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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 FORM 10-K
 
    ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES
EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended October 3, 2020  
OR
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES
EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from                  to                    .
 
Commission File No. 0-121
 
KULICKE AND SOFFA INDUSTRIES, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter) 
Pennsylvania23-1498399
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation)(IRS Employer Identification No.)
23A Serangoon North Avenue 5, #01-01, K&S Corporate Headquarters, Singapore 554369
(Address of Principal Executive Offices and Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (215) 784-6000
N/A
(Former name, former address and former fiscal year, if changed since last report)

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each classTrading Symbol(s)Name of each exchange on which registered
Common Stock, Without Par ValueKLICThe Nasdaq Global Market

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes
 No
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes  No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files). Yes  No
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):



Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
Emerging growth company
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.  
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes  No
As of March 28, 2020, the aggregate market value of the registrant's common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $1,315.4 million based on the closing sale price as reported on The NASDAQ Global Market (reference is made to Part II, Item 5 herein for a statement of assumptions upon which this calculation is based).
APPLICABLE ONLY TO CORPORATE REGISTRANTS
As of November 16, 2020, there were 62,029,334 shares of the registrant's common stock, without par value, outstanding.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

Portions of the registrant's Proxy Statement for the 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed on or about January 13, 2021 are incorporated by reference into Part II, Item 5 and Part III, Items 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14 herein of this Report. Such Proxy Statement, except for the parts therein which have been specifically incorporated by reference, shall not be deemed “filed” for the purposes of this Report on Form 10-K.
 








Table of Contents
KULICKE AND SOFFA INDUSTRIES, INC.
 2020 Annual Report on Form 10-K
October 3, 2020
 Index 
 Page Number
 Part I 
Item 1.Business
Item 1A.Risk Factors
Item 1B.Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2.Properties
Item 3.Legal Proceedings
Item 4.Mine Safety Disclosures
Part II
Item 5.Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
Part II
Item 6.Selected Consolidated Financial Data
Item 7.Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A.Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk
Item 8.Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9.Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A.Controls and Procedures
Item 9B.Other Information
Part III
Item 10.Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11.Executive Compensation
Item 12.Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13.Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Item 14.Principal Accounting Fees and Services
Part IV
Item 15.Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Signatures


Table of Contents
PART I

Forward-Looking Statements
In addition to historical information, this filing contains statements relating to future events or our future results. These statements are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and are subject to the safe harbor provisions created by statute. Such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements with respect to our future revenue, increasing, continuing or strengthening, or decreasing or weakening, demand for our products, replacement demand, our research and development efforts, our ability to identify and realize new growth opportunities, our ability to control costs and our operational flexibility as a result of (among other factors):
our expectations regarding the potential impacts on our business of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the economic and public health effects, and of governmental and other responses to these impacts;
projected growth rates in the overall semiconductor industry, the semiconductor assembly equipment market, and the market for semiconductor packaging materials; and
projected demand for ball bonder, wedge bonder, advanced packaging and electronic assembly equipment and for tools, spare parts and services.
Generally, words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “estimate,” “plan,” “continue,” “goal” and “believe,” or the negative of or other variations on these and other similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this filing. We do not undertake to update or revise the forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
Forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and involve risks and uncertainties. Our future results could differ significantly from those expressed or implied by our forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, those described below and under the heading “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended October 3, 2020 (the “Annual Report” or "Form 10-K") and our other reports and registration statements filed from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This discussion should be read in conjunction with our audited financial statements included in this Annual Report.
We operate in a rapidly changing and competitive environment. New risks emerge from time to time and it is not possible for us to predict all risks that may affect us. Future events and actual results, performance and achievements could differ materially from those set forth in, contemplated by or underlying the forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date on which they were made. Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statement to reflect actual results or changes in, or additions to, the factors affecting such forward-looking statement. Given those risks and uncertainties, investors should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements as predictions of actual results.
Item 1. BUSINESS
Kulicke and Soffa Industries, Inc. ("we", the "Company" or "K&S") designs, manufactures and sells capital equipment and tools used to assemble semiconductor devices, including integrated circuits (“ICs”), high and low powered discrete devices, light-emitting diodes (“LEDs”), and power modules. In addition, we have a portfolio of equipment that is used to assemble components onto electronic circuit boards. We also service, maintain, repair and upgrade our equipment. Our customers primarily consist of semiconductor device manufacturers, integrated device manufacturers (“IDMs”), outsourced semiconductor assembly and test providers (“OSATs”), other electronics manufacturers and automotive electronics suppliers.
K&S was incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1956. Our principal offices are located at 23A Serangoon North Avenue 5, #01-01, Singapore 554369 and our telephone number in the United States is (215) 784-6000. We maintain a website with the address www.kns.com. We are not including the information contained on our website as a part of, or incorporating it by reference into, this filing. We make available free of charge (other than an investor's own Internet access charges) on or through our website our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to these reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after the material is electronically filed with or otherwise furnished to the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports are also available on the SEC's website at www.sec.gov.
Our year end for each of fiscal 2020, 2019 and 2018 was October 3, 2020, September 28, 2019, and September 29, 2018, respectively.
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Key Events in Fiscal 2020
COVID-19 Pandemic
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the global economy, disrupted global supply chains, lowered equity market valuations, created significant volatility and disruption in financial markets, and significantly increased unemployment levels. In addition, the pandemic has resulted in temporary closures and failures of many businesses and the institution of social distancing and sheltering-in-place requirements in many jurisdictions. As these measures begin to be relaxed, in certain jurisdictions there has been a resurgence of illnesses, potentially leading to more severe restrictions in the future.
In response to the pandemic, we have temporarily closed certain offices in the United States, Europe and Asia as well as executed our Business Continuity Plan ("BCP"), which measures have disrupted how we operate our business. While we are currently operating at nearly full capacity in all of our manufacturing locations, work-from-home practices were instituted across every office worldwide, which have impacted our non-manufacturing productivity, including our research & development. At this point, our BCP has not included significant headcount reductions or changes in our overall liquidity position. As certain countries begin to relax the measures, we have restarted certain activities, such as our research & development, in accordance with local guidelines.
We have not experienced significant delays in customer deliveries, but our supply chain is strained in some cases as the availability of materials, logistics and freight options are challenging in many jurisdictions. Demand for many of our products was consistent with our expectations for our fourth quarter of fiscal 2020, but we are seeing a lower projected demand in the automotive end market, which particularly impacts near-term demand for our wedge bonders. We believe the semiconductor industry macroeconomics have not changed and we anticipate the industry’s long-term growth projections will normalize, but the sector is expected to see significant short-term volatility and potential disruption.
Various countries have announced measures, including government grants, tax changes and tax credits, among other types of relief, in response to the pandemic. For fiscal 2020, we have received a $4.5 million COVID-19 related grant from the Singapore government as well as other measures including rental rebates and social insurance exemption, which are not material to our operating results.
Based on our current evaluation, the pandemic has not had a material impact on our financial condition and operating results in fiscal 2020. We believe that our existing cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments, existing Facility Agreements, and anticipated cash flows from operations will be sufficient to meet our liquidity and capital requirements, notwithstanding the COVID-19 pandemic, for at least the next twelve months from the date of filing. However, as this is a highly dynamic situation, and it is still developing rapidly, there is uncertainty surrounding our business, and our near- and long-term liquidity, financial condition and operating results could deteriorate.
For other information, please see Part II Item 1A. Risk Factors - The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic could adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
Trade Restriction and Emerging Regulation
In 2020, the U.S. Department of Commerce’s Bureau of Industry and Security (“BIS”) announced new Export Administration Regulations (“EAR”) specifically applicable to Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. and its affiliates (collectively, "Huawei"). We have assessed the potential impact of the new BIS rules and EAR, and do not believe that they will have a material direct impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations, but they could have indirect impacts, including increasing tensions in U.S. and Chinese trade relations, potentially leading to negative sentiments towards U.S.-based companies among Chinese consumers. For additional information, please see Part II Item 1A. Risk Factors - We are subject to export restrictions that may limit our ability to sell to certain customers and the U.S.-China trade war could adversely affect our business.
Share Repurchase Program
On August 15, 2017, the Company's Board of Directors authorized a program (the "Program") to repurchase up to $100 million of the Company’s common stock on or before August 1, 2020. In 2018 and 2019, the Board of Directors increased the share repurchase authorization under the Program to $200 million and $300 million, respectively. On July 3, 2020, the Board of Directors increased the share repurchase authorization under the Company's existing share repurchase program by an additional $100 million to $400 million, and extended its duration through August 1, 2022. The Company has entered into a written trading plan under Rule 10b5-1 of the Exchange Act to facilitate repurchases under the Program. The Program may be suspended or discontinued at any time and is funded using the Company's available cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments. Under the Program, shares may be repurchased through open market and/or privately negotiated transactions at prices deemed appropriate by management. The timing and amount of repurchase transactions under the Program depend on market conditions as well as corporate and regulatory considerations. During the fiscal year ended October 3, 2020, the
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Company repurchased a total of approximately 2.5 million shares of common stock at a cost of approximately $55.0 million. As of October 3, 2020, our remaining share repurchase authorization under the Program was approximately $142.1 million.
Dividends
On August 26, 2020, May 29, 2020, February 20, 2020 and December 12, 2019, the Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend $0.12 per share of common stock. During the fiscal year ended October 3, 2020, the Company declared dividends of $0.48 per share of common stock. The declaration of any future cash dividend is at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will depend on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, business conditions and other factors, as well as a determination that such dividends are in the best interests of the Company's stockholders.
Business Environment
The semiconductor business environment is highly volatile and is driven by internal dynamics, both cyclical and seasonal, in addition to macroeconomic forces. Over the long term, semiconductor consumption has historically grown, and is forecast to continue to grow. This growth is driven, in part, by regular advances in device performance and by price declines that result from improvements in manufacturing technology. In order to exploit these trends, semiconductor manufacturers, both IDMs and OSATs, periodically invest aggressively in latest generation capital equipment. This buying pattern often leads to periods of excess supply and reduced capital spending—the so-called semiconductor cycle. Within this broad semiconductor cycle there are also, generally weaker, seasonal effects that are specifically tied to annual, end-consumer purchasing patterns. Typically, semiconductor manufacturers prepare for heightened demand by adding or replacing equipment capacity by the end of the September quarter. Occasionally, this results in subsequent reductions in the December quarter. This annual seasonality can be overshadowed by effects of the broader semiconductor cycle. Macroeconomic factors also affect the industry, primarily through their effect on business and consumer demand for electronic devices, as well as other products that have significant electronic content such as automobiles, white goods, and telecommunication equipment. There can be no assurances regarding levels of demand for our products and we believe historic industry-wide volatility will persist.
In the Asia/Pacific region, our customer base has also become more geographically concentrated as a result of economic and industry conditions. Approximately 94.2% and 93.3% of our net revenue for fiscal 2020 and 2019, respectively, was for shipments to customer locations outside of the U.S., primarily in the Asia/Pacific region. Approximately 51.6% and 46.7% of our net revenue for fiscal 2020 and 2019, respectively, was for shipments to customers located in China, which is subject to risks and uncertainties related to the respective policies of the governments of China and the U.S.
The U.S. and several other countries have levied tariffs on certain goods, and have introduced other trade restrictions, which, together with the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic discussed above, has resulted in substantial uncertainties in the semiconductor, LED, memory and automotive market with a resulting softening demand. While the Company anticipates long-term growth in semiconductor consumption, the adverse impacts on demand, which began in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2018, has continued through, and may continue beyond, fiscal 2020.
Our Capital Equipment segment is primarily affected by the industry's internal cyclical and seasonal dynamics in addition to broader macroeconomic factors that can positively or negatively affect our financial performance. The sales mix of IDM and OSAT customers in any period also impacts financial performance, as changes in this mix can affect our products' average selling prices and gross margins due to differences in volume purchases and machine configurations required by each customer type.
Our Aftermarket Products and Services ("APS") segment has historically been less volatile than our Capital Equipment segment. The APS sales are more directly tied to semiconductor unit consumption rather than capacity requirements and production capability improvements. 
We continue to position our business to leverage our research and development leadership and innovation and to focus our efforts on mitigating volatility, improving profitability and ensuring longer-term growth. We remain focused on operational excellence, expanding our product offerings and managing our business efficiently throughout the business cycles. Our visibility into future demand is generally limited, forecasting is difficult, and we generally experience typical industry seasonality.
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To limit potential adverse cyclical, seasonal and macroeconomic effects on our financial position, we have continued our efforts to maintain a strong balance sheet. As of October 3, 2020, our total cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments, net of short-term borrowings, were $530.1 million, a $2.2 million decrease from the prior fiscal year end. We believe our strong cash position will allow us to continue to invest in product development and pursue non-organic opportunities.
Technology Leadership
We compete largely by offering our customers advanced equipment and tools available for the interconnect processes. We believe our technology leadership contributes to the strong market positions of our ball bonder, wedge bonder and tools products. To maintain our competitive advantage, we invest in product development activities designed to produce improvements to existing products and to deliver next-generation products. These investments often focus as much on improvements in the semiconductor assembly process as on specific pieces of assembly equipment or tools. In order to generate these improvements, we typically work in close collaboration with customers, end users, and other industry members. In addition to producing technical advances, these collaborative development efforts strengthen customer relationships and enhance our reputation as a technology leader and solutions provider.
In addition to gold, silver alloy wire and aluminum wire, our leadership in the industry's use of copper wire for the bonding process is an example of the benefits of our collaborative efforts. By working with customers, material suppliers, and other equipment suppliers, we have developed a series of robust, high-yielding production processes, which have made copper wire widely accepted and significantly reduced the cost of assembling an integrated circuit.
Our leadership also has allowed us to maintain a competitive position in the latest generations of ball bonders. Gen-S is our smart bonder series and RAPID™ is the first product in the series to address the Industry 4.0 requirements. The key features of this series include Real-time Process & Performance Monitoring, Real-time Equipment Health Monitoring, Advanced Data Analytics & Traceability, Predictive Maintenance Monitoring & Analysis, and Detection & Enhanced Post-Bond Inspection.
We optimize our bonder platforms to deliver variants of our products to serve emerging high-growth markets. For example, we have developed extensions of our Gen-S platform (RAPID™ MEM) to address opportunities in memory assembly, in particular for NAND Flash storage.
Our leading technology for wedge bonder equipment uses ribbon or heavy wire for different applications such as power electronics, automotive and semiconductor applications. The advanced interconnect capabilities of PowerFusionPS improve the processing of high-density power packages, due to an expanded bondable area, wider leadframe capability, indexing accuracy and teach mode. In all cases, we are making a concerted effort to develop commonality of subsystems and design practices, in order to improve performance and design efficiencies. We believe this will benefit us as it will increase synergies between the various engineering product groups. Furthermore, we continually research adjacent market segments where our technologies could be used. Many of these initiatives are in the early stages of development and some have yielded results such as the Asterion™ hybrid wedge bonder which is built on an enhanced architecture that includes an expanded bond area, new robust pattern recognition capabilities and extremely tight process controls. Another example of our developing equipment for high-growth niche markets is our AT Premier PLUS. This machine utilizes a modified wire bonding process to mechanically place bumps on devices in a wafer format, for variants of the flip chip assembly process. Typical applications include complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (“CMOS”) image sensors, surface acoustical wave (“SAW”) filters and high brightness LEDs. These applications are commonly used in most, if not all, smartphones available today in the market. We also have expanded the use of AT Premier PLUS for wafer level wire bonding for micro-electro-mechanical systems (“MEMS”) and other sensors.
Our technology leadership and bonding process know-how have enabled us to develop highly function-specific equipment with high throughput and accuracy. This forms the foundation for our advanced packaging equipment development. We established a dedicated team to develop and manufacture advanced packaging bonders for the emerging 2.5 dimensional integrated circuit (“2.5D IC”) and 3 dimensional integrated circuit (“3D IC”) markets. By reducing the interconnect dimensions, 2.5D ICs and 3D ICs are expected to provide form factor, performance and power efficiency enhancements over traditional flip-chip packages in production today. High-performance processing and memory applications, in addition to mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, are anticipated to be earlier adopters of this new packaging technology.
We have also broadened our advanced packaging solutions for mass reflow to include flip chip, wafer level packaging ("WLP"), fan-out wafer level packaging ("FOWLP"), advanced package-on-package, embedded die, and System-in-Package ("SiP"). These solutions enable us to diversify our business while further expanding market reach into the automotive, LED lighting, medical and industrial segments with electronic assembly solutions.
During fiscal 2019, we entered into a new market, miniLED for display backlighting and direct emitting display, with the launch of PIXALUXTM. The PIXALUXTM is a high-speed die placement equipment, and one of the most mass production ready
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solutions for miniLED placement in the market. MiniLEDs are used in TV, IT display, large display, signage display, consumer display and automotive markets. The usage of miniLEDs is expected to grow significantly over the next few years, followed by microLED adoption. We intend to leverage the momentum we already have with PIXALUXTM to continue to innovate and provide solutions to the industry to meet the challenges of packaging and assembling the next-generation of electronic devices.
We bring the same technology focus to our tools business, driving tool design and manufacturing technology to optimize the performance and process capability of the equipment in which our tools are used. For all our equipment products, tools are an integral part of their process capability. We believe our unique ability to simultaneously develop both equipment and tools is a core strength supporting our products' technological differentiation.
Customers
Our major customers include IDMs and OSATs, industrial manufacturers and automotive electronics suppliers. Revenue from our customers may vary significantly from year-to-year based on their respective capital investments, operating expense budgets, and overall industry trends. There was no customer with sales representing more than 10% of net revenue in fiscal 2020.
The following table reflects our top ten customers, based on net revenue, for each of the last three fiscal years:
Fiscal 2020Fiscal 2019Fiscal 2018
1Forehope Electronic Co., Ltd1Super Power International Ltd (2)1Haoseng Industrial Co., Ltd. (1)(2)
2Haoseng Industrial Co., Ltd. (2)2Micron Technology, Inc.2ASE Industrial Holding (3)
3ASE Industrial Holding (3)3First Technology China, Ltd. (2)3Super Power International Ltd (2)
4Xinye Electronics Co. (2)4ASE Industrial Holding (3)4Micron Technology Inc.
5Regent Manner Limited5Xinye Electronics Co. (2)5First Technology China, Ltd. (2)
6First Technology China Ltd (2)6Forehope Electronic Co., Ltd6Tesla, Inc.
7Matfron Semiconductor Technology Co. Ltd (2)7Infineon Technologies7Samsung
8Tesla, Inc.8ST Microelectronics8Texas Instruments, Inc.
9Micron Technology, Inc.9On Semiconductor9Xinye Electronics Co. (2)
10ST Microelectronics10Haoseng Industrial Co., Ltd. (2)10Infineon Technologies
(1) Represents more than 10% of our net revenue for the applicable fiscal year.
(2) Distributor of our products.
(3) Siliconware Precision Industries Ltd. and Advanced Semiconductor Engineering merged in fiscal 2018 to form ASE Industrial Holding.
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Sales and Customer Support
We believe long-term customer relationships are critical to our success, and comprehensive sales support and customer support are an important means of establishing those relationships. To maintain these relationships, we primarily utilize our direct sales force, as well as distribution channels such as agents and distributors, depending on the product, region, or end-user application. In all cases, our goal is to position our sales support and customer support resources near our customers' facilities so as to provide support for customers in their own language and consistent with local customs. Our sales support and customer support resources are located primarily in Singapore, Israel, Taiwan, China, Korea, Malaysia, the Philippines, Japan, Thailand, the U.S., Germany, Mexico, Switzerland and the Netherlands. Supporting these local resources, we have technology centers offering additional process expertise in Singapore, China, Switzerland, Israel, the U.S. and the Netherlands.
By establishing relationships with semiconductor manufacturers, OSATs, and vertically integrated manufacturers of electronic systems, we gain insight into our customers' future semiconductor packaging strategies. In addition, we also send our products and equipment to customers or potential customers for trial and evaluation. These insights assist us in our efforts to develop products and processes that address our customers' future assembly requirements.
Backlog
Our backlog consists of customer orders scheduled for shipment within the next twelve months. A majority of our orders are subject to cancellation or deferral by our customers with limited or no penalties. Also, customer demand for our products can vary dramatically without prior notice. Because of the volatility of customer demand, possibility of customer changes in delivery schedules or cancellations and potential delays in product shipments, our backlog as of any particular date may not be indicative of net revenue for any succeeding period.
The following table reflects our backlog as of October 3, 2020 and September 28, 2019:
As of
(in thousands)October 3, 2020September 28, 2019
Backlog$127,924 $104,711 
Manufacturing
We believe excellence in manufacturing can create a competitive advantage, both by producing at lower costs and by providing superior responsiveness to changes in customer demand. To achieve these goals, we manage our manufacturing operations through a single organization and believe that fewer, larger factories allow us to capture economies of scale and generate cost savings through lower manufacturing costs.
Our equipment manufacturing activities consist mainly of integrating outsourced parts and subassemblies and testing finished products to customer specifications. We largely utilize an outsource model, allowing us to minimize our fixed costs and capital expenditures. For certain low-volume, high customization parts, we manufacture subassemblies ourselves. Just-in-time inventory management has reduced our manufacturing cycle times and lowered our on-hand inventory requirements. Raw materials used in our equipment manufacturing are generally available from multiple sources; however, many outsourced parts and components are only available from a single or limited number of sources.
Our ball bonder, wedge bonder, AT Premier, APAMA and Katalyst bonder manufacturing and assembly is done at our facility in Singapore. Our Hybrid and Electronic Assembly solutions manufacturing and assembly is done at our facility in the Netherlands. We have ISO 9001 and ISO 14001 certifications for our equipment manufacturing facilities in Singapore and the Netherlands.
We manufacture dicing blades, capillaries and a portion of our bonding wedge inventory at our facility in China. The capillaries are made using blanks produced at our facilities in China and Israel. We both produce and outsource the production of our bonding wedges. Both the China and Israel facilities are ISO 9001 certified. The China facility is also ISO 14001 and ISO 18001 certified.
Research and Product Development
Many of our customers generate technology roadmaps describing their projected packaging technology requirements. Our research and product development activities are focused on delivering robust production solutions to those projected requirements. We accomplish this by regularly introducing improved versions of existing products or by developing next-generation products. We follow this product development methodology in all our major product lines.
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Intellectual Property
Where circumstances warrant, we apply for patents on inventions governing new products and processes developed as part of our ongoing research, engineering, and manufacturing activities. We currently hold a number of U.S. patents, many of which have foreign counterparts. We believe the duration of our patents often exceeds the commercial life cycles of the technologies disclosed and claimed in the patents. Additionally, we believe much of our important technology resides in our trade secrets and proprietary software.
Competition
The market for semiconductor equipment and packaging materials products is intensely competitive. Significant competitive factors in the semiconductor equipment market include price, speed/throughput, production yield, process control, delivery time, innovation, quality and customer support, each of which contribute to lower the overall cost per package being manufactured. Our major equipment competitors are ASM Pacific Technology, BE Semiconductor Industries N.V. and Shinkawa Ltd.
Significant competitive factors in the semiconductor packaging materials industry include performance, price, delivery, product life, and quality. Our significant tools competitors are PECO, Disco Corporation, Small Precision Tools and CCTC.
In each of the markets we serve, we face competition and the threat of competition from established competitors and potential new entrants, some of which may have greater financial, engineering, manufacturing, and marketing resources.
Environmental and Other Regulatory Matters
We are subject to various federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations governing, among other things, the generation, storage, use, emission, discharge, transportation and disposal of hazardous materials and the health and safety of our employees. In addition, we are subject to environmental laws which may require investigation and cleanup of any contamination at facilities we own or operate or at third-party waste disposal sites we use or have used.
We have incurred in the past, and expect in the future to incur, costs to comply with environmental laws. We are not, however, currently aware of any material costs or liabilities relating to environmental matters, including any claims or actions under environmental laws or obligations to perform any cleanups at any of our facilities or any third-party waste disposal sites, that we expect to have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or operating results. However, it is possible that material environmental costs or liabilities may arise in the future.
Though the majority of our manufacturing activities take place outside of the U.S., certain of our advanced packaging products are subject to the EAR because they are based on U.S. technology or contain more than a de minimis amount of controlled U.S. content. The EAR require licenses for, and sometimes prohibit, the export of certain products. The Commerce Control List (“CCL”) sets forth the types of goods and services controlled by the EAR, including civilian science, technology, and engineering dual use items. For products listed on the CCL, a license may be required as a condition to export depending on the end destination, end use or end user and any applicable license exceptions.
Our business is subject to various other regulations typical of businesses of our type in the jurisdictions in which we operate.
Business Continuity Management Plan
We have developed and implemented a global Business Continuity Management Plan ("BCP") for our business operations. The BCP is designed to facilitate the prompt resumption of our business operations and functions arising from an event which impacts or potentially impacts our business operations.  As the scale, timing, and impact of disasters and disruptions are unpredictable, the Plan has been designed to be flexible in responding to actual events as they occur.  The Plan provides a structured framework for safeguarding our employees and property, making a financial and operational assessment, protecting our books and records, perpetuating critical business functions, and enabling the continuation of customer transactions.
Human Capital
As of October 3, 2020, we had 2,544 regular full-time employees and 292 temporary workers worldwide.
We are committed to providing a safe and healthy workplace and a diverse and collaborative environment rich in opportunities to enable our employees to grow both professionally and personally in their careers within the organization. We are also committed to treating employees with dignity and respect. Diversity is important at K&S and we believe that the combined knowledge and diverse views across our global locations strengthens our competitive edge. We value different backgrounds and celebrate unique perspectives.
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At K&S, our regional Human Resource (HR) managers support the local leaders and managers, ensuring that our employment and labor practices adhere to regional and local regulations. We continually review these policies and benchmark them against market peers to implement leading practices on recruitment, onboarding and employee development. Our HR function also includes centers of excellence in Talent Management, Talent Acquisition, HR Management Information System and Compensation, ensuring best practices in these important areas. Through our HR practices, we aim to foster an inclusive workplace, to attract the best talent and to support our employees in reaching their full potential within the organization.
To ensure fair and equitable pay for all employees, we participate in several globally recognized compensation surveys annually. The survey organizations pool our data together with all the responding companies to determine market relevant pay ranges for all our positions. The Company also strives to ensure that our employee benefits are compliant in the cities, states and countries in which we operate, while annual benefits benchmarking ensures that our benefits are attractive in the markets where we compete for talent.
We believe in investing in our employees’ professional growth by encouraging them to continually develop their functional and leadership skills and to obtain different experiences as they progress along their career paths through the Company. At K&S, we have adopted the 70/20/10 learning model as our development framework to encourage our employees to participate actively in technical and soft skill training programs, learn through peer coaching and mentoring, and develop professionally through various stretch assignments and projects.
We maintain an open-door policy and provide multiple avenues for employees to voice their concerns and raise suggestions. Every two to three years, we conduct a global employee engagement survey, the Voice of K&S, to gather feedback from all our employees. Employees may also report any grievances through the global Whistleblower Hotline. Employees also have access to local HR representatives and the Global Vice President of HR.

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Item 1A. RISK FACTORS
Semiconductor Industry and Macroeconomic Risks
Our operating results and financial condition could be adversely impacted by volatile worldwide economic conditions.
Though the semiconductor industry's cycle can be independent of the general economy, global economic conditions may have a direct impact on demand for semiconductor units and ultimately demand for semiconductor capital equipment and tools. Accordingly, our business and financial performance is impacted, both positively and negatively, by fluctuations in the macroeconomic environment. Expenditures by our customers depend on the current and anticipated market demand for semiconductors and products that use semiconductors, including mobile devices, personal computers, consumer electronics, telecommunications equipment, automotive components and other industrial products. Significant downturns in the market for semiconductor devices or in general economic conditions reduce demand for our products and can materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results. Our visibility into future demand is generally limited and forecasting is difficult. There can be no assurances regarding levels of demand for our products and we believe historic, industry-wide volatility will persist.
The effects of the COVID-19 pandemic could adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial condition.
A strain of Coronavirus ("COVID-19"), which was first detected in Wuhan, China in December 2019, had rapidly spread across China and across the globe, and on March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19 a pandemic. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, many countries have suspended travel to and from affected countries and imposed quarantines.
The COVID-19 pandemic has significantly impacted the global economy, disrupted global supply chains, lowered many equity market valuations, created significant volatility and disruption in financial markets, and significantly increased unemployment levels. In addition, the pandemic has resulted in temporary closures and failures of many businesses and the institution of social distancing and sheltering-in-place requirements in many jurisdictions. As these measures begin to be relaxed, in certain jurisdictions there has been a resurgence of illnesses, potentially leading to more severe restrictions in the future.
In response to the pandemic, we temporarily closed certain offices in the United States, Europe and Asia as well as executed our BCP, which measures have disrupted how we operate our business. While we are currently operating at full capacity in all of our manufacturing locations, work-from-home practices were instituted across every office worldwide, which have impacted our non-manufacturing productivity, including our research & development.
The duration and extent of the impact from the COVID-19 pandemic depends on future developments that cannot be accurately predicted at this time, but may include the following:
a decrease in short-term and/or long-term demand for our products resulting from widespread business shutdowns and slowdowns, quarantines, travel and logistics restrictions and other actions taken by governments, businesses, and the general public in an effort to limit exposure to and spread of COVID-19;
negative impacts to our operations, technology development, new product introduction and customer qualifications resulting from our efforts to mitigate the impact of COVID-19 through execution of our BCP;
disruptions to our supply chain, including materials, equipment, engineering support and services, due to efforts to contain the spread of COVID-19;
more difficult and more expensive travel and transportation of our supplies and products, ultimately affecting the sales of our products;
increased volatility in the semiconductor industry due to heightened uncertainty, including our inability to keep pace relative to our competitors during a post-COVID-19 market recovery should that occur; and
reduced sales volume to or loss of significant customers, or cancellation, delay or reduction of backlogged customer orders.
Due to the unprecedented and rapidly changing social and economic impacts associated with the COVID-19 pandemic on the global economy generally, we are unable to predict or estimate the ultimate impact on our business or business prospects. The ultimate significance of COVID-19 on our business will depend on, among other things: the extent and duration of the pandemic, the severity of the disease and the number of people infected with the virus; the effects on the economy of the
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pandemic and of the measures taken by governmental authorities and other third parties restricting day-to-day life and the length of time that such measures remain in place; and governmental programs implemented to assist businesses impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. At this time, we cannot estimate the short- or long-term impacts of COVID-19 on our business, liquidity, results of operations or financial condition.
Unpredictable spending by our customers due to uncertainties in the macroeconomic environment could adversely affect our net revenue and profitability.
Our net revenue and profitability are based on our customers' anticipated sales. Reductions or other fluctuations in their spending as a result of uncertain conditions in the macroeconomic environment, including from government, economic or fiscal instability, global health crisis and pandemics, restricted global credit conditions, reduced demand, unbalanced inventory levels, fluctuations in interest rates, higher energy prices, or other conditions, could adversely affect our net revenue and profitability. Our profitability can be affected because we incur a certain amount of fixed costs that we cannot modulate up and down to meet increases or decreases in demand. The impact of general economic slowdowns could make our customers cautious and delay orders until the economic environment becomes clearer.
The semiconductor industry is volatile with sharp periodic downturns and slowdowns. Cyclical industry downturns are made worse by volatile global economic conditions.
The semiconductor industry is volatile, with periods of rapid growth followed by industry-wide retrenchment. These periodic downturns and slowdowns have adversely affected our business, financial condition and operating results. Downturns have been characterized by, among other things, diminished product demand, excess production capacity, and accelerated erosion of selling prices. Historically these downturns have severely and negatively affected the industry's demand for capital equipment, including assembly equipment and, to a lesser extent, tools. There can be no assurances regarding levels of demand for our products. In any case, we believe the historical volatility of our business, both upward and downward, will persist.
Difficulties in forecasting demand for our product lines may lead to periodic inventory shortages or excesses.
We typically operate our business with limited visibility of future demand. We do not have long-term contracts with many of our customers. As a result, demand for our products in future periods is difficult to predict and we sometimes experience inventory shortages or excesses. We generally order supplies and otherwise plan our production based on internal forecasts for demand. We have in the past failed, and may again in the future fail, to accurately forecast demand for our products. This has led to, and may in the future lead to, delays in product shipments or, alternatively, an increased risk of inventory obsolescence. If we fail to accurately forecast demand for our products, our business, financial condition and operating results may be materially and adversely affected.
Our quarterly operating results fluctuate significantly and may continue to do so in the future.
In the past, our quarterly operating results have fluctuated significantly. We expect that our quarterly results will continue to fluctuate. Although these fluctuations are partly due to the cyclical and volatile nature of the semiconductor industry, they also reflect other factors, many of which are outside of our control.
Some of the factors that may cause our net revenue and operating margins to fluctuate significantly from period to period are:
market downturns;
industry inventory levels;
the mix of products we sell because, for example:
certain lines of equipment within our business segments are more profitable than others; and
some sales arrangements have higher gross margins than others;
canceled or deferred orders;
seasonality;
competitive pricing pressures may force us to reduce prices;
higher than anticipated costs of development or production of new equipment models;
the availability and cost of the components for our products;
delays in the development and manufacture of our new products and upgraded versions of our products and market acceptance of these products when introduced;
customers' delay in purchasing our products due to anticipation that we or our competitors may introduce new or upgraded products; and
our competitors' introduction of new products.
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Many of our expenses, such as research and development, selling, general and administrative expenses, and interest expense, do not vary directly with our net revenue. Our research and development efforts include long-term projects lasting a year or more, which require significant investments. In order to realize the benefits of these projects, we believe that we must continue to fund them even during periods when our revenue has declined. As a result, a decline in our net revenue would adversely affect our operating results as we continue to make these expenditures. In addition, if we were to incur additional expenses in a quarter in which we did not experience comparable increased net revenue, our operating results would decline. In a downturn, we may have excess inventory, which could be written off. Some of the other factors that may cause our expenses to fluctuate from period-to-period include:
timing and extent of our research and development efforts;
severance, restructuring, and other costs of relocating facilities;
inventory write-offs due to obsolescence or other causes; and
an increase in the cost of labor or materials.
Because our net revenue and operating results are volatile and difficult to predict, we believe consecutive period-to-period or year-over-year comparisons of our operating results may not be a good indication of our future performance.
Competitive Risks
Our average selling prices usually decline over time and may continue to do so.
Typically, our average selling prices have declined over time due to continuous price pressure from our customers and competitive cost reductions in our industry’s supply chains. We seek to offset this decline by continually reducing our cost structure by consolidating operations in lower cost areas, reducing other operating costs, and by pursuing product strategies focused on product performance and customer service. These efforts may not be able to fully offset price declines; therefore, our financial condition and operating results may be materially and adversely affected. Developing new products can give us an opportunity to increase prices, so a failure to innovate is also a risk to pricing.
We may not be able to rapidly develop, manufacture and gain market acceptance of new and enhanced products required to maintain or expand our business.
We believe our continued success depends on our ability to continuously develop and manufacture new products and product enhancements on a timely and cost-effective basis. We must introduce these products and product enhancements into the market in a timely manner in response to customers' demands for higher performance assembly equipment and leading-edge materials customized to address rapid technological advances in integrated circuits, and capital equipment designs. Our competitors may develop new products or enhancements to their products that offer improved performance and features, or lower prices which may render our products less competitive. The development and commercialization of new products require significant capital expenditures over an extended period of time, and some products we seek to develop may never become profitable. In addition, we may not be able to develop and introduce products incorporating new technologies in a timely manner that will satisfy our customers' future needs or achieve market acceptance.
We may be unable to continue to compete successfully in the highly competitive semiconductor equipment and packaging materials industries.
The semiconductor equipment and packaging materials industries are very competitive. In the semiconductor equipment industry, significant competitive factors include price, speed/throughput, production yield, process control, delivery time, innovation, quality and customer support. In the semiconductor packaging materials industry, competitive factors include price, delivery and quality.
In each of our markets, we face competition and the threat of competition from established competitors and potential new entrants. In addition, established competitors may combine to form larger, better-capitalized companies. Some of our competitors have or may have significantly greater financial, engineering, manufacturing and marketing resources. Some of these competitors are Asian and European companies that have had, and may continue to have, an advantage over us in supplying products to local customers who appear to prefer to purchase from local suppliers.
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We expect our competitors to improve their current products' performance, and to introduce new products and materials with improved price and performance characteristics. Our competitors may independently develop technology similar to or better than ours. New product and material introductions by existing competitors or by new market entrants could hurt our sales. If a semiconductor manufacturer or subcontract assembler selects a competitor's product or materials for a particular assembly operation, we may not be able to sell products or materials to that manufacturer or assembler for a significant period of time. Manufacturers and assemblers sometimes develop lasting relationships with suppliers and assembly equipment providers in our industry and often go years without requiring replacement. In addition, we may have to lower our prices in response to price cuts by our competitors, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results. If we cannot compete successfully, we could be forced to reduce prices and could lose customers and experience reduced margins and profitability.

Geographic, Trade and Customer Risks

Substantially all of our sales, distribution channels and manufacturing operations are located outside of the U.S., which subjects us to risks, including risks from changes in trade regulations, currency fluctuations, political instability and conflicts.
Over 90% of our net revenue is for shipments to customers located outside of the U.S., primarily in the Asia/Pacific region. In the Asia/Pacific region, our customer base is also becoming more geographically concentrated in China as a result of economic and industry conditions. Approximately 51.6%, 46.7% and 46.0% of our net revenue for fiscal 2020, 2019, and 2018, respectively, was for shipments to customers located in China.
We expect our future performance to depend on our ability to continue to compete in foreign markets, particularly in the Asia/Pacific region. Some of these economies have been highly volatile, resulting in significant fluctuation in local currencies, and political and economic instability. These conditions may continue or worsen, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.
We also rely on non-U.S. suppliers for materials and components used in our products, and substantially all of our manufacturing operations are located in countries other than the U.S. We manufacture our ball, wedge and APAMA bonders in Singapore, our Hybrid and Electronic Assembly solutions in the Netherlands, our dicing blades, capillaries and bonding wedges in China, capillary blanks in Israel and China, and our corporate headquarters is in Singapore. We also rely on independent foreign distribution channels for certain of our product lines. As a result, a major portion of our business is subject to the risks associated with international, and particularly Asia/Pacific, commerce, such as:
stringent and frequently changing trade compliance regulations;
less protective foreign intellectual property laws;
longer payment cycles in foreign markets;
foreign exchange restrictions and capital controls, monetary policies and regulatory requirements;
restrictions or significant taxes on the repatriation of our assets, including cash;
tariff and currency fluctuations;
difficulties of staffing and managing dispersed international operations, including labor work stoppages and strikes in our factories or the factories of our suppliers;
changes in our structure or tax incentive arrangements;
possible disagreements with tax authorities;
episodic events outside our control such as, for example, outbreaks of coronaviruses, influenza or other illnesses;
natural disasters such as earthquakes, fires or floods;
risks of war and civil disturbances or other events that may limit or disrupt manufacturing and markets;
act of terrorism that impact our operations, customers or supply chain or that target U.S. interests or U.S. companies;
seizure of our foreign assets, including cash;
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changing political conditions; and
legal systems which are less developed and may be less predictable than those in the U.S.
In addition, there is a potential risk of conflict and instability in the relationship between Taiwan and China which could disrupt the operations of our customers and/or suppliers in both Taiwan and China and our manufacturing operations in China.
Our international operations also depend on favorable trade relations between the U.S. and those foreign countries in which our customers, subcontractors and materials suppliers have operations. A protectionist trade environment in either the U.S. or those foreign countries in which we do business, such as a change in the current tariff structures, export compliance or other trade policies, may materially and adversely affect our ability to sell our products in foreign markets.
We are subject to export restrictions that may limit our ability to sell to certain customers and the U.S.-China trade war could adversely affect our business.
The U.S. and several other countries have levied tariffs on certain goods and have introduced other trade restrictions that may impact our customers’ investment in manufacturing equipment, reduce the competitiveness of our products, or inhibit our ability to sell products or purchase necessary equipment and supplies. In particular, trade tensions between the U.S. and China have been escalating since 2018, with U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods and retaliatory Chinese tariffs on U.S. goods. We cannot predict what further actions may ultimately be taken with respect to tariffs or trade relations between the U.S. and other countries, what products may be subject to such actions, or what actions may be taken by other countries in response. Further changes in trade policy, tariffs, additional taxes, restrictions on exports or other trade barriers, or restrictions on supplies, equipment, and raw materials, may limit our ability to produce products, increase our selling and/or manufacturing costs, reduce the competitiveness of our products, or inhibit our ability to sell products or purchase necessary equipment and supplies, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, or financial condition.
Though nearly all of our manufacturing activities take place outside of the U.S., certain of our advanced packaging products are subject to the EAR because they are based on U.S. technology or contain more than a de minimis amount of controlled U.S. content. The EAR require licenses for, and sometimes prohibit, the export of certain products. The CCL sets forth the types of goods and services controlled by the EAR, including civilian science, technology, and engineering dual use items. For products listed on the CCL, a license may be required as a condition to export depending on the end destination, end use or end user and any applicable license exceptions.
In 2020, the BIS amended the EAR to expand controls on certain foreign products based on U.S. technology and sold to Huawei and certain other companies. This amendment impacts some of our advanced packaging products, which are based on U.S. technology and are within the scope of the expanded EAR controls on Huawei. Therefore, these products cannot be sold to Huawei, and are subject to certain end-use restrictions. We do not believe that this amendment to the EAR will have a material direct impact on our business, financial condition or results of operations, but it could have indirect impacts, including increasing tensions in U.S. and Chinese trade relations, potentially leading to negative sentiments towards U.S.-based companies among Chinese consumers. Additionally, some end users may prefer to avoid the U.S. supply chain to avoid the application of these regulations.
Future changes in, and responses to, U.S. trade policy could reduce the competitiveness of our products and cause our sales to decline, and therefore could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.
Because a small number of customers account for most of our sales, our net revenue could decline if we lose a significant customer.
The semiconductor manufacturing industry is highly concentrated, with a relatively small number of large semiconductor manufacturers and their subcontract assemblers and vertically integrated manufacturers of electronic systems purchasing a substantial portion of our semiconductor assembly equipment and packaging materials. Sales to a relatively small number of customers have historically accounted for a significant percentage of our net revenue. There was no customer with sales representing more than 10% of net revenue in fiscal 2020. Sales to our ten largest customers comprised 50.0% and 53.8% of our net revenue for fiscal 2020 and fiscal 2019, respectively.
We expect a small number of customers will continue to account for a high percentage of our net revenue for the foreseeable future. Thus, our business success depends on our ability to maintain strong relationships with our customers. Any one of a number of factors could adversely affect these relationships. If, for example, during periods of escalating demand for our equipment, we were unable to add inventory and production capacity quickly enough to meet the needs of our customers, they may turn to other suppliers making it more difficult for us to retain their business. We may also make commitments from time-to-time to our customers regarding minimum volumes and performance standards, and if we are unable to meet those commitments, we may incur liabilities to our customers. If we lose orders from a significant customer, if a significant customer
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reduces its orders substantially, or if we incur liabilities for not meeting customer commitments, these losses, reductions or liabilities may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.
We maintain a backlog of customer orders that is subject to cancellation, reduction or delay in delivery schedules, which may result in lower than expected revenues.
We manufacture products primarily pursuant to purchase orders for current delivery or to forecast, rather than pursuant to long-term supply contracts. As a result, we must commit resources to the manufacture of products without binding purchase commitments from customers. The semiconductor industry is occasionally subject to double-booking and rapid changes in customer outlooks or unexpected build ups of inventory in the supply channel as a result of shifts in end market demand and macro-economic conditions. Accordingly, many of these purchase orders or forecasts may be revised or canceled without penalty. Even in cases where our standard terms and conditions of sale or other contractual arrangements do not permit a customer to cancel an order without penalty, we may from time to time accept cancellations to maintain customer relationships or because of industry practice, custom or other factors. Our inability to sell products after we devote significant resources to them could have a material adverse effect on our levels of inventory, revenues and profitability. While we currently believe our inventory levels are appropriate for the current economic environment, continued global economic uncertainty may result in lower than expected demand.
Human Capital Risks
Increased labor costs and competition for qualified personnel may reduce the efficiency of our flexible manufacturing model and adversely impact our operating results.
There is some uncertainty with respect to the pace of rising labor costs in the various countries in which we operate. In addition, there is substantial competition in China, Singapore, Israel and the Netherlands for qualified and capable personnel, which may make it difficult for us to recruit and retain qualified employees. If we are unable to staff sufficient personnel at our China, Singapore, Israel and the Netherlands facilities or if there are increases in labor costs that we are unable to recover in our pricing to our customers, we may experience increased manufacturing costs, which would adversely affect our operating results.
Our business depends on attracting and retaining management, sales and technical employees as well as on the succession of senior management.
Our future success depends on our ability to hire and retain qualified management, sales, finance, accounting and technical employees, including senior management. Experienced personnel with the relevant and necessary skill sets in our industry are in high demand and competition for their talents is intense, especially in Asia, where most of the Company’s key personnel are located. If we are unable to continue to attract and retain the managerial, marketing, finance, accounting and technical personnel we require, our business, financial condition and operating results may be materially and adversely affected.
Effective succession planning is also important to our long-term success. Failure to ensure effective transfer of knowledge and smooth transitions involving senior management could hinder our strategic planning and execution. From time to time, senior management or other key employees may leave our company. While we strive to reduce the negative impact of such changes, the loss of any key employee could result in significant disruptions to our operations, including adversely affecting the timeliness of product releases, the successful implementation and completion of company initiatives, the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures and our internal control over financial reporting, and the results of our operations. In addition, hiring, training, and successfully integrating replacement critical personnel could be time consuming, may cause additional disruptions to our operations, and may be unsuccessful, which could negatively impact future revenues.
Product Risks
Alternative packaging technologies may render some of our products obsolete and materially and adversely affect our overall business and financial results.
Alternative packaging technologies have emerged that may improve device performance or reduce the size of an integrated circuit package, as compared to traditional wire bonding. These technologies include flip chip and wafer-level packaging. Some of these alternative technologies eliminate the need for wires to establish the electrical connection between a die and its package. The semiconductor industry may, in the future, shift a significant part of its volume into alternative packaging technologies which do not employ our products. If a significant shift to alternative packaging technologies or to another technology not offered by us were to occur, demand for our equipment and related packaging materials may be materially and adversely affected. Given that a majority of our revenue comes from wire bonding, a reduced demand for our wire bonding equipment could materially and adversely affect our financial results.
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We send products and equipment to customers or potential customers for trial, evaluation or other purposes which may result in retrofit charges, impairments or write-down of inventory value if the products and equipment are not subsequently purchased by the customers.
From time to time we send certain products and equipment to customers or potential customers for testing, evaluation or other purposes in advance of receiving any confirmation of purchase or purchase orders. Such equipment may be at the customer location for an extended period of time per the agreements with these customers and potential customers. The customer may refuse to buy all or partial quantities of such product or equipment and return this back to us. As a result, we may incur charges to retrofit the machines or sell the machines as second hand at a lower price, and accordingly may have to record impairments on the returned inventory, all of which would adversely affect our operating results.
Undetected problems in our products could directly impair our financial results.
If flaws in design, production, assembly or testing of our products (by us or our suppliers) were to occur, we could experience a rate of failure in our products that would result in substantial repair, replacement or service costs and potential damage to our reputation. Continued improvement in manufacturing capabilities, control of material and manufacturing quality and costs and product testing are critical factors in our future growth. There can be no assurance that our efforts to monitor, develop, modify and implement appropriate tests and manufacturing processes for our products will be sufficient to permit us to avoid a rate of failure in our products that results in substantial delays in shipment, significant repair or replacement costs or potential damage to our reputation, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition.
Costs related to product defect and errata may harm our results of operations and business.
Costs of product defects and errata (deviations from product specifications) due to, for example, problems in our design and manufacturing processes, or those of our suppliers, could include:
incurring warranty expenses;
writing off the value of inventory;
disposing of products that cannot be fixed;
retrofitting products that have been shipped;
providing product replacements or modifications; and
defending against litigation.
These costs could be large and may increase expenses and lower our operating profits. Our reputation with customers or end users could be damaged as a result of product defects and errata, and product demand could be reduced. These factors could harm our business and financial results.
Operations and Supply Chain Risks
We may not be able to continue to consolidate manufacturing and other facilities or entities without incurring unanticipated costs and disruptions to our business.
As part of our ongoing efforts to drive further efficiency, we may consolidate our manufacturing and other facilities or entities. Should we consolidate, we may experience unanticipated events, including the actions of governments, suppliers, employees or customers, which may result in unanticipated costs and disruptions to our business. We may also incur restructuring charges, severance costs, asset impairments and other effects that could negatively impact our financial condition and results of operations.
We depend on our suppliers, including sole source suppliers, for critical raw materials, components and subassemblies. If our suppliers do not deliver their products to us, or deliver non-compliant or defective products, we would be unable to deliver our products to our customers.
Our products are complex and require raw materials, components and subassemblies having a high degree of reliability, accuracy and performance. We rely on subcontractors to manufacture many of these components and subassemblies and we rely on sole source suppliers for certain key technology parts and raw materials. As a result, we are exposed to a number of significant risks, including:
decreased control over the manufacturing process for components and subassemblies;
changes in our manufacturing processes in response to changes in the market, which may delay our shipments;
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our inadvertent use of defective or contaminated raw materials;
the relatively small operations and limited manufacturing resources of some of our suppliers, which may limit their ability to manufacture and sell subassemblies, components or parts in the volumes we require and at acceptable quality levels and prices;
restrictions on our ability to rely on suppliers due to changes in trade regulation;
the inability of suppliers to meet customer demand requirements during volatile cycles;
reliability or quality issues with certain key subassemblies provided by single source suppliers as to which we may not have any short-term alternative;
shortages caused by disruptions at our suppliers and subcontractors for a variety of reasons, including health pandemics, regional or localized stay-at-home orders, work stoppage or fire, earthquake, flooding or other natural disasters;
delays in the delivery of raw materials or subassemblies, which, in turn, may delay shipments to our customers;
loss of suppliers as a result of consolidation of suppliers in the industry; and
loss of suppliers because of their bankruptcy or insolvency.
If we are unable to deliver products to our customers on time and at expected cost for these or any other reasons, or we are unable to meet customer expectations as to cycle time, or we are unable to maintain acceptable product quality or reliability, our business, financial condition and operating results may be materially and adversely affected.
Regulations related to “conflict minerals” may force us to incur additional expenses, may make our supply chain more complex and may result in damage to our reputation with customers.
In 2012, under the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, or the Dodd-Frank Act, the SEC adopted requirements for companies that use certain minerals and metals, known as conflict minerals, in their products, regardless of whether these products are manufactured by third parties. These requirements require companies to conduct due diligence and disclose whether or not such minerals originate from the Democratic Republic of Congo and certain adjoining countries. These requirements could adversely affect the sourcing, availability and pricing of minerals used in the manufacture of semiconductor devices, including our products. In addition, since our supply chain is complex, we may not be able to sufficiently verify the origins for these minerals and metals used in our products through the due diligence procedures that we implement, which may harm our reputation. In such event, we may also face difficulties in satisfying customers who require that all of the components of our products are certified as conflict mineral free.
We may be materially and adversely affected by environmental and safety laws and regulations.
We are subject to various federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations governing, among other things, the generation, storage, use, emission, discharge, transportation and disposal of hazardous material, investigation and remediation of contaminated sites and the health and safety of our employees. Increasingly, public attention has focused on the environmental impact of manufacturing operations and the risk to neighbors of chemical releases from such operations.
Proper waste disposal plays an important role in the operation of our manufacturing plants. In many of our facilities we maintain wastewater treatment systems that remove metals and other contaminants from process wastewater. These facilities operate under permits that must be renewed periodically. A violation of those permits may lead to revocation of the permits, fines, penalties or the incurrence of capital or other costs to comply with the permits, including potential shutdown of operations.
Compliance with existing or future land use, environmental and health and safety laws and regulations may: (1) result in significant costs to us for additional capital equipment or other process requirements, (2) restrict our ability to expand our operations and/or (3) cause us to curtail our operations. We also could incur significant costs, including cleanup costs, fines or other sanctions and third-party claims for property damage or personal injury, as a result of violations of or liabilities under such laws and regulations. Any costs or liabilities to comply with or imposed under these laws and regulations could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and operating results.
We may acquire or divest businesses or enter into joint ventures or strategic alliances, which may materially affect our business, financial condition and operating results.
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We continually evaluate our portfolio of businesses and may decide to buy or sell businesses or enter into joint ventures or other strategic alliances. We may be unable to successfully integrate acquired businesses with our existing businesses and successfully implement, improve and expand our systems, procedures and controls to accommodate these acquisitions. These transactions place additional demands on our management and current labor force. Additionally, these transactions require significant resources from our legal, finance and business teams. In addition, we may divest existing businesses, which would cause a decline in revenue or profitability and may make our financial results more volatile. If we fail to integrate and manage acquired businesses successfully or to mitigate the risks associated with divestitures, joint ventures or other alliances, our business, financial condition and operating results may be materially and adversely affected.
Intellectual Property Risks
Our success depends in part on our intellectual property, which we may be unable to protect.
Our success depends in part on our proprietary technology. To protect this technology, we rely principally on contractual restrictions (such as nondisclosure and confidentiality provisions) in our agreements with employees, subcontractors, vendors, consultants and customers and on the common law of trade secrets and proprietary “know-how.” We also rely, in some cases, on patent and copyright protection, although this protection may in some cases be insufficient due to the rapid development of technology in our industry. We may not be successful in protecting our technology for a number of reasons, including the following:
employees, subcontractors, vendors, consultants and customers may violate their contractual agreements, and the cost of enforcing those agreements may be prohibitive, or those agreements may be unenforceable or more limited than we anticipate;
foreign intellectual property laws may not adequately protect our intellectual property rights; and
our patent and copyright claims may not be sufficiently broad to effectively protect our technology; our patents or copyrights may be challenged, invalidated or circumvented; or we may otherwise be unable to obtain adequate protection for our technology.
In addition, our partners and alliances may have rights to technology developed by us. We may incur significant expense to protect or enforce our intellectual property rights. If we are unable to protect our intellectual property rights, our competitive position may be weakened.
Third parties may claim we are infringing on their intellectual property, which could cause us to incur significant litigation costs or other expenses, or prevent us from selling some of our products.
The semiconductor industry is characterized by rapid technological change, with frequent introductions of new products and technologies. Industry participants often develop products and features similar to those introduced by others, creating a risk that their products and processes may give rise to claims they infringe on the intellectual property of others. We may unknowingly infringe on the intellectual property rights of others and incur significant liability for that infringement. If we are found to have infringed on the intellectual property rights of others, we could be enjoined from continuing to manufacture, market or use the affected product, or be required to obtain a license to continue manufacturing or using the affected product. A license could be very expensive to obtain or may not be available at all. Similarly, changing or re-engineering our products or processes to avoid infringing the rights of others may be costly, impractical or time consuming.
Occasionally, third parties assert that we are, or may be, infringing on or misappropriating their intellectual property rights. In these cases, we defend, and will continue to defend, against claims or negotiate licenses where we consider these actions appropriate. Intellectual property cases are uncertain and involve complex legal and factual questions. If we become involved in this type of litigation, it could consume significant resources and divert our attention from our business.
Risks Related to Our Shares and Corporate Law
We have the ability to issue additional equity securities, which would lead to dilution of our issued and outstanding common shares.
The issuance of additional equity securities or securities convertible into equity securities will result in dilution of our existing shareholders' equity interests in us. Our board of directors has the authority to issue, without vote or action of shareholders, preferred shares in one or more series, and has the ability to fix the rights, preferences, privileges and restrictions of any such series. Any such series of preferred shares could contain dividend rights, conversion rights, voting rights, terms of redemption, redemption prices, liquidation preferences or other rights superior to the rights of holders of our common shares. In addition, we are authorized to issue, without shareholder approval, up to an aggregate of 200 million common shares, of which
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approximately 61.6 million shares were outstanding as of October 3, 2020. We are also authorized to issue, without shareholder approval (except as required by the rules of the Nasdaq stock market), securities convertible into either common shares or preferred shares. We may issue such shares in connection with financing transactions, joint ventures, mergers and acquisitions or other purposes.
The market price of our common shares and our earnings per share may decline as a result of any acquisitions or divestitures.
The market price of our common shares may decline as a result of any acquisitions or divestitures made by us if we do not achieve the perceived benefits of such acquisitions or divestitures as rapidly or to the extent anticipated by financial or industry analysts or if the effect on our financial results is not consistent with the expectations of financial or industry analysts. In addition, the issuance of dilutive equity in connection with acquisitions or the failure to achieve expected benefits and unanticipated costs relating to our acquisitions could reduce our future earnings per share.
Anti-takeover provisions in our articles of incorporation and bylaws and under Pennsylvania law may discourage other companies from attempting to acquire us.
Some provisions of our articles of incorporation and bylaws as well as Pennsylvania law may discourage some transactions where we would otherwise experience a fundamental change. For example, our articles of incorporation and bylaws contain provisions that:
classify our board of directors into four classes, with one class being elected each year;
permit our board to issue “blank check” preferred shares without shareholder approval; and
prohibit us from engaging in some types of business combinations with a holder of 20% or more of our voting securities without super-majority board or shareholder approval.
Further, under the Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law, because our shareholders approved bylaw provisions that provide for a classified board of directors, shareholders may remove directors only for cause. These provisions and some other provisions of the Pennsylvania Business Corporation Law could delay, defer or prevent us from experiencing a fundamental change and may adversely affect our common shareholders' voting and other rights.
Information Technology and Enterprise System Risks
We may be subject to disruptions or failures in our information technology systems and network infrastructures that could have a material adverse effect on us.
We maintain and rely extensively on information technology systems and network infrastructures for the effective operation of our business. We also hold large amounts of data in data center facilities around the world, primarily in Singapore and the U.S., on which our business depends. A disruption, infiltration or failure of our information technology systems or any of our data centers as a result of software or hardware malfunctions, computer viruses, cyber-attacks, employee theft or misuse, power disruptions, natural disasters or accidents could cause breaches of data security and loss of critical data, which in turn could materially adversely affect our business. Our security procedures, such as virus protection software and our business continuity planning, such as our disaster recovery policies and back-up systems, may not be adequate or implemented properly to fully address the adverse effect of such events, which could adversely impact our operations. In addition, our business could be adversely affected to the extent we do not make the appropriate level of investment in our technology systems as our technology systems become out-of-date or obsolete and are not able to deliver the type of data integrity and reporting we need to run our business. Furthermore, when we implement new systems and/or upgrade existing systems, we could be faced with temporary or prolonged disruptions that could adversely affect our business.
We have experienced, and expect to continue to be subject to, cybersecurity threats and incidents, ranging from employee error or misuse, to individual attempts to gain unauthorized access to information systems, to sophisticated and targeted measures known as advanced persistent threats, none of which have been material to the Company to date. We devote significant resources to network security and other measures to protect our systems and data from unauthorized access or misuse. However, depending on the nature and scope, cybersecurity incidents could result in business disruption; the misappropriation, corruption or loss of confidential information and critical data (of the Company or that of third parties); reputational damage; litigation with third parties; diminution in the value of our investment in research, development and engineering; data privacy issues; and increased cybersecurity protection and remediation costs.
We are implementing a new enterprise resource planning system. Our failure to implement it successfully, on time and on budget could have a material adverse effect on us.
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We are currently in the process of reviewing a new enterprise resource planning (“ERP”) system and will be implementing the new system over the next two years. ERP implementations are complex, time-consuming, and involve substantial expenditures on system software and implementation activities. The ERP system will be critical to our ability to provide important information to our management, obtain and deliver products, provide services and customer support, send invoices and track payments, fulfill contractual obligations, accurately maintain books and records, provide accurate, timely and reliable reports on our financial and operating results, and otherwise operate our business. ERP implementations also require transformation of business and financial processes in order to reap the benefits of the ERP system. Any such implementation involves risks inherent in the conversion to a new computer system, including loss of information and potential disruption to our normal operations. The implementation and maintenance of the new ERP system has required, and will continue to require, the investment of significant financial and human resources and the implementation may be subject to delays and cost overruns. In addition, we may not be able to successfully complete the implementation of the new ERP system without experiencing difficulties. Any disruptions, delays or deficiencies in the design and implementation or the ongoing maintenance of the new ERP system could adversely affect our ability to process orders, ship products, provide services and customer support, send invoices and track payments, fulfill contractual obligations, accurately maintain books and records, provide accurate, timely and reliable reports on our financial and operating results, including reports required by the SEC, and otherwise operate our business. Additionally, if we do not effectively implement the ERP system as planned or the system does not operate as intended, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting could be adversely affected or our ability to assess it adequately could be delayed.
Currency, Tax and Accounting Risks
We are exposed to fluctuations in currency exchange rates that could negatively impact our financial results and cash flows.
Because most of our foreign sales are denominated in U.S. dollar or Euro, an increase in value of the U.S. dollar or the Euro against foreign currencies will make our products more expensive than those offered by some of our foreign competitors. In addition, a weakening of the U.S. dollar against other currencies other than the Euro could make our costs in non-U.S. locations more expensive to fund. Our ability to compete overseas may therefore be materially and adversely affected by the fluctuations of the U.S. dollar or the Euro against other currencies.
Because nearly all of our business is conducted outside the U.S., we face exposure to adverse movements in foreign currency exchange rates which could have a material adverse impact on our financial results and cash flows. Historically, our primary exposures have related to net working capital exposures denominated in currencies other than the foreign subsidiaries' functional currency, and remeasurement of our foreign subsidiaries' net monetary assets from the subsidiaries' local currency into the subsidiaries' functional currency. In general, an increase in the value of the U.S. dollar could require certain of our foreign subsidiaries to record translation and remeasurement gains. Conversely, a decrease in the value of the U.S. dollar could require certain of our foreign subsidiaries to record losses on translation and remeasurement. An increase in the value of the U.S. dollar could increase the cost to our customers of our products in those markets outside the U.S. where we sell in U.S. dollars, and a weakened U.S. dollar could increase the cost of local operating expenses and procurement of raw materials, both of which could have an adverse effect on our cash flows. Our primary exposures include the Singapore Dollar, Chinese Yuan, Japanese Yen, Swiss Franc, Philippine Peso, Thai Baht, Taiwan Dollar, South Korean Won, Israeli Shekel and Euro. Although we from time to time have entered into foreign exchange forward contracts to hedge certain foreign currency exposure of our operating expenses, our attempts to hedge against these risks may not be successful and may result in a material adverse impact on our financial results and cash flows.
Changes to our existing tax incentive in Singapore may materially reduce our reported results of operations in future periods.
In fiscal 2020, we have renewed our tax incentive which provides that certain classes of income are subject to reduced income tax rates in Singapore and which is presently scheduled to expire in our fiscal 2025. In order to retain this tax benefit, we must meet certain employment and investment conditions. If we cannot, or elect not to, comply with these conditions, we could be required to refund material tax benefits previously realized with respect to this tax incentive. Subsequent renewals are at the discretion of the Singapore government and we may not be able to extend the tax incentive arrangement beyond its expiration date or we may also elect not to renew this tax incentive arrangement. In the absence of the tax incentive, the income tax rate in Singapore that would otherwise apply is 17%, which would result in a significant increase in our provision for (benefit from) income taxes in future periods.
Weaknesses in our internal controls and procedures could result in material misstatements in our financial statements.
Pursuant to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting. Our internal controls over financial reporting are processes designed to provide reasonable assurance
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regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. A material weakness is a control deficiency, or combination of control deficiencies, that results in a more than remote likelihood that a material misstatement of annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected.
Our internal controls may not prevent all potential errors or fraud. Any control system, no matter how well designed and implemented, can only provide reasonable and not absolute assurance that the objectives of the control system will be achieved. We or our independent registered public accountants may identify material weaknesses in our internal controls which could adversely affect our ability to ensure proper financial reporting and could affect investor confidence in us and the price of our common shares. We previously disclosed in our Form 10-K/A for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2017, and in our Forms 10-Q and 10 Q/A (as applicable) for each interim period in fiscal 2018, material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting in respect of (i) recording and review of manual journal entries related to our warranty accrual and accounts payable and (ii) cash disbursements. Management implemented a number of remediation actions, and has concluded that the material weaknesses described above were remediated as of September 29, 2018.
The phase-out of the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) could affect interest rates under our existing overdraft credit facility agreement.
LIBOR is the basic rate of interest used in lending between banks on the London interbank market. We use LIBOR as a reference rate to calculate interest rates under our overdraft line of credit facility (“Overdraft Facility”). In 2017, the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority, which regulates LIBOR, announced that it intends to phase out LIBOR by the end of 2021. It is unclear if LIBOR will cease to exist at that time or if new methods of calculating LIBOR will be established such that it continues to exist after 2021. The U.S. Federal Reserve, in conjunction with the Alternative Reference Rates Committee, a steering committee comprised of large U.S. financial institutions, is considering replacing U.S. dollar LIBOR with a new index, the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (“SOFR”), calculated using short-term repurchase agreements backed by Treasury securities. Whether or not SOFR, or another alternative reference rate, attains market traction as a LIBOR replacement tool remains in question. If LIBOR ceases to exist, we will need to agree upon a replacement index with the bank under our Overdraft Facility, and the interest rate under our Overdraft Facility may change. The new rate may not be as favorable to us as those in effect prior to any LIBOR phase-out. In addition, the transition process may involve, among other things, increased volatility or illiquidity in markets for instruments that currently rely on LIBOR. Any such effects of the transition away from LIBOR, as well as other unforeseen effects, may result in expenses, difficulties, complications or delays in connection with future financing efforts, which could have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our ability to recognize tax benefits on our existing U.S. tax attributes may be limited.
As of October 3, 2020, we have generated state net operating loss carryforwards of $144.2 million and U.S federal and state tax credits of $9.1 million (“U.S. tax attributes”) that can be used to reduce our future U.S. federal and state income tax obligations. However, under the Tax Reform Act of 1986, the potential future utilization of our U.S. tax attributes may be limited following an ownership change, which is generally defined as a greater than 50% increase in equity ownership by 5% shareholders in any three-year period under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code. Should an ownership change be deemed to occur under Section 382, the resulting limitation in our ability to fully utilize our U.S. tax attributes could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.
Changes in tax legislation could adversely impact our future profitability.
We are subject to income taxes in the U.S. and many foreign jurisdictions. Tax laws and regulations are continuously evolving with corporate tax reform and base-erosion efforts continuing to be high priorities in many tax jurisdictions in which we operate. Although the timing and methods of implementation may vary, many countries, including those in the Asia/Pacific region in which we have significant operations, have implemented, or are in the process of implementing, legislation or practices inspired by the base erosion and profit shifting project undertaken by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development. The increased scrutiny on international tax and continuous changes to countries’ tax legislation may also affect the policies and decisions of tax authorities with respect to certain income tax and transfer pricing positions taken by the Company in prior or future periods. We continue to monitor new tax legislation or other developments since significant changes in tax legislation, or in the interpretation of existing legislation, could materially and adversely affect our financial condition and operating results.
Other changes in taxation could materially impact our future effective tax rate.
Our future effective tax rate could be affected by numerous factors including higher or lower than anticipated foreign earnings in various jurisdictions where we are subjected to tax rates that differ from the U.S. federal statutory tax rate, by failure to meet the conditions of or to renew our tax incentive arrangement, by changes in the valuation allowances recorded against certain
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deferred tax balances, or by changes in tax laws, regulations, accounting principles, or interpretations thereof. Changes in our assertion for foreign earnings permanently or non-permanently reinvested as a result of changes in facts and circumstances and challenges by tax authorities to our historic or future tax positions and transfer pricing policies could also significantly adversely impact our future effective tax rate.

Item 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.

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Item 2. PROPERTIES
The following table reflects our major facilities as of October 3, 2020:
Facility (1)Approximate SizeFunctionBusiness SegmentLease Expiration Date
Singapore215,000 sq. ft.Corporate headquarters, manufacturing, technology, sales and service centerCapital EquipmentNovember 2043 (2)
Suzhou, China155,000 sq. ft.Manufacturing, technology and shared support services centerAPSOwned
Eindhoven, The Netherlands116,000 sq. ft.Manufacturing, technology, sales and service centerCapital EquipmentSeptember 2030 (3)
Fort Washington, Pennsylvania88,000 sq. ft.Technology, sales and service centerNot applicableOwned
Santa Ana, California65,000 sq. ft.Technology, sales and service centerNot applicableAugust 2036 (4)
Haifa, Israel31,000 sq. ft.Manufacturing and technology centerAPSOctober 2037 (5)

(1)Each of the facilities listed in this table is leased other than the facility in Suzhou, China and Fort Washington, Pennsylvania
(2)Includes lease extension periods at the Company's option. Initial lease expires in November 2023.
(3)Includes lease extension periods at the Company's option. Initial lease expires in September 2025.
(4)Includes lease extension periods at the Company's option. Initial lease expires in September 2026.
(5)Includes lease extension periods at the Company's option. Initial lease expires in October 2027.
In addition, the Company rents space for sales support, customer support, services and administrative functions in China, Germany, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, Switzerland, Taiwan, Thailand, Vietnam and the Philippines. The Company believes the facilities are generally in good condition and suitable to the extent of utilization needed.

Item 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
From time to time, we may be a plaintiff or defendant in cases arising out of our business. We are party to ordinary, routine litigation incidental to our business. We cannot be assured of the results of any pending or future litigation, but we do not believe resolution of any currently pending matters will materially or adversely affect our business, financial condition or operating results.

Item 4.    MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.
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PART II
Item 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Our common stock is traded on The Nasdaq Global Market (“Nasdaq”) under the symbol “KLIC.” On November 16, 2020, there were approximately 188 holders of record of the shares of outstanding common stock.
On August 26, 2020, May 29, 2020, February 20, 2020 and December 12, 2019, the Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend $0.12 per share of common stock. During the fiscal year ended October 3, 2020, the Company declared dividends of $0.48 per share of common stock. The declaration of any future cash dividend is at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will depend on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, business conditions and other factors, as well as a determination that such dividends are in the best interests of the Company's stockholders.
For the purpose of calculating the aggregate market value of shares of our common stock held by non-affiliates, as shown on the cover page of this report, we have assumed all of our outstanding shares were held by non-affiliates except for shares held by our directors and executive officers. However, this does not necessarily mean that all directors and executive officers of the Company are, in fact, affiliates of the Company, or there are no other persons who may be deemed to be affiliates of the Company. Further information concerning the beneficial ownership of our executive officers, directors and principal shareholders will be included in our Proxy Statement for the 2021 Annual Meeting of Shareholders to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on or about January 13, 2021.
Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities and Use of Proceeds
None.
Purchases of Equity Securities by the Issuer and Affiliated Purchasers
The following table summarizes the repurchases of common stock during the three months ended October 3, 2020 (in thousands, except per share amounts):
PeriodTotal Number of Shares PurchasedAverage Price Paid Per ShareTotal Number of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
Approximate Dollar Value of Shares That May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs (1)
June 28, 2020 to July 25, 2020102 $21.04 102 $148,755 
July 26, 2020 to August 29, 202047 $24.55 47 $147,603 
August 30, 2020 to October 3, 2020237 $23.02 237 $142,144 
For the three months ended October 3, 2020386 386 
(1)On August 15, 2017, the Company's Board of Directors authorized a program (the "Program") to repurchase up to $100 million in total of the Company's common stock on or before August 1, 2020. In 2018 and 2019, the Board of Directors increased the share repurchase authorization under the Program to $200 million and $300 million, respectively. On July 3, 2020, the Board of Directors increased the share repurchase authorization under the Company’s existing share repurchase program by an additional $100 million to $400 million, and extended its duration through August 1, 2022. The Company may purchase shares of its common stock through open market and privately negotiated transactions at prices deemed appropriate by management. The Company has entered into a written trading plan under Rule 10b5-1 of the Exchange Act to facilitate repurchases under the Program. The Program may be suspended or discontinued at any time and will be funded using the Company's available cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments. The timing and amount of repurchase transactions under the Program depend on market conditions as well as corporate and regulatory considerations.

Item 6. SELECTED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL DATA
The following tables reflect selected historical consolidated financial data derived from the consolidated financial statements of Kulicke and Soffa Industries, Inc. and subsidiaries as of and for each of the fiscal years ended 2020, 2019, 2018, 2017, and 2016. As previously reported on the Annual Report on Form 10-K/A for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2017, the Company restated certain of its financial statements and related notes for the fiscal years ended September 30, 2017 and October 1, 2016. This Annual Report reflects the restated numbers for those periods.
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This data should be read in conjunction with our consolidated financial statements, including notes and other financial information included elsewhere in this report in respect of the fiscal years identified in the column headings of the tables below.
Fiscal
(in thousands)20202019201820172016
Statement of Operations Data:
Net revenue$623,176 $540,052 $889,121 $809,041 $627,192 
Income from operations58,509 21,610 166,632 113,083 53,953 
Interest income, net5,825 13,077 10,917 5,432 2,211 
Income before income taxes64,334 34,687 177,549 118,515 56,164 
Provision for (benefit from) income taxes(1)
11,998 22,910 120,744 (7,394)7,709 
Share of results of equity-method investee, net of tax36 124 129 (190)— 
Net income $52,300 $11,653 $56,676 $126,099 $48,455 

Fiscal
20202019201820172016
Per Share Data:
Net income per share:
Basic$0.83 $0.18 $0.82 $1.78 $0.69 
Diluted$0.83 $0.18 $0.80 $1.75 $0.68 
Cash dividends declared per share$0.48 $0.48 $0.24 $— $— 
Weighted average shares outstanding:
Basic62,828 65,286 69,380 70,906 70,477 
Diluted63,359 65,948 70,419 72,063 70,841 

Fiscal
(in thousands)20202019201820172016
Balance Sheet Data:
Cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments$530,127 $593,184 $614,148 $608,410 $547,907 
Working capital702,303 719,109 813,197 760,401 654,983 
Total assets 1,054,566 1,079,616 1,185,740 1,171,107 982,444 
Long-term and current portion of financing obligation— 15,032 15,957 16,769 17,318 
Shareholders' equity757,994 769,063 880,207 920,030 799,524 
(1) The following are the most significant factors that affected our provision for (benefit from) income taxes: volatility in our earnings each fiscal year; variation in our earnings among the various tax jurisdictions in which we operate; changes in assumptions regarding repatriation of foreign earnings; changes in tax legislation; remeasurement of deferred taxes; valuation allowances against certain deferred tax assets; and unrecognized tax benefit.
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Item 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
In addition to historical information, this filing contains statements relating to future events or our future results. These statements are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”) and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and are subject to the safe harbor provisions created by statute. Such forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements with respect to our future revenue, increasing, continuing or strengthening, or decreasing or weakening, demand for our products, replacement demand, our research and development efforts, our ability to identify and realize new growth opportunities, our ability to control costs and our operational flexibility as a result of (among other factors):
our expectations regarding the potential impacts on our business of the COVID-19 pandemic, including the economic and public health effects, and of governmental and other responses to these impacts;
projected growth rates in the overall semiconductor industry, the semiconductor assembly equipment market, and the market for semiconductor packaging materials; and
projected demand for ball bonder, wedge bonder, advanced packaging and electronic assembly equipment and for tools, spare parts and services.
Generally, words such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “could,” “anticipate,” “expect,” “intend,” “estimate,” “plan,” “continue,” “goal” and “believe,” or the negative of or other variations on these and other similar expressions identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are made only as of the date of this filing. We do not undertake to update or revise the forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise.
Forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and involve risks and uncertainties. Our future results could differ significantly from those expressed or implied by our forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, without limitation, those described below and under the heading “Risk Factors” in this Annual Report on Form 10-K and our other reports and registration statements filed from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission. This discussion should be read in conjunction with our audited financial statements included in this Annual Report.
We operate in a rapidly changing and competitive environment. New risks emerge from time to time and it is not possible for us to predict all risks that may affect us. Future events and actual results, performance and achievements could differ materially from those set forth in, contemplated by or underlying the forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date on which they were made. Except as required by law, we assume no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statement to reflect actual results or changes in, or additions to, the factors affecting such forward-looking statements. Given those risks and uncertainties, investors should not place undue reliance on forward-looking statements as predictions of actual results.
This section of this Form 10-K generally discusses fiscal 2020 and 2019 items and year-to-year comparisons between fiscal 2020 and 2019. Discussions of fiscal 2018 items and year-to-year comparisons between fiscal 2019 and 2018 that are not included in this Form 10-K can be found in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Part II, Item 7 of the Company’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended September 28, 2019.
Our Management's Discussion and Analysis ("MD&A") is provided in addition to the accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes to assist readers in understanding our results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows. The MD&A is organized as follows:
Overview:  Introduction of our operations, key events, business environment, technology leadership, products and services
Critical Accounting Policies
Recent Accounting Pronouncements
Results of Operations
Liquidity and Capital Resources
Other Obligations and Contingent Payments
Overview
For an overview of our business, see "Part I – Item 1. – Business".
Critical Accounting Policies
The preparation of consolidated financial statements requires us to make assumptions, estimates and judgments that affect the
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reported amounts of assets and liabilities, net revenue and expenses during the reporting periods, and disclosures of contingent assets and liabilities as of the date of the consolidated financial statements. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate estimates, including, but not limited to, those related to accounts receivable, reserves for excess and obsolete inventory, carrying value and lives of fixed assets, goodwill and intangible assets, income taxes, equity-based compensation expense and warranties. We base our estimates on historical experience and on various other assumptions that we believe to be reasonable. As a result, we make judgments regarding the carrying values of our assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Authoritative pronouncements, historical experience and assumptions are used as the basis for making estimates, and on an ongoing basis, we evaluate these estimates. Actual results may differ from these estimates.
We believe the following critical accounting policies, which have been reviewed with the Audit Committee of our Board of Directors, reflect our more significant judgments and estimates used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.
Revenue Recognition
In accordance with ASC No. 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, the Company recognizes revenue when we satisfy performance obligations as evidenced by the transfer of control of our products or services to customers. In general, the Company generates revenue from product sales, either directly to customers or to distributors. In determining whether a contract exists, we evaluate the terms of the agreement, the relationship with the customer or distributor and their ability to pay.
The Company recognizes revenue from sales of our products, including sales to our distributors, at a point in time, generally upon shipment or delivery to the customer or distributor, depending upon the terms of the sales order. Control is considered transferred when title and risk of loss pass, when the customer becomes obligated to pay and, where applicable, when the customer has accepted the products or upon expiration of the acceptance period. For sales to distributors, payment is due on our standard commercial terms and is not contingent upon resale of the products.
Our business is subject to contingencies related to customer orders, including:
Right of Return: A large portion of our revenue comes from the sale of equipment used in the semiconductor assembly process. Other product sales relate to consumable products, which are sold in high-volume quantities, and are generally maintained at low stock levels at our customer's facility. Customer returns have historically represented a very small percentage of customer sales on an annual basis.
Warranties: Our equipment is generally shipped with a one-year warranty against manufacturing defects. We establish reserves for estimated warranty expense when revenue for the related equipment is recognized. The reserve for estimated warranty expense is based upon historical experience and management's estimate of future expenses, including product parts replacement, freight charges and labor costs expected to be incurred to correct product failures during the warranty period.
Conditions of Acceptance: Sales of our consumable products generally do not have customer acceptance terms. In certain cases, sales of our equipment have customer acceptance clauses which may require the equipment to perform in accordance with customer specifications or when installed at the customer's facility. In such cases, if the terms of acceptance are satisfied at our facility prior to shipment, the revenue for the equipment will be recognized upon shipment. If the terms of acceptance are satisfied at our customers' facilities, the revenue for the equipment will not be recognized until acceptance, which is typically obtained after installation and testing, is received from the customer.
Service revenue is generally recognized over time as the services are performed.
The Company measures revenue based on the amount of consideration we expect to be entitled to in exchange for products or services. Any variable consideration such as sales incentives are recognized as a reduction of net revenue at the time of revenue recognition.
The length of time between invoicing and payment is not significant under any of our payment terms. In instances where the timing of revenue recognition differs from the timing of invoicing, we have determined our contracts generally do not include a significant financing component. Shipping and handling costs billed to customers are recognized in net revenue.
Shipping and handling costs paid by the Company are included in cost of sales.
Allowance for Doubtful Accounts
We maintain allowances for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from our customers' failure to make required payments. If the financial condition of our customers were to deteriorate, resulting in an impairment of their ability to make payments, additional allowances may be required. We are subject to concentrations of customers and sales to a few geographic locations, which could also impact the collectability of certain receivables. If global or regional economic conditions deteriorate
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or political conditions were to change in some of the countries where we do business, it could have a significant impact on our results of operations, and our ability to realize the full value of our accounts receivable.
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Inventories
Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (on a first-in, first-out basis) or net realizable value. We generally provide reserves for obsolete inventory and for inventory considered to be in excess of demand. Demand is generally defined as 18 months forecasted future consumption for equipment, 24 months forecasted future consumption for spare parts, and 12 months forecasted future consumption for tools. Forecasted consumption is based upon internal projections, historical sales volumes, customer order activity and a review of consumable inventory levels at customers' facilities. We communicate forecasts of our future consumption to our suppliers and adjust commitments to those suppliers accordingly. If required, we reserve the difference between the carrying value of our inventory and the lower of cost or net realizable value, based upon projections about future consumption, and market conditions. If actual market conditions are less favorable than projections, additional inventory reserves may be required.
Inventory reserve provision for certain subsidiaries is determined based on management's estimate of future consumption for equipment and spare parts. This estimate is based on historical sales volumes, internal projections and market developments and trends.
Accounting for Impairment of Goodwill
ASC No. 350, Intangibles-Goodwill and Other requires goodwill and other intangible assets with indefinite lives to be reviewed for impairment annually, or more frequently if circumstances indicate a possible impairment. We assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value. If, after assessing the qualitative factors, a company determines that it is not more likely than not that the fair value of a reporting unit is less than its carrying value, then performing the two-step impairment test is unnecessary. However, if a company concludes otherwise, then it is required to perform the goodwill impairment test. Following the Company's early adoption of ASU 2017-04, Intangibles - Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment in the third quarter of fiscal 2017, the requirement to perform a hypothetical purchase price allocation to measure goodwill impairment (i.e. step 2 of the goodwill impairment test) was eliminated. Accordingly, the Company's impairment test is performed by comparing the fair value of a reporting unit with its carrying value, and determining if the carrying amount exceeds its fair value.
As part of the annual evaluation, the Company performs an impairment assessment of its goodwill in the fourth quarter of each fiscal year to coincide with the completion of its annual forecasting and refreshing of its business outlook processes. On an ongoing basis, the Company monitors if a “triggering” event has occurred that may have the effect of reducing the fair value of a reporting unit below its respective carrying value. Adverse changes in expected operating results and/or unfavorable changes in other economic factors used to estimate fair values could result in a non-cash impairment charge in the future.
Impairment assessments inherently involve judgment as to the assumptions made about the expected future cash flows and the impact of market conditions on those assumptions. Future events and changing market conditions may impact the assumptions as to prices, costs, growth rates or other factors that may result in changes in the estimates of future cash flows. Although the Company believes the assumptions that it has used in testing for impairment are reasonable, significant changes in any one of the assumptions could produce a significantly different result. Indicators of potential impairment may lead the Company to perform interim goodwill impairment assessments, including significant and unforeseen customer losses, a significant adverse change in legal factors or in the business climate, a significant adverse action or assessment by a regulator, a significant stock price decline or unanticipated competition.
For further information on goodwill and other intangible assets, see Note 3 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8.
Income Taxes
In accordance with ASC No. 740, Income Taxes, deferred income taxes are determined using the balance sheet method. The Company records a valuation allowance to reduce its deferred tax assets to the amount expected, on a more likely than not basis, to be realized. While the Company has considered future taxable income and ongoing tax planning strategies in assessing the need for the valuation allowance, if it were to determine that it would be able to realize its deferred tax assets in the future in excess of its net recorded amount, an adjustment to the deferred tax asset would increase income in the period when such determination is made. Likewise, should the Company determine that it would not be able to realize all or part of its deferred tax assets in the future, an adjustment to the deferred tax assets would decrease income in the period such determination is made.
The Company determines the amount of the unrecognized tax benefit with respect to uncertain tax positions taken or expected to be taken on its income tax returns in accordance with ASC No. 740 Topic 10, Income Taxes, General (“ASC 740.10”). Under ASC 740.10, the Company utilizes a two-step approach for evaluating uncertain tax positions. Step one, or recognition, requires a company to determine if the weight of available evidence indicates a tax position is more likely than not to be sustained upon examination solely based on its technical merit. Step two, or measurement, is based on the largest amount of
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benefit, which is more likely than not to be realized on settlement with the taxing authority, including resolution of related appeals or litigation process, if any.
Equity-Based Compensation
The Company accounts for equity-based compensation under the provisions of ASC No. 718, Compensation - Stock Compensation (“ASC 718”). ASC 718 requires the recognition of the fair value of the equity-based compensation in net income. Compensation expense associated with Relative TSR Performance Share Units is determined using a Monte-Carlo valuation model, and compensation expense associated with time-based and Special/Growth Performance Share Units is determined based on the number of shares granted and the fair value on the date of grant. See Note 10 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 for a summary of the terms of these performance-based awards. The fair value of the Company's stock option awards are estimated using a Black-Scholes option valuation model. The fair value of equity-based awards is amortized over the vesting period of the award and the Company elected to use the straight-line method for awards granted after the adoption of ASC 718.
RECENT ACCOUNTING PRONOUNCEMENTS
See Note 1 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 for a description of certain recent accounting pronouncements, including the expected dates of adoption and effects on our consolidated results of operations and financial condition.
RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Results of Operations for fiscal 2020 and 2019
The following table reflects our income from operations for fiscal 2020 and 2019:
 Fiscal  
(dollar amounts in thousands)20202019$ Change% Change
Net revenue$623,176 $540,052 $83,124 15.4 %
Cost of sales325,201 285,462 39,739 13.9 %
Gross profit297,975 254,590 43,385 17.0 %
Selling, general and administrative116,007 116,811 (804)(0.7)%
Research and development123,459 116,169 7,290 6.3 %
Operating expenses239,466 232,980 6,486 2.8 %
Income from operations$58,509 $21,610 $36,899 170.7 %
Bookings and Backlog
Our backlog consists of customer orders scheduled for shipment within the next twelve months. A booking is recorded when a customer order is reviewed and it is determined that all specifications can be met, production (or service) can be scheduled, a delivery date can be set, and the customer meets our credit requirements. We use bookings to evaluate the results of our operations, generate future operating plans and assess the performance of our company. While we believe that this measure is useful in evaluating our business, this information should be considered as supplemental in nature and is not meant as a substitute for revenue recognized in accordance with GAAP. In addition, other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate bookings differently or not at all, which reduces its usefulness as a comparative measure. Reconciliation of bookings to net revenue is not practicable. A majority of our orders are subject to cancellation or deferral by our customers with limited or no penalties. Also, customer demand for our products can vary dramatically without prior notice. Because of the volatility of customer demand, possibility of customer changes in delivery schedules or cancellations and potential delays in product shipments, our backlog as of any particular date may not be indicative of net revenue for any succeeding period.
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The following tables reflect our bookings and backlog for fiscal 2020 and 2019:
Fiscal
(in thousands)20202019
Bookings$646,389 $503,098 
As of
(in thousands)October 3, 2020September 28, 2019
Backlog$127,924 $104,711 
The semiconductor industry is volatile and our operating results are adversely impacted by volatile worldwide economic conditions. Though the semiconductor industry's cycle can be independent of the general economy, global economic conditions may have a direct impact on demand for semiconductor units and ultimately demand for semiconductor capital equipment and expendable tools. Accordingly, our business and financial performance is impacted, both positively and negatively, by fluctuations in the macroeconomic environment. Our visibility into future demand is generally limited and forecasting is difficult. There can be no assurances regarding levels of demand for our products and we believe historical industry-wide volatility will persist.
The U.S. and several other countries have levied tariffs on certain goods. In particular, trade tensions between the U.S. and China have been escalating since 2018, with U.S. tariffs on Chinese goods and retaliatory Chinese tariffs on U.S. goods. These have resulted in uncertainties in the semiconductor, LED, memory and automotive markets. While the Company anticipates long-term growth in semiconductor consumption, the adverse impacts in demand, which began in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2018, has continued through, and may continue beyond, fiscal 2020.
Net Revenue
Our net revenues for fiscal 2020 increased as compared to our net revenues for fiscal 2019. The increase in net revenue is primarily due to higher volume in both Capital Equipment and APS.
The following table reflects net revenue by business segment for fiscal 2020 and 2019:
 Fiscal  
(dollar amounts in thousands)20202019$ Change% Change
Net revenue% of total net revenueNet revenue% of total net revenue
Capital Equipment$462,059 74.1 %$386,820 71.6 %$75,239 19.5 %
APS161,117 25.9 %153,232 28.4 %7,885 5.1 %
Total net revenue$623,176 100.0 %$540,052 100.0 %$83,124 15.4 %
Capital Equipment
For fiscal 2020, the higher Capital Equipment net revenue as compared to fiscal 2019 was primarily driven by growing demand in the general semiconductor end market for consumer applications and telecommunication infrastructure renewal for 5G buildout and in the LED end market due to the adoption of the advanced LED backlighting display. This was partially offset by lower demand in the memory and automotive end markets and unfavorable price variance due to less favorable customer mix.
APS
For fiscal 2020, the higher APS net revenue as compared to fiscal 2019 was primarily due to higher volume in spares and services. This was partially offset by a price reduction in our bonding tools business.
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Gross Profit Margin
 The following table reflects gross profit as a percentage of net revenue by business segment for fiscal 2020 and 2019: 
 Fiscal
 20202019Basis point
change
Capital Equipment44.7 %43.6 %110 
APS56.7 %56.1 %60 
Total gross margin47.8 %47.1 %70 
Capital Equipment
For fiscal 2020, the higher Capital Equipment gross profit margin as compared to fiscal 2019 was primarily driven by better absorption from higher volume and change in the estimation of warranty reserve. Refer to Note 1 to the consolidated financial statements in Item 8 for details of the change in the estimation of warranty reserve. This is partially offset by less favorable product mix.
APS
For fiscal 2020, the APS gross margin was generally consistent with the prior year.
Income from Operations
For fiscal 2020, total income from operations was higher by $36.9 million as compared to fiscal 2019. This was primarily due to increased revenue in fiscal 2020, partially offset by higher operating expenses.
The following tables reflect income / (loss) from operations by business segment for fiscal 2020 and 2019:
 Fiscal  
(dollar amounts in thousands)20202019$ Change% Change
Capital Equipment$22,069 $(12,577)$34,646 275.5 %
APS36,440 34,187 2,253 6.6 %
Total income from operations$58,509 $21,610 $36,899 170.7 %
Capital Equipment
For fiscal 2020, the higher Capital Equipment income from operations as compared to fiscal 2019 was primarily due to higher volume as explained under 'Net Revenue' above.
APS
For fiscal 2020, the higher APS income from operations as compared to fiscal 2019 was primarily due to higher volume as explained under 'Net Revenue' above.
Operating Expenses
The following table reflects operating expenses for fiscal 2020 and 2019:
 Fiscal
(dollar amounts in thousands)20202019$ Change% Change
Selling, general and administrative$116,007 $116,811 $(804)(0.7)%
Research and development123,459 116,169 $7,290 6.3 %
Total$239,466 $232,980 $6,486 2.8 %
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Selling, General and Administrative (“SG&A”)
For fiscal 2020, the lower SG&A expenses as compared to fiscal 2019 were primarily due to a $4.5 million COVID-19 related grant received from the Singapore government, $1.8 million lower severance expenses, and $0.7 million for a claimed cargo insurance. These were partially offset by $5.2 million in higher staff costs related to an increase in incentive compensation as a result of the current fiscal stronger performance and $0.9 million lower restructuring expenses in prior year.
Research and Development (“R&D”)
For fiscal 2020, the higher R&D expenses as compared to fiscal 2019 were primarily due to higher staff costs related to an increase in incentive compensation as a result of the current fiscal stronger performance.
Interest Income and Expense
The following table reflects interest income and interest expense for fiscal 2020 and 2019: 
 Fiscal  
(dollar amounts in thousands)20202019$ Change% Change
Interest income$7,541 $15,132 $(7,591)(50.2)%
Interest expense$(1,716)$(2,055)$339 (16.5)%
Interest income
For fiscal 2020, the lower interest income as compared to fiscal 2019 was primarily due to lower weighted average interest rates on cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments.
Interest expense
For fiscal 2020, the lower interest expense as compared to fiscal 2019 was primarily due to the absence of interest expense related to the financing obligation for our corporate headquarters. The financing obligation was derecognized pursuant to the transition guidance provided in ASC 842, which was adopted at the beginning of the current fiscal year. This was partially offset by the higher average short-term debt which was fully repaid in the current fiscal year.
Provision for Income Taxes
The following table reflects the provision for income taxes and the effective tax rate for fiscal 2020 and 2019: 
 Fiscal
(dollar amounts in thousands)20202019Change
Provision for income taxes$11,998 $22,910 $(10,912)
Effective tax rate18.6 %66.0 %(47.4)%

For fiscal 2020, the effective tax rate differed from the U.S. federal statutory tax rate primarily due to tax benefits from tax incentives, foreign earnings subject to a lower statutory tax rate than the U.S. federal statutory tax rate, and tax credits generated during the fiscal year net of a $3.5 million out of period adjustment, partially offset by tax expense related to deemed income, valuation allowances recorded against certain deferred tax assets, undistributed foreign earnings, and other non-deductible items. The $3.5 million out of period adjustment was to correct previously unrecorded income tax expense related to prior years jurisdictional adjustments. The Company determined that the out of period adjustment to the provision for incomes taxes and income taxes payable was not material to its current or prior period consolidated financial statements.
For fiscal 2019, the effective tax rate differed from the U.S. federal statutory tax rate primarily due to tax expense related to adjustments to the U.S. one-time transition tax pursuant to subsequently issued U.S. Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “TCJA”) regulations, valuation allowances recorded against certain deferred tax assets, remeasurement of certain deferred tax balances, undistributed foreign earnings, and deemed dividends, partially offset by tax benefit from foreign earnings subject to a lower statutory tax rate than the U.S. federal statutory tax rate, tax incentives, and tax credits generated during the fiscal year.
Please refer to Note 14: Income Taxes.
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LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES
The following table reflects total cash and investments as of October 3, 2020 and September 28, 2019:
 As of 
(dollar amounts in thousands)October 3, 2020September 28, 2019Change
Cash and cash equivalents$188,127 $364,184 $(176,057)
Short-term investments342,000 229,000 113,000 
Total cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments$530,127 $593,184 $(63,057)
Percentage of total assets50.3 %54.9 % 
The following table reflects summary Consolidated Statement of Cash Flow information for fiscal 2020 and 2019:
 Fiscal
(in thousands)20202019
Net cash provided by operating activities$94,412 $65,967 
Net cash (used in) / provided by investing activities(125,957)47,468 
Net cash used in financing activities(145,809)(71,318)
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents1,297 919 
Changes in cash, and cash equivalents$(176,057)$43,036 
Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of period364,184 321,148 
Cash and cash equivalents, end of period$188,127 $364,184 
Fiscal 2020
Net cash provided by operating activities was primarily the result of net income of $52.3 million, non-cash adjustments of $34.9 million and working capital changes of $7.2 million. The change in working capital was primarily driven by an increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses and other current liabilities of $38.1 million. This was partially offset by an increase in inventories of $26.2 million, and prepaid expenses and other current assets of $3.6 million, and an increase in accounts and notes receivable of $1.9 million.
The increase in accounts payable and accrued expenses and other current liabilities was primarily due to higher purchases due to higher manufacturing activities. The increase in inventories was due to increased manufacturing activities in fiscal 2020 in response to increased sales in fiscal 2020. The increase in accounts receivable was due to higher sales.
The net cash used in investing activities primarily relates to purchases of short-term investments of $442.0 million, capital expenditures of $11.7 million and an equity investment of $1.3 million, partially offset by maturity of short-term investments of $329.0 million.
The net cash used in financing activities primarily relates to a net repayment of short-term debt of $60.9 million, repurchase of common stock of $54.5 million, and dividends paid to common stockholders of $30.2 million.
Fiscal 2019
Net cash provided by operating activities was primarily the result of net income of $11.7 million, non-cash adjustments of $43.1 million and working capital changes of $11.2 million. The change in working capital was primarily driven by an decrease in accounts and notes receivable of $47.4 million and a decrease in inventories of $24.1 million. This was partially offset primarily by a decrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses and other current liabilities of $53.8 million and a decrease in income taxes payable of $7.8 million.
The decrease in accounts receivable was due to lower collections and sales in fiscal 2019. The decrease in inventories was due to decreased manufacturing activities in fiscal 2019 in response to decreased sales in fiscal 2019. The decrease in accounts payable and accrued expenses and other current liabilities was primarily due to lower accruals on incentive compensation and
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lower purchases due to lower manufacturing activities. The lower income taxes payable was primarily due to lower profit and payment of tax in fiscal 2019.
The increase in net cash provided by investing activities primarily relates to maturity of short-term investments of $683.0 million, partially offset by purchases of short-term investments of $619.0 million, capital expenditures of $11.7 million and an equity investment of $5.0 million.
Net cash used in financing activities primarily relates to the repurchase of common stock of $99.9 million, and dividends paid to common stockholders of $31.6 million, partially offset by an increase in net overdraft of $60.1 million under our overdraft line of credit.
Fiscal 2021 Liquidity and Capital Resource Outlook
We expect our fiscal 2021 capital expenditures to be between $32.0 million and $36.0 million. The actual amounts for 2021 will vary depending on market conditions. Expenditures are anticipated to be primarily used for R&D projects, enhancements to our manufacturing operations, improvements to our information technology security, implementation of an enterprise resource planning system and leasehold improvements for our facilities.
We believe that our existing cash and investments and anticipated cash flows from operations will be sufficient to meet our liquidity and capital requirements for at least the next twelve months from the date of filing. Our liquidity is affected by many factors, some based on normal operations of our business and others related to global economic conditions and industry uncertainties, which we cannot predict. We also cannot predict economic conditions and industry downturns or the timing, strength or duration of recoveries. We intend to continue to use our cash for working capital needs and for general corporate purposes.
We may seek, as we believe appropriate, additional debt or equity financing which would provide capital for corporate purposes, working capital funding, additional liquidity needs or to fund future growth opportunities, including possible acquisitions and investments. The timing and amount of potential capital requirements cannot be determined at this time and will depend on a number of factors, including our actual and projected demand for our products, semiconductor and semiconductor capital equipment industry conditions, competitive factors, and the condition of financial markets.
As of October 3, 2020 and September 28, 2019, approximately $492.0 million and $591.3 million of cash, cash equivalents, and short-term investments were held by the Company's foreign subsidiaries, respectively, with a portion of the cash amounts expected to be available for use in the U.S. without incurring additional U.S. income tax.
The Company’s international operations and capital requirements are funded primarily by cash generated by foreign operating activities and cash held by foreign subsidiaries. Most of the Company's operations and liquidity needs are outside the U.S. In fiscal 2020, the Company’s U.S. operations and capital requirements have been funded primarily by cash generated from U.S. operating activities, repatriation of cash generated by foreign operating activities, and by a Facility Agreement with MUFG Bank, Ltd. In the future, the Company may repatriate additional cash held by foreign subsidiaries that has already been subject to U.S. tax. We believe these future repatriations of cash and our U.S. sources of cash and liquidity are sufficient to meet our other business needs in the U.S. for the foreseeable future including funding of U.S. operations, capital expenditures, repayment of outstanding balances under the Facility Agreement with MUFG Bank, Ltd., dividend program, and the share repurchase program as approved by the Board of Directors. Should the Company’s U.S. cash needs exceed its funds generated by U.S. and foreign operations due to changing business conditions or transactions outside the ordinary course, such as acquisitions of large capital assets, businesses or any other capital appropriation in the U.S., the Company may require additional financing in the U.S. In this event, the Company could seek U.S. borrowing alternatives.
Share Repurchase Program
On August 15, 2017, the Company's Board of Directors authorized the Program to repurchase up to $100 million of the Company’s common stock on or before August 1, 2020. In 2018 and 2019, the Board of Directors increased the share repurchase authorization under the Program to $200 million and $300 million, respectively. On July 3, 2020, the Board of Directors increased the share repurchase authorization under the Company's existing share repurchase program by an additional $100 million to $400 million, and extended its duration through August 1, 2022. The Company has entered into a written trading plan under Rule 10b5-1 of the Exchange Act to facilitate repurchases under the Program. The Program may be suspended or discontinued at any time and is funded using the Company's available cash, cash equivalents and short-term investments. Under the Program, shares may be repurchased through open market and/or privately negotiated transactions at prices deemed appropriate by management. The timing and amount of repurchase transactions under the Program depend on market conditions as well as corporate and regulatory considerations.
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During the fiscal year ended October 3, 2020, the Company repurchased a total of approximately 2.5 million shares of common stock at a cost of approximately $55.0 million. As of October 3, 2020, our remaining share repurchase authorization under the Program was approximately $142.1 million.
Dividends
On August 26, 2020, May 29, 2020, February 20, 2020 and December 12, 2019, the Board of Directors declared a quarterly dividend $0.12 per share of common stock. During the fiscal year ended October 3, 2020, the Company declared dividends of $0.48 per share of common stock. The declaration of any future cash dividend is at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will depend on the Company's financial condition, results of operations, capital requirements, business conditions and other factors, as well as a determination that such dividends are in the best interests of the Company's stockholders.
Other Obligations and Contingent Payments
In accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, certain obligations and commitments as of October 3, 2020 are appropriately not included in the Consolidated Balance Sheets and Statements of Operations in this Form 10-K. However, because these obligations and commitments are entered into in the normal course of business and because they may have a material impact on our liquidity, we have disclosed them in the table below.
Additionally, as of October 3, 2020, the Company had deferred tax liabilities of $33.0 million, unrecognized tax benefit within the income tax payable for uncertain tax positions of $11.3 million and related accrued interest of $1.6 million. These amounts are not included in the contractual obligation table below because we are unable to reasonably estimate the timing of these payments at this time.
The following table presents certain payments due by the Company under contractual obligations with minimum firm commitments as of October 3, 2020:
  Payments due in
(in thousands)TotalLess than 1 year1 - 3 years3 - 5 yearsMore than 5 years
Inventory purchase obligations (1)
$152,832 152,832 $— $— $— 
U.S. one-time transition tax payable (2)
(reflected on our Balance Sheets)
71,458 9,495 13,621 29,797 18,545 
Asset retirement obligations (reflected on our Balance Sheets)(3)
1,802 296 216 1,152 138 
Total $226,092 $162,623 $13,837 $30,949 $18,683 
(1)We order inventory components in the normal course of our business. A portion of these orders are non-cancellable and a portion may have varying penalties and charges in the event of cancellation.
(2)Associated with the U.S. one-time transition tax on certain earnings and profits of our foreign subsidiaries in relation to the TCJA.
(3)Asset retirement obligations are associated with commitments to return the property to its original condition upon lease termination at various sites.
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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
Bank Guarantees
On November 22, 2013, the Company obtained a $5.0 million credit facility with Citibank in connection with the issuance of bank guarantees for operational purposes. As of October 3, 2020 and September 28, 2019, the outstanding amount was $3.3 million and $3.1 million respectively.
Credit Facilities
On February 15, 2019, the Company entered into a Facility Letter and Overdraft Agreement (collectively, the “Facility Agreements”) with MUFG Bank, Ltd., Singapore Branch (the “Bank”). The Facility Agreements provide the Company with an overdraft line of credit facility of up to $150.0 million (the “Overdraft Facility”) for general corporate purposes. Amounts outstanding under the Overdraft Facility, including interest, are payable upon thirty days written demand by the Bank. Interest on the Overdraft Facility is calculated on a daily basis, and the applicable interest rate is calculated at the overnight U.S. Dollar LIBOR rate plus a margin of 1.5% per annum. The Overdraft Facility is an unsecured facility per the terms of the Facility Agreements. The Facility Agreements contain customary non-financial covenants, including, without limitation, covenants that restrict the Company’s ability to sell or dispose of its assets, cease owning at least 51% of one of its subsidiaries (the "Subsidiary"), or encumber its assets with material security interests (including any pledge of monies in the Subsidiary’s cash deposit account with the Bank). The Facility Agreements also contain typical events of default, including, without limitation, non-payment of financial obligations when due, cross defaults to other material indebtedness of the Company or any breach of a representation or warranty under the Facility Agreements. As of October 3, 2020, there was no outstanding amount under the Overdraft Facility.
As of October 3, 2020, we did not have any other off-balance sheet arrangements, such as contingent interests or obligations associated with variable interest entities.
Item 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
Interest Rate Risk
Our available-for-sale securities, if applicable, may consist of short-term investments in highly rated debt instruments of the U.S. Government and its agencies, financial institutions, and corporations. We continually monitor our exposure to changes in interest rates and credit ratings of issuers with respect to any available-for-sale securities and target an average life to maturity of less than 18 months. Accordingly, we believe that the effects to us of changes in interest rates and credit ratings of issuers are limited and would not have a material impact on our financial condition or results of operations.
Foreign Currency Risk
Our international operations are exposed to changes in foreign currency exchange rates due to transactions denominated in currencies other than the location's functional currency. Our international operations are also exposed to foreign currency fluctuations that impact the remeasurement of net monetary assets of those operations whose functional currency, the U.S. dollar, differs from their respective local currencies, most notably in Israel, Singapore and Switzerland. Our U.S. operations also have foreign currency exposure due to net monetary assets denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar. In addition to net monetary remeasurement, we have exposures related to the translation of subsidiary financial statements from their functional currency, the local currency, into its reporting currency, the U.S. dollar, most notably in the Netherlands, China, Taiwan, Japan and Germany.
Based on our foreign currency exposure as of October 3, 2020, a 10.0% fluctuation could impact our financial position, results of operations or cash flows by $2.0 to $3.0 million. Our attempts to hedge against these risks may not be successful and may result in a material adverse impact on our financial results and cash flow.
We enter into foreign exchange forward contracts to hedge a portion of our forecasted foreign currency-denominated expenses in the normal course of business and, accordingly, they are not speculative in nature. These foreign exchange forward contracts have maturities of up to twelve months. We have foreign exchange forward contracts with notional amounts of $37.3 million outstanding as of October 3, 2020.
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Item 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
The consolidated financial statements of Kulicke and Soffa Industries, Inc. listed in the index appearing under Item 15(a)(1) herein are filed as part of this Report under this Item 8.

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Kulicke and Soffa Industries, Inc.
Opinions on the Financial Statements and Internal Control over Financial Reporting
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Kulicke and Soffa Industries, Inc. and its subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of October 3, 2020 and September 28, 2019, and the related consolidated statements of operations, comprehensive income, changes in shareholders’ equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended October 3, 2020, including the related notes and schedule of valuation and qualifying accounts for each of the three years in the period ended October 3, 2020 appearing under Item 15(a)(2) (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). We also have audited the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of October 3, 2020, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO).
In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of October 3, 2020 and September 28, 2019, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended October 3, 2020 in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. Also in our opinion, the Company maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of October 3, 2020, based on criteria established in Internal Control - Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the COSO.
Basis for Opinions
The Company's management is responsible for these consolidated financial statements, for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting, included in Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting appearing under Item 9A. Our responsibility is to express opinions on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and on the Company's internal control over financial reporting based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud, and whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects.
Our audits of the consolidated financial statements included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. Our audit of internal control over financial reporting included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, and testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk. Our audits also included performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinions.
Definition and Limitations of Internal Control over Financial Reporting
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (i) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (ii) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and
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expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (iii) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
Critical Audit Matters
The critical audit matter communicated below is a matter arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that was communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that (i) relates to accounts or disclosures that are material to the consolidated financial statements and (ii) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matter below, providing a separate opinion on the critical audit matter or on the accounts or disclosures to which it relates.
Valuation of provision for income taxes
As described in Notes 1 and 14 to the consolidated financial statements, for fiscal year 2020 the Company recorded a provision for income taxes of $11,998K. As disclosed by management, determining the provision for income taxes requires management to evaluate technical positions, make assumptions and judgments, and apply technical tax regulations in concluding on the Company’s tax liability.
The principal considerations for our determination that performing procedures relating to the valuation of provision for income taxes is a critical audit matter are (i) the significant judgments applied by management when valuing the provision for income taxes; (ii) a high degree of auditor judgement, subjectivity, and effort in performing procedures and evaluating management’s significant assumptions and judgements when applying technical tax regulations; and (iii) the audit effort included the use of professionals with specialized skill and knowledge.
Addressing the matter involved performing procedures and evaluating audit evidence in connection with forming our overall opinion on the consolidated financial statements. These procedures included testing the effectiveness of controls relating to the valuation of provision for income taxes. These procedures also included, among others, evaluating the appropriateness of management’s interpretation and application of technical tax regulations, evaluating management’s documentation regarding their technical tax positions, and testing the underlying data used in management’s determination of the valuation of provision for income taxes. Professionals with specialized skill and knowledge were used to assist in evaluating the appropriateness and documentation of technical tax positions.




/s/ PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP
Singapore
November 20, 2020

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2011.
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 KULICKE AND SOFFA INDUSTRIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(in thousands, except per share amount)
As of
October 3, 2020September 28, 2019
ASSETS
Current assets:
Cash and cash equivalents$188,127 $364,184 
Short-term investments342,000 229,000 
Accounts and notes receivable, net of allowance for doubtful accounts of $968 and $597, respectively198,640 195,830 
Inventories, net111,809 89,308 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets19,620 15,429 
Total current assets860,196 893,751 
Property, plant and equipment, net59,147 72,370 
Operating right-of-use assets22,688  
Goodwill56,695 55,691 
Intangible assets, net37,972 42,651 
Deferred tax assets8,147 6,409 
Equity investments7,535 6,250 
Other assets2,186 2,494 
TOTAL ASSETS$1,054,566 $1,079,616 
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY  
Current liabilities:  
Short term debt$ $60,904 
Accounts payable57,688 36,711 
Operating lease liabilities5,903  
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities76,762 64,533 
Income taxes payable17,540 12,494 
Total current liabilities157,893 174,642 
Financing obligation 14,207 
Deferred tax liabilities33,005 32,054 
Income taxes payable74,957 80,290 
Operating lease liabilities18,325  
Other liabilities12,392 9,360 
TOTAL LIABILITIES$296,572 $310,553 
Commitments and contingent liabilities (Note 16)
SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY:  
Preferred stock, without par value:  
Authorized 5,000 shares; issued - none$ $ 
Common stock, no par value:  
Authorized 200,000 shares; issued 85,364 and 85,364 respectively; outstanding 61,558 and 63,172 shares, respectively539,213 533,590 
Treasury stock, at cost, 23,806 and 22,192 shares, respectively(394,817)(349,212)
Retained earnings616,119 594,625 
Accumulated other comprehensive loss(2,521)(9,940)
TOTAL SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY$757,994 $769,063 
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY$1,054,566 $1,079,616 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.
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KULICKE AND SOFFA INDUSTRIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS
(in thousands, except per share data)
 Fiscal
 202020192018
Net revenue$623,176 $540,052 $889,121 
Cost of sales325,201 285,462 479,680 
Gross profit297,975 254,590 409,441 
Selling, general and administrative116,007 116,811 123,188 
Research and development123,459 116,169 119,621 
Operating expenses239,466 232,980 242,809 
Income from operations58,509 21,610 166,632 
Interest income7,541 15,132 11,971 
Interest expense(1,716)(2,055)(1,054)
Income before income taxes64,334 34,687 177,549 
Provision for income taxes11,998 22,910 120,744 
Share of results of equity-method investee, net of tax36 124 129 
Net income$52,300 $11,653 $56,676 
Net income per share:  
Basic$0.83 $0.18 $0.82 
Diluted$0.83 $0.18 $0.80 
Weighted average shares outstanding:  
Basic62,828 65,286 69,380 
Diluted63,359 65,948 70,419 
 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.














 

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KULICKE AND SOFFA INDUSTRIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(in thousands)
Fiscal
202020192018
Net income$52,300 $11,653 $56,676 
Other comprehensive income / (loss):
Foreign currency translation adjustment7,755 (6,534)(3,633)
Unrecognized actuarial (loss) / gain on pension plan, net of tax(1,490)22 116 
6,265 (6,512)(3,517)
Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:
Unrealized gain / (loss) on derivative instruments, net of tax358 (741)(669)
Reclassification adjustment for loss / (gain) on derivative instruments recognized, net of tax796 1,215 (1,755)
Net increase / (decrease) from derivatives designated as hedging instruments, net of tax 1,154 474 (2,424)
Total other comprehensive income / (loss)7,419 (6,038)(5,941)
Comprehensive income$59,719 $5,615 $50,735 
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

























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Table of Contents
KULICKE AND SOFFA INDUSTRIES, INC.
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS' EQUITY
(in thousands)
 Common StockTreasury StockRetained earnings Accumulated Other Comprehensive (loss) / incomeShareholders' Equity
SharesAmount
Balances as of September 30, 201770,197 $506,515 $(157,604)$569,080 $2,039 $920,030 
Issuance of stock for services rendered33 780 — — — 780 
Repurchase of common stock(3,760)— (91,060)— — (91,060)
Exercise of stock options6 55 — — — 55 
Issuance of shares for equity-based compensation667  — — —  
Equity-based compensation— 10,480 — — — 10,480 
Cumulative effect of accounting changes— 1,414 — 4,006 — 5,420 
Cash dividends declared— — — (16,233)— (16,233)
Components of comprehensive income:
Net income—