10-K 1 mts154085_10k.htm FORM 10-K FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED OCTOBER 3, 2015

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(MTS LOGO) 

 

MTS Systems Corporation

 

Annual Report on Form 10-K

  

For the Fiscal Year Ended October 3, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
 

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UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION 

Washington, D.C. 20549 

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark One)

☒  ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the fiscal year ended October 3, 2015

or

☐  TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 For the Transition Period from _____________ to ______________

 

Commission File No. 0-2382

  

MTS SYSTEMS CORPORATION 

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter) 

   
Minnesota 41-0908057

(State or other jurisdiction

of incorporation)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
   

14000 Technology Drive

Eden Prairie, Minnesota 

55344
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)

  

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (952) 937-4000

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

  

Title of each class Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, $0.25 par value

The NASDAQ Stock Market LLC 

(NASDAQ Global Select Market)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined by Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No x

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes x No o

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

Large accelerated filer x     Accelerated filer  o     Non-accelerated filer o     Smaller reporting company o

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o No x

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of March 28, 2015 was approximately $1.1 billion based on the closing price of $74.30 as reported on the NASDAQ.

As of November 30, 2015, there were 14,835,161 shares of Common Stock outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of MTS System Corporation’s definitive Proxy Statement (to be filed pursuant to Regulations 14A within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year ended October 3, 2015) for its annual shareholders’ meeting to be held February 9, 2016 are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Form 10-K to the extent described in such Part.

 

 
 
 

 

MTS Systems Corporation

Annual Report on Form 10-K

For the Year Ended October 3, 2015

 

Table of Contents  
     
PART I
     
Item 1. Business 1
Item 1A. Risk Factors 7
Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 13
Item 2. Properties 14
Item 3. Legal Proceedings 16
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 16
     
PART II
     
Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 16
Item 6. Selected Financial Data 19
Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 21
Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 50
Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 52
Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 52
Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 52
Item 9B. Other Information 58
     
PART III
     
Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 58
Item 11. Executive Compensation 60
Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 60
Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 60
Item 14. Principal Accountant Fees and Services 60
     
PART IV
     
Item 15. Exhibits, Financial Statement Schedules 60
  Signatures 64

 

 
 

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PART I

 

ITEM 1.      BUSINESS

 

Business Overview 

 

MTS Systems Corporation (the Company or MTS) is a leading global supplier of high-performance test systems and position sensors that was incorporated under Minnesota law in 1966. Our operations are organized and managed in two reportable segments, Test and Sensors, based upon global similarities within their markets, products, operations and distribution. The Test and Sensors segments represented approximately 82% and 18% of our revenue, respectively, for the fiscal year ended October 3, 2015.

 

Terms

 

When we use the terms “we,” “us,” the “Company” or “our” in this report, unless the context otherwise requires, we are referring to MTS Systems Corporation.

  

Fiscal year 2015 refers to the fiscal year ended October 3, 2015; fiscal year 2014 refers to the fiscal year ended September 27, 2014; and fiscal year 2013 refers to the fiscal year ended September 28, 2013. Fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013 include 53, 52 and 52 weeks, respectively. All dollar amounts are in thousands (unless otherwise noted).

  

Products and Markets by Business Segment

 

Test Segment

Our Test segment (Test) provides testing solutions including hardware, software and services. The testing solutions are used by customers in the development of products to characterize the product’s mechanical properties. Our solutions simulate forces and motions that customers expect their products to encounter in use. Mechanical simulation testing in a lab setting is an accepted method to accelerate product development compared to reliance on full physical prototypes in real-world settings, proving ground testing and virtual testing because it provides more controlled simulation and accurate measurement. The need for mechanical simulation increases in proportion to the cost of a product, the range and complexity of the physical environment in which the product will be used, expected warranty or recall risk and expense, governmental regulation and potential legal liability. A significant portion of the products in Test are considered by our customers to be capital expenditures. We believe the timing of purchases may be impacted by interest rates, general economic conditions, product development cycles and new product initiatives.

  

A typical Test system includes a reaction frame to hold the prototype specimen, a hydraulic pump or electro-mechanical power source, piston actuators to create the force or motion and a computer controller with specialized software to coordinate the actuator movement and record and manipulate results. Lower force and less dynamic testing can usually be accomplished with electro-mechanical power sources, which are generally less expensive than hydraulic systems. In addition to these basic components, we sell a variety of accessories and spare parts. We also provide a number of service offerings, including installation, calibration, maintenance, training and consulting.

  

Test has a diverse set of customers by industry and geography. Regionally, the Americas, Europe and Asia represented 25%, 21% and 54% of orders for fiscal year 2015, respectively, based upon customer location.

 

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Products, service and customers are grouped into the following three global markets:

 

·Ground Vehicles (approximately 55% of Test orders for fiscal year 2015)

This market consists of automobile, truck, motorcycle, motorsports vehicles, construction equipment, agricultural equipment, rail, and off-road vehicle manufacturers and their suppliers. Our products are used to measure and simulate solutions to assess durability, vehicle dynamics and aerodynamics of vehicles, sub-systems and components. Our products include:

oRoad simulators for durability simulation;

oTire performance and rolling resistance measurement systems;

oMoving road-plane systems and balances for aerodynamic measurements in wind tunnels; and

oService to maintain the equipment and maximize the life of the product.

  

·Materials (approximately 30% of Test orders for fiscal year 2015)

This market covers diverse industries such as power generation, aerospace, vehicles and bio-medical. Our products and services support customers in the research and development of products through the physical characterization of material properties, such as ceramics, composites and steel. Bio-medical applications include systems to test durability and performance of implants, prostheses and other medical and dental materials and devices.

 

·Structures (approximately 15% of Test orders for fiscal year 2015)

This market serves the structural testing needs and service in the fields of aerospace, wind energy, oil and gas, and structural engineering, among others. The aerospace structural testing market consists of manufacturers of commercial, military, and private aircraft and their suppliers that use our products, systems and software to perform static and fatigue testing of aircraft and space vehicles. The wind energy market consists of wind turbine manufacturers and their component suppliers that use our products to reduce the cost and improve the reliability of blades, bearings and entire wind turbines. Systems for structural engineering include high force static and dynamic testing, as well as seismic simulation tables used around the world to test the design of structures, such as bridges and buildings, and to help governments establish building codes. Structural engineering customers include construction companies, government agencies, universities and the manufacturers of building materials.

 

Sensors Segment

Our Sensors segment (Sensors) products are used by industrial machinery and mobile equipment manufacturers to automate the operation of their products for improved safety and end-user productivity. Examples of customer industries include manufacturers of plastic injection molding machines, steel mills, fluid power, oil and gas, medical, wood product processing equipment, mobile equipment and energy. Our products are also used to measure fluid displacement, such as liquid levels for customers in the process industries.

 

Sensors manufactures products utilizing magnetostriction technology. We have developed a unique implementation of the technology known as Temposonics®. This technology offers high speed and precise non-contact position sensing and is ideal for use in harsh operating environments.

 

Sensors customers are also diverse by industry and geography. Regionally, the Americas, Europe and Asia represented 32%, 47% and 21% of orders for fiscal year 2015, respectively, based upon customer location.

   

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Products and customers are grouped into the following three global markets:

 

·Industrial Machinery (approximately 80% of Sensors orders for fiscal year 2015)

This market consists of a wide range of industrial machinery original equipment manufacturers (OEM’s) and their end use customers with applications in all areas of manufacturing, including plastics, steel, wood and other forms of factory automation. Temposonics sensors provide position feedback for motion control systems, improving productivity by enabling high levels of automation, as well as driving improved quality of manufactured parts. Temposonics technology is known for ruggedness in harsh manufacturing environments, which maximizes machine up-time and lowers overall manufacturing costs of our customers.

 

·Mobile Hydraulics (approximately 15% of Sensors orders for fiscal year 2015)

This market consists of mobile equipment OEM’s with applications in construction, agriculture, material handling, mining and other heavy vehicle markets. Our sensors provide feedback for motion control and implement positioning, enabling improved productivity while also enhancing safe operation of the machines. The overall ruggedness and reliability of our technology in high shock and vibration applications makes it especially suitable to the market.

 

·Liquid Level (approximately 5% of Sensors orders for fiscal year 2015)

This market encompasses a wide range of liquid level storage tank applications in oil and gas, chemical processing, food and beverage and pharmaceutical companies. Our technology provides precise measurements over long distances (tanks up to seventy feet long). Our sensors provide value by incorporating the measurement of the target liquid, a second measurement and temperature, all in a single package.

 

Financial and geographical information about our segments is included in Item 7 and Note 4 of the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

  

Sales and Service

 

Test Segment

Test products are sold worldwide through a direct field sales and service organization, independent representatives and distributors and to a much lesser extent, through other means (e.g. catalogs, internet, etc.) for standard products and accessories. Direct field sales and service personnel are compensated through salary and order incentive programs. Independent representatives and distributors are either compensated through commissions based upon orders or discounts off list prices.

 

In addition to direct field sales and service personnel throughout the United States and China, we have sales and service subsidiaries in Toronto, Canada; Berlin, Germany; Paris, France; Guildford, United Kingdom; Turin, Italy; Gothenburg and Gislaved, Sweden; Chinchon, Spain; Tokyo and Nagoya, Japan; Seoul, South Korea; Moscow, Russia and Shanghai and Shenzhen, China.

 

In fiscal year 2015, Test product orders ranged in value from less than $1 to approximately $21,000 on a United States dollar-equivalent basis. The average order size was approximately $77. We also market services to customers on a per-call and contract basis, accounting for virtually all of our service revenue in the Consolidated Statements of Income for the fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013. Service orders in fiscal year 2015 ranged from less than $1 to over $1,275 on a United States dollar-equivalent basis.

 

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The timing and volume of large orders valued at $5,000 or greater on a United States dollar-equivalent basis may produce volatility in orders, backlog and quarterly operating results. Most customer orders are based on fixed-price quotations and typically have an average sales cycle of three to nine months due to the technical nature of the test systems and customer capital expenditure approval processes. The sales cycle for larger, more complex test systems may be two years or longer.

 

Sensors Segment 

Sensors products are sold worldwide through a direct sales organization as well as through independent distributors. The direct sales organization is compensated through salary and commissions based upon revenue. The independent distributors pay us a wholesale price and re-sell the product to their customers. Our products are sold at unit prices ranging from a few dollars to $15, with an average sales price of approximately $600 (in actual dollars) on a United States dollar-equivalent basis. While the average sales cycle for Sensors is approximately one week to one month for existing customers purchasing standard products, the sales cycle for a new account can range from three months to two years depending on customer testing and specification requirements.

  

Manufacturing and Engineering

 

Test Segment

Test systems are largely built to order and primarily engineered and assembled at our headquarters in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. We also operate manufacturing facilities in Shenzhen and Shanghai, China, which manufacture test systems serving the materials market, and our facility in Lexington, North Carolina manufactures test systems serving the ground vehicles market. We perform some smaller system assembly at our locations in Berlin, Germany and Seoul, South Korea. Installation of systems, training, service and consulting services are primarily delivered at customer sites. The engineering and assembly cycle for a typical Test system ranges from one to twelve months, depending on the complexity of the system and the availability of components. The engineering and assembly cycle for larger, more complex systems may be up to three years.

  

Sensors Segment

Sensors are primarily built to order, engineered and assembled regionally at facilities located in Cary, North Carolina; Lüdenscheid, Germany; and Machida, Japan. Assembly cycles generally vary from several days to several weeks, depending on the degree of product customization, the size of the order and manufacturing capacity.

 

Sources and Availability of Raw Materials and Components

 

A significant portion of Test systems and Sensors products consist of materials and component parts purchased from independent vendors. We are dependent, in certain situations, on a limited number of vendors to provide raw materials and components, such as mechanical and electronic components. However, we have not experienced any recent issues in procuring materials, parts or components needed in our engineering or production processes.

  

As Test generally sells products and services based on fixed-price contracts, fluctuations in the cost of materials and components between the date of the order and the delivery date may impact the expected profitability. The material and component cost variability is considered in the estimation and customer negotiation process. We believe fluctuations in the cost of raw materials and components did not have a significant impact on our operating results for fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013.

 

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Patents and Trademarks

 

We rely on a combination of patents, copyrights, trademarks and proprietary trade secrets to protect our proprietary technology, some of which are material to our segments. We have obtained numerous patents and trademarks worldwide and actively file and renew patents and trademarks on a global basis to establish and protect our proprietary technology. We are also party to exclusive and non-exclusive license and confidentiality agreements relating to our own and third-party technologies. We aggressively protect certain of our processes, products and strategies as proprietary trade secrets. Our efforts to protect intellectual property and avoid disputes over proprietary rights include ongoing review of third-party patents and patent applications.

  

Seasonality

 

There is no significant seasonality in Test or Sensors.

  

Working Capital

 

Neither Test nor Sensors segments have significant finished product inventory, but each maintains inventories of materials and components to facilitate on-time product delivery. Test may have varying levels of work-in-process projects that are classified as inventory or unbilled receivables, depending upon the manufacturing cycle, timing of orders, project revenue recognition and shipments to customers.

  

In Test, payments are often received from customers upon order or at milestones during the fulfillment of the order, depending upon the size and customization of the system. These are recorded as advance payments from customers on our Consolidated Balance Sheets and reduced as revenue is recognized. Conversely, if revenue is recognized on a project prior to customer billing, an unbilled accounts receivable is recorded on our Consolidated Balance Sheets until the customer is billed. Upon billing, it is recorded as accounts receivable. Changes in the average size, payment terms and revenue recognition for orders in Test may have a significant impact on accounts receivable, unbilled accounts receivable, advance payments from customers and inventory. It has not been our practice to provide rights of return for our products. Payment terms vary and are subject to negotiation.

 

Customers

 

We do not have a significant concentration of sales with any individual customer within Test or Sensors. Therefore, the loss of any one customer would not have a material impact on our results.

  

Order Backlog

 

Most of our products are built to order. Our backlog of orders, defined as firm orders from customers that remain unfulfilled, totaled approximately $353,013, $326,473 and $290,151 at October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013, respectively. The majority of this backlog is related to Test. Based on anticipated manufacturing schedules, we estimate that approximately $267,000 of the backlog at October 3, 2015 will be converted to revenue during fiscal year 2016. Delays may occur in the conversion of backlog into revenue as a result of export licensing compliance, technical difficulties, specification changes, manufacturing capacity, supplier issues or access to the customer site for installation. While the backlog is subject to order cancellations, we have not historically experienced a significant number of order cancellations. Refer to Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for further discussion of order cancellations.

 

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Government Contracts

 

Revenue from U.S. Government contracts varies by year. A portion of our government business is subject to renegotiation of profits or termination of contracts or subcontracts at the election of the U.S. Government. In addition to contract terms, we must comply with procurement laws and regulations relating to the formation, administration and performance of U.S. Government contracts. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations could lead to the termination of contracts at the election of the U.S. Government or the suspension or debarment from U.S. Government contracting or subcontracting. U.S. Government revenue as a percentage of our total revenue was approximately 3%, 5% and 5% for fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

Competition

 

Test Segment

For relatively simple and inexpensive mechanical testing applications, customers may satisfy their needs internally by building their own test systems or using competitors who compete on price, performance, quality and service. For larger and more complex mechanical test systems, we compete directly with several companies throughout the world based upon customer value including application knowledge, engineering capabilities, technical features, price, quality and service.

 

Sensors Segment

We primarily compete on factors that include technical performance, price and service in new applications or in situations in which other position sensing technologies have been used. Sensors’ competitors are typically either larger companies that carry multiple sensor product lines or smaller, privately held companies throughout the world.

 

Research and Development

 

We invest in significant product, system, and software application development. Occasionally, we also contract with our customers to advance the state of technology and increase product functionality. Costs associated with research and development (R&D) are expensed as incurred, totaling $23,705, $23,844 and $22,812 for fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. During fiscal year 2015 and 2014, we allocated certain resources to capitalized software development activities. Total internal software development costs capitalized during fiscal years 2015 and 2014 were $1,966 and $494, respectively.

 

Environmental Compliance

 

We believe our operations are in compliance with all applicable material environmental regulations within the jurisdictions in which we operate. Capital expenditures for environmental compliance were not material in fiscal year 2015, and we do not expect such expenditures will be material in fiscal year 2016.

  

Employees

 

We had 2,400 employees as of October 3, 2015, including 1,240 employees located outside the United States.

 

Available Information

 

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) maintains a website that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers, including the Company, that file electronically with the SEC. The public can obtain any documents that we file with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov. We file annual reports, quarterly reports, proxy statements and other documents with the SEC under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Exchange Act). The public may read and copy any materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330.

 

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We also make available free of charge on or through the “Investor Relations” pages of our corporate website (www.mts.com) our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and, if applicable, amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnishes it to, the SEC. Our Code of Conduct (the “Code”), any waivers from and amendments to the Code and our Corporate Governance Guidelines, Articles of Incorporation and Bylaws, as well as the Charters for the Audit, Compensation and Governance and Nominating Committees of our Board of Directors are also available free of charge on the “Investor Relations” pages of our corporate website (www.mts.com).

 

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

 

Our business involves risks. The following summarizes what we believe to be the most important risks facing us that could adversely impact our business, financial condition or operating results. The information about these risks should be considered carefully together with the other information contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Additional risks not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial may also adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations in future periods.

  

Market Risks

 

Our business is significantly international in scope.

We have manufacturing facilities in North America, Europe and Asia. Sales outside of the United States, including export sales from U.S. business locations, accounted for approximately 75% of our revenue in fiscal year 2015. Accordingly, our business is subject to the political, economic and other risks that are inherent in operating in foreign countries. These risks include, but are not limited to:

·exposure to the risk of currency value fluctuations, where payment for products is denominated in a currency other than U.S. dollars;

·variability in the U.S. dollar value of foreign currency-denominated assets, earnings and cash flows;

·difficulty enforcing agreements, including patent and trademarks, and collecting receivables through foreign legal systems;

·trade protection measures and import or export licensing requirements;

·tax rates in certain foreign countries that exceed those in the U.S. and the imposition of withholding requirements on foreign earnings;

·higher danger of terrorist activity, war or civil unrest, compared to domestic operations;

·imposition of tariffs, exchange controls or other restrictions;

·difficulty in staffing and managing global operations;

·required compliance with a variety of foreign laws and regulations and U.S. laws and regulations, such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act applicable to our international operations and significant compliance costs and penalties for failure to comply with any of these laws and regulations; and

·changes in general economic and political conditions in countries where we operate, particularly in emerging markets.

 

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Volatility in the global economy could adversely affect results.

Long-term disruptions in the capital and credit markets would likely adversely affect our customers’ operations and financing of both our international and U.S. customers and could therefore result in a decrease in orders. In addition, during periods of economic uncertainty, our customers’ spending patterns and financing availability could be negatively impacted, reducing demand for our products and services.

 

Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates could affect our financial results.

Although our financial results are reported in U.S. dollars, a large portion of our sales and operating costs are realized in Euros, the Japanese Yen, the Chinese Yuan and other foreign currencies. Our profitability is affected by movements of the U.S. dollar against these currencies in which we generate revenues and incur expenses. To the extent that we are unable to match revenues received in foreign currencies with costs paid in the same currency, exchange rate fluctuations in any such currency could have an adverse effect on financial results. During times of a strengthening U.S. dollar, our reported sales and earnings from our international operations will be lower because the applicable local currency will translate into fewer U.S. dollars. Significant long-term fluctuations in relative currency values, in particular a significant change in the relative values of the U.S. dollar, Euro or Japanese Yen, could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition given that approximately 75% of our revenue has historically been derived from customers outside of the United States. As further described below, our fiscal year 2015 results were negatively impacted by currency translation.

  

Our business is subject to strong competition.

Our products are sold in competitive markets throughout the world. Competition is based on application knowledge, product features and design, brand recognition, reliability, technology, breadth of product offerings, price, delivery, customer relationships and after-market support. If we are not perceived as competitive in overall value as measured by these criteria, our customers would likely choose solutions offered by our competitors or developed internally.

 

Our business is subject to customer demand cycles.

For many of our products, orders are subject to customers’ procurement cycles and their willingness and ability to invest in capital, especially in the cyclical automotive, aircraft and machine tool industries. Any event that adversely impacts those customers’ new product development activities may reduce their demand for our products.

 

We may experience difficulty obtaining materials or components for our products, or the cost of materials or components may increase.

We purchase materials and components from third-party suppliers, some of whom may be competitors. Other materials and components may be provided by a limited number of suppliers or by sole sources and could only be replaced with difficulty or at significant added cost. Additionally, some materials or components may become scarce or difficult to obtain in the market or they may increase in price. This could adversely affect the lead-time within which we receive the materials or components, and in turn affect our commitments to our customers, or could adversely affect the material cost or quality.

 

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Interest rate fluctuations could adversely affect results.

Significant changes in interest rates may affect our business in several ways, depending on our financial position and short-term financing needs. We may, at times, use debt to purchase shares of our common stock, finance working capital needs or finance the growth of the business through acquisitions. Fluctuations in interest rates can increase borrowing costs. We have not elected to mitigate this risk since our borrowings are typically outstanding for a short period of time. Increases in short-term interest rates may directly impact the amount of interest we are required to pay and reduce earnings accordingly. Conversely, lower interest rates will adversely impact the interest we earn on cash and short-term investments.

 

Operational Risks

 

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. If our remedial measures are insufficient to address the material weaknesses, or if additional material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting are discovered or occur in the future, our consolidated financial statements may contain material misstatements, which could adversely affect our stock price and could negatively impact our results of operations.

As of October 3, 2015, we concluded that there were material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. The material weaknesses related to our risk assessment, information and communications and monitoring processes with respect to revenue, identification of deliverables contained in multiple element revenue arrangements and timely closure of revenue projects and release of residual accrued costs have been identified and included in management’s assessment. See Item 9A in Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for further details.

 

While we are committed to remediating the control deficiencies that gave rise to the material weaknesses, there can be no assurances that our remediation efforts will be successful or that we will be able to prevent future control deficiencies (including material weaknesses) from happening that could cause us to incur unforeseen costs, negatively impact our results of operations, cause our consolidated financial results to contain material misstatements, cause the market price of our common stock to decline, damage our reputation or have other potential material adverse consequences.

 

The changes we are making in Test processes and operating systems may not deliver the results we require for growth of the business.

We continue to invest in our Test operating model and modify our business processes and systems. We have restructured the business to make it a more scalable business model. Successful implementation of these initiatives is critical to our growth.

 

Our business operations may be affected by government contracting risks.

Government business is important to us. Revenue from U.S. Government contracts varies by year. Such revenue as a percent of our total revenue was approximately 3%, 5% and 5% for fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.

 

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We must comply with procurement laws and regulations relating to the formation, administration and performance of U.S. Government contracts. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations could lead to suspension or debarment from U.S. Government contracting or subcontracting and result in administrative, civil or criminal penalties. Failure to comply could also have a material adverse effect on our reputation, our ability to secure future U.S. Government contracts and export control licenses and our results of operations and financial condition. These laws and regulations also create compliance risks and affect how we do business with federal agency clients. U.S. Government contracts, as well as contracts with certain foreign governments with which we do business, are also subject to modification or termination by the government, either for the convenience of the government or for default as a result of our failure to perform under the applicable contract. Further, any investigation relating to, or suspension or debarment from, U.S. Government contracting could have a material impact on our results of operations as, during the duration of any suspension or debarment, we would be prohibited or otherwise limited in our ability to enter into prime contracts or subcontracts with U.S. Government agencies, certain entities that receive U.S. Government funds or that are otherwise subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR), and certain state government or commercial customers who decline to contract with suspended or debarred entities. A federal suspension could also impact our ability to obtain export control licenses, which have material importance to our business.

 

We are subject to risks because we design and manufacture first-of-a-kind products.

We design and build systems that are unique and innovative and, in some cases, the first created to address complex and unresolved issues. The design, manufacture and support of these systems may involve higher than planned costs. If we are unable to meet our customers’ expectations, our reputation and ability to utilize our expertise will likely be damaged.

 

The backlog, sales, delivery and acceptance cycle for many of our products is irregular and may not develop as anticipated.

Many of our products have long sales, delivery and acceptance cycles. In addition, our backlog is subject to order cancellations and our sales arrangements typically do not include specific cancellation provisions. If an order is cancelled, we typically would only be entitled to receive reimbursement from the customer for actual costs incurred under the arrangement plus a reasonable margin. Events may cause recognition of orders, backlog and results of operations to be aberrant over shorter periods of time. These factors include the timing of individual large orders which may be impacted by interest rates, customer capital spending and product development cycles, design and manufacturing problems, capacity constraints, delays in product readiness, damage or delays in transit, problems in achieving technical performance requirements and various customer-initiated delays. Any such delay may cause fluctuation in our reported periodic financial results.

 

The business could be adversely affected by product liability and commercial litigation.

Our products or services may be claimed to cause or contribute to personal injury or property damage to our customers’ facilities. Additionally, we are, at times, involved in commercial disputes with third parties, such as customers, vendors and others. The ensuing claims may arise singularly, in groups of related claims or in class actions involving multiple claimants. Such claims and litigation are frequently expensive and time-consuming to resolve, may result in substantial liability to us, which liability and related costs and expenses may not be recoverable through insurance or other forms of reimbursement.

 

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We may experience difficulties obtaining and retaining the services of skilled employees.

We rely on knowledgeable, experienced and skilled technical personnel, particularly engineers, sales management and service personnel, to design, assemble, sell and service our products. We may be unable to attract, retain and motivate a sufficient number of such people, which could adversely affect our business. The inability to transfer knowledge and transition between roles within these teams could also adversely affect our business.

 

We may fail to protect our intellectual property effectively or may infringe upon the intellectual property of others.

We have developed significant proprietary technology and other rights that are used in our businesses. We rely on trade secret, copyright, trademark and patent laws and contractual provisions to protect our intellectual property. While we take enforcement of these rights seriously, other companies such as competitors or others in markets in which we do not participate, may attempt to copy or use our intellectual property for their own benefit.

 

In addition, the intellectual property of others also has an impact on our ability to offer some of our products and services for specific uses or at competitive prices. Competitors’ patents or other intellectual property may limit our ability to offer products and services to our customers. Any infringement on the intellectual property rights of others could result in litigation and adversely affect our ability to continue to provide, or could increase the cost of providing, products and services.

 

Intellectual property litigation is very costly and could result in substantial expense and diversions of our resources, both of which could adversely affect our businesses, financial condition and results. In addition, there may be no effective legal recourse against infringement of our intellectual property by third parties, whether due to limitations on enforcement of rights in foreign jurisdictions or as a result of other factors.

 

If we are unable to protect our information systems against misappropriation of data or breaches of security, our business operations and financial results could be adversely impacted.

Information security risks have generally increased in recent years because of the proliferation of new technologies and the increased sophistication and activities of cyber attacks. Although we strive to have appropriate security controls in place, prevention of security breaches cannot be assured, particularly as cyber threats continue to evolve. We may be required to expend additional resources to continue to enhance our security measures or to investigate and remediate any security vulnerabilities. The consequences of these risks could adversely impact our business operations and financial results.

 

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Government regulation imposes costs and other constraints.

Our manufacturing operations and past and present ownership and operations of real property are subject to extensive and changing federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations, including laws and regulations pertaining to health and safety matters, as well as the handling or discharge of hazardous materials into the environment. We expect to continue to incur costs to comply with these laws, and may incur penalties for any failure to do so. We may also be identified as a responsible party and be subject to liability relating to any investigation and clean-up of properties used for industrial purposes or the generation or disposal of hazardous substances. Some of our export sales require approval from the U.S. government. Changes in political relations between the U.S. and foreign countries and/or specific potential customers for which export licenses may be required, may cause a license application to be delayed or denied, or a previously issued license withdrawn, rendering us unable to complete a sale, or vulnerable to competitors who do not operate under such restrictions. Capital expenditures for environmental compliance were not material in fiscal year 2015, and we do not expect such expenditures will be material in fiscal year 2016 but the factors described above may cause our estimates to differ from our expectations.

 

We have been required to conduct a good faith reasonable country of origin analysis on our use of “conflict minerals,” which has imposed and may impose additional costs on us and could raise reputational and other risks.

The SEC has promulgated final rules in connection with the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act regarding disclosure of the use of certain minerals, known as conflict minerals, mined from the Democratic Republic of the Congo and adjoining countries. While there is pending litigation challenging these rules, we have incurred and will continue to incur costs associated with complying with these disclosure requirements, including costs to determine the source of any conflict minerals used in our products. We have adopted a policy relating to conflict minerals, incorporating the standards set forth in the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Due Diligence Guidance, which affect the sourcing, supply, and pricing of materials used in our products. As we continue our due diligence, we may face reputational challenges if we are unable to verify the origins for all metals used in our products through the procedures we have and may continue to implement. We may also encounter challenges in our efforts to satisfy customers that may require all of the components of products purchased to be certified as conflict free. If we are not able to meet customer requirements, customers may choose to disqualify us as a supplier.

 

We may not achieve our growth plans for the expansion of the business.

In addition to market penetration, our long-term success depends on our ability to expand our business through (a) new product development and service offerings; (b) mergers and acquisitions; and/or (c) geographic expansion.

 

New product development and service offerings require that we maintain our ability to improve existing products, continue to bring innovative products and services to market in a timely fashion and adapt products and services to the needs and standards of current and potential customers. Our products and services may become less competitive or eclipsed by technologies to which we do not have access or which render our solutions obsolete.

 

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Mergers and acquisitions will be accompanied by risks that may include:

 

·suitable candidates may not exist or may not be available at acceptable costs;

·failure to achieve the financial and strategic goals for the acquired and combined businesses;

·difficulty integrating the operations and personnel of the acquired businesses;

·disruption of ongoing business and distraction of management from the ongoing business;

·dilution of existing stockholders and earnings per share;

·unanticipated, undisclosed or inaccurately assessed liabilities, legal risks and costs; and

·difficulties retaining the key vendors, customers or employees of the acquired business.

 

Acquisitions of businesses having a significant presence outside the U.S. will increase our exposure to the risks of international operations discussed in the operational risk factors.

 

Geographic expansion may be outside of the U.S., and hence will be disproportionately subject to the risks of international operations discussed in the operational risk factors.

 

We may be required to recognize impairment charges for long-lived assets.

As of October 3, 2015, the net carrying value of long-lived assets (property and equipment, goodwill and other intangible assets) totaled approximately $127,837. We periodically assess the value of these assets for impairment in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. Significant negative industry or economic trends, disruptions to our businesses, significant unexpected or planned changes in use of the assets, divestitures and market capitalization declines may result in impairments to goodwill and other long-lived assets. No impairment was identified in fiscal year 2015. Future impairment charges could significantly affect results of operations in the periods for which any such impairment charges are recognized.

   
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

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ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

Shown below is a breakdown of the approximate square footage of our primary owned and leased facilities as of October 3, 2015. We consider our current facilities adequate to support our operations during fiscal year 2016.

 

Owned Property

             
Location   Use of Facility     Approximate
Square Footage
 
Eden Prairie, Minnesota (USA)   Corporate headquarters and primary Test manufacturing and research     420,000  
Cary, North Carolina (USA)   Sensors manufacturing, research and North American sales and service administration     65,000  
Berlin, Germany   Test manufacturing and European sales and service administration     72,000  
Shenzhen, China   Test manufacturing, research and sales and service administration     75,000  
Shanghai, China   Test manufacturing and sales and service administration     129,000  
Total         761,000  

 

 

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Leased Property

             
Location   Use of Facility   Lease
Expires
  Approximate
Square Footage
Lexington, North Carolina (USA)   Test manufacturing   2019   12,000
Ludenscheid, Germany   Sensors manufacturing, research and European   2017   55,000
    Sensors sales and service administration   2016   10,000
    Sensors manufacturing   2016   10,000
Creteil, France   Test sales and service administration   2018   16,000
Guildford, UK   Test sales, service and manufacturing   2025   8,000
Tokyo, Japan   Test sales and service administration   2018   7,000
    Sensors manufacturing and Asia sales and service administration   2025   5,000
Swatz Creek, Michigan (USA)   Test manufacturing and research   2017   8,000
Sungnam, South Korea   Test sales, service administration and assembly   2019   8,000
Cary, North Carolina (USA)   Sensors manufacturing   2020   8,000
Beijing, China   Test sales, service   2017   6,000
Shanghai, China   Test sales, service administration and assembly   2018   13,000
    Test sales and service   2016   7,000
Shenzhen, China   Test manufacturing and warehouse   2016   13,000
    Test manufacturing and warehouse   2016   16,000
Berlin, Germany   Test land under Berlin facility   2052   97,000
Shenzhen, China   Test land under Shenzhen facility   2047   155,000
Shanghai, China   Test land under Shanghai facility   2056   161,000
Other Locations1   Test and Sensors other sales and services       70,000
Total           685,000

 

1We also lease space in the United States, Europe and Asia for Test sales and service administration, including locations in Germany, Sweden, Italy, Spain, Russia, China, Japan and various other locations in the United States. Neither the amount of leased space nor the rental obligations in these locations is significant individually or in aggregate.

 

Additional information relative to lease obligations is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, appearing under Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


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ITEM 3.      LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

  

Discussion of legal matters is incorporated by reference from Note 13, “Commitments and Contingencies,” included in Item 8, “Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements,” under Part II of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and should be considered an integral part of Part I, Item 3, “Legal Proceedings.”

  

ITEM 4.      MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

  

Not applicable.

  

PART II

  

ITEM  5.MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

  

Shares of our common stock are traded on the NASDAQ Global Select MarketSM under the trading symbol MTSC. The table below sets forth the quarterly high and low common stock prices for each quarter in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 as quoted on NASDAQ OnlineSM (www.nasdaq.net).

  

   Market Price
(per share data)  High  Low
Fiscal Year 2015      
First Quarter  $76.17   $62.20 
Second Quarter  $77.39   $67.86 
Third Quarter  $76.68   $63.94 
Fourth Quarter  $70.66   $54.35 
Fiscal Year 2014          
First Quarter  $72.62   $62.01 
Second Quarter  $78.90   $65.00 
Third Quarter  $71.20   $56.87 
Fourth Quarter  $72.97   $59.97 

 

The number of record holders of our common stock as at November 30, 2015 was 733. This number does not reflect shareholders who hold their shares in the name of broker-dealers or other nominees.

 

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Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

             
(in thousands, except shares)  Total Number
of Shares
Purchased
  Average
Price Paid
per Share
  Total Number
of Shares
Purchased as
Part of
Publicly
Announced
Plans or
Programs
  Maximum
Number of
Shares
that May Yet
be Purchased
Under the
Plans or
Programs
June 28, 2015 - August 1, 2015              -  $  -              -   731,162 
August 2, 2015 - August 29, 2015   -  $       -     -   731,162 
August 30, 2015 - October 3, 2015   -  $ -     -   731,162 

 

We purchase common stock to mitigate dilution related to new shares issued as employee equity compensation such as stock option, restricted stock, and employee stock purchase plan awards, as well as to return to shareholders capital not immediately required to fund ongoing operations.

 

Our Board of Directors approved, and on February 11, 2011 announced, a 2,000,000 share purchase authorization. Authority over pricing and timing under this authorization has been delegated to management. The share purchase authorization has no expiration date. At October 3, 2015, there were 731,162 shares available for purchase under the existing authorization.

  

Dividends  

Our dividend policy is to maintain a payout ratio that allows dividends to increase with the long-term growth of earnings per share, while sustaining dividends through economic cycles. Our dividend practice is to target, over time, a payout ratio of approximately 25% of net earnings per share. We have historically paid dividends to holders of our common stock on a quarterly basis. The declaration and payment of future dividends will depend on many factors, including, but not limited to, our earnings, financial condition, business developments needs and regulatory consideration and are at the discretion of our Board of Directors. During fiscal years 2015 and 2014, we declared quarterly cash dividends of $0.30 per share to holders of our common stock, which resulted in a payout ratio of approximately 40% and 44% of net earnings per share, respectively. Cash outlay for dividends paid was higher in fiscal year 2015 compared to fiscal year 2014 due to a fifth dividend payment occurring during the 53rd week of the fiscal year.

  

Debt Covenants

Our unsecured credit facility includes certain financial covenants, including the ratio of consolidated total indebtedness to consolidated EBITDA, as well as the ratio of consolidated EBITDA to consolidated interest expense. These financial covenants may restrict our ability to pay dividends and purchase outstanding shares of our common stock. At October 3, 2015 and September 27, 2014, we were in compliance with these financial covenants. Information on our debt agreements is included in Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

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Shareholder Performance Graph

The following graph compares the cumulative total shareholder return of our common stock over the last five fiscal years with the cumulative total shareholder return on the Russell 2000 Index and a peer group of companies in the Laboratory Apparatus and Analytical, Optical, Measuring, and Controlling Instruments Standard Industrial Code (SIC Code 3820) that are traded on the NASDAQ, NYSE and NYSE MKT exchanges. The graph assumes that $100 (in actual dollars) was invested at market close on October 2, 2010 in our common stock, the Russell 2000 Index and the SIC Code 3820 Peer Group and that all dividends were reinvested. The graph is not necessarily indicative of future investment performance.

 

 (LINE GRAPH)

  

  Fiscal Year 
(in actual dollars)  20101   20111   20121   2013   2014   2015 
MTS Systems Corporation  $100.00   $99.43   $177.94   $216.15   $237.57   $203.12 
Russell 2000 Index   100.00    96.02    126.66    164.79    173.93    175.48 
SIC Code 3820 Peer Group2   100.00    95.13    119.36    161.72    183.81    176.68 

 

1Fiscal year 2012 refers to the fiscal year ended September 29, 2012, fiscal year 2011 refers to the fiscal year ended October 1, 2011 and fiscal year 2010 refers to the fiscal year ended October 2, 2010.
  
2Modified to remove non-exchange traded companies.
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ITEM 6.      SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

 

The following selected financial data should be read in conjunction with Item 7 and Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. 

                               
  Fiscal Year1  
(in thousands, except per share data)   2015     2014     2013     2012     2011  
Operating Results                              
Revenue $ 563,934   $ 564,328   $ 569,439   $ 542,256   $ 467,368  
Gross profit   219,613     223,643     231,939     236,192     201,990  
Gross margin %   38.9 %   39.6 %   40.7 %   43.6 %   43.2 %
Research and development expense $  23,705   $  23,844   $  22,812    $  21,893   $  14,785  
Research and development expense as a % of revenue   4.2 %   4.2 %   4.0 %   4.0 %   3.2 %
Effective income tax rate   23.2 %   28.1 %   27.1 %   35.4 %   30.5 %
Net income $  45,462   $  42,009   $  57,806   $  51,556   $  50,942  
Net income as a % of revenue   8.1 %   7.4 %   10.2 %   9.5 %   10.9 %
Earnings per share                              
Basic $  3.03   $  2.76   $  3.69   $  3.24   $  3.29  
Diluted $  3.00   $  2.73   $  3.64   $  3.21   $  3.24  
Weighted average shares outstanding2                              
Basic    14,984      15,218      15,664      15,913      15,487  
Diluted    15,142      15,397      15,861      16,077      15,739  
Depreciation and amortization    21,106      19,279      16,589      13,782      12,894  
                               
Financial Position                              
Total assets $ 460,831   $ 487,408   $ 451,277   $ 409,438   $ 427,859  
Interest-bearing debt3    21,183      60,000      35,000      -      40,000  
Total shareholders’ equity   258,142     258,127     256,537     226,719     210,848  
Interest-bearing debt as a % of shareholders’ equity   8.2 %   23.2 %   13.6 %   0.0 %   19.0 %
Return on equity4   17.6 %   16.4 %   25.5 %   24.5 %   30.7 %
Return on invested capital5   15.5 %   15.4 %   22.5 %   25.1 %   22.6 %
                               
Other Statistics                              
Orders $ 618,296   $ 615,586   $ 567,418   $ 565,327   $ 540,023  
Backlog of orders at year-end   353,013     326,473     290,151     298,363     287,916  
Dividends declared per share    1.20      1.20      1.20      1.05      0.85  
Capital Expenditures    18,445      20,038      29,690      15,625      10,145  

 

1Fiscal years 2015, 2014, 2013, 2012 and 2011 include 53, 52, 52, 52 and 52 weeks, respectively.

2Assumes the conversion of potential common shares using the treasury stock method.

3Consists of short-term borrowings.

4Calculated by dividing net income by beginning shareholders’ equity.

 

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5The measure “Return on Invested Capital” (ROIC) is not a measure of performance presented in accordance with U.S. Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). ROIC is calculated by dividing adjusted net income by average invested capital. Adjusted net income is calculated by excluding after-tax interest expense from reported net income. In addition, for fiscal year 2012, adjusted net income also excludes the cost related to the settlement of the U.S. Government investigation. Average invested capital is defined as the aggregate of average interest-bearing debt and average shareholders’ equity and is calculated as the sum of current and prior year ending amounts divided by two. Because the ratio is not prescribed or authorized by GAAP, the ROIC percentage is a non-GAAP financial measure. We believe ROIC is useful to investors as a measure of operating performance and of the effectiveness of the use of capital in our operations. We use ROIC as a measure to monitor and evaluate operating performance relative to our invested capital. This measure should not be construed as an alternative to return on equity or any other measure determined in accordance with GAAP.

  

Presented below is the reconciliation of the non-GAAP financial measure to the nearest GAAP measure:

 

             Fiscal Year           
(in thousands)   2015    2014    2013    2012    2011 
Net income  $45,462   $42,009   $57,806   $51,556   $50,942 
Expense to settle U.S. Government investigation   -    -    -    7,750    - 
Restructuring expense, net of tax   -    4,376    -    -    - 
After-tax interest expense   767    637    372    535    808 
Adjusted net income*  $46,229   $47,022   $58,178   $59,841   $51,750 
                          
Total beginning shareholders’ equity  $258,127   $256,537   $226,719   $210,848   $166,106 
Total ending shareholders’ equity   258,142    258,127    256,537    226,719    210,848 
Total beginning interest bearing debt   60,000    35,000    -    40,000    40,000 
Total ending interest bearing debt   21,183    60,000    35,000    -    40,000 
Sum of invested capital  $597,452   $609,664   $518,256   $477,567   $456,954 
Average invested capital*  $298,726   $304,832   $259,128   $238,784   $228,477 
                          
Return on invested capital*   15.5%   15.4%   22.5%   25.1%   22.6%
                          
* Denotes Non-GAAP financial measure                     

 

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ITEM 7.MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A) is designed to provide a reader of our financial statements with a narrative from the perspective of management on our financial condition, results of operations, liquidity and certain other factors that may affect our future results. Our MD&A is presented in nine sections:

 

·Overview

·Financial Results

·Cash Flow Comparison

·Liquidity and Capital Resources

·Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

·Critical Accounting Policies

·Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

·Quarterly Financial Information

·Forward Looking Statements

 

Our MD&A should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and related Notes included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. All dollar amounts are in thousands (unless otherwise noted).

 

Overview 

MTS Systems Corporation is a leading global supplier of high-performance test systems and position sensors. Our testing hardware and software solutions help customers accelerate and improve design, development and manufacturing processes and are used for determining the mechanical behavior of materials, products and structures. Our high-performance position sensors provide controls for a variety of industrial and vehicular applications.

 

Our goal is to grow profitably, generate strong cash flow and deliver a strong return on invested capital to our shareholders by leveraging our leadership position in the research and development and industrial and mobile equipment global end markets. Our desire is to be the innovation leader in creating test and measurement solutions to support our customers. Through innovation, we believe we can create value for our customers that will drive our growth. There are four global macro-trends that will help enable this growth: energy scarcity; environmental concerns; globalization, including development of the emerging markets; and global demographics. These macro-trends have significant implications for our customers, such as increasing the demand for new and more innovative products and increasing our customers’ organizational complexity. We believe we have an excellent geographic footprint and are well positioned in both Test and Sensors markets to take advantage of these macro-trends and deliver profitable growth in the years ahead.

 

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We are working toward our goals of sustained double digit growth in annual revenue, margin expansion and mid-to-upper teens for Return on Invested Capital (ROIC). Our plan is to grow at twice the market rate with merger and acquisitions filling the gap to sustain our double-digit growth goals. Economic conditions and the competitive environment may impact the timing of when the goals are achieved. There are four primary opportunities we are pursuing which will support these goals:

 

·Expanding service offerings in our Test business;

·Growth in composite materials which drives new testing requirements and technologies in the Test materials market;

·Development of intelligent machines which provides opportunity in the Sensors mobile hydraulics market; and

·Opportunistic mergers and acquisitions.

 

We believe that our business model supports achieving our double digit growth milestone assuming we continue to move aggressively to build our infrastructure, expand our offerings and execute on opportunities with our key customers around the world. In order to accelerate our revenue growth over the next few years, investments in infrastructure, sales support and field service capacity and capability are essential. We invested significantly in fiscal years 2014 and 2013, moderately in fiscal year 2015 and will continue to moderately invest in future years.

 

Fiscal Year

We have a 5-4-4 week accounting cycle with the fiscal year ending on the Saturday closest to September 30. Fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013 ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013, respectively. Fiscal year 2015 included 53 weeks, while fiscal years 2014 and 2013 both included 52 weeks.

 

Foreign Currency

Approximately 75% of our revenue has historically been derived from customers outside of the United States. Our financial results are principally exposed to changes in exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and the Euro, the Japanese Yen and the Chinese Yuan. A change in foreign exchange rates could positively or negatively affect our reported financial results. The discussion below quantifies the impact of foreign currency translation on our financial results for the periods discussed.

 

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Financial Results

 

Fiscal Year 2015 Compared to Fiscal Year 2014

 

Total Company

 

Results of Operations

The following table compares results of operations in fiscal years 2015 and 2014, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation and the acquisition of Roehrig Engineering, Inc. (REI) in fiscal year 2014.

                                 
            Estimated        
            Business     REI     Currency        
(in thousands)     2015     Change     Acquisition     Translation     2014  
Revenue   $  563,934   $  27,292   $  5,432   $  (33,118 ) $  564,328  
Cost of sales      344,321      22,295      3,740      (22,399 )    340,685  
Gross profit      219,613      4,997      1,692      (10,719 )    223,643  
Gross margin     38.9 %                     39.6 %
                                 
Operating expenses:                                
Selling and marketing      82,974      (227 )    117      (5,052 )    88,136  
General administrative      51,438      1,284      921      (2,174 )    51,407  
Research and development      23,705      384      -      (523 )    23,844  
Total operating expenses      158,117      1,441      1,038      (7,749 )    163,387  
Income from operations   $  61,496   $  3,556   $  654   $  (2,970 ) $  60,256  
                                 

Severance and Related Costs

We initiated workforce reductions and other cost reduction actions during fiscal year 2014. As a result of these actions, we incurred severance and related costs of $6,336 in fiscal year 2014, of which $3,507, $1,805, and $1,024 were reported in cost of sales, selling and marketing, and general and administrative expense, respectively. No severance and related costs were recognized in fiscal year 2015.

 

Revenue

                   
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014   $ %
Revenue $  563,934   $  564,328   $  (394) (0.1%)
                   

Revenue was essentially flat. Increases in revenue from higher sales volumes, the impact of the 53rd week in fiscal year 2015 and $5,432 from the acquisition of REI which was completed in fiscal year 2014 were more than offset by the negative impact of currency translation. Excluding the impact of currency translation, revenue increased 5.8%. Test revenue increased $4,727 due to higher sales volumes, the impact of the 53rd week in fiscal year 2015 and the acquisition of REI which was completed in fiscal year 2014, partially offset by a 4.6% unfavorable currency translation. Sensors revenue declined $5,121 driven by an 11.3% unfavorable impact of currency translation.

 

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The following table compares revenue in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 by geography.

                     
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014     $   %
Americas $  173,523   $  176,133   $  (2,610)   (1.5%)
Europe    149,308      179,043      (29,735)   (16.6%)
Asia    241,103      209,152      31,951   15.3%
Total Revenue $  563,934   $  564,328   $  (394)   (0.1%)
                     

Although selective product price changes were implemented during each of these fiscal years, the overall impact of pricing changes did not have a material effect on revenue.

 

Gross Profit

                   
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014   $ %
Gross profit $  219,613   $  223,643   $  (4,030) (1.8%)
Gross margin   38.9 %   39.6 %    (0.7)  ppts
                   

Gross profit declined due to the negative impact of currency translation, unfavorable product mix and an investment in labor and systems to improve utilization in the upcoming fiscal year. Due to a higher concentration of manufacturing performed in the U.S., currency had a 0.3 percentage point positive impact on the gross margin rate. Excluding the impact of currency translation, the gross margin rate decreased by 1.0 percentage point primarily driven by unfavorable product mix resulting from a higher number of custom projects which generally have lower margins and an investment in labor and systems to improve utilization in the upcoming fiscal year. The decrease was partially offset by severance and related costs of $3,507 recognized in fiscal year 2014 and nine months of profit totaling $1,692 from the acquisition of REI in fiscal year 2014.

 

Selling and Marketing Expense

                   
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014   $ %
Selling and marketing $  82,974   $  88,136   $  (5,162) (5.9%)
% of Revenue   14.7 %   15.6 %      
                   

Selling and marketing expenses decreased due to a favorable impact of currency translation, severance and related costs of $1,805 during fiscal year 2014 and lower external commissions as a result of revenue timing, partially offset by merit increases and the timing of selling activities to drive future revenue growth.

 

General and Administrative Expense

                   
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014   $ %
General administrative $  51,438   $  51,407   $  31 0.1%
% of Revenue   9.1 %   9.1 %      
                   

The general and administrative expense increase was driven by an estimated favorable impact of currency translation and $1,024 of severance and related costs incurred in fiscal year 2014 that did not recur in fiscal year 2015, offset by increased professional fees and nine months of expenses totaling $921 related to the acquisition of REI completed in fiscal year 2014.

 

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Research and Development Expense

                   
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014   $ %
Research and development $  23,705   $  23,844   $  (139) (0.6%)
% of Revenue   4.2 %   4.2 %      
                   

Research and development expense declined primarily due to an increase in the capitalization of internally developed software labor of $1,472 as headcount was reallocated to internally developed software activities and a favorable impact of currency translation, partially offset by higher compensation and benefits related to increased headcount.

 

Income from Operations

                   
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014   $ %
Income from operations $  61,496   $  60,256   $  1,240 2.1%
% of Revenue   10.9 %   10.7 %      
                   

Income from operations increased primarily due to lower operating expenses.

 

Interest Expense, net

                   
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014   $ %
Interest expense, net $  795   $  692   $  103 14.9%
                   

Interest expense, net was higher due to higher average borrowings on our credit facility.

 

Other (Expense) Income, net

                   
              Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014   $ %
Other expense, net $  1,529   $  1,121   $  408 36.4%
                   

The increase in other expense, net was primarily driven by increased net losses on foreign currency transactions.

 

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Provision for Income Taxes

             
             Increased / (Decreased) 
(in thousands)   2015    2014    $    % 
Provision for income taxes  $13,710   $16,434   $(2,724)   (16.6%)
Effective Rate   23.2%   28.1%   (4.9) ppts

 

The decreased provision for income taxes during fiscal year 2015 was primarily due to a decrease in the effective tax rate. The decrease in the effective tax rate was primarily driven by the enactment of tax legislation during the three months ended December 27, 2014 that retroactively extended the United States research and development tax credit and resulted in a tax benefit of $2,098 in the first quarter of fiscal year 2015. In addition, we recognized a tax benefit of $1,836 associated with the favorable resolution in 2015 of audit matters in connection with the Internal Revenue Service examination of tax years ending October 1, 2011 and September 29, 2012. The 2015 rate was also favorably impacted by our geographic mix of earnings, with foreign income generally taxed at lower rates than domestic income. The 2014 effective tax rate includes a one-time benefit due to the recognition of additional federal and state research and development credit benefits of $2,563 which related to prior years.

 

Net Income

             
             Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands, except per share data)   2015    2014    $    % 
Net income  $45,462   $42,009   $3,453    8.2%
Diluted earnings per share   3.00    2.73    0.27    9.9%

 

A $6,336 charge for severance and related costs negatively impacted fiscal year 2014 earnings per diluted share by $0.28. Excluding the severance and related costs, diluted earnings per share in fiscal year 2014 would have been essentially flat year-over-year.

 

Orders and Backlog

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2015 and 2014, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation and the acquisition of REI in fiscal year 2014.

                
         Estimated     
(in thousands)   2015    Business
Change
    REI
Acquisition
    Currency
Translation
    2014 
Orders  $618,296   $35,159   $6,392   $(38,841)  $615,586 

 

Orders were up 0.4% driven by strong orders in Asia, partially offset by the unfavorable impact of currency translations. Excluding the impact of currency translation, orders increased 6.7%. Orders for fiscal year 2015 included six large orders in Asia totaling $67,696 and one large order in the Americas totaling $5,150. Orders for fiscal year 2014 included six large orders in Asia totaling $42,249 and two large Americas orders totaling $19,028.

 

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The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 by geography.

            Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014     $   %
Americas $  158,735   $  188,738   $  (30,003)   (15.9%)
Europe    157,383      170,563      (13,180)   (7.7%)
Asia    302,178      256,285      45,893   17.9%
Total Orders $  618,296   $  615,586   $  2,710   0.4%

 

Backlog of undelivered orders at October 3, 2015 was $353,013, an increase of $26,540 or 8.1%, compared to backlog of $326,473 at September 27, 2014. The majority of this backlog is related to Test. Based on anticipated manufacturing schedules, we estimate that approximately $267,000 of the backlog at October 3, 2015 will be converted into revenue during fiscal year 2016 (76% conversion). The conversion rate is slightly down from the prior year rate of 77% due to a shift from short cycle, quicker turning orders to larger custom orders in fiscal year 2015.

 

We believe backlog is not an absolute indicator of future revenue because a portion of the orders in backlog could be cancelled at the customer’s discretion. While the backlog is subject to order cancellations, we have not historically experienced a significant number of order cancellations. During fiscal year 2015, two custom orders in Test totaling approximately $8,484 were cancelled. During fiscal year 2014, one custom order in Test totaling approximately $11,109 was cancelled. These cancelled orders were booked in a fiscal year prior to the year in which they were cancelled.

  

Test Segment

 

Results of Operations

The following table compares results of operations in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 for Test, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation and the acquisition of REI in fiscal year 2014.

 

               
         Estimated      
(in thousands)   2015    Business
Change
    REI
Acquisition
    Currency
Translation
    2014 
Revenue  $462,880   $20,435   $5,432   $(21,140)  $458,153 
Cost of sales   298,011    18,311    3,740    (16,738)   292,698 
Gross profit   164,869    2,124    1,692    (4,402)   165,455 
Gross margin   35.6%                  36.1%
                          
Operating expenses:                         
Selling and marketing   64,446    (1,231)   117    (2,905)   68,465 
General administrative   40,561    595    921    (924)   39,969 
Research and development   17,577    410    -    (6)   17,173 
Total operating expenses   122,584    (226)   1,038    (3,835)   125,607 
Income from operations  $42,285   $2,350   $654   $(567)  $39,848 

 

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Revenue

         Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  %
Revenue  $462,880   $458,153   $4,727    1.0%

 

The increase in revenue was primarily a result of strong engineer-to-order revenue converted from a higher beginning of the year backlog, productivity improvements and the favorable impact of a 53rd week in fiscal year 2015, partially offset by the unfavorable impact of currency translation. Excluding the impact of currency translation, revenue increased 5.6%.

 

The following table compares revenue in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 for Test by geography.

                 
                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015     2014     $   %
Americas $  142,464   $  144,633   $  (2,169 ) (1.5%)
Europe    100,501      126,886      (26,385 ) (20.8%)
Asia    219,915      186,634      33,281     17.8%
Total Revenue $  462,880   $  458,153   $  4,727   1.0%

 

Gross Profit

                         
                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)     2015     2014     $     %  
Gross profit   $ 164,869   $ 165,455   $ (586 )   (0.4% )
Gross margin     35.6 %   36.1 %   (0.5 ) ppts  

 

Gross profit declined primarily due to the negative impact of currency translation, partially offset by $3,507 of severance and related costs recognized in fiscal year 2014 and nine months of profit related to the fiscal year 2014 acquisition of REI in the amount of $1,692. Excluding the aforementioned, the gross margin rate decreased 1.8 percentage points driven by unfavorable product mix as fiscal year 2015 gross profit included a higher number of large custom projects which generally have lower margins.

 

Selling and Marketing Expense

             
         Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  %
Selling and marketing  $64,446   $68,465   $(4,019)   (5.9%)
% of Revenue   13.9%   14.9%          

 

Selling and marketing expense declined primarily due to the favorable impact of currency translation, lower external commissions due to timing of revenue and severance and related costs of $1,799 recognized in fiscal year 2014, partially offset by merit increases and timing of selling activities to drive future revenue growth.

 

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General and Administrative Expense  

              
             Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015    2014    $    % 
General administrative  $40,561   $39,969   $592    1.5%
% of Revenue   8.8%   8.7%          

 

The general and administrative expense increase was driven by increased spending related to professional fees and nine months of expenses totaling $921 related to the acquisition of REI completed in fiscal year 2014, partially offset by the favorable impact of currency translation.

  

Research and Development Expense

             
              Increased / (Decreased) 
(in thousands)   2015    2014    $    % 
Research and development  $17,577   $17,173   $404    2.4%
% of Revenue   3.8%   3.7%          

 

Research and development expense increased primarily due to an increase in headcount resulting in higher compensation expense.

 

Income from Operations

             
             Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015    2014    $    % 
Income from operations  $42,285   $39,848   $2,437    6.1%
% of Revenue   9.1%   8.7%          

 

Income from operations increased due to lower operating expenses.

 

Orders and Backlog

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 for Test, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation and the acquisition of REI in fiscal year 2014.

          
      Estimated   
(in thousands)   2015    Business
Change
    REI
Acquisition
    Currency
Translation
    2014 
Orders  $519,049   $32,656   $6,392   $(27,222)  $507,223 

 

Orders increased 2.3% driven by strong orders in Asia and Europe fueled by the ground vehicle market, partially offset by the unfavorable impact of currency translation. Excluding the impact of currency translation, orders increased 7.7%. Orders for fiscal year 2015 included six large orders in Asia totaling $67,696 and one large order in the Americas totaling $5,150. Orders for fiscal year 2014 included six large orders in Asia totaling $42,249 and two large Americas orders totaling $19,028. In fiscal year 2015, Test accounted for 83.9% of total Company orders, compared to 82.4% in fiscal year 2014.

  

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The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 for Test by geography.

             
         Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  %
Americas  $126,760   $157,354   $(30,594)   (19.4%)
Europe   110,435    116,105    (5,670)   (4.9%)
Asia   281,854    233,764    48,090    20.6%
Total Orders  $519,049   $507,223   $11,826    2.3%

 

Backlog of undelivered orders at October 3, 2015 was $339,967, an increase of 9.7% from backlog of $309,994 at September 27, 2014. As previously mentioned, backlog at the end of fiscal years 2015 and 2014 was negatively impacted by two custom orders in Test totaling approximately $8,484 and one custom order totaling approximately $11,109, respectively.

  

Sensors Segment

 

Results of Operations

The following table compares results of operations in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 for Sensors, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation.

      Estimated   
(in thousands)   2015    Business
Change
    Currency
Translation
    2014 
Revenue  $101,054   $6,857   $(11,978)  $106,175 
Cost of sales   46,310    3,984    (5,661)   47,987 
Gross profit   54,744    2,873    (6,317)   58,188 
Gross margin   54.2%             54.8%
                     
Operating expenses:                    
Selling and marketing   18,528    1,004    (2,147)   19,671 
General administrative   10,877    689    (1,250)   11,438 
Research and development   6,128    (26)   (517)   6,671 
Total operating expenses   35,533    1,667    (3,914)   37,780 
Income from operations  $19,211   $1,206   $(2,403)  $20,408 

 

Revenue

             
             Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2015    2014    $    % 
Revenue  $101,054   $106,175   $(5,121)   (4.8%)

 

The decrease in revenue was primarily driven by the negative impact of currency translation. Excluding the impact of currency translation, Sensors revenue was up 6.5% driven by a higher beginning of the period backlog for fiscal year 2015 and additional sales in machine markets due to the favorable Euro exchange rates prompting customers to buy.

 

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The following table compares revenue in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 for Sensors by geography.

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  %
Americas  $31,059  $31,500  $(441)   (1.4%)
Europe   48,807   52,157   (3,350)   (6.4%)
Asia   21,188   22,518   (1,330)   (5.9%)
Total Revenue  $101,054  $106,175  $(5,121)   (4.8%)

 

Gross Profit

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  %
Gross profit  $54,744  $58,188  $(3,444)  (5.9%)
Gross margin   54.2%  54.8%  (0.6) ppts  

 

Gross profit declined primarily due to the unfavorable impact of currency translation. Excluding the impact of currency translation, the gross margin rate declined 0.8 percentage points due to an unfavorable product mix resulting from sales increases in certain lower margin industrial markets.

 

Selling and Marketing Expense

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  % 
Selling and marketing  $18,528  $19,671  $(1,143)  (5.8%)
% of Revenue   18.3%  18.5%        

 

The decrease in selling and marketing expense was primarily driven by the favorable impact of currency translation, partially offset by higher compensation and benefits resulting from increased headcount to support future revenue growth.

 

General and Administrative Expense

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  % 
General administrative  $10,877  $11,438  $(561)  (4.9%)
% of Revenue   10.8%  10.8%        

 

The decrease in general and administrative expense was primarily driven by the favorable impact of currency translation and cost containment measures, partially offset by increased compensation.

 

Research and Development Expense

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  %
Research and development  $6,128  $6,671  $(543)  (8.1%)
% of Revenue   6.1%  6.3%        

 

The decrease in research and development expense was primarily driven by the favorable impact of currency translation and cost containment measures, partially offset by increased compensation and benefits expense resulting from increased headcount.

 

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Income from Operations

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015  2014  $  %
Income from operations  $19,211  $20,408  $(1,197)  (5.9%)
% of Revenue   19.0%  19.2%        

 

Income from operations decreased primarily as a result of decreased gross profit, partially offset by lower operating expenses.

 

Orders and Backlog

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 for Sensors, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation.

          
       Estimated    
       Business  Currency     
(in thousands)  2015  Change  Translation  2014 
Orders  $99,247  $2,503  $(11,619) $108,363 

 

The decline in orders was primarily driven by the unfavorable impact of currency translations. Excluding the impact of currency translation, Sensors orders were up 2.3% from increases in all geographies. Sensors accounted for 16.1% of total Company orders, compared to 17.6% for fiscal year 2014.

 

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2015 and 2014 for Sensors by geography.

 

               Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2015   2014  $  %
Americas  $31,975    $31,384    $591  1.9%
Europe   46,948     54,458     (7,510) (13.8%)
Asia   20,324     22,521     (2,197) (9.8%)
Total Orders  $99,247    $108,363    $(9,116) (8.4%)

 

Backlog of undelivered orders at October 3, 2015 was $13,046, a decrease of 20.8% compared to backlog of $16,479 at September 27, 2014.

 

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Fiscal Year 2014 Compared to Fiscal Year 2013

 

Total Company

 

Results of Operations

The following table compares results of operations in fiscal years 2014 and 2013, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation and the acquisition of REI in fiscal year 2014.

            
       Estimated   
       Business  REI  Currency     
(in thousands)  2014  Change  Acquisition  Translation  2013 
Revenue  $564,328  $(7,320) $2,294  $(85) $569,439 
Cost of sales   340,685   858   1,766   561   337,500 
Gross profit   223,643   (8,178)  528   (646)  231,939 
Gross margin   39.6%              40.7%
                      
Operating expenses:                     
Selling and marketing   88,136   6,765   240   122   81,009 
General administrative   51,407   2,783   263   198   48,163 
Research and development   23,844   919   -   113   22,812 
Total operating expenses   163,387   10,467   503   433   151,984 
Income from operations  $60,256  $(18,645) $25  $(1,079) $79,955 

 

Revenue

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013  $  %
Revenue  $564,328  $569,439  $(5,111)  (0.9%)

 

The decrease was driven by lower backlog at the end of fiscal year 2013 and a higher content of slower turning backlog in Test, partially offset by increased order volumes in Sensors and increased service revenue in Test. Test revenue decreased 3.4% to $458,153, while Sensors revenue increased 11.4% to $106,175.

 

The following table compares revenue in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 by geography.

 

            Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013   $  %
Americas  $176,133  $165,677   $10,456  6.3 %
Europe   179,043   178,610    433  0.2 %
Asia   209,152   225,152    (16,000) (7.1 %)
Total Revenue  $564,328  $569,439   $(5,111) (0.9 %)

 

Although selective product price changes were implemented during each of these fiscal years, the overall impact of pricing changes did not have a material effect on revenue.

 

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Gross profit

                  
            Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013   $  %
Gross profit  $223,643   $231,939  $(8,296) (3.6%)
Gross margin   39.6%   40.7%  (1.1)  ppts 

 

The previously mentioned severance and related costs of $3,507 unfavorably impacted gross profit as a percentage of revenue by 0.7 percentage points. In addition, unfavorable product mix from a higher proportion of revenue from lower margin products decreased our gross margin percent by 1.2 percentage points. These unfavorable factors were partially offset by a 0.5 percentage point increase in gross margin primarily driven by the favorable impact of an increase in Sensors revenue, which is higher margin, compared to total Company revenue and a reduction in various miscellaneous manufacturing expenses.

 

Selling and Marketing Expense

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013  $  %
Selling and marketing  $88,136  $81,009  $7,127   8.8%
% of Revenue   15.6%  14.2%        

 

The increase was driven by higher compensation and benefits resulting from increased headcount, higher sales commissions based on the increase in orders, as well as the previously mentioned severance and related costs of $1,805 during fiscal year 2014.

 

General and Administrative Expense

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013  $  %
General administrative  $51,407  $48,163  $3,244   6.7%
% of Revenue   9.1%  8.5%        

 

The increases were primarily driven by higher compensation and benefits driven by increased headcount of approximately $2,600, higher legal expenses of approximately $1,800, as well the previously mentioned severance and related costs of $1,024 which was partially offset by lower consulting fees of approximately $1,700 and other miscellaneous expenses of approximately $500 in fiscal year 2014.

 

Research and Development Expense

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013  $  %
Research and development  $23,844  $22,812  $1,032   4.5%
% of Revenue   4.2%  4.0%        

 

The increase was driven by higher compensation and benefits resulting from increased headcount in both Test and Sensors.

 

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Income from Operations

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013  $  %
Income from operations  $60,256  $79,955  $(19,699)  (24.6%)
% of Revenue   10.7%  14.0%        

 

Excluding the previously mentioned severance and related costs of $6,336, income from operations decreased 16.7% for fiscal year 2014, driven by a $4,789 decrease in gross profit and an $8,574 increase in operating expenses resulting from ongoing investments for growth in sales and research and development.

 

Historically, our operating costs have been impacted by a level of inflation ranging from -1% to 4%. We use a number of strategies to mitigate the effects of cost inflation including cost productivity initiatives such as global procurement strategies, as well as price increases. However, if our operating costs were to become subject to significant inflationary pressures, we may not be able to fully offset such higher costs.

 

Interest Expense, net

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013  $  %
Interest expense, net  $692  $334  $358   107.2%

 

The increase was driven by a relatively higher level of outstanding borrowings under the Company’s credit facility during fiscal year 2014 compared to fiscal year 2013.

 

Other Expense, net

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013  $  %
Other expense, net  $1,121  $367  $754   205.4%

 

The increase in net expense was primarily driven by $600 of royalty income in fiscal year 2013 that we did not receive in fiscal year 2014.

  

Provision for Income Taxes

          
           Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014  2013  $  %
Provision for income taxes  $16,434  $21,448  $(5,014)  (23.4%)
Effective Rate   28.1%  27.1%        

 

The decrease in the provision for income taxes was primarily due to decreased income before income taxes. The tax rate was unfavorably impacted by lower R&D tax credits in the current year due to the expiration of the R&D tax credit. Both fiscal years 2014 and 2013 had one-time tax benefits associated with R&D tax credits that caused our effective tax rate to be lower than it has been historically.

 

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Net Income

             
             Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands, except per share data)  2014   2013   $   % 
Net income  $42,009   $57,806   $(15,797)   (27.3%)
Diluted earnings per share   2.73    3.64    (0.91)   (25.0%)
                     

The decrease was primarily driven by lower income from operations. The previously mentioned $6,336 charge for severance and related costs in fiscal year 2014 negatively impacted earnings per diluted share by $0.28.

 

Orders and Backlog

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2014 and 2013, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation and the acquisition of REI in fiscal year 2014.

                
         Estimated      
(in thousands)   2014    Business
Change
    REI
Acquisition
    Currency
Translation
    2013 
Orders  $615,586   $48,079   $2,083   $(1,994)  $567,418 
                          

Orders totaled $615,586, an increase of $48,168 or 8.5%, compared to orders of $567,418 for fiscal year 2013. Fiscal year 2014 orders included eight large orders (equal to or in excess of $5,000) totaling $61,277. The large orders were comprised of six large Asian and two large Americas’ Test orders totaling $42,249 and $19,028, respectively. Fiscal year 2013 orders included five large orders totaling $37,397, and included three large European and two large Americas’ Test orders totaling $22,238 and $15,156, respectively. Excluding the large orders, base orders increased 4.6%, reflecting 3.1% growth in Test, primarily in the Americas and Asia, as well as 11.3% growth in Sensor which experienced growth across all geographies.

 

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 by geography.

                      
             Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)  2014   2013   $   %
Americas  $188,738   $169,017   $19,721   11.7 %
Europe   170,563    181,823    (11,260)  (6.2 %)
Asia   256,285    216,578    39,707   18.3 %
Total Orders  $615,586   $567,418   $48,168   8.5 %
                      

Backlog of undelivered orders at September 27, 2014 was $326,473, an increase of $36,322, or 12.5%, compared to backlog of $290,151 at September 28, 2013. We believe backlog is not an absolute indicator of future revenue because a portion of the orders in backlog could be cancelled at the customer’s discretion. While the backlog is subject to order cancellations, we have not historically experienced a significant number of order cancellations. During fiscal year 2014, one custom order in Test totaling approximately $11,109 was cancelled. During fiscal year 2013, one custom order in Test totaling approximately $2,110 was cancelled. These cancelled orders were booked in a fiscal year prior to the year in which they were cancelled.

 

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Test Segment

 

Results of Operations 

The following table compares results of operations in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for Test, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation and the acquisition of REI in fiscal year 2014.

 

        Estimated     
(in thousands)  2014   Business
Change
   REI
Acquisition
   Currency
Translation
   2013 
Revenue  $458,153   $(18,437)  $2,294   $177   $474,119 
Cost of sales   292,698    (5,740)   1,766    536    296,136 
Gross profit   165,455    (12,697)   528    (359)   177,983 
Gross margin   36.1%                  37.5%
                          
Operating expenses:                         
Selling and marketing   68,465    4,483    240    308    63,434 
General administrative   39,969    3,266    263    166    36,274 
Research and development   17,173    (119)   -      1    17,291 
Total operating expenses   125,607    7,630    503    475    116,999 
Income from operations  $39,848   $(20,327)  $25   $(834)  $60,984 
                          

Revenue

 

                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2014   2013   $   %  
Revenue   $ 458,153   $ 474,119   $ (15,966 )   (3.4% )
                           

Revenue was $458,153, a decrease of $15,966 or 3.4%, compared to revenue of $474,119 for fiscal year 2013, including an estimated $177 favorable impact of currency translation. This decrease was primarily driven by lower backlog at the end of fiscal year 2013 as well as the timing of conversion of custom order backlog, partially offset by growth in service and standard products.

 

The following table compares revenue in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for Test by geography.

                           
                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2014   2013   $   %  
Americas   $ 144,633   $ 138,340   $ 6,293     4.5%
Europe     126,886     131,197     (4,311 )   (3.3% )
Asia     186,634     204,582     (17,948 )   (8.8% )
Total Revenue   $ 458,153   $ 474,119   $ (15,966 )   (3.4% )
                           

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Gross Profit

 

                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2014   2013   $   %  
Gross profit   $ 165,455   $ 177,983   $ (12,528 )   (7.0% )
  Gross margin     36.1 %   37.5 %   (1.4 ) ppts  

 

The previously mentioned severance and related costs of $3,507 unfavorably impacted gross profit as a percentage of revenue by 0.8 percentage points. Excluding these costs, the gross margin rate decreased by 0.6 percentage points. The decreased gross profit rate was driven by decreased Test volume, unfavorable product mix from a higher content of custom projects partially offset by reductions in compensation and benefits from lower than expected variable rate compensation and discretionary contributions related to an employee retirement plan.

  

Selling and Marketing Expense

 

                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2014   2013   $   %  
Selling and marketing   $ 68,465   $ 63,434   $ 5,031     7.9 %
  % of Revenue     14.9 %   13.4 %            
                           

The increase was driven by continued investment in sales expansion to drive future revenue growth, higher sales commissions due to the increase in orders, as well as the previously mentioned severance and related costs of $1,799 in fiscal year 2014. The continued investment in sales expansion primarily consists of higher compensation and benefits resulting from increased headcount.

 

General and Administrative Expense

 

                Increased / (Decreased)

(in thousands)

  2014   2013   $   %  
General administrative   $ 39,969   $ 36,274   $ 3,695     10.2 %
  % of Revenue     8.7 %   7.7 %            
                           

 

The increase was primarily driven by higher legal expenses, higher compensation and benefits driven by increased headcount, as well as the previously mentioned severance and related costs of $1,024 in fiscal year 2014. These increases were partially offset by a lower level of investment in productivity and infrastructure initiatives.

  

Research and Development Expense

 

                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2014   2013   $   %  
Research and development   $ 17,173   $ 17,291   $ (118 )   (0.7% )
  % of Revenue     3.7 %   3.6 %            
                           

The decrease was primarily driven by the re-allocation of certain engineering resources to work on backlog conversion.

 

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Income from Operations

 

                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands) 2014   2013   $   %  
Income from operations   $ 39,848   $ 60,984   $ (21,136 )   (34.7% )
  % of Revenue     8.7 %   12.9 %            
                           

Excluding the previously mentioned severance and related costs of $6,330, income from operations decreased 24.3%, driven by decreased gross profit as well as a $5,785 increase in operating expenses.

  

Orders and Backlog

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for Test, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation and the acquisition of REI in fiscal year 2014.

 

          Estimated        
(in thousands)   2014   Business
Change
  REI
Acquisition
  Currency
Translation
  2013  
Orders   $ 507,223   $ 36,890   $ 2,083   $ (1,774 ) $ 470,024  
                                 

Orders totaled $507,223, an increase of $37,199 or 7.9% compared to orders of $470,024 for fiscal year 2013, primarily driven by 3.1% growth in base orders as well as variability in large orders. Large orders for fiscal year 2014 were $61,277. There were six large orders in Asia and two large orders in the Americas totaling $42,249 and $19,028, respectively. Orders in Asia consisted of two orders totaling $17,159 in the structures market and four orders totaling $25,090 in the ground vehicles market. Orders in Americas consisted of two orders totaling $19,028, one of which was a $12,199 order in the ground vehicles market and the other was a $6,829 order in the structures market. Large orders in fiscal year 2013 totaled $37,394 and included three large European orders in the ground vehicles market totaling approximately $22,238. In addition, fiscal year 2013 orders included two large Americas’ orders in the ground vehicles market totaling approximately $15,156. Currency translation unfavorably impacted orders by approximately $1,774. Test accounted for 82.4% of total Company orders, compared to 82.8% for fiscal year 2013.

 

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for Test by geography.

 

                Increased / (Decreased)
(in thousands)   2014   2013   $   %  
Americas   $ 157,354   $ 140,455   $ 16,899     12.0 %
Europe     116,105     133,911     (17,806 )   (13.3 %)
Asia     233,764     195,658     38,106     19.5 %
Total Orders   $ 507,223   $ 470,024   $ 37,199     7.9 %

  

Backlog of undelivered orders at September 27, 2014 was $309,994, an increase of 12.7% from backlog of $275,020 at September 28, 2013. As previously mentioned, backlog at the end of fiscal year 2014 was negatively impacted by a custom order in Test totaling approximately $11,109 that was cancelled during the second quarter of fiscal year 2014. Also, as previously mentioned, backlog at the end of fiscal year 2013 was negatively impacted by the cancellation of one custom order totaling approximately $2,110.

 

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Sensors Segment

 

Results of Operations 

The following table compares results of operations in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for Sensors, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation.

                 
        Estimated
        Business   Currency      
(in thousands)  2014   Change   Translation   2013 
Revenue  $106,175   $11,117   $(262)  $95,320 
Cost of sales   47,987    6,598    25    41,364 
Gross profit   58,188    4,519    (287)   53,956 
Gross margin   54.8%             56.6%
                     
Operating expenses:                    
Selling and marketing   19,671    2,282    (186)   17,575 
General administrative   11,438    (483)   32    11,889 
Research and development   6,671    1,038    112    5,521 
Total operating expenses   37,780    2,837    (42)   34,985 
Income from operations  $20,408   $1,682   $(245)  $18,971 
                     

Revenue 

                 
              Increased / (Decreased) 
(in thousands)  2014   2013   $   % 
Revenue  $106,175   $95,320   $10,855    11.4%
                     

The increase was primarily driven by higher beginning of period backlog and increased order volume.

 

The following table compares revenue in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for Sensors by geography. 

                     
             Increased / (Decreased)  
(in thousands)  2014    2013       % 
Americas  $31,500   $27,337   $4,163    15.2%
Europe   52,157    47,413    4,744    10.0%
Asia   22,518    20,570    1,948    9.5%
Total Revenue  $106,175   $95,320   $10,855    11.4%

 

Gross Profit 

                 
             Increased / (Decreased) 
(in thousands)  2014   2013   $   % 
Gross profit  $58,188   $53,956   $4,232    7.8%
Gross margin   54.8%  56.6%   (1.8) ppts 

 

Gross profit was $58,188, an increase of $4,232 or 7.8%, compared to gross profit of $53,956 for fiscal year 2013. Gross profit as a percentage of revenue was 54.8%, down compared to fiscal year 2013.

 

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Selling and Marketing Expense  

                     
             Increased / (Decreased)  
(in thousands)  2014   2013       
Selling and marketing  $19,671   $17,575   $2,096    11.9%
% of Revenue   18.5%   18.4%          

 

The increase was primarily due to higher compensation and benefits driven by increased headcount to support future sales growth.

 

General and Administrative Expense  

                     
             Increased / (Decreased)  
(in thousands)   2014     2013     $      
General administrative  $11,438   $11,889   $(451)   (3.8%)
% of Revenue   10.8%   12.5%          

 

The decrease was primarily driven by expenses recognized in fiscal year 2013 related to senior management transition.

 

Research and Development Expense   

                     
              Increased / (Decreased)  
(in thousands)  2014    2013       % 
Research and development  $6,671   $5,521   $1,150    20.8%
% of Revenue   6.3%   5.8%          

 

The increase was primarily driven by higher compensation and benefits resulting from increased headcount.

 

Income from Operations 

                           
                Increased / (Decreased)  
(in thousands)   2014   2013   $   %  
Income from operations   $ 20,408   $ 18,971   $ 1,437     7.6 %
% of Revenue     19.2 %   19.9 %            

 

The increase was driven by higher gross profit, partially offset by increased operating expenses.

 

Orders and Backlog 

The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for Sensors, separately identifying the estimated impact of currency translation.

                           
          Estimated        
(in thousands)   2014   Business
Change
  Currency Translation   2013  
Orders   $ 108,363   $ 11,189   $ (220 ) $ 97,394  

 

Orders totaled $108,363, an increase of $10,969 or 11.3% compared to orders of $97,394 for fiscal year 2013. The industrial and mobile hydraulic markets were up 9.0% and 26.0%, respectively, driven by strong demand in all geographic regions. Sensors accounted for 17.6% of total Company orders, compared to 17.2% for fiscal year 2013.

 

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The following table compares orders in fiscal years 2014 and 2013 for Sensors by geography. 

                           
                Increased / (Decreased)  
(in thousands)   2014   2013   $   %  
Americas   $ 31,384   $ 28,562   $ 2,822     9.9 %
Europe     54,458     47,912     6,546     13.7 %
Asia     22,521     20,920     1,601     7.7 %
Total Orders   $ 108,363   $ 97,394   $ 10,969     11.3 %

 

Backlog of undelivered orders at September 27, 2014 was $16,479, an increase of 8.9% from backlog of $15,131 at September 28, 2013.

 

Cash Flow Comparison - Fiscal Years 2015, 2014 and 2013

Total cash and cash equivalents decreased $8,629 for fiscal year 2015. The decrease was primarily due to $50,026 in repayments of short-term borrowings, purchases of our common stock of $29,115, dividend payments of $22,445 and investment in property and equipment of $18,445. The decrease was partially offset by net income of $45,462, $21,106 in depreciation and amortization, $19,040 for decreased working capital requirements, $11,183 received through short-term borrowings, $7,351 in stock-based compensation and $4,847 of proceeds received from the exercise of stock options and share purchases under our employee stock purchase plan.

 

Total cash and cash equivalents increased $12,064 during fiscal year 2014. This increase was driven by net income of $42,009, $24,102 in net proceeds received from borrowings on the credit facility, $19,279 in depreciation and amortization and $7,590 of proceeds from the exercise of stock options and stock purchases under our employee stock purchase plan. These increases were partially offset by purchases of our common stock of $31,013, investment in property and equipment of $20,038, dividend payments of $18,330 and $14,192 in cash payments associated with the acquisition of REI.

 

Total cash and cash equivalents decreased $31,519 during fiscal year 2013. This decrease was driven by $77,850 for increased working capital requirements, investment in property and equipment of $29,690, purchases of our common stock of $24,767 and dividend payments of $19,113. These decreases were partially offset by net income of $57,806, $35,000 in proceeds received from borrowings on the credit facility, $16,589 in depreciation and amortization and $8,645 of proceeds from the exercise of stock options.

 

Cash flow from operating activities provided cash totaling $100,436 during fiscal year 2015 compared to cash provided of $64,669 in fiscal year 2014 and cash used of $2,059 in fiscal year 2013.

 

Fiscal year 2015 cash flow from operating activities was primarily driven by $45,462 in net income, $21,106 in depreciation and amortization, $13,065 in increased advance payments received from customers driven by the mix of orders, $6,772 in increased accounts payable resulting from general timing of purchases and payments, $3,308 in decreased accounts and unbilled receivables resulting from general timing of billing and collections, partially offset by $4,105 in increased inventories to support future revenue.

 

Fiscal year 2014 cash flow from operating activities was primarily driven by net income of $42,009 and $19,279 in depreciation and amortization.

 

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Fiscal year 2013 cash flow from operating activities was primarily driven by $43,179 increased accounts and unbilled receivables resulting from higher volume as well as the general timing of billing and collections, $21,082 decreased advance payments received from customers driven by timing of customer orders and relatively unfavorable customer payment terms, $9,616 increased inventories to support future revenue and $3,973 decreased accounts payable resulting from general timing of purchases and payments. The decrease was partially offset by net income of $57,806 and $16,589 in depreciation and amortization.

 

Cash flow from investing activities required $19,112, $34,230 and $29,690 use of cash during fiscal years 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively. Fiscal year 2015 cash usage was due to $18,445 in investments in property and equipment and payment of $667 associated with the acquisition of Instrument and Calibration Sweden AB (ICS). The cash usage for fiscal year 2014 was due to $20,038 in investments in property and equipment and $14,192 in payments associated with the acquisition of REI. The cash usage for fiscal year 2013 represents investment in property and equipment. See Note 11 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding the acquisition of ICS.

 

Cash flow from financing activities used cash of $84,785 and $15,928 during fiscal years 2015 and 2014, respectively, compared to $1,280 of cash provided in fiscal year 2013. Cash was used in fiscal year 2015 to repay $50,026 of short-term borrowings, purchase 400,000 shares under our share purchase program and 12,918 shares related to stock-based compensation arrangements in an amount of $29,115 and to pay dividends of $22,445. The usage of cash was partially offset by $11,183 received through short-term borrowings and $4,847 of proceeds received in connection with stock option exercises and share purchases under our employee stock purchase plan.

 

Cash used in fiscal year 2014 was primarily due to the purchase of approximately 457,000 shares of our common stock in an amount of $31,013, which includes purchases of approximately 7,000 shares related to stock-based compensation arrangements in the amount of $374, and to pay $18,330 in cash dividends. The usage of cash was partially offset by $24,102 in net proceeds from short-term borrowings and $7,590 received from stock option exercises and stock purchases under our employee stock purchase plan.

 

Cash provided by financing activities in fiscal year 2013 was primarily due to $35,000 of borrowings on our credit facility and $8,645 received from stock option exercises and stock purchases under our employee stock purchase plan. The cash received was partially offset by purchases of our common stock in an amount of $24,767, including purchases of stock related to stock-based compensation arrangements of $454 and payment of cash dividends of $19,113.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources 

We had cash and cash equivalents of $51,768 as of October 3, 2015. Of this amount, approximately $4,618 was located in North America, $23,765 in Europe and $23,385 in Asia. Of the $47,150 of cash located outside of the U.S., approximately $24,772 is not available for use in the U.S. without the incurrence of U.S. federal and state income tax consequences.

 

The North American balance was primarily invested in bank deposits. In Europe and Asia, the balances were primarily invested in money market funds and bank deposits. In accordance with our investment policy, we place cash equivalent investments with issuers who have high-quality investment credit ratings. In addition, we limit the amount of investment exposure we have with any particular issuer. Our investment objectives are to preserve principal, maintain liquidity and achieve the best available return consistent with our primary objectives of safety and liquidity. At October 3, 2015, we held no short-term investments.

 

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At October 3, 2015, our capital structure was comprised of $21,183 in short-term debt and $258,276 in shareholders’ equity. Total interest-bearing debt at October 3, 2015 was $21,183. The borrowings on the credit facility include, at our discretion, optional month-to-month term renewals and loan repricing until September 2019. Under the terms of the credit facility, we have agreed to certain financial covenants, including, among other covenants, the ratio of consolidated total indebtedness to consolidated earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and the ratio of consolidated EBITDA to consolidated interest expense. These covenants may restrict our ability to pay dividends and purchase outstanding shares of our common stock. At October 3, 2015, we were in compliance with these financial covenants.

 

Shareholders’ equity increased by $15 during fiscal year 2015, primarily due to higher net income of $45,462, partially offset by $29,115 in purchases of our common stock and $17,969 in dividends declared.

 

We believe that our liquidity, represented by funds available from cash, cash equivalents, credit facility and anticipated cash from operations are adequate to fund ongoing operations for the short-term and long-term internal growth opportunities, capital expenditures, dividends and share purchases, as well as to fund strategic acquisitions.

 

Contractual Obligations 

As of October 3, 2015, our contractual obligations were as follows:  

                                 
(in thousands)   Total   Less than
1 year
  1 - 3 years   3 - 5 years   More than
5 years
 
Operating Lease Obligations1   $ 13,263   $ 4,406   $ 4,818   $ 2,018   $ 2,021  
Other Long-Term Obligations2     15,163     1,805     3,616     2,674     7,068  
Total Contractual Obligations3   $ 28,426   $ 6,211   $ 8,434   $ 4,692   $ 9,089  

 

1Operating leases are primarily for office space and automobiles. Refer to Note 13 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional lease information.
  
2Other long-term obligations include liabilities under pension and other retirement plans and warehouse fee obligations.
  
3Long-term income tax liabilities for uncertain tax positions have been excluded from the contractual obligations table as we are not able to make a reasonably reliable estimate of the amount and period of related future payments. At October 3, 2015, our long-term liability for uncertain tax positions was $5,649. Refer to Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional income tax information.

 

At October 3, 2015, we had letters of credit and guarantees outstanding totaling $25,671 and $30,995, respectively, primarily to bond advance payments and performance guarantees related to customer contracts in Test.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements 

As of the end of fiscal year 2015, we did not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that have, or are reasonably likely to have, a current or future material effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to investors.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies

The Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP), which require us to make estimates and assumptions in certain circumstances that affect amounts reported. The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and assumptions, giving due consideration to materiality, that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, revenues and expenses and related disclosures of any contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements. We regularly review our estimates and assumptions, which are based on historical experience and on various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

  

We believe that of our significant accounting policies, the following are particularly important to the portrayal of our results of operations and financial position and are subject to an inherent degree of uncertainty as they may require the application of a higher level of judgment by us. For further information see “Summary of Significant Accounting Policies” under Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

  

Revenue Recognition

We are required to comply with a variety of technical accounting requirements in order to achieve consistent and accurate revenue recognition. The most significant area of judgment and estimation is percentage-of-completion contract accounting. We develop cost estimates that include materials, component parts, labor and overhead costs. Detailed costs plans are developed for all aspects of the contracts during the bidding phase. Cost estimates are largely based on actual historical performance of similar projects combined with current knowledge of the projects in progress. Significant factors that impact the cost estimates include technical risk, inflationary cost of materials and labor, changes in scope and schedule and internal and subcontractor performance. Actual costs incurred during the project phase are monitored and compared to the estimates on a monthly basis. Cost estimates are revised based on changes in circumstances. Anticipated losses on long-term contracts are recognized when such losses become evident.

 

Inventories

We maintain a material amount of inventory to support our engineering and manufacturing operations. This inventory is stated at the lower of cost or market. On a regular basis, we review our inventory and identify which is excess, slow moving or obsolete by considering factors such as inventory levels, expected product life and forecasted sales demand. Any identified excess, slow moving or obsolete inventory is written down to its market value through a charge to income from operations. It is possible that additional inventory write-down charges may be required in the future if there is a significant decline in demand for our products and we do not adjust our manufacturing production accordingly.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

We review the carrying value of long-lived assets or asset groups, such as property and equipment and intangibles subject to amortization, when events or changes in circumstances such as asset utilization, physical change, legal factors or other matters indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. When this review indicates the carrying value of an asset or asset group exceeds the sum of the undiscounted cash flows expected to result from the use and eventual disposition of the asset or asset group, we recognize an asset impairment charge against income from operations. The amount of the impairment loss recorded is the amount by which the carrying value of the impaired asset or asset group exceeds its fair value.

 

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Goodwill

Goodwill represents the excess of cost over the fair value of the identifiable net assets of businesses acquired and allocated to our reporting units at the time of acquisition. Goodwill is tested for impairment annually and when an event occurs or circumstances change that indicate the carrying value of the reporting unit may not be recoverable.

  

Evaluating goodwill for impairment involves the determination of the fair value of each reporting unit in which goodwill is recorded using a two-step process. A reporting unit is an operating segment or a component of an operating segment for which discrete financial information is available and reviewed by management on a regular basis.

  

Prior to completing the two-step process described below, we have the option to perform a qualitative assessment of goodwill for impairment to determine whether it is more likely than not (i.e., a likelihood of more than 50%) that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying amount, including goodwill and other intangible assets. If we conclude the fair value is more likely than not less than the carrying value, we would perform the two-step process. Otherwise, no further testing would be needed.

  

If the two-step process is required, the first step of the impairment test is to compare the calculated fair value of each reporting unit to its carrying value, including goodwill. We estimate the fair value of a reporting unit using a discounted cash flow model that requires input of certain estimates and assumptions requiring judgment, including projections of economic conditions and customer demand, revenue and margins, changes in competition, operating costs and new product introductions. If the fair value exceeds the carrying value, no further work is required and no impairment loss is recognized. If the carrying value exceeds the fair value, the goodwill of the reporting unit is potentially impaired and step 2 would need to be performed to measure the impairment loss. In step 2, we would calculate the implied fair value of goodwill by deducting the fair value of all tangible and intangible net assets, including unrecognized intangible assets, of the reporting unit from the fair value of the reporting unit. If the implied fair value of goodwill is less than the carrying value of goodwill, an impairment loss equal to the difference would be recognized in the period identified. The loss recognized cannot exceed the carrying amount of goodwill.

  

While we believe the estimates and assumptions used in determining the fair value of our reporting units are reasonable, significant changes in estimates of future cash flows, such as those caused by unforeseen events or changes in market conditions, could materially impact the fair value of a reporting unit which could result in the recognition of a goodwill impairment charge.

  

Software Development Costs

We incur costs associated with the development of software to be sold, leased or otherwise marketed. Software development costs are expensed as incurred until technological feasibility has been established, at which time future costs incurred are capitalized until the product is available for general release to the public. A certain amount of judgment and estimation is required to assess when technological feasibility is established, as well as the ongoing assessment of the recoverability of capitalized costs. In evaluating the recoverability of capitalized software costs, we compare expected product performance, utilizing forecasted revenue amounts, to the total costs incurred to date and estimates of additional costs to be incurred. If revised forecasted product revenue is less than, and/or revised forecasted costs are greater than, the previously forecasted amounts, the net realizable value may be lower than previously estimated, which could result in the recognition of an impairment charge in the period in which such a determination is made.

 

 

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Warranty Obligations

We are subject to warranty obligations on sales of our products. We record general warranty provisions based on an estimated warranty expense percentage applied to current period revenue. The percentage applied reflects our historical warranty claims experience over the preceding twelve-month period. Both the experience percentage and the warranty liability are evaluated on an ongoing basis for adequacy. In addition, warranty provisions are also recognized for certain nonrecurring product claims that are individually significant. A certain amount of judgment is required in determining appropriate reserve levels for anticipated warranty claims. While these reserve levels are based on our historical warranty claims experience, they may not reflect the actual claims that will occur over the upcoming warranty period and additional warranty reserves may be required.

 

Income Taxes 

We record a tax provision for the anticipated tax consequences of the reported results of operations. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using the currently enacted tax rates that apply to taxable income in effect for the years in which those deferred tax assets and liabilities are expected to be realized or settled. We record a valuation allowance to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount that is believed more likely than not to be realized. We believe it is more likely than not that forecasted income, including income that may be generated as a result of certain tax planning strategies, together with the tax effects of the deferred tax liabilities, will be sufficient to fully recover the remaining net realizable value of its deferred tax assets. In the event that all or part of the net deferred tax assets are determined not to be realizable in the future, an adjustment to the valuation allowance would be charged to earnings in the period such determination is made. In addition, the calculation of tax liabilities involves significant judgment in estimating the impact of uncertainties in the application of complex tax laws. Resolution of these uncertainties in a manner inconsistent with our expectations could have a material impact on our financial condition and operating results. See Note 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information on income taxes.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2014-09, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606). This update clarifies the principles for revenue recognition in transactions involving contracts with customers. The new revenue recognition guidance provides a five-step analysis to determine when and how revenue is recognized. The new guidance will require revenue recognition to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to a customer in an amount that reflects the consideration a company expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services.

 

In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Deferral of Effective Date. This update defers the mandatory effective date of its revenue recognition standard by one year. The standard is required to be adopted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within that annual period, which is our fiscal year 2019. Early application is permitted for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within that annual period, which is our fiscal year 2018. We have not yet evaluated what impact, if any, the adoption of this guidance may have on our financial condition, results of operations or disclosures.

 

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In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-11, Inventory (Topic 330): Simplifying the Measurement of Inventory. This update modifies existing requirements regarding measuring inventory at the lower of cost or market. Under current inventory standards, the market value requires consideration of replacement cost, net realizable value and net realizable value less an approximately normal profit margin. The new guidance replaces market with net realizable value defined as estimated selling prices in the ordinary course of business, less reasonably predictable costs of completion, disposal and transportation. This eliminates the need to determine and consider replacement cost or net realizable value less an approximately normal profit margin when measuring inventory. The standard is required to be adopted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within that annual period, which is our fiscal year 2018. The amendment is to be applied prospectively with early permitted. We have not yet evaluated what impact, if any, the adoption of this guidance may have on our financial condition, results of operations or disclosures.

  

In July 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-12, Plan Accounting: Defined Benefit Pension Plans (Topic 960), Defined Contribution Pension Plans (Topic 962), Health and Welfare Benefit Plans (Topic 965): (Part I) Fully Benefit-Responsive Investment Contracts, (Part II) Plan Investment Disclosures, (Part III) Measurement Date Practical Expedient (consensuses of the FASB Emerging Issues Task Force). The update allows for a plan with a fiscal year end that does not coincide with the end of the calendar month to measure its investments and investment-related accounts using the month end closest to its fiscal year end. In previous guidance, the measurement date was required to coincide with the fiscal year end. The standard is required to be adopted for periods beginning after December 15, 2015, which is our fiscal year 2017. The measurement date practical expedient is to be applied prospectively. We have not yet evaluated what impact, if any, the adoption of this guidance may have on our financial condition, results of operations or disclosures.

  

In September 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-16, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Simplifying the Accounting for Measurement-Period Adjustments. This update eliminates the requirement for an acquirer in a business combination to account for measurement-period adjustments retrospectively. Under the existing business combination standard, an acquirer reports provisional amounts with respect to acquired assets and liabilities when their measurements are incomplete as of the end of the reporting period. Prior to this update, an acquirer is required to adjust provisional amounts and the related impact on earnings by restating prior period financial statements during the measurement period which cannot exceed one year from the date of acquisition. The new guidance requires that the cumulative impact of a measurement-period adjustment, including the impact on prior periods, be recognized in the reporting period in which the adjustment is identified eliminating the requirement to restate prior period financial statements. The new standard requires disclosure of the nature and amount of measurement-period adjustments as well as information with respect to the portion of the adjustments recorded in current-period earnings that would have been recorded in previous reporting periods if the adjustments to provisional amounts had been recognized as of the acquisition date. The standard is required to be adopted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2015, including interim periods within that annual period, which is our fiscal year 2017. The amendment is to be applied prospectively to measurement-period adjustments that occur after the effective date with earlier adoption permitted. We have not yet evaluated what impact, if any, the adoption of this guidance may have on our financial condition, results of operations or disclosures.

 

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In November 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-17, Income Taxes (Topic 740): Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes. This update requires deferred tax liabilities and assets to be classified as noncurrent in the Consolidated Balance Sheet. The standard is required to be adopted for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, including interim periods within that annual period, which is our fiscal year 2018. The amendment may be applied either prospectively to all deferred tax liabilities and assets or retrospectively to all periods presented. We have not yet evaluated what impact, if any, the adoption of this guidance may have on our financial condition, results of operations or disclosures.

  

Quarterly Financial Information

Revenue and operating results reported on a quarterly basis do not necessarily reflect trends in demand for our products or our operating efficiency. Revenue and operating results in any quarter may be significantly affected by customer shipments, installation timing or the timing of the completion of one or more contracts where revenue is recognized upon shipment or customer acceptance rather than on the percentage-of-completion method of revenue recognition. Our use of the percentage-of-completion revenue recognition method for large, long-term projects generally has the effect of minimizing significant fluctuations quarter-over-quarter. See Note 1 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information on our revenue recognition policy. Quarterly earnings also vary as a result of the use of estimates including, but not limited to, the rates used in recording federal, state and foreign income tax expense. See Notes 1 and 8 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information on our use of estimates and income tax related matters, respectively.

  

Selected quarterly financial information for the fiscal years ended October 3, 2015 and September 27, 2014 was as follows:  

                
(in thousands, except  First  Second  Third  Fourth  Full
per share data)  Quarter  Quarter  Quarter  Quarter  Year1
   (unaudited)  (unaudited)  (unaudited)  (unaudited)   
Fiscal Year 2015                         
Revenue  $142,584   $143,955   $133,912   $143,483   $563,934 
Gross profit   56,831    56,542    53,209    53,031    219,613 
Income before income taxes   14,885    16,875    15,146    12,266    59,172 
Net income  $13,786   $11,706   $10,783   $9,187   $45,462 
Earnings per share:                         
Basic  $0.91   $0.78   $0.72   $0.62   $3.03 
Diluted  $0.90   $0.77   $0.72   $0.61   $3.00 
                          
Fiscal Year 2014                         
Revenue  $138,410   $137,343   $145,471   $143,104   $564,328 
Gross profit   54,539    55,534    57,695    55,875    223,643 
Income before income taxes   13,695    11,938    17,193    15,617    58,443 
Net income  $9,145   $7,779   $14,144   $10,941   $42,009 
Earnings per share:                         
Basic  $0.60   $0.51   $0.94   $0.72   $2.76 
Diluted  $0.59   $0.50   $0.92   $0.71   $2.73 

 

1The quarters will not sum to the fiscal year amount due to rounding and the effect of weighting.

 

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Forward-Looking Statements

Statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K including, but not limited to, the discussion under Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, that are not statements of historical fact are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the Act). In addition, certain statements in our future filings with the SEC, in press releases, and in oral and written statements made by us or with our approval that are not statements of historical fact constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Act. Examples of forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to: (i) projections of revenue, income or loss, earnings or loss per share, the payment or nonpayment of dividends, capital structure, the adequacy of our liquidity and reserves, the anticipated level of expenditures required and other statements concerning future financial performance; (ii) statements of our plans and objectives by our management or Board of Directors, including those relating to products or services or planned merger or acquisition activity; (iii) statements of assumptions underlying such statements; (iv) statements regarding business relationships with vendors, customers or collaborators or statements relating to our order cancellation history; and (v) statements regarding products, their characteristics, our geographic footprint, performance, sales potential or effect in the hands of customers. Words such as “believes,” “anticipates,” “expects,” “intends,” “targeted,” “should,” “potential,” “goals,” “strategy,” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements, but are not the exclusive means of identifying such statements.

  

Forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties that may cause actual results to differ materially from those in such statements. Factors that could cause actual results to differ from those discussed in the forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, those described in Item 1A, Risk Factors. The performance of our business and our securities may be adversely affected by these factors and by other factors common to other businesses and investments, or to the general economy. Forward-looking statements are qualified by some or all of these risk factors. Therefore, you should consider these forward looking statements with caution and form your own critical and independent conclusions about the likely effect of these risk factors on our future performance. Forward-looking statements speak only as of the date on which statements are made, and we undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances after the date on which such statement is made to reflect the occurrence of unanticipated events or circumstances. Readers should carefully review the disclosures and the risk factors described in this and other documents we file from time to time with the SEC, including our reports on Forms 10-Q and 8-K.

  

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

  

Foreign Currency Exchange Risk

Approximately 75% of our revenue has historically been derived from customers outside of the United States and about 68% of this revenue (approximately 50% of our total revenue) is denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. Our international subsidiaries have functional currencies other than our U.S. dollar reporting currency and, occasionally, transact business in currencies other than their functional currencies. These non-functional currency transactions expose us to market risk on assets, liabilities and cash flows recognized on these transactions.

 

The strengthening of the U.S. dollar relative to foreign currencies decreases the value of foreign currency-denominated revenue and earnings when translated into U.S. dollars. Conversely, a weakening of the U.S. dollar increases the value of foreign currency-denominated revenue and earnings. The following table illustrates financial results utilizing currency exchange rates from the prior year to estimate the impact of currency on the following financial items.

 

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Foreign Currency Exchange Rates 

             
(in thousands) 2015   2014   2013
(Decrease) increase from currency translation on:            
   Orders $  (38,841) $  (1,994) $  (6,460)
   Revenue    (38,118)    (85)    (8,091)
   Net Income $  (2,193) $  (736) $  (920)

 

The estimated net effect of currency translation on orders, revenue and net income was unfavorable in fiscal year 2015 in comparison to fiscal year 2014, primarily driven by the unfavorable translation impact associated with the relative strengthening in the value of the U.S. dollar against the Euro, the Japanese Yen and the Chinese Yuan throughout fiscal year 2015 compared to fiscal year 2014.

 

A hypothetical 10% appreciation or depreciation in foreign currencies against the U.S. dollar, assuming all other variables are held constant, would result in an increase or decrease in fiscal year 2015 revenue of approximately $21,831.

 

We have operational procedures to mitigate these non-functional currency exposures. We also utilize foreign currency exchange contracts to exchange currencies at set exchange rates on future dates to offset expected gains or losses on specifically identified exposures.

 

Mark-to-market gains and losses on derivatives designated as cash flow hedges in our currency hedging program are recorded within accumulated other comprehensive income in the Consolidated Balance Sheets. We recognize gains and losses associated with the fair value of cash flow hedges at the time a gain or loss is recognized on the hedged exposure in the Consolidated Statements of Income or at the time the cash flow hedge is determined to be ineffective. The associated mark-to-market gains and losses are reclassified from accumulated other comprehensive income to the same line item in the Consolidated Statements of Income upon which the underlying hedged transaction is reported. Net gains and losses on foreign currency transactions, included in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Income, were a net loss of $2,510 in fiscal year 2015, a net loss of $1,362 in fiscal year 2014 and a net loss of $1,768 in fiscal year 2013. See Note 5 to the Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

Interest Rates

We are also directly exposed to changes in market interest rates on cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments and debt, and are indirectly exposed to the impact of market interest rates on overall business activity.

 

On floating-rate investments, increases and decreases in market interest rates will increase or decrease future interest income, respectively. On floating-rate debt, increases or decreases in market interest rates will increase or decrease future interest expense, respectively. On fixed-rate investments, increases or decreases in market interest rates do not impact future interest income but may decrease or increase the fair market value of the investments, respectively.

  

At October 3, 2015, we had cash and cash equivalents of $51,768, most of which was invested in interest-bearing bank deposits or money market funds, with interest rates that are reset every 1-89 days. A hypothetical increase or decrease of 1% in market interest rates, assuming all other variables were held constant, would increase or decrease interest income by approximately $598 on an annualized basis.

  

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Our short-term borrowings outstanding at the end of fiscal year 2015 consisted of $21,183 utilization of the revolving credit facility. Borrowings under the credit facility require interest payments calculated at a floating rate and, therefore, are impacted by the effect of increases or decreases in market interest rates. Because we anticipate the borrowing to be outstanding for only a short period of time, we have elected not to mitigate this risk. A hypothetical increase or decrease of 1 percentage point in interest rates, assuming all other variables were held constant, would increase or decrease interest expense by approximately $549 on an annualized basis.

  

At October 3, 2015, a discount rate of 2.3% and an expected rate increase in future compensation levels of 3.0% was used in the calculation of the pension liability related to the non-contributory, defined benefit pension plan of one of our international subsidiaries.

  

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

Our audited financial statements and notes thereto described in Item 15 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and appearing on pages F-1 through F-45 of this report, are incorporated by reference herein. See also “Quarterly Financial Data” in Management’s Discussion and Analysis under Item 7 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, which is incorporated herein by reference.

  

ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE

 

None.

 

ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

(a)Evaluation of disclosure controls and procedures

  

Our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, have conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of the design and operation of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the Exchange Act)) as of October 3, 2015. Our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that, as a result of the material weaknesses in internal control over financial reporting as described below, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective as of October 3, 2015.

  

For purposes of Rule 13a-15(e), the term disclosure controls and procedures means controls and other procedures of an issuer that are designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by the issuer in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act (15 U.S.C. 78a et seq.) is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. Disclosure controls and procedures include, without limitation, controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed by an issuer in the reports that it files or submits under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to the issuer’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, or persons performing similar functions, as appropriate to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.

 

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(b)Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

  

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as such term is defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Under the supervision of the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors and with the participation of our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, we conducted an evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting using the criteria established in Internal Control – Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

  

The Company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that:

  

(i)Pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company;

 

(ii)Provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and

 

(iii)Provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

  

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

  

A material weakness is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

Based on our assessment and those criteria, management concluded that our internal control over financial reporting as of October 3, 2015 was not effective due to the material weaknesses described as follows:

  

·Risk Assessment, Information and Communication and Monitoring Activities – Revenue Arrangements

 

(i)With respect to risk assessment, our controls were not designed in a manner that would enable us to sufficiently identify and address risks associated with:

 

(a)   the review of contractual revenue arrangements, the identification of the various deliverables contained within those arrangements and the deferral of revenue associated with the undelivered elements which are separable from the delivered elements contained in the arrangement;

 

(b)   the timely closure of revenue projects within our enterprise resource planning (ERP) system and the release of residual accrued costs related to those revenue projects; and

 

(c)   providing reasonable assurance that certain automated ERP system controls were properly configured to recognize revenue and cost of goods sold related to a specific revenue type code.

 

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(ii)With respect to information and communications, the controls related to communication of the requirements to perform certain control activities over accrued project costs were not effective at the time of a personnel changeover.

 

(iii)With respect to monitoring, the controls were not designed in a manner to enable us to effectively determine the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting with respect to certain revenue controls.

 

The deficiencies in these COSO components are interrelated and represent a material weakness in the aggregate with respect to the revenue process. This material weakness contributed to the other material weaknesses described below and ultimately to a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of our interim and annual consolidated financial statements would not be prevented or detected and corrected on a timely basis.

  

·Control Activities – Revenue Arrangements With Multiple Deliverables

  

The design of our controls were inadequate to provide reasonable assurance of the consistent identification of deliverables contained within our revenue arrangements and the revenue deferral associated with undelivered elements determined to be separable from the delivered elements in the arrangement.

  

·Control Activities – Accrued Project Costs

  

The design and operating effectiveness of our controls were inadequate to provide reasonable assurance of the timely closure of revenue projects within our ERP system and the release of residual accrued costs related to those revenue projects.

  

These material weaknesses resulted in material misstatements in revenue and cost of sales that were corrected prior to the issuance of the Company’s consolidated financial statements. Notwithstanding the identified material weaknesses, management believes that the consolidated financial statements included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K fairly represent, in all material respects, our financial condition, results of operations and cash flows at and for the periods presented in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles based on the performance of additional procedures by management designed to ensure the reliability of our financial reporting.

  

KPMG LLP, an independent registered public accounting firm, has audited the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of October 3, 2015, and has issued an adverse report which is included in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

  

(c)Remediation Plan for Material Weaknesses in Internal Control over Financial Reporting

  

We are committed to remediating the control deficiencies that gave rise to the material weaknesses by implementing changes to our internal control over financial reporting. Management is responsible for implementing changes and improvements in our internal control over financial reporting and for remediating the control deficiencies that gave rise to the material weaknesses.

 

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To remediate the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting described above, we will be performing a complete review of our revenue recognition controls and procedures by members of our management team with the requisite level of accounting knowledge, experience and training and will include a review with an external party to evaluate the sufficiency of those controls and procedures. These measures also include the implementation of financial reporting risk assessments and review processes to ensure the related significant accounting policies are implemented and applied properly under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles on a consistent basis throughout the Company.

 

We will also develop an internal communications protocol amongst all individuals in the organization responsible for performing control activities with respect to revenue recognition and will enhance our own internal monitoring of the effectiveness of our revenue recognition control activities.

 

Futher, we intend to implement new procedures in our sales and contracting processes to include identification of specific deliverables contained within multiple element revenue arrangements, and to defer the revenue associated with the undelivered elements determined to be separable from the delivered elements in the arrangement. These measures will include the hiring of new personnel, as well as providing additional training for existing personnel.

  

(d)Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

  

There were no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2015 that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. The changes described above to remediate the material weaknesses will be implemented after the end of the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2015.

 

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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

The Board of Directors and Shareholders

MTS Systems Corporation:

  

We have audited MTS Systems Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of October 3, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO). MTS Systems Corporation’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in the accompanying Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.

 

We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audit also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.

 

Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.

  

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A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Material weaknesses related to the Company’s risk assessment, information and communication, and monitoring components with respect to the revenue process, control activities over identification of deliverables contained in multiple element revenue arrangements, and control activities over timely closure of revenue projects and release of residual accrued costs have been identified and included in management’s assessment. We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the consolidated balance sheets of MTS Systems Corporation and subsidiaries as of October 3, 2015 and September 27, 2014 and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows, and the related financial statement Schedule II, for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended October 3, 2015. These material weaknesses were considered in determining the nature, timing, and extent of audit tests applied in our audit of the fiscal year 2015 consolidated financial statements, and this report does not affect our report dated December 2, 2015, which expressed an unqualified opinion on those consolidated financial statements.

 

In our opinion, because of the effect of the aforementioned material weaknesses on the achievement of the objectives of the control criteria, MTS Systems Corporation has not maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of October 3, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).

  

/s/ KPMG LLP

  

Minneapolis, Minnesota

December 2, 2015

 

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ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION

  

None.

  

PART III

  

ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

  

The required information with respect to our directors, our Code of Conduct, compliance with Section 16(a) of the Exchange Act and our Audit Committee, including our Audit Committee financial experts, is incorporated by reference to the information set forth under the headings “Election of Directors” and “Other Information – Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” in our Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders scheduled to be held on February 9, 2016.

  

Executive Officers serve at the discretion of and are elected by our Board of Directors. There are no family relationships amongst any of the executive officers named, nor is there any undisclosed arrangement or understanding pursuant to which any person was selected as an officer. The business experience of the executive officers over the last five years, their present position, their age and the year in which such person became an executive officer are presented in the table below.

 

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Officer

 

 

 

 

Business Experience

 

 

 

 

Age

Executive

Officer
Since

           

Jeffrey A. Graves,
President and Chief Executive Officer

President and Chief Executive Officer since May 2012. President and Chief Executive Officer of C&D Technologies, Inc., a global manufacturer of energy storage systems, from July 2005 to May 2012. 54 2012
       

Jeffrey P. Oldenkamp,

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

 

Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since January 2015. Vice President of Test Finance from January 2014 to January 2015. Americas Operations Chief Financial Officer and Vice President of Finance of Nilfisk-Advance, Inc., a global manufacture of professional cleaning equipment, from January 2012 to January 2014 and Vice President of Finance for the Americas from April 2008 to January 2012.

 

43 2015

William E. Bachrach,

Senior Vice President, Test

Senior Vice President of Test since October 2014. Senior Vice President and General Manager of Sensors from March 2013 to January 2015. Chief Operating Officer of ROAM Data, a global payment solutions provider, from 2010 to March 2013. President of Murata Power Solutions (formerly C&D Technologies Power Systems) from 2005 to 2009.

 

56 2013
       

John V. Emholz,

Senior Vice President and General Manager, Sensors

  

Senior Vice President and General Manager of Sensors since January 2015. Vice President of the Electronics Business Unit for Danfoss Power Solutions, a global hydraulic systems and components for mobile machinery business, from May 2007 to December 2014.

 

52 2015

Catherine S. Powell,

Senior Vice President, General Counsel, Chief Compliance Officer and Corporate Secretary

 

Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Chief Compliance Officer since November 2015. Assistant Corporate Secretary from August 2012 to November 2015. Assistant General Counsel from February 2012 to November 2015. Associate General Counsel for Modine Manufacturing Company, a developer and manufacturer of thermal management systems and components, from November 2008 to January 2012.

  

53 2015

 

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ITEM 11.EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference to the information set forth under headings “Executive Compensation,” “Election of Directors – Non-Employee Director Compensation,” and “Other Information – Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation” in our Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders scheduled to be held on February 9, 2016.

  

ITEM 12.SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS

  

The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference to the information set forth under the heading “Other Information – Security Ownership of Principal Shareholders and Management” and “Other Information – Information Regarding Equity Compensation Plans” in our Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders scheduled to be held on February 9, 2016.

  

ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE

  

The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference to the information set forth under the headings “Election of Directors – Other Information Regarding the Board” and “Other Information – Related Party Transactions” in our Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders scheduled to be held February 9, 2016.

  

ITEM 14.  PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

  

The information required by this Item is incorporated by reference to the information set forth under the heading “Ratification of Appointment of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm” in our Proxy Statement for the Annual Meeting of Shareholders scheduled to be held on February 9, 2016.

  

PART IV

  

ITEM 15.EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

 

(a)The following documents are filed as part of this report:

 

(1)Consolidated Financial Statements

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

  

Consolidated Balance Sheets – October 3, 2015 and September 27, 2014

  

Consolidated Statements of Income for the Fiscal Years Ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013

  

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the Fiscal Years Ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013

  

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the Fiscal Years Ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013

  

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Fiscal Years Ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013

  

Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

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(2)Financial Statement Schedules

 

See accompanying Index to Financial Statements on page F-1

 

All other schedules

 

(3)Exhibits

     
Exhibit    
Number   Description
 
3.1   Restated and Amended Articles of Incorporation, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.a of the Company’s Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 29, 2012.
     
3.2   Amended and Restated Bylaws, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 3.b of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed November 28, 2011.
     
10.1   Executive Variable Compensation Plan, incorporated by reference to Appendix A of the Company’s Proxy Statement filed on December 30, 2014.*
     
10.2   2012 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, incorporated by reference to Appendix B of the Company’s Proxy Statement filed on December 28, 2010.*
     
10.3   Amendments to the Company’s Executive Deferred Compensation Plan (2005), incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed October 28, 2008.*
     
10.4   2011 Stock Incentive Plan, conformed copy including all amendments through October 1, 2013, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended December 27, 2014.*
     
10.5   Form of Notice of Grant and Terms and Conditions of Employee Options under 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.1 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed February 9, 2011.*
     
10.6   Form of Notice of Grant and Terms and Conditions of Employee Restricted Stock Units under 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.2 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed February 9, 2011.*
     
10.7   Form of Notice of Grant and Terms and Conditions of Employee Restricted Stock under 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.3 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed February 9, 2011.*
     
10.8   Form of Notice of Grant and Terms and Conditions of Restricted Stock for Directors under 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 99.4 of the Company’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed February 9, 2011.*

 

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10.9   Form of Notice of Grant of Restricted Stock and Restricted Stock Agreement – Director under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended December 28, 2013.*
     
10.10   Form of Notice of Grant of Restricted Stock Units and Restricted Stock Agreement – Non-Employee Director under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended December 28, 2013.*
     
10.11   Uniform Terms and Conditions Applicable to Non-Employee Director Restricted Stock Unit Grants under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.3 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended December 28, 2013.*
     
10.12   Form of Notice of Grant of Restricted Stock Units and Restricted Stock Unit Agreement – Employee under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.4 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended December 28, 2013.*
     
10.13   Uniform Terms and Conditions Applicable to Employee Restricted Stock Unit Grants under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.5 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended December 28, 2013.*
     
10.14   Form of Notice of Grant of Non-Qualified Stock Options and Option Agreement – Employee under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.6 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended December 28, 2013.*
     
10.15   Uniform Terms and Conditions Applicable to Employee Option Grants under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.7 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended December 28, 2013.*
     
10.16   Uniform Terms and Conditions Applicable to Employee Performance Restricted Stock Unit Agreements under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan (filed herewith).*
     
10.17   Form of Notice of Grant Performance Restricted Stock Units and Performance Restricted Stock Unit Agreement - Employee under the 2011 Stock Incentive Plan (filed herewith).*
     
10.18   Letter Agreement, dated as of March 31, 2012, between the Company and Jeffrey A. Graves, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed April 9, 2012.*
     
10.19   Letter Agreement, dated February 25, 2013, between the Company and William E. Bachrach, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Form 10-Q for the fiscal quarter ended March 30, 2013.*
     
10.20   Letter Agreement, dated December 9, 2014, by and between the Company and John Emholz, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed December 15, 2014.*
     
10.21   Consulting Agreement, dated January 3, 2015, by and between the Company and Susan Knight, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed January 5, 2015.*
     
10.22   Form of Indemnification Agreement between the Company and each of its directors and executive officers, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed September 1, 2006.*

 

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10.23   Executive Severance Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed October 3, 2013.*
     
10.24   Executive Change in Control Severance Plan, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.2 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed October 3, 2013.*
     
10.25   Credit Agreement, dated as of September 24, 2014, among the Company; U.S. Bank National Association; HSBC Bank USA, National Association; Wells Fargo Bank, National Association; JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A.; J.P. Morgan Securities LLC; and Wells Fargo Securities LLC, incorporated by reference to Exhibit 10.1 of the Company’s Current Report on Form 8-K filed September 25, 2014.**
     
21   Subsidiaries of the Registrant (filed herewith).
     
23   Consent of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (filed herewith).
     
31.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (filed herewith).
     
31.2   Certification of the Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (filed herewith).
     
32.1   Certification of the Chief Executive Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (filed herewith).
     
32.2   Certification of the Chief Financial Officer Pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (filed herewith).
     
101.INS***   XBRL Instance Document (filed herewith).
     
101.SCH***   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document (filed herewith).
     
101.CAL***   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document (filed herewith).
     
101.DEF***   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document (filed herewith).
     
101.LAB***   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document (filed herewith).
     
101.PRE***   XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document (filed herewith).
     
*   Denotes our contract or executive compensation plan or arrangement required to be filed as an exhibit pursuant to Item 15 of Form 10-K.
     
**   Pursuant to Item 601(b)(4)(iii)(A) of Regulation S-K, we have omitted certain agreements with respect to long-term debt not exceeding 10% of consolidated total assets. We agree to furnish a copy of any such agreements to the Securities and Exchange Commission upon request.
     
***  

XBRL (Extensible Business Reporting Language) information is furnished and not filed or a part of a registration statement or prospectus for purposes of Sections 11 or 12 of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, is deemed not filed for purposes of Section 18 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and otherwise is not subject to liability under these sections.

  

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SIGNATURES

 

Pursuant to the requirements of Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, the registrant has duly caused this report to be signed on its behalf by the undersigned, thereunto duly authorized.

     
  MTS SYSTEMS CORPORATION
     
  By: /s/ JEFFREY A. GRAVES
    Jeffrey A. Graves
    President and Chief Executive Officer
     
  By: /s/ JEFFREY P. OLDENKAMP
    Jeffrey P. Oldenkamp
    Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
     
Date:  December 2, 2015    

 

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Pursuant to the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, this report has been signed below by the following persons on behalf of the registrant and in the capacities and on the dates indicated.

 

/s/ JEFFREY A. GRAVES   President and   December 2, 2015
Jeffrey A. Graves   Chief Executive Officer    
    and Director    
    (Principal Executive Officer)    
         
/s/ JEFFREY P. OLDENKAMP   Senior Vice President   December 2, 2015
Jeffrey P. Oldenkamp   and Chief Financial Officer    
    (Principal Financial Officer and    
    Principal Accounting Officer)    
         
/s/ DAVID J. ANDERSON   Non-Executive   December 2, 2015
David J. Anderson   Chair of the Board    
         
/s/ DAVID D. JOHNSON   Director   December 2, 2015
David D. Johnson        
         
/s/ EMILY M. LIGGETT   Director   December 2, 2015
Emily M. Liggett        
         
/s/ RANDY J. MARTINEZ   Director   December 2, 2015
Randy J. Martinez        
         
/s/ BARB J. SAMARDZICH   Director   December 2, 2015
Barb J. Samardzich        
         
/s/ MICHAEL V. SCHROCK   Director   December 2, 2015
Michael V. Schrock        
         
/s/ GAIL P. STEINEL   Director   December 2, 2015
Gail P. Steinel        
         
/s/ CHUN HUNG (KENNETH) YU   Director   December 2, 2015
Chun Hung (Kenneth) Yu        

 

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MTS Systems Corporation and Subsidiaries

 

Index to Consolidated Financial Statements

 

  Page
       
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm   F-2
       
Consolidated Balance Sheets – October 3, 2015 and September 27, 2014   F-3
       
Consolidated Statements of Income for the Fiscal Years Ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013   F-4
       
Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income for the Fiscal Years Ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013   F-5
       
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the Fiscal Years Ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013   F-6
       
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Fiscal Years Ended October 3, 2015, September 27, 2014 and September 28, 2013   F-7
       
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements   F-8 through F-44
       
Financial Statement Schedule    
       
Schedule Description    
       
     II Summary of Consolidated Allowances for Doubtful Accounts   F-45
         
F-1
 

Table of Contents

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

The Board of Directors and Shareholders

MTS Systems Corporation:

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of MTS Systems Corporation and subsidiaries as of October 3, 2015 and September 27, 2014, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended October 3, 2015. In connection with our audits of the consolidated financial statements, we have also audited financial statement Schedule II. These consolidated financial statements and financial statement schedule are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements and financial statement schedule based on our audits.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of MTS Systems Corporation and subsidiaries as of October 3, 2015 and September 27, 2014 and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the fiscal years in the three-year period ended October 3, 2015, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic consolidated financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly, in all material respects, the information set forth therein.

 

We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), MTS Systems Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of October 3, 2015, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated December 2, 2015 expressed an adverse opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

 

/s/ KPMG LLP

 

Minneapolis, Minnesota

December 2, 2015

 

F-2
 

Table of Contents

 
Consolidated Balance Sheets
(in thousands, except per share data)

 

   October 3, 2015   September 27, 2014 
Assets          
Current assets          
Cash and cash equivalents  $51,768   $60,397
Accounts receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $3,411 and $2,609, respectively   89,829    104,399 
Unbilled accounts receivable   77,519    75,762 
Inventories   86,303    83,557 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   8,104    13,937 
Deferred income taxes   14,190    12,930 
Total current assets   327,713    350,982 
Property and equipment, net   80,454    81,575 
Goodwill   27,677    26,123 
Other intangible assets, net   19,706    21,178 
Other assets   2,010    3,694 
Deferred income taxes   3,271    3,856 
Total assets  $460,831   $487,408 
           
Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity          
Current liabilities          
Short-term borrowings  $21,183   $60,000 
Accounts payable   32,994    27,189 
Accrued payroll and related costs   27,938    30,009 
Advance payments from customers   65,734    52,335 
Accrued warranty costs   4,695    4,286 
Accrued income taxes   3,273    6,041 
Deferred income taxes   990    1,641 
Accrued dividends       4,476 
Other accrued liabilities   19,845    17,004 
Total current liabilities   176,652    202,981 
Deferred income taxes   8,154    6,045 
Non-current accrued income taxes   5,649    5,990 
Defined benefit pension plan obligation   7,784    7,654 
Other long-term liabilities   4,450    6,611 
Total liabilities   202,689    229,281 
           
Shareholders’ Equity          
Common stock, $0.25 par value; 64,000 shares authorized: 14,932 and 15,180 shares issued and outstanding as of October 3, 2015 and September 27, 2014, respectively   3,733    3,795 
Additional paid-in capital   4,275    6,112 
Retained earnings   255,711    242,396 
Accumulated other comprehensive income   (5,577)   5,824 
Total shareholders’ equity   258,142    258,127 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity  $460,831   $487,408 
           
The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3
 

Table of Contents

 

Consolidated Statements of Income
(in thousands, except per share data)

 

For the Fiscal Year Ended  October 3, 2015  September 27, 2014  September 28, 2013
Revenue             
Product  $484,835  $487,011  $497,620 
Service   79,099   77,317   71,819 
Total Revenue   563,934   564,328   569,439 
Cost of Sales             
Product   296,962   296,449   296,256 
Service   47,359   44,236   41,244 
Total Cost of Sales   344,321   340,685   337,500 
Gross Profit   219,613   223,643   231,939 
Operating Expenses             
Selling and marketing   82,974   88,136   81,009 
General and administrative   51,438   51,407   48,163 
Research and development   23,705   23,844   22,812 
Total Operating Expenses   158,117   163,387   151,984 
Income From Operations   61,496   60,256   79,955 
Interest income (expense), net   (795)  (692)  (334)
Other income (expense), net   (1,529)  (1,121)  (367)
Income Before Income Taxes   59,172   58,443   79,254 
Provision for income taxes   13,710   16,434   21,448 
Net Income  $45,462  $42,009  $57,806 
Earnings Per Share             
Basic  $3.03  $2.76  $3.69 
Diluted  $3.00  $2.73  $3.64 
              
Dividends declared per share  $1.20  $1.20  $1.20 

 

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4
 

Table of Contents

 

 

Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income            
(in thousands, except per share data)      

             
For the Fiscal Year Ended  October 3, 2015   September 27, 2014   September 28, 2013 
Net income  $45,462   $42,009   $57,806 
Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax:               
Foreign currency translation adjustments   (11,215)   (5,099)   585 
Derivative instruments:               
Unrealized net gain (loss)   2,226    1,112    1,349 
Net (gain) loss reclassified to earnings   (2,738)   (691)   (464)
Defined benefit pension plan:               
Unrealized net gain (loss)   (874)   (2,553)   (128)
Net loss reclassified to earnings   350    324    363 
Currency exchange rate change   850    394    (269)
Other comprehensive income (loss)   (11,401)   (6,513)   1,436 
Comprehensive income  $34,061   $35,496   $59,242 

 

The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5
 

Table of Contents

 

Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity
(in thousands, except per share data)

                                   
                        Accumulated        
  Common Stock   Additional         Other   Total  
  Shares         Paid-In   Retained   Comprehensive   Shareholders’  
  Issued   Amount   Capital   Earnings   Income   Equity  
Balance, September 29, 2012  15,640   $  3,910   $  652   $  211,256   $  10,901   $  226,719  
Total comprehensive income  -      -      -      57,806      1,436      59,242  
Exercise of stock options  243      61      7,833      -      -      7,894  
Stock-based compensation  40      10      3,653      -      -      3,663  
Tax benefit from equity compensation  -      -      1,835      -      -      1,835  
Issuance for employee stock purchase plan  20      5      746      -      -      751  
Common stock purchased and retired  (535 )    (134 )    (14,719 )    (9,914 )    -      (24,767 )
Dividends, $1.20 per share  -      -      -      (18,800 )    -      (18,800 )
Balance, September 28, 2013  15,408   $  3,852   $  -   $  240,348   $  12,337   $  256,537  
Total comprehensive income  -      -      -      42,009      (6,513 )    35,496  
Exercise of stock options  182      46      6,680      -      -      6,726  
Stock-based compensation  31      7      6,045      -      -      6,052  
Tax benefit from equity compensation  -      -      1,727      -      -      1,727  
Issuance for employee stock purchase plan  16      4      860      -      -      864  
Common stock purchased and retired  (457 )    (114 )    (9,200 )    (21,699 )    -      (31,013 )
Dividends, $1.20 per share  -      -      -      (18,262 )    -      (18,262 )
Balance, September 27, 2014  15,180   $  3,795   $  6,112   $  242,396   $  5,824   $  258,127  
Total comprehensive income  -      -      -      45,462      (11,401 )    34,061  
Exercise of stock options  92      23      3,904      -      -      3,927  
Stock-based compensation  57      14      7,443      -      -      7,457  
Tax benefit from equity compensation  -      -      734      -      -      734  
Issuance for employee stock purchase plan  16      4      916      -      -      920  
Common stock purchased and retired  (413 )    (103 )    (14,834 )    (14,178 )    -      (29,115 )
Dividends, $1.20 per share  -      -      -      (17,969 )    -      (17,969 )
Balance, October 3, 2015  14,932   $  3,733   $  4,275   $  255,711   $  (5,577 ) $  258,142  
                                   
The accompanying Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.  

 

F-6
 

Table of Contents

 

Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows                  
(in thousands)      

             
For the Fiscal Year Ended  October 3, 2015   September 27, 2014   September 28, 2013 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:               
Net income  $45,462   $42,009   $57,806 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash               
provided by (used in) operating activities:               
Stock-based compensation   7,351    5,761    3,736 
Excess tax benefits from stock-based compensation   (771)   (1,723)   (1,807)
Fair value adjustment to acquired inventory               
and deferred revenue   -    564    - 
Net periodic pension benefit cost   986    <