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Table of Contents
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2022
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934 FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM TO
Commission File No. 1-15579
 msa-20221231_g1.jpg
MSA SAFETY INCORPORATED
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Pennsylvania 46-4914539
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization) (IRS Employer Identification No.)
1000 Cranberry Woods Drive
Cranberry Township,Pennsylvania 16066-5207
(Address of principal executive offices) (Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (724776-8600
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Common Stock, no par valueMSANew York Stock Exchange
(Title of each class)(Trading symbol(s))(Name of each exchange on which registered)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes  ¨    No  x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes  x    No  ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large Accelerated FilerxAccelerated filerNon-accelerated filerSmaller reporting companyEmerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. ¨ 
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The aggregate market value of voting stock held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2022 was approximately $4.4 billion. As of February 10, 2023, there were outstanding 39,213,240 shares of common stock, no par value.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Proxy Statement for the May 12, 2023 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III.


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Cautionary Statement Regarding Forward-Looking Statements
This report may contain (and verbal statements made by MSA® Safety Incorporated (MSA) may contain) "forward-looking statements" within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These statements relate to future events or future financial performance and involve various assumptions, known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause our actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. These risks and other factors include, but are not limited to, those listed in this report under “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and elsewhere in this report. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “intends,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “predicts,” “potential” or other comparable words. Actual results, performance or outcomes may differ materially from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements and may not align with historical performance and events due to a number of factors, including those discussed in the sections of this report described above. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot guarantee future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements, and caution should be exercised against placing undue reliance upon such statements. We are under no duty to update publicly any of the forward-looking statements after the date of this report, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.
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PART I
Item 1. Business
OverviewEstablished in 1914, MSA Safety Incorporated is the global leader in the development, manufacture and supply of safety products and software that protect people and facility infrastructures. Recognized for their market leading innovation, many MSA products integrate a combination of electronics, software, mechanical systems and advanced materials to protect users against hazardous or life-threatening situations. The Company's comprehensive product line, which are governed by rigorous safety standards across highly regulated industries, is used by workers around the world in a broad range of markets, including fire service, the oil, gas and petrochemical industry, construction, industrial manufacturing applications, heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration ("HVAC-R"), utilities, mining and the military. The Company's core products include breathing apparatus where self-contained breathing apparatus ("SCBA") is the principal product, fixed gas and flame detection systems, portable gas detection instruments, industrial head protection products, firefighter helmets and protective apparel and fall protection devices.
The Company’s leading market positions across nearly all of its core products are supported and enabled by a strong commitment to investing in new product development that continually raises the bar for safety equipment performance, all while upholding an unwavering commitment to integrity. We dedicate significant resources to research and development, which allows us to produce innovative safety products that are often first to market. Our global product development teams include cross-functional associates throughout the Company, including research and development, marketing, sales, operations and quality management. Our engineers and technical associates work closely with the safety industry’s leading standards-setting groups and trade associations to develop industry specific product standards and to anticipate their impact on our product line.
SegmentsWe tailor our product offerings and distribution strategy to satisfy distinct customer preferences that vary across geographic regions. To best serve these customer preferences, we have organized our business into four geographic operating segments that are aggregated into three reportable geographic segments: Americas, International and Corporate. Segment information is presented in Note 8—Segment Information of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
Because our consolidated financial statements are stated in U.S. dollars and much of our business is conducted outside the U.S., currency fluctuations may affect our results of operations and financial position and may affect the comparability of our results between financial periods.
ProductsWe design, manufacture, and sell a comprehensive line of safety products and solutions to protect the health and safety of workers and facility infrastructures around the world in the fire service, the oil, gas and petrochemical industry, construction, industrial manufacturing applications, HVAC-R, utilities, mining and the military. Our products protect people against a wide variety of hazardous or life-threatening situations.
The following is a brief description of each of our product categories:
Core products. MSA's corporate strategy includes a focus on driving sales of core products, where we have leading market positions and a distinct competitive advantage. Core products, as mentioned above, include breathing apparatus where SCBA is the principal product, fixed gas and flame detection systems, portable gas detection instruments, industrial head protection products, firefighter helmets and protective apparel and fall protection devices. Core products comprised approximately 90% and 89% of sales in 2022 and 2021, respectively.
The following is a brief description of our core product offerings:
Breathing apparatus products. The primary breathing apparatus product is the SCBA. SCBA are used by first responders, petrochemical plant workers and anyone entering an environment deemed immediately dangerous to life and health. The SCBA functions together with various MSA cloud-based software modules and proprietary accessories to create a complete and customizable solution for our customers. Our primary breathing apparatus product in the Americas segment, the MSA G1 SCBA, is a revolutionary platform that offers many differentiated features. With new hardware and software upgrades always under development, this platform continues to evolve to meet our customers’ needs. Our newest breathing apparatus product, the MSA M1 SCBA, represents the most advanced and ergonomic SCBA we have ever launched for our International markets. The “M” stands for modular, which is a critical design element that allows this platform to meet the many varied needs of customers around the world. We sell breathing apparatus across both the Americas and International segments.
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Fixed gas and flame detection instruments ("FGFD"). Our permanently installed fixed gas and flame detection instruments are used in oil, gas and petrochemical applications, wastewater, heating, ventilation and air conditioning ("HVAC") and general industrial production facilities to detect the presence or absence of various gases in the air. Typical applications of these instruments include the detection of an oxygen deficiency in confined spaces or the presence of combustible or toxic gases. The FGFD product line generates a meaningful portion of overall revenue from recurring business including replacement components and related service. We sell these instruments in both our Americas and International segments. Key products include:
Permanently installed gas detection monitoring systems. This product line is used to monitor for combustible and toxic gases and oxygen deficiency in virtually any application where continuous monitoring is required. Our systems are used for gas detection in the oil and gas industry, petrochemical, pulp and paper, wastewater, refrigerant monitoring, pharmaceutical production and general industrial applications. Our Ultima®X5000 and S5000 gas monitors enhance facility and worker safety while lowering overall cost of ownership for our customers through differentiated sensor technology. These systems utilize a wide array of sensor technologies including electrochemical, catalytic, infrared and ultrasonic.
Flame detectors and open-path infrared gas detectors. These instruments are used for plant-wide monitoring of toxic gases and for detecting the presence of flames. These systems use infrared optics to detect potentially hazardous conditions across long distances, making them suitable for use in such applications as offshore oil rigs, storage vessels, refineries, pipelines and ventilation ducts.
In 2021 MSA acquired Bacharach, Inc. and its affiliated companies (Bacharach), a leader in gas detection technologies used in the HVAC-R markets. Bacharach’s advanced instrumentation technologies help protect lives and the environment, while also increasing operational efficiency for its diversified customer base. Bacharach's portfolio of gas detection and analysis products are used to detect, measure and analyze leaks of various gases that are commonly found in both commercial and industrial settings. Bacharach has strong expertise in the refrigerant leak detection market with customers in the HVAC-R, food retail, automotive, commercial and industrial refrigeration, and military markets.
Portable gas detection instruments. Our hand-held portable gas detection instruments are used to detect the presence or absence of various gases in the air. The product line is used by oil, gas and petrochemical workers, general industrial workers, miners, utility workers, first responders or anyone working in a confined space environment. Typical applications of these instruments include the detection of an oxygen deficiency in confined spaces or the presence of combustible or toxic gases. Our single- and multi-gas detectors provide portable solutions for detecting the presence of oxygen, combustible gases and various toxic gases, including hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, ammonia and chlorine, either singularly or up to six gases at once. Our ALTAIR® 2X, ALTAIR 4XR and ALTAIR 5X Multigas Detectors, with our internally developed XCell® sensor technology, provide faster response times and unsurpassed durability. During 2022, we launched the ALTAIR® io™ 4 gas detection wearable, designed with fully integrated connectivity for real-time visibility across worksites. We sell portable gas detection instruments in both our Americas and International segments.
MSA also leverages proprietary Internet of Things solutions and wireless solutions to connect our hardware products directly to our cloud offering ("MSA Grid"). MSA Grid offers solutions for both fleet management and live monitoring while interfacing directly with the breadth of MSA hardware products. Through this cloud technology, MSA provides services that enhance worker safety and accountability by adding this layer of transparency that does not normally exist in industrial settings.
Industrial head protection. We offer a complete line of industrial head protection and accessories that includes the iconic V-Gard® helmet brand, a bellwether product in MSA's portfolio for over 50 years. We offer customers a wide range of color choices and we are a world leader in the application of customized logos. Our industrial head protection products have a wide user base, including oil, gas and petrochemical workers, steel and construction workers, miners and industrial workers. Our Fas-Trac® III Suspension system was designed to provide enhanced comfort without sacrificing safety. Our strongest sales of head protection products have historically been in the Americas segment.
Firefighter helmets and protective apparel. We offer a complete line of fire helmets that includes our Cairns® and Gallet® helmet brands. Our Cairns helmets are primarily used by firefighters in North America while the Gallet helmets are primarily used by firefighters across our International segment. Globe® Holding Company, LLC ("Globe") and B T Q Limited ("Bristol Uniforms"), are both leading innovators and providers of firefighter personal protective equipment ("PPE") and boots. MSA's firefighter safety PPE offering in the Americas segment protects firefighters from head to toe, with Cairns Helmets, our industry leading G1 SCBA, and Globe turnout gear and boots. MSA's firefighter safety PPE offering in the International segment includes the XF1 Gallet Helmet and Bristol Uniforms turnout gear, in addition to the M1 SCBA described above.
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Fall protection. Our broad line of fall protection equipment includes harnesses, lanyards, self-retracting lifelines, engineered systems and confined space equipment. Fall protection equipment is used by workers in the construction industry, oil, gas and petrochemical market, utilities industry, aerospace industry, general industrial applications and anyone working at height. MSA’s new V-Series fall protection equipment has transformed the Company’s harness and self-retracting lanyard portfolio, with approximately 50 new fall protection products launched over the past several years. The V-Series brand of fall protection equipment is inspired by MSA's iconic V-Gard hard hat, which is used by millions of workers around the world. Additionally, we recently launched a patent-pending Personal Fall Limiter with a smart hook connector that uses radio -frequency identification ("RFID") technology to alert wearers when they are not secured to an anchorage point.
MSA+. Our new safety solutions platform that integrates safety hardware technology, cloud software solutions and safety services was launched in 2022. By integrating our offerings and coupling them with subscription pricing, MSA improved access to our solutions and facilitates the digital transformation of safety programs while further accelerating our recurring revenue business.
Non-core products. MSA maintains a portfolio of non-core products. Non-core products reinforce and extend the core offerings, drawing upon our customer relationships, distribution channels, geographical presence and technical experience. These products are complementary to the core offerings and sometimes reflect more episodic or contract-driven growth patterns. Key non-core products include air-purifying respirators ("APR"), eye and face protection, ballistic helmets and gas masks. Ballistic helmet and gas mask sales are the primary sales to our military customers and were approximately $55 million globally in 2022 compared to $43 million in 2021.
We have patents and pending patents across substantially all of our products.
CustomersOur customers generally fall into two categories: distributors and end-users. In our Americas segment, the majority of our sales are made through distribution. In our International segment, sales are made through both indirect and direct sales channels. For the year ended December 31, 2022, no individual customer represented more than 10% of our sales.
Sales and DistributionOur sales and distribution team consists of marketing, field sales and customer service organizations. In most geographic areas, our field sales organizations work jointly with select distributors to call on end-users and educate them about hazards, exposure limits, safety requirements and product applications, as well as the specific performance attributes of our products. We believe that understanding end-user requirements is critical to increasing MSA's market share.
The in-depth customer training and education provided by our sales associates to our customers is critical to ensuring proper use of many of our products, such as SCBA and gas detection instruments. As a result of our sales associates working closely with end-users, they gain valuable insight into customer preferences and needs. To better serve our customers and to ensure that our sales associates are among the most knowledgeable and professional in the industry, we place significant emphasis on training our sales associates in product application, industry standards and regulations.
We believe our sales and distribution strategy allows us to deliver a customer value proposition that differentiates our products and services from those of our competitors, resulting in increased customer loyalty and demand.
In areas where we use indirect selling, we promote, distribute and service our products to general industry through authorized national, regional and local distributors. We distribute fire service products primarily through specially trained local and regional distributors who provide advanced training and service capabilities to volunteer and paid municipal fire departments. Because of our broad and diverse product line and our desire to reach as many markets and market segments as possible, we have over 2,200 authorized distributor locations worldwide.
MSA maintains a diversified portfolio of safety products that protect workers and facility infrastructure across a broad array of end markets. While the Company sells its products through distribution, which can limit end-user visibility, the Company provides estimated ranges of end market exposure to facilitate understanding of its growth drivers. The Company estimates that approximately 35%-40% of its overall revenue is derived from the fire service market and approximately 25%-30% of its revenue is derived from the energy market. The remaining revenue is split among construction, utilities, general industrial applications, military and mining.
Competition—The global safety products market is broad and highly fragmented with few participants offering a comprehensive line of safety products. The sophisticated safety products market in which we compete is comprised of both core and non-core offerings and is a subset of the larger safety market. We maintain leading positions in nearly all of our core products. Over the long-term, we believe global demand for safety products will continue to grow. Purchases of these products are non-discretionary, protecting workers' health in hazardous and life-threatening work environments. Their use is often mandated by government and industry regulations, which are increasingly enforced on a global basis.
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The safety products market is highly competitive, with participants ranging in size from small companies focusing on a single type of PPE to several large multinational corporations that manufacture and supply many types of sophisticated safety products. Our main competitors vary by region and product. We believe that participants in this industry compete primarily on the basis of product characteristics (such as functional performance, technology, cost of ownership, comfort, design and style), brand name recognition and after-market service support.
We believe we compete favorably within each of our operating segments as a result of our high quality, innovative offerings and strong brand trust and recognition.
Research and DevelopmentTo achieve and maintain our market leading positions, we operate several sophisticated research and development facilities. We believe our dedication and commitment to innovation and research and development allows us to produce state-of-the-art safety products that are often first to market and exceed industry standards. Our primary engineering groups are located in the United States, Germany and China. Our global product development teams include cross-geographic and cross-functional members from various areas throughout the Company, including research and development, marketing, sales, operations and quality management. These teams are responsible for setting product line strategies based on their understanding of customers' needs and available technology, as well as the opportunities and challenges they foresee in each product area. We believe our team-based, cross-geographical and cross-functional approach to new product development is a source of competitive advantage. Our approach to the new product development process allows us to tailor our product offerings and product line strategies to satisfy distinct customer preferences and industry regulations that vary across our operating segments.
We believe another important aspect of our approach to new product development is that our engineers and technical associates work closely with the safety industry’s leading standards-setting groups and trade associations. These organizations include the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ("NIOSH"), the National Fire Protection Association ("NFPA"), American National Standards Institute ("ANSI"), International Safety Equipment Association ("ISEA") and their overseas counterparts. Key members of our management team understand the impact that these standard-setting organizations have on our new product development pipeline. As such, management devotes significant time and attention to anticipating a new standard's impact on our sales and operating results. Because of our understanding of customer needs, membership on global standards-setting bodies, investment in research and development and our unique new product development process, we believe we are well positioned to anticipate and adapt to changing product standards. While the length of the approval process can be unpredictable, we believe that we are well positioned to gain the approvals and certifications necessary to meet new government and multinational product regulations.
Patents and Intellectual PropertyWe own significant intellectual property, including a number of domestic and foreign patents, patent applications and trademarks related to our products, processes and business. Although our intellectual property plays an important role in maintaining our competitive position in a number of markets that we serve, no single patent, or patent application, trademark or license is, in our opinion, of such value to us that our business would be materially affected by the expiration or termination thereof, other than the “MSA” trademark. Our patents expire at various times in the future not exceeding 20 years. Our general policy is to apply for patents on an ongoing basis in the United States and other countries, as appropriate, to perfect our patent development. In addition to our patents, we have also developed or acquired a substantial body of manufacturing know-how that we believe provides a significant competitive advantage over our competitors.
Raw Materials and SuppliersMany of the components of our products are formulated, machined, tooled or molded in-house and by select tier one supplier partners, which comprise approximately two-thirds of our cost of sales. For example, we rely on integrated manufacturing capabilities for breathing apparatus, gas masks, ballistic helmets, hard hats and circuit boards. The primary materials that we source from third parties include electronic components, high density polyethylene, chemical filter media, rubber and plastic components, eye and face protective lenses, air cylinders, certain metals and ballistic resistant, flame resistant and non-ballistic fabrics. We purchase these materials both domestically and internationally, and we believe our supply sources are both well established and reliable. In spite of some market-softening, especially in the consumer space, the demand for industrial-based electronic components continues to outpace supply. For these industrial-based electronic components, lead times remain extended and the overall market constrained, which is not unique to MSA. We continue to navigate these supply chain issues. We have close supplier relationship programs with our key raw material distributors and strategic supplier partners. Although we generally do not have long-term supply contracts with all suppliers, thus far we have not experienced any significant problems in obtaining adequate raw materials by prioritizing formal supply agreements with our select strategic supplier partners.
Please refer to MSA's Form SD filed on May 25, 2022 for further information on our conflict minerals analysis. Form SD may be obtained free of charge at www.sec.gov.
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Human Capital—As of December 31, 2022, the Company employed approximately 5,000 people worldwide, of which approximately 2,200 were employed in the United States and 2,800 were employed outside of the United States. Approximately 20% of our global workforce is covered by collective bargaining agreements or works councils. Overall, we consider our employee relations to be good. Our culture is important to our success. To that end, we maintain seven core values that define our culture. They are Integrity, Customer Focus, Diversity and Inclusion, Innovation and Change, Engagement, Teamwork and Speed and Agility. Our core values are encircled by “A Culture of Safety.”
Workplace Health & SafetyAs a company whose mission is dedicated to worker safety, MSA places great emphasis on the health and safety of our own associates. The Company maintains a global Environmental, Health and Safety Management System, deploys a variety of programs to reduce and eliminate injuries and promote safety and regularly measures the progress of those programs. These programs promote personal responsibility for workplace safety and encourage associates to set a meaningful example as safety ambassadors.
Employee Health and Well-BeingTo support mental health and emotional well-being, all associates and their dependents worldwide have access to an Employee Assistance Program, at no cost to them. This includes access to visits with mental health care providers through the program.
Diversity and Inclusion—Diversity and Inclusion is a Core Value at MSA, and the Company seeks a wide variety of people, thoughts, perspectives, and ideas.
MSA strives to provide a diverse and inclusive work environment, paired with a culture of excellence in which associates feel comfortable openly sharing thoughts and ideas. Creating an inclusive environment helps to recruit and retain talent, promoting engagement, fostering innovation, and achieving MSA’s business objectives.
The Company maintains several Employee Resource Business Groups designed to foster a culture that is both engaged and inclusive. These groups are voluntary, associate-driven communities that capitalize on the wide variety of people and perspectives at MSA, driving our core value of Diversity and Inclusion. The Company also maintains an Executive Diversity Council and several regional councils focused on increasing organizational awareness, accountability and impact of Diversity and Inclusion initiatives.
MSA also partners with a number of non-profit and community-based organizations to help to build a pipeline of future talent with differing backgrounds, thoughts, experiences, and perspectives.
Approximately 52% of our U.S. workforce self-identifies as diverse. This includes women who comprise approximately 41% of our U.S. workforce. Among associates within executive pay grades, 41% self-identify as diverse. We determine race and gender diversity based on our employees’ self-identification or other information compiled to meet the requirements of the U.S. government, compiled as of December 31, 2022. We count a diverse woman as one individual.
Leadership and Development—MSA provides programs to enable continuous learning, growth and development opportunities.
First, our "MOVE" (Meaningful, Ongoing, Vital Exchanges) Performance Management philosophy is a core element of associate engagement. Exchanges between associates and supervisors provide a flexible, ongoing feedback loop to drive and enhance the engagement of associates, while facilitating the achievement of our strategic goals.
Second, the MSA Leader model sets the expectations of MSA people leaders. Grounded in core principles that define MSA’s high performance culture of excellence, the MSA Leader model guides the development of current and aspiring leaders. It outlines the traits, knowledge, competencies, and experiences that MSA requires for successful leadership while encouraging leaders to remain true to their personal styles. The model is the foundation of leadership development at MSA. By combining leadership development, culture, and business acumen, leaders are better prepared to drive a high-performance culture while maintaining an engaged workforce with opportunities for development and growth.
Beyond these core programs, MSA designs and delivers a variety of associate leadership and development programs to further enhance the associate experience and opportunities for growth. Associates are empowered to own their career development through business-aligned resources, tools and programs.
Compensation and Rewards—MSA’s Global Compensation Philosophy strives to provide total compensation for all associates at the market median, utilizing base salary, cash incentives and, in some cases, equity grants to achieve this goal. We further strive to provide above-market compensation opportunities for associates who exceed goals and expectations. This approach to Total Rewards is designed to help MSA attract, retain and motivate high-performing individuals who foster an innovative culture and drive business results.
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Environmental MattersOur facilities and operations are subject to laws and regulations relating to environmental protection and human health and safety. In the opinion of management, compliance with current environmental protection laws will not have a material adverse effect on our financial condition. See Item 1A—Risk Factors, for further information regarding our environmental risks which could impact the Company.
SeasonalityOur operating results are not significantly affected by seasonal factors. Sales are generally higher during the second and fourth quarters. During periods of economic expansion or contraction and following significant catastrophes, our sales by quarter have varied from this seasonal pattern. Government-related sales tend to increase in the fourth quarter. Americas segment sales tend to be strong during the oil and gas market turnaround seasons late in the first quarter, early in the second quarter and then again at the end of the third quarter and beginning of the fourth quarter. International segment sales are typically weaker for the Europe region in the summer holiday months of July and August and seasonality can be affected by the timing of delivery of larger orders. Invoicing and the delivery of larger orders can affect sales patterns variably across all reportable segments.
Available InformationOur Internet address is www.MSAsafety.com. We make the following filings available free of charge on the Investor Relations page on our website as soon as they have been electronically filed with or furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"): our annual reports on Form 10-K, our quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, our current reports on Form 8-K and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as well as our proxy statement. Information contained on our website is not part of this annual report on Form 10-K or our other filings with the SEC. The SEC maintains an Internet site at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers like us who file electronically with the SEC.
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Item 1A. Risk Factors
RISKS RELATED TO LEGAL AND REGULATORY CHALLENGES
Claims of injuries or potential safety issues or quality concerns could be made against our various subsidiaries.
Our products and solutions are often used in high-risk and unpredictable environments and our mission, reputation and business success rely on our ability to design and provide safe, high quality and reliable products that earn and maintain customer trust. In the event the parties using our products are injured, or if any of our products are alleged to have contributed, we could be subject to claims or suffer reputational harm. In addition, we may be required to or may voluntarily recall or redesign certain products or components due to concern about product safety, quality, ease of use or customer confidence. Any significant claims, recalls or field actions that result in significant expense or negative publicity against us could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition and liquidity, including any successful claim brought against us in excess or outside of available insurance coverage.
Our subsidiaries, may experience losses from product liability claims, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition and liquidity.

Our subsidiaries face an inherent business risk of exposure to product liability or other legal claims or penalties related to the design, manufacture, marketing, or sale of any of our current or former products and solutions. Our subsidiaries are named periodically in single incident lawsuits, or, at times, in cumulative trauma product liability lawsuits which may be numerous, and the number of claims newly asserted in any given period is difficult to predict and may aggregate or escalate suddenly. Any type of product injury claim may result in losses in excess of available insurance coverage and have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition and liquidity.

On January 5, 2023, the Company divested MSA LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary that holds legacy product liability claims relating to coal dust, asbestos, silica, and other exposures, to a joint venture between R&Q Insurance Holdings Ltd. and Obra Capital, Inc. (the "Purchaser") The transaction is subject to risks related to counterparty commercial risk as well as agreement enforcement and interpretation. Third parties also could seek to assert claims against us for which MSA LLC is the legally responsible party, and we may be required to incur fees and expenses to enforce that wrongly asserted claims are properly redirected to MSA LLC. The divested subsidiary MSA LLC and the Purchaser have indemnified us with respect to MSA LLC’s cumulative trauma product liability losses and other defined exposures. The ability of MSA LLC and the Purchaser to honor their indemnity obligations is subject to commercial risk and, in addition, in the event of a dispute, the transaction, negotiated indemnities, and the extent of other legally-available protections may be subject to future judicial interpretation. MSA and its remaining subsidiaries continue to be responsible for claims relating to any current or former products and solutions that were not transferred as part of the divestiture.
Our ability to market and sell our products is subject to existing government laws, regulations and standards. Changes in such laws, regulations and standards or our failure to comply with them could materially and adversely affect our results of operations.
Most of our products are required to meet performance and test standards designed to protect the safety of people and infrastructures around the world. Our inability to comply with these standards could result in declines in revenue, profitability and cash flow. Changes in laws and regulations could reduce the demand for our products or require us to re-engineer our products, thereby creating opportunities for our competitors. Regulatory approvals for our products may be delayed or denied for a variety of reasons that are outside of our control. Additionally, market anticipation of significant new standards can cause customers to accelerate or delay buying decisions.
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We are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations across our global organization and any violation of these laws and regulations could adversely affect our results of operations.
We are subject to numerous, and sometimes conflicting, laws and regulations on matters as diverse as anti-corruption, import/export controls, product content requirements, trade restrictions, tariffs, taxation, sanctions, internal and disclosure control obligations, securities regulation, anti-competition, data privacy, Brexit changes and labor relations, among others. This includes laws and regulations in emerging markets where legal systems may be less developed or familiar to us. Compliance with diverse legal requirements is costly, time consuming and requires significant resources. Violations of one or more of these laws or regulations in the conduct of our business could result in significant fines, criminal sanctions against us or our officers, prohibitions on doing business and damage to our reputation. These actions could result in liability for significant monetary damages, fines and/or criminal prosecution, unfavorable publicity and other reputational damage and have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
We are subject to various environmental laws and any violation of these laws could adversely affect our results of operations.
Included in the extensive laws, regulations and ordinances to which we are subject, are those relating to the protection of the environment. Examples include those governing discharges to water, discharges to air (including greenhouse gas emissions), handling and disposal practices for solid and hazardous wastes and the maintenance of a safe workplace. These laws impose penalties for noncompliance and liability for response costs and certain damages resulting from past and current spills, disposals, other releases of hazardous materials and other noncompliance with such laws. These environmental laws may continue to change in the future due to a variety of factors, such as government focus on climate change. We could incur substantial costs as a result of noncompliance with or liability for cleanup pursuant to these environmental laws. Such laws continue to change, and we may be subject to more stringent environmental laws in the future. If more stringent environmental laws are enacted, these future laws could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
We are subject to risks related to our environmental, social and governance activities and disclosures.
Environmental social and governance, often referred to as ESG, reporting and disclosure requirements continue to evolve, with increasing investor expectations and additional regulatory requirements anticipated. Failure to accurately and timely meet these expectations and requirements may result in reputational damage, regulatory penalties and litigation among other consequences.
We are subject to various U.S and foreign tax laws and any changes in these laws related to the taxation of businesses and resolutions of tax disputes could adversely affect our results of operations.
The U.S. Congress, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (or, OECD) and other government agencies in jurisdictions in which we and our affiliates invest or do business have maintained a focus on issues related to the taxation of multinational companies. The OECD has changed numerous long-standing tax principles through its base erosion and profit shifting project which could adversely impact our effective tax rate.
We are subject to regular review and audit by both foreign and domestic tax authorities. While we believe our tax positions will be sustained, the final outcome of tax audits and related litigation may differ materially from the tax amounts recorded in our consolidated financial statements, which could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
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RISKS RELATED TO SUPPLY AND MANUFACTURING
Our future results are subject to the risk that purchased components and materials are unavailable or available at excessive cost due to material shortages, excessive demand, currency fluctuation, inflationary pressure and other factors.
We depend on various components, materials and services from supply chain partners to manufacture our products. It is possible that any of our supplier relationships could be terminated or otherwise disrupted, or that our suppliers may be unable to timely deliver to us. Any sustained interruption in our receipt of adequate supplies or services could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Our inability to successfully manage price fluctuations due to market demand, currency risks or material shortages, or future price fluctuations (whether due to inflationary pressures or otherwise) could have a material adverse effect on our business and our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
Our plans to continue to improve productivity and reduce complexity may not be successful, which could adversely affect our ability to compete.
MSA has integrated parts of its European operating segment that have historically been individually managed entities, into a centrally managed organization model. We plan to continue to leverage the benefits of scale created from this approach and are in the process of implementing a more efficient and cost-effective enterprise resource planning system in additional locations across the International Segment. MSA runs the risk that these and similar initiatives may not be completed substantially as planned, may be more costly to implement than expected, or may not result in the efficiencies or cost savings anticipated. In addition, if not properly managed, these initiatives could cause disruptions in our day-to-day operations and have a negative impact on MSA's financial results. It is also possible that other major productivity and streamlining programs may be required in the future.
RISKS RELATED TO ECONOMIC, MARKET AND COMPETITIVE CONDITIONS
Unfavorable economic and market conditions could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We are subject to risks arising from adverse changes in global economic conditions. We have significant operations in a number of countries outside the U.S., including some in emerging markets. Long-term economic uncertainty in some of the regions of the world in which we operate, such as Asia, Latin America, the Middle East and Europe, could result in declines in revenue, profitability and cash flow due to reduced orders, payment delays, supply chain disruptions or other factors caused by the economic challenges faced by our customers and suppliers.
A portion of MSA's sales are made to customers in the oil, gas and petrochemical market. We estimate that between approximately 25% - 30% of our global business is sold into the energy market vertical with the most significant exposure in industrial head protection, portable gas detection and FGFD. Approximately 10% - 15% of consolidated revenue, primarily in industrial head protection and portable gas detection, is more exposed to a pullback in employment trends across the energy market. Another 5% - 10% of consolidated revenue, primarily in FGFD is more exposed to a pullback in capital equipment spending within the energy market. It is possible that volatility in the oil, gas and petrochemical industry, whether related to economic, climate-related energy policy, or other conditions, could negatively impact our business and could result in declines in our consolidated results of operations and cash flow.
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Pandemics or disease outbreaks, such as COVID-19, may cause unfavorable economic or market conditions which could impact demand patterns and/or disrupt global supply chains and manufacturing operations. Collectively, these outcomes could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Pandemics or disease outbreaks such as COVID-19 could result in a widespread health crisis that could adversely affect the economies of developed and emerging markets, potentially resulting in an economic downturn that could affect customers’ demand for our products in certain industrial-based end-markets. The spread of pandemics or disease outbreaks may also disrupt the Company’s manufacturing operations, supply chain, or logistics necessary to import, export and deliver products to our customers. During a pandemic or crisis, applicable laws and response directives such as vaccine mandates or occupational safety and health requirements, could, in some circumstances, result in skilled labor impacts including voluntary attrition or difficulty finding labor, or otherwise adversely affect our ability to operate our plants, obtain inputs from suppliers, or to deliver our products in a timely manner. Some laws and directives may also hinder our ability to move certain products across borders. Economic conditions can also influence order patterns. These factors could negatively impact our consolidated results of operations and cash flow.
A reduction in the spending patterns of government agencies or delays in obtaining government approval for our products could materially and adversely affect our net sales, earnings and cash flow.
The demand for our products sold to the fire service market, the homeland security market and other government agencies is, in large part, driven by available government funding. Government budgets are set annually, and we cannot assure that government funding will be sustained at similar levels in the future. A significant reduction in available government funding could result in declines in our consolidated results of operations and cash flow.
The markets in which we compete are highly competitive, and some of our competitors have greater financial and other resources than we do. The competitive pressures faced by us could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.
The safety products market is highly competitive, with participants ranging in size from small companies focusing on single types of safety products, to large multinational corporations that manufacture and supply many types of safety products. Our main competitors vary by region and product. We believe that participants in this industry compete primarily on the basis of product characteristics (such as functional performance, technology, cost of ownership, comfort, design and style), price, service and delivery, customer support, the ability to meet the special requirements of customers, brand name trust and recognition, and e-business capabilities. Some of our competitors have greater financial and other resources than we do and our business could be adversely affected by competitors’ new product innovations, technological advances made to competing products and pricing changes made by us in response to competition from existing or new competitors. We may not be able to compete successfully against current and future competitors, and the competitive pressures faced by us could have a material adverse effect our business, consolidated results of operations and financial condition. In addition, e-business is a rapidly developing area, and the execution of a successful e-business strategy involves significant time, investment and resources. If we are unable to successfully expand e-business capabilities in support of our customer needs, our brands may lose market share, which could negatively impact revenue and profitability.
RISKS RELATED TO NEW AND ADJACENT INITIATIVES
Our plans to improve future profitability through restructuring programs may not be successful and could lead to unintended consequences.
We have incurred and may incur restructuring charges primarily related to severance costs for staff reductions associated with our ongoing initiatives to drive profitable growth and right size our operations as well as programs to adjust our operations in response to current business conditions. For example, in 2022, 151 positions were eliminated in response to the changing business environment. Our cost structure in future periods is somewhat dependent upon our ability to maintain increased productivity without backfilling certain positions. If our programs are not successful, there could be a material adverse effect on our business and consolidated results of operations.
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Our inability to successfully identify, consummate and integrate current and future acquisitions or to realize anticipated cost savings and other benefits could adversely affect our business. Additionally, divestitures may expose us to alleged potential liabilities which could adversely affect our business.
One of our operating strategies is to selectively pursue acquisitions. Any future acquisitions will depend on our ability to identify suitable acquisition candidates and successfully consummate such acquisitions. Acquisitions involve a number of risks including:
failure of the acquired businesses to achieve the results we expect;
diversion of our management’s attention from operational matters;
our inability to retain key personnel of the acquired businesses;
risks associated with unanticipated events or liabilities;
potential disruption of our existing business; and
customer dissatisfaction or performance problems at the acquired businesses.
If we are unable to integrate or successfully manage businesses that we have recently acquired or may acquire in the future, we may not realize anticipated cost savings, improved manufacturing efficiencies and increased revenue, which may result in material adverse short and long-term effects on our consolidated operating results, financial condition and liquidity. Even if we are able to integrate the operations of our acquired businesses into our operations, we may not realize the full benefits of the cost savings, revenue enhancements or other benefits that we may have expected at the time of acquisition. In addition, even if we achieve the expected benefits, we may not be able to achieve them within the anticipated time frame, and such benefits may be offset by costs incurred in integrating the acquired companies and increases in other expenses.

We have also divested businesses and may consider divesting businesses in the future. Divestiture risks relate to our ability to find appropriate purchasers, execute transactions on favorable terms, separate divested business operations with minimal impact to our remaining operations, and effectively manage any transitional service arrangements. Any of these factors could materially and adversely affect our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
If we fail to introduce successful new products or extend our existing product line, we could lose our market position and our financial performance could be materially and adversely affected.
In the safety products market, there are frequent introductions of new products and product line extensions. If we are unable to identify emerging customer and technological trends, maintain and improve the competitiveness of our products and introduce new products, we may lose our market position, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. We continue to invest significant resources in research and development and market research, which includes the development of software platforms for our connected products. However, continued product and/or service development and marketing efforts are subject to the risks inherent in the development process. These risks include delays, the failure of new products and product line extensions to achieve anticipated levels of market acceptance and the risk of failed product introductions.
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RISKS RELATED TO CYBERSECURITY OR MISAPPROPRIATION OF OUR CRITICAL INFORMATION
A failure of our information systems or a cybersecurity breach could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.
The proper functioning and security of our information systems is critical to the operation and reputation of our business. This includes the systems that support and operate our Safety io and MSA+™ platforms. Our information systems may be vulnerable to damage or disruption from natural or man-made disasters, computer viruses, power losses or other system or network failures. In addition, hackers, cyber-criminals and other persons could attempt to gain unauthorized access to our information systems with the intent of harming the Company, harming our information systems or obtaining sensitive information such as intellectual property, trade secrets, financial and business development information, and customer and vendor related information. To date, we have not experienced any material breaches or material losses related to cyber-attacks. If our information systems or security fail, or if there is any compromise or breach of our security, it could disrupt our operations and/or result in a violation of applicable privacy and other laws, legal and financial exposure, remediation costs, negative impacts on our customers' willingness to transact business with us, or a loss of confidence in our security measures, which could have an adverse effect on our business, our reputation and our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
Like many companies, from time to time, we have experienced attempts on our computer systems by unauthorized outside parties. Because the techniques used by computer hackers and others to access or sabotage networks continually evolve and generally are not recognized until launched against a target, we may be unable to anticipate, prevent or detect these attacks. As a result, the impact of any future incident cannot be predicted, including the failure of our information systems or misappropriation of our technologies and/or processes. Any such system failure or loss of such information could harm our competitive position or cause us to incur significant costs to remedy the damages caused by the incident. We have taken steps and incurred costs to further strengthen the security of our computer systems and continue to assess, maintain and enhance the ongoing effectiveness of our information security systems. While we attempt to mitigate these risks by employing a number of measures, including employee training, comprehensive monitoring of our networks and systems, and maintenance of backup and protective systems, our systems, networks remain potentially vulnerable to advanced persistent threats. We cannot assure that ongoing improvements to our infrastructure and cybersecurity programs will be sufficient to prevent or limit the damage from any future cyber-attack or disruption to our information systems. It is therefore possible that in the future we may suffer an attack, unauthorized parties may gain access to personal information in our possession and we may not be able to identify any such incident in a timely manner.
Our continued success depends on our ability to protect our intellectual property. If we are unable to protect our intellectual property, our business could be materially and adversely affected.
Our success depends, in part, on our ability to obtain and enforce patents, maintain trade secret protection and operate without infringing on the proprietary rights of third parties. We have been issued patents and have registered trademarks with respect to many of our products, but our competitors could independently develop similar or superior products or technologies, duplicate any of our designs, trademarks, processes or other intellectual property or design around any processes or designs on which we have or may obtain patents or trademark protection. In addition, it is possible that third parties may have, or will acquire, licenses for patents or trademarks that we may use or desire to use, so that we may need to acquire licenses to, or to contest the validity of, such patents or trademarks of third parties. Such licenses may not be made available to us on acceptable terms, if at all, and we may not prevail in contesting the validity of third party rights.
We also protect trade secrets, know-how and other confidential information against unauthorized use by others or disclosure by persons who have access to them, such as our employees, through contractual arrangements. These agreements may not provide meaningful protection for our trade secrets, know-how or other proprietary information in the event of any unauthorized use, misappropriation or disclosure of such trade secrets, know-how or other proprietary information. Our inability to maintain the proprietary nature of our technologies could have a material adverse effect on our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
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RISKS RELATED TO HUMAN CAPITAL MANAGEMENT
If we lose any of our key personnel or are unable to attract, train and/or retain qualified personnel or plan the succession of senior management, our ability to manage our business and continue our growth could be negatively impacted.
Our success depends in large part on the continued contributions of our key management, engineering and sales and marketing personnel, many of whom are highly skilled and would be difficult to replace. Our success also depends on the abilities of new personnel to function effectively, both individually and as a group. If we are unable to attract, effectively integrate and retain management, engineering, sales and marketing or other key personnel, then the execution of our growth strategy and our ability to react to changing market requirements may be impeded, and our business could suffer as a result.
In addition, hiring, training, and successfully integrating replacement critical personnel could be time consuming, may cause additional disruptions to our operations, and may be unsuccessful, which could negatively impact future revenues. Competition for personnel is intense, and we cannot assure that we will be successful in attracting and retaining qualified personnel. The hiring of new personnel may also result in increased costs and we do not currently maintain key person life insurance.
Our success also depends on effective succession planning. Failure to ensure effective transfer of knowledge and smooth transitions involving senior management could hinder our strategic planning and execution. From time to time, senior management or other key employees may leave the Company. While we strive to reduce the negative impact of such changes, the loss of any key employee could result in significant disruptions to our operations, including adversely affecting the timeliness of product releases, the successful implementation and completion of company initiatives, the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures and our internal control over financial reporting, and the results of our operations.
We may be unable to hire or retain and develop a highly skilled and diverse global workforce or effectively manage changes in our workforce and respond to shifts in labor availability.
It it important to our business to hire, retain and develop a highly skilled and diverse global workforce. We compete to hire new personnel with a variety of capabilities in the many countries in which we manufacture and market our products. We also invest resources and time to develop and retain our employees' skills and competencies. We could experience unplanned or increased turnover of employees with key capabilities, or fail to develop adequate succession plans for leadership positions or hire and retain a workforce with the skills and in the locations we need to operate and grow our business. We could also fail to attract and develop personnel with key emerging capabilities that we need to continue to respond to changing consumer and customer needs and grow our business, including skills in the areas of manufacturing, engineering, sales, service, and various functional support areas. Occurrence of any of these conditions could deplete our institutional knowledge base and erode our competitiveness.
We are experiencing continuing a tight and competitive labor market and could face unforeseen challenges in the availability of labor. A sustained labor shortage or increased turnover rates within our employee base have led and could lead to increased costs such as increased overtime to meet demand and increased wages to attract and retain employees. We have also been negatively affected and could continue to be negatively affected by labor shortages or constraints experienced by our partners, including our external manufacturing partners and freight providers. Failure to achieve and maintain a diverse workforce, compensate our employees competitively and fairly, maintain a safe and inclusive environment or promote the well-being of our employees could affect our reputation and also result in lower performance and an inability to retain valuable employees.
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RISKS RELATED TO DOING BUSINESS INTERNATIONALLY
We have significant international operations and are subject to the risks of doing business in foreign countries and global supply chains.
We have business operations in more than 40 international locations. In 2022, approximately one-half of our net sales were made by operations located outside the United States. We also rely on global supply chains or otherwise source critical components and raw materials from suppliers based in foreign countries, which at times are used in manufacturing operations across our global footprint. In certain cases, components could be sole sourced or otherwise not easily substituted due to the highly regulated nature of our products. Therefore, our operations and sourcing strategies are subject to supply shortages, sourcing delays, or disruption due to various geopolitical, economic, disasters, and other risks and uncertainties, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. These risks include the following:
Scarcity of parts and components necessary to manufacture our products;
unexpected changes in regulatory requirements;
changes in trade policy or tariff regulations;
changes in tax laws and regulations;
unintended consequences due to changes to the Company's legal structure;
additional valuation allowances on deferred tax assets due to an inability to generate sufficient profit in certain foreign jurisdictions;
intellectual property protection difficulties or intellectual property theft;
difficulty in collecting accounts receivable;
complications in complying with a variety of foreign laws and regulations, some of which may conflict with U.S. laws;
foreign privacy laws and regulations;
trade protection measures and price controls;
trade sanctions and embargoes;
nationalization and expropriation;
increased international instability, potential instability of foreign governments or impacts from geopolitical conflict such as supplier or transportation disruptions;
effectiveness of worldwide compliance with MSA's anti-bribery policy, the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and similar local laws;
difficulty in hiring and retaining qualified employees;
the ability to effectively negotiate with labor unions in foreign countries;
the need to take extra security precautions for our international operations;
costs and difficulties in managing culturally and geographically diverse international operations;
pandemics, severe weather events, or other disasters; and
risks associated with the United Kingdom's decision to exit the European Union, including disruptions to trade and free movement of goods, services and people to and from the United Kingdom; increased foreign exchange volatility with respect to the British pound; and additional legal and economic uncertainty.
Any one or more of these risks could have a negative impact on the success of our international operations and, thereby, have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
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Because we derive a significant portion of our sales from the operations of our foreign subsidiaries, future currency exchange rate fluctuations could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition, and could affect the comparability of our results between financial periods.
Our operations outside of the United States account for a significant portion of our net sales. The results of our foreign operations are generally reported in local currency and then translated into U.S. dollars at the applicable exchange rates for inclusion in our consolidated financial statements. The exchange rates between some of these currencies and the U.S. dollar have fluctuated significantly in recent years and may continue to do so in the future. A weakening of the currencies in which sales are generated relative to the currencies in which costs are denominated would decrease our results of operations and cash flow. Although the Company uses instruments to hedge certain foreign currency risks, these hedges only offset a portion of the Company’s exposure to foreign currency fluctuations.
In addition, because our consolidated financial statements are stated in U.S. dollars, such fluctuations may affect our consolidated results of operations and financial position, and may affect the comparability of our results between financial periods. Our inability to effectively manage our exchange rate risks or any volatility in currency exchange rates could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
We benefit from free trade laws and regulations, such as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement and any changes to these laws and regulations could adversely affect our results of operations.
Existing free trade laws and regulations, such as the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement, provide certain beneficial duties and tariffs for qualifying imports and exports, subject to compliance with the applicable classification and other requirements. Changes in laws or policies governing the terms of foreign trade, and in particular increased trade restrictions, tariffs or taxes on imports from countries where we manufacture products, such as China and Mexico, could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
GENERAL RISK FACTORS
Damage to the reputation of MSA or to one or more of our product brands could adversely affect our business.
Developing and maintaining our reputation, as well as the reputation of our brands, is a critical factor in our relationship with customers, distributors and others. Our inability to address negative publicity or other issues, including concerns about product safety or quality, real or perceived, could negatively impact our business which could have a material adverse effect on our business, consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
If our goodwill, other intangible assets and long-lived assets become impaired, we may be required to record significant charges to earnings.
We review our long-lived assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying amount may not be recoverable. Goodwill and indefinite-lived intangible assets are required to be assessed for impairment at least annually. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances, indicating that the carrying amount of our goodwill, indefinite-lived intangible assets or long-lived assets may not be recoverable, include slower growth rates in our markets, reduced expected future cash flows, increased country risk premiums as a result of political uncertainty and a decline in stock price and market capitalization. We consider available current information when calculating our impairment charge. If there are indicators of impairment, our long-term cash flow forecasts for our operations deteriorate or discount rates increase, we may be required to recognize additional impairment charges in later periods. See Note 13—Goodwill and Intangible Assets of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for the carrying amounts of goodwill in each of our reporting segments and details on indefinite-lived intangible assets that we hold.
Risks related to our defined benefit pension and other post-retirement plans could adversely affect our results of operations and cash flow.
Significant changes in actual investment return on pension assets, discount rates, and other factors could adversely affect our results of operations and pension contributions in future periods. U.S. generally accepted accounting principles require that we calculate income or expense for the plans using actuarial valuations. These valuations reflect assumptions about financial markets and interest rates, which may change based on economic conditions. Funding requirements for our pension plans may become more significant. However, the ultimate amounts to be contributed are dependent upon, among other things, interest rates, underlying asset returns and the impact of legislative or regulatory changes related to pension funding obligations. For further information regarding our pension plans, refer to Note 15—Pensions and Other Post-retirement Benefits of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
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If we fail to meet our debt service requirements or the restrictive covenants in our debt agreements or if interest rates increase, our results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected.
We have a substantial amount of debt upon which we are required to make scheduled interest and principal payments and we may incur additional debt in the future. A significant portion of our debt bears interest at variable rates that may increase in the future.
Our debt agreements require us to comply with certain restrictive covenants. If we are unable to generate sufficient cash to service our debt or if interest rates increase, our consolidated results of operations and financial condition could be materially and adversely affected. Additionally, a failure to comply with the restrictive covenants contained in our debt agreements could result in a default, which if not waived by our lenders, could substantially increase borrowing costs and require accelerated repayment of our debt. Please refer to Note 12—Long-Term Debt of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for commentary on our compliance with the restrictive covenants.
Any period of interest rate increases may adversely affect our ability to obtain new financing or to refinance existing debt on terms the Company deems attractive, the cost of such financing, exchange-rates, and our profitability, which in turn may have a material adverse effect on our liquidity and capital resources. As of December 31, 2022, we had $308.6 million of variable rate borrowings under our revolving credit facility. A 50 basis point increase or decrease in interest rates could result in $1.4 million of additional interest expense. When the $315.0 million of variable rate debt undertaken to complete the MSA, LLC divestiture is taken into account, a 50 basis point increase or decrease in interest rates could result in $3.0 million of additional interest expense. Please refer to Note 20—Contingencies of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for additional information regarding the divestiture.
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Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments
None.
Item 2. Properties
Our principal executive offices are located at 1000 Cranberry Woods Drive, Cranberry Township, PA, United States. We own or lease our primary facilities. Our primary manufacturing locations in the Americas segment are located in Cranberry Township, PA; Jacksonville, NC; Murrysville, PA; New Kensington, PA; and Pittsfield, NH, and our primary distribution center is located in New Galilee, PA. The primary manufacturing locations in the International segment are located in Berlin, Germany; Bristol, United Kingdom; Châtillon-sur-Chalaronne, France, Devizes, United Kingdom; Galway, Ireland; and Suzhou, China. Our primary research and development centers are located in Berlin, Germany; Cranberry Township, PA; and Suzhou, China.
We believe that all of our facilities, including the manufacturing facilities, are in good repair and in suitable condition for the purposes for which they are used.
Item 3. Legal Proceedings
Please refer to Note 20—Contingencies to the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures
Not applicable.
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Information about our Executive Officers
The following sets forth the names and ages of our executive officers as of February 16, 2023:
NameAgeTitle
Nishan J. Vartanian(a)
63 Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer since May 2020.
Steven C. Blanco(b)
56 Sr. Vice President and President, MSA Americas segment since June 2022.
Bob Leenen(c)
49 Sr. Vice President and President, MSA International segment since June 2022.
Lee B. McChesney(d)
51 Sr. Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer since October 2022.
Stephanie L. Sciullo(e)
38 Sr. Vice President and Chief Legal Officer, Corporate Social Responsibility & Public Affairs since June 2022.
 
(a)Prior to his present position, Mr. Vartanian was President and Chief Executive Officer since May 2018.
(b)Prior to his present position, Mr. Blanco served as Vice President and President, MSA Americas segment since August 2017.
(c)Prior to his present position, Mr. Leenen served as Vice President and President, MSA International segment since September 2017.
(d)Prior to his present position, Mr. McChesney was Vice President, Corporate Finance and Chief Financial Officer, Global Tools and Storage for Stanley Black & Decker's (a manufacturer of industrial tools and household hardware) since January 2021; Chief Financial Officer, Global Tools and Storage and Corporate FP&A since November 2019; and prior thereto served as President, Hand Tools, Accessories and Storage since 2016.
(e)Prior to her present position, Ms. Sciullo was Vice President and Chief Legal Officer, Corporate Social Responsibility & Public Affairs since August 2021; Vice President and Chief Legal Officer since January 2020; and prior thereto served as Deputy General Counsel since 2016.
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PART II
Item 5.    Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Our common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol “MSA.” On February 10, 2023, there were 153 registered holders of our shares of common stock.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
PeriodTotal Number of Shares PurchasedAverage Price Paid Per ShareTotal Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced
Plans or Programs
Maximum Number of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased
Under the Plans or Programs
October 1 — October 31, 2022— $— — 203,214 
November 1 — November 30, 2022— $— — 193,458 
December 1 — December 31, 2022231 $134.47 — 189,191 
The share repurchase program authorizes up to $100.0 million in repurchases of MSA common stock in the open market and in private transactions. The share purchase program has no expiration date. The maximum number of shares that may be purchased is calculated based on the dollars remaining under the program and the respective month-end closing share price. We have purchased a total of 778,814 shares, or $72.7 million, since this program's inception.
The above shares purchased during the quarter related to stock-based compensation transactions.
We do not have any other share repurchase programs.

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Comparison of Five-Year Cumulative Total Return
The following paragraph compares the most recent five-year performance of MSA stock with (1) the Standard & Poor’s 500 Composite Index, (2) S&P Midcap 400 Index and (3) S&P Midcap 400 Industrials. Because our competitors are principally privately held concerns or subsidiaries or divisions of corporations engaged in multiple lines of business, we do not believe it feasible to construct a peer group comparison on an industry or line-of-business basis. The S&P 500 Composite Index, S&P Midcap 400 Index and the S&P Midcap 400 Industrials, while including corporations both larger and smaller than MSA in terms of market capitalization, is composed of corporations with an average market capitalization similar to us.
COMPARISON OF 5 YEAR CUMULATIVE TOTAL RETURN
ASSUMES INITIAL INVESTMENT OF $100
Among MSA Safety Incorporated, the S&P 500 Index, S&P Midcap 400, and S&P Midcap 400 Industrials
msa-20221231_g2.jpg
Assumes $100 invested on December 31, 2017 in stock or index, including reinvestment of dividends. Fiscal year ending December 31.
Value at December 31,
201720182019202020212022
MSA Safety Incorporated$100.00 $123.58 $168.18 $201.44 $205.77 $199.25 
S&P 500 Index100.00 95.62 125.72 148.85 191.58 156.88 
S&P Midcap 400100.00 88.92 112.21 127.54 159.12 138.34 
S&P Midcap 400 Industrials100.00 85.11 113.67 132.41 170.07 150.52 
Prepared by Zacks Investment Research, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved. Copyright 1980-2023.
Index Data: Copyright Standard and Poor’s, Inc. Used with permission. All rights reserved.

Item 6. [Reserved]
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Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the historical financial statements and other financial information included elsewhere in this annual report on Form 10-K. This discussion may contain forward-looking statements that involve risks and uncertainties. The forward-looking statements are not historical facts, but rather are based on current expectations, estimates, assumptions and projections about our industry, business and future financial results. Our actual results could differ materially from the results contemplated by these forward-looking statements due to a number of factors, including those discussed in the sections of this annual report entitled “Forward-Looking Statements” and “Risk Factors.”
This section generally discusses the results of our operations for the year ended December 31, 2022 compared to the year ended December 31, 2021. For a discussion on the year ended December 31, 2021 compared to the year ended December 31, 2020, please refer to Part II, Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2021 filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on February 19, 2021.
MSA Safety Incorporated ("MSA") is organized into four geographical operating segments that are aggregated into three reportable geographic segments: Americas, International and Corporate. The Americas segment is comprised of our operations in North America and Latin America geographies. The International segment is comprised of our operations of all geographies outside of the Americas. Certain global expenses are allocated to each segment in a manner consistent with where the benefits from the expenses are derived. Please refer to Note 8—Segment Information of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for further information.
On January 5, 2023, the Company divested Mine Safety Appliances LLC ("MSA LLC") a wholly owned subsidiary that holds legacy product liability claims relating to coal dust, asbestos, silica, and other exposures, to a joint venture between R&Q Insurance Holdings Ltd. and Obra Capital, Inc. In connection with the closing, MSA contributed $341 million in cash and cash equivalents, while R&Q and Obra contributed an additional $35 million. As a result of the transaction, MSA will derecognize all legacy cumulative trauma product liability reserves, related insurance assets, and associated deferred tax assets of the divested subsidiary from its balance sheet in the first quarter of 2023. R&Q and Obra have assumed management of the divested subsidiary, including the management of its claims. Refer to Note 20—Contingencies of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for further information.
On July 1, 2021, the Company acquired Bacharach, Inc. and its affiliated companies ("Bacharach") in a transaction valued at $329.4 million, net of cash acquired. Headquartered near Pittsburgh in New Kensington, Pa., Bacharach is a leader in gas detection technologies used in the heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration ("HVAC-R") markets. Bacharach’s advanced instrumentation technologies help protect lives and the environment, while also increasing operational efficiency for its diversified customer base. Bacharach's portfolio of gas detection and analysis products are used to detect, measure and analyze leaks of various gases that are commonly found in both commercial and industrial settings. Bacharach has strong expertise in the refrigerant leak detection market with customers in the HVAC-R, food retail, automotive, commercial and industrial refrigeration, and military markets. Refer to Note 14—Acquisitions of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for further information.
During July 2021, the Company purchased the remaining 10% noncontrolling interest in MSA (China) Safety Equipment Co., Ltd. from our former China partner for $19.0 million, inclusive of a $5.6 million distribution.
On January 25, 2021, the Company acquired 100% of the common stock of B T Q Limited, including Bristol Uniforms and Bell Apparel ("Bristol") in an all-cash transaction valued at $63.0 million, net of cash acquired. Bristol, which is headquartered in the United Kingdom ("U.K."), is a leading innovator and provider of protective apparel to the fire, rescue services, and utility sectors. The acquisition strengthens MSA's position as a global market leader in fire service personal protective equipment ("PPE") products, which include breathing apparatus, firefighter helmets, thermal imaging cameras, and firefighter protective apparel, while providing an avenue to expand its business in the U.K. and key European markets. The fire service equipment brands of MSA, which include Gallet Firefighter Helmets, the M1 and G1 Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus range, Cairns Helmets, Globe Manufacturing, and now Bristol, represent more than 460 combined years of innovation in the fire service industry, with a common mission: protecting the health and safety of firefighters. Bristol is also a leading manufacturer of flame-retardant, waterproof, and other protective work wear for the utility industry. Marketed under the Bell Apparel brand, this line complements MSA's existing and broad range of offerings for the global utilities market. Refer to Note 14—Acquisitions of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for further information.
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BUSINESS OVERVIEW
MSA is a global leader in the development, manufacture and supply of safety products that protect people and facility infrastructures. Recognized for their market leading innovation, many MSA products integrate a combination of electronics, mechanical systems and advanced materials to protect users against hazardous or life-threatening situations. The Company's comprehensive product line, which is governed by rigorous safety standards across highly regulated industries, is used by workers around the world in a broad range of markets, including fire service, oil, gas and petrochemical industry, construction, industrial manufacturing applications, utilities, mining and the military. MSA's core products include breathing apparatus, fixed gas and flame detection systems, portable gas detection instruments, industrial head protection products, firefighter helmets and protective apparel, and fall protection devices. We are committed to providing our customers with service unmatched in the safety industry and, in the process, enhancing our ability to provide a growing line of safety solutions for customers in key global markets.
We tailor our product offerings and distribution strategy to satisfy distinct customer preferences that vary across geographic regions. To best serve these customer preferences, we have organized our business into four geographical operating segments that are aggregated into three reportable geographic segments: Americas, International and Corporate. In 2022, 68% and 32% of our net sales were made by our Americas and International segments, respectively.
Americas. Our largest manufacturing and research and development facilities are located in the United States. We serve our markets across the Americas with manufacturing facilities in the U.S., Mexico and Brazil. Operations in the other countries within the Americas segment focus primarily on sales and distribution in their respective home country markets.
International. Our International segment includes companies in Europe, the Middle East and Africa ("EMEA") and the Asia Pacific region. In our largest International subsidiaries (in Germany, France, U.K., Ireland and China), we develop, manufacture and sell a wide variety of products. In China, the products manufactured are sold primarily in China as well as in regional markets. Operations in other International segment countries focus primarily on sales and distribution in their respective home country markets. Although some of these companies may perform limited production, most of their sales are of products manufactured in our plants in Germany, France, the U.S., U.K., Ireland and China or are purchased from third-party vendors.
Corporate. The Corporate segment primarily consists of general and administrative expenses incurred in our corporate headquarters, costs associated with corporate development initiatives, legal expense, interest expense, foreign exchange gains or losses and other centrally-managed costs. Corporate general and administrative costs comprise the majority of the expense in the Corporate segment. During the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021 and 2020 corporate general and administrative costs were $40.3 million, $37.6 million, and $28.5 million, respectively. These increases primarily reflect an increase in centrally managed functions.
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Year Ended December 31, 2022 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2021
Net Sales20222021Dollar
Increase
(Decrease)
Percent
Increase
(Decrease)
(In millions)
Consolidated$1,527.9$1,400.2$127.79.1%
Americas1,043.2908.1135.114.9%
International484.7492.1(7.4)(1.5)%
Net Sales. Net sales for the year ended December 31, 2022, were $1.53 billion, an increase of $127.7 million, from $1.40 billion for the year ended December 31, 2021, driven by strategic price increases, volume growth, and acquisitions, partially offset by foreign currency translation. We saw strong growth across most of our core products and across both reporting segments. Constant currency sales increased by 12.2% for the year ended December 31, 2022. Please refer to the Net Sales table below for a reconciliation of the year over year sales change.
Net SalesYear Ended December 31, 2022 versus December 31, 2021
(Percent Change)AmericasInternational Consolidated
GAAP reported sales change14.9%(1.5)%9.1%
Currency translation effects0.2%8.5%3.1%
Constant currency sales change15.1%7.0%12.2%
Less: Acquisitions(2.8)%(1.6)%(2.3)%
Organic constant currency change12.3%5.4%9.9%
Note: Constant currency sales change and Organic constant currency sales change are non-GAAP financial measure provided by the Company to give a better understanding of the Company's underlying business performance. Constant currency sales change is calculated by deducting the percentage impact from currency translation effects from the overall percentage change in net sales. Organic constant currency sales change is calculated by deducting the percentage impact from acquisitions and currency translation effects from the overall percentage change in net sales.
Net sales for the Americas segment were $1,043.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2022, an increase of $135.1 million, or 14.9%, compared to $908.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. During 2022, constant currency sales in the Americas segment increased 15.1% or on an organic constant currency basis increased 12.3%, excluding acquisitions. Growth was driven by favorable unit growth, new products, pricing and this volume growth was across most product categories. The inclusion of Bacharach drove the acquisition related sales.
Net sales for the International segment were $484.7 million for the year ended December 31, 2022, a decrease of $7.4 million, or 1.5%, compared to $492.1 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. Constant currency sales in the International segment increased 7.0% compared to the prior year period with organic constant currency growth of 5.4%. Growth was driven by favorable unit growth, new products, pricing and this volume growth was across most product categories; however, the unfavorable impact of foreign currency translation offset this growth on a reported basis. The inclusion of Bacharach drove acquisition related sales.
Looking ahead, we continue to operate in a very dynamic environment. There are a number of other evolving factors that will continue to influence our revenue and earnings outlook. These factors include, among other things, supply chain constraints, raw material or semiconductor availability, the risk of additional COVID lockdowns, industrial employment rates, interest rate changes, military conflict, currency exchange volatility, the pace of economic recovery, as well as geopolitical risk, particularly as it relates to energy uncertainty which could affect operations and suppliers based in Germany and broader Europe. These or other conditions could impact our future results and growth expectations well into 2023.
Refer to Note 8—Segment Information to the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K, for information regarding sales by product group.
Gross profit. Gross profit for the year ended December 31, 2022 was $673.8 million, an increase of $58.5 million, or 9.5%, compared to $615.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. The ratio of gross profit to net sales was 44.1% in 2022 compared to 43.9% in 2021. Pricing and productivity efforts were partially offset by inflation, inventory and product warranty charges.
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Selling, general and administrative expenses. Selling, general and administrative ("SG&A") expenses were $338.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2022, an increase of $6.0 million, or 1.8%, compared to $332.9 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. Overall, selling, general and administrative expenses were 22.2% of net sales in 2022 compared to 23.8% of net sales in 2021. Organic constant currency SG&A increased $13 million or 4.0%, demonstrating leverage on revenue growth. This increase was driven by wage inflation and strategic investments to support revenue growth. Areas of savings included lower acquisition related costs and savings from our restructuring programs in our International segment. Please refer to the Selling, general and administrative expenses table for a reconciliation of the year-over-year expense change.
Selling, general, and administrative expensesYear Ended
December 31, 2022 versus December 31, 2021
(Percent Change)Consolidated
GAAP reported change1.8%
Currency translation effects2.9%
Constant currency change4.7%
Less: Acquisitions and strategic transaction costs(0.7)%
Organic constant currency change4.0%
Note: Constant currency SG&A change and Organic constant currency SG&A change are non-GAAP financial measure provided by the Company to give a better understanding of the Company's underlying business performance. Constant currency SG&A change is calculated by deducting the percentage impact from currency translation effects from the overall percentage change in SG&A. Organic constant currency SG&A change is calculated by deducting the percentage impact from acquisitions and related strategic transaction costs and currency translation effects from the overall percentage change in SG&A.
Research and development expense. Research and development expense was $57.0 million for the year ended December 31, 2022, a decrease of $0.8 million, or 1.4%, compared to $57.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. Research and development expense was 3.7% of net sales in 2022, compared to 4.1% of net sales in 2021.
We capitalized approximately $8.7 million and $8.1 million of software development costs during the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively. Depreciation expense for capitalized software development cost of $7.9 million and $4.9 million during the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021, was recorded in costs of products sold on the Consolidated Statements of Income. Refer to Note 1—Significant Accounting Policies of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for further details regarding our software development costs.
MSA remains committed to dedicating significant resources to research and development activities, including the development of technology-based safety solutions. As we continue to invest a significant portion of our new product development into technology-based safety solutions, we anticipate that the historical relationship of research and development expense to net sales will continue to evolve; however, we do not anticipate reductions in the relative level of total spend on research and development activities on an annual basis. Total spend on both software development and research and development activities was $65.7 million and $65.9 million during the years ended December 31, 2022 and 2021.
Restructuring charges. During the year ended December 31, 2022, the Company recorded restructuring charges of $8.0 million primarily related to our ongoing international initiatives to drive profitable growth and right size operations. This compared to restructuring charges of $16.4 million during the year ended December 31, 2021, primarily related to our ongoing initiatives to drive profitable growth and acquisition integration activities. We remain focused on executing programs to optimize our cost structure.
Currency exchange. Currency exchange losses were $10.3 million during the year ended December 31, 2022, compared to $0.2 million during the year ended December 31, 2021. The currency exchange losses for the current period related primarily due to foreign currency exposure on unsettled inter-company balances and the recognition of non-cash cumulative translation losses as result of our plan to close a foreign subsidiary. Currency exchange in 2021 related to foreign currency exposure on unsettled inter-company balances.
Refer to Note 18—Derivative Financial Instruments of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for information regarding our currency exchange rate risk management strategy.
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Product liability expense. Product liability expense during the year ended December 31, 2022 was $20.6 million compared to $185.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. Product liability expense for both periods primarily relates to increases in MSA LLC's reserve for cumulative trauma product liability claims and defense costs incurred for these claims. Adjustments to the reserve for the year ended December 31, 2022 totaled $8.4 million net of insurance receivable of $1.6 million. The reserve includes estimated amounts for claims expected to be resolved through the year 2075. On January 5, 2023, the Company divested MSA LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary that holds legacy product liability claims relating to coal dust, asbestos, silica, and other exposures. As a result of the transaction, we will derecognize in the first quarter of 2023 all legacy cumulative trauma product liability reserves, related insurance assets, and associated deferred tax assets of the divested subsidiary from our balance sheet and recognize a loss of approximately $200 million. Please refer to Note 20—Contingencies of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for additional information.
GAAP operating income. Consolidated operating income for the year ended December 31, 2022 was $239.1 million compared to $22.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. The increase in operating results was driven by the factors described in the preceding sections.
Adjusted operating income. Americas adjusted operating income for the year ended December 31, 2022 was $267.4 million, an increase of $64.9 million or 32%, compared to $202.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. The increase in adjusted operating income is primarily attributable to higher sales volumes driven by the full year impact of the Bacharach acquisition and organic business activity, partially offset by higher SG&A expenses to support business growth.
International adjusted operating income for the year ended December 31, 2022 was $60.9 million, a decrease of $12.4 million, or 17%, compared to adjusted operating income of $73.3 million for the year ended December 31, 2021. The decrease in adjusted operating income is primarily attributable to lower revenue and gross margins as a result of unfavorable currency translation and transactional impact, inflationary pressures, partially offset by lower SG&A expenses.
Corporate segment adjusted operating loss for the year ended December 31, 2022 was $37.9 million, an increase of $2.7 million, or 8%, compared to an adjusted operating loss of $35.2 million for the year ended December 31, 2021 due primarily to increased costs to support higher business activity.
The following tables represent a reconciliation from GAAP operating income to adjusted operating income (loss) and adjusted EBITDA. Adjusted operating margin % is calculated as adjusted operating income (loss) divided by net sales and adjusted EBITDA margin % is calculated as adjusted EBITDA divided by net sales.
Adjusted operating incomeYear Ended December 31, 2022
(In thousands)AmericasInternationalCorporateConsolidated
Net sales$1,043,238 $484,715 $— $1,527,953 
GAAP operating income239,137 
Restructuring charges (Note 3)7,965 
Currency exchange losses, net10,255 
Product liability expense (Note 20)20,590 
Acquisition related costs (Note 14)(a)
12,440 
Adjusted operating income (loss)267,392 60,923 (37,928)290,387 
Adjusted operating margin %25.6 %12.6 %
Depreciation and amortization(a)
34,334 12,256 520 47,110 
Adjusted EBITDA301,726 73,179 (37,408)337,497 
Adjusted EBITDA %28.9 %15.1 %
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Adjusted operating incomeYear Ended December 31, 2021
(In thousands)AmericasInternationalCorporateConsolidated
Net sales$908,068 $492,114 $— $1,400,182 
GAAP operating income22,780 
Restructuring charges (Note 3)16,433 
Currency exchange losses, net216 
Product liability expense (Note 20)185,264 
Acquisition related costs (Note 14)(a)
15,884 
Adjusted operating income (loss)202,496 73,279 (35,198)240,577 
Adjusted operating margin %22.3 %14.9 %
Depreciation and amortization(a)
31,236 13,718 463 45,417 
Adjusted EBITDA233,732 86,997 (34,735)285,994 
Adjusted EBITDA %25.7 %17.7 %
(a) Acquisition related costs include advisory, legal, accounting, valuation, and other professional or consulting fees incurred during due diligence and integration. These costs are included in SG&A expense in the unaudited Condensed Consolidated Statements of Income. Acquisition-related costs also include the acquisition related amortization, which is included in Cost of products sold in the Consolidated Statements of Income.
Note: Adjusted operating income (loss) and adjusted EBITDA are non-GAAP financial measures. Adjusted operating income (loss) is reconciled above to the nearest GAAP financial measure, Operating income (loss), and excludes restructuring, currency exchange, product liability expense, and acquisition related costs. Adjusted EBITDA is reconciled above to the nearest GAAP financial measure, Operating income (loss) and excludes depreciation and amortization expense. Adjusted operating margin % and Adjusted EBITDA % are operating ratios derived from non-GAAP financial measures.
Total other expense (income), net. Total other expense, net, for the year ended December 31, 2022, was $0.6 million, a decrease of $1.4 million compared to other income, net, of $0.8 million for the year ended December 31, 2021, driven primarily by higher interest expense, related to rising interest rate environment, and a write-down of an equity investment, partially offset by higher pension income, resulting from higher expected rate of return on plan assets. We expect total interest expense for 2023 to be between $48 million and $50 million, this increase is primarily related to the additional long-term debt to divest MSA LLC as of January 5, 2023. We expect non-cash pension income to decline by $8 million compared to 2022.
Income taxes. The reported effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2022 was 24.7%, which includes a benefit of 0.8% for share-based payments, expense of 0.1% related to higher profits in foreign jurisdictions, and an expense of 1.2% due to nondeductible compensation. This compared to a reported effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2021 of 7.7%, which included a benefit of 18.3% for share-based payments, a benefit of 10.9% related to higher profits in foreign jurisdictions and settlement of a foreign audit, and an expense of 15.3% due to nondeductible compensation.
We are subject to regular review and audit by both foreign and domestic tax authorities. While we believe our tax positions will be sustained, the final outcome of tax audits and related litigation may differ materially from the tax amounts recorded in our consolidated financial statements.
Net income attributable to MSA Safety Incorporated. Net income was $179.6 million for the year ended December 31, 2022, or $4.56 per diluted share, compared to $21.3 million, or $0.54 per diluted share, for the year ended December 31, 2021.
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Non-GAAP Financial Information
To supplement our Consolidated Financial Statements presented in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”), we use, and this report includes, certain non-GAAP financial measures. These financial measures include organic constant currency changes, financial measures excluding the impact of acquisitions and related acquisition related costs (including acquisition related amortization), adjusted operating income, adjusted operating margin percentage, adjusted EBITDA and adjusted EBITDA margin percentage. We believe that the use of these non-GAAP financial measures provide investors with additional useful information and provide a more complete understanding of our operating performance and trends, and facilitate comparisons with the performance of our peers. Management also uses these measures internally to assess and better understand our underlying business performance and trends related to core business activities. The non-GAAP financial measures and key performance indicators we use, and computational methods with respect thereto, may differ from the non-GAAP financial measures and key performance indicators, and computational methods, that our peers use to assess their performance and trends.
The presentation of these non-GAAP financial measures does not comply with U.S. GAAP. These non-GAAP financial measures should be viewed as supplemental in nature, and not as a substitute for, or superior to, our reported results prepared in accordance with GAAP. When non-GAAP financial measures are disclosed, the Securities and Exchange Commission's Regulation G requires: (i) the presentation of the most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP and (ii) a reconciliation of the differences between the non-GAAP financial measure presented and the most directly comparable financial measure calculated and presented in accordance with GAAP. For an explanation of these measures, together with a reconciliation to the most directly comparable GAAP financial measure, please refer to the reconciliations referenced above in Management's Discussion & Analysis.
We may also provide financial information on a constant currency basis, which is a non-GAAP financial measure. These references to a constant currency basis do not include operational impacts that could result from fluctuations in foreign currency rates, which are outside of management's control. To provide information on a constant currency basis, the applicable financial results are adjusted by translating current and prior period results in local currency to a fixed foreign exchange rate. This approach is used for countries where the functional currency is the local country currency. This information is provided so that certain financial results can be viewed without the impact of fluctuations in foreign currency rates, thereby facilitating period-to-period comparisons of business performance. Constant currency information is not recognized under U.S. GAAP and it is not intended as an alternative to U.S. GAAP measures.
LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
Our main source of liquidity is operating cash flows, supplemented by borrowings. Our principal liquidity requirements are for working capital, capital expenditures, principal and interest payments on debt, declared dividend payments and acquisitions. At December 31, 2022, approximately 46% of our long-term debt is at fixed interest rates with repayment schedules through 2036. The remainder of our long-term debt is at variable rates on an unsecured revolving credit facility that is due in 2026. At December 31, 2022, approximately 82% of our borrowings are denominated in US dollars, which limits our exposure to currency exchange rate fluctuations.
At December 31, 2022, the Company had cash and cash equivalents, including restricted cash, totaling $164.4 million, and access to sufficient capital, providing ample liquidity and flexibility to continue to maintain our balanced capital allocation strategy. At December 31, 2022, $589.9 million of the existing $900.0 million senior revolving credit facility was unused, including letters of credit issued under the facility. The facility also provides an accordion feature that allows the Company to access an additional $400.0 million of capacity pending approval by MSA’s board of directors and from the bank group. The Company believes our healthy balance sheet and access to significant capital at the year ended December 31, 2022, positions us well to navigate through challenging business conditions.
Operating activities. Operating activities provided cash of $157.5 million in 2022, compared to providing cash of $199.1 million in 2021. The reduced operating cash flow as compared to the same period in 2021 was primarily related to increased working capital requirements, notably increased inventory balances at year-end 2022 to support the higher backlog and accounts receivable related to stronger fourth quarter 2022 revenue. Payments for subsidiary MSA LLC's product liability claims exceeded collections from insurance companies by $27.2 million in the year ended December 31, 2022, compared to $24.1 million in 2021. On January 5, 2023, the Company divested MSA LLC and as a result, will derecognize all legacy cumulative trauma product liability reserves, related insurance assets, and associated deferred tax assets of the divested subsidiary from our balance sheet and will recognize a loss of approximately $200 million in the first quarter of 2023 and expect related cash outflows to be recognized within operating activities in the consolidated statements of cash flows. R&Q and Obra have assumed management of the divested subsidiary, including the management of its claims. The divestiture enhances operating cash flow predictability by eliminating costs associated with defending and settling the transferred claims.
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Please refer to Note 20—Contingencies of the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for additional information.
Investing activities. Investing activities used cash of $4.5 million for the year ended December 31, 2022, compared to using $415.5 million in 2021. The decrease in cash used in investing activities as compared to the same period in 2021 was primarily related to the absence of acquisitions. We remain active in evaluating additional acquisition opportunities that will allow us to continue to grow in key end markets and geographies.
Financing activities. Financing activities used cash of $113.4 million for the year ended December 31, 2022, compared to providing cash of $203.9 million in 2021. During 2022, we had net payments on long-term debt of $13.0 million as compared to net proceeds on long-term debt of $293.2 million during the same period in 2021 to fund the acquisitions of Bacharach and Bristol and buy-out our minority partner in our China business. We paid cash dividends of $71.5 million during 2022, compared to $68.6 million, exclusive of a $5.6 million dividend to our former noncontrolling interest partner in China as part of the buy-out, during 2021. We also used cash of $34.4 million during 2022 to repurchase shares, compared to using $6.2 million during the same period in 2021. In 2022, $30.4 million of our repurchase activity was related to purchases under our 2015 stock repurchase program.
In January 2023, we entered into a new $250 million term loan and $65 million was drawn down from our revolving credit facility to fund the divestiture of MSA LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary that, at the time of divestiture held legacy product liability claims relating to coal dust, asbestos, silica, and other exposures. Subsequent to this transaction, we have more than $500 million of availability remaining on our revolving credit facility.
CUMULATIVE TRANSLATION ADJUSTMENTS
The year-end position of the U.S. dollar relative to international currencies at December 31, 2022, resulted in a translation loss of $19.5 million being recorded to cumulative translation adjustments shareholders' equity account for the year ended December 31, 2022, compared to a translation loss of $25.4 million being recorded to the cumulative translation adjustments account during 2021.
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
We are obligated to make future payments under various contracts, including debt and lease agreements. Our significant cash obligations as of December 31, 2022, are as follows:
(In millions)Total20232024202520262027Thereafter
Long-term debt$575.2 $7.4 $7.4 $7.4 $316.0 $7.4 $229.6 
Operating leases52.2 10.0 7.5 5.2 4.1 3.4 22.0 
Inventory costing method change tax8.0 2.7 2.7 2.6 — — — 
Transition tax2.0 0.7 1.3 — — — — 
Totals$637.4 $20.8 $18.9 $15.2 $320.1 $10.8 $251.6 
The significant obligations table does not include obligations to taxing authorities due to uncertainty surrounding the ultimate settlement of amounts and timing of these obligations. It also does not include $315 million of variable rate debt related to the January 5, 2023, divestiture of MSA LLC.
We expect to meet our future debt service obligations through cash provided by operations. Approximately $308.6 million of debt payable in 2026, included in the table above, relates to our unsecured senior revolving credit facility that has a weighted average interest rate of 5.13% as of December 31, 2022. We expect to generate sufficient operating cash flow to make payments against this amount each year. To the extent that a balance remains when the facility matures in 2026, we expect to refinance the remaining balance through new borrowing facilities. Interest expense on fixed rate debt over the next five years is expected to be approximately $7.5 million in 2023, $7.3 million in 2024, $7.0 million in 2025, $6.8 million in 2026 and $6.6 million in 2027. We expect total interest expense for 2023 to be between $48 million and $50 million.
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The Company had outstanding bank guarantees and standby letters of credit with banks as of December 31, 2022 totaling $9.3 million, of which $1.5 million relate to the senior revolving credit facility. These letters of credit serve to cover customer requirements in connection with certain sales orders and insurance companies. The Company is also required to provide cash collateral in connection with certain arrangements. At December 31, 2022, the Company has $1.5 million of restricted cash in support of these arrangements.
We expect to make net contributions of $8.2 million to our pension plans in 2023 which are primarily associated with our International segment. We have not been required to make contributions to our U.S. based qualified defined benefit pension plan in many years.
We have purchase commitments for materials, supplies, services and property, plant and equipment as part of our ordinary conduct of business.
Please refer to Note 20—Contingencies to the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for further discussion on the Company's product liabilities.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
We prepare our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (U.S. GAAP). The preparation of these financial statements requires us to make estimates and judgments that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses and the related disclosures. We evaluate these estimates and judgments on an on-going basis based on historical experience and various assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. However, different amounts could be reported if we had used different assumptions and in light of different facts and circumstances. Actual amounts could differ from the estimates and judgments reflected in our consolidated financial statements. A summary of the Company's significant accounting policies is included in Note 1—Significant Accounting Policies to the consolidated financial statements in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
The more critical judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements are discussed in Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in this Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2022. During 2021, the Company made acquisitions that raised business combinations to a critical accounting policy and estimate. There were no business combinations during 2022.
Business combinations. In accordance with the accounting guidance for business combinations, the Company uses the acquisition method of accounting to allocate costs of acquired businesses to the assets acquired and liabilities assumed based on their estimated fair values at the dates of acquisition. The excess costs of acquired businesses over the fair values of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed will be recognized as goodwill. The valuations of the acquired assets and liabilities will impact the determination of future operating results. In addition to using management estimates and negotiated amounts, the Company uses a variety of information sources to determine the estimated fair values of acquired assets and liabilities including: third-party appraisals for the estimated value and lives of identifiable intangible assets and property, plant and equipment; third-party actuaries for the estimated obligations of defined benefit pension plans and similar benefit obligations; and legal counsel or other experts to assess the obligations associated with legal, environmental and other contingent liabilities.
The business and technical judgment of management was used in determining which intangible assets have indefinite lives and in determining the useful lives of finite-lived intangible assets in accordance with the accounting guidance for goodwill and other intangible assets.
Cumulative trauma product liability. The Company and its subsidiaries face an inherent business risk of exposure to product liability claims arising from the alleged failure of our products to prevent the types of personal injury or death against which they are designed to protect. Product liability claims are categorized as either single incident or cumulative trauma.
Single incident product liability claims involve incidents of short duration that are typically known when they occur and involve observable injuries, which provide a more objective basis for quantifying damages. The Company estimates its subsidiaries' liability for single incident product liability claims based on expected settlement costs for asserted single incident product liability claims and an estimate of costs for single incident product liability claims incurred but not reported ("IBNR"). Single incident product liability exposures are evaluated on an annual basis, or more frequently if changing circumstances warrant. Adjustments are made to the reserve as appropriate.
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Cumulative trauma product liability claims involve exposures to harmful substances that occurred over many years and may have developed over long periods of time into diseases. In the case of MSA LLC, the subsidiary's combined cumulative trauma product liability reserve is based upon estimates of its liability for asserted and IBNR cumulative trauma product liability claims. In addition, in connection with finalizing and reporting the Company's results of operations, management works annually (unless significant changes in trends or new developments warrant an earlier review) with an outside valuation consultant and outside legal counsel to review MSA LLC's potential exposure to all cumulative trauma product liability claims. Each of these factors may increase or decrease significantly within an individual period depending on, among other things, the timing of claims filings or settlements, or litigation outcomes during a particular period that are especially favorable or unfavorable to MSA LLC. We accordingly consider MSA LLC’s claims experience over multiple periods and/or whether there are changes in MSA LLC’s claims experience and trends that are likely to continue for a significant time into the future in determining whether to make an adjustment to the reserve, rather than evaluating such factors solely in the short term.
Please refer to Note 20—Contingencies to the consolidated financial statements in Part II Item 8 of this Form 10-K for further discussion on the Company's product liabilities and divestiture of MSA LLC on January 5, 2023.
Income taxes. We recognize deferred tax assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates to record the tax effect of temporary differences between the book and tax basis of recorded assets and liabilities. We record valuation allowances to reduce deferred tax assets to the amounts that we estimate are probable to be realized. When assessing the need for valuation allowances, we consider projected future taxable income and prudent and feasible tax planning strategies. Should a change in circumstances lead to a change in our judgments about the realizability of deferred tax assets in future years, we adjust the related valuation allowances in the period that the change in circumstances occurs.
We record an estimated income tax liability based on our best judgment of the amounts likely to be paid in the various tax jurisdictions in which we operate. We record tax benefits related to uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken on a tax return when such benefits meet a more likely than not threshold. We recognize interest related to unrecognized tax benefits in interest expense and penalties in operating expenses. The tax liabilities ultimately paid are dependent on a number of factors, including the resolution of tax audits, and may differ from the amounts recorded. Tax liabilities are adjusted through income when it becomes probable that the actual liability differs from the amount recorded.
Pensions and other post-retirement benefits. We sponsor certain pension and other post-retirement benefit plans. Accounting for the net periodic benefit costs and credits for these plans requires us to estimate the cost of benefits to be provided well into the future and to attribute these costs over the expected work life of the employees participating in these plans. These estimates require our judgment about discount rates used to determine these obligations, expected returns on plan assets, rates of future compensation increases, rates of increase in future health care costs, participant withdrawal and mortality rates and participant retirement ages. Differences between our estimates and actual results may significantly affect the cost of our obligations under these plans and could cause net periodic benefit costs and credits to change materially from year-to-year. Discount rates and plan asset valuations are point-in-time measures. The discount rate assumptions used in determining projected benefit obligations for our U.S. and foreign plans were based on the spot rate method at December 31, 2022.
Expected returns on plan assets are based on capital market expectations by asset class.
The following table summarizes the impact of changes in significant actuarial assumptions on our December 31, 2022 actuarial valuations.
Impact of Changes in Actuarial Assumptions
Change in Discount
Rate
Change in Expected
Return
Change in Market Value of Assets
(In thousands)1%(1)%1%(1)%5%(5)%
(Decrease) increase in net benefit cost$(7,875)$9,942 $(5,682)$5,682 $(1,482)$1,333 
(Decrease) increase in projected benefit obligation(61,274)77,324 — — — — 
Increase (decrease) in funded status61,274 (77,324)— — 25,853 (25,853)
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Goodwill and Indefinite-lived Intangible Assets. On October 1st of each year, or more frequently if indicators of impairment exist or if a decision is made to sell a business, we evaluate goodwill for impairment. Such indicators may include a decline in expected cash flows, a significant adverse change in the business climate, unanticipated competition, slower growth rates, or negative developments in equity and credit markets, among others.
All goodwill is assigned to and evaluated for impairment at the reporting unit level, which is defined as an operating segment or one level below an operating segment. The evaluation of impairment involves using either a qualitative or quantitative approach as outlined in Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC") Topic 350. In 2022, we performed a quantitative test at October 1, 2022. Quantitative testing involves comparing the estimated fair value of each reporting unit to its carrying value. We estimate reporting unit fair value using a weighted average of fair values determined by discounted cash flow ("DCF") and market approach methodologies, as we believe both are important indicators of fair value. A number of assumptions and estimates are involved in the application of the DCF model, including sales volumes and prices, costs to produce, tax rates, capital spending, discount rates, and working capital changes. Cash flow forecasts are generally based on approved business unit operating plans for the early years and historical relationships in later years. The market approach methodology measures value through an analysis of peer companies. The analysis entails measuring the multiples of EBITDA at which peer companies are trading.
In the event the carrying value is in excess of the estimated fair value of a reporting unit per the weighted average of the DCF and market approach models, an impairment loss equal to such excess would be recognized, which could materially and adversely affect reported consolidated results of operations and shareholders’ equity. At October 1, 2022, based on our quantitative test, the fair values of each of our reporting units exceeded their respective carrying value by at least 42%.
The intangible asset with an indefinite life is also subject to impairment testing on October 1st of each year, or more frequently if indicators of impairment exist. The impairment test compares the fair value of the intangible asset with its carrying amount. We perform a quantitative assessment of the indefinite lived trade name intangible asset as outlined in ASC 350 by comparing the estimated fair value of the trade name intangible asset to its carrying value. We estimate the fair value using the relief from royalty income approach. A number of significant assumptions and estimates are involved in the application of the relief from royalty model, including sales volumes and prices, royalty rates and tax rates. Forecasts are based on sales generated by the underlying trade name assets and are generally based on approved business unit operating plans for the early years and historical relationships in later years. At October 1, 2022, based on our quantitative test, the fair value of the trade name asset exceeded its carrying value by approximately 37%.
RECENTLY ADOPTED AND RECENTLY ISSUED ACCOUNTING STANDARDS
None
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Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Market risk represents the risk of adverse changes in the value of a financial instrument caused by changes in currency exchange rates, interest rates and equity prices. We are exposed to market risks related to currency exchange rates and interest rates.
Currency exchange rates. We are subject to the effects of fluctuations in currency exchange rates on various transactions and on the translation of the reported financial position and operating results of our non-U.S. companies from local currencies to U.S. dollars. A hypothetical 10% strengthening or weakening of the U.S. dollar would increase or decrease our reported sales and net income for the year ended December 31, 2022 by approximately $62.8 million and $6.5 million, or 4.1% and 3.6%, respectively.
When appropriate, we may attempt to limit our transactional exposure to changes in currency exchange rates through forward contracts or other actions intended to reduce existing exposures by creating offsetting currency exposures. At December 31, 2022, we had open foreign currency forward contracts with a U.S. dollar notional value of $103.0 million. A hypothetical 10% increase in December 31, 2022 forward exchange rates would result in a $10.3 million increase in the fair value of these contracts.
Interest rates. We are exposed to changes in interest rates primarily as a result of borrowing and investing activities used to maintain liquidity and fund business operations. Because of the relatively short maturities of temporary investments and the variable rate nature of our revolving credit facility, these financial instruments are reported at carrying values which approximate fair values.
At December 31, 2022, we had $266.5 million of fixed rate debt which matures at various dates through 2036. The incremental increase in the fair value of fixed rate long-term debt resulting from a hypothetical 10% decrease in interest rates would be approximately $8.0 million. However, our sensitivity to interest rate declines and the corresponding increase in the fair value of our debt portfolio would unfavorably affect earnings and cash flows only to the extent that we elected to repurchase or retire all or a portion of our fixed rate debt portfolio at prices above carrying values.
At December 31, 2022, we had $308.6 million of variable rate borrowings under our revolving credit facility. A 50 basis point increase or decrease in interest rates could have a $1.4 million impact on future pre-tax earnings under our current capital structure. A 50 basis point increase or decrease in interest rates could have a $3.0 million impact on future pre-tax earnings when the additional $315.0 million of variable rate debt undertaken to complete the MSA, LLC divestiture is taken into account.
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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Management’s Reports to Shareholders
Management’s Report on Responsibility for Financial Reporting
Management of MSA Safety Incorporated (the Company) is responsible for the preparation of the consolidated financial statements included in this annual report. The consolidated financial statements were prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America and include amounts that are based on the best estimates and judgments of management. The other financial information contained in this annual report is consistent with the consolidated financial statements.
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. The Company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles.
The Company’s internal control over financial reporting includes policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect transactions and dispositions of assets; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and the directors of the Company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use or disposition of the Company’s assets that could have a material effect on our financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
Management assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022. In making this assessment, management used the criteria set forth by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO) in Internal Control-Integrated Framework (2013). Based on our assessment and those criteria, management has concluded that the Company maintained effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022.
The Company's independent registered public accounting firm that audited the consolidated financial statements included in this annual report issued an attestation report on the Company's internal control over financial reporting.
/s/    NISHAN J. VARTANIAN      
Nishan J. Vartanian
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer
/s/    LEE B. MCCHESNEY
Lee B. McChesney
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer
February 16, 2023
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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm


To the Shareholders and the Board of Directors of MSA Safety Incorporated

Opinion on Internal Control over Financial Reporting
We have audited MSA Safety Incorporated’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) (the COSO criteria). In our opinion, MSA Safety Incorporated (the Company) maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022, based on the COSO criteria.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB), the consolidated balance sheets of the Company as of December 31, 2022 and 2021, the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, cash flows, and changes in retained earnings, accumulated other comprehensive loss and noncontrolling interests for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2022, and the related notes and financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a) 2 and our report dated February 16, 2023 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
Basis for Opinion
The Company’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.
Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Definition and Limitations of Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.


/s/ Ernst & Young LLP


Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
February 16, 2023
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Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm


To the Shareholders and the Board of Directors of MSA Safety Incorporated

Opinion on the Financial Statements
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of MSA Safety Incorporated (the Company) as of December 31, 2022 and 2021, the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, cash flows, and changes in retained earnings, accumulated other comprehensive loss and noncontrolling interests for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2022, and the related notes and financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Item 15(a) 2 (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company at December 31, 2022 and 2021, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2022, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB), the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2022, based on criteria established in Internal Control-Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework), and our report dated February 16, 2023 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
Basis for Opinion
These financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the PCAOB and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
Critical Audit Matter
The critical audit matter communicated below is a matter arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relates to accounts or disclosures that are material to the financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective or complex judgments. The communication of the critical audit matter does not alter in any way our opinion on the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matter below, providing a separate opinion on the critical audit matter or on the accounts or disclosures to which it relates.
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Valuation of cumulative trauma product liability claims
Description of the Matter
As more fully described in Notes 1 and 20 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company's subsidiary MSA LLC is named as a defendant in lawsuits comprised of cumulative trauma product liability claims involving potential exposures to substances that are alleged to have occurred over a number of years. In recent periods, this has included asbestos, silica and coal dust claims. It is probable that MSA LLC will incur losses related to asserted and incurred but not reported (IBNR) claims and that the amount of losses can be reasonably estimated. At December 31, 2022, the Company’s reserve for cumulative trauma product liability claims was $395.1 million, representing its best estimate of the expected losses related to these claims.

Auditing management’s accounting for and disclosure of loss contingencies arising from cumulative trauma product liability claims was especially challenging, as the estimate of probable loss is highly subjective. In particular, the estimate was sensitive to significant assumptions that included, among others, the number of claims asserted against MSA LLC and the counsel asserting those claims, the percentage of claims resolved through settlement and the values of settlements paid to claimants.
How We Addressed the Matter in Our Audit
We obtained an understanding, evaluated the design and tested the operating effectiveness of relevant internal controls over the Company’s assessment and measurement of its estimate of probable loss for its subsidiary's cumulative trauma product liability claims. Our audit procedures included testing controls over the Company’s assessment and measurement of the best estimate of the expected losses related to cumulative trauma product liability claims.

To test the Company’s assessment of its subsidiary's cumulative trauma product liability claims, we performed audit procedures which included, among others: reading the minutes of the meetings of the committees of the board of directors, requesting and receiving internal and external legal counsel letters, meeting with internal and external counsel to discuss the claims, meeting with management’s valuation consultant, testing the completeness and accuracy of data from underlying systems that are used in the Company’s assessment, performing a historical lookback analysis on claims data, performing a search for new or contrary evidence affecting the assessment, and obtaining a representation letter from the Company. Additional audit procedures to test the Company’s valuation of the expected losses related to cumulative trauma product liability claims included: evaluating significant assumptions underlying the estimate, including the number of claims asserted against MSA LLC and the counsel asserting those claims, the percentage of claims resolved through settlement and the values of settlements paid to claimants. We engaged our actuarial specialists to assist in the analysis of the significant assumptions and methodology used by management. Our procedures also included evaluating the sufficiency of the Company’s disclosures with respect to cumulative trauma product liability claims described in Note 20 to the consolidated financial statements.
/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2014.

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
February 16, 2023
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MSA SAFETY INCORPORATED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
Year ended December 31,
(In thousands, except per share amounts)202220212020
Net sales$1,527,953 $1,400,182 $1,348,223 
Cost of products sold854,122 784,834 752,731 
Gross profit673,831 615,348 595,492 
Selling, general and administrative338,872 332,862 290,334 
Research and development57,012 57,793 58,268 
Restructuring charges (Note 3)7,965 16,433 27,381 
Currency exchange losses, net10,255 216 8,578 
Product liability expense (Note 20)20,590 185,264 39,036 
Operating income239,137 22,780 171,895 
Interest expense21,660 10,758 9,432 
Other income, net (Note 16)(21,056)(11,582)(5,684)
Total other expense (income), net604 (824)3,748 
Income before income taxes238,533 23,604 168,147 
Provision for income taxes (Note 10)58,903 1,816 43,009 
Net income$179,630 $21,788 $125,138 
Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests (448)(1,061)
Net income attributable to MSA Safety Incorporated$179,630 $21,340 $124,077 
Earnings per share attributable to MSA Safety Incorporated common shareholders (Note 9):
Basic$4.58 $0.54 $3.19 
Diluted$4.56 $0.54 $3.15 
Dividends per common share$1.82 $1.75 $1.71 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.
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MSA SAFETY INCORPORATED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
Year ended December 31,
(In thousands)202220212020
Net income$179,630 $21,788 $125,138 
Other comprehensive (loss) income, net of tax:
Foreign currency translation adjustments (Note 6)(19,453)(25,354)22,260 
Pension and post-retirement plan actuarial gains, net of tax (Note 6)6,961 58,256 9,296 
Unrealized gains (losses) on available-for-sale securities (Note 6)3 (4)(7)
Reclassifications from accumulated other comprehensive loss into net income (Note 6)2,912 267 216 
Total other comprehensive (loss) income, net of tax(9,577)33,165 31,765 
Comprehensive income170,053 54,953 156,903 
Comprehensive income attributable to noncontrolling interests (356)(1,220)
Comprehensive income attributable to MSA Safety Incorporated$170,053 $54,597 $155,683 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.
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MSA SAFETY INCORPORATED
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS 
December 31,
(In thousands, except share amounts)20222021
Assets
Cash and cash equivalents$162,902 $140,895 
Trade receivables, less allowance for credit loss of $6,769 and $5,789
297,028 254,187 
Inventories (Note 4)338,316 280,617 
Investments, short-term (Note 19)9,905 48,974 
Prepaid income taxes21,700 21,235 
Notes receivable, insurance companies (Note 20)5,931 3,914 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets 44,344 42,982 
Total current assets880,126 792,804 
Property, plant and equipment, net (Note 5)207,552 207,793 
Operating lease right-of-use assets, net (Note 17)44,142 50,178 
Prepaid pension cost (Note 15)141,643 163,283 
Deferred tax assets (Note 10)25,490 35,257 
Goodwill (Note 13)620,622 636,858 
Intangible assets, net (Note 13)281,853 306,948 
Notes receivable, insurance companies, noncurrent (Note 20)38,695 44,626 
Insurance receivable (Note 20) and other noncurrent assets136,853 158,649 
Total assets$2,376,976 $2,396,396 
Liabilities
Notes payable and current portion of long-term debt (Note 12)$7,387 $ 
Accounts payable112,532 106,780 
Employees’ compensation45,077 49,884 
Insurance and product liability (Note 20)73,898 55,125 
Income taxes payable (Note 10)6,149 5,366 
Accrued restructuring (Note 3) and other current liabilities100,822 113,451 
Total current liabilities345,865 330,606 
Long-term debt, net (Note 12)565,445 597,651 
Pensions and other employee benefits (Note 15)137,810 189,973 
Noncurrent operating lease liabilities (Note 17)35,345 40,706 
Deferred tax liabilities (Note 10)31,881 33,337 
Product liability (Note 20) and other noncurrent liabilities 336,889 369,735 
Total liabilities$1,453,235 $1,562,008 
Commitments and contingencies (Note 20)
Shareholders' Equity
Preferred stock, 4.5% cumulative, $50 par value (Note 7)
3,569 3,569 
Common stock, no par value (180,000,000 shares authorized; 62,081,391 shares issued; 39,213,064 and 39,276,518 shares outstanding at December 31, 2022 and 2021, respectively)
281,980 260,121 
Treasury shares, at cost (Note 7)(361,438)(330,376)
Accumulated other comprehensive loss (Note 6)(158,717)(149,140)
Retained earnings1,158,347 1,050,214 
Total shareholders’ equity923,741 834,388 
Total liabilities and shareholders’ equity$2,376,976 $2,396,396 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of the consolidated financial statements.
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MSA SAFETY INCORPORATED
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
Year ended December 31,
(In thousands)202220212020
Operating Activities
Net income$179,630 $21,788 $125,138 
Depreciation and amortization56,317 50,317 39,674 
Stock-based compensation (Note 11)19,650 18,908 6,920 
Pension (income) expense (Note 15) and other charges(11,499)2,448 10,082 
Deferred income tax benefit (Note 10)5,171 (38,850)(2,254)
Loss on asset write-down and dispositions, net6,290 788 236 
Pension contributions (Note 15)(5,032)(5,543)(5,596)
Currency exchange losses, net (Note 6)10,255 216 8,578 
Product liability expense (Note 20)20,590 185,264 39,036 
Collections on insurance receivable and notes receivable,
insurance companies (Note 20)
9,516 15,443 10,853 
Product liability payments (Note 20)(36,755)(39,548)(23,727)
Changes in:
Trade receivables
(38,587)4,374 7,677 
Inventories (Note 4)(67,366)(17,827)(13,645)
Accounts payable7,585 13,299 (3,069)
Other current assets and liabilities(1,795)823 7,749 
Other noncurrent assets and liabilities
3,485 (12,755)(1,097)
Cash Flow From Operating Activities157,455 199,145 206,555 
Investing Activities
Capital expenditures(42,553)(43,837)(48,905)
Purchase of short-term investments (Note 19)(79,542)(133,913)(199,318)
Proceeds from maturities of short-term investments (Note 19)119,000 160,000