10-K 1 fiscal2015form10-k.htm 10-K 10-K
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 __________________________________________________ 
FORM 10-K
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO
SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended October 2, 2015                         Commission File No. 1-7463
__________________________________________________ 
 Jacobs Engineering Group Inc.
 
 
 
Delaware
 
95-4081636
State of incorporation
 
IRS Employer
identification number
 
 
155 North Lake Avenue
Pasadena, California 91101
 
(626) 578-3500
Address of principal executive offices
 
Telephone number (including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 __________________________________________________ 
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, $1 par value
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
 __________________________________________________ 
Indicate by check-mark if the Registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act:   ý    Yes  ¨    No
Indicate by check-mark if the Registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.  ¨    Yes  ý    No
Indicate by check-mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  ý    Yes  ¨    No
Indicate by check-mark whether the Registrant: has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files).
ý    Yes - ¨    No
Indicate by check-mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the Registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  ý
Indicate by check-mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer”, “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer
 
ý
  
Accelerated filer
 
¨
 
 
 
 
Non-accelerated filer
 
¨
  
Smaller reporting company
 
¨
Indicate by check-mark whether the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act)  ¨    Yes  ý    No
There were 122,557,955 shares of common stock outstanding as of November 20, 2015. The aggregate market value of the Registrant’s common equity held by non-affiliates was approximately $5.6 billion as of March 27, 2015, based upon the last reported sales price on the New York Stock Exchange on that date.
__________________________________________________ 
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the Registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be issued in connection with its 2016 annual meeting of shareholders are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K where indicated.



JACOBS ENGINEERING GROUP INC.
Fiscal 2015 Annual Report on Form 10-K
Table of Contents
 
 
 
 
 
Item
  
 
Page No.
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
Item 1A.
 
Item 1B.
 
Item 2.
 
Item 3.
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 5.
 
Item 6.
 
Item 7.
 
Item 7A.
 
Item 8.
 
Item 9.
 
Item 9A.
 
Item 9B.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 10.
 
Item 11.
 
Item 12.
 
Item 13.
 
Item 14.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 15.
 
 

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PART I
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
In addition to historical information, this Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Forward-looking statements are statements that do not directly relate to any historical or current fact. When used herein, words such as "expects," "anticipates," "believes," "seeks," "estimates," "plans," "intends," “future,” “will,” “would,” “could,” “can,” “may,” and similar words are intended to identify forward-looking statements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements. Although such statements are based on management’s current estimates and expectations and/or currently available competitive, financial, and economic data, forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain and involve risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from what may be inferred from the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, those listed and discussed in Item 1A—Risk Factors below. We undertake no obligation to release publicly any revisions or updates to any forward-looking statements. We encourage you to read carefully the risk factors described herein and in other documents we file from time to time with the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC").
Unless the context otherwise requires, all references herein to "Jacobs" or the "Registrant" are to Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and its predecessors, and references to the "Company", "we", "us" or "our" are to Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries.


Item 1.
BUSINESS

General Background Information

We are one of the largest technical professional services firms in the world. We provide a diverse range of technical, professional, and construction services to a large number of industrial, commercial, and governmental clients. We provide four broad categories of services:

Project Services (including engineering, design, architecture, interiors, planning, environmental, and similar services);

Process, Scientific, and Systems Consulting Services (including services performed in connection with scientific testing, analysis, and consulting activities, as well as information technology and systems engineering and integration activities);

Construction Services (encompassing traditional field construction services as well as modular construction consulting capabilities, direct hire construction, and construction management services); and

Operations and Maintenance Services (including services performed in connection with operating large, complex facilities on behalf of clients, as well as services involving process plant and facilities maintenance).

We focus our services on clients operating in the following industries and markets:

Oil and gas exploration, production, and refining;

Chemicals and polymers;

Programs for various national governments, including aerospace, defense, and environmental programs;

Buildings (including specialized buildings for clients operating in the fields of healthcare, education, and high technology; governmental complexes; other specialized civic and mission critical buildings, installations, and laboratories; and retail and commercial buildings);

Infrastructure and telecommunications;


Page 3


Mining and minerals;

Pharmaceuticals and biotechnology;

Power;

Pulp and paper;

Technology and manufacturing; and,

Food and consumer products, among others.

We are headquartered in Pasadena, California, USA, and provide our services through more than 200 offices located around the globe, primarily in North America, South America, Europe, the Middle East, India, Australia, Africa, and Asia.

How We Operate

The relationships we have with our clients drive our business. As a broad-based technical professional services firm, we offer a range of services to help our clients maintain a competitive edge in their respective markets. From feasibility studies to design, to engineering, to construction, to start-up and commissioning, and then to operations and maintenance, we customize our services to meet business and project goals. Our global network of professionals works with a multi-office approach in an effort to provide clients with the best, most economical project or program solutions.

We strive to provide client value through continuous improvement in our performance. We regularly monitor our clients' expectations, our project delivery protocols and system, and our operational performance. Tools such as our Jacobs Value Enhancing Practices, Global Standard Operating Procedures, project reviews, the Jacobs System to Ensure Project Success ("JSTEPS") and Safe Plans of Action ("SPAs") provide added value to our clients' projects. They also allow us to create performance improvement actions during the project execution. Through continuous improvement upon our performance, our tools, and our processes, we believe we can offer our clients superior value when they do business with us.

JacobsValue+SM ("Value Plus") is an internal tool we use to document and quantify the actual value or savings we provide to our clients and their projects. Some of the benefits achieved through the Value Plus program include lower total installed cost, shorter schedule, and reduced life cycle cost. Value Plus is implemented at project initiation: a project goal is created, and cost-saving ideas are entered into the Value Plus database. When the Value Plus cycle is complete, the project team and client identify unique cost and/or schedule reductions for the project.

Our Business Model

Our organizational structure and integrated system for delivering services are key components of our business strategy. Our operating units generally use a matrix organizational structure whereby our project management functions are supported by the various technical planning, design, and construction disciplines that are necessary to effectively execute long-term engineering and construction contracts. We recognize that technical expertise alone cannot grow our business; project management skills and the ability to manage multi-million dollar projects and programs for our clients are critical to our success. Crucial functions, such as project controls and procurement, are embedded within each of our regions and serve operations by providing specialized services required by projects.

Our business is set up to foster cooperation among teams and across our operating units. Historically, we have not operated “profit centers” within the Company, nor do we allow our operating groups to compete against each other for contracts. Our organizational structure and integrated system for delivering services are key components of our business strategy. The following three ideas support our business model:

Multi-Domestic Approach
We work in many countries with locally-staffed offices that share a common set of values, tools, and a single vision, while maintaining one-on-one contact with individual clients. This multi-domestic approach enables us to provide customized service suited to the locale while still taking advantage of the Company’s global network.

Boundaryless Approach

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Our diversity encompasses our people, geographic reach, expertise, and technical capabilities. On projects around the world, we enhance local expertise with the best talent and the best technology available anywhere throughout the Company. This seamless, boundaryless approach keeps us flexible and enhances our ability to develop the best possible solutions for our clients, regardless of office or project location.

Cost Management Approach
As the global economy expands and companies providing technical, professional, and construction services are required to compete against each other across geographic boundaries, companies that can provide their clients with cost-efficient solutions to their project needs have the advantage. With a strong focus on managing costs, we provide savings to clients and deliver superior technical, professional, and construction services safely, efficiently, and within the cost and time parameters our clients require.

Jacobs’ corporate functions include Project Delivery, Safety, Finance and Administration, Legal, Human Resources, Information Technology, Compliance and, through fiscal 2015, Global Sales and Marketing, which are all integral to our success.

The Company's Culture

Our employees are our most important and valuable asset and, therefore, the prevention of job-related injuries is given top priority. It is the policy of the Company to provide and maintain a safe and healthy working environment and to follow operating practices that safeguard all employees and result in a more efficient operation.     BeyondZero® , the name of our program that promotes our culture of caring, moves beyond efforts to have an incident and injury-free safety performance. We implement a culture of caring where concern for employees' health, safety, and welfare extends outside the office walls, beyond the project site fences and into their homes, cars, and all the places where they interact with family, friends, and fellow employees.

Since Jacobs’ founding, the Company has been based on doing business honestly, ethically, and with the utmost integrity. Our culture, and our Code of Conduct that is signed annually by all employees, prescribes that everyone at the Company must adhere to Jacobs’ Core Values and ethical code, and comply with the laws that govern the Company’s activities worldwide. Our employees and business partners are expected to follow the highest principles of business conduct, integrity, and ethics as they carry out their responsibilities, and are guided by the following principles in carrying out their responsibilities: loyalty, compliance with applicable laws, observance of ethical standards, avoidance of conflicts of interest, and communication. We endeavor to deal fairly with our employees, customers, suppliers, and competitors, and to respect the policies and procedures of those outside the Company.

We strive to present a clear and consistent image of our Company to our clients, employees, shareholders, and business partners - regarding how we behave, how we communicate, how we look, and most importantly, how our promises to our clients are delivered - anywhere in the world. 

We accomplish this foremost through our core values, which allow us to behave as one company and unify us worldwide. By keeping our core values as a central focus of our Company, we are able to think the same way and arrive at similar conclusions, regardless of our physical location. Our core values are:

People are our greatest asset;

We are relationship-based; and

Growth is an imperative.
    
The balance inherent in our core values is also evident in our approach to sustainability, which maintains an even balance among the people, the economics, and the environmental aspects of business. Jacobs is driven to continuously improve efficiencies and reduce energy and resources, practices that drive down costs and contribute to a lower impact on the environment. The Company adheres to the following seven sustainability principles:

Sustainable development is a corporate priority;

We seek broad, deep, differentiated capabilities and services;


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Sustainable development is integrated into our business;

Training and education are important;

Our facilities and operations follow sustainable principles;

We contribute to the common effort for sustainability; and

We are open and transparent.

Applying the best, most efficient and effective sustainable solutions for clients worldwide, in all major industries in which our clients operate, allows us to make a significant contribution to a safe and sustainable future. Each year we issue a Sustainability Report that describes many of our efforts and accomplishments regarding environmental sustainability.
    
With respect to human resources, our goal is to establish an inclusive, diverse workplace that energizes the people who fuel our Company's growth. Although we are a large company with over 64,000 employees in over 25 countries, our employees are unified in their focus on superior value, safety, and ethical business practices regardless of the country in which they work, and employees frequently move around the system as they grow their careers.

How We Grow

Jacobs has grown significantly since its founding in 1947; both through organic growth and through strategic acquisitions, an important part of the Company’s growth strategy. We have acquired and integrated numerous companies over the years that have enhanced our capabilities, geographic reach, and offerings.

In terms of organic growth, our relationship-based business model is central to our sustained growth and profitability. We pursue the development of long-term relationships and alliances with our clients. By working with our clients on their capital programs, we increase our understanding of their overall business needs, as well as the unique technical requirements of their specific projects. This increased understanding enables us, we believe, to provide superior value to our clients. Our approach provides us with opportunities to market the services our clients are expected to need in the pre-design phase, such as master planning, permitting, or project finance options; in the design phase; and in the construction, post-start-up and commissioning phases of a facility, including operations and maintenance services.

Our relationships with clients also present ongoing opportunities to expand into adjacent markets. For example, clients operating in the mining and minerals market often have a need for our infrastructure and buildings capabilities. The same is true for clients operating in other markets.

We market our services to clients in a wide range of public and institutional, process, and industrial markets. We increase our opportunities through selective market diversity, and are able to price contracts more competitively and enhance overall profitability while delivering additional value to our clients by integrating and bundling our services. In complex economic times, we have the ability to evolve along with market cycles worldwide. When opportunities decrease in a particular market or geography, other opportunities often increase. Because of our selective market diversity, we believe we are well-positioned to address a wide range of opportunities across many markets and geographies, which helps us grow our business.

Closely linked to our relationship-based business model is our multi-domestic geographic strategy. Our core clients can depend on us for assistance with their engineering and construction needs when they move projects around the world. We therefore follow our clients into new geographic regions, which helps us perform meaningful portions of their projects by utilizing local resources rather than exporting the work to other offices.


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The Role of Acquisitions and Strategic Investments in the Development Our Business

When we review acquisition targets, we are conscious of the effect the acquisition may have on our client base. We favor acquisitions that allow us to (i) expand into a new client market; (ii) enhance the range of services we provide existing clients; and/or (iii) access new geographic areas in which our clients either already operate or plan to expand. By expanding into new geographic areas and adding to our existing technical and project management capabilities, we strive to position ourselves as a preferred, single-source provider of technical, professional, and construction services to our major clients. The following is a brief description of some of our recent key acquisitions (in reverse chronological order):

On March 31, 2015, we acquired Suzhou Hans Chemical Engineering Co. ("SHCE") headquartered in China. SHCE has two specialty Class A design licenses in China’s Chemical, Petrochemical and Pharmaceutical industries, which allows the firm to provide engineering design for all types of chemical projects in China irrespective of project size plus procurement and project management services for various projects in China. These combined resources enable Jacobs to offer customers in China a complete spectrum of services for all types of chemical and petrochemical projects.

On July 1, 2014, we acquired Federal Network Systems ("FNS"), a subsidiary of Verizon Communications headquartered in Ashburn, Virginia. FNS provides systems integration and communication, information technology and data security solutions for the global market with a particular focus on supporting the Intelligence Community, the U.S. Department of Defense ("DoD"), and federal civilian customers. FNS designs, integrates, secures, operates and maintains highly complex mission critical voice, data and video networks.

On February 7, 2014, we acquired Eagleton Engineering, LLC ("Eagleton") headquartered in Houston, Texas. The acquisition enhances our capabilities in midstream and upstream pipeline engineering, design and field surveying services. Eagleton specializes in pipeline engineering, primarily providing professional services and resources to the oil, gas and petrochemical industries. The firm’s services cover the full life cycle of project planning and delivery, from conceptual studies and design to full turnkey engineering, procurement and construction solutions and operational support.

On December 24, 2014, we acquired the assets of FMHC Corporation ("FMHC") headquartered in Chicago, Illinois. This acquisition enhances our ability to provide turnkey wireless communications site development, design, network deployment, construction, and related services to clients operating in the wireless telecommunications industry.

On December 20, 2013, we acquired Stobbarts Limited, a construction firm based in West Cumbria, United Kingdom. The acquisition enhances our capabilities in nuclear, decommissioning, construction and civil engineering.

On December 13, 2013, we acquired Sinclair Knight Merz Management Pty Limited and Sinclair Knight Merz Holdings Limited (collectively, "SKM"), a provider of engineering, design, procurement, construction and project management services. Due to its size and complexities, more information about the SKM acquisition is provided throughout this report.

On November 22, 2013, we acquired certain assets and liabilities of MARMAC Field Services, Inc. headquartered in Costa Mesa, California. The acquisition enhances our capabilities in pipeline engineering and design services; both geographically and by adding additional capabilities to serve the utility and gas industries.

On October 18, 2013, we acquired a 45% interest in Guimar Engenharia, a privately held engineering services and project management/construction management ("PMCM") company based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The acquisition represents Jacobs’ first significant investment in Brazil. Guimar has a broad client base and operations throughout Brazil, where it is a leading provider of PMCM services for clients in the pulp and paper, petroleum, chemicals, food and beverage, mining and minerals, building and infrastructure industries.

On October 14, 2013, we acquired substantially all the assets and liabilities of the Trompeter Group. This acquisition enhances our capabilities in advanced engineering services, maintenance support,

Page 7


technical training services, and contingent workforce services to the automotive manufacturing industry. The business is headquartered in Detroit, Michigan.

On August 30, 2013, our South African joint venture, Jacobs Matasis (Proprietary) Limited, acquired Ilitha Projects and Ilitha Staffing. Ilitha Projects provides management and Engineering, Procurement, Construction and Management (EPCM) services to clients in a broad range of market sectors, including oil and gas, refining, chemicals, power, nuclear, marine mining and metals. Ilitha Staffing supplies technical contract staff sourcing and management services with a strong emphasis on integration with the client’s culture and business practices.

Commencing on June 6, 2013, and through the end of fiscal 2015, we acquired further ownership interests in Consulting Engineering Services (India) Private Limited (“CES”), an infrastructure and civil engineering company headquartered in Delhi, India. As of the end of fiscal 2015, the Company's ownership interest in CES is 99.2%. CES provides a range of solutions in infrastructure development, planning, engineering, and construction management.

On May 28, 2013, we acquired Compass Technology Services, Inc. ("Compass"), headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia. Compass is a provider of telecommunications professional and field services in the Southeastern U.S. and enhances our capabilities in wireless telecommunications infrastructure design and construction.

In August 2012, we acquired a consulting project management business based in Sydney, Australia. The primary purpose of this acquisition was to expand our geographic presence and grow our infrastructure business in Australia.

In December 2011, we acquired Unique World Pty Ltd. ("Unique World"), headquartered in Sydney, Australia. Unique World is an information management and knowledge management consultancy specializing in enabling technologies such as collaboration, business process automation, business intelligence, intranets, and portals. Unique World expands our capabilities in Australia to include such information technology ("IT") services, as well as expanding the client base to which we can offer these services.

In November 2011, we acquired KlingStubbins, Inc., a 500-person firm headquartered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania with offices located throughout the U.S. and China. KlingStubbins provides professional services in the areas of architecture, engineering, interiors, planning, and landscape architecture. The markets served by KlingStubbins include corporate/commercial, governmental, science and technology, higher education, mission critical, and interiors.
    
After we complete an acquisition, we move quickly to integrate the newly acquired operations. We typically assign senior operations personnel to manage the overall integration process with assistance from our sales, accounting, legal, IT, human resources, and risk management departments. Although integrating newly acquired businesses can be very challenging, the assimilation process is critical in order to assure (i) that our global businesses processes and systems are properly deployed throughout the newly-acquired entities and (ii) that we can begin to leverage off the acquired talents, skills, and expertise to grow our business and help our clients execute their capital programs. Newly-acquired businesses are generally not left as stand-alone entities within the Company’s internal reporting system. The businesses we acquire are typically folded in to existing operational organizations within the Company. For additional information regarding certain issues related to our acquisition strategy, please refer to Item 1A— Risk Factors below.

Financial Information About Segments

Although we describe our business in this Annual Report on Form 10-K in terms of the various services we provide, the markets in which our clients operate, and the geographic areas in which we operate, we have concluded that our operations may be aggregated into one reportable segment pursuant to those accounting principles generally accepted in the U.S. (“U.S. GAAP”). In making this determination, we considered the various economic characteristics of our operations, including: the nature of the services we provide, the nature of our internal processes for delivering and distributing those services, and the types of customers we have. In addition to the discussion that follows, please refer to Note 14 — Segment Information of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.


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There is a high degree of similarity among the workforces employed across the categories of services we provide. For example, professionals in engineering and design services (i.e., services provided by persons who are degreed, and in certain circumstances licensed, such as engineers, architects, scientists, and economists) exist in all four service categories. In addition, there is a high degree of similarity among a significant component of the workforces we employ to perform construction and operations and maintenance ("O&M") projects. In providing construction and O&M services, we employ a large number of skilled craft labor personnel. These may include welders, pipe fitters, electricians, crane operators, and other personnel who work on very large capital projects (in the case of projects classified within the construction services category) or on smaller capital projects (in the case of maintenance projects classified within the O&M services category).

All of our offices use a matrix organizational structure. Our results, therefore, are dependent on groups representing technical disciplines (e.g., electrical engineering, mechanical engineering, cost engineering, etc.) supporting project management personnel (who maintain the relationship between our clients and us and are ultimately responsible for delivering projects to our clients safely, on time, and on budget). Additionally, our operating regions use common tools, policies, and procedures to manage and run their respective units. These include project review meetings, project performance evaluations, and project execution plans.
    
Each of the Company's operating regions provides most of the services the Company offers generally, and each of our operating regions includes in its customer base many of the same or similar clients as our other regions.
    
The use of technology throughout our organization is highly uniform. Whether it is computer-aided design and drafting (“CADD”) applications used by our engineering and design staff, or modeling programs used by the scientific and consulting staff, or scheduling, estimating, and cost control applications used by home-office personnel in support of our construction and maintenance activities, all of the service categories described above are equally affected by changes in technology as they occur in the economy at large.

Furthermore, the types of information and internal reports used by the Company’s chief operating decision maker (the “CODM”), who is also the Company’s chief executive officer, and other members of management to monitor performance, evaluate results of operations, allocate resources, and otherwise manage the business support a single reportable segment. Accordingly, based on these similarities, we have concluded that our operations may be aggregated into one reportable segment for purposes of the disclosures included in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

During the first quarter of fiscal 2016, we announced a reorganization of our operations around four global lines of business. This reorganization is intended to better serve our global clients, leverage our workforce, help streamline operations, and provide enhanced growth opportunities. The four global lines of business are: Petroleum & Chemicals, Buildings & Infrastructure, Aerospace & Technology, and Industrial. Each business unit has a president that reports directly to the Company's President & CEO. As part of the reorganization, certain support functions (i.e. Sales), which have been managed centrally for many years, will be embedded in the new business units and will report to the respective line of business presidents. The costs of other support functions (e.g., accounting, legal, human resources, and information technology) and certain other activities (e.g., global insurance) will either be assigned or allocated to each new business unit using a rationale method of assignment/allocation, or will remain an element of corporate general and administrative expenses. In addition, the Company has significantly modified its major cash incentive plan utilizing forecasted performance metrics aligned along the new lines of business. We are in the process of modifying our systems and work processes to report the results of these business units in an accurate and timely manner. We are also developing processes for accurately eliminating inter-unit revenue and profit. We expect to complete our system and other process changes so that we may accurately report operating results by line of business to the Company's President & CEO no later than the second quarter of fiscal 2016.
 

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Services Provided

As described above, the services we provide generally fall into the following four broad categories: Project Services; Process, Scientific, and Systems Consulting services; Construction services; and Operations and Maintenance services.    
    
The following table sets forth our revenues from each of our four service categories for each of the last five fiscal years (in thousands):
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Project Services
 
$
6,307,015

 
$
6,576,004

 
$
5,977,917

 
$
5,693,419

 
$
5,070,575

Process, Scientific, and Systems Consulting
 
1,188,418

 
758,957

 
705,694

 
772,031

 
815,561

Construction
 
3,291,823

 
4,138,729

 
3,825,878

 
3,145,311

 
3,060,820

Operations and Maintenance
 
1,327,576

 
1,221,467

 
1,308,887

 
1,283,017

 
1,434,708

 
 
$
12,114,832

 
$
12,695,157

 
$
11,818,376

 
$
10,893,778

 
$
10,381,664


Project Services

We employ the engineering, architecture, interiors, design, planning, and related disciplines necessary to design and engineer modern process plants, buildings, infrastructure projects, technology and manufacturing facilities, consumer products manufacturing facilities, power plants and stations, pulp and paper plants, and other facilities.

We are capable of providing our clients with a variety of value engineering services, including "safety in design". Through safety in design we integrate best practices, hazard analysis, and risk assessment methods early in the design phase of projects, taking those steps necessary to eliminate or mitigate injury and damage during the construction, start-up, testing and commissioning, and operations phases of a project.

In the area of construction management, we provide our clients with a wide range of services as an agent for our clients. We may act as program director, whereby we oversee, on the owner's behalf, the complete planning, design, and construction phases of the project. Alternatively, our services may be limited to providing construction consulting.

Project Services also includes planning, scheduling, procurement, estimating, cost engineering, project accounting,
project delivery (quality), safety, and all other key support services needed for complete cradle-to-grave project delivery.

Process, Scientific, and Systems Consulting Services

We employ the professional and technical skills and expertise with respect to a broad range of consulting services, including: performing pricing studies, market analyses, and financial projections necessary in determining the feasibility of a project; performing gasoline reformulation modeling; analyzing and evaluating layout and mechanical designs for complex processing plants; analyzing automation and control systems; analyzing, designing, and executing biocontainment strategies; developing and performing process protocols with respect to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration-mandated qualification and validation requirements; and performing geological and metallurgical studies.

Also included in this service category are revenues relating to defense and aerospace-related programs. Such services typically are more technical and scientific in nature than other project services we provide, and may involve such tasks as supporting the development and testing of conventional weapons systems; weapons modeling and simulations; computer systems development, maintenance, and support; evaluation and testing of mission-critical control systems; aerospace, testing, and propulsion systems and facilities; and other highly technical or scientific tasks.

Construction Services

In addition to the construction management services included under Project Services above, we provide traditional field construction services to private and public sector clients. We also provide modular construction consulting services. In the area of environmental remediation and restoration, we also provide environmental remedial construction services for a variety of public and private sector clients.

Historically, our field construction activities have been focused primarily on those construction projects for which we perform much of the related engineering and design work. By focusing our construction efforts in this way, we attempt to minimize the risks associated with constructing complex projects based on designs prepared by third parties. The financial risk

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to us of constructing complex assets based on designs prepared by third parties may be particularly significant on fixed-price contracts; therefore, we generally avoid this type of project. However, we will pursue construction-only projects when we can negotiate pricing and other contract terms we deem acceptable and which we believe can result in a fair return for the degree of risk we assume.

Operations and Maintenance Services

O&M refers to all of the tasks required to operate and maintain large, complex facilities on behalf of clients. We provide key management and support services over all aspects of the operations of a facility, including managing subcontractors and other on-site personnel. O&M also includes process plant maintenance services, which generally involves all tasks required to keep a process plant (typically a refinery or chemical plant) in day-to-day operation.

Within the aerospace and defense areas, O&M often requires us to provide the management and technical support services necessary to operate and maintain such sites as engine test facilities, weapons integration facilities, and high-tech simulation and verification centers. Such O&M contracts also frequently require us to provide facilities management and maintenance services; utilities operations and maintenance services; property management and disposition services; and construction support services.

Within the environmental area, O&M often includes engineering and technical support services as well as program management services necessary to remediate contaminated sites.

Although the gross profit margins we realize from O&M services are generally lower than those associated with the other services we provide, the costs to support maintenance activities are also generally lower. Also, O&M services offer us an opportunity for long-term relationships with clients. This aspect of O&M services greatly reduces the selling costs in respect of such services.

The Industries and Markets in Which Our Clients Operate

We market our services to clients where the scope of work required by their capital projects and programs is within our expertise. Within each market, we may offer specialty services unique to the sector, or services which differentiate us from our competitors in the marketplace.

The following table sets forth our revenues from each of the various industry groups and markets in which our clients operate for each of the last five fiscal years (in thousands):
 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
National Government Programs
 
$
2,643,696

 
$
2,282,116

 
$
2,284,533

 
$
2,272,611

 
$
2,313,240

Chemicals and Polymers
 
2,380,721

 
2,985,352

 
2,391,144

 
1,704,723

 
1,461,125

Refining – Downstream
 
1,955,726

 
2,239,343

 
2,337,387

 
2,379,750

 
2,256,092

Infrastructure
 
1,625,895

 
1,361,574

 
1,015,864

 
1,085,649

 
1,219,633

Oil & Gas – Upstream
 
919,222

 
863,344

 
915,478

 
790,546

 
753,471

Buildings
 
901,041

 
834,122

 
738,404

 
843,938

 
893,528

Industrial and Other
 
757,357

 
758,036

 
899,756

 
690,124

 
630,694

Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology
 
474,245

 
452,662

 
523,490

 
576,303

 
404,687

Mining & Minerals
 
456,929

 
918,608

 
712,320

 
550,134

 
449,194

 
 
$
12,114,832

 
$
12,695,157

 
$
11,818,376

 
$
10,893,778

 
$
10,381,664

    
Chemicals and Polymers

Our clients in this sector rely on our extensive knowledge of and experience with feedstock synthesis, chemical synthesis, and polymerization, including advanced polymerization reactors and state-of-the-art, post-reactor processing techniques to help bring new products and new facilities to market quickly and economically. We apply best practices on capital and maintenance work by leveraging resources within our alliances and partnerships. Specialty services we provide to our clients in these industries include project finance structuring consulting, market analysis, facility appraisal, and procurement with global inspection capabilities.


Page 11


An important capability we offer our clients in the chemicals business is in the area of field services. We have contracts with major chemical producers worldwide to provide construction, on-site maintenance, and turnaround activities. Many of these contracts are evergreen in nature, with relationships extending over many years due to our focus on safety, value, and client satisfaction and lead us to numerous formal alliances.
    
Refining - Downstream

Our typical refining projects for global clients include new design and construction, revamps or expansions of existing plants, turnarounds, upgrades of individual process units within refineries, and long-term maintenance services. We also provide process assessments, facility appraisals, feasibility studies, technology evaluations, project finance structuring and support, and multi-client subscription services.

Our modular construction consulting capabilities, asset management/maintenance services, and formal client alliances help differentiate us to customers operating in this industry. Using modular construction decreases congestion at the construction site and provides enhanced safety, cost, and project execution benefits in remote locations.

We also include power generation projects within our clients' refining and processing facilities, such as simple and combined cycle power projects, industrial gas turbines, and emergency power generation stations. In addition, we offer support in the procurement and commissioning of equipment.
    
National Government Programs

We categorize our National Government Programs as generally relating to aerospace and defense programs or environmental programs for government entities.

Aerospace and Defense Programs

We provide an in-depth range of science, engineering, construction and technical support services to the aerospace and defense industry. Long-term clients include the Ministry of Defence in the U.K., NASA, the DoD, the U.S. Special Operations Command ("USSOCOM"), and the Australian Department of Defence. Specific to NASA is our ability to design, build, operate, and maintain highly complex facilities relating to space systems, including test and evaluation facilities, launch facilities, and support infrastructure.

Our experience in the defense sector includes military systems acquisition management and strategic planning; operations and maintenance of test facilities and ranges; test and evaluation services in computer, laboratory, facility, and range environments; test facility computer systems instrumentation and diagnostics; and test facility design and build. We also provide systems engineering and integration of complex weapons and space systems, as well as hardware and software design of complex flight and ground systems.

We have provided advanced technology engineering services to the DoD for more than 50 years, and currently support major defense programs in the U.S. and internationally. We operate and maintain several DoD test centers and provide services and assist in the acquisition and development of systems and equipment for Special Operations Forces, as well as the development of biological, chemical, and nuclear detection and protection systems.

We maintain enterprise information systems for government and commercial clients worldwide, ranging from the operation of complex computational networks to the development and validation of specific software applications. We also support the DoD in a number of information technology programs, including network design, integration, and support; command and control technology; development and maintenance of databases and customized applications; and security solutions.
    
Environmental Programs

We provide environmental investigation, permitting, restoration, remediation, engineering, and site operations services to a number of European, North American, and Middle Eastern government agencies. Our projects include hazardous and nuclear waste management and site cleanup and closure; the preparation of feasibility studies and environmental investigations; environmental design; and remediation services on several national programs, as well as compliance with various national environmental policies.


Page 12


Additionally, we support our clients in such areas as pollution prevention assessments; underground storage tank removal; contaminated soil and water remediation, monitoring and systems cleanup; long-term water quality management plans; and air quality planning and permitting. Much of this type of work is in support of large infrastructure projects that are underway in both Europe and in North America.

As a differentiating aspect of our support to our government clients, we provide asset management services in the form of long-term infrastructure operations and maintenance. Asset management also includes building closures that involve deactivation, decommissioning, and demolition of government facilities. This is an integral part of our services for the U.S. Department of Energy.
    
Infrastructure

The strengths we offer our clients in this industry group include expertise in transportation, transit, aviation, water and wastewater, and civil construction projects throughout North America, Europe, India, the Middle East, and Asia. Representative clients include national government departments and agencies in the U.S. and the U.K.; state departments of transportation within the U.S.; other regional and local agencies; and private industry freight transport firms.

Transportation development/rehabilitation is a core competency of our infrastructure business. Typical projects include highways, bridges, transit, tunnels, airports, railroads, intermodal facilities, and maritime or port projects where our interdisciplinary teams work independently or as an extension of the client's staff. Providing alternative financing methods has proven successful in Europe where there is privatization of public infrastructure systems.

In water infrastructure, we help public and private sector clients develop or rehabilitate critical water resource systems. Emerging economies are investing heavily in water and wastewater systems, while governments in North America and Europe are addressing the challenges of drought and aging infrastructure. We also develop water/wastewater conveyance systems and water flood defense projects.

Oil & Gas - Upstream

As international oil companies develop reserves and try to maximize their existing resources, our expertise in a range of production methods, combined with our commitment to safety and strength in project management, helps us deliver a wide range of projects for oil and gas operators.

In the exploration and production market, our projects range from oil recovery through steam injection to gas treating, gas gathering, and gas storage projects including extraction of commercially valuable elements of the gas stream, utilizing new technologies such as Steam-Assisted Gravity Drainage ("SAGD").

Typical projects for our clients in this sector involve the design and construction of projects that recover oil and gas, and include oil thermal recovery facilities either by in-situ means or oil sands mining, upgraders, pipelines, gas plants, and CO2 flood. These are typically large projects that may involve many of our offices and often include work-share with our Mumbai, India office as a value-added engineering center to reduce project costs.

We also provide substantial maintenance and modification services for aging oil and gas facilities around the world. In connection with the refining market, we also provide process assessments, facility appraisals, feasibility studies, technology evaluations, project finance structuring consulting services, and other support services.    

Buildings

We have planned, designed, and constructed buildings for a variety of clients and markets for more than 60 years. We
believe our global presence and understanding of contracting and delivery demands keep us in an excellent position to provide professional services worldwide.

Our diversified client base encompasses both public and private sectors and relates primarily to institutional, commercial, government and corporate buildings, including projects at many of the world's leading medical and research centers, and universities. We focus our efforts and resources in areas where capital spending initiatives drive demand, and where changes and advances in technology require innovative, value-adding solutions. We also provide integrated facility management services (sometimes through joint ventures with third parties) for which we assume responsibility for the ongoing operation and maintenance of entire commercial or industrial complexes on behalf of clients.


Page 13


We have specific capabilities in energy and power, master planning, and commissioning for office headquarters, aviation facilities, mission-critical facilities, municipal and civic buildings, courts and correctional facilities, mixed-use and commercial centers, healthcare and education campuses, and recreation complexes.

Advanced technology clients require highly specialized buildings in the fields of medical research, nano science, biotechnology, and laser sciences. We offer total integrated design and construction management solutions to these projects, many of which are world leaders in their functions.

We also have capabilities in the pharma-bio, data center, government intelligence, corporate headquarters/interiors, and science and technology-based education markets around the globe.

Our government building projects include large, multi-year programs in the U.S. and Europe. U.S. government agencies we serve include the Federal Aviation Administration ("FAA"); the General Services Administration ("GSA"); the Internal Revenue Service ("IRS"); the U.S. Departments of State, Treasury, Agriculture, Homeland Security, and Defense; and the Army National Guard, among others. In the U.K., we are leading the Custodial Services' project management delivery program to upgrade the U.K. prison stock and also certain security-led programs such as upgrading works to the Palace of Westminster and some regional police authorities.

We are providing services to the DoD on military family housing; quality of life projects; training, maintenance, and readiness facilities; and command and control centers, as well as military facilities supporting the DoD's global re-basing program, the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure ("BRAC") program.

Industrial and Other

We provide a broad range of services to our clients operating in the power, pulp and paper, high-technology manufacturing, and food, beverage, and consumer products industries and markets.

Power

Global energy demand is expected to grow by nearly 50 percent over the next 25 years, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Significant capital spend in the power business is being driven by plant obsolescence and the need for utilities to comply with regulatory requirements and changes in environmental legislation. Our typical projects include simple and combined cycle power projects, cogeneration power plants, asset lifetime extension projects, and emergency power generation stations. In addition to traditional engineering, we offer services in procurement and commissioning of equipment, as well as construction services for the power market including thermal, biomass, renewables, and nuclear energy facilities.

Pulp and Paper

The pulp and paper industry has been consolidating for many years, and several of our traditional pulp and paper clients have emerged as major consumer product companies. These clients have created new opportunities for us in non-traditional areas, such as wall board plants and facilities that manufacture diapers and feminine care products. Typical projects range from small mill projects to complex, multi-million-dollar paper machine rebuilds, mill expansions, and the construction of new facilities.

Pulp and paper projects encompass many areas of a mill, and our expertise also includes the converting and packaging of paper products for distribution and consumer use. Our pulp and paper capability extends through our offices in the U.S., U.K., France, Spain, Italy, and Mexico to clients worldwide. A significant portion of our work consists of assisting our clients in their compliance with environmental regulations and standards that affect the pulp and paper industry. We monitor all key environmental regulations affecting our clients and offer compliance studies, permitting support, design of pollution control systems, and compliance services regarding air pollutant standards and hazardous air pollutant emission limits from industrial boilers.

High-Technology Manufacturing

We provide our core services for a variety of high tech manufacturing and test facilities, particularly for clients in the automotive and industrial industries. Typical automotive projects range from conceptual design and feasibility studies to complete design-build programs of aero-acoustic wind tunnels, engine test facilities, acoustic enclosures, transmission test stands; powertrain, environmental, emissions, altitude, and electromagnetic compatibility test facilities; in-line and end-of-line

Page 14


component test stands; and computer-based measurement and control systems. We also serve advanced technology and research facilities, including facilities supporting research in fusion and fission energy, nanoscale materials, and high-powered lasers and X-rays to support important research activities in the U.S., Europe, and the U.K.

In addition, we perform projects for clients operating in the semiconductor industry. Projects in the semiconductor industry are typically more complex than many other commercial facilities, requiring a greater emphasis on cleanroom and similar high-end technologies. Our projects range from on-site plant engineering and tool hookups to multi-million dollar state-of-the-art wafer fabrication and crystal growing facilities used to produce solar energy cells, microprocessors for computers, and other consumer electronic devices.

Food, Beverages, and Consumer Products

As a provider to the food, beverage, and consumer products supply chain, our global presence and capabilities allow us to help our clients with targeted expansion and new investments. Our food processing services include hygienic design, clean-in-place ("CIP") systems, heat transfer systems, material handling of liquids and solids, refrigeration, and compliance with government requirements. From facility design to raw materials processing to converting, packaging, and distribution, our vast depth of expertise helps our clients do just that. Our knowledge of food and beverage processing results in plants that are productive, efficient, and economical.

Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology

We provide our pharmaceuticals and biotechnology clients single-point consulting, engineering, procurement, construction management, and validation ("EPCMV") project delivery, enabling us to execute the industry's largest capital programs on a single-responsibility basis. Typical projects in this sector include laboratories, research and development facilities, pilot plants, bulk active pharmaceutical ingredient production facilities, full-scale biotechnology production facilities, and secondary manufacturing facilities.

As companies in this industry continue to experience pressure to decrease product time-to-market, reduce costs, and increase return on investment, the types of services we provide have grown over the years to include modular construction, as well as other consulting and strategic planning to help our clients complete capital projects faster and more efficiently.

Regulatory compliance, state-of-the-art technology, and increased efficiencies are critical issues to our clients in these industries. We have expertise in containment, barrier technology, locally controlled environments, building systems automation, and off-the-site design and fabrication of facility modules, as well as vaccine production and purification, and aseptic processing.

Mining and Minerals

Our mining and minerals business targets the non-ferrous and ferrous metal markets, precious metals, energy minerals (uranium, coal, oil sands), and industrial and fertilizer minerals (mineral sands, borates, trona, phosphates and potash). We work with many of the resources companies undertaking new and existing facility upgrades and process plant developments. We offer project management; front-end studies; full EPCM capabilities; and completions, commissioning and start-up services specializing in new plant construction, brownfield expansions, and sustaining capital and maintenance projects.

For our mining and mineral clients, we provide the industry proprietary sulfuric acid production technology through our Chemetics® product - an important synergistic by-product of the smelting process and a key consumable in mines employing ore leaching technology. We are also able to deliver value to our mining clients by providing distinctive adjacent capabilities such as infrastructure and major equipment and materials to support their mining operations.

By focusing on mitigating our clients' resource risk, we are able to address challenges of tight labor markets by providing a reliable and familiar labor pool for their ongoing projects. We host local offices in the most active mining geographies (South America, Australia, Canada, India, and South Africa), and can thereby effectively help our clients improve their project delivery and resource availability.


Backlog

Backlog represents the total dollar amount of revenues we expect to record in the future as a result of performing work under contracts that have been awarded to us. With respect to O&M contracts, however, we include in backlog the

Page 15


amount of revenues we expect to receive for only one succeeding year, regardless of the remaining life of the contract. For national government programs (other than U.S. federal O&M contracts), our policy is to include in backlog the full contract award, whether funded or unfunded, excluding option periods. In accordance with industry practice, substantially all of our contracts are subject to cancellation, termination, or suspension at the discretion of the client. In addition, the contracts in our backlog are subject to changes in the scope of services to be provided as well as adjustments to the costs relating to the contracts. Accordingly, backlog is not necessarily indicative of our future revenues or earnings.

Our backlog includes expected revenues for contracts that are based on estimates. For additional information regarding our backlog including those risk factors specific to backlog, please refer to Item 1A — Risk Factors, and Item 7 — Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations below. Our backlog at October 2, 2015 and September 26, 2014 was $18.8 billion and $18.4 billion, respectively. Subject to the factors discussed in Item 1A—Risk Factors below, we estimate that approximately 7.3 billion, or 38.6%, of total backlog at October 2, 2015 will be realized as revenues within the next fiscal year.
 

Significant Customers

The following table sets forth the percentage of total revenues earned directly or indirectly from agencies of the U.S. federal government for each of the last five fiscal years: 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
21.7
%
 
17.8
%
 
19.9
%
 
22.1
%
 
24.4
%

Given the percentage of total revenue derived from the U.S. federal government, the loss of U.S. federal government agencies as customers would have a material adverse effect on the Company. In addition, any or all of our government contracts could be terminated, we could be suspended or debarred from all government contract work, or payment of our costs could be disallowed. For more information on risks relating to our government contracts, see Item 1A - Risk Factors below.

It is uncommon for a commercial customer to contribute 10% or more of the Company’s total revenues. On occasion, however, we will perform a number of field services projects for a single customer in the same fiscal year which, primarily because of the amount of pass-through costs (discussed below) that is included in revenue, will cause total revenue from that customer to exceed 10% of total consolidated revenues. For additional information regarding certain risks related to our customer concentration, please refer to Item 1A — Risk Factors below.

Financial Information About Geographic Areas

Selected financial information regarding the geographic areas in which we operate is included in Note 14 — Segment Information of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is incorporated herein by reference. For fiscal 2015, approximately 40.9% of our revenues was earned from clients outside the United States. Our international operations are subject to a variety of risks, which are described under Item 1A - Risk Factors below.

Contracts

While there is considerable variation in the pricing provisions of the contracts we undertake, our contracts generally fall into two broad categories: cost-reimbursable and fixed-price. The following table sets forth the percentages of total revenues represented by these types of contracts for each of the last five fiscal years:
 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
Cost-reimbursable
 
83%
 
83%
 
85%
 
85%
 
84%
Fixed-price
 
17%
 
17%
 
15%
 
15%
 
16%

In accordance with industry practice, most of our contracts (including those with the U.S. federal government) are subject to termination at the discretion of the client, which is discussed in greater detail in Item 1A — Risk Factors. In such situations, our contracts typically provide for reimbursement of costs incurred and payment of fees earned through the date of termination.


Page 16


When we are directly responsible for engineering, design, procurement, and construction of a project or the maintenance of a client’s plant or facility, we reflect the costs of materials, equipment, and subcontracts in both revenues and costs. On other projects, where the client elects to pay for such items directly and we have no associated responsibility for such items, these amounts are not reflected in either revenues or costs. The following table sets forth the approximate amount of such pass-through costs included in revenues for each of the last five fiscal years (in millions of dollars):
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
2012
 
2011
$
2,602.6

 
$
2,954.9

 
$
2,624.8

 
$
2,328.4

 
$
2,118.5


Cost-Reimbursable Contracts

Cost-reimbursable contracts generally provide for reimbursement of costs incurred plus an amount of profit. The profit element may be in the form of a simple mark-up applied to the labor costs incurred or it may be in the form of a fee, or a combination of a mark-up and a fee. The fee element can also take several forms. The fee may be a fixed amount; it may be an amount based on a percentage of the costs incurred; or it may be an incentive fee based on targets, milestones, or performance factors defined in the contract. In general, we prefer cost-reimbursable contracts because we believe the primary reason for awarding a contract to us should be our technical expertise and professional qualifications rather than price.

Fixed-Price Contracts

Fixed-price contracts include both “lump sum bid” contracts and “negotiated fixed-price” contracts. Under lump sum bid contracts, we typically bid against other contractors based on specifications the client furnishes. This type of pricing presents certain inherent risks, including the possibility of ambiguities in the specifications received, problems with new technologies, and economic and other changes that may occur over the contract period. Additionally, it is not unusual for lump sum bid contracts to lead to an adversarial relationship with clients, which is contrary to our relationship-based business model. Accordingly, lump sum bid contracts are not our preferred form of contract, and, as such, the Company has rarely entered into individual lump sum bid contracts that are material to its financial results. In contrast, under a negotiated fixed-price contract, we are selected as the contractor first and then we negotiate a price with our client. Negotiated fixed-price contracts frequently exist in single-responsibility arrangements where we perform some portion of the work before negotiating the total price of the project. Thus, although both types of contracts involve a firm price for the client, the lump sum bid contract provides the greater degree of risk to us. However, because of economies that may be realized during the contract term, both negotiated fixed-price and lump sum bid contracts may offer greater profit potential than other types of contracts. Over the past five years, most of our fixed-price work has been either negotiated fixed-price contracts or lump sum bid contracts for project services, rather than turn-key construction.

Competition

With respect to each of the four broad categories of services we provide, we compete with a large number of companies across the world. Typically, no single company or companies dominate the market in which we provide any such services. We compete based on the following factors, among others: price of services, technical capabilities, reputation for quality, safety record, availability of qualified personnel, ability to timely perform work, and willingness to accept project-related risk. For more information regarding the competitive conditions in our business, please refer to Item 1A—Risk Factors below.

Employees

At October 2, 2015, we had approximately 49,900 full-time, staff employees (including contract staff). Additionally, as of October 2, 2015, there were approximately 14,100 persons employed in the field on a project basis. The number of field employees varies in relation to the number and size of the maintenance and construction projects in progress at any particular time.

Executive Officers of the Registrant

The information required by Paragraph (a), and Paragraphs (c) through (g) of Item 401 of Regulation S-K (except for information required by Paragraph (e) of that Item to the extent the required information pertains to our executive officers) and Item 405 of Regulation S-K is set forth under the captions "The Board of Directors and its Committees - Nominees," "The board of Directors and its Committees - Continuing Directors," and "Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting

Page 17


Compliance" in our definitive proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days after the close of our fiscal year and is incorporated herein by reference.

The following table presents the information required by Paragraph (b) of Item 401 of Regulation S-K.
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year Joined the
Name
 
Age
 
Position with the Company
 
Registrant
Steven J. Demetriou
 
57

 
President, Chief Executive Officer and Director
 
2015
Kevin C. Berryman
 
56

 
Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer
 
2014
Terence D. Hagen
 
51

 
President, Aerospace & Technology
 
1987
Andrew F. Kremer
 
58

 
President, Industrial
 
1998
Joseph G. Mandel
 
55

 
President, Petroleum & Chemicals
 
2011
Phillip J. Stassi
 
60

 
President, Buildings & Infrastructure
 
1977
Santo Rizzuto
 
55

 
Former Executive Vice President, Operations
 
2013
Cora L. Carmody
 
57

 
Senior Vice President, Information Technology
 
2008
Geoffrey P. Sanders
 
58

 
Senior Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer
 
1988
Lori S. Sundberg
 
51

 
Senior Vice President, Global Human Resources
 
2013
Michael R. Tyler
 
59

 
Senior Vice President and General Counsel
 
2013

All of the officers listed in the preceding table serve in their respective capacities at the pleasure of the Board of Directors of the Company. Messrs. Hagen, Kremer, Stassi and Sanders as well as Ms. Carmody have each served in executive and senior management capacities with the Company for more than five years. Below is additional information on the executive officers.

Mr. Demetriou joined the Company in August 2015. Mr. Demetriou served as Chairman and CEO of Aleris Corporation for 14 years, a global downstream aluminum producer based in Cleveland, Ohio. Over the course of his career, he has gained broad experience with companies in a range of industries including Metals, Specialty Chemicals, Oil & Gas, Manufacturing and Fertilizers.

Mr. Berryman joined the Company in December 2014. Mr. Berryman served as EVP and CFO for five years at International Flavors and Fragrances Inc., an S&P 500 company and leading global creator of flavors and fragrances used in a wide variety of consumer products. Prior to that, he spent 25 years at Nestlé in a number of finance roles including treasury, mergers & acquisitions, strategic planning, and control.

Mr. Mandel joined the Company in February 2011 through the acquisition of certain operating companies comprising Aker Solutions ASA, a global provider of products, systems and services to the oil and gas industry. Mr. Mandel served in various senior management roles with Aker Solutions ASA since first joining them in 1995.

Mr. Rizzuto was Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director of SKM from October 2011 until the company's acquisition by Jacobs in December 2013. From 1997 to 2011 he served in a number of global operational leadership roles within SKM. As previously announced Mr. Rizzuto will be leaving the company in December 2015 as part of the Company's reorganization along global lines of business.

Mr. Sanders joined the company in June 1988. He was elected Senior Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer in May 2014. Mr. Sanders previously served as Vice President, Controller of the Company for over 10 years with responsibility for various finance, tax, accounting, and other functions within the Company.

Ms. Sundberg joined the Company in April 2013. Ms. Sundberg served as the Senior Vice President of Human Resources and Ethics at Arizona Public Services Company, Arizona's largest electric utility company, from  November 2007 to April 2013.  From 1998 to 2007 she served in a number of global HR leadership roles with American Express.

Mr. Tyler joined the Company in June 2013. He previously served as Executive Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of Sanmina Corporation, a global electronics manufacturing services provider from April 2007 to June 2013, and Chief Legal and Administrative Officer of Gateway, Inc., a computer hardware company, from January 2004 to April 2007.

Ms. Carmody's last day with the Company was October 2, 2015.

Page 18



Available Information

You may read and copy any materials we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room located at 100 F Street N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. In order to obtain information about the operation of the Public Reference Room, a person may call the SEC at 1-800-732-0330. The SEC also maintains a site on the Internet that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. The SEC’s website is http://www.sec.gov. You may also read and download the various reports we file with, or furnish to, the SEC free of charge from our website at www.jacobs.com.
 

Page 19


Item 1A.    RISK FACTORS
We operate in a changing environment that involves numerous known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations. The risks described below highlight some of the factors that have affected and could affect us in the future. We may also be affected by unknown risks or risks that we currently think are immaterial. If any such events actually occur, our business, financial condition, and results of operations could be materially adversely affected.
Construction and maintenance sites are inherently dangerous workplaces. If we fail to maintain safe work sites, we can be exposed to significant financial losses and reputational harm, as well as civil and criminal liabilities.
Construction and maintenance sites often put our employees and others in close proximity with large pieces of mechanized equipment, moving vehicles, chemical and manufacturing processes, and highly regulated materials, in a challenging environment. On many sites we are responsible for safety and, accordingly, must implement safety procedures. If we fail to implement such procedures or if the procedures we implement are ineffective, our employees and others may become injured, disabled or even lose their lives, the completion or commencement of our projects may be delayed, and we may be exposed to litigation or investigations. Unsafe work sites also have the potential to increase employee turnover, increase the cost of a project to our clients, and raise our operating costs. Any of the foregoing could result in financial losses or reputational harm, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
In addition, our projects can involve the handling of hazardous and other highly regulated materials, which, if improperly handled or disposed of, could subject us to civil and/or criminal liabilities. We are also subject to regulations dealing with occupational health and safety. Although we maintain functional groups whose primary purpose is to ensure we implement effective health, safety, and environmental (“HSE”) work procedures throughout our organization, including construction sites and maintenance sites, the failure to comply with such regulations could subject us to liability. In addition, despite the work of our functional groups, we cannot guarantee the safety of our personnel or that there will be no damage to or loss of our work, equipment or supplies.
Our safety record is critical to our reputation. Many of our clients require that we meet certain safety criteria to be eligible to bid for contracts and many contracts provide for automatic termination or forfeiture of some or all of our contract fees or profit in the event we fail to meet certain measures. Accordingly, if we fail to maintain adequate safety standards, we could suffer reduced profitability or the loss of projects or clients, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Our vulnerability to the cyclical nature of the markets in which our clients operate is exacerbated during economic downturns or time of political uncertainty.
We provide technical, professional, construction, and O&M services to clients operating in a number of markets including oil and gas exploration, production, and refining; programs for various national governments, including the U.S. federal government; chemicals and polymers; mining and minerals; pharmaceuticals and biotechnology; infrastructure; buildings; power; and other, general industrial and consumer businesses and markets (such as technology and manufacturing; pulp and paper; and food and consumer products). These markets and the resulting demand for our services have been, and we expect will continue to be, cyclical and subject to significant fluctuations due to a variety of factors beyond our control, including economic conditions and changes in client spending, particularly during periods of economic or political uncertainty.
Current global economic and political conditions have negatively impacted many of our clients’ ability and willingness to fund their projects, including their ability to raise capital and pay, or timely pay, our invoices. They have also caused our clients to reduce their capital expenditures, alter the mix of services purchased, seek more favorable price and other contract terms, and otherwise slow their spending on our services. For example, in the public sector, declines in state and local tax revenues as well as other economic declines may result in lower state and local government spending. In addition, due to these conditions many of our competitors may be more inclined to take greater or unusual risks or accept terms and conditions in contracts that we might not deem acceptable. These conditions have reduced , and may continue to reduce, the demand for our services, which has had, and may continue to have a significant negative impact on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Current economic and political conditions also make it extremely difficult for our clients, our vendors, and us to accurately forecast and plan future business activities and could cause businesses to continue to slow spending on our services. We cannot predict the timing, strength or duration of any economic slowdown or subsequent economic recovery worldwide or in our clients’ markets. In addition, our business has traditionally lagged recoveries in the general economy and, therefore, may

Page 20


not recover as quickly as the economy at large. A continuation or worsening of current weak economic conditions or a reduction in government spending could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Regardless of economic or market conditions, investment decisions by our customers may vary by location or as a result of other factors like the availability of labor or relative construction cost. Because we are dependent on the timing and funding of new awards, we are therefore vulnerable to changes in our clients’ markets and investment decisions. As a result, our past results have varied and may continue to vary depending upon the demand for future projects in the markets and the locations in which we operate.
Fluctuations in commodity prices may affect our customers’ investment decisions and therefore subject us to risks of cancellation, delays in existing work, or changes in the timing and funding of new awards.
Commodity prices can affect our customers in a number of ways. For example, for those customers that produce commodity products such as oil, gas, copper, or fertilizers, fluctuations in price can have a direct effect on their profitability and cash flow and, therefore, their willingness to continue to invest or make new capital investments. To the extent commodity prices decline or fluctuate and our customers defer new investments or cancel or delay existing projects, the demand for our services decreases, which may have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Commodity prices can also strongly affect the costs of projects. Rising commodity prices can negatively impact the potential returns on investments that are planned, as well as those in progress, and result in customers deferring new investments or canceling or delaying existing projects. Cancellations and delays have affected our past results and may continue to do so in significant and unpredictable ways and could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Our project execution activities may result in liability for faulty engineering services.
If we fail to provide our services in accordance with applicable professional standards, we could be exposed to large damages or even criminal violations. Our engineering practice, for example, involves professional judgments regarding the planning, design, development, construction, operations and management of industrial facilities and public infrastructure projects. While we do not generally accept liability for consequential damages in our contracts, and although we have adopted a range of insurance, risk management and risk avoidance programs designed to reduce potential liabilities, a catastrophic event at one of our project sites or completed projects resulting from the services we have performed could result in significant professional or product liability, and warranty or other claims against us as well as reputational harm, especially if public safety is impacted. These liabilities could exceed our insurance limits or the fees we generate, may not be covered by insurance at all due to various exclusions in our coverage, and could impact our ability to obtain insurance in the future. Further, even where coverage applies, the policies have deductibles, which result in our assumption of exposure for a layer of coverage with respect to any claim filed by us. In addition, clients or subcontractors who have agreed to indemnify us against any such liabilities or losses might refuse or be unable to pay us. An uninsured claim, either in part or in whole, as well as any claim covered by insurance but subject to a high deductible, if successful and of a material magnitude, could have a substantial impact on our operations.
We engage in a highly competitive business. If we are unable to compete effectively, we could lose market share and our business and results of operations could be negatively impacted.
We face intense competition to provide technical, professional, and construction services to clients. The extent of such competition varies by industry, geographic market, and project type. For example, with respect to our construction and operations and maintenance services, clients generally award large projects to large contractors, which may give our larger competitors an advantage when bidding for these projects. Conversely, with respect to our engineering, design, architectural, and consulting services, low barriers of entry can result in competition with smaller, newer competitors. The extent and type of competition varies by market and geographic area. Competition can place downward pressure on our contract prices and profit margins, and may force us to accept contractual terms and conditions that are less favorable to us, thereby increasing the risk that we may not realize profit margins at the same rates as we've seen in the past. If we are unable to compete effectively, we may experience a loss of market share or reduced profitability or both, which if significant, could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

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Our results of operations depend on the award of new contracts and the timing of the performance of these contracts.
Our revenues are derived from new contract awards. Delays in the timing of the awards or cancellations of such prospects as a result of economic conditions, material and equipment pricing and availability or other factors could impact our long-term projected results. It is particularly difficult to predict whether or when we will receive large-scale projects as these contracts frequently involve a lengthy and complex bidding and selection process, which is affected by a number of factors, such as market conditions, governmental and environmental approvals. Since a significant portion of our revenues is generated from such projects, our results of operations and cash flows can fluctuate significantly from quarter to quarter depending on the timing of our contract awards and the commencement or progress of work under awarded contracts. In addition, many of these contracts are subject to financing contingencies and as a result, we are subject to the risk that the customer will not be able to secure the necessary financing for the project.

The uncertainty of our contract award timing can also present difficulties in matching workforce size with contract needs. In some cases, we maintain and bear the cost of a ready workforce that is larger than necessary under existing contracts in anticipation of future workforce needs for expected contract awards. If an expected contract award is delayed or not received, we may incur additional costs resulting from reductions in staff or redundancy of facilities which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
The outcome of pending and future claims and litigation could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
We are a party to litigation in the normal course of business. Since we engage in engineering and construction activities for large facilities and projects where design, construction or systems failures can result in substantial injury or damage to employees or others, we are exposed to substantial claims and litigation and investigations if there is a failure at any such facility or project. Such claims could relate to, among other things, personal injury, loss of life, business interruption, property damage, pollution, and environmental damage and be brought by our clients or third parties, such as those who use or reside near our clients’ projects. We can also be exposed to claims if we agreed that a project will achieve certain performance standards or satisfy certain technical requirements and those standards or requirements are not met. In many of our contracts with clients, subcontractors, and vendors, we agree to retain or assume potential liabilities for damages, penalties, losses, and other exposures relating to projects that could result in claims that greatly exceed the anticipated profits relating to those contracts. In addition, while clients and subcontractors may agree to indemnify us against certain liabilities, such third parties may refuse or be unable to pay us.
We maintain insurance coverage for various aspects of our business and operations. Our insurance programs have varying exclusions, coverage limits and maximums, and insurance companies may seek to deny claims we might make. In addition, we have elected to retain a portion of losses that may occur through the use of various deductibles, limits, and retentions under these programs. As a result, we may be subject to future liability for which we are only partially insured, or completely uninsured.
Although in the past we have been generally able to cover our insurance needs, there can be no assurances that we can secure all necessary or appropriate insurance in the future, or that such insurance can be economically secured. For example, catastrophic events can result in decreased coverage limits, more limited coverage, increased premium costs or deductibles. We monitor the financial health of the insurance companies from which we procure insurance, and this is one of the factors we take into account when purchasing insurance. Our insurance is purchased from a number of the world's leading providers, often in layered insurance or quota share arrangements. If any of our third party insurers fail, abruptly cancel our coverage or otherwise cannot satisfy their insurance requirements to us, then our overall risk exposure and operational expenses could be increased and our business operations could be interrupted.
In addition, the nature of our business sometimes results in clients, subcontractors, and vendors presenting claims to us for, among other things, recovery of costs related to certain projects. Similarly, we occasionally present change orders and claims to our clients, subcontractors, and vendors for, among other things, additional costs exceeding the original contract price. If we fail to document properly the nature of our claims and change orders or are otherwise unsuccessful in negotiating reasonable settlements with our clients, subcontractors, and vendors, we could incur cost overruns, reduced profits or, in some cases, a loss for a project. Further, these claims can be the subject of lengthy negotiations, arbitration or litigation proceedings, which could result in the investment of significant amounts of working capital pending the resolution of the relevant change orders and claims. A failure to promptly recover on these types of claims could have a material adverse impact on our liquidity and financial results. Additionally, irrespective of how well we document the nature of our claims and change orders, the cost to prosecute and defend claims and change orders can be significant.

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Litigation and regulatory proceedings are subject to inherent uncertainties and unfavorable rulings can and do occur. Pending or future claims against us could result in professional liability, product liability, criminal liability, warranty obligations, and other liabilities which, to the extent we are not insured against a loss or our insurer fails to provide coverage, could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

The nature of our contracts, particularly those that are fixed-price, subject us to risks of cost overruns. We may experience reduced profits or, in some cases, losses under these contracts if costs increase above our estimates.

For fiscal 2015, approximately 17.0% of our revenues were earned under fixed-price contracts. Such contracts require us to estimate the total cost of the project in advance of our performance. For these contracts, we may benefit from any cost-savings, but we bear the risk of paying some, if not all, of any cost overruns. Fixed-price contract amounts are established in part on cost and scheduling estimates that are based on a number of assumptions, including those about future economic conditions, prices and availability of labor, equipment and materials, and other exigencies. If these estimates prove inaccurate, there are errors or ambiguities as to contract specifications, or if circumstances change due to, among other things, unanticipated technical problems, difficulties in obtaining permits or approvals, changes in local laws or labor conditions, weather or other delays beyond our control, changes in the costs of raw materials, or our vendors’ or subcontractors’ inability or failure to perform, then cost overruns may occur and we could experience reduced profits or, in some cases, a loss for that project. These risks are exacerbated for projects with long-term durations because there is an increased risk that the circumstances on which we based our original estimates will change in a manner that increases costs. If the project is significant, or there are one or more issues that impact multiple projects, costs overruns could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Our contracts that are fundamentally cost reimbursable in nature may also present a risk to the extent the final cost on a project exceeds the amount the customer expected or budgeted. Like fixed-price contracts, the expected cost of cost-reimbursable projects are based in part on our estimates of the resources and time necessary to perform such contracts. If we are unable to properly support the costs we incur or otherwise fail to obtain proper reimbursement for all costs incurred - for whatever reason - the project may be less profitable than we expect or even result in losses. Additionally, we may be required to pay liquidated damages if we fail to meet schedule or performance requirements of our contracts, which could harm our reputation and have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operation.

Our continued success is dependent upon our ability to hire, retain, and utilize qualified personnel.
The success of our business is dependent upon our ability to hire, retain, and utilize qualified personnel, including engineers, architects, designers, craft personnel, and corporate management professionals at a reasonable cost who have the required experience and expertise. The market for these and other personnel is competitive. From time to time, it may be difficult to attract and retain qualified individuals with the expertise and in the timeframe demanded by our clients, or to replace such personnel when needed in a timely manner. In certain geographic areas, for example, we may not be able to satisfy the demand for our services because of our inability to successfully hire and retain qualified personnel. In addition, some of our personnel hold government granted clearance that may be required to obtain government projects. If we were to lose some or all of these personnel, they would be difficult to replace.
In addition, in the event that any of our key personnel retire or otherwise leave the Company, we need to have appropriate succession plans in place and to successfully implement such plans, which requires devoting time and resources toward identifying and integrating new personnel into leadership roles and other key positions. If we cannot attract and retain qualified personnel or effectively implement appropriate succession plans, it could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
The cost of providing our services, including the extent to which we utilize our workforce, affects our profitability. For example, the uncertainty of contract award timing can present difficulties in matching our workforce size with our contracts. If an expected contract award is delayed or not received, we could incur costs resulting from excess staff, reductions in staff, or redundancy of facilities that could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial conditions, and results of operations.


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The contracts in our backlog may be adjusted, cancelled or suspended by our clients and, therefore, our backlog is not necessarily indicative of our future revenues or earnings. Additionally, even if fully performed, our backlog is not a good indicator of our future gross margins.
As of the end of fiscal 2015, our backlog totaled approximately $18.8 billion. There is no assurance that backlog will actually be realized as revenues in the amounts reported or, if realized, will result in profits. In accordance with industry practice, substantially all of our contracts are subject to cancellation, termination, or suspension at the discretion of the client. In the event of a project cancellation, we would generally have no contractual right to the total revenue reflected in our backlog. Projects can remain in backlog for extended periods of time because of the nature of the project and the timing of the particular services required by the project. The risk of contracts in backlog being cancelled or suspended generally increases during periods of wide-spread economic slowdowns.

The contracts in our backlog are subject to changes in the scope of services to be provided as well as adjustments to the costs relating to the contracts. The revenue for certain contracts included in backlog are based on estimates. Additionally, the way we perform on our individual contracts can affect greatly our gross margins and hence, future profitability.

In some markets, there is a continuing trend towards cost-reimbursable contracts with incentive-fee arrangements. Typically, our incentive fees are based on such things as achievement of target completion dates or target costs, overall safety performance, overall client satisfaction, and other performance criteria. If we fail to meet such targets or achieve the expected performance standards, we may receive a lower, or even zero, incentive fee resulting in lower gross margins. Accordingly, there is no assurance that the contracts in backlog, assuming they produce the revenues currently expected, will generate gross margins at the rates we have realized in the past.
Contracts with the U.S. federal government and other governments and their agencies pose additional risks relating to future funding and compliance.
Contracts with the U.S. federal government and other governments and their agencies, which are a significant source of our revenue and profit, are subject to various uncertainties, restrictions, and regulations including oversight audits by various government authorities as well as profit and cost controls, which could result in withholding or delay of payments to us. Government contracts are also exposed to uncertainties associated with funding such as sequestration and budget deficits. Contracts with the U.S. federal government, for example, are subject to the uncertainties of Congressional funding. Governments are typically under no obligation to maintain funding at any specific level, and funds for government programs may even be eliminated.
As a result, our government clients may reduce the scope or terminate our contracts for convenience or decide not to renew our contracts with little or no prior notice. Since government contracts represent a significant percentage of our revenues (for example, those with the U.S. federal government represented approximately 21.7% of our total revenue in fiscal 2015), a significant reduction in government funding or the loss of such contracts could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Most government contracts are awarded through a rigorous competitive process. The U.S. federal government has increasingly relied upon multiple-year contracts with multiple contractors that generally require those contractors to engage in an additional competitive bidding process for each task order issued under a contract. This process may result in us facing significant additional pricing pressure and uncertainty and incurring additional costs. Moreover, we may not be awarded government contracts because of existing policies designed to protect small businesses and under-represented minorities. Our inability to win new contracts or be awarded work under existing contracts could have a negative impact on our business and results of operations.
In addition, government contracts are subject to specific procurement regulations and a variety of other socio-economic requirements, which affects how we transact business with our clients and, in some instances, impose additional costs on our business operations. For example, for contracts with the U.S. federal government, we must comply with the Federal Acquisition Regulation, the Truth in Negotiations Act, the Cost Accounting Standards, the Service Contract Act, and numerous regulations governing, environmental protection, and employment practices. Government contracts also contain terms that expose us to heightened levels of risk and potential liability than non-government contracts. This includes, for example, unlimited indemnification obligations.
We also are subject to government audits, investigations, and proceedings. For example, government agencies such as the U.S. Defense Contract Audit Agency routinely review and audit us to determine the adequacy of and our compliance with

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our internal control systems and policies and whether allowable costs are in accordance with applicable regulations. These audits can result in a determination that a rule or regulation has been violated or that adjustments are necessary to the amount of contract costs we believe are reimbursable by the agencies and the amount of our overhead costs allocated to the agencies.
If we violate a rule or regulation, fail to comply with a contractual or other requirement or do not satisfy an audit, a variety of penalties can be imposed including monetary damages and criminal and civil penalties. In addition, any or all of our government contracts could be terminated, we could be suspended or debarred from all government contract work, or payment of our costs could be disallowed. For example, in so-called "qui tam" actions brought by individuals or the government under the U.S. Federal False Claims Act or under similar state and local laws, treble damages can be awarded. The occurrence of any of these actions could harm our reputation and could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Many of our federal government contracts require us to have security clearances, which can be difficult and time consuming to obtain. If our employees are unable to obtain or retain the necessary securities clearances, our clients could terminate or not renew existing contracts or award us new contracts. To the extent this occurs, our operations and results of operations could be negatively impacted.

Our use of joint ventures and partnerships exposes us to risks and uncertainties, many of which are outside of our control.
As is common in the industry, we perform certain contracts as a member of joint ventures, partnerships, and similar arrangements. This situation exposes us to a number of risks, including the risk that our partners may be unable to fulfill their obligations to us or our clients. We cannot control the actions of our joint venture partners, including the nonperformance, default or bankruptcy of our joint venture partners. Our partners may be unable or unwilling to provide the required levels of financial support to the partnerships. If these circumstances occur, we may be required to pay financial penalties or liquidated damages, provide additional services, or make additional investments to ensure adequate performance and delivery of the contracted services. Under agreements with joint and several liabilities, we could be liable for both our obligations and those of our partners. These circumstances could also lead to disputes and litigation with our partners or clients, all of which could have a material adverse impact on our reputation, business, financial condition, and results of operations. We depend on the management effectiveness of our joint venture partners. Differences in views among the joint venture participants may result in delayed decisions or in failures to agree on major issues, which could materially affect the business and operations of these ventures.
We participate in joint ventures and similar arrangements in which we are not the controlling partner. In these cases, we have limited control over the actions of the joint venture. These joint ventures may not be subject to the same requirements regarding internal controls and internal control over financial reporting that we follow. To the extent the controlling partner makes decisions that negatively impact the joint venture or internal control problems arise within the joint venture, it could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
The failure by a joint venture partner to comply with applicable laws, regulations or client requirements could negatively impact our business and, for government clients, could result in fines, penalties, suspension or even debarment being imposed on us, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
We are dependent on third parties to complete many of our contracts.
Much of the work performed under our contracts is performed by third-party subcontractors we hire. We also rely on third-party equipment manufacturers or suppliers to provide much of the equipment and materials used for projects. If we are unable to hire qualified subcontractors or find qualified equipment manufacturers or suppliers, our ability to successfully complete a project could be impaired. If we are not able to locate qualified third-party subcontractors or the amount we are required to pay for subcontractors or equipment and supplies exceeds what we have estimated, especially in a lump-sum or a fixed-price contract, we may suffer losses on these contracts. If a subcontractor, supplier, or manufacturer fails to provide services, supplies or equipment as required under a contract for any reason, we may be required to source these services, equipment or supplies to other third parties on a delayed basis or on less favorable terms, which could impact contract profitability. There is a risk that we may have disputes with our subcontractors relating to, among other things, the quality and timeliness of work performed, customer concerns about the subcontractor, or our failure to extend existing task orders or issue new task orders under a contract. In addition, faulty workmanship, equipment or materials could impact the overall project, resulting in claims against us for failure to meet required project specifications.

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In the current economic environment, third parties may find it difficult to obtain sufficient financing to help fund their operations. The inability to obtain financing could adversely affect a third party’s ability to provide materials, equipment or services which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. In addition, a failure by a third party subcontractor, supplier or manufacturer to comply with applicable laws, regulations or client requirements could negatively impact our business and, for government clients, could result in fines, penalties, suspension or even debarment being imposed on us, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Negative conditions in the credit and financial markets and delays in receiving client payments could result in liquidity problems, adversely affecting our cost of borrowing or our business.
Although we finance much of our operations using cash provided by operations, at times we depend on the availability of credit to grow our business and to help fund business acquisitions. In addition, some of our clients depend on the availability of credit to help finance their capital projects. Instability in the credit markets in the U.S. or abroad, could cause the availability of credit to be relatively difficult or expensive to obtain at competitive rates, on commercially reasonable terms or in sufficient amounts. This situation could make it more difficult or more expensive for us to access funds, refinance our existing indebtedness, enter into agreements for new indebtedness, or obtain funding through the issuance of securities or such additional capital may not be available on terms acceptable to us. We may also enter into business acquisition agreements that require us to access credit, which if not available at the closing of the acquisition could result in a breach of the acquisition agreement and a resulting claim for damages by the sellers of such business. In addition, market conditions could negatively impact our clients’ ability to fund their projects and, therefore, utilize our services, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
In addition, we are subject to the risk that the counterparties to our credit agreements may go bankrupt if they suffer catastrophic demand on their liquidity that will prevent them from fulfilling their contractual obligations to us. We also routinely enter into contracts with counterparties including vendors, suppliers, and subcontractors that may be negatively impacted by events in the credit markets. If those counterparties are unable to perform their obligations to us or our clients, we may be required to provide additional services or make alternate arrangements on less favorable terms with other parties to ensure adequate performance and delivery of services to our clients. These circumstances could also lead to disputes and litigation with our partners or clients, which could have a material adverse impact on our reputation, business, financial condition, and results of operations.
In addition, we typically bill our clients for our services in arrears and are, therefore, subject to our clients delaying or failing to pay our invoices. In weak economic environments, we may experience increased delays and failures due to, among other reasons, our clients’ unwillingness to pay for alleged poor performance or to preserve their own working capital. If one or more clients delays in paying or fail to pay us a significant amount of our outstanding receivables, it could have a material adverse impact on our liquidity, financial condition, and results of operations.
Furthermore, our cash balances and short-term investments are maintained in accounts held by major banks and financial institutions located primarily in North America, Europe, South America, Australia and Asia. Some of our accounts hold deposits in amounts that exceed available insurance. Although none of the financial institutions in which we hold our cash and investments have gone into bankruptcy or forced receivership, or have been seized by their governments, there is a risk that such events may occur in the future. If any such events were to occur, we would be at risk of not being able to access our cash which may result in a temporary liquidity crisis that could impede our ability to fund our operations, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Maintaining adequate bonding and letter of credit capacity is necessary for us to successfully bid on and win some contracts.
In line with industry practice, we are often required to provide performance or payment bonds or letters of credit to our customers. These instruments indemnify the customer should we fail to perform our obligations under the contract. If a bond or a letter of credit is required for a particular project and we are unable to obtain an appropriate bond or letter of credit, we cannot pursue that project. Historically, we have had adequate bonding and letter of credit capacity but, as is typically the case, the issuance of a bond is at the surety’s sole discretion and the issuance of a letter of credit is based on the Company's credit worthiness. Because of an overall lack of worldwide bonding capacity, we may find it difficult to find sureties who will provide required levels of bonding or such bonding may only be available at significant additional cost. There can be no assurance that our bonding capacity will continue to be available to us on reasonable terms. In addition, future projects may require us to obtain letters of credit that extend beyond the term of our existing credit facilities. Our inability to obtain

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adequate bonding and, as a result, to bid on new contracts that require such bonding or letter of credit could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows.
Past and future environmental, heath, and safety laws could impose significant additional costs and liabilities.
We are subject to a variety of environmental, health, and safety laws and regulations governing, among other things, discharges to air and water, the handling, storage, and disposal of hazardous or waste materials and the remediation of contamination associated with the releases of hazardous substances and human health and safety. These laws and regulations and the risk of attendant litigation can cause significant delays to a project and add significantly to its cost. Violations of these regulations could subject us and our management to civil and criminal penalties and other liabilities.
Various U.S. federal, state, local, and foreign environmental laws and regulations may impose liability for property damage and costs of investigation and cleanup of hazardous or toxic substances on property currently or previously owned by us or arising out of our waste management or environmental remediation activities. These laws may impose responsibility and liability without regard to knowledge of or causation of the presence of contaminants. The liability under these laws is joint and several. We have potential liabilities associated with our past waste management and other activities and with our current and prior ownership of various properties. The discovery of additional contaminants or the imposition of unforeseen clean-up obligations at these or other sites could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.
When we perform our services, our personnel and equipment may be exposed to radioactive and hazardous materials and conditions. We may be subject to liability claims by employees, customers, and third parties as a result of such exposures. In addition, we may be subject to fines, penalties or other liabilities arising under environmental or safety laws. A claim, if not covered by insurance, could have a material adverse impact on our results of operations and financial condition.
Such laws, regulations and policies are reviewed periodically and any changes could affect us in substantial and unpredictable ways. Such changes could, for example, relax or repeal laws and regulations relating to the environment, which could result in a decline in the demand for our environmental services and, in turn, could negatively impact our revenue. Changes in the environmental laws and regulations, remediation obligations, enforcement actions, stricter interpretations of existing requirements, future discovery of contamination or claims for damages to persons, property, natural resources or the environment could result in material costs and liabilities that we currently do not anticipate. If we fail to comply with such laws or regulations, whether actual or alleged, we could be exposed to fines, penalties or potential litigation liabilities, including costs, settlements and judgments, any of which could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
In addition, we and many of our clients operate in highly regulated environments, which may require us or our clients to obtain, and to comply with, federal, state, and local government permits and approvals. Any of these permits or approvals may be subject to denial, revocation or modification under various circumstances. Failure to obtain or comply with, or the loss or modification of, the conditions of permits or approvals may subject us to penalties or other liabilities, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and result of operations.
If we fail to comply with federal, state, local or foreign governmental requirements, our business may be adversely affected.
We are subject to U.S. federal, state, local and foreign laws and regulations that affect our business. For example, our global operations require importing and exporting goods and technology across international borders. Although we have policies and procedures to comply with U.S. and foreign international trade laws, the violation of such laws could subject the Company and its employees to civil or criminal penalties, including substantial monetary fines, or other adverse actions including denial of import or export privileges privileges or debarment from participation in U.S. government contracts, and could damage our reputation and our ability to do business.
Employee, agent or partner misconduct or our overall failure to comply with laws or regulations could weaken our ability to win contracts, which could result in reduced revenues and profits.
Misconduct, fraud, non-compliance with applicable laws and regulations, or other improper activities by one of our employees, agents or partners could have a significant negative impact on our business and reputation. Such misconduct could include the failure to comply with government procurement regulations, regulations regarding the protection of classified information, regulations prohibiting bribery and other corrupt practices, regulations regarding the pricing of labor and other costs in government contracts, regulations on lobbying or similar activities, regulations pertaining to the internal controls over financial reporting, regulations pertaining to export control, environmental laws, and any other applicable laws or regulations. For example, we routinely provide services that may be highly sensitive or that relate to critical national security matters; if a

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security breach were to occur, our ability to procure future government contracts could be severely limited. The precautions we take to prevent and detect these activities may not be effective, and we could face unknown risks or losses. Our failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations or acts of misconduct could subject us to fines and penalties, cancellation of contracts, loss of security clearance, and suspension or debarment from contracting, which could weaken our ability to win contracts and result in reduced revenues and profits and could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
We could be adversely affected by violations of the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and similar worldwide anti-bribery laws.
The U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (“FCPA”), the U.K. Bribery Act of 2010, and similar anti-bribery laws in other jurisdictions generally prohibit companies and their intermediaries from making improper payments for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. Our policies mandate compliance with these anti-bribery laws, including the requirements to maintain accurate information and internal controls. We operate in many parts of the world that have experienced governmental corruption to some degree and in certain circumstances, strict compliance with anti-bribery laws may conflict with local customs and practices. Despite our training and compliance programs, there is no assurance that our internal control policies and procedures will protect us from acts committed by our employees or agents. If we are found to be liable for FCPA or other violations (either due to our own acts or our inadvertence, or due to the acts or inadvertence of others), we could suffer from civil and criminal penalties or other sanctions, including contract cancellations or debarment, and loss of reputation, any of which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
The loss of or a significant reduction in business from one or a few customers could have an adverse impact on us.
A few clients have in the past and may in the future account for a significant portion of our revenue and/or backlog in any one year or over a period of several consecutive years. For example, in fiscal 2015, 2014, and fiscal 2013, approximately 21.7%, 17.8%, and 19.9%, respectively, of our revenue was earned directly or indirectly from agencies of the U.S. federal government. Although we have long-standing relationships with many of our significant clients, our clients may unilaterally reduce, delay, or cancel their contracts at any time. Our loss of or a significant reduction in business from a significant client could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
In addition to the risks discussed elsewhere in Risk Factors, our international operations are also exposed to additional risks and uncertainties including unfavorable political developments and weak foreign economies.
For fiscal 2015, approximately 40.9% of our revenues was earned from clients outside the U.S. Our business is dependent on the continued success of our international operations, and we expect our international operations to continue to account for a significant portion of our total revenues. Our international operations are subject to a variety of risks, including:
 Recessions and other economic crises in other regions, such as Europe, or specific foreign economies and the impact on our costs of doing business in those countries;
Difficulties in staffing and managing foreign operations, including logistical and communication challenges;
Unexpected changes in foreign government policies and regulatory requirements;
Lack of developed legal systems to enforce contractual rights;
Renegotiation or nullification of our existing contracts;
The adoption of new, and the expansion of existing, trade or other restrictions;
Embargoes;
Changes in labor conditions;
Acts of war, civil unrest, force majeure, and terrorism;
The ability to finance efficiently our foreign operations;
Social, political, and economic instability;
Expropriation of property;
Tax increases;
Currency exchanges rate fluctuations;
Limitations on the ability to repatriate foreign earnings; and

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U.S. government policy changes in relation to the foreign countries in which we operate, including embargoes or other trade restrictions.
The lack of a well-developed legal system in some of these countries may make it difficult to enforce our contractual rights. In addition, military action or continued unrest, particularly in the Middle East, could impact the supply or pricing of oil, disrupt our operations in the region and elsewhere. To the extent our international operations are affected by unexpected or adverse economic, political and other conditions, our business, financial condition, and results of operations may be adversely affected.
We work in international locations where there are high security risks, which could result in harm to our employees or unanticipated cost.
Some of our services are performed in high risk locations, where the country or location is subject to political, social or economic risks, or war or civil unrest. In those locations where we have employees or operations, we may expend significant efforts and incur substantial security costs to maintain the safety of our personnel. Despite these activities, in these locations, we cannot guarantee the safety of our personnel and we may suffer future losses of employees and subcontractors.
Foreign exchange risks may affect our ability to realize a profit from certain projects.
Our reported financial condition and results of operations are exposed to the effects (both positive and negative) that fluctuating exchange rates have on the process of translating the financial statements of our international operations, which are denominated in currencies other than the U.S. dollar, into the U.S. dollar. While we generally attempt to denominate our contracts in the currencies of our expenditures, we do enter into contracts that expose us to currency risk, particularly to the extent contract revenue is denominated in a currency different than the contract costs. We attempt to minimize our exposure from currency risks by obtaining escalation provisions for projects in inflationary economies or entering into derivative (hedging) instruments, when there is currency risk exposure that is not naturally mitigated via our contracts. These actions, however, may not always eliminate currency risk exposure. Based on fluctuations in currency, the U.S. dollar value of our backlog may from time to time increase or decrease significantly. We may also be exposed to limitations on our ability to reinvest earnings from operations in one country to fund the financing requirements of our operations in other countries.

Our business strategy relies in part on acquisitions to sustain our growth. Acquisitions of other companies present certain risks and uncertainties.
Our business strategy involves growth through, among other things, the acquisition of other companies. Acquiring companies presents a number of risks, including:
Assumption of liabilities of an acquired business, including liabilities that were unknown at the time the acquisition was negotiated;
Valuation methodologies may not accurately capture the value of the acquired business;
Failure to realize anticipated benefits, such as cost savings and revenue enhancements;
Difficulties relating to combining previously separate entities into a single, integrated, and efficient business;
The effects of diverting management’s attention from day-to-day operations to matters involving the integration of acquired companies;
Potentially substantial transaction costs associated with business combinations;
Potential impairment resulting from the overpayment for an acquisition or post-acquisition deterioration in an acquired business;
Difficulties relating to assimilating the personnel, services, and systems of an acquired business and to assimilating marketing and other operational capabilities;
Difficulties retaining key personnel of an acquired business;
Increased burdens on our staff and on our administrative, internal control and operating systems, which may hinder our legal and regulatory compliance activities;
Difficulties in applying and integrating our system of internal controls to an acquired business;
Increased financial and accounting challenges and complexities in areas such as tax planning, treasury management, financial reporting and internal controls; and
The potential requirement for additional equity or debt financing, which may not be available, or if available, may not have favorable terms.

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While we often obtain indemnification rights from the sellers of acquired businesses, such rights may be difficult to enforce, the losses may exceed any dedicated escrow funds, and the indemnitors may not have the ability to financially support the indemnity.

If our management is unable to successfully integrate acquired companies or implement our growth strategy, our operating results could be harmed. In addition, even if the operations of an acquisition are integrated successfully, we may not realize the full benefits of an acquisition, including the synergies, cost savings, or sales or growth opportunities that we expect. These benefits may not be achieved within the anticipated time frame, or at all. Moreover, we cannot assure that we will continue to successfully expand or that growth or expansion will result in profitability.
In addition, there is no assurance that we will continue to locate suitable acquisition targets or that we will be able to consummate any such transactions on terms and conditions acceptable to us. Existing cash balances and cash flow from operations, together with borrowing capacity under our credit facilities, may be insufficient to make acquisitions Credit market conditions may also make it more difficult and costly to finance acquisitions. Acquisitions may also bring us into businesses we have not previously conducted and expose us to additional business risks that are different than those we have traditionally experienced.
In the event we issue stock as consideration for certain acquisitions we may make, we could dilute share ownership.
One method of acquiring companies or otherwise funding our corporate activities is through the issuance of additional equity securities. If we issue additional equity securities, such issuances could have the effect of diluting our earnings per share as well as our existing shareholders’ individual ownership percentages in the Company.
Our quarterly results may fluctuate significantly, which could have a material negative effect on the price of our common stock.
Our quarterly operating results may fluctuate significantly, which could cause our operating results to fall below the expectations of securities analysts and have a material negative effect on the price of our common stock. Fluctuations are caused by a number of factors, including:
Fluctuations in the spending patterns of our government and commercial customers;
The number and significance of projects executed during a quarter;
Unanticipated changes in contract performance, particularly with contracts that have funding limits;
The timing of resolving change orders, requests for equitable adjustments, and other contract adjustments;
Delays incurred in connection with a project;
Changes in prices of commodities or other supplies;
Changes in foreign currency exchange rates;
Weather conditions that delay work at project sites;
The timing of expenses incurred in connection with acquisitions or other corporate initiatives;
Natural disasters or other crises;
Staff levels and utilization rates;
Changes in prices of services offered by our competitors; and
General economic and political conditions.
Our actual results could differ from the estimates and assumptions used to prepare our financial statements.
In preparing our financial statements, our management is required under U.S. GAAP to make estimates and assumptions as of the date of the financial statements. These estimates and assumptions affect the reported values of assets, liabilities, revenue, and expenses and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. Areas requiring significant estimates by our management include:
Recognition of contract revenue, costs, profit or losses in applying the principles of percentage of completion accounting;
Estimated amounts for expected project losses, warranty costs, contract close-out or other costs;

Page 30


Recognition of recoveries under contract change orders or claims;
Collectability of billed and unbilled accounts receivable and the need and amount of any allowance for doubtful accounts;
Estimates of other liabilities, including litigation and insurance revenues/reserves and reserves necessary for self-insured risks;
Accruals for estimated liabilities, including litigation reserves;
Valuation of assets acquired, and liabilities, goodwill, and intangible assets assumed, in acquisitions;
Valuation of stock-based compensation;
The determination of liabilities under pension and other post-retirement benefit programs; and
Income tax provisions and related valuation allowances.
Our actual business and financial results could differ from our estimates of such results, which could have a material negative impact on our financial condition and results of operations.
An impairment charge of goodwill could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.
Because we have grown in part through acquisitions, goodwill and intangible assets represent a substantial portion of our assets. Under U.S. GAAP, we are required to test goodwill carried in our Consolidated Balance Sheets for possible impairment on an annual basis based upon a fair value approach. As of October 2, 2015, we had $3.0 billion of goodwill, representing 39.2% of our total assets of $7.8 billion. We have chosen to perform our annual impairment reviews of goodwill at the end of the third quarter of our fiscal year. We also are required to test goodwill for impairment between annual tests if events occur or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce our enterprise fair value below its book value. These events or circumstances could include a significant change in the business climate, including a significant sustained decline in a reporting unit’s market value, legal factors, operating performance indicators, competition, sale or disposition of a significant portion of our business, potential government actions toward our facilities, and other factors.

If our market capitalization drops significantly below the amount of net equity recorded on our balance sheet, it might indicate a decline in our fair value and would require us to further evaluate whether our goodwill has been impaired. If the fair value of our reporting units is less than their carrying value, we could be required to record an impairment charge. The amount of any impairment could be significant and could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations for the period in which the charge is taken. For a further discussion of goodwill impairment testing, please see Item 7—Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations below.

We may be required to contribute additional cash to meet any underfunded benefit obligations associated with retirement and post-retirement benefit plans we manage.
We have various employee benefit plan obligations that require us to make contributions to satisfy, over time, our underfunded benefit obligations, which are generally determined by calculating the projected benefit obligations minus the fair value of plan assets. For example, as of October 2, 2015, and September 26, 2014, our defined benefit pension and post-retirement benefit plans were projected to be underfunded by $413.1 million and $400.8 million, respectively. See Note 6—Pension Plans of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional disclosure. In the future, our benefit plan obligations may increase or decrease depending on changes in the levels of interest rates, pension plan asset performance and other factors. If we are required to contribute a significant amount of the deficit for underfunded benefit plans, our cash flows could be materially and adversely affected.

Rising inflation, interest rates, and/or construction costs could reduce the demand for our services as well as decrease our profit on our existing contracts, in particular with respect to our fixed-price contracts.
Rising inflation, interest rates, or construction costs could reduce the demand for our services. In addition, we bear all of the risk of rising inflation with respect to those contracts that are fixed-price. Because a significant portion of our revenues are earned from cost-reimbursable type contracts (approximately 83.0% during fiscal 2015), the effects of inflation on our financial condition and results of operations over the past few years have been generally minor. However, if we expand our business into markets and geographic areas where fixed-price and lump-sum work is more prevalent, inflation may have a larger impact on our results of operations in the future. Therefore, increases in inflation, interest rates or construction costs could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

Page 31


We may be affected by market or regulatory responses to climate change.
Growing concerns about climate change may result in the imposition of additional environmental regulations. For example, there is a growing consensus that new and additional regulations may be enacted concerning, among other things, greenhouse gas emissions could result in increased compliance costs for us and our clients. Legislation, international protocols, regulation or other restrictions on emissions could also affect our clients, including those who are involved in the exploration, production or refining of fossil fuels, emit greenhouse gases through the combustion of fossil fuels or emit greenhouse gases through the mining, manufacture, utilization or production of materials or goods. Such policy changes could increase the costs of projects for our clients or, in some cases, prevent a project from going forward, thereby potentially reducing the need for our services, which would in turn have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations. However, these changes could also increase the pace of projects, such as carbon capture or storage projects, that could have a positive impact on our business. We cannot predict when or whether any of these various proposals may be enacted or what their effect will be on us or on our customers.
Our effective tax rate may increase or decrease.
We are subject to income taxes in the U.S. and numerous foreign jurisdictions. Significant judgment is required in determining our worldwide provision for income taxes. In the ordinary course of our business, there are many transactions and calculations where the ultimate tax determination is uncertain. We are regularly under audit by tax authorities. Although we believe that our tax estimates and tax positions are reasonable, they could be materially affected by many factors including the final outcome of tax audits and related litigation, the introduction of new tax accounting standards, legislation, regulations, and related interpretations, our global mix of earnings, the realizability of deferred tax assets and changes in uncertain tax positions. An increase or decrease in our effective tax rate could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and results of operations.
Systems and information technology interruption or failure and data security breaches could adversely impact our ability to operate or expose us to significant financial losses and reputational harm.
We rely heavily on computer, information, and communications technology and related systems in order to properly operate our business. From time to time, we experience occasional system interruptions and delays. In the event we are unable to regularly deploy software and hardware, effectively upgrade our systems and network infrastructure, and take other steps to maintain or improve the efficiency and efficacy of our systems, the operation of such systems could be interrupted or result in the loss, corruption, or release of data. In addition, our computer and communication systems and operations could be damaged or interrupted by natural disasters, force majeure events, telecommunications failures, power loss, acts of war or terrorism, computer viruses, malicious code, physical or electronic security breaches, intentional or inadvertent user misuse or error, or similar events or disruptions. Any of these or other events could cause interruptions, delays, loss of critical and/or sensitive data or similar effects, which could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial condition, protection of intellectual property, and results of operations, as well as those of our clients.

In addition, we face the threat to our computer systems of unauthorized access, computer hackers, computer viruses, malicious code, organized cyber-attacks and other security problems and system disruptions, including possible unauthorized access to and disclosure of our and our clients’ proprietary or classified information. We rely on industry accepted security measures and technology to securely maintain all confidential and proprietary information on our computer systems, but they may still be vulnerable to these threats. As a result, we may be required to expend significant resources to protect against the threat of these system disruptions and security breaches or to alleviate problems caused by these disruptions and breaches. Any of these events could damage our reputation and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and cash flows.
We may not be able to protect our intellectual property or that of our clients.
Our technology and intellectual property provide us, in many instances, with a competitive advantage. Although we protect our property through patent registrations, license restrictions, and similar mechanisms, we may not be able to successfully preserve our rights and they could be invalidated, circumvented, challenged or become obsolete. In addition, the laws of some foreign countries in which we operate do not protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the U.S. If we are unable to protect and maintain our intellectual property rights or if there are any successful intellectual property challenges or infringement proceedings against us, our ability to differentiate our service offerings could be reduced. Litigation to determine the scope of intellectual property rights, even if ultimately successful, could be costly and could divert management’s attention away from other aspects of our business.

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In addition, if our intellectual property rights or work processes become obsolete, we may not be able to differentiate our service offerings and some of our competitors may be able to offer more attractive services to our customers. Our competitors may independently attempt to develop or obtain access to technologies that are similar or superior to our technologies.
Our clients or other third parties may also provide us with their technology and intellectual property. There is a risk we may not sufficiently protect our or their information from improper use or dissemination and, as a result, could be subject to claims and litigation and resulting liabilities, loss of contracts or other consequences that could have an adverse impact on our business, financial condition, and results of operations.
Our businesses could be materially and adversely affected by events outside of our control.
Extraordinary or force majeure events beyond our control, such as natural or man-made disasters, could negatively impact our ability to operate. As an example, from time to time we face unexpected severe weather conditions which may result in weather-related delays that are not always reimbursable under a fixed-price contract; evacuation of personnel and curtailment of services; increased labor and material costs in areas resulting from weather-related damage and subsequent increased demand for labor and materials for repairing and rebuilding; inability to deliver materials, equipment and personnel to jobsites in accordance with contract schedules and loss of productivity. We may remain obligated to perform our services after any such natural or man-made event, unless a force majeure clause or other contractual provision provides us with relief from our contractual obligations. If we are not able to react quickly to such events, or if a high concentration of our projects are in a specific geographic region that suffers from a natural or man-made catastrophe, our operations may be significantly affected, which could have a negative impact on our operations. In addition, if we cannot complete our contracts on time, we may be subject to potential liability claims by our clients which may reduce our profits.
We are subject to professional standards, duties and statutory obligations on professional reports and opinions we issue, which could subject us to monetary damages.
We issue reports and opinions to clients based on our professional engineering expertise as well as our other professional credentials that subject us to professional standards, duties and obligations regulating the performance of our services. For example, we issue opinions and reports to government clients in connection with securities offerings. If a client or another third party alleges that our report or opinion is incorrect or it is improperly relied upon and we are held responsible, we could be subject to significant monetary damages. In addition, our reports and other work product may need to comply with professional standards, licensing requirements, securities regulations and other laws and rules governing the performance of professional services in the jurisdiction where the services are performed. We could be liable to third parties who use or rely upon our reports and other work product even if we are not contractually bound to those third parties. These events could in turn result in monetary damages and penalties.
Delaware law and our charter documents may impede or discourage a takeover or change of control.
We are a Delaware corporation. Certain anti-takeover provisions of the Delaware general corporation law impose restrictions on the ability of others to acquire control of us. In addition, certain provisions of our charter documents may impede or discourage a takeover. For example:
Our Board of Directors is divided into three staggered classes (although our Board of Directors is currently being destaggered);
Only our Board of Directors can fill vacancies on the board;
There are various restrictions on the ability of a shareholder to nominate a director for election; and
Our Board of Directors can authorize the issuance of preference shares.
These types of provisions, as well as our ability to adopt a shareholder rights agreement in the future, could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire control of us, even if the acquisition would be beneficial to our shareholders. Accordingly, stockholders may be limited in the ability to obtain a premium for their shares.
 
Item 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.

Item 2.
PROPERTIES

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Our properties consist primarily of office space within general, commercial office buildings located in major cities primarily in the following countries: United States; Australia; Austria; Belgium; Canada; Chile; China; Finland; France; Germany; Greece; India; Italy; Malaysia; Mexico; Morocco; The Netherlands; Oman; The Philippines; Poland; Puerto Rico; Peru; Republic of Ireland; Saudi Arabia; South Africa; Singapore; Spain; Sweden; United Arab Emirates; and the United Kingdom. Such space is used for operations (providing technical, professional, and other home office services), sales, and administration. Most of our properties are leased. In addition, we own facilities located in Charleston, South Carolina which had served as our principal manufacturing and fabrication site for our modular construction activities. We also have fabrication facilities located in Canada in Pickering, Ontario and Edmonton and Lamont, Alberta. The total amount of space used by us for all of our operations is approximately 8.3 million square feet.
We also lease smaller, project offices located throughout the U.S., the U.K., and in certain other countries. We also rent most of our construction equipment on a short-term basis.

Item 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
The information required by this Item 3 is included in Note 11 — Contractual Guarantees, Litigation, Investigations, and Insurance of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE
Section 1503 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) requires domestic mine operators to disclose violations and orders issued under the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (the “Mine Act”) by the federal Mine Safety and Health Administration. Under the Mine Act, an independent contractor, such as Jacobs, that performs services or construction of a mine is included within the definition of a mining operator. We do not act as the owner of any mines.
Information concerning mine safety violations or other regulatory matters required by Section 1503(a) of the Dodd-Frank Act and Item 104 of Regulation S-K is included in Exhibit 95.



Page 34


PART II
 
Item 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Market Information
Jacobs’ common stock is listed on the NYSE and trades under the symbol JEC. We provided to the NYSE, without qualification, the required annual certification of our Chief Executive Officer regarding compliance with the NYSE’s corporate governance listing standards. The following table sets forth the low and high sales prices of a share of our common stock during each of the fiscal quarters presented, based on the NYSE Composite Price History: 
 
 
Low Sales
Price
 
High Sales
Price
Fiscal 2015:
 
 
 
 
First quarter
 
$
39.78

 
$
49.94

Second quarter
 
37.87

 
45.49

Third quarter
 
41.68

 
48.25

Fourth quarter
 
36.05

 
44.64

Fiscal 2014:
 
 
 
 
First quarter
 
$
55.80

 
$
64.27

Second quarter
 
58.20

 
66.88

Third quarter
 
52.57

 
65.02

Fourth quarter
 
49.13

 
55.00

Shareholders
According to the records of our transfer agent, there were 1,116 shareholders of record as of November 20, 2015.

Share Repurchases

On August 19, 2014, the Board of Directors approved a program to repurchase up to $500 million of the Company's common stock over a three year period. Share repurchases may be executed through various means including, without limitation, open market transactions, privately negotiated transactions or otherwise. The share repurchase program does not oblige the Company to purchase any shares. The authorization for the share repurchase program may be terminated, increased, or decreased by the Company's Board of Directors in its discretion at any time. The timing of our share repurchases may depend upon market conditions, other uses of capital, and other factors. As of October 2, 2015, the Company exhausted the repurchase capacity under the authorization.
    
A summary of repurchases of our common stock each fiscal month during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2015 is as follows (in thousands, except per-share amounts):
Period
Total Number of Shares Purchased
Average Price Paid per Share (1)
Total Numbers of Shares Purchased as Part of Publicly Announced Plans or Programs
Approximate Dollar Value of Shares that May Yet Be Purchased Under the Plans or Programs
June 27 through July 24, 2015
404

$
40.29

404

$
532,362

July 25 through August 21, 2015
289

42.88

289

519,974

August 22 through October 2, 2015
536

38.63

536

500,000

Total
1,229

$
40.18

1,229

$
500,000

(1)
Includes commissions paid.

On July 23, 2015, the Board of Directors approved a program to purchase up to an additional $500 million of the Company's

Page 35


common stock over the next three years. This approval was in addition to the then available capacity remaining under the Company's August 2014 $500 million share repurchase authorization. The new share repurchase authorization is subject to the same general terms and conditions as the prior share repurchase authorization summarized above.
Dividends
Our policy is to use cash flows from operations to fund future growth, pay down debt, and, subject to market conditions, repurchase common stock under a stock buy-back program approved by our Board of Directors. Accordingly, we have not paid a cash dividend since fiscal 1984. Although our Board of Directors periodically reviews and considers the merits of paying cash dividends, we currently have no plans to pay cash dividends in the foreseeable future.
Unregistered Sales of Equity Securities.

On October 14, 2013, we acquired the assets of Trompeter Enterprises, L.L.C., Motion Mekanix, Inc., Teamm Workforce, Inc., and Sims Software II, Inc. (collectively "Trompeter"); and on December 20, 2013, we acquired the assets of Stobbarts (Nuclear) Limited, for cash and shares of our common stock. In connection with these acquisitions, we issued 33,947 shares of our common stock with an aggregate value of approximately $2.0 million. No underwriters or placement agents were involved with these acquisitions.
The issuance of our common stock in the acquisition was exempt from the registration requirements of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), pursuant to Rule 506 thereof. The offer and sale of the shares of our common stock: (i) was made as part of a transaction that did not involve more than 35 purchasers, (as defined in Rule 501(e) under the Securities Act) who were either accredited investors or had such knowledge and experience in financial and business matters that such purchaser was capable of evaluating the merits and risks of acquiring shares of our common stock, and (ii) did not involve any general solicitation or general advertising.


Page 36



Performance Graph
The following graph and table shows the changes over the past five-year period in the value of $100 invested at the end of fiscal 2010 in (1) the common stock of Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., (2) the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index, and (3) the Dow Jones Heavy Construction Group Index. The values of each investment are based on share price appreciation, with reinvestment of all dividends, provided any were paid. The investments are assumed to have occurred at the beginning of the period presented. The stock performance included in this graph is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.


 
 
 
2010
 
2011
 
2012
 
2013
 
2014
 
2015
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc.
 
100.00

 
83.44

 
104.47

 
150.34

 
126.15

 
96.72

S&P 500
 
100.00

 
101.14

 
131.69

 
157.17

 
188.18

 
187.02

Dow Jones US Heavy Construction
 
100.00

 
87.48

 
115.38

 
145.34

 
138.73

 
103.03

Note: The above information was provided by Research Data Group, Inc.


Page 37


Item 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following table presents selected financial data for each of the last five fiscal years. This selected financial data should be read in conjunction with the Consolidated Financial Statements and related notes beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Dollar amounts are presented in thousands, except for per share information:

 
 
2015 (a)
 
2014 (b)
 
2013
 
2012 (c)
 
2011
Results of Operations:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
 
$
12,114,832

 
$
12,695,157

 
$
11,818,376

 
$
10,893,778

 
$
10,381,664

Net earnings attributable to Jacobs
 
302,971

 
328,108

 
423,093

 
378,954

 
331,029

Financial Position:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Current ratio
 
1.66 to 1
 
1.66 to 1
 
2.14 to 1
 
2.07 to 1
 
1.47 to 1
Working capital
 
$
1,301,810

 
$
1,542,225

 
$
2,151,939

 
$
1,865,025

 
$
1,011,565

Current assets
 
3,282,976

 
3,892,071

 
4,039,558

 
3,612,077

 
3,180,091

Total assets
 
7,785,926

 
8,453,659

 
7,274,144

 
6,839,433

 
6,199,226

Cash
 
460,859

 
732,647

 
1,256,405

 
1,032,457

 
905,633

Long-term debt
 
584,434

 
764,075

 
415,086

 
528,260

 
2,042

Total Jacobs stockholders’ equity
 
4,291,745

 
4,469,255

 
4,213,097

 
3,722,473

 
3,312,988

Return on average equity
 
6.92
%
 
7.56
%
 
10.66
%
 
10.77
%
 
10.73
%
Backlog:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Technical professional services
 
$
11,692,404

 
$
12,607,029

 
$
11,118,400

 
$
10,266,500

 
$
9,100,100

Field services
 
7,114,166

 
5,773,005

 
6,099,500

 
5,643,200

 
5,189,700

Total
 
$
18,806,570

 
$
18,380,034

 
$
17,217,900

 
$
15,909,700

 
$
14,289,800

Per Share Information:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings per share
 
$
2.42

 
$
2.51

 
$
3.27

 
$
2.97

 
$
2.63

Diluted earnings per share
 
2.40

 
$
2.48

 
$
3.23

 
2.94

 
2.60

Stockholders’ equity
 
34.85

 
33.92

 
32.00

 
28.65

 
25.93

Average Number of Shares of
   Common Stock and Common
   Stock Equivalents Outstanding
   (Diluted)
 
126,110

 
132,371

 
130,945

 
128,692

 
127,235

Common Shares Outstanding
   at Year End
 
123,153

 
131,753

 
131,639

 
129,936

 
127,785

 
(a)
Includes costs of $107.9 million or $0.86 per diluted share, related to the Company's restructuring initiatives in the second, third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2015.

(b)
Includes costs of $109.2 million or $0.82 per diluted share, related to the Company's restructuring initiatives in the third and fourth quarter of fiscal 2014.

(c)
Includes a one-time, after-tax gain of $4.0 million, or $0.03 per diluted share, related to the sale of the Company's intellectual property for iron ore pelletizing and certain other related assets.


Page 38



Item 7.
MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Critical Accounting Policies
In order to understand better the changes that occur to key elements of our financial condition, results of operations, and cash flows, a reader of this Management’s Discussion and Analysis (“MD&A”) should be aware of the critical accounting policies we apply in preparing our consolidated financial statements.
The consolidated financial statements contained in this report were prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP. The preparation of our consolidated financial statements and the financial statements of any business performing long-term engineering and construction-type contracts requires management to make certain estimates and judgments that affect both the entity’s results of operations and the carrying values of its assets and liabilities. Although our significant accounting policies are described in Note 2 – Significant Accounting Policies of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K, the following discussion is intended to highlight and describe those accounting policies that are especially critical to the preparation of our consolidated financial statements.
Revenue Accounting for Contracts and Use of Joint Ventures—In general, we recognize revenues at the time we provide services. Depending on the commercial terms of the contract, we recognize revenues either when costs are incurred, or using the percentage-of-completion method of accounting by relating contract costs incurred to date to the total estimated costs at completion. This method of revenue recognition requires us to prepare estimates of costs to complete contracts in progress as of the balance sheet dates. In making such estimates, judgments are required to evaluate the possible effects of variances in schedule; the costs of materials and labor; productivity; and the impact of change orders, claims, contract disputes, and achievement of contractual performance standards. Many of our engineering and construction contracts provide for reimbursement of costs plus a fixed or percentage fee. For contracts containing incentive fee arrangements, fees are frequently based on achievement of target completion dates, target costs, and/or other performance criteria. Failure to meet these targets or increases in contract costs can result in unrealized incentive fees or non-recoverable costs, which could exceed revenues recognized from the project.
We provide for contract losses in their entirety in the period they become known without regard to the percentage of completion. For multiple contracts with a single customer we account for each contract separately.
The nature of our business sometimes results in clients, subcontractors or vendors presenting claims to us for recovery of costs they incurred in excess of what they expected to incur, or for which they believe they are not contractually responsible. In those situations where a claim against us may result in additional costs to the contract, we include in the total estimated costs of the contract (and therefore, the estimated amount of margin to be earned under the contract) an estimate, based on all relevant facts and circumstances available, of the additional costs to be incurred. Similarly, and in the normal course of business, we may present claims to our clients for costs we have incurred for which we believe we are not contractually responsible. In those situations where we have presented such claims to our clients, we include in revenues the amount of costs incurred, without profit, to the extent it is probable that the claims will result in additional contract revenue, and the amount of such additional revenue can be reliably estimated. Costs associated with unapproved change orders are included in revenues using substantially the same criteria used for claims.
Certain cost-reimbursable contracts with government customers as well as many commercial clients provide that contract costs are subject to audit and adjustment. In this situation, revenues are recorded at the time services are performed based upon the amounts we expect to realize upon completion of the contracts. In those situations where an audit indicates that we may have billed a client for costs that are not allowable under the terms of the contract, we estimate the amount of such nonbillable costs and adjust our revenues accordingly.
As is common to the industry, we execute certain contracts jointly with third parties through various forms of joint ventures and consortiums. Although the joint ventures own and hold the contracts with the clients, the services required by the contracts are typically performed by us and our joint venture partners, or by other subcontractors under subcontracting agreements with the joint ventures. The assets of our joint ventures, therefore, consist almost entirely of cash and receivables (representing amounts due from clients), and the liabilities of our joint ventures consist almost entirely of amounts due to the joint venture partners (for services provided by the partners to the joint ventures under their individual subcontracts) and other subcontractors. In general, at any given time, the equity of our joint ventures represents the undistributed profits earned on contracts the joint ventures hold with clients. Very few of our joint ventures have employees. None of our joint ventures have

Page 39


third-party debt or credit facilities. Our joint ventures, therefore, are simply mechanisms used to deliver engineering and construction services to clients. Rarely do they, in and of themselves, present any risk of loss to us or to our partners separate from those that we would carry if we were performing the contract on our own. Under U.S. GAAP, our share of losses associated with the contracts held by the joint ventures, if and when they occur, has always been reflected in our Consolidated Financial Statements.
In evaluating the Company's joint ventures (also referred to as "variable interest entities", or "VIEs") for accounting and consolidation purposes, we perform a qualitative analysis to determine whether or not the Company has a “controlling financial interest” in the VIE. The Company is deemed to have a controlling financial interest in a VIE if it has (i) the power to direct the activities of the VIE that most significantly impact the VIE's economic performance; and (ii) the right to receive benefits, or obligation to absorb losses, that could potentially be significant to the VIE. In making our qualitative analysis, the Company assesses each VIE to determine those activities that most significantly impact the VIE's economic performance and whether the Company, another entity, or multiple entities have the power to direct those activities.
 If we determine that we have the power to direct those activities of the VIE that most significantly impact its financial performance and have the right or obligation to receive benefits or absorb losses that could potentially be significant to the VIE, then we are the primary beneficiary of the VIE and we consolidate the VIE. If we determine that we do not have the power to direct the most significant activities of the VIE or power is shared by two or more unrelated parties, then we are not the primary beneficiary and we do not consolidate the VIE.
For the Company's unconsolidated joint ventures, we use either the equity method of accounting or proportional consolidation. The Company does not currently participate in any significant VIEs in which it has a controlling financial interest. There were no changes in facts and circumstances in the period that caused the Company to reassess the method of accounting for its VIEs.
Accounting for Stock Issued to Employees and Others— We measure the cost of employee services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the estimated grant-date fair value of the award. We estimate the fair value of stock options granted to employees and directors using the Black-Scholes option-pricing model. Like all option-pricing models, the Black-Scholes model requires the use of highly subjective assumptions including (i) the expected volatility of the market price of the underlying stock, and (ii) the expected term of the award, among others. Accordingly, changes in assumptions and any subsequent adjustments to those assumptions can cause drastically different fair values to be assigned to our stock option awards. For restricted stock units containing service and performance conditions with measures external to the Company, compensation expense is based on the fair value of such units determined using Monte Carlo Simulations. Due to the uncertainties inherent in the use of assumptions and the results of applying Monte Carlo Simulations, the amount of expense recorded in the accompanying consolidated financial statements may not be representative of the effects on our future consolidated financial statements because equity awards tend to vest over several years and additional equity awards may be made in the future.
Accounting for Pension Plans— The accounting for pension plans requires the use of assumptions and estimates in order to calculate periodic pension cost and the value of the plans’ assets and liabilities. These assumptions include discount rates, investment returns, and projected salary increases, among others. The actuarial assumptions used in determining the funded statuses of the plans are provided in Note 6 – Pension Plans of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
The expected rates of return on plan assets for fiscal 2016 range from 3.5% to 8.5% compared to 4.5% to 8.5% for the prior year. We believe the range of rates selected for fiscal 2016 reflects the long-term returns expected on the plans’ assets, considering recent market conditions, projected rates of inflation, the diversification of the plans’ assets, and the expected real rates of market returns. The discount rates used to compute plan liabilities were changed from a range of 1.8% to 8.8% in fiscal 2014 to a range of 1.6% to 7.8% in fiscal 2015. These assumptions represent the Company’s best estimate of the rates at which its pension obligations could be effectively settled.
Changes in the actuarial assumptions often have a material effect on the values assigned to plan assets and liabilities, and the associated pension expense. For example, if the discount rate used to value the net pension benefit obligation (“PBO”) at October 2, 2015, was higher (lower) by 0.5%, the PBO would have been lower (higher) at that date by approximately $102.1 million for non-U.S. plans, and by approximately $25.8 million for U.S. plans. If the expected return on plan assets was higher (lower) by 1.0%, the net periodic pension cost for fiscal 2016 would be lower (higher) by approximately $9.0 million for non-U.S. plans, and by approximately $3.6 million for U.S. plans. Differences between actuarial assumptions and actual performance (i.e., actuarial gains and losses) that are not recognized as a component of net periodic pension cost in the period in which such differences

Page 40


arise are recorded to accumulated other comprehensive income (loss) and are recognized as part of net periodic pension cost in future periods in accordance with U.S. GAAP. Management monitors trends in the marketplace within which our pension plans operate in an effort to assure the fairness of the actuarial assumptions used.
 
Contractual Guarantees, Litigation, Investigations, and Insurance— In the normal course of business, we are subject to certain contractual guarantees and litigation. The guarantees to which we are a party generally relate to project schedules and plant performance. Most of the litigation in which we are involved has us as a defendant in workers’ compensation; personal injury; environmental; employment/labor; professional liability; and other similar lawsuits. We maintain insurance coverage for various aspects of our business and operations. We have elected, however, to retain a portion of losses that occur through the use of various deductibles, limits, and retentions under our insurance programs. This situation may subject us to some future liability for which we are only partially insured, or completely uninsured, and we intend to mitigate any such future liability by continuing to exercise prudent business judgment in negotiating the terms and conditions of our contracts.
In accordance with U.S. GAAP, we record in our Consolidated Balance Sheets amounts representing our estimated liability relating to such guarantees, litigation, and insurance claims. We include any adjustments to such liabilities in our consolidated results of operations.
In addition, as a contractor providing services to the U.S. federal government and several of its agencies, we are subject to many levels of audits, investigations, and claims by, or on behalf of, the U.S. federal government with respect to contract performance, pricing, costs, cost allocations, and procurement practices. We adjust revenues based upon the amounts we expect to realize considering the effects of any client audits or governmental investigations.
Testing Goodwill for Possible Impairment— The goodwill carried on our Consolidated Balance Sheets is tested annually for possible impairment. In performing the annual impairment test, we evaluate our goodwill at the reporting unit level. For fiscal 2015 and consistent with prior years, we determined that we have two reporting units, which are based on geography. We refer to these reporting units internally as “Europe” and “Non-Europe”. Each of our reporting units conducts the business activities described elsewhere in this 2015 Form 10-K, which includes providing professional technical services such as design, engineering, and architectural services; construction and/or construction management services; and operations and maintenance services.
Our geography-based reporting units reflect the Company’s organizational structure, which is based predominately on geography, as well as our acquisition strategy, which favors acquisition targets that, among other things, provide access to new geographic areas. Our reporting units represent rational groupings into which substantially all of our major acquisitions (which are responsible for the goodwill appearing in our Consolidated Balance Sheets) have been assimilated, and where all of the operations under each reporting unit share in the benefits of the goodwill created by our acquisitions.
During the first quarter of fiscal 2016, we announced a reorganization of our operations around four global lines of business. This reorganization is intended to better serve our global clients, leverage our workforce, help streamline operations, and provide enhanced growth opportunities. The four global lines of business are: Petroleum & Chemicals, Buildings & Infrastructure, Aerospace & Technology, and Industrial. Each business unit has a president that reports directly to the Company's President & CEO. As part of the reorganization, certain support functions (i.e. Sales), which have been managed centrally for many years, will be embedded in the new business units and will report to the respective line of business presidents. The costs of other support functions (e.g., accounting, legal, human resources, and information technology) and certain other activities (e.g., global insurance) will either be assigned or allocated to each new business unit using a rationale method of assignment / allocation, or will remain an element of corporate general and administrative expenses. In addition, the Company has significantly modified its major cash incentive plan utilizing forecasted performance metrics aligned along the new lines of business. We are in the process of modifying our systems and work processes to report the results of these business units accurately and timely. We are also developing processes for accurately eliminating inter-unit revenue and profit. We expect to complete our system and other process changes so that we may accurately report operating results by line of business to the Company's President & CEO no later than the second quarter of fiscal 2016.
U.S. GAAP does not prescribe a specific valuation method for estimating the fair value of reporting units. The valuation technique used to estimate the fair value of the reporting units requires the use of significant estimates and assumptions, including revenue growth rates, operating margins, discount rates and future market conditions, among others.
For fiscal years 2014 through 2015, we used both an income approach and a market approach to test our goodwill for possible impairment. Such approaches require us to make estimates and judgments. Under the income approach, fair value is

Page 41


determined by using the discounted cash flows of our reporting units. Under the market approach, the fair value of our reporting units is determined by reference to guideline companies that are reasonably comparable to our reporting units; the fair values are estimated based on the valuation multiples of the invested capital associated with the guideline companies. In assessing whether there is an indication that the carrying value of goodwill has been impaired, we utilize the results of both valuation techniques and consider the range of fair values indicated. The fair values for each reporting unit exceeded the respective book values by over 20% to 40%. The key assumptions used to determine the fair value of our reporting units in our testing were:
Income Approach
With respect to the income approach, we utilized internal financial projections through fiscal 2018 (for the fiscal 2014 impairment analysis) and fiscal 2019 (for the fiscal 2015 impairment analysis). We assumed a weighted average cost of capital of 11.00% (for the fiscal 2014 impairment analysis) and 11.25% (for the fiscal 2015 impairment analysis). We also assumed a residual period growth rate of 3.00% (for both the fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2015 impairment analyses).
Market Approach
With respect to the market approach, for guideline publicly traded companies reasonably comparable to the Company's reporting units, the Company used multiples ranging from 5.9 to 7.6 of EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) and 7.6 to 10.0 of EBIT (earnings before interest and taxes), for the fiscal year 2014 test applied to the projected fiscal year 2014 to 2016 financial results for each of our reporting units. The Company used multiples ranging from 6.3 to 6.4 of EBITDA and 7.4 to 7.5 of EBIT, for the fiscal year 2015 test applied to the projected fiscal year 2015 to 2017 financial results for each of our reporting units.
It is possible that changes in market conditions, economy, facts and circumstances, judgments, and assumptions used in estimating the fair value could change, resulting in possible impairment of goodwill in the future. The fair values resulting from the valuation techniques used are not necessarily representative of the values we might obtain in a sale of the reporting units to willing third parties.
The Company performs the annual goodwill impairment test for the reporting units at the end of the third quarter of our fiscal year. The Company will test goodwill for impairment between annual tests if an event occurs or circumstances change that would more likely than not reduce the fair value of a reporting unit below its carrying amount. We have determined that the fair value of our reporting units substantially exceeded their respective carrying values for fiscal years 2015, 2014, and 2013.
Based on the most recent results of our annual impairment tests, there were no indications of impairment of the goodwill shown in our Consolidated Balance Sheets at either October 2, 2015, or September 26, 2014. Furthermore, the Company performed an interim impairment assessment at October 2, 2015, and concluded that it was not more likely than not that the fair value of either reporting unit had been reduced to an amount below its carrying amount.



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Fiscal 2015 — Overview

Fiscal Year
The Company’s fiscal year ends on the Friday closest to September 30 (determined on the basis of the number of workdays) and, accordingly, an additional week of activity is added every five-to-six years. Fiscal 2015 results of operations includes an additional week of operations as compared to fiscal 2014 and fiscal 2013, which was not material to the Company's fiscal 2015 consolidated results of operations.
The 2015 Restructuring
During the second quarter of fiscal 2015, the Company commenced a series of initiatives intended to improve operational efficiency, reduce costs, and better position itself to drive growth of the business in the future (the "2015 Restructuring"). Actions related to the 2015 Restructuring completed during the fiscal year include involuntary terminations, the abandonment of certain leased offices, combining operational organizations, and the co-location of employees into other existing offices. We are not exiting any service types or client end-markets. The Company's consolidated results of operations for fiscal 2015 include a $157.2 million pre-tax impact relating to costs associated with the 2015 Restructuring. The costs of the 2015 Restructuring are almost entirely included in selling, general, and administrative expense in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Earnings. The Company expects to largely complete the 2015 Restructuring by the end of the first quarter of fiscal 2016. The following table summarizes the effects of the 2015 Restructuring on the Company's consolidated results of operations for fiscal 2015 (in thousands, except for earnings per share):
 
 
Year Ended
 
 
October 2, 2015
 
 
U.S. GAAP
 
Effects of 2015 Restructuring
Without 2015 Restructuring
 Consolidated pre-tax earnings (loss)
 
$
430,137

 
$
(157,192
)
 
$
587,329

 Tax (expense) benefit
 
(101,255
)
 
49,278

 
(150,533
)
 Net earnings of the Group
 
328,882

 
(107,914
)
 
436,796

 Non-controlling interests
 
(25,911
)
 

 
(25,911
)
 Net earnings of Jacobs
 
$
302,971

 
$
(107,914
)
 
$
410,885

 Diluted earnings (loss) per share
 
$
2.40

 
$
(0.86
)
 
$
3.26


The 2015 Inter-company Debt Refinancing

During the third quarter of fiscal 2015, the Company completed the refinancing of certain international inter-company debt (the "2015 Inter-company Debt Refinancing"). The 2015 Inter-company Debt Refinancing resulted in a one-time tax benefit of $23.1 million, or $0.18 per share.
The 2014 Restructuring and Other Unusual Events Affecting Fiscal 2014

During the third quarter of fiscal 2014, the Company initiated the "2014 Restructuring". In recognition of the slowdown in several of the Company's clients' end markets, the Company implemented a series of initiatives which, much like the 2015 Restructuring, were intended to improve operational efficiency and reduce costs, and also to accelerate the integration of SKM.

In addition to the 2014 Restructuring and the acquisition of SKM, the Company's consolidated results of operations for fiscal 2014 were affected by the following discrete events:
$6.8 million, or $0.05 per diluted share, increase to net earnings due to the favorable resolution of an international tax matter in the first quarter of fiscal 2014; as a result of these events, approximately $4.1 million of accrued interest expense was reversed;
$6.4 million, or $0.05 per diluted share, increase to net earnings related to a gain on the sale of certain intellectual property in the second quarter of fiscal 2014;

Page 43


$22.7 million, or $0.18 per diluted share, decrease to net earnings relating to certain specific operational events at SKM and SKM transaction-related costs and expenses incurred during the first half of the fiscal year; and
$22.3 million, or $0.16 per diluted share, decrease to net earnings due to lower margins associated with certain projects in Europe combined with unusual weather effects in the second quarter of fiscal 2014.

As used herein, the term "2014 Events" refers to the combined effects of both the 2014 Restructuring and the unusual events described above. Within this MD&A, the Company may disclose and discuss its results of operations before the effects of the 2015 Restructuring, the 2014 Events and/or certain other transactions and events described herein. Although such information is non-GAAP in nature, it is presented because management believes it provides a better view of the Company’s operating results to investors to assess the Company’s performance and operating trends. As used herein, the terms "adjusted earnings" and "adjusted net earnings" refer to the Company's GAAP earnings as adjusted to eliminate the effects of the 2014 Events (when used in reference to fiscal 2014 results of operations) and the 2015 Restructuring (when used in reference to fiscal 2015 results of operations).
2015 Overview
The Company's GAAP net earnings for fiscal 2015 decreased by $25.1 million, or 7.6%, compared to fiscal 2014. Included in net earnings for fiscal 2015 is the 2015 Inter-company Debt Refinancing. Included in our fiscal year 2015 results was a $12.1 million negative impact related to the strengthening U.S. Dollar. Excluding the effects of the 2015 Restructuring and the 2014 Restructuring, the Company's adjusted net earnings for fiscal 2015 decreased by $26.4 million, or 6.0%, compared to the prior year.

The effects of lower prices of crude oil and certain commodities, including copper and iron ore, continue to present headwinds for clients operating in the Refining-Downstream, Oil & Gas-Upstream, and Mining and Minerals industries and markets. Our Infrastructure and National Government Programs groups continue to perform well. Actions taken pursuant to the 2015 Restructuring have begun to lower the Company's overall cost structure, which is helping to offset the negative pressures we are experiencing in certain of our markets.

The Company's results for fiscal 2015 when compared to the prior year were positively impacted by (i) the SKM acquisition, which is included for all of fiscal 2015 compared to only approximately 9-1/2 months in fiscal 2014 and, to a lesser degree, (ii) the other acquisitions completed during fiscal 2014 (described below). Also influencing the comparability of the Company's fiscal 2015 results of operations to fiscal 2014 were the 2015 Restructuring and the 2014 Events.

The following table summarizes the effects of the 2014 Events on the Company's consolidated results of operations for fiscal 2014 (in thousands, except for earnings per share):

 
 
Year Ended
 
 
September 26, 2014
 
 
U.S. GAAP
 
Effects of 2014 Events
 
Without 2014 Events
 Consolidated pre-tax earnings (loss)
 
$
542,166

 
$
(141,541
)
 
$
683,707

 Tax (expense) benefit
 
(190,054
)
 
32,359

 
(222,413
)
 Net earnings of the Group
 
352,112

 
(109,182
)
 
461,294

 Non-controlling interests
 
(24,004
)
 

 
(24,004
)
 Net earnings of Jacobs
 
$
328,108

 
$
(109,182
)
 
$
437,290

 Diluted earnings (loss) per share
 
$
2.48

 
$
(0.82
)
 
$
3.30


Backlog at October 2, 2015 was $18.8 billion, and represents an increase of 2.3% over backlog at September 26, 2014. Backlog remains near record levels despite the negative effects on backlog stemming from foreign exchange. New prospects and new sales remain strong and the Company continues to have a positive outlook for many of the industry groups and markets in which our clients operate.


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During fiscal 2015, the Company repurchased and retired 9.7 million shares of its common stock under its share repurchase program. Total cash spent for the shares repurchased during fiscal 2015 was $422.3 million. As of October 2, 2015, the Company exhausted the $500 million approved by the Board of Directors on August 19, 2014. On July 23, 2015, the Board of Directors approved a program to purchase an additional $500 million of the Company's common stock over the next three years.
Business Combinations Completed During Fiscal 2014
In December 2013, the Company acquired all of the outstanding equity interests in SKM. The acquisition of SKM is described in more detail under Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements, below, as well as on page 7 and beginning on page F-11 of our Annual Report on Form 10-K.
We also completed a number of other acquisitions during fiscal 2014 including Federal Network Systems LLC ("FNS", formerly a subsidiary of Verizon); Eagleton Engineering, LLC; FMHC Corporation; Stobbarts (Nuclear) Limited; Trompeter Enterprises; and MARMAC Field Services, Inc. The results of operations of these other acquisitions were not material, individually or in the aggregate, to the Company's consolidated results of operations for fiscal 2014. During fiscal 2014, we also acquired an additional 15% interest in Jacobs, Zamel and Turbag Consulting Engineers Company ("ZATE"). This transaction brought the Company's ownership in ZATE to 75%.
Consistent with other business combinations we have completed in the past, we began integrating SKM and the other businesses we acquired last year into our existing operations almost immediately after each business was acquired. Accordingly, it is not practicable to provide complete financial information for fiscal 2015 on a stand-alone basis for any of the businesses we acquired last year.
Results of Operations
General
Our business focuses exclusively on providing technical professional services and field services to a large number of industrial, commercial, and governmental clients around the world. The services we provide generally fall into four broad categories:
Project Services (including engineering, design, architecture, interiors, planning, environmental, and similar services);
Process, Scientific, and Systems Consulting Services (including services performed in connection with scientific testing, analysis, and consulting activities, as well as information technology and systems engineering and integration activities);
Construction Services (encompassing traditional field construction services as well as modular construction consulting services, direct hire construction, and construction management services); and
Operations and Maintenance Services (including services performed in connection with operating large, complex facilities on behalf of clients, as well as services involving process plant and facilities maintenance).
The scope of services we can provide our clients, therefore, ranges from consulting and conceptual design services (which are often required by clients in the very early stages of a project) to complete single-responsibility, design-build contracts, to services required in the post start-up phases of a project such as O&M services.

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The following table sets forth our revenues by type of service for each of the last three fiscal years (in thousands):
 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Technical Professional Services revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Project Services
 
$
6,307,015

 
$
6,576,004

 
$
5,977,917

Process, Scientific, and Systems Consulting
 
1,188,418

 
758,957

 
705,694

Total Technical Professional Services revenues
 
7,495,433

 
7,334,961

 
6,683,611

Field Services revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Construction
 
3,291,823

 
4,138,729

 
3,825,878

Operations and Maintenance (“O&M”)
 
1,327,576

 
1,221,467

 
1,308,887

Total Field Services revenues
 
4,619,399

 
5,360,196

 
5,134,765

 
 
$
12,114,832

 
$
12,695,157

 
$
11,818,376


Project Services revenues for the year ended October 2, 2015 decreased $269.0 million, or 4.1%, from the corresponding period last year. The decrease in Project Services revenues was due primarily to the lower business volumes in the Refining - Downstream and Chemicals and Polymers markets, particularly in North American and U.K., driven principally by the decline in oil and other commodity prices, combined with the effects of the strengthening U.S. dollar.

Process, Scientific, and Systems Consulting revenues for the year ended October 2, 2015 increased $429.5 million, or 56.6%, from the corresponding period last year. The increase was due primarily to the FNS acquisition completed during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014. The revenues in this service type relate to science, engineering, and technical support services provided primarily to the U.S. federal government clients and its various agencies.

Construction revenues for the year ended October 2, 2015 decreased $846.9 million, or 20.5%, from the corresponding period last year. The decrease was primarily due to the winding down of a U.S. project in the Mining and Minerals market combined with lower business volume in the Refining - Downstream line of business.

Operations and Maintenance revenues for the year ended October 2, 2015 increased $106.1 million, or 8.7%, from the corresponding period last year. The increase was primarily due to higher volume in the Chemicals and Polymers and Refining-Downstream markets, partially offset by a decline in National Government Programs.

We focus our services on clients operating in select industry groups and markets. We believe these industry groups and markets have sufficient common needs to permit cross-utilization of our resources. The following table sets forth our revenues by these industry groups and markets for each of the last three fiscal years (in thousands):
 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
National Government Programs
 
$
2,643,696

 
$
2,282,116

 
$
2,284,533

Chemicals and Polymers
 
2,380,721

 
2,985,352

 
2,391,144

Refining – Downstream
 
1,955,726

 
2,239,343

 
2,337,387

Infrastructure
 
1,625,895

 
1,361,574

 
1,015,864

Oil & Gas – Upstream
 
919,222

 
863,344

 
915,478

Buildings
 
901,041

 
834,122

 
738,404

Industrial and Other
 
757,357

 
758,036

 
899,756

Pharmaceuticals and Biotechnology
 
474,245

 
452,662

 
523,490

Mining & Minerals
 
456,929

 
918,608

 
712,320

 
 
$
12,114,832

 
$
12,695,157

 
$
11,818,376

Revenues decreased $580.3 million, or 4.6%, from $12.7 billion for fiscal 2014 to $12.1 billion for fiscal 2015. Revenues for fiscal year 2015 include a negative impact of $561.0 million related to the strengthening U.S. Dollar.


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Revenues from clients operating in the National Government Programs market increased $361.6 million, or 15.8%, to $2.6 billion from $2.3 billion for the corresponding period last year. The increase was due primarily to the FNS acquisition completed during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2014.

Revenues from projects for clients operating in the Chemicals and Polymers industries decreased $604.6 million, or 20.3%, to $2.4 billion from $3.0 billion for the corresponding period last year. The decrease in revenues was due primarily to the normal winding-down and completion of certain projects in the U.S, the U.K, and Europe. Although we continue to receive new awards for FEED (front-end engineering design) and pre-FEED services, larger integrated oil companies continue to re-evaluate their investment opportunities considering current oil prices. We have long-term relationships with numerous chemical companies around the world, and we believe this industry group will provide growth opportunities in the long-term. The acquisition of SKM strengthened our capabilities for customers operating in this market as evidenced by a significant professional services contract we were awarded for what will be the largest chlorine dioxide plant in the world, located in Asia.

Revenues from clients operating in the Refining - Downstream market decreased $283.6 million, or 12.7%, to $2.0 billion from $2.2 billion for the corresponding period last year. The decrease occurred within our operations in Canada, Europe, and the U.K.

Revenues from clients operating in the Infrastructure market increased $264.3 million, or 19.4%, from $1.4 billion for fiscal 2014 to $1.6 billion for fiscal 2015. The increase was due primarily to increased activity in the U.K., the U.S., and Australia. We believe market conditions may continue to improve within this industry group, particularly for transportation, water, and certain other projects around the globe (although there is higher uncertainty in U.S. federal funding for certain highway projects). One example is the Asset Management Programme (AMP6) cycle in the U.K., where we provide a full range of professional services, including regulatory strategic consultancy, engineering, project support and asset maintenance.

Revenues on projects for clients operating in the Oil & Gas-Upstream market increased $55.9 million, or 6.5%, to $919.2 million from $863.3 million for the corresponding period last year. The increase was due primarily to higher business volume in the U.S. and the Middle East, partially offset by a decrease in Canada. The Company believes that the recent decline in crude oil prices has dampened our client's near-term capital spending plans. As a result, we expect certain clients to begin deploying more of their capital budgets to sustaining capital-type programs (small-cap projects and maintenance-driven work), an area where the Company is strong.
Revenues from clients operating in the Buildings market increased $66.9 million, or 8.0%, from $834.1 million for fiscal 2014 to $901.0 million for fiscal 2015. We saw growth globally with health care, higher education, mission critical, and certain other technically complex buildings and facilities supported by the acquisition of SKM. We view the Buildings market as improving as our business in this industry group continues to shift towards projects for clients in the private sector.
Revenues from clients operating in the Mining and Minerals markets decreased $461.7 million, or 50.3%, from $918.6 million for fiscal 2014 to $456.9 million for fiscal 2015. The decrease was due to the winding down of several projects in North and South America and Australia without significant new work being added. Globally, continuing pressure on commodity prices have caused our clients in these industries to behave more conservatively when it comes to new spend. It is possible that this situation may continue for the foreseeable future. Accordingly, the Company is refocusing and reallocating its resources onto brownfield and sustaining capital-type projects. Longer-term, we believe we are well positioned to realize incremental business when the current pricing environment improves.
Direct costs of contracts decreased $474.9 million, or 4.5%, from $10.62 billion during fiscal 2014 to $10.15 billion during fiscal 2015. Direct costs of contracts include all costs incurred in connection with and directly for the benefit of client contracts, including depreciation and amortization relating to assets used in connection with providing the services required by client projects. The level of direct costs of contracts may fluctuate between reporting periods due to a variety of factors including the amount of pass-through costs we incur during a period. On those projects where we are responsible for subcontract labor or third-party materials and equipment, we reflect the amounts of such items in both revenues and costs (and we refer to such costs as “pass-through costs”). On other projects, where the client elects to pay for such items directly and we have no associated responsibility for such items, these amounts are not considered pass-through costs and are, therefore, not reflected in either revenues or costs. To the extent that we incur a significant amount of pass-through costs in a period, our direct cost of contracts are likely to increase as well.
Pass-through costs decreased $352.2 million, or 11.9%, from $2.95 billion during fiscal 2014 to $2.60 billion for fiscal 2015. In general, pass-through costs are more significant on projects that have a higher content of field services activities. Pass-

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through costs are generally incurred at a specific point in the lifecycle of a project and are highly dependent on the needs of our individual clients and the nature of the clients’ projects. However, because we have hundreds of projects which start at various times within a fiscal year, the effect of pass-through costs on the level of direct costs of contracts can vary between fiscal years without there being a fundamental or significant change to the underlying business.
As a percentage of revenues, direct costs of contracts were 83.8% for fiscal 2015, compared to 83.7% for fiscal 2014. The relationship between direct costs of contracts and revenues will fluctuate between reporting periods depending on a variety of factors including the mix of business during the reporting periods being compared as well as the level of margins earned from the various types of services provided. Generally speaking, the more procurement we do on behalf of our clients (i.e., where we purchase equipment and materials for use on projects, and/or procure subcontracts in connection with projects) and the more field services revenues we have relative to technical, professional services revenues, the higher the ratio will be of direct costs of contracts to revenues. Because revenues from pass-through costs typically have lower margin rates associated with them, it is not unusual for us to experience an increase or decrease in such revenues without experiencing a corresponding increase or decrease in our gross margins and operating profit. The ratio of direct costs of contracts to revenues was flat over the prior year period.
Selling, general, and administrative ("SG&A") expenses for fiscal 2015 decreased by $22.9 million, or 1.5%, to $1.52 billion, compared to $1.55 billion for fiscal 2014. The decrease in SG&A expenses was primarily due to lower costs stemming from the 2014 Events, which were partially offset by increased costs related to the 2015 Restructuring. Excluding the effects of the 2015 Restructuring and the 2014 Events, adjusted SG&A expenses for fiscal 2015 decreased $67.4 million, or 4.7%, to $1.37 billion from $1.44 billion for the corresponding period last year.
Net interest expense for fiscal 2015 increased $10.5 million to $12.2 million from $1.7 million in fiscal 2014. Included in net interest expense for fiscal 2014 was the reversal of $4.1 million of accrued interest expense recorded in connection with income tax liabilities relating to certain contested international tax matters which were favorably resolved during the first quarter of fiscal 2014. Adjusting for this reversal of expense, net interest expense for fiscal 2014 was $5.9 million.

The Company's effective income tax rate for fiscal 2015 declined to 23.5% from 35.1% in fiscal 2014. The decrease was primarily the result of the $23.1 million, or $0.18 per share, tax benefit related to the 2015 Inter-company Debt Refinancing discussed earlier. Also contributing to the decrease in the tax rate when compared to prior year were the benefits realized by other, individually insignificant discrete and non-discrete items realized in the third and fourth quarters of fiscal 2015.

Fiscal 2014 Compared to Fiscal 2013

The Company’s net earnings decreased $95.0 million, or 22.5%, from $423.1 million for fiscal 2013 to $328.1 million for fiscal 2014. In addition to the effects of the 2014 Restructuring and the acquisition of SKM, the Company's consolidated results of operations for fiscal 2014 were affected by the other 2014 events described above.

Revenues increased $876.8 million, or 7.4%, from $11.8 billion for fiscal 2013 to $12.7 billion for fiscal 2014.

Revenues from clients operating in the Chemicals and Polymers industries increased $594.2 million, or 24.9%, from $2.4 billion for fiscal 2013 to $3.0 billion for fiscal 2014. This increase occurred throughout many of the geographic locations in which we operate. We continued to receive new awards for FEED (front-end engineering design) and pre-FEED services.
Revenues from clients operating in the Infrastructure market increased $345.7 million, or 34.0%, from $1.0 billion for fiscal 2013 to $1.4 billion for fiscal 2014. SKM contributed approximately 50.0% of the increase, with the U.K. and U.S. legacy operations contributing to the remainder of the increase.
Revenues from clients operating in the Buildings market increased $95.7 million, or 13.0%, from $738.4 million for fiscal 2013 to $834.1 million for fiscal 2014. Although SKM was responsible for most of this increase, the Company saw growth in our U.S. and Middle East markets.
Revenues from clients operating in the Mining and Minerals markets increased $206.3 million, or 29.0%, from $712.3 million for fiscal 2013 to $918.6 million for fiscal 2014. The increased revenues in 2014 was due primarily to SKM. Globally, our clients in these industries behaved relatively conservatively during fiscal 2014 when it cames to new spend.

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Revenues from clients operating in the Pharmaceutical and Biotechnology markets decreased $70.8 million, or 13.5%, from $523.5 million for fiscal 2013 to $452.7 million for fiscal 2014. The decrease in revenues were due primarily to the normal wind-down and completion of projects, including work on several vaccine plants located in North America.
Revenues from clients operating in the Industrial and Other category decreased $141.7 million, or 15.8%, from $899.8 million for fiscal 2013 to $758.0 million for fiscal 2014. The decrease in revenues was due primarily to decreased activity in the Pulp & Paper market in the U.S. and the High-Technology Manufacturing market in Ireland.
Direct costs of contracts increased $645.3 million, or 6.5%, from $9.98 billion during fiscal 2013 to $10.62 billion during fiscal 2014. Pass-through costs increased $330.0 million, or 12.6%, from $2.62 billion during fiscal 2013 to $2.95 billion for fiscal 2014.
As a percentage of revenues, direct costs of contracts were 83.7% for fiscal 2014, compared to 84.4% for fiscal 2013. The ratio of direct costs of contracts to revenues over the prior year period decreased, primarily as a result of higher margins in both professional technical services and field services activities and the acquisition of SKM.
SG&A expenses for fiscal 2014 increased by $372.4 million, or 31.7%, to $1.55 billion, compared to $1.17 billion for fiscal 2013. The increase in SG&A expenses reflects the effects of the 2014 Restructuring discussed above as well as the results of operations of SKM. Also included in SG&A expenses for the current fiscal year are transaction-related expenses incurred in connection with the SKM acquisition of $9.2 million. Also included in SG&A expenses for fiscal 2014 are due diligence and other transaction-related costs incurred in connection with other mergers and acquisition activity.
Net interest expense for fiscal 2014 decreased $5.8 million to $1.7 million from $7.5 million in fiscal 2013. The decrease is related to the reassessment during fiscal 2014 of a tax matter involving one of our international subsidiaries which resulted in the reversal of $8.1 million of accrued interest, offset in part by the net impacts of the SKM acquisition.
The Company’s consolidated effective income tax rate was 35.1% for fiscal 2014, compared to 33.5% in fiscal 2013. Contributing to the increase as compared to the prior year was the effect of the 2014 Restructuring. Also contributing to the higher effective tax rate is the stamp duty paid in the first quarter of fiscal 2014 related to the SKM acquisition.

Contractual Obligations
The following table sets forth certain information about our contractual obligations as of October 2, 2015 (in thousands):
 
 
 
 
Payments Due by Fiscal Period
 
 
Total
 
1 Year
or Less
 
1 - 3
Years
 
3 - 5
Years
 
More than 5
Years
Debt obligations
 
$
597,798

 
$
13,364

 
$

 
$
584,434

 
$

Operating leases (a)
 
933,250

 
152,744

 
255,860

 
185,803

 
338,843

Obligations under defined benefit pension
   plans (b)
 
416,725

 
45,930

 
97,445

 
105,397

 
167,953

Obligations under nonqualified deferred
   compensation plans (c)
 
136,378

 
16,023

 
33,994

 
36,767

 
49,594

Purchase obligations (d)
 
1,473,546

 
1,473,546

 

 

 

Interest (e)
 
25,525

 
7,685

 
14,764

 
3,076

 

Total
 
$
3,583,222

 
$
1,709,292

 
$
402,063

 
$
915,477

 
$
556,390

 
(a)
Assumes the Company will make the end of lease term residual value guarantee payment of $62.4 million in 2025 with respect to the lease of an office building in Houston, Texas. Please refer to Note 10—Commitments and Contingencies, and Derivative Financial Instruments of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
(b)
Assumes that future contributions will be consistent with amounts projected to be contributed in fiscal 2016, allowing for certain growth based on rates of inflation and salary increases, but limited to the amount recorded as of October 2, 2015. Actual contributions will depend on a variety of factors, including amounts required by local laws and regulations, and other funding requirements.

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(c)
Assumes that future payments will be consistent with amounts paid in fiscal 2015, allowing for certain growth. Due to the nonqualified nature of the plans, and the fact that benefits are based in part on years of service, the payments included in the schedule were limited to the amount recorded as of October 2, 2015.
(d)
Represents those liabilities estimated to be under firm contractual commitments as of October 2, 2015; primarily accounts payable and accrued payroll.
(e)
Determined based on borrowings outstanding at the end of fiscal 2015 using the interest rates in effect at that time and, for our outstanding long term debt, concluding with the expiration date of the 2014 Facility, as defined below.
Backlog
Backlog represents the total dollar amount of revenues we expect to record in the future as a result of performing work under contracts that have been awarded to us. We include in backlog the entire value of contracts at the time the contracts are awarded to us or when we have otherwise been authorized by the client to proceed with the services required by the contracts. With respect to O&M contracts, however, we include in backlog the amount of revenues we expect to receive for only one succeeding year, regardless of the remaining life of the contract. For national government programs (other than U.S. federal O&M contracts), our policy is to include in backlog the full contract award, whether funded or unfunded, excluding option periods. In accordance with industry practice, substantially all of our contracts are subject to cancellation or termination at the discretion of the client. In a situation where a client terminates a contract, we would ordinarily be entitled to receive payment for work performed up to the date of termination and, in certain instances, we may be entitled to allowable termination and cancellation costs. In addition, it is not unusual for clients to change the scope of services required by the contract over the life of the project. Accordingly, backlog can fluctuate from one reporting period to the next due to the timing of when new contracts are added to backlog and when the contract revenue is recognized in our consolidated financial statements. Many of our contracts require us to provide services that span over a number of fiscal quarters (and sometimes over fiscal years).
Please refer to Item 1A—Risk Factors, above, for a discussion of other factors that may cause backlog to ultimately convert into revenues at different amounts.
The following table summarizes our backlog for each of the last three fiscal years (in millions): 
 
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
Technical professional services
 
$
11,692.4

 
$
12,607.0

 
$
11,118.4

Field services
 
7,114.2

 
5,773.0

 
6,099.5

Total
 
$
18,806.6

 
$
18,380.0

 
$
17,217.9

Our backlog at October 2, 2015 increased by $0.4 billion, or 2.3%, to $18.8 billion from $18.4 billion at September 26, 2014. The increase in backlog from September 26, 2014 to October 2, 2015 was due primarily to new awards from clients operating in the Chemicals and Pharmaceuticals industries, off-set in part by an approximate $600 million reduction due to foreign exchange.
Backlog relating to work to be performed either directly or indirectly for the U.S. federal government and its agencies totaled approximately $4.6 billion (or 24.6% of total backlog), $4.4 billion (or 23.9% of total backlog), and $3.9 billion (or 22.9% of total backlog) at October 2, 2015, September 26, 2014, and September 27, 2013, respectively. Most of our federal contracts require that services be provided beyond one year. In general, these contracts must be funded annually (i.e., the amounts to be spent under the contract must be appropriated by the U.S. Congress to the procuring agency, and then the agency must allot these sums to the specific contracts).
We estimate that approximately 7.3 billion, or 38.6%, of total backlog at October 2, 2015 will be realized as revenues within the next fiscal year.
Effects of Inflation
The effects of inflation on our business is discussed in Item 1A—Risk Factors, and is incorporated herein by reference.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
At October 2, 2015, our primary sources of liquidity consisted of $460.9 million of cash and cash equivalents and $1,013.1 million of available borrowing capacity under our $1.60 billion revolving credit facility (the "2014 Facility").

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Additional information regarding the 2014 Facility is set forth in Note 5 - Borrowings in Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We finance as much of our operations and growth as possible through cash generated by our operations.
During fiscal 2015, our cash and cash equivalents decreased by $271.8 million from $732.6 million at September 26, 2014 to $460.9 million at October 2, 2015. This compares to a net decrease in cash and cash equivalents of $523.8 million during the corresponding period last year. During fiscal 2015, we experienced net cash inflows of $484.6 million from operating activities offset by outflows of $553.3 million from financing activities, $96.1 million from investing activities, and $106.9 million from the effects of exchange rate changes.
Operations provided net cash of $484.6 million during fiscal 2015. This compares to net cash inflows of $721.7 million and $448.5 million during fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively. The $237.1 million decrease in cash provided by operations in fiscal 2015 as compared to fiscal 2014 was due primarily to a $264.6 million unfavorable change in the Company's working capital accounts and a $23.2 million decrease in net earnings attributable to the Group partially offset by a $31.2 million change related to the Company's defined benefit pension plans.
Because such a high percentage of our revenues are earned on cost-plus type contracts, and due to the significance of revenues relating to pass-through costs, most of the costs we incur are included in invoices we send to clients. Although we continually monitor our accounts receivable, we manage the operating cash flows of the Company by managing the working capital accounts in total, rather than by the individual elements. The primary elements of the Company’s working capital accounts are accounts receivable, accounts payable, and billings in excess of cost. Accounts payable consists of obligations to third parties relating primarily to costs incurred for projects which are generally billable to clients. Accounts receivable consist of billings to our clients — a substantial portion of which is for project-related costs. Billings in excess of cost consist of billings to and payments from our clients for costs yet to be incurred.
This relationship between revenues and costs, and between receivables and payables is unique to our industry, and facilitates review of our liquidity at the total working capital level. The changes in cash flows relating to our working capital accounts were due simply to the timing of cash receipts and payments within our working capital accounts and is not indicative of any known trend or fundamental change to the underlying business. We still continue to experience delays in certain payments and have seen an increase in the length of payment terms with certain customers. We believe that this situation does not present a significant risk to the Company's cash flows. We believe the risk of not collecting substantially all of the Company's outstanding receivables is remote. Though the Company provides services in a number of countries outside the U.S., we believe our credit risk is not significant. Our private sector customers are comprised principally of large, well known, and well established multi-national companies. Our government customers are comprised of national, state, and local agencies located principally in the U.S. and the U.K. We have not historically experienced significant collection issues with either of our governmental or non-governmental customers.
 
We used $96.1 million of cash and cash equivalents for investing activities during fiscal 2015. This compares to $1.5 billion and $157.1 million during fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively. This decrease was primarily the result of minimal acquisition activity in fiscal 2015 as compared to the Company's acquisition of SKM for $1.2 billion ($1.1 billion net of cash acquired) in fiscal 2014. There was also minimal acquisition activity in fiscal 2013.

Additions to property and equipment totaled $88.4 million, $132.1 million, and $127.3 million for fiscal years 2015, 2014, and 2013, respectively. Included in fiscal 2015 and 2014 activity are significant expenditures for leasehold improvements relating primarily to the consolidation of certain office space, expansion of office space and relocations of certain office space, all occurring in a number of locations.
Our financing activities resulted in net cash outflows of $553.3 million during fiscal 2015 as compared to net cash inflows of $304.9 million and net cash outflows of $59.7 million during fiscal 2014 and 2013, respectively. The $858.2 million in incremental cash outflows during fiscal 2015 as compared to the previous year was due primarily to (i) a $502.7 million increase in cash used to pay-off long-term debt during fiscal 2015, combined with (ii) $343.9 million used to repurchase shares of Company common stock (discussed in further detail in Part II, Item 5 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K). Substantially all of the amounts borrowed during fiscal 2014 under our 2014 Facility was used to fund the Company's business acquisitions completed last year.
    The Company had $460.9 million of cash and short term equivalents at October 2, 2015. Of this amount, approximately $99.9 million was held in the U.S. and $361.0 million was held outside of the U.S., primarily in Canada, the U.K., and the Eurozone. Other than the tax cost of repatriating funds held outside the U.S. to the U.S. (see Note 9—Income

Page 51


Taxes of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K), there are no impediments to repatriating these funds to the U.S.
The total amount utilized under the 2014 Facility at October 2, 2015 was $586.9 million ($584.4 million in the form of direct borrowings and $2.5 million utilized in the form of letters of credit). Please refer to Note 5—Borrowings of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for additional information regarding the 2012 facility and the 2014 Facility.
We believe we have adequate liquidity and capital resources to fund our operations, support our acquisition strategy, and service our debt for the next twelve months. We had $460.9 million in cash and cash equivalents at October 2, 2015, compared to $732.6 million at September 26, 2014. Our consolidated working capital position at October 2, 2015 was $1.3 billion; a decrease of $240.4 million from September 26, 2014.
Additionally, there was $1.0 billion of borrowing capacity available at October 2, 2015 under the 2014 Facility. We believe that the remaining capacity, terms and conditions of our revolving credit facility, combined with cash on-hand and the other committed and uncommitted facilities we have in place, are adequate for our working capital and general business requirements.
The Company had $236.4 million of letters of credit outstanding at October 2, 2015. Of this amount, $2.5 million were issued under the 2014 Facility and $233.9 million were issued under separate, committed and uncommitted letter-of-credit facilities.
Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements
We are party to financial instruments with off-balance sheet risk in the form of guarantees not reflected in our balance sheet that arise in the normal course of business. However, such off-balance sheet arrangements are not reasonably likely to have an effect on our financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or resources that is material to investors. See Note 10 – Commitments and Contingencies, and Derivative Financial Instruments of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on page F-1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
New Accounting Pronouncements

From time to time, the Financial Accounting Standards Board ("FASB") issues accounting standards updates (each being an "ASU") to its Accounting Standards Codification ("ASC"), which constitutes the primary source of U.S. GAAP. The Company regularly monitors ASUs as they are issued and considers their applicability to its business. All ASUs applicable to the Company are adopted by the due date and in the manner prescribed by the FASB. A discussion of those recently issued ASUs most likely to affect the presentation of the Company's consolidated financial statements follows.

In May 2014, the FASB issued ASU No. 2014-09—Revenue from Contracts with Customers. The new guidance provided by ASU 2014-09 is intended to remove inconsistencies and perceived weaknesses in the existing revenue requirements, provide a more robust framework for addressing revenue issues, improve comparability, provide more useful information and simplify the preparation of financial statements. ASU 2014-09 was initially effective for annual and interim reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2016. On July 9, 2015 the FASB approved a one year deferral of the effective date of this standard. The revised effective date for the standard is for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017 and interim periods therein. The FASB also approved changes allowing for early adoption of the standard as of the original effective date. The Company continues to evaluate the impact that the new guidance may have on the consolidated financial statements.

In April 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-03—Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs. ASU 2015-03 was issued to simplify the presentation of debt issuance costs by requiring such costs to be presented as a deduction from the corresponding debt liability. Through this ASU, the FASB intends to make the presentation of debt issuance costs consistent with the presentation of debt discounts or premiums. The guidance is effective for financial statements issued for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2015, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The Company does not believe the adoption of this ASU will have a material effect on its consolidated financial statements.

In May 2015, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update 2015-07—Disclosures for Investments in Certain Entities that Calculate Net Asset Value Per Share (or its Equivalent). ASU 2015-07 removes the requirement to categorize within the fair value hierarchy investments for which fair values are estimated using the net asset value practical expedient provided by

Page 52


ASC 820—Fair Value Measurement. Disclosures about investments in certain entities that calculate net asset value per share are limited under ASU 2015-07 to those investments for which the entity has elected to estimate the fair value using the net asset value practical expedient. ASU 2015-07 is effective for entities (other than public business entities) for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2016, with retrospective application to all periods presented. Early application is permitted. The Company is evaluating the impact of the ASU, but does not expect the impacts to be material to its consolidated financial statements.

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Item 7A.
QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
We do not enter into derivative financial instruments for trading, speculation or other purposes that would expose the Company to market risk. In the normal course of business, our results of operations are exposed to risks associated with fluctuations in interest rates and currency exchange rates.
Interest Rate Risk
Please refer to the discussion of the 2014 Facility and the 2012 Facility in the liquidity and capital resources discussion in Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, and Note 5 - Borrowings in Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements beginning on Page F-1 of this Annual report on Form 10-K.
Foreign Currency Risk
In situations where our operations incur contract costs in currencies other than their functional currency, we attempt to have a portion of the related contract revenues denominated in the same currencies as the costs. In those situations where revenues and costs are transacted in different currencies, we sometimes enter into foreign exchange contracts in order to limit our exposure to fluctuating foreign currencies. We follow the provisions of ASC 815-10 - Derivatives and Hedging in accounting for our derivative contracts. The Company does not currently have exchange rate sensitive instruments that would have a material effect on our consolidated financial statements or results of operations.

Item 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
The information required by this Item 8 is submitted as a separate section beginning on page F-1of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 9.
CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE
None.

Item 9A.
CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES
Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures
The Company’s management, with the participation of its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, evaluated the effectiveness of the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures as defined by Rule 13a-15(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”) as of October 2, 2015, the end of the period covered by this Annual Report on Form 10-K (the “Evaluation Date”). Based on that evaluation, the Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that the Company’s disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of the Evaluation Date.
Management’s Annual Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
Management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal controls over financial reporting, as defined in Rule 13a-15(f) under the Exchange Act. Management, with the participation of its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, has assessed the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting as of the Evaluation Date based on the framework established in “Internal Control—Integrated Framework”, issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this evaluation, management has concluded that the Company’s internal controls over financial reporting as of the Evaluation Date were effective. The Company’s independent registered public accounting firm, Ernst & Young LLP, has issued an attestation report on the Company’s internal control over financial reporting which appears later in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.
Changes in Internal Control
There were no changes in the Company’s internal control over financial reporting during the Company’s fiscal quarter ended October 2, 2015, that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

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Limitations on Effectiveness of Controls
The Company’s management, including its Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, does not expect that its disclosure controls and procedures or its system of internal control over financial reporting will prevent or detect all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well designed or operated, can provide only reasonable, but not absolute, assurance that the objectives of the system of internal control are met. The design of the Company’s control system reflects the fact that there are resource constraints, and that the benefits of such control system must be considered relative to their costs. Further, because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that all control failures and instances of fraud, if any, within the Company have been detected. These inherent limitations include the realities that judgments in decision-making can be faulty and that breakdowns can occur because of simple error or mistake. Additionally, controls can be circumvented by the intentional acts of individuals, by collusion of two or more people, or by management override of the controls. The design of any system of controls is also based in part on certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that the design of any particular control will always succeed in achieving its objective under all potential future conditions.

Item 9B.
OTHER INFORMATION

                On November 19, 2015, the Human Resource and Compensation Committee of the Board of Directors of the Company (the "Compensation Committee") approved a new Management Incentive Plan (the “Management Incentive Plan”). The Management Incentive Plan replaces the Company's Incentive Bonus Plan beginning in fiscal 2016.  Specific measures and targets will be assigned to each participant based on their respective role in the organization. Select officers and managers of the Company are eligible to participate in the new Management Incentive Plan, and the Chief Executive Officer automatically participates.  Goals under the Management Incentive Plan will be defined at the corporate and business unit level.
                
Also on November 19, 2015, the Compensation Committee approved a new form of restricted stock unit agreement under the Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 1999 Stock Incentive Plan, as amended and restated.  This new form of award agreement provides for the award of performance-based restricted stock units based on growth in earnings per share from fiscal year to fiscal year (the "Award Agreement").  This metric considers the Company’s net earnings as a factor in the award, and divides such net earnings by the weighted average number of shares of the Company’s common stock outstanding during each fiscal year to reflect the growth in earnings per share from fiscal year to fiscal year.  
 
The foregoing summaries do not purport to be complete and are qualified in their entirety by reference to the terms of the Management Incentive Plan and the Award Agreement, copies of which are filed herewith as Exhibits 10.43 and 10.45, and are incorporated herein by reference.



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PART III
 
Item 10.
DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE
Directors, Executive Officers, Promoters and Control Persons
The information required by Paragraph (a), and Paragraphs (c) through (g) of Item 401 of Regulation S-K (except for information required by Paragraph (e) of that Item to the extent the required information pertains to our executive officers) and Item 405 of Regulation S-K is set forth under the captions “The Board of Directors and its Committees - Nominees,” “The Board of Directors and its Committees - Continuing Directors,” and “Section 16(a) Beneficial Ownership Reporting Compliance” in our definitive proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days after the close of our fiscal year and is incorporated herein by reference. The information required by Paragraph (b) of Item 401 of Regulation S-K , as well as the information required by Paragraph (e) of that Item to the extent the required information pertains to our executive officers, is set forth in Part I, Item 1 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K under the heading “Executive Officers of the Registrant.”
Code of Ethics
We have adopted a code of ethics for our chief executive, chief financial, and principal accounting officers; a code of business conduct and ethics for members of our Board of Directors; and corporate governance guidelines. The full text of the codes of ethics and corporate governance guidelines is available at our website at www.jacobs.com. In the event we make any amendment to, or grant any waiver from, a provision of the code of ethics that applies to the principal executive officer, principal financial officer or principal accounting officer that requires disclosure under applicable SEC rules, we will disclose such amendment or waiver and the reasons therefor on our website. We will provide any person without charge a copy of any of the aforementioned codes of ethics upon receipt of a written request. Requests should be addressed to: Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., 155 S. North Lake Avenue, Pasadena, California 91101, Attention: Corporate Secretary.
Corporate Governance
The information required by Items 407(d)(4) and (d)(5) of Regulation S-K is set forth under the caption “The Board of Directors and its Committees - Committees of the Board of Directors - Audit Committee” in our definitive proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days after the close of our fiscal year and is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 11.
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION
The information required by this Item is set forth under the captions “The Board of Directors and its Committees - Compensation of Directors for Fiscal 2015,” “The Board of Directors and its Committees - Committees of the Board of Directors - Compensation Committee Interlocks and Insider Participation,” “Compensation Committee Report,” “Compensation Discussion and Analysis,” and “Executive Compensation” in our definitive proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days after the close of our fiscal year and is incorporated herein by reference.
 

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Item 12.
SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS
Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity Compensation Plans
The following table presents certain information about our equity compensation plans as of October 2, 2015:
 
 
Column A
 
Column B
 
Column C
Plan Category
 
Number of securities to be issued upon
exercise of outstanding options,
warrants, and rights
 
Weighted- average
exercise price of
outstanding options,
warrants, and rights
 
Number of securities remaining
available for future issuance under equity compensation
plans (excluding securities reflected in Column A)
Equity compensation plans approved by shareholders (a)
 
4,072,707

 
$
46.06

 
7,144,884

Equity compensation plans not approved by shareholders
 

 

 

Total
 
4,072,707

 
$
46.06

 
7,144,884

____________________
(a)
The number in Column A excludes purchase rights accruing under our two, broad-based, shareholder-approved employee stock purchase plans: The Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 1989 Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “1989 ESPP”), and the Global Employee Stock Purchase Plan (the “GESPP”). These plans give employees the right to purchase shares at an amount and price that are not determinable until the end of the specified purchase periods, which occur monthly. Our shareholders have authorized a total of 27.8 million shares of common stock to be issued through the 1989 ESPP and the GESPP. From the inception of the 1989 ESPP and the GESPP through October 2, 2015, a total of 26.5 million shares have been issued, leaving 1.3 million shares of common stock available for future issuance at that date.

The information required by Item 403 of Regulation S-K is set forth under the caption “Security Ownership” in our definitive proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days after the close of our fiscal year and is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 13.
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE
The information required by this Item is set forth under the captions “The Board of Directors and its Committees - Independence of Directors,” “The Board of Directors and its Committees - Committees of the Board of Directors,” and “Certain Relationships and Related Transactions” in our definitive proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days after the close of our fiscal year and is incorporated herein by reference.

Item 14.
PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES
The information required by this Item is set forth under the captions “Report of the Audit Committee” and “Audit and Non-Audit Fees” in our definitive proxy statement to be filed with the SEC pursuant to Regulation 14A within 120 days after the close of our fiscal year and is incorporated herein by reference.

Page 57


PART IV

Item 15.
EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES

(a)Documents filed as part of this report:
(1)
The Company’s Consolidated Financial Statements at October 2, 2015 and September 26, 2014 and for each of the three years in the period ended October 2, 2015, September 26, 2014 and September 28, 2012 and the notes thereto, together with the report of the independent auditors on those Consolidated Financial Statements are hereby filed as part of this report, beginning on page F-1.
(2)
Financial statement schedules – no financial statement schedules are presented as the required information is either not applicable, or is included in the consolidated financial statements or notes thereto.
(3)
See Exhibits and Index to Exhibits, below.


Page 58


(b)Exhibits and Index to Exhibits:

2.1

 
Merger Implementation Deed between Sinclair Knight Merz Management Pty Limited and Sinclair Knight Merz Holdings Limited and Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and Jacobs Australia Holdings Company Pty. Ltd, dated as of September 8, 2013. Filed as Exhibit 2.2 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2013 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
2.2

 
Sales Agreement between Sinclair Knight Merz Management Pty Limited, Sinclair Knight Merz Holdings Limited, Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and Jacobs Australia Holdings Company Pty, Ltd., dated as of December 13, 2013.  Filed as Exhibit 2.3 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the first quarter of fiscal 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
3.1

 
Amended and Restated Certificate of Incorporation of the Registrant. Filed as Exhibit 3.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on January 28, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
3.2

 
Amended and Restated Bylaws of the Registrant. Filed as Exhibit 3.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on July 16, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
4.1

 
See Sections 5 through 18 of Exhibit 3.1.
 
 
 
4.2

 
See Article II, Section 3.03 of Article III, Article VI and Section 7.04 of Article VII of Exhibit 3.2.
 
 
 
10.1#

 
The Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Incentive Bonus Plan for Officers and Key Managers as amended and restated on May 22, 2014. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.2#

 
The Executive Security Program of Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2014 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.3#

 
Amendment to the Executive Security Program of Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., dated December 23, 2008. Filed as Exhibit 10.3 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2014 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.4#

 
Amendment to the Executive Security Program of Jacobs Engineering Group Inc., dated May 31, 2009. Filed as Exhibit 10.4 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2014 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.5#

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 1991 Executive Deferral Plan, effective June 1, 1991. Filed as Exhibit 10.5 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2012 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.6#

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 1993 Executive Deferral Plan, effective December 1, 1993. Filed as Exhibit 10.6 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2012 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.7#

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 1995 Executive Deferral Plan, effective January 1, 1995. Filed as Exhibit 10.7 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2014 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.8#

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Amended and Restated Executive Deferral Plan. Filed as Exhibit 10.8 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2012 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.

Page 59


10.9#

 
The Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 1989 Employee Stock Purchase Plan, as Amended and Restated-effective January 22, 2009. Filed as Exhibit 10.9 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2014 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.10#

 
The Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Global Employee Stock Purchase Plan. Filed as Exhibit 10.10 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2011 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.11#

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 401(k) Plus Savings Plan and Trust, as Amended and Restated April 1, 2003. Filed as Exhibit 10.12 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2012 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.12#

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 1999 Stock Incentive Plan, as Amended and Restated. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K (File No. 333-157014) on January 28, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.13#

 
Form of Indemnification Agreement entered into between the Registrant and certain of its officers and directors. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2012 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.14#

 
Form of Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Non-Qualified Stock Option Agreement. Filed as Exhibit 4.3 to the Registrant’s Registration Statement on Form S-8 filed on January 29, 2009 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.15#

 
Form of Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Restricted Stock Agreement. Filed as Exhibit 10.3 to the Registrant's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2012 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.16#

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement. Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2012 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.17#

 
Form of Restricted Stock Award Agreement. Filed as Exhibit 10.3 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on June 1, 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.18#

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 1999 Outside Director Stock Plan, as Amended and Restated. Filed as Exhibit 10.21 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2012 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.19#

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement (Performance Shares - Net Earnings Growth 2013 Award). Filed as Exhibit 10.3 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2013 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.20#

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement. (Performance Shares - TSR 2013 Award). Filed as Exhibit 10.4 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2013 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.21

 
Credit Agreement dated as of March 29, 2012 among Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and certain of its subsidiaries as borrowers, and the Bank of America, N.A, (as Administrative Agent); BNP Paribas, and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. (as Co-Syndication Agents); Union Bank, N.A. (as Documentation Agent); Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (as Sole Book Manager); and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, BNP Paribas Securities Corp, and Wells Fargo Securities, LLC (as Joint Lead Arrangers). Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant's Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2012 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 

Page 60


10.22#

 
Employment agreement between Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and Michael Tyler dated May 28, 2013. Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2013 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.23#

 
Retirement Agreement dated April 14, 2014 between the Registrant and Thomas R. Hammond.  Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2014 and incorporated herein by reference. 

 
 
 
10.24#

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. 2005 Executive Deferral Plan, effective January 1, 2005. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2010 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.25#

 
Agreement between Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and Noel G. Watson dated July 1, 2010. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2010 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.26#

 
Consulting Agreement between Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and Noel G. Watson dated July 1, 2010. Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2010 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.27#

 
Amendment No. 1 to Consulting Agreement between the Registrant and Noel G. Watson dated July 1, 2011. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.28#

 
Amendment No. 2 to Consulting Agreement between the Registrant and Noel G. Watson dated July 1, 2013. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2013 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.29

 
Term Loan Agreement dated January 27, 2011 between Jacobs Engineering U.K. Limited and Royal Bank of Scotland Finance (Ireland). Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.30

 
Senior Term Loan Facility dated January 26, 2011 between Jacobs Nederland B.V. and BNP Paribas. Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.31

 
Senior Term Loan Facility dated January 26, 2011 between Jacobs Engineering U.K. Limited and Bank of America, N.A., London Branch. Filed as Exhibit 10.3 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
10.32

 
Senior Term Loan Facility dated January 26, 2011 between Jacobs Australia Pty Limited and Bank of America, N.A., Australian Branch. Filed as Exhibit 10.4 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
10.33

 
Form of Guaranty among certain subsidiaries of the Registrant and Royal Bank of Scotland Finance (Ireland), BNP Paribas, Bank of America, N.A., London Branch, and Bank of America, N.A., Australian Branch. Filed as Exhibit 10.5 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.34#

  
Employment Agreement dated December 23, 2010 between the Registrant and Gary Mandel. Filed as Exhibit 10.6 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2011 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.35

 
Amended and Restated Credit Agreement dated as of February 7, 2014 among Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and certain of its subsidiaries as borrowers, and the Bank of America, N.A. (as Administrative Agent); Bank of America, N.A., BNP Paribas, and Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. (as Co-Syndication Agents); The Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ, LTD, and TD Bank, N.A. (as Co-Documentation Agents); Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated (as Sole Book Manager); and Merrill Lynch, Pierce, Fenner & Smith Incorporated, BNP Paribas Securities Corp, and Wells Fargo Securities, LLC (as Joint Lead Arrangers).  Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on February 11, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 

Page 61


10.36#

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement (Performance Shares - Net Earnings Growth - 2014 Award).  Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.

 
 
 
10.37#

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement (Performance Shares - TSR - 2014 Award).  Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.38

 
Amendment No. 3 to Consulting Agreement between the Registrant and Noel G. Watson dated July 1, 2014. Filed as Exhibit 10.40 to the Registrant’s fiscal 2014 Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.39#

 
Offer Letter by and between Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. and Kevin C. Berryman, effective November 12, 2014.  Filed as Exhibit 99.1 to Amendment No. 1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K/A on November 17, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
10.40#

 
Transition Agreement with Craig L. Martin, dated as of December 19, 2014. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on December 23, 2014 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.41#

 
Letter Agreement with Noel G. Watson, dated as of February 25, 2015. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on March 2, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.42

 
Amendment Agreement, dated as of March 4, 2015, among Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., certain subsidiaries thereof party thereto, each lender party thereto, each issuer of letters of credit party thereto and Bank of America, N.A., as Administrative Agent and Swing Line Lender. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on March 5, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.43#

 
Form of Transition Agreement. Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.44#

 
Form of Stock Option Agreement (December 2014 grants). Filed as Exhibit 10.3 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the second quarter of fiscal 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.45#

 
Offer Letter with Steven J. Demetriou, dated as of July 10, 2015. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on July 16, 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.46#

 
Form of Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.47#

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Award Agreement (Performance Shares - Net Earnings Growth). Filed as Exhibit 10.2 to the Registrant’s Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the third quarter of fiscal 2015 and incorporated herein by reference.
 
 
 
10.48#

 
Separation Agreement with Santo Rizzuto dated October 16, 2015. Filed as Exhibit 10.1 to the Registrant’s Current Report on Form 8-K on October 22, 2015.
 
 
 
†10.49

 
Separation Agreement with Cora Carmody, effective September 15, 2015.
 
 
 
†10.50

 
Jacobs Engineering Group Inc. Management Incentive Plan, as Amended and Restated, effective November 19, 2015.
 
 
 
†10.51

 
Form of Restricted Stock Agreement (awarded pursuant to the 1999 Stock Incentive Plan).
 
 
 
†10.52

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement (awarded pursuant to the 1999 Stock Incentive Plan).
 
 
 
†10.53

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement (Performance Shares - Earnings Per Share Growth).
 
 
 
†10.54

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement (Performance Shares - TSR).
 
 
 
†10.55

 
Form of Restricted Stock Unit Agreement (Cash Settled Non-US Employees).
 
 
 

Page 62


†10.56

 
Form of Nonqualified Stock Option Agreement (1999 Stock Incentive Plan).
 
 
 
†21.

  
List of Subsidiaries of Jacobs Engineering Group Inc.
 
 
†23.

  
Consent of Ernst & Young LLP, Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm.
 
 
†31.1

  
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
 
†31.2

  
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to Section 302 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
 
†32.1

  
Certification of Chief Executive Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
 
†32.2

  
Certification of Chief Financial Officer pursuant to 18 U.S.C. Section 1350, as adopted pursuant to Section 906 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.
 
 
†95.

 
Mine Safety Disclosure.
 
 
 
†101.INS

  
XBRL Instance Document
 
 
†101.SCH

  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Schema Document
 
 
†101.CAL

  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Calculation Linkbase Document
 
 
†101.DEF

  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Definition Linkbase Document
 
 
†101.LAB

  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Label Linkbase Document
 
 
†101.PRE

  
XBRL Taxonomy Extension Presentation Linkbase Document
Being filed herewith.