a significant amount of goodwill, intangible assets and other long-lived assets. At least annually, we review goodwill for impairment. Long-lived assets, identifiable intangible assets and goodwill are also reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable from future cash flows. These events or circumstances could include a significant change in the business climate, legal factors, operating performance indicators, competition, sale or disposition of a significant portion of the business or other factors. If the carrying value of a long-lived asset is considered impaired, an impairment charge is recorded for the amount by which the carrying value of the long-lived asset exceeds its fair value. Our determination of future cash flows, future recoverability and fair value of our long-lived assets includes significant estimates and assumptions. Changes in those estimates or assumptions or lower than anticipated future financial performance may result in the identification of an impaired asset and a non-cash impairment charge, which could be material. Any such charge could adversely affect our operating results and financial condition.

Our operations are dependent upon the services of key individuals, and their loss could materially harm us.

We rely upon the knowledge, experience and skills of our employees to compete effectively in our business and manage our operations. In addition, our future success will depend on, among other factors, our ability to attract and retain executive management, key employees and other qualified personnel. Upon the departure of key employees, our success may depend upon the existence of adequate succession plans. The loss of key employees or the failure to attract or retain qualified employees could have a material adverse effect on us in the event that our succession plans prove inadequate.

Planned re-configuration, relocation or expansion of certain production operations may incur unanticipated costs or delays that could adversely affect operating results.

The development and expansion of certain products and models may require the re-configuration, relocation or expansion of certain production operations. Expansion may also involve the acquisition of existing manufacturing facilities that require upgrades and improvements or the need to build new manufacturing facilities. Such activities may be delayed or incur unanticipated costs which could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and financial condition. In addition, the start-up of operations in new facilities may incur unanticipated costs and inefficiencies which may adversely affect our profitability during the ramp up of production in those facilities.

 

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The relative strength of the U.S. dollar may impact sales.

We have historically generated considerable sales in Canada and sales to Canadian dealers are made in U.S. dollars. The current strength of the U.S. dollar relative to the Canadian dollar has adversely impacted sales in Canada. Should the U.S. dollar remain strong or further strengthen relative to the Canadian dollar, sales will likely continue to be negatively impacted.

Business acquisitions pose integration risks.

Business acquisitions and the merger of subsidiaries within Thor, pose a number of potential integration risks that may result in us experiencing negative consequences to our business, financial condition or results of operations. The pace of transaction activity, the integration of recently acquired assets, operations and companies and the merger of subsidiaries within Thor involve a number of related risks, including, but not limited to:

 

   

Demands on management related to various transaction and integration activities;

 

   

The diversion of management’s attention from the management of daily operations to the integration of operations;

 

   

The assimilation and retention of employees;

 

   

The ability of the management teams at these entities to meet operational and financial expectations;

 

   

The integration of departments and systems, including accounting systems, technologies, books and records and procedures

 

   

Potential loss of existing customers; and

 

   

The establishment or maintenance of uniform standards and controls, including internal accounting controls, procedures and policies.

Commodity price fluctuations may impact operating results.

Commodity costs, including aluminum which is utilized extensively by certain of our subsidiaries, are subject to price fluctuations outside of our control. The price of aluminum is typically influenced by macroeconomic factors, global supply and demand of aluminum (including expectations for growth and contraction and the level of global inventories), and the level of activity by financial investors. In addition, the price of aluminum is influenced by the supply of and demand for metal in a particular region and associated transportation costs. Similarly, other commodity prices such as steel are also subject to price fluctuations outside of our control. Pricing changes for aluminum and steel, and the level of aluminum and steel inventory maintained by the Company, may ultimately adversely impact operating results.

Compliance with conflict mineral disclosure requirements creates additional compliance cost and may create reputational challenges.

The SEC adopted rules pursuant to Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act setting forth new disclosure requirements concerning the use or potential use of certain minerals, deemed conflict minerals (tantalum, tin, gold and tungsten), that are mined from the Democratic Republic of Congo and adjoining countries. These requirements necessitate due diligence efforts by the Company to assess whether such minerals are used in our products in order to make the relevant required annual disclosures that began in May 2014. We have incurred costs and diverted internal resources to comply with these disclosure requirements, including for diligence to determine the sources of those minerals that may be used or necessary to the production of our products. Compliance costs are expected to continue in future periods. Further action or clarification from the SEC or a court regarding required disclosures could result in reputational challenges that could impact future sales if we determine that certain of our products contain minerals not determined to be conflict free or if we are unable to sufficiently verify the origins for all conflict minerals used in our products and are required to make such disclosures.

Our risk management policies and procedures may not be fully effective in achieving their purposes.

Our policies, procedures, controls and oversight to monitor and manage our enterprise risks may not be fully effective in achieving their purpose and may leave exposure to identified or unidentified risks. Past or future misconduct by our employees or vendors could result in violations of law by us, regulatory sanctions and/or serious reputational harm or financial harm. The Company monitors its policies, procedures and controls; however, we cannot assure you that our policies, procedures and controls will be sufficient to prevent all forms of misconduct. We review our compensation policies and practices as part of our overall enterprise risk management program, but it is possible that our compensation policies could incentivize inappropriate risk taking or misconduct. If such inappropriate risks or misconduct occurs, it is possible that it could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and/or our financial condition.

 

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Risks Relating To Our Company

Provisions in our charter documents and Delaware law may make it difficult for a third party to acquire our Company and could depress the price of our common stock.

Our Restated Certificate of Incorporation contains certain supermajority voting provisions that could delay, defer or prevent a change in control of our Company. These provisions could also make it more difficult for shareholders to elect directors, amend our Restated Certificate of Incorporation or take other corporate actions.

We are also subject to certain provisions of the Delaware General Corporation Law that could delay, deter or prevent us from entering into an acquisition, including provisions which prohibit a Delaware corporation from engaging in a business combination with an interested shareholder unless specific conditions are met. The existence of these provisions could limit the price that investors are willing to pay in the future for shares of our common stock and may deprive investors of an opportunity to sell shares at a premium over prevailing prices.

Our stock price may fluctuate in response to various conditions, many of which are beyond our control.

The stock market, in general, experiences volatility that has often been unrelated to the underlying operating performance of companies. If this volatility continues, the trading price of our common stock could decline significantly, independent of our actual operating performance. The market price of our common stock may fluctuate significantly in response to numerous factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the following:

 

   

Our development of new products and features or the development of new products and features by our competitors;

 

   

Development of new collaborative arrangements by us, our competitors or other parties;

 

   

Changes in government regulations applicable to our business;

 

   

Changes in investor perception of our business and/or management;

 

   

Changes in the global economic conditions or the general market conditions in our industry;

 

   

Occurrence of major catastrophic events;

 

   

Sale of our common stock held by certain equity investors or members of management; and

 

   

Fluctuations in our quarterly results may, particularly if unforeseen, cause us to miss investor expectations or independent analyst estimates which might result in analysts or investors changing their opinions and/or recommendations regarding our stock.

ITEM  1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

None.

 

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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

As of July 31, 2015, we own or lease approximately 8,829,000 square feet of manufacturing plant and office space. We believe that our present facilities, consisting primarily of steel clad, steel or wood frame and masonry construction, and the machinery and equipment contained in these facilities, are generally well maintained and in good condition. We believe that these facilities are adequate for our current and foreseeable purposes and that we would be able to obtain replacements for our leased premises at acceptable costs should our leases not be renewed.

The following table describes the location, number and size of our principal manufacturing plants and other materially important physical properties as of July 31, 2015:

 

Locations

         Owned or Leased          No. of
      Buildings      
   Approximate
Building Area
      Square Feet       
 

RVs:

        

Jackson Center, OH (Airstream) (A)(B)

   Owned                9              417,000   

Middlebury, IN (Keystone) (A)

   Owned                1                91,000   

Burley, ID (Keystone) (C)

   Owned                5                  162,000   

Goshen, IN (Keystone) (A)

   Owned              24           2,053,000   

Nappanee, IN (Heartland) (A)

   Owned                2              111,000   

Elkhart, IN (Thor Motor Coach) (B)

   Owned              13              711,000   

Topeka, IN (CrossRoads) (A)

   Owned              15              526,000   

Topeka, IN (Livin’ Lite) (A)

   Owned                1              234,000   

Syracuse, IN (CrossRoads) (A)

   Owned                3              139,000   

Elkhart, IN (Heartland) (A)

   Owned              17              910,000   

Elkhart, IN (Heartland) (A)

   Leased                2              166,000   

Pendleton, OR (Keystone) (A)

   Owned                4              395,000   

Howe, IN (Heartland) (A)

   Owned                2              223,000   

Lagrange, IN (Heartland (A)

   Leased                1              126,000   

Shipshewana, IN (KZ) (A)

   Owned              12              472,000   

RV Subtotal

              111           6,736,000   

Other:

        

Cassopolis, MI (D)

   Leased                4              270,000   

Elkhart, IN (D)

   Leased                4              389,000   

Other Subtotal

                  8                  659,000   

Corporate:

        

Elkhart, IN (Corporate)

   Owned                1                13,000   

Milford, IN (utilized by Bison)

   Owned                7              138,000   

Elkhart, IN (utilized by Thor Motor Coach)

   Owned                3              223,000   

Wakarusa, IN (utilized by Keystone and Thor Motor Coach)

   Owned              18           1,060,000   

Corporate Subtotal

                29           1,434,000   

Total

              148           8,829,000   

(A)   Included in the towable recreational vehicles reportable segment.

(B)   Included in the motorized recreational vehicles reportable segment.

(C)   These locations are vacant and have been placed on the market.

(D)   Included in the other non-reportable segment.

 

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ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

The Company is involved in certain litigation arising out of its operations in the normal course of its business, most of which is based upon state “lemon laws”, warranty claims and vehicle accidents (for which the Company carries insurance above a specified self-insured retention or deductible amount). The outcomes of legal proceedings and claims brought against the Company are subject to significant uncertainty. There is significant judgment required in assessing both the probability of an adverse outcome and the determination as to whether an exposure can be reasonably estimated. In management’s opinion, the ultimate disposition of any current legal proceedings or claims against the Company will not have a material effect on the Company’s financial condition, operating results or cash flows. Litigation is, however, inherently uncertain and an adverse outcome from such litigation could have a material effect on the operating results of a particular reporting period.

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

 

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PART II

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information

The Company’s Common Stock, par value $0.10 per share (the “Common Stock”), is traded on the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”). Set forth below is the range of high and low market prices for the Common Stock for each quarter during the Company’s two most recent fiscal years, as quoted in the NYSE Monthly Market Statistics and Trading Reports:

 

    Fiscal 2015     Fiscal 2014  
          High                 Low                 High                 Low        

First Quarter

  $ 54.95      $ 49.03      $ 59.94      $ 49.28   

Second Quarter

    59.00        52.02        57.51        50.92   

Third Quarter

    64.65        56.39        64.71        48.24   

Fourth Quarter

    63.14        53.60        61.82        52.24   

Holders

As of September 4, 2015, the number of holders of record of the Common Stock was 160.

Dividends

In fiscal 2015, we paid a $0.27 per share dividend in each quarter. In fiscal 2014, we paid a $0.23 per share dividend in each quarter and a $1.00 special dividend in the second quarter.

The Company’s Board currently intends to continue quarterly cash dividend payments in the future. The declaration of future dividends and the establishment of the per share amounts, record dates and payment dates for any such future dividends are subject to the determination of the Board, and will be dependent upon future earnings, cash flows and other factors.

There are no limitations on the Company’s ability to pay dividends pursuant to any credit facility.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

The following table provides information with respect to purchases of common shares during the quarter ended July 31, 2015:

 

Period

   (a)
Total Number of
     Shares (or Units)    

Purchased (1)
     (b)
     Average Price Paid    
per Share (or Unit)
     (c)
Total Number  of
Shares (or Units)

    Purchased as Part of    
Publicly Announced
Plans or Programs
     (d)
Maximum Number
(or  Approximate Dollar
Value) of Shares (or
Units) that May Yet Be
Purchased Under the
Plans or Programs
 

May 1 through May 31, 2015

     1,000,000       $ 60.00                   

June 1 through June 30, 2015

                               

July 1 through July 31, 2015

                               
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total

     1,000,000       $ 60.00                   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

 

(1)

The Company entered into a repurchase agreement, dated May 15, 2015, to purchase 1,000,000 shares of its common stock at a price of $60.00 per share from the Thompson Family Foundation in a private transaction that did not involve a publicly announced plan or program.

There were no purchases of equity securities in the first three quarters of fiscal 2015.

Equity Compensation Plan Information – see ITEM 12

 

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ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

    Fiscal Years Ended July 31,  
    2015     2014(1)     2013(2)(3)     2012     2011(4)(5)(6)  

Income statement data:

         

Net sales

      $       4,006,819          $       3,525,456          $       3,241,795          $       2,639,798          $       2,340,442   

Net income from continuing operations

    202,009        175,516        151,676        111,435        91,647   

Net income

    199,385        179,002        152,862        121,739        106,273   

Earnings per common share from continuing operations:

         

Basic

    3.80        3.29        2.86        2.07        1.66   

Diluted

    3.79        3.29        2.86        2.07        1.66   

Earnings per common share:

         

Basic

    3.75        3.36        2.88        2.26        1.92   

Diluted

    3.74        3.35        2.88        2.26        1.92   

Dividends paid per common share

    1.08        1.92        2.22        0.60        0.40   

Balance sheet data:

         

Total assets

      $ 1,503,248          $ 1,408,718          $ 1,328,268          $ 1,243,054          $ 1,198,070   

 

(1)

Includes a special $1.00 per share dividend.

 

(2)

Includes non-cash goodwill and intangible asset impairments of $6,810 and $4,715, respectively, associated with a subsidiary in our discontinued bus business, and a non-cash long-lived asset impairment of $2,000 associated with a subsidiary in our towable segment.

 

(3)

Includes a special $1.50 per share dividend.

 

(4)

Includes non-cash trademark impairments of $2,036 and $1,430 for trademarks associated with subsidiaries in our motorized segment and discontinued bus business, respectively.

 

(5)

Includes expenses of $6,333 attributable to legal and professional fees in connection with the Heartland acquisition and costs associated with the resolution of an SEC matter.

 

(6)

Includes a gain on the involuntary conversion of assets of $9,417 related to the fiscal 2010 fire at a subsidiary in our discontinued bus business.

The footnote items noted above related to the discontinued bus business would only impact the net income and earnings per common share totals in the chart above.

 

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Table of Contents

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

Our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (“MD&A”) should be read in conjunction with the Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements and Notes thereto included in ITEM 8 of this Report.

Our MD&A focuses on our ongoing operations. Discontinued operations are excluded from our MD&A except as indicated otherwise.

Executive Overview

We were founded in 1980 and have grown to be one of the largest manufacturers of RVs in North America. Our combined U.S. and Canadian market share in the travel trailer and fifth wheel portion of the towable segment is approximately 37.1% for the calendar year to date period ended June 30, 2015. In the motorized segment of the RV industry, we have a combined U.S. and Canadian market share of approximately 24.6% for the calendar year to date period ended June 30, 2015.

Our business model includes decentralized operating units and we compensate operating management primarily with cash, based upon the profitability of the business unit which they manage. Our corporate staff provides financial management, insurance, legal, human resource, risk management, marketing and internal audit functions. Senior corporate management interacts regularly with operating management to assure that corporate objectives are understood and are monitored appropriately.

Our RV products are sold to dealers who, in turn, retail those products. We generally do not finance dealers directly, but do provide repurchase agreements to the dealers’ floor plan lenders.

Our growth has been both internal and by acquisition. Our strategy is designed to increase our profitability by driving innovation, servicing our customers, manufacturing quality products, improving the efficiencies of our facilities and by acquisitions.

We generally rely on internally generated cash flows from continuing operations to finance our growth. Capital expenditures of $42,283 in fiscal 2015 were made primarily for land, production building additions and improvements and replacing machinery and equipment used in the ordinary course of business.

Discontinued Operations

On July 31, 2013, we entered into a definitive Stock Purchase Agreement to sell our bus business to Allied Specialty Vehicles, Inc. (“ASV”) and received $105,043 in final cash consideration from the sale. The sale closed on October 20, 2013. Thor’s bus business included Champion Bus, Inc., General Coach America, Inc., Goshen Coach, Inc., El Dorado National (California), Inc., and El Dorado National (Kansas), Inc. As a result of the sale, the results of operations of the bus business are reported as income from discontinued operations, net of income taxes on the Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income for the years ended July 31, 2015, 2014, and 2013. Discontinued operations also reflect the results of the ambulance product line, through the date of its sale on April 30, 2013. See Note 3, “Discontinued Operations”, in the Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements for further information. The following table summarizes the results of discontinued operations:

 

     2015      2014      2013  

Net sales

   $       $       83,903       $       448,385   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Operating income (loss) of discontinued operations

   $ (4,791)       $ (5,735)       $ 12,080   

Pre-tax gain on disposal of discontinued business

             7,079           

Impairment charges

                     11,525   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income (loss) before income taxes

     (4,791)         1,344         555   

Income tax benefit

     2,167         2,142         631   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of taxes

   $       (2,624)       $ 3,486       $ 1,186   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Other Significant Events

On June 3, 2013, Thor Wakarusa, LLC, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Thor, purchased a recreational vehicle production campus in Wakarusa, Indiana for $5,819. The purchase included land and production facilities, comprised of approximately one million square feet of total production space on more than 150 acres, along with certain related equipment, including more than 35 paint booths specifically designed for painting recreational vehicles. The Company uses the facilities primarily for motorized recreational vehicle production and to vertically integrate certain paint operations through one of its towable recreational vehicle subsidiaries.

 

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On August 30, 2013, the Company acquired the assets of towable recreational vehicle manufacturer Livin’ Lite Corp., located in Wakarusa, Indiana, through a wholly-owned subsidiary for final cash consideration of $16,769, net of cash acquired. As a result of the purchase, the Company formed a new entity, Livin’ Lite. The Company purchased the assets to expand its recreational vehicle market share and complement its existing brands with Livin’ Lite’s advanced lightweight product offerings.

On October 31, 2013, the Company acquired the assets of towable recreational vehicle manufacturer Bison Coach, LLC, located in Milford, Indiana, for final cash consideration of $16,914. As a result of the purchase, the Company formed a new entity, Bison. The Company purchased the net assets of Bison to supplement its existing product offerings with Bison’s equestrian products with living quarters.

On May 1, 2014, the Company acquired all the outstanding capital stock of towable recreational vehicle manufacturer KZ for initial cash consideration paid in fiscal 2014 of $52,409, net of cash acquired, and a working capital adjustment of $2,915 paid in the first quarter of fiscal 2015, resulting in total net cash consideration of $55,324. The Company purchased KZ to expand its towable recreational vehicle market share and supplement its existing towable RV product offerings and dealer base.

On January 5, 2015, the Company closed on a Stock Purchase Agreement (“CRV/DRV SPA”) for the acquisition of all the outstanding membership units of towable recreational vehicle manufacturer Cruiser RV, LLC (“CRV”) and luxury fifth wheel towable recreational vehicle manufacturer DRV, LLC (“DRV”) by its Heartland Recreational Vehicles, LLC subsidiary (“Heartland”). In accordance with the CRV/DRV SPA, the closing was deemed effective as of January 1, 2015. As contemplated in the CRV/DRV SPA, the Company also acquired, in a series of integrated transactions, certain real estate used in the ongoing operations of CRV and DRV. Cash consideration paid for this acquisition was $47,523, net of cash acquired. The Company purchased CRV and DRV to expand its towable recreational vehicle market share and to supplement and expand its existing lightweight travel trailer and luxury fifth wheel product offerings and dealer base.

On May 1, 2015, the Company closed on a Membership Interest Purchase Agreement with Postle Aluminum Company, LLC for the acquisition of all the outstanding membership units of Postle Operating, LLC (“Postle”) for cash consideration paid in fiscal 2015 of $144,048, net of cash acquired. Postle is a manufacturer of aluminum extrusion and specialized component products for the RV and other markets, and will operate as an independent operation in the same manner as the Company’s other subsidiaries.

On May 15, 2015, the Company entered into a repurchase agreement (the “May 15, 2015 Repurchase Agreement”), to purchase shares of its common stock from the Thompson Family Foundation (the “Foundation”) in a private transaction. Pursuant to the terms of the May 15, 2015 Repurchase Agreement, the Company purchased from the Foundation 1,000,000 shares of its common stock at a price of $60.00 per share, and held them as treasury stock, representing an aggregate purchase price of $60,000. The closing price of Thor common stock on May 15, 2015 was $61.29. The transaction was consummated on May 19, 2015, and the Company used available cash to purchase the shares. The number of shares repurchased by the Company represented 1.9% of the Company’s issued and outstanding common stock immediately prior to the repurchase.

Industry Outlook

The Company monitors the industry conditions in the RV market through the use of monthly wholesale shipment data as reported by the RVIA, which is typically issued on a one month lag and represents the manufacturers’ RV production and delivery to dealers. In addition, the Company also monitors monthly retail sales trends as reported by Statistical Surveys, Inc., whose data is typically issued on a month and a half lag. The Company believes that monthly RV retail sales data is important as consumer purchases impact future dealer orders and ultimately our production.

We believe our dealer inventory is at appropriate levels for seasonal consumer demand, with dealers remaining optimistic yet pragmatic in advance of the RV Open House in September 2015. RV dealer inventory of Thor products as of July 31, 2015 increased 5.8% to approximately 67,700 units from approximately 64,000 units as of July 31, 2014. Thor’s RV backlog as of July 31, 2015 increased 6.7% to $573,966 from $538,074 as of July 31, 2014.

Industry Wholesale Statistics – Calendar YTD

Key wholesale statistics for the RV industry, as reported by RVIA, are as follows:

 

     U.S. and Canada Wholesale Unit Shipments  
     Calendar Year through June 30,                
     2015      2014      Increase      Change  

Towables - Units

     177,939         168,737         9,202         5.5%   

Motorized - Units

     24,714         23,328         1,386         5.9%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

                     202,653                         192,065                         10,588                         5.5%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

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In August 2015, the RVIA forecasted that calendar year 2015 wholesale shipments for all RV categories will total 373,700 units, a 4.7% increase over calendar year 2014, with most of the 2015 unit growth expected in travel trailers and fifth wheels. Calendar year 2015 motorized unit shipments are forecasted to increase 6.8% over calendar year 2014. Travel trailers and fifth wheels are expected to account for 84% of all RV shipments in 2015. The outlook for calendar 2015 growth in RV sales is based on modestly rising consumer confidence and home values, improved credit availability, continued slow gains in job and income prospects and the impact of the current stronger U.S dollar on Canadian sales as well as other global economic risks. RVIA has also forecasted that 2016 calendar year shipments for all categories will total 383,100 units, a 2.5% increase from the expected calendar year 2015 wholesale shipments.

Industry Retail Statistics – Calendar YTD

We believe that retail demand is the key to continued growth in the RV industry. With appropriate levels of dealer inventory currently, we believe that RV industry wholesale shipments will generally be on a one-to-one replenishment ratio with retail sales going forward.

Key retail statistics for the RV industry, as reported by Statistical Surveys, Inc., are as follows:

 

     U.S. and Canada Retail Unit Registrations  
     Calendar Year through June 30,                
     2015      2014      Increase      Change  

Towables - Units

     170,347         153,239         17,108         11.2%   

Motorized - Units

     22,905         20,587         2,318         11.3%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

                 193,252                     173,826                       19,426                       11.2%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Note: Data reported by Statistical Surveys, Inc. is based on official state records. This information is subject to adjustment and is continuously updated.

Company Wholesale Statistics – Calendar YTD

The Company’s wholesale RV shipments, for the calendar year periods through June 30, 2015 and 2014, (using data to correspond to the industry periods denoted above) were as follows:

 

     U.S. and Canada Wholesale Unit Shipments  
     Calendar Year through June 30,                
     2015      2014      Increase      Change  

Towables - Units

     64,803         57,602         7,201         12.5%   

Motorized - Units

     6,084         6,033         51         0.8%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

                   70,887                       63,635                         7,252                       11.4%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Company Retail Statistics – Calendar YTD

Retail shipments of the Company’s RV products, as reported by Statistical Surveys, Inc. were as follows for the calendar year periods through June 30, 2015 and 2014 (to correspond to the industry periods denoted above, and adjusted to include results of acquisitions only from the date of acquisition forward):

 

     U.S. and Canada Retail Unit Registrations  
     Calendar Year through June 30,                
     2015      2014      Increase      Change  

Towables - Units

     61,021         54,249         6,772         12.5%   

Motorized - Units

     5,628         4,961         667         13.4%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

                   66,649                       59,210                         7,439                       12.6%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Note: Data reported by Statistical Surveys, Inc. is based on official state records. This information is subject to adjustment and is continuously updated.

 

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Table of Contents

Company Wholesale Statistics – Fiscal Year

For the fiscal years ended July 31, 2015 and 2014, the Company’s wholesale RV shipments were as follows:

 

     U.S. and Canada Wholesale Unit Shipments  
     Fiscal Year Ended July 31,                
     2015      2014      Increase      Change  

Towables - Units

     115,685         100,685         15,000         14.9%   

Motorized - Units

     10,858         10,219         639         6.3%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total

                 126,543                     110,904                       15,639                         14.1%   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Our outlook for future growth in retail sales is dependent upon various economic conditions faced by consumers such as the rate of unemployment, the level of consumer confidence, the growth in disposable income, changes in interest rates, credit availability, the pace of recovery in the housing market, the impact of rising taxes and fuel prices. With continued improvement in consumer confidence, availability of retail and wholesale credit, low interest rates and the absence of negative economic factors, we would expect to see incremental improvements in RV sales and expect to benefit from our ability to increase production to meet increasing demand.

A positive future outlook for the RV segment is supported by favorable demographics, as more people reach the age brackets that historically have accounted for the bulk of retail RV sales. The number of consumers between the ages of 55 and 74 will total 78 million by 2025, 24% higher than in 2012 according to the RVIA. In addition, in recent years the industry has benefited from growing retail sales to younger consumers with new product offerings targeted to younger, more active families, as they place a higher value on family outdoor recreation than any prior generation. Based on a study from the Pew Research Center, the “Millennial” generation, defined as those currently between the ages of 18 and 33, consisted of more than 68 million people in 2014. In general, these consumers are more technologically savvy, but still value active outdoor experiences shared with family and friends, making them strong potential customers for our industry in the decades to come. Younger RV consumers are generally attracted to lower and moderately priced entry-level travel trailers, as affordability is a key driver at this stage in their lives. As the first generation of the internet age, Millennials are more comfortable gathering information online, and are therefore generally more knowledgeable about products and competitive pricing than any prior generation.

Economic or industry-wide factors affecting our RV business include the costs of commodities used in the manufacture of our products. Material cost is the primary factor determining our cost of products sold, and any future increases in raw material costs would negatively impact our profit margins if we were unable to raise prices for our products by corresponding amounts. Historically, we have been able to pass along those cost increases to customers.

We have not experienced any recent unusual cost increases or supply constraints from our chassis suppliers. The recreational vehicle industry has, from time to time, experienced shortages of chassis due to various causes such as component shortages, production delays or work stoppages at the chassis manufacturers which has impacted our sales and earnings. We believe that the current supply of chassis used in our motorized RV production is adequate for current production levels, and that available inventory would compensate for short-term changes in supply schedules if they occur.

 

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Table of Contents

FISCAL 2015 VS. FISCAL 2014

 

    

Fiscal 2015

          

Fiscal 2014

          

Change

Amount

   

%

 

NET SALES

              

Recreational vehicles

              

Towables

   $ 3,096,405         $ 2,721,625         $ 374,780        13.8   

Motorized

     870,799           803,831           66,968        8.3   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total recreational vehicles

     3,967,204           3,525,456           441,748        12.5   

Other

     56,594                     56,594          

Intercompany eliminations

     (16,979                  (16,979       
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total

   $         4,006,819         $         3,525,456         $         481,363        13.7   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

# OF UNITS

              

Recreational vehicles

              

Towables

     115,685           100,685           15,000        14.9   

Motorized

     10,858           10,219           639        6.3   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total

     126,543           110,904           15,639        14.1   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   
    

Fiscal 2015

   

% of

Segment

Net Sales

    

Fiscal 2014

   

% of

Segment

Net Sales

    

Change

Amount

   

%

 

GROSS PROFIT

              

Recreational vehicles

              

Towables

   $ 442,509        14.3       $ 375,163        13.8       $ 67,346        18.0   

Motorized

     111,625        12.8         95,233        11.8         16,392        17.2   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total recreational vehicles

     554,134        14.0         470,396        13.3         83,738        17.8   

Other

     3,965        7.0                        3,965          

Intercompany eliminations

     (554                            (554       
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total

   $ 557,545        13.9       $ 470,396        13.3       $ 87,149        18.5   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

SELLING, GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE
EXPENSES

              

Recreational vehicles

              

Towables

   $ 168,379        5.4       $ 142,346        5.2       $ 26,033        18.3   

Motorized

     44,859        5.2         37,979        4.7         6,880        18.1   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total recreational vehicles

     213,238        5.4         180,325        5.1         32,913        18.3   

Other

     2,006        3.5                        2,006          

Corporate

     35,647                28,387                7,260        25.6   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total

   $ 250,891        6.3       $ 208,712        5.9       $ 42,179        20.2   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE INCOME TAXES

              

Recreational vehicles

              

Towables

   $ 259,092        8.4       $ 221,123        8.1       $ 37,969        17.2   

Motorized

     66,746        7.7         57,277        7.1         9,469        16.5   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total recreational vehicles

     325,838        8.2         278,400        7.9         47,438        17.0   

Other

     1,424        2.5                        1,424          

Intercompany eliminations

     (554                            (554       

Corporate

     (33,813             (25,581             (8,232     (32.2
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total

   $ 292,895        7.3       $ 252,819        7.2       $ 40,076        15.9   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   
ORDER BACKLOG   

As of

July 31, 2015

          

As of

July 31, 2014

          

Change

Amount

   

%

 

Recreational vehicles

              

Towables

   $ 304,005         $ 296,828         $ 7,177        2.4   

Motorized

     269,961           241,246           28,715        11.9   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

Total

   $ 573,966         $ 538,074         $ 35,892        6.7   
  

 

 

      

 

 

      

 

 

   

 

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CONSOLIDATED

Consolidated net sales for fiscal 2015 increased $481,363, or 13.7%, compared to fiscal 2014. The fiscal 2015 acquisitions of CRV/DRV and Postle, coupled with the fiscal 2014 acquisition of KZ, which had twelve months of operations in fiscal 2015 as compared to three months in fiscal 2014 from the date of acquisition, accounted for $258,885 of the $481,363 increase. Consolidated gross profit for fiscal 2015 increased $87,149, or 18.5%, compared to fiscal 2014. Consolidated gross profit was 13.9% of consolidated net sales for fiscal 2015 compared to 13.3% of consolidated net sales for fiscal 2014. Selling, general and administrative expenses for fiscal 2015 increased 20.2% compared to fiscal 2014. Income before income taxes for fiscal 2015 was $292,895 as compared to $252,819 in fiscal 2014, an increase of 15.9%. The specifics on the changes in net sales, gross profit, selling, general and administrative expenses and income before income taxes are addressed in the segment reporting below.

Corporate costs included in selling, general and administrative expenses increased $7,260 to $35,647 for fiscal 2015 compared to $28,387 for fiscal 2014. The increase is partially attributable to a net increase of $1,670 related to the changes in the portion of our actuarially determined workers’ compensation and product liability reserves recorded at the corporate level. This increase is partially due to the prior year period including a non-recurring favorable adjustment. Stock-based compensation also increased by $2,025, as fiscal 2015 expense included the equivalent of a full year of vested stock awards as compared to two-thirds of a year in fiscal 2014 as most stock awards vest ratably over three years. Bonuses also increased by $1,407 in correlation with the increase in income from continuing operations before income taxes. In addition, legal and professional fees also increased $1,900, partly attributable to initial costs incurred related to the development of long-term strategic growth initiatives and for management retention and succession training seminars.

Corporate interest income and other income and expense was $1,834 of income for fiscal 2015 compared to $2,806 of income for fiscal 2014. The $972 decrease in income is due partly to a decrease in overall interest income of $351, primarily due to reduced interest income on notes receivable as a result of lower note balances. In addition, the market value appreciation on the Company’s deferred compensation plan assets was $724 in the current year as compared to appreciation of $1,028 in the prior year, a decrease of $304.

The overall annual effective tax rate for fiscal 2015 was 31.0% on $292,895 of income before income taxes, compared to 30.6% on $252,819 of income before income taxes for fiscal 2014. The primary reason for the increase in the overall effective income tax rate was the larger amount of uncertain tax positions that settled favorably in fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2015, partially offset by a tax benefit in fiscal 2015 from the retroactive reinstatement of the federal research and development credit and other credits that were enacted on December 19, 2014.

The changes in costs and price within our business due to inflation were not significantly different from inflation in the United States economy as a whole. Levels of capital investment, pricing and inventory investment in our business were not materially affected by changes caused by inflation.

 

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SEGMENT REPORTING

Towable Recreational Vehicles

Analysis of Change in Net Sales for Fiscal 2015 vs. Fiscal 2014

 

         Fiscal 2015          % of
Segment
    Net Sales    
         Fiscal 2014          % of
Segment
    Net Sales    
     Change
    Amount     
    %
    Change     
 

NET SALES:

                

Towables

                

  Travel Trailers

   $ 1,590,287         51.4       $ 1,349,246         49.6       $ 241,041        17.9   

  Fifth Wheels

     1,498,531         48.4         1,349,707         49.6         148,824        11.0   

  Other

     7,587         0.2         22,672         0.8         (15,085     (66.5
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

Total Towables

   $         3,096,405         100.0       $ 2,721,625         100.0       $ 374,780        13.8   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   
     Fiscal 2015      % of
Segment
Net Sales
     Fiscal 2014      % of
Segment
Net Sales
     Change
Amount
    %
Change
 

# OF UNITS:

                

Towables

                

  Travel Trailers

     80,254         69.4         66,453         66.0         13,801        20.8   

  Fifth Wheels

     34,684         30.0         33,031         32.8         1,653        5.0   

  Other

     747         0.6         1,201         1.2         (454     (37.8
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

Total Towables

     115,685         100.0         100,685         100.0         15,000        14.9   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

IMPACT OF CHANGE IN MIX AND PRICE ON NET SALES:    %
Increase
(Decrease)
 

Towables

  

  Travel Trailers

     (2.9

  Fifth Wheels

     6.0   

  Other

     (28.7

Total Towables

     (1.1

The increase in total towable net sales of 13.8% compared to the prior fiscal year resulted from a 14.9% increase in unit shipments and a 1.1% overall decrease in the impact of the change in the overall net price per unit and product mix. The fiscal 2015 acquisition of CRV/DRV, coupled with the fiscal 2014 acquisition of KZ, which had twelve months of operations in fiscal 2015 as compared to three months in fiscal 2014, accounted for $219,270 of the $374,780 increase in towables net sales and for 9,483 of the 15,000 increase in total towable unit sales.

The overall industry increase in combined travel trailer and fifth wheel wholesale unit shipments for the twelve month period ended July 31, 2015 was 8.4% compared to the same period last year according to statistics published by RVIA.

The decrease in the overall net price per unit within the travel trailer product lines of 2.9% is primarily due to mix, as sales in fiscal 2015 include a higher concentration of entry-level to mid-level product lines as compared to fiscal 2014, which is partially attributable to recent acquisitions. The increase in the overall net price per unit within the fifth wheel product lines of 6.0% is primarily due to changes in product mix, which is partly attributable to recent acquisitions, and net price increases. In fiscal 2015, the “Other “category consisted solely of truck and folding campers and other specialty towable recreational vehicles, which carry a significantly lower selling price than the park models which were produced in fiscal 2014 and included in Other.

 

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Table of Contents

Cost of products sold increased $307,434 to $2,653,896, or 85.7% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2015 compared to $2,346,462, or 86.2% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2014. The change in material, labor, freight-out and warranty comprised $283,228 of the $307,434 increase in cost of products sold and was due to increased sales volume. Material, labor, freight-out and warranty as a combined percentage of towable net sales decreased to 79.8% in fiscal 2015 from 80.4% in fiscal 2014. This 0.6% decrease as a percentage of towable net sales is primarily due to the favorable impact of net price increases in fiscal 2015 and a reduction in the material cost percentage to sales due in part to the retroactive reinstatement of tariff rebates on certain imported raw material products during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015. Total manufacturing overhead increased $24,206 to $182,244 in fiscal 2015 compared to $158,038 in fiscal 2014 primarily as a result of the increase in sales volume.

Variable costs in manufacturing overhead increased $22,686 to $169,126 or 5.5% of towable net sales for fiscal 2015 compared to $146,440 or 5.4% of towable net sales for fiscal 2014. This increase as a percentage of towable net sales is primarily due to employee medical benefits and workers’ compensation costs. Fixed costs in manufacturing overhead, which consists primarily of facility costs, property taxes and depreciation, increased $1,520 to $13,118 in fiscal 2015 from $11,598 in fiscal 2014 primarily due to facility expansions.

Towable gross profit increased $67,346 to $442,509, or 14.3% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2015 compared to $375,163, or 13.8% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2014. The increase in gross profit and gross profit percentage was due primarily to the 13.8% increase in towable net sales and the decrease in the cost of products sold percentage noted above.

Selling, general and administrative expenses were $168,379, or 5.4% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2015 compared to $142,346, or 5.2% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2014. The primary reason for the $26,033 increase in selling, general and administrative expenses was increased towable net sales and towable income before income taxes, which caused related commissions, bonuses and other compensation to increase by $16,226. Sales related travel, advertising and promotion costs also increased $3,258 in correlation with the increase in sales. These two cost categories were also the primary reason for the increase in selling, general and administrative expense as a percentage of towable net sales. In addition, legal and professional fees and related settlement costs increased $2,321, self-insured employee medical costs increased $1,255 and vehicle repurchase costs increased $672.

Towable income before income taxes increased to 8.4% of towable net sales for fiscal 2015 from 8.1% of towable net sales for fiscal 2014. The primary factors for this increase in percentage were the impact of the 13.8% increase in towable net sales as well as the net price increases and the improvement in the cost of products sold percentage noted above, partially offset by the increased percentage of selling, general and administrative expenses discussed above.

Motorized Recreational Vehicles

Analysis of Change in Net Sales for Fiscal 2015 vs. Fiscal 2014

 

         Fiscal 2015          % of
Segment

    Net Sales    
         Fiscal 2014          % of
Segment

    Net Sales    
     Change
    Amount     
    %
    Change     
 

NET SALES:

                

Motorized

                

Class A

   $ 517,318         59.4       $ 458,201         57.0       $ 59,117        12.9   

Class C

     273,171         31.4         275,190         34.2         (2,019     (0.7

Class B

     80,310         9.2         70,440         8.8         9,870        14.0   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

Total Motorized

   $         870,799         100.0       $         803,831         100.0       $         66,968        8.3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   
     Fiscal 2015      % of
Segment

Net Sales
     Fiscal 2014      % of
Segment

Net Sales
     Change
Amount
    %
Change
 

# OF UNITS:

                

Motorized

                

Class A

     5,698         52.5         4,975         48.7         723        14.5   

Class C

     4,476         41.2         4,629         45.3         (153     (3.3

Class B

     684         6.3         615         6.0         69        11.2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

Total Motorized

     10,858         100.0         10,219         100.0         639        6.3   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

   

 

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Table of Contents
IMPACT OF CHANGE IN MIX AND PRICE ON NET SALES:    %
Increase

(Decrease)
 

Motorized

  

Class A

     (1.6

Class C

     2.6   

Class B

     2.8   

Total Motorized

     2.0   

The increase in total motorized net sales of 8.3% compared to the prior fiscal year resulted from a 6.3% increase in unit shipments and a 2.0% overall increase in the impact of the change in the net price per unit resulting primarily from mix of product.

The overall market increase in unit shipments of motorhomes was 6.5% for the twelve month period ended July 31, 2015 compared to the same period last year according to statistics published by RVIA.

The decrease in the overall net price per unit within the Class A product line of 1.6% is primarily due to a shift in the concentration of sales from the generally larger and more expensive diesel units to the more moderately priced gas units compared to a year ago. Increasing sales of a newer line of innovative product offerings of smaller, more moderately priced units that still offer many of the same amenities as larger models also contributed to the decrease. The modest increases in the overall net price per unit within both the Class C and Class B product line of 2.6% and 2.8%, respectively, are primarily due to changes in product mix and net price increases.

Cost of products sold increased $50,576 to $759,174, or 87.2% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2015 compared to $708,598, or 88.2% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2014. The change in material, labor, freight-out and warranty comprised $47,304 of the $50,576 increase in cost of products sold and was due to increased sales volume. Material, labor, freight-out and warranty as a combined percentage of motorized net sales decreased to 82.7% in fiscal 2015 from 83.7% in fiscal 2014. The decrease in percentage is due to the favorable impact of product mix changes and a reduction in the material cost percentage to sales due in part to the retroactive reinstatement of tariff rebates on certain imported raw material products during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015. Labor and warranty cost percentages also decreased as the combination of assimilating an increasing labor force while expanding production lines and product offerings a year ago led to increased labor and warranty costs in the prior year. Total manufacturing overhead costs increased $3,272 to $38,759 in fiscal 2015 compared to $35,487 in fiscal 2014 primarily as a result of the increase in sales volume.

Variable costs in manufacturing overhead increased $2,515 to $35,060, or 4.0% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2015 compared to $32,545, or 4.0% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2014 as a result of the increase in net sales. Fixed costs in manufacturing overhead, which consists primarily of facility costs, property taxes and depreciation, increased $757 to $3,699 in fiscal 2015 from $2,942 in fiscal 2014, reflecting additional costs due to facility expansions.

Motorized gross profit increased $16,392 to $111,625, or 12.8% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2015 compared to $95,233, or 11.8% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2014. The increase in the gross profit amount and gross profit percentage is attributable to the 8.3% increase in net sales and the decrease in the cost of products sold percentage noted above.

Selling, general and administrative expenses were $44,859, or 5.2% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2015 compared to $37,979, or 4.7% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2014. The primary reason for the $6,880 increase, and the increase as a percentage of motorized net sales, was increased motorized net sales and motorized income before income taxes, which caused related commissions, bonuses and other compensation to increase by $5,219. Sales related travel, advertising and promotion costs also increased $713 in correlation with the increase in sales. In addition, legal and professional fees and related settlement costs increased $982.

Motorized income before income taxes was 7.7% of motorized net sales for fiscal 2015 and 7.1% of motorized net sales for fiscal 2014. This increase in percentage is primarily attributable to the increase in gross profit percentage noted above, partially offset by the increase in selling, general and administrative expenses as a percentage of motorized net sales noted above.

 

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Table of Contents

FISCAL 2014 VS. FISCAL 2013

 

     Fiscal 2014             Fiscal 2013            

Change

Amount

     %  

NET SALES

                 

Recreational vehicles

                 

Towables

   $       2,721,625          $       2,650,253          $ 71,372         2.7   

Motorized

     803,831            591,542            212,289         35.9   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total

   $ 3,525,456          $ 3,241,795          $       283,661         8.8   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

# OF UNITS

                 

Recreational vehicles

                 

Towables

     100,685            99,202            1,483         1.5   

Motorized

     10,219            7,420            2,799         37.7   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total

     110,904            106,622            4,282         4.0   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    
     Fiscal 2014     

% of

Segment

Net Sales

     Fiscal 2013     

% of

Segment

Net Sales

    

Change

Amount

     %  

GROSS PROFIT

                 

Recreational vehicles

                 

Towables

   $ 375,163         13.8       $ 351,276         13.3       $ 23,887         6.8   

Motorized

     95,233         11.8         73,263         12.4         21,970         30.0   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total

   $ 470,396         13.3       $ 424,539         13.1       $ 45,857         10.8   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

SELLING, GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES

                 

Recreational vehicles

                 

Towables

   $ 142,346         5.2       $ 133,585         5.0       $ 8,761         6.6   

Motorized

     37,979         4.7         29,354         5.0         8,625         29.4   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total recreational vehicles

     180,325         5.1         162,939         5.0         17,386         10.7   

Corporate

     28,387                 31,711                 (3,324)         (10.5)   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total

   $ 208,712         5.9       $ 194,650         6.0       $ 14,062         7.2   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

INCOME (LOSS) BEFORE INCOME TAXES

                 

Recreational vehicles

                 

Towables

   $ 221,123         8.1       $ 205,724         7.8       $ 15,399         7.5   

Motorized

     57,277         7.1         43,907         7.4         13,370         30.5   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total recreational vehicles

     278,400         7.9         249,631         7.7         28,769         11.5   

Corporate

     (25,581)                 (27,659)                 2,078         7.5   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total

   $ 252,819         7.2       $ 221,972         6.8       $ 30,847         13.9   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

ORDER BACKLOG

    

 

As of

July 31, 2014

  

  

       

 

As of

July 31, 2013

  

  

       

 

Change

Amount

  

  

     %   

Recreational vehicles

                 

Towables

   $ 296,828          $ 228,416          $ 68,412         30.0   

Motorized

     241,246            213,116            28,130         13.2   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

Total

   $ 538,074          $ 441,532          $ 96,542         21.9   
  

 

 

       

 

 

       

 

 

    

 

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Table of Contents

CONSOLIDATED

Consolidated net sales for fiscal 2014 increased $283,661, or 8.8%, compared to fiscal 2013. Consolidated gross profit for fiscal 2014 increased $45,857, or 10.8%, compared to fiscal 2013. Consolidated gross profit was 13.3% of consolidated net sales for fiscal 2014 compared to 13.1% of consolidated net sales for fiscal 2013. Selling, general and administrative expenses for fiscal 2014 increased 7.2% compared to fiscal 2013. Income before income taxes for fiscal 2014 was $252,819 as compared to $221,972 in fiscal 2013, an increase of 13.9%. The specifics on the changes in net sales, gross profit, selling, general and administrative expenses and income before income taxes are addressed in the segment reporting below.

Corporate costs in selling, general and administrative expenses were $28,387 for fiscal 2014 compared to $31,711 for fiscal 2013. The decrease of $3,324 is primarily attributable to a decrease of $3,082 in the portion of the actuarially determined workers’ compensation liability reserve recorded at Corporate. In addition, legal and professional fees decreased $1,911. Costs related to our Corporate repurchase reserve required for vehicle repurchase commitments also decreased $730, as repurchase activity has been lower compared to the prior year. The expenses for fiscal 2013 also included a total of $1,106 in one-time employee compensation and stock-based separation costs. These decreases from 2013 were partially offset by an increase in stock-based compensation of $2,398 and an increase of $939 in bonuses and other compensation costs in 2014 in correlation with the increase in income from continuing operations before income taxes.

Corporate interest income and other income and expense was $2,806 of income in fiscal 2014 compared to $4,052 of income for fiscal 2013. The $1,246 decrease in income is primarily due to a decrease in overall interest income of $1,079, primarily due to reduced interest income on our notes receivable due to lower note balances.

The overall annual effective tax rate for fiscal 2014 was 30.6% on $252,819 of income before income taxes, compared to 31.7% on $221,972 of income before income taxes for fiscal 2013. The primary reason for the decrease in the overall effective income tax rate was the larger amount of uncertain tax benefits that settled favorably in fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013, partially offset by a tax benefit in fiscal 2013 from the retroactive reinstatement of the federal research and development credit and other credits that were enacted on January 2, 2013.

The changes in costs and price within our business due to inflation were not significantly different from inflation in the United States economy as a whole. Levels of capital investment, pricing and inventory investment in our business were not materially affected by changes caused by inflation.

 

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Table of Contents

SEGMENT REPORTING

Towable Recreational Vehicles

Analysis of Change in Net Sales for Fiscal 2014 vs. Fiscal 2013 

 

         Fiscal 2014          % of
Segment
    Net Sales    
         Fiscal 2013          % of
Segment
    Net Sales    
     Change
    Amount     
     %
    Change     
 

NET SALES:

                 

Towables

                 

Travel Trailers

   $ 1,349,246         49.6       $ 1,286,000         48.5       $ 63,246         4.9   

Fifth Wheels

     1,349,707         49.6         1,343,492         50.7         6,215         0.5   

Other

     22,672         0.8         20,761         0.8         1,911         9.2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total Towables

   $ 2,721,625         100.0       $ 2,650,253         100.0       $ 71,372         2.7   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    
     Fiscal 2014      % of
Segment
Net Sales
     Fiscal 2013      % of
Segment

Net Sales
     Change
Amount
     %
Change
 

# OF UNITS:

                 

Towables

                 

Travel Trailers

     66,453         66.0         65,153         65.7         1,300         2.0   

Fifth Wheels

     33,031         32.8         33,455         33.7         (424)         (1.3)   

Other

     1,201         1.2         594         0.6         607         102.2   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total Towables

     100,685         100.0         99,202         100.0         1,483         1.5   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

IMPACT OF CHANGE IN MIX AND PRICE ON NET SALES:    %
Increase
(Decrease)
 

Towables

  

Travel Trailers

     2.9   

Fifth Wheels

     1.8   

Other

     (93.0)   

Total Towables

     1.2   

The increase in total towable net sales of 2.7% compared to the prior fiscal year resulted from a 1.5% increase in unit shipments and a 1.2% overall increase in the impact of the change in the overall net price per unit and product mix.

The overall industry increase in travel trailer and fifth wheel wholesale unit shipments for the twelve month period ended July 31, 2014 was 9.1% compared to the same period last year according to statistics published by RVIA.

The increases in the overall net price per unit within the travel trailer product lines of 2.9% and within the fifth wheel product lines of 1.8% are primarily due to changes in product mix and net price increases. The “other” category formerly related solely to park model sales but now also includes truck and folding campers and other specialty towable recreational vehicles due to the additions of Livin’ Lite and Bison, which carry a significantly lower selling price than park models and now comprise the majority of the unit sales in this category.

Cost of products sold increased $47,485 to $2,346,462, or 86.2% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2014 compared to $2,298,977, or 86.7% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2013. The change in material, labor, freight-out and warranty comprised $36,112 of the $47,485 increase in cost of products sold and was due to increased sales volume. Material, labor, freight-out and warranty as a combined percentage of towable net sales decreased to 80.4% in fiscal 2014 from 81.2% in fiscal 2013. This 0.8% decrease as a percentage of towable net sales is primarily due to the favorable impact of net price increases in fiscal 2014, partially offset by increased labor costs associated with the current competitive labor market. Total manufacturing overhead increased $11,373 to $158,038 in fiscal 2014 compared to $146,665 in fiscal 2013 primarily as a result of the increase in sales volume.

 

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Table of Contents

Variable costs in manufacturing overhead increased $10,189 to $146,440 or 5.4% of towable net sales for fiscal 2014 compared to $136,251 or 5.1% of towable net sales for fiscal 2013. This increase as a percentage of towable net sales is due to increased indirect labor costs resulting from facility expansions and the competitive labor market, as well as additional utility and building maintenance costs due to the unusually severe and protracted winter in fiscal 2014 as compared to fiscal 2013. Fixed costs in manufacturing overhead, which consists primarily of facility costs, property taxes and depreciation, increased $1,184 to $11,598 in fiscal 2014 from $10,414 in fiscal 2013 primarily due to facility expansions.

Towable gross profit increased $23,887 to $375,163, or 13.8% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2014 compared to $351,276, or 13.3% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2013. The increase in gross profit and gross profit percentage was due primarily to the 2.7% increase in towable net sales and net price increases.

Selling, general and administrative expenses were $142,346, or 5.2% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2014 compared to $133,585, or 5.0% of towable net sales, for fiscal 2013. The primary reason for the $8,761 increase in selling, general and administrative expenses was increased towable net sales and towable income before income taxes, which caused related commissions, bonuses and other compensation to increase by $7,433. Sales related travel, advertising and promotion costs also increased $1,218 in correlation with the increase in sales. Legal and professional fees and related settlement costs increased $1,182 in total. These increases were partially offset by a reduction of $613 in vehicle repurchase costs.

Towable income before income taxes increased to 8.1% of towable net sales for fiscal 2014 from 7.8% of towable net sales for fiscal 2013. The primary factor for this increase in percentage was the impact of the 2.7% increase in towable net sales as well as changes in product mix and net price increases noted above.

Motorized Recreational Vehicles

Analysis of Change in Net Sales for Fiscal 2014 vs. Fiscal 2013

 

           Fiscal 2014            % of
Segment

    Net Sales    
         Fiscal 2013          % of
Segment

    Net Sales    
     Change
    Amount     
     %
    Change     
 

NET SALES:

                 

Motorized

                 

  Class A

   $ 458,201         57.0       $ 355,639         60.1       $ 102,562         28.8   

  Class C

     275,190         34.2         188,261         31.8         86,929         46.2   

  Class B

     70,440         8.8         47,642         8.1         22,798         47.9   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total Motorized

   $ 803,831         100.0       $ 591,542         100.0       $ 212,289         35.9   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    
     Fiscal 2014      % of
Segment

Net Sales
     Fiscal 2013      % of
Segment

Net Sales
     Change
Amount
     %
Change
 

# OF UNITS:

                 

Motorized

                 

  Class A

     4,975         48.7         3,559         48.0         1,416         39.8   

  Class C

     4,629         45.3         3,414         46.0         1,215         35.6   

  Class B

     615         6.0         447         6.0         168         37.6   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

Total Motorized

     10,219         100.0         7,420         100.0         2,799         37.7   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

IMPACT OF CHANGE IN MIX AND PRICE ON NET SALES:    %
Increase

(Decrease)
 

Motorized

  

  Class A

     (11.0

  Class C

     10.6   

  Class B

     10.3   

Total Motorized

     (1.8

The increase in total motorized net sales of 35.9% compared to the prior fiscal year resulted from a 37.7% increase in unit shipments and a 1.8% overall decrease in the impact of the change in the net price per unit resulting primarily from mix of product.

 

30


Table of Contents

The overall market increase in unit shipments of motorhomes was 25.2% for the twelve month period ended July 31, 2014 compared to the same period last year according to statistics published by RVIA.

The decrease in the overall net price per unit within the Class A product line of 11.0% is primarily due to a shift in the concentration of sales from the generally larger and more expensive diesel units to the more moderately priced gas units compared to a year ago. Increasing sales of a new line of innovative product offerings of smaller, more moderately priced units that still offer many of the same amenities as larger models also contributed to the decrease. The increase in the overall net price per unit within the Class C product line of 10.6% is primarily due to changes in product mix and net price increases. Within the Class B product line, the increase in the overall net price per unit of 10.3% is primarily due to a greater concentration of sales of higher priced models in the current year.

Cost of products sold increased $190,319 to $708,598, or 88.2% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2014 compared to $518,279, or 87.6% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2013. The change in material, labor, freight-out and warranty comprised $178,200 of the $190,319 increase in cost of products sold and was due to increased sales volume. Material, labor, freight-out and warranty as a combined percentage of motorized net sales was 83.7% for both fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013. This percentage remained the same as the favorable impact of product mix changes and selective net price increases in fiscal 2014 was offset by increased labor costs due to the current competitive labor market and labor start-up costs related to facility and production line expansions necessitated by increasing sales and backlog. Total manufacturing overhead costs increased $12,119 to $35,487 in fiscal 2014 compared to $23,368 in fiscal 2013 primarily as a result of the increase in sales volume.

Variable costs in manufacturing overhead increased $10,837 to $32,545, or 4.0% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2014 compared to $21,708, or 3.7% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2013. This increase as a percentage of motorized net sales is due to increased indirect labor and employee benefit costs resulting from increased production and the competitive labor market, as well as additional utility and building maintenance costs due to the unusually severe and protracted winter weather in fiscal 2014 compared to fiscal 2013. Fixed costs in manufacturing overhead, which consists primarily of facility costs, property taxes and depreciation, increased $1,282 to $2,942 in fiscal 2014 from $1,660 in fiscal 2013, reflecting additional costs due to facility expansions.

Motorized gross profit increased $21,970 to $95,233, or 11.8% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2014 compared to $73,263, or 12.4% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2013. The increase in the gross profit amount is attributable to the 35.9% increase in net sales, while the decrease in gross profit percentage is primarily due to the increased indirect labor and facility related costs discussed in the cost of products section above.

Selling, general and administrative expenses were $37,979, or 4.7% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2014 compared to $29,354, or 5.0% of motorized net sales, for fiscal 2013. The primary reason for the $8,625 increase was increased motorized net sales and motorized income before income taxes, which caused related commissions, bonuses and other compensation to increase by $6,925. Sales related travel, advertising and promotion costs also increased $990 in correlation with the increase in sales.

Motorized income before income taxes was 7.1% of motorized net sales for fiscal 2014 and 7.4% of motorized net sales for fiscal 2013. This decrease in percentage is primarily attributable to the decrease in gross profit percentage noted above.

Financial Condition and Liquidity

As of July 31, 2015, we had cash and cash equivalents of $183,478 compared to $289,336 on July 31, 2014. The components of the $105,858 decrease in fiscal 2015 are described in more detail below, but the decrease is primarily due to $247,860 of cash provided by operations being more than offset by cash uses of $194,486 for towable recreational vehicle and other business acquisitions, $42,283 for capital expenditures, $57,381 for cash dividends to our stockholders and $60,000 for the purchase of treasury stock.

Working capital at July 31, 2015 was $397,506 compared to $473,334 at July 31, 2014. Capital expenditures of $42,283 for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2015 were made primarily to purchase land and production buildings to expand our RV operations and to replace machinery and equipment used in the ordinary course of business.

We believe our on hand cash and cash equivalents, and funds generated from continuing operations, will be sufficient to fund expected future operational requirements. We have relied on internally generated cash flows from operations to finance substantially all our growth. We may, however, consider debt to make an acquisition.

Our three main priorities for the use of current and future available cash include supporting and growing our core RV business, both organically and through acquisitions, maintaining and growing our regular dividends over time, and strategic share repurchases or special dividends as determined by the Company’s Board.

In regard to supporting and growing our business, we anticipate capital expenditures in fiscal 2016 of approximately $50,000, primarily for the continued expansion of our recreational vehicle facilities and replacing and upgrading machinery, equipment and other assets to be used in the ordinary course of business. We may also consider additional strategic growth acquisitions that complement or expand our ongoing operations.

 

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Relative to regular dividends, the Company’s Board currently intends to continue quarterly cash dividend payments in the future. The declaration of future dividends and the establishment of the per share amounts, record dates and payment dates for any such future dividends are subject to the determination of the Board, and will be dependent upon future earnings, cash flows and other factors. There are no limitations on the Company’s ability to pay dividends pursuant to any credit facility.

Future purchases of the Company’s common stock or special cash dividends may occur based upon market and business conditions and excess cash availability, subject to applicable legal limitations and determination by the Board.

Operating Activities

Net cash provided by operating activities for fiscal 2015 was $247,860 as compared to net cash provided by operating activities of $149,261 for fiscal 2014 and cash provided of $145,066 for fiscal 2013. For fiscal 2015, net income adjusted for non-cash items (primarily depreciation, amortization of intangibles, deferred income tax benefit and stock-based compensation) resulted in $230,024 of operating cash. Changes in working capital provided $17,836 of operating cash during fiscal 2015, primarily due to a decrease in accounts receivable, which was largely attributable to the timing of shipments and quicker collections on accounts receivable at the fiscal year end compared to the prior year. The increase in cash generated from accounts receivable was partially offset by a reduction in accounts payable resulting from the timing of payments and reduced inventory purchases at fiscal year end as compared to the prior year.

For fiscal 2014, net income adjusted for non-cash items resulted in $198,664 of operating cash. Changes in working capital used $49,403 during that period, primarily due to increases in accounts receivable and inventory correlating with the increase in sales and backlog during the period.

For fiscal 2013, net income adjusted for non-cash items resulted in $183,499 of operating cash. Changes in working capital used $38,433 during that period, primarily due to increases in accounts receivable and inventory correlating with the increase in sales and backlog during the period.

Investing Activities

Net cash used in investing activities for fiscal 2015 was $234,968, primarily due to $144,048 and $47,523 of net cash consideration paid for the acquisitions of Postle and CRV/DRV, respectively, a final purchase price adjustment payment of $2,915 related to the fiscal 2014 acquisition of the KZ towable recreational vehicle business and capital expenditures of $42,283. The capital expenditures of $42,283 included approximately $37,000 for land and production building additions and improvements, as well as software system enhancements, with the remainder primarily to replace machinery and equipment used in the ordinary course of business.

Net cash provided by investing activities for fiscal 2014 was $2,928, primarily due to $105,043 in cash consideration received from the sale of the bus business, $8,699 in proceeds from the disposition of property, plant and equipment and $6,425 in proceeds received on notes receivable, mostly offset by $16,769, $16,914 and $52,409 of net cash consideration paid for the towable recreational vehicle acquisitions of the assets of Livin’ Lite and Bison and the stock of KZ, respectively, and capital expenditures of $30,406. The capital expenditures of $30,406 included approximately $24,700 for land, building and office additions and software system enhancements, with the remainder primarily to replace machinery and equipment used in the ordinary course of business.

Net cash used in investing activities for fiscal 2013 was $13,996, primarily for capital expenditures of $24,305 and $10,718 for the acquisitions of the discontinued Krystal and Federal Coach bus businesses, partially offset by proceeds from notes receivable of $7,000 and $12,051 in net proceeds from the disposition of the ambulance product line within our discontinued bus operations. The capital expenditures of $24,305 included approximately $18,700 for land, building and office additions and improvements with the remainder primarily to replace machinery and equipment used in the ordinary course of business.

Financing Activities

Net cash used in financing activities of $118,750 for fiscal 2015 was primarily related to the repurchase of a total of 1,000,000 shares of common stock of the Company for $60,000 and for cash dividend payments of $57,381. The Company repurchased the shares at a discount to the then current market price and did not incur brokerage fees. The Company considered the repurchases of shares to be a good use of its cash and does not believe future liquidity will be negatively impacted. See Note 16 to our Consolidated Financial Statements contained elsewhere in this report for a description of the share repurchase transaction. The Company paid a regular quarterly $0.27 per share dividend in each of the four quarters of fiscal 2015 which totaled $57,381. The Company increased its previous regular quarterly dividend of $0.23 per share to $0.27 per share in October 2014. The Company increased its previous regular quarterly dividend of $0.18 per share to $0.23 per share in October 2013.

Net cash used in financing activities of $99,454 for fiscal 2014 was primarily for cash dividend payments of $102,314, which included a regular quarterly $0.23 per share dividend for each of the four quarters of fiscal 2014 and a special $1.00 per share dividend in November 2013.

 

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Net cash used in financing activities of $113,111 for fiscal 2013 was primarily for cash dividend payments of $117,687, which included a regular quarterly $0.18 per share dividend for each of the four quarters of fiscal 2013 and a special $1.50 per share dividend in December 2012.

The Company considered the special $1.00 per share dividend in fiscal 2014 and the special $1.50 per share dividend in fiscal 2013 to be prudent uses of its cash and does not believe future liquidity will be negatively impacted.

Critical Accounting Principles

Our Consolidated Financial Statements are prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The preparation of these financial statements requires the use of estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the periods presented. We believe that of our accounting policies, the following may involve a higher degree of judgment, estimates and complexity.

Impairment of Goodwill, Intangible and Long-Lived Assets

Goodwill is not amortized but is tested for impairment annually and whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that an impairment may have occurred. We utilize a two-step quantitative assessment to test for impairment. The first step involves a comparison of the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying value. If the carrying value of the reporting unit exceeds its fair value, the second step of the process involves a comparison of the implied fair value and carrying value of the goodwill of that reporting unit. If the carrying value of the goodwill of a reporting unit exceeds the implied fair value of that goodwill, an impairment loss is recognized in an amount equal to the excess.

We review our long-lived assets (individually or in a related group as appropriate) for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of such assets may not be recoverable from future cash flows attributable to the assets. Additionally, we review our goodwill for impairment at least annually on April 30 of each year. Accordingly, we continually assess whether events or changes in circumstances represent a ‘triggering’ event that would require us to complete an impairment assessment. Factors that we consider in determining whether a triggering event has occurred include, among other things, whether there has been a significant adverse change in legal factors, business climate or competition related to the operation of the asset, whether there has been a significant decrease in actual or expected operating results related to the asset and whether there are current plans to sell or dispose of the asset. The determination of whether a triggering event has occurred is subject to significant management judgment, including at which point or fiscal quarter a triggering event has occurred when the relevant adverse factors persist over extended periods.

Should a triggering event be deemed to occur, and for each of the annual goodwill impairment assessments, management is required to estimate the expected net cash flows to be realized over the life of the asset and/or the asset’s fair value. Fair values are generally determined by a discounted cash flow model. These estimates are also subject to significant management judgment including the determination of many factors such as sales growth rates, gross margin patterns, cost growth rates, terminal value assumptions and discount rates. Changes in these estimates can have a significant impact on the determination of cash flows and fair value and could potentially result in future material impairments. Management engages an independent valuation firm to assist in certain of its impairment assessments.

See Note 3 and Note 6 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for discussion of certain goodwill, intangible and long-lived asset impairment charges.

As of July 31, 2015, the Company has seven continuing individual reporting units that carry goodwill. One reporting unit carries 39% of our consolidated goodwill of $312,622 and a second reporting unit carries another 34% of our consolidated goodwill. For these two reporting units, our estimate of their fair values exceeded their respective carrying values by 376% and 111%, respectively, as of our April 30, 2015 assessment.

Insurance Reserves

Generally, we are self-insured for workers’ compensation, products liability and group medical insurance. Under these plans, liabilities are recognized for claims incurred, including an estimate for those incurred but not reported. The liability for workers’ compensation claims is determined by the Company with the assistance of a third party administrator and actuary using various state statutes and historical claims experience. Group medical reserves are estimated using historical claims experience. We have a self-insured retention (“SIR”) for products liability and personal injury matters ranging from $500 to $7,500 depending on the product type and when the occurrence took place. Generally, any occurrence (as defined by our insurance policies) after March 31, 2015 is subject to the $500 SIR, while matters occurring after March 31, 2014 and through March 31, 2015 are subject to a $1,000 SIR. We have established a liability on our balance sheet for such occurrences based on historical data, known cases and actuarial information. Amounts above the SIR, up to a certain dollar amount, are covered by our excess insurance policy. Currently, we maintain excess liability insurance aggregating $50,000 with outside insurance carriers to minimize our risks related to catastrophic claims in excess of our self-insured positions for products liability and personal injury matters. Any material change in the aforementioned factors could have an adverse impact on our operating results.

 

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Product Warranty

We generally provide retail customers of our products with a one-year warranty covering defects in material or workmanship, with longer warranties on certain structural components. We record a liability based on our best estimate of the amounts necessary to settle future and existing claims on products sold as of the balance sheet date. Factors we use in estimating the warranty liability include a history of units sold, existing dealer inventory, average cost incurred and a profile of the distribution of warranty expenditures over the warranty period. A significant increase in dealer shop rates, the cost of parts or the frequency of claims could have a material adverse impact on our operating results for the period or periods in which such additional claims or costs materialize. Management believes that the warranty liability is adequate; however, actual claims incurred could differ from estimates, requiring adjustments to the reserves. Warranty liabilities are reviewed and adjusted as necessary on at least a quarterly basis.

Income Taxes

The objectives of accounting for income taxes are to recognize the amount of taxes payable or refundable for the current year and deferred tax liabilities and assets for the future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our financial statements or tax returns. Judgment is required in assessing the future tax consequences of events that have been recognized in our financial statements or tax returns. Fluctuations in the actual outcome of these tax consequences could materially impact our financial position or results of operations.

We recognize liabilities for uncertain tax positions based on a two-step process. The first step is to evaluate the tax position for recognition by determining if the weight of available evidence indicates that it is more likely than not that the position will be sustained on audit, including resolution of related appeals or litigation processes, if any. The second step requires us to estimate and measure the tax benefit as the largest amount that is more than 50% likely to be realized upon ultimate settlement. It is inherently difficult and subjective to estimate such amounts, as we have to determine the probability of various possible outcomes. We reevaluate these uncertain tax positions on a quarterly basis. This evaluation is based on factors including, but not limited to, changes in facts or circumstances, changes in tax law, effectively settled issues under audit, voluntary settlements and new audit activity. Such a change in recognition or measurement would result in the recognition of a tax benefit or an additional charge to the tax provision.

Significant judgment is required in determining our provision for income taxes, our deferred tax assets and liabilities and the valuation allowance recorded against our deferred tax assets, if any. Valuation allowances must be considered due to the uncertainty of realizing deferred tax assets. Companies must assess whether valuation allowances should be established against their deferred tax assets on a tax jurisdictional basis based on the consideration of all available evidence, using a more likely than not standard. We have evaluated the realizability of our deferred tax assets on our Consolidated Balance Sheets which includes the assessment of the cumulative income over recent prior periods.

Revenue Recognition

Revenues from the sale of recreational vehicles are recorded primarily when all of the following conditions have been met:

1) An order for a product has been received from a dealer;

2) Written or oral approval for payment has been received from the dealer’s flooring institution, if applicable;

3) A common carrier signs the delivery ticket accepting responsibility for the product as agent for the dealer; and

4) The product is removed from our property for delivery to the dealer who placed the order.

These conditions are generally met when title passes, which is when vehicles are shipped to dealers in accordance with shipping terms, which are primarily FOB shipping point. Most sales are made to dealers financing their purchases under flooring arrangements with banks or finance companies. Certain shipments are sold to customers on credit or cash on delivery (“COD”) terms. We recognize revenue on credit sales upon shipment and COD sales upon payment and delivery.

Products are not sold on consignment, dealers do not have the right to return products and dealers are typically responsible for interest costs to floor plan lenders.

Revenues from the sale of extruded aluminum components are recognized when title to products and the risk of loss are transferred to the customer, which is generally upon shipment. Intercompany sales are eliminated upon consolidation.

 

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Repurchase Commitments

We are contingently liable under terms of repurchase agreements with financial institutions providing inventory financing for certain dealers of certain of our RV products. These arrangements, which are customary in the RV industry, provide for the repurchase of products sold to dealers in the event of default by the dealer. In addition to the guarantee under these repurchase agreements, we may also be required to repurchase RV inventory relative to dealer terminations in certain states in accordance with state laws or regulatory requirements. The repurchase price is generally determined by the original sales price of the product and pre-defined curtailment arrangements and we typically resell the repurchased product at a discount from its repurchase price. We account for the guarantee under our repurchase agreements with our dealers’ financing institutions by estimating and deferring a portion of the related product sale that represents the estimated fair value of the repurchase obligation. The estimated fair value takes into account our estimate of the loss we will incur upon resale of any repurchases. This estimate is based on recent historical experience supplemented by management’s assessment of current economic and other conditions affecting our dealers. This deferred amount is included in our repurchase and guarantee reserve.

Our risk of loss under these repurchase agreements is reduced because (a) we sell our products to a large number of dealers under these arrangements, (b) the repurchase price we are obligated to pay declines over the period of the agreements (generally up to eighteen months) while the value of the related product may not decline ratably and (c) we have historically been able to readily resell any repurchased product. We believe that any future losses under these agreements will not have a significant effect on our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

Principal Contractual Obligations and Commercial Commitments

Our principal contractual obligations and commercial commitments at July 31, 2015 are summarized in the following charts. We have no other material off balance sheet commitments:

 

     Payments Due By Period  
Contractual Obligations        Total          Fiscal 2016        Fiscal 2017-2018       Fiscal 2019-2020       After 5 Years    

Capital leases (1)

   $ 12,121       $ 995       $ 1,965       $ 1,948       $ 7,213   

Operating leases (1)

     13,496         2,490         3,402         1,428         6,176   

Purchase obligations (2)

     87,363         65,756         21,607                   

Unrecognized income tax benefits (3)

     997         997                           
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Total contractual cash obligations

   $   113,977       $   70,238       $   26,974       $   3,376       $   13,389   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

(1)  See Note 14 to the Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

 

(2)  Represent commitments to purchase specified quantities of raw materials at market prices in our other non-reportable segment. The dollar values above have been estimated based on July 31, 2015 market prices.

 

(3)  We have included in unrecognized income tax benefits $997 for payments expected to be made in fiscal 2016. Unrecognized income tax benefits in the amount of $11,945 have been excluded from the table because we are unable to determine a reasonably reliable estimate of the timing of future payment.

 

     Total      Amount of Commitment Expiration Per Period  
Other Commercial Commitments    Amounts
Committed
     Less Than
One Year (1)
     1-3 Years      4-5 Years      Over 5 Years  

Standby repurchase obligations (1)

   $   1,363,576       $     729,037       $ 634,539       $                 –       $                 –   

 

(1)

The standby repurchase obligations generally extend up to eighteen months from the date of sales of the related product to the dealer. In estimating the expiration of the standby repurchase obligations, we used inventory reports as of July 31, 2015 from our dealers’ primary lending institutions and made an assumption for obligations for inventory aged 0-12 months that it was financed evenly over the twelve month period.

Accounting Pronouncements

Reference is made to Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements contained in this report for a summary of recently issued accounting pronouncements, which summary is hereby incorporated by reference.

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

None.

 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA — SEE ITEM 15

Quarterly Financial Data (Unaudited)

 

     Quarter Ended  
     October 31      January 31      April 30      July 31  

Fiscal 2015

           

Net sales

   $     921,992       $     852,416       $     1,174,255       $     1,058,156   

Gross profit from continuing operations

     117,665         102,000         166,601         171,279   

Net income from continuing operations

     39,201         30,267         63,552         68,989   

Net income

     38,925         28,648         62,845         68,967   

Earnings per common share from continuing operations: (1)

           

Basic

     0.73         0.57         1.19         1.31   

Diluted

     0.73         0.57         1.19         1.31   

Earnings per common share: (1)

           

Basic

     0.73         0.54         1.18         1.31   

Diluted

     0.73         0.54         1.17         1.31   

Dividends paid per common share

     0.27         0.27         0.27         0.27   

Market prices per common share

           

High

   $ 54.95       $ 59.00       $ 64.65       $ 63.14   

Low

   $ 49.03       $ 52.02       $ 56.39       $ 53.60   
     Quarter Ended  
     October 31      January 31 (2)      April 30      July 31  
Fiscal 2014            

Net sales

   $ 799,963       $ 635,330       $ 1,046,823       $ 1,043,340   

Gross profit from continuing operations

     105,183         70,327         142,080         152,806   

Net income from continuing operations

     36,394         17,218         55,125         66,779   

Net income

     41,108         16,192         55,122         66,580   

Earnings per common share from continuing operations: (1)

           

Basic

     0.68         0.32         1.03         1.25   

Diluted

     0.68         0.32         1.03         1.25   

Earnings per common share: (1)

           

Basic

     0.77         0.30         1.03         1.25   

Diluted

     0.77         0.30         1.03         1.25   

Dividends paid per common share

     0.23         1.23         0.23         0.23   

Market prices per common share

           

High

   $ 59.94       $ 57.51       $ 64.71       $ 61.82   

Low

   $ 49.28       $ 50.92       $ 48.24       $ 52.24   

 

  (1)

Earnings per common share are computed independently for each of the quarters presented. The summation of the quarterly amounts will not necessarily equal the total earnings per common share reported for the year due to changes in the weighted average shares outstanding during the year.

 

  (2)

Includes a special $1.00 per share dividend.

 

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ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

None.

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

Part A – Disclosure Controls and Procedures

The Company maintains “disclosure controls and procedures”, as such term is defined under Securities Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(e), that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in our Exchange Act reports is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms, and that such information is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosures. In designing and evaluating the disclosure controls and procedures, the Company’s management recognizes that any controls and procedures, no matter how well designed and operated, can provide only reasonable assurance of achieving the desired control objectives and the Company’s management necessarily is required to apply its judgment in evaluating the cost-benefit relationship of possible controls and procedures. The Company has carried out an evaluation, as of the end of the period covered by this report, under the supervision and with the participation of the Company’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of the design and operation of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures. Based on this evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer have concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the Company in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified by the SEC’s rules and forms and is accumulated and communicated to the Company’s management as appropriate to allow for timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

Part B – Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Exchange Act Rule 13a-15(f). Internal control over financial reporting refers to a process designed by, or under the supervision of, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer and effected by our Board of Directors, management and other personnel, to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and includes those policies and procedures that: (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that in reasonable detail accurately and fairly reflect our transactions and dispositions of our assets; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, and that our receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of our management and members of our Board of Directors and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of our assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements.

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting cannot provide absolute assurance of achieving financial reporting objectives. Internal control over financial reporting is a process that involves human diligence and compliance and is subject to lapses in judgment and breakdowns resulting from human failures. Internal control over financial reporting also can be circumvented by collusion or improper override. Because of such limitations, there is a risk that material misstatements may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis by internal control over financial reporting. Projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are also subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions or that the degree of compliance with established policies or procedures may deteriorate.

The Company’s management conducted an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2015 using the criteria set forth in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on its assessment, management believes that as of July 31, 2015, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting is effective based on those criteria. As permitted by SEC guidance, management excluded from its assessment the operations of Postle Operating, LLC, which was acquired on May 1, 2015 and which accounted for approximately 11% of consolidated total assets and 1% of consolidated net sales as of and for the year ended July 31, 2015.

Our independent registered public accounting firm, Deloitte & Touche LLP, has issued an attestation report on our internal control over financial reporting. The report appears in Part D of this Item 9A.

Part C – Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

During the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2015, there have been no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.

 

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Part D – Attestation Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Thor Industries, Inc.

Elkhart, Indiana

We have audited the internal control over financial reporting of Thor Industries, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of July 31, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. As described in Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting, management excluded from its assessment the internal control over financial reporting at Postle Operating, LLC which was acquired on May 1, 2015 and whose financial statements constitute approximately 11% of consolidated total assets and 1% of consolidated net sales as of and for the year ended July 31, 2015. Accordingly, our audit did not include the internal control over financial reporting at Postle Operating, LLC. The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed by, or under the supervision of, the company’s principal executive and principal financial officers, or persons performing similar functions, and effected by the company’s board of directors, management, and other personnel to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

Because of the inherent limitations of internal control over financial reporting, including the possibility of collusion or improper management override of controls, material misstatements due to error or fraud may not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Also, projections of any evaluation of the effectiveness of the internal control over financial reporting to future periods are subject to the risk that the controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

In our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2015, based on the criteria established in Internal Control — Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission.

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated financial statements of the Company as of and for the year ended July 31, 2015 and our report dated September 21, 2015 expressed an unqualified opinion on those financial statements.

/s/ Deloitte & Touche LLP

Chicago, Illinois

September 21, 2015

ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

None.

 

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PART III

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

The Company has adopted a written code of ethics, the “Thor Industries, Inc. Business Ethics Policy”, which is applicable to all directors, officers and employees of the Company, including the Company’s principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller and other executive officers identified pursuant to this Item 10 who perform similar functions (collectively, the “Selected Officers”). In accordance with the rules and regulations of the SEC, a copy of the code has been posted on the Company’s website and is also available in print to any person, without charge, upon request. The Company intends to disclose any changes in or waivers from its code of ethics applicable to any Selected Officer on its website at www.thorindustries.com or by filing a Form 8-K.

The other information in response to this Item is included under the captions OUR BOARD OF DIRECTORS; EXECUTIVE OFFICERS WHO ARE NOT DIRECTORS; BOARD OF DIRECTORS: STRUCTURE, COMMITTEES AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE and SECTION 16(A) BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP REPORTING COMPLIANCE, in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A, which portions of said Proxy Statement are hereby incorporated by reference.

ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

The information required in response to this Item is contained under the captions EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION and DIRECTOR COMPENSATION in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A, which portions of said Proxy Statement are hereby incorporated by reference.

Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation

No member of the Compensation and Development Committee of the Board of Directors is or was formerly an officer or employee of the Company or any of its subsidiaries. During fiscal 2015, no executive officer of the Company or any of its subsidiaries served on the Compensation and Development Committee (or equivalent), or the Board of Directors, of another entity whose executive officer(s) served on our Compensation and Development Committee or Board of Directors.

ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED SHAREHOLDER MATTERS

Equity Compensation Plan Information

The following table provides information as of July 31, 2015 about the Company’s Common Stock that is authorized for issuance under the Company’s equity compensation plans, including the Thor Industries, Inc. 2010 Equity and Incentive Plan (the “2010 Plan”), the Thor Industries, Inc. 2006 Equity Incentive Plan (the “2006 Plan”) and the Thor Industries, Inc. 1999 Stock Option Plan (the “1999 Plan”).

 

Plan Category    Number of securities to be
issued upon exercise of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
(a)
    Weighted-average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants and rights
(b)
   

Number of securities remaining
available for future issuance

under equity compensation plans
(excluding securities reflected

in column (a))
(c)

Equity compensation plans approved by security holders

     280,353  (1)    $ –  (2)            1,423,257 (3)

Equity compensation plans not approved by security holders

                                 –                                    –                                      – 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

Total

                     280,353       $          1,423,257 
  

 

 

   

 

 

   

 

 

(1)

Represents shares underlying restricted stock units granted pursuant to the 2010 Plan, the 2006 Plan and the 1999 Plan. The 1999 Plan was frozen in 2006 upon the adoption of the 2006 Plan.

 

(2)

The restricted stock units of 280,353 in column (a) do not have an exercise price.

 

(3)

Represents shares remaining available for future issuance pursuant to the 2010 Plan and the 2006 Plan.

The other information required in response to this Item is contained under the captions OWNERSHIP OF COMMON STOCK and SUMMARIES OF EQUITY COMPENSATION PLANS in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement, to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A, which portions of said Proxy Statement are hereby incorporated by reference.

 

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Table of Contents

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

The information required in response to this Item is contained under the captions CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND TRANSACTIONS WITH MANAGEMENT and BOARD OF DIRECTORS: STRUCTURE, COMMITTEES AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A, which portions of said Proxy Statement are hereby incorporated by reference.

ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

The information required in response to this Item is contained under the caption INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM FEES in the Company’s definitive Proxy Statement, to be filed with the Commission pursuant to Regulation 14A, which portion of said Proxy Statement is hereby incorporated by reference.

 

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Table of Contents

PART IV

ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

(a)  (1) Financial Statements

 

     Page     

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

   F-1   

Consolidated Balance Sheets, July 31, 2015 and 2014

   F-2   

Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income for the Years Ended July  31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

   F-3   

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Years Ended July 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

   F-4   

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended July 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

   F-5   

Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements as of and for the Years Ended July  31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

   F-6   

(a)  (2) Financial Statement Schedules

All financial statement schedules have been omitted since the required information is either not applicable or is included in the consolidated financial statements and notes thereto included in this Form 10-K.

(b) Exhibits

 

Exhibit    

    

Description

3.1

    

Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(a) of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2001)

    

3.2

    

Certificate of Amendment to Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.2 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2004)

    

3.3

    

By-laws (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(b) of the Company’s Registration Statement No. 33-13827)

    

3.4

    

First Amendment to the By-laws of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3(ii) of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated March 11, 2010)

    

4.1

    

Form of Common Stock Certificate (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4(a) of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 1987)

    

10.1

    

Thor Industries, Inc. 1999 Stock Option Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 dated November 5, 1999)

    

10.2

    

Thor Industries, Inc. Restricted Stock Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 4.1 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 dated December 3, 1997)

    

10.3

    

Thor Industries, Inc. 2006 Equity Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended July 31, 2007)

    

10.4

    

Thor Industries, Inc. Amended and Restated Deferred Compensation Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 15, 2008)

    

10.5

    

Thor Industries, Inc. 2008 Annual Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 15, 2008)

    

10.6

    

Thor Industries, Inc. Form of Indemnification Agreement for executive officers and directors of the Company (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended January 31, 2011)

    

10.7

    

Thor Industries, Inc. Form of Stock Option Agreement for grants under the Thor Industries, Inc. 2006 Equity Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 6, 2008)

    

10.8

    

Thor Industries, Inc. Form of Restricted Stock Award Certificate and Restricted Stock Award Agreement – for grants to directors for grants under the Thor Industries, Inc. 2006 Equity Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 6, 2008)

    

10.9

    

Thor Industries, Inc. Form of Restricted Stock Award Certificate and Restricted Stock Award Agreement – for grants to employees and consultants for grants under the Thor Industries, Inc. 2006 Equity Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated May 6, 2008)

    

10.10

    

Credit Agreement between the Company and Stephen Adams, in his individual capacity, and Stephen Adams and his successors, as trustee under the Stephen Adams Living Trust, dated January 15, 2009 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 22, 2009)

    

10.11

    

Credit Agreement between the Company and Stephen Adams, in his individual capacity, and Stephen Adams and his successors, as trustee under the Stephen Adams Living Trust, dated January 30, 2009 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated February 3, 2009)

    

 

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Table of Contents

10.12

    

Credit Agreement between the Company and Marcus Lemonis, Stephen Adams, in his individual capacity, and Stephen Adams and his successors, as trustee under the Stephen Adams Living Trust, dated as of December 22, 2009 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 22, 2009)

 

10.13

    

Amended and Restated Dealer Exclusivity Agreement, dated as of January 30, 2009, by and among Thor Industries, Inc., FreedomRoads Holding Company, LLC, and certain subsidiaries of FreedomRoads, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended April 30, 2011)

 

10.14

    

Amendment to Exclusivity Agreement between the Company, FreedomRoads Holding Company, LLC, FreedomRoads, LLC and certain subsidiaries of FreedomRoads, LLC, dated as of December 22, 2009 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 22, 2009)

 

10.15

    

First Amendment to Credit Agreement, dated January 15, 2009, between the Company and Stephen Adams, in his individual capacity, and Stephen Adams and his successors, as trustee under the Stephen Adams Living Trust, dated December 22, 2009 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 22, 2009)

 

10.16

    

First Amendment to Credit Agreement, dated January 30, 2009, between the Company and Stephen Adams, in his individual capacity, and Stephen Adams and his successors, as trustee under the Stephen Adams Living Trust, dated December 22, 2009 (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 22, 2009)

 

10.17

    

Thor Industries, Inc. 2010 Equity and Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Appendix D to the Company’s Proxy Statement on Schedule 14A filed on November 2, 2010)

 

10.18

    

Form of Stock Option Agreement for grants under the Thor Industries, Inc. 2010 Equity and Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended April 30, 2011)

 

10.19

    

Registration Rights Agreement, dated as of September 16, 2010, by and among Thor Industries, Inc. and certain holders of shares of capital stock of Thor Industries, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated September 22, 2010)

 

10.20

    

Letter Agreement, dated July 8, 2011, by and among Thor Industries, Inc., Catterton Partners VI, L.P., Catterton Partners VI Offshore, L.P., CP6 Interest Holdings, LLC, and CPVI Coinvest, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated July 13, 2011)

 

10.21

    

Employment offer letter, dated January 26, 2012, from the Company to Bob Martin (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated January 31, 2012)

 

10.22

    

Stipulation of Settlement, executed on April 13, 2012 by the Company, in the case of In Re: FEMA Trailer Formaldehyde Product Liability Litigation, MDL No. 1873, before the United States District Court, Eastern District of Louisiana (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated April 13, 2012)

 

10.23

    

Form of Restricted Stock Award Certificate and Restricted Stock Award Agreement of Robert W. Martin (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated June 7, 2012)

 

10.24

    

Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement for Grants to Employees of the Company under the Thor Industries, Inc. 2010 Equity and Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated October 12, 2012)

 

10.25

    

Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement for Grants to Non-Employee Directors of the Company under the Thor Industries, Inc. 2010 Equity and Incentive Plan (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated October 12, 2012)

 

10.26

    

Agreement, dated December 12, 2012, between the Company and Marcus Lemonis, Stephen Adams, in his individual capacity, and Stephen Adams and his successor, as trustee under the Stephen Adams Living Trust (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated December 14, 2012)

 

10.27

    

Stock Purchase Agreement, dated July 31, 2013, between Thor Industries, Inc. and Allied Specialty Vehicles, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K dated August 1, 2013)

 

10.28

    

Stock Purchase Agreement, dated April 16, 2014, by and among Thor Industries, Inc. and Daryl E. Zook, Trista E. Nunemaker, Tonja Zook-Nicholas, The Daryl E. Zook GST Exempt Lifetime Trust or its assignee, and The Daryl E. Zook GST Non-Exempt Lifetime Trust or its assignee (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended April 30, 2014)

 

10.29

    

Stock Purchase Agreement, dated January 5, 2015, by and among Heartland Recreational Vehicles, LLC and David E. Fought, Jeffrey D. Fought, Paul R. Corman, Robert L. Tiedge, John J. Mohamed, E. Dale Fenton, Dan E. Van Liew, Sidnaw Corporation, Inc., and Laure R. Cunningham (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended January 31, 2015)

 

10.30

    

Membership Interest Purchase Agreement, dated May 1, 2015, by and among Thor Industries, Inc. and Postle Aluminum Company, LLC (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended April 30, 2015)

 

10.31

    

Repurchase Agreement, dated as of May 15, 2015, by and between Thor Industries, Inc. and The Thompson Family Foundation, Inc. (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarterly period ended April 30, 2015)

 

14.1

    

Thor Industries, Inc. Business Ethics Policy (incorporated by reference to Exhibit 14.1 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended July 31, 2010)

 

21.1

    

Subsidiaries of the Company*

 

 

42


Table of Contents

23.1

    

Consent of Deloitte & Touche LLP, dated September 21, 2015*

 

31.1

    

Certification of the Chief Executive Officer filed pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002*

 

31.2

    

Certification of the Chief Financial Officer filed pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002*

 

32.1

    

Certification of the Chief Executive Officer furnished pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002**

 

32.2

    

Certification of the Chief Financial Officer furnished pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002**

 

101.INS

    

XBRL Instance Document*

 

101.SCH

    

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document*

 

101.CAL

    

XBRL Taxonomy Calculation Linkbase Document*

 

101.PRE

    

XBRL Taxonomy Presentation Linkbase Document*

 

101.LAB

    

XBRL Taxonomy Label Linkbase Document*

 

101.DEF

    

XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document*

 

Attached as Exhibits 101 to this report are the following financial statements from the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended July 31, 2015 formatted in XBRL (“eXtensible Business Reporting Language”): (i) the Consolidated Balance Sheets, (ii) the Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income, (iii) Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity, (iv) the Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows and (v) related notes to these financial statements.

 

*

Filed herewith

**

Furnished herewith

 

43


Table of Contents

SIGNATURES

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the Registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on September 21, 2015 on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

 

THOR INDUSTRIES, INC.

  

(Signed)

     

/s/ Robert W. Martin

              
     

 

              
      Robert W. Martin               
     

Director, Chief Executive Officer and President

              
     

(Principal executive officer)

              

Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed on September 21, 2015 by the following persons on behalf of the Registrant and in the capacities indicated.

(Signed)

     

/s/ Robert W. Martin

     

(Signed)

     

/s/ Colleen Zuhl

  
     

Robert W. Martin

           

Colleen Zuhl

  
     

Director, Chief Executive Officer and President

           

Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

  
     

(Principal executive officer)

           

(Principal financial and accounting officer)

  

(Signed)

     

/s/ Peter B. Orthwein

     

(Signed)

     

/s/ James L. Ziemer

  
     

Peter B. Orthwein

           

James L. Ziemer

  
     

Executive Chairman of the Board

           

Director

  

(Signed)

     

/s/ Andrew E. Graves

     

(Signed)

     

/s/ Jan H. Suwinski

  
     

Andrew E. Graves

           

Jan H. Suwinski

  
     

Director

           

Director

  

(Signed)

     

/s/ J. Allen Kosowsky

     

(Signed)

     

/s/ Alan Siegel

  
     

J. Allen Kosowsky

           

Alan Siegel

  
     

Director

           

Director

  

(Signed)

     

/s/ Wilson R. Jones

              
     

Wilson R. Jones

              
     

Director

              

 

44


Table of Contents

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

To the Board of Directors and Stockholders of

Thor Industries, Inc.

Elkhart, Indiana

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Thor Industries, Inc. and subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of July 31, 2015 and 2014, and the related consolidated statements of income and comprehensive income, stockholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended July 31, 2015. These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits.

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

In our opinion, such consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Thor Industries, Inc. and subsidiaries at July 31, 2015 and 2014, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended July 31, 2015, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

We have also audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of July 31, 2015, based on the criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission and our report dated September 21, 2015 expressed an unqualified opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

/s/ Deloitte & Touche LLP

Chicago, Illinois

September 21, 2015

 

  F-1   
 

 

  


Table of Contents

Thor Industries, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Balance Sheets, July 31, 2015 and 2014

(amounts in thousands except share and per share data)

 

         2015             2014      

Assets

    

Current assets:

    

Cash and cash equivalents

   $ 183,478      $ 289,336   

Accounts receivable, trade, less allowance for doubtful accounts — $1,283 in 2015 and $348 in 2014

     244,052        264,927   

Accounts receivable, other

     25,642        14,866   

Inventories

     246,115        216,354   

Notes receivable

     8,367        1,429   

Prepaid expenses and other

     8,323        5,740   

Deferred income taxes, net

     59,864        51,397   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current assets

     775,841        844,049   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Property, plant and equipment, net

     234,045        169,862   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Other assets:

    

Goodwill

     312,622        256,579   

Amortizable intangible assets, net

     169,018        119,783   

Long-term notes receivable

            8,992   

Other

     11,722        9,453   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total other assets

     493,362        394,807   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Assets

   $ 1,503,248      $ 1,408,718   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

    

Current liabilities:

    

Accounts payable

   $ 162,587      $ 164,619   

Accrued liabilities:

    

Compensation and related items

     51,984        43,888   

Product warranties

     108,206        94,938   

Income and other taxes

     11,000        18,468   

Promotions and rebates

     19,817        17,474   

Product, property and related liabilities

     10,892        12,928   

Other

     13,849        18,400   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total current liabilities

     378,335        370,715   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Unrecognized tax benefits

     11,945        23,689   

Deferred income taxes, net

     20,563        19,388   

Other liabilities

     27,218        17,229   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total long-term liabilities

     59,726        60,306   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Contingent liabilities and commitments

    

Stockholders’ equity:

    

Preferred stock—authorized 1,000,000 shares; none outstanding

              

Common stock—par value of $.10 a share; authorized, 250,000,000 shares; issued 62,306,037 shares in 2015 and 62,210,429 shares in 2014

     6,231        6,221   

Additional paid-in capital

     215,539        208,501   

Retained earnings

     1,172,432        1,030,428   

Less treasury shares of 9,911,474 in 2015 and 8,880,877 in 2014, at cost

     (329,015     (267,453
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total stockholders’ equity

     1,065,187        977,697   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Equity

   $ 1,503,248      $ 1,408,718   
  

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

See Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

  F-2   
 

 

  


Table of Contents

Thor Industries, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Income and Comprehensive Income for the Years Ended July 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

(amounts in thousands, except per share data)

 

                 2015                     2014                      2013      

Net sales

   $ 4,006,819      $ 3,525,456       $ 3,241,795   

Cost of products sold

     3,449,274        3,055,060         2,817,256   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Gross profit

     557,545        470,396         424,539   

Selling, general and administrative expenses

     250,891        208,712         194,650   

Impairment charges

            710         2,000   

Amortization of intangible assets

     16,015        12,920         10,460   

Interest income

     1,292        1,577         2,628   

Interest expense

     180        10         6   

Other income, net

     1,144        3,198         1,921   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Income from continuing operations before income taxes

     292,895        252,819         221,972   

Income taxes

     90,886        77,303         70,296   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income from continuing operations

     202,009        175,516         151,676   

Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of income taxes

     (2,624     3,486         1,186   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Net income

   $ 199,385      $ 179,002       $ 152,862   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Earnings per common share from continuing operations:

       

Basic

   $ 3.80      $ 3.29       $ 2.86   

Diluted

   $ 3.79      $ 3.29       $ 2.86   

Earnings (loss) per common share from discontinued operations:

       

Basic

   $ (0.05   $ 0.07       $ 0.02   

Diluted

   $ (0.05   $ 0.06       $ 0.02   

Earnings per common share:

       

Basic

   $ 3.75      $ 3.36       $ 2.88   

Diluted

   $ 3.74      $ 3.35       $ 2.88   

Net income

   $ 199,385      $ 179,002       $ 152,862   

Unrealized appreciation on investments, net of tax effects of $0, $12 and $23

            22         38   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

Comprehensive income

   $ 199,385      $ 179,024       $ 152,900   
  

 

 

   

 

 

    

 

 

 

See Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

  F-3   
 

 

  


Table of Contents

Thor Industries, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Stockholders’ Equity for the Years Ended July 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

(amounts in thousands, except share and per share data)

 

                                

Additional

Paid-in

     Retained     

Accumulated

Other
Comprehensive

 
     Treasury Stock      Common Stock           
     Shares      Amount      Shares      Amount      Capital      Earnings      Income (Loss)  

Balance at July 31, 2012

     8,857,339       $ (266,104)         61,777,849       $ 6,178       $ 192,248       $ 918,565       $ (60)   

Net income

                                             152,862           

Stock option and restricted stock activity

     941         (43)         203,951         21         5,783                   

Special dividend - $1.50 per common share

                                             (79,525)           

Cash dividends - $0.72 per common share

                                             (38,162)           

Cashless exercises of stock options

                     63,464         6         (2,009)                   

Unrealized appreciation on investments, net of tax

                                                     38   

Stock compensation expense

                                     2,816                   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at July 31, 2013

     8,858,280         (266,147)         62,045,264         6,205         198,838         953,740         (22)   

Net income

                                             179,002           

Stock option and restricted stock activity

     1,831         (101)         101,313         10         3,674                   

Restricted stock unit activity

     20,766         (1,205)         63,852         6         758                   

Special dividend - $1.00 per common share

                                             (53,290)           

Cash dividends - $0.92 per common share

                                             (49,024)           

Unrealized appreciation on investments, net of tax

                                                     22   

Stock compensation expense

                                     5,231                   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at July 31, 2014

     8,880,877         (267,453)         62,210,429         6,221         208,501         1,030,428           

Net income

                                             199,385           

Shares purchased

     1,000,000         (60,000)                                           

Stock option and restricted stock activity

                     5,000         1         140                   

Restricted stock unit activity

     30,597         (1,562)         90,608         9         122                   

Cash dividends - $1.08 per common share

                                             (57,381)           

Stock compensation expense

                                     6,776                   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

Balance at July 31, 2015

     9,911,474       $   (329,015)         62,306,037       $     6,231       $   215,539       $   1,172,432       $  –   
  

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

    

 

 

 

See Notes to the Consolidated Financial Statements.

 

  F-4   
 

 

  


Table of Contents

Thor Industries, Inc. and Subsidiaries

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended July 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013

(amounts in thousands)

 

             2015                      2014                      2013          

Cash flows from operating activities:

        

Net income

   $ 199,385       $ 179,002       $ 152,862   

Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash provided by operating activities:

        

Depreciation

     15,366         12,850         13,950   

Amortization of intangibles

     16,015