10-K 1 a10kdocument12312016q4.htm 10-K Document
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
(Mark One)
x
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016.
 
or
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
For the transition period from                      to                    .
Commission File Number 000-06217
 
intclogo2015a08.jpg
INTEL CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Delaware
 
94-1672743
State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization
 
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
 
 
 
2200 Mission College Boulevard, Santa Clara, California
 
95054-1549
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code (408) 765-8080
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of each class
 
Name of each exchange on which registered
Common stock, $0.001 par value
 
The NASDAQ Global Select Market*
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:
None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes x  No ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes ¨  No x
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes x  No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every interactive data file required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes x  No ¨
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (§229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer  x
 
Accelerated filer  ¨
 
Non-accelerated filer  ¨
 
Smaller reporting company  ¨
 
 

 
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
 
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes ¨  No x
Aggregate market value of voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the registrant as of July 1, 2016, based upon the closing price of the common stock as reported by the NASDAQ Global Select Market on such date, was
$154.8 billion
4,728 million shares of common stock outstanding as of February 7, 2017
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of the registrant’s proxy statement related to its 2017 Annual Stockholders’ Meeting to be filed subsequently are incorporated by reference into Part III of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Except as expressly incorporated by reference, the registrant’s proxy statement shall not be deemed to be part of this report.



INTEL CORPORATION
 
FORM 10-K
FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2016
INDEX
 
  
Page
 
Item 1.
Item 1A.
Item 1B.
Item 2.
Item 3.
Item 4.
 
Item 5.
Item 6.
Item 7.
Item 7A.
Item 8.
Item 9.
Item 9A.
Item 9B.
 
Item 10.
Item 11.
Item 12.
Item 13.
Item 14.
 
Item 15.



Forward-Looking Statements
This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements that involve a number of risks and uncertainties. Words such as "anticipates," "expects," "intends," "goals," "plans," "believes," "seeks," "estimates," "continues," "may," "will," “would,” "should," “could,” and variations of such words and similar expressions are intended to identify such forward-looking statements. In addition, any statements that refer to projections of our future financial performance, our anticipated growth and trends in our businesses, uncertain events or assumptions, and other characterizations of future events or circumstances are forward-looking statements. Such statements are based on management's expectations as of the date of this filing and involve many risks and uncertainties that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied in our forward-looking statements. Such risks and uncertainties include those described throughout this report and particularly in "Risk Factors" in Part I, Item 1A of this Form 10-K. Given these risks and uncertainties, readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on such forward-looking statements. Readers are urged to carefully review and consider the various disclosures made in this Form 10-K and in other documents we file from time to time with the Securities and Exchange Commission that disclose risks and uncertainties that may affect our business. The forward-looking statements in this Form 10-K do not reflect the potential impact of any divestitures, mergers, acquisitions, or other business combinations that had not been completed as of February 17, 2017. In addition, the forward-looking statements in this Form 10-K are made as of the date of this filing, and Intel does not undertake, and expressly disclaims any duty, to update such statements, whether as a result of new information, new developments or otherwise, except to the extent that disclosure may be required by law.

1


PART I



ITEM 1.
BUSINESS
Company Overview
We are a world leader in the design and manufacturing of essential products and technologies that power the cloud and an increasingly smart, connected world. Intel delivers computer, networking, and communications platforms to a broad set of customers including original equipment manufacturers (OEMs), original design manufacturers (ODMs), cloud and communications service providers, as well as industrial, communications and automotive equipment manufacturers. We are expanding the boundaries of technology through our relentless pursuit of Moore’s Law and computing breakthroughs that make amazing experiences possible. We were incorporated in California in 1968 and reincorporated in Delaware in 1989.
Company Strategy
Our vision is if it is smart and connected, it is best with Intel®. As a result, our strategy is to drive a "Virtuous Cycle of Growth" that enables the expansion of the data center as well as the proliferation of smart, connected things and devices, while continuing to fuel technology with the economics of Moore's Law.
People are experiencing a dramatic shift in their relationship to technology as things and devices become increasingly connected to each other and the cloud, merging the digital and physical worlds. Computing is becoming pervasive everywhere and in everything. The Virtuous Cycle of Growth leverages Intel's core assets to power the cloud and drive the increasingly smart and connected world.
Virtuous Cycle of Growth
a17029vcgepsr01.jpg
Our businesses across the cloud and data center, through things and devices, are accelerated by memory and field-programmable gate array (FPGA) technologies—all of which are bound together by connectivity and enhanced by the economics of Moore's Law. We further transform these technologies to deliver compelling user experiences.
The Cloud and Data Center. We believe that the most important trend shaping the future of the smart and connected world is the cloud. We design and optimize our products to deliver industry leading performance and best in class total cost of ownership for cloud workloads. Intel is adding new products and features to our portfolio to address emerging, high growth workloads such as artificial intelligence, media, and 5G.

2


Things and Devices. Things and devices encompass all smart devices, including PCs, sensors, consoles, and other edge devices that are connected to the cloud. When a "thing" is connected to the cloud, the data it captures can be measured in real time and accessed virtually from anywhere. We will continue to deliver leadership, performance, and innovation in PCs. In our Internet of Things business, we focus our investments on areas where we see growth potential, such as the autonomous vehicle, industrial, and retail market segments.
Memory and Programmable Solutions. Advancements in memory technology and programmable solutions, such as FPGAs, make possible entirely new classes of products for the data center and Internet of Things. The need for faster storage and greater memory capacity unlocks value in the cloud as the demand to automate and analyze exponential quantities of data increases. FPGAs can efficiently manage the changing workload demands of next-generation data centers and offer the flexibility for users to change their workloads real-time. FPGAs are also used in a wide range of other applications, such as machine learning and Advanced Driver Assistance Systems.
Connectivity. As the connectivity technologies continue to evolve, more things and devices are able to connect with each other and the cloud. The ability to connect, and to derive actionable insights from massive amounts of data brings new experiences to our daily lives and transforms businesses.
Moore's Law. Our co-founder Gordon Moore predicted, in what is known as Moore's Law, that transistor density on integrated circuits would double about every two years. Intel’s advancement of Moore’s Law has driven significant computing power growth and increasingly better economics and pricing. We will continue to harness the value of Moore's Law by enabling new devices with higher functionality and complexity while controlling power, cost, and size.
Leveraging our core assets enhances our strategy and provides us with the scale, capacity, and global reach to establish new technologies and respond to customers’ needs quickly. Our core assets include the following:
Silicon and Manufacturing Technology Leadership. We have long been the leader in silicon manufacturing process technology and we aim to continue our lead through investment and innovation in this critical area. Unlike many other semiconductor companies, we primarily manufacture our products in our own manufacturing facilities, which enables us to optimize performance, shorten our time-to-market, and scale new products more rapidly. We believe this competitive advantage will be extended in the future as the costs to build leading-edge fabrication facilities increase over time.
Architecture and Platforms. We are able to share intellectual property across our platforms and operating segments, which reduces our costs and provides a higher return on capital in our growth market segments. The combination of our shared intellectual property portfolio and our interchangeable manufacturing assets allows us to seamlessly shift our production capabilities to respond to market demand. We continue to invest in improving Intel architecture and product platforms to deliver increased value to our customers and expand the capabilities of the architecture in adjacent market segments.
Software and Services. We offer software and services that provide solutions through a combination of hardware and software for consumer and corporate environments and that assist software developers in creating software applications that take advantage of our platforms.
Customer Orientation. We focus on providing compelling user experiences by developing our next generation of products based on customer needs and expectations. In turn, our products help enable the design and development of new user experiences, form factors, and usage models. We offer platforms that incorporate various components and capabilities designed and configured to work together to provide an optimized solution that customers can easily integrate into their products.
Acquisitions and Strategic Investments. We invest in companies around the world that we believe will further our strategic objectives, stimulate growth in the digital economy, create new business opportunities for Intel, and generate financial returns. Our investments take different forms, including acquisition of companies to further advance our strategic objectives, which is exemplified by our acquisition of Altera Corporation (Altera) in Q1 2016. Through the Altera acquisition, we are able to combine programmable solutions with our leading-edge products and manufacturing process to enable new classes of products for the data center and Internet of Things market segments.

3


Corporate Responsibility. Throughout our history, Intel has expanded the reach, influence, and power of computing to improve people’s everyday lives. We set ambitious goals and make strategic investments to drive improvements in environmental sustainability, supply chain responsibility, diversity and inclusion, and social impact that benefit the environment and society. We believe that our focus on corporate responsibility—built on a strong foundation of transparency, governance, and ethics—creates value for Intel and our stockholders by helping us mitigate risks, reduce costs, build brand value, and identify new market opportunities. To understand our performance and the progress we are making toward our corporate responsibility goals, refer to "Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability" below and our Corporate Responsibility Report on our website.
Business Organization
We manage our business through the following operating segments:
Client Computing Group (CCG)
 
Includes platforms designed for notebooks, 2 in 1 systems, desktops (including all-in-ones and high-end enthusiast PCs), tablets, phones, wireless and wired connectivity products, and mobile communication components.
 
Data Center Group (DCG)
 
Includes workload-optimized platforms and related products designed for enterprise, cloud, and communication infrastructure market segments.
 
Internet of Things Group (IOTG)
 
Includes platforms designed for Internet of Things market segments, including retail, transportation, industrial, video, buildings and smart cities, along with a broad range of other market segments.
 
Non-Volatile Memory Solutions Group (NSG)
 
Includes NAND flash memory products primarily used in solid-state drives.
 
Intel Security Group (ISecG)
 
Includes security software products designed to deliver innovative solutions that secure computers, mobile devices, and networks around the world.
 
Programmable Solutions Group (PSG)
 
Includes programmable semiconductors (primarily FPGAs) and related products for a broad range of market segments, including communications, data center, industrial, military, and automotive.
 
All Other
 
Includes results from our other non-reportable segment and corporate-related charges.
For additional information regarding our operating segments, including the planned divestiture of ISecG, see "Note 4: Operating Segments and Geographic Information" and "Note 10: Acquisitions and Divestitures" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.

4


Revenue by Major Operating Segment
Net revenue for each of our reported operating segments is presented below.
Percentage of Revenue by Major Operating Segment
(Dollars in Millions)
revenuebyos2016a01.jpg
Products
Platforms
We offer platforms that incorporate various components and technologies, including a microprocessor and chipset, a stand-alone System-on-Chip (SoC), or a multichip package. A platform may be enhanced by additional hardware, software, and services offered by Intel. Platforms are used in various form factors across our CCG, DCG, and IOTG operating segments. We derive a substantial majority of our revenue from platforms, which is our principal product.
A microprocessor—the central processing unit (CPU) of a computer system—processes system data and controls other devices in the system. We offer microprocessors with one or multiple processor cores. Multi-core microprocessors can enable improved multitasking and energy-efficient performance by distributing computing tasks across two or more cores. In addition, many of our processor families integrate graphics functionality onto the processor die. In 2016, we released our 7th generation Intel® Core™ processor, formerly code-named Kaby Lake as well as Intel® Xeon® processor E5 v4 family, formerly code-named Broadwell.
A chipset sends data between the microprocessor and input, display, and storage devices, such as the keyboard, mouse, monitor, hard drive or solid-state drive, and optical disc drives. Chipsets extend the audio, video, and other capabilities of many systems and perform essential logic functions, such as balancing the performance of the system and removing bottlenecks.
We offer and develop SoC and multichip packaging products that integrate our CPUs with other system components, such as graphics, audio, imaging, communication and connectivity, and video, onto a single product. SoC and multichip packaging products are designed to reduce total cost of ownership, provide improved performance due to higher integration and lower power consumption, and enable a variety of our form factors.


5


We offer a range of platforms based upon the following microprocessors:
processorlistclearcolor2016a.jpg
For additional product information, see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Part II, Item 7 of this Form 10-K.

6


Competition
The computing industry continuously evolves with new and enhanced technologies and products from existing and new providers. The marketplace can change quickly in response to the introduction of such technologies and products and other factors such as changes in customer and end-user requirements, expectations, and preferences. As technologies evolve and new market segments emerge, the boundaries between the market segments that we compete in are also subject to change.
Intel faces significant competition in the development and market acceptance of our products in this environment. Our platforms, based on Intel architecture, are positioned to compete across the compute continuum, from the lowest power and mobile devices to the most powerful data center servers. These platforms have integrated hardware and software and offer customers benefits such as ease of use, savings in total cost of ownership, and the ability to scale systems to accommodate increased usage.
Competitors
We compete against other companies that make and sell platforms, other silicon components, and software to businesses that build and sell computing and communications systems to end users. Our competitors also include companies that sell goods and services to businesses that use them for their internal and/or customer-facing processes (e.g., businesses running large data centers). In addition, we face competition from OEMs, ODMs, and other industrial and communications equipment manufacturers that, to some degree, choose to vertically integrate their own proprietary semiconductor and software assets. By doing so, these competitors may be attempting to offer greater differentiation in their products and to increase their share of the profits for each finished product they sell. Continuing changes in industry participants through, for example, acquisitions or business collaborations could also have a significant impact on our competitive position.
In the PC market segment, we are a leading provider of platforms for traditional desktops and notebooks. We face existing and emerging competition in these product areas. Tablets, phones, and other mobile devices offered by numerous vendors are significant competitors to traditional PCs for many usages and considerable blurring of system form factors currently exists in the marketplace. We are a relatively recent provider of platforms for tablets and phones, and we face strong competition from vendors that use applications processors based on the ARM* architecture, feature low-power, long battery-life operation, and are built in SoC formats that integrate numerous functions on one chip.
In the data center market segment, we are a leading provider of data center platforms and face competition from companies using ARM architecture or other technologies. Internet cloud computing, storage, and networking are areas of significant targeted growth for us in the data center segment, and we face strong competition in these market segments.
In the Internet of Things market segment, we have a long-standing position as a supplier of components and software for embedded products. This marketplace continues to expand significantly with increasing types and numbers of smart and connected devices for industrial, commercial, and consumer uses such as wearables. As this market segment evolves, we face numerous large and small incumbent processor competitors, as well as new entrants that use ARM architecture and other operating systems and software. In addition, the Internet of Things requires a broad range of connectivity solutions and we face competition from companies providing traditional wireless solutions such as cellular, WiFi, and Bluetooth, as well as several new entrants who are taking advantage of new focused communications protocols.
In the memory market segment, we compete against other providers of NAND flash memory products. We focus our efforts primarily on incorporating NAND flash memory into solution products, such as solid-state drives supporting enterprise and consumer applications. We believe that our memory offerings, including innovative developments such as Intel® Optane™ technology, complement our product offerings in our other segments.
Our security business operates in highly competitive, fragmented, and rapidly changing market segments. We are a major provider of cybersecurity products and services to both businesses and consumers. For businesses, we compete with companies selling individual point security products and companies selling multiple security products. We offer businesses a portfolio of products that are integrated into a comprehensive security solution. For consumers, we primarily compete against other major security companies and providers of free security products. Our consumer offerings are designed to protect user data, identity, and devices across the compute continuum.

7


In the programmable solutions market segment, we are a leading provider of programmable semiconductors and related products, including FPGAs and SoC FPGAs. We face competition from other programmable logic companies, as well as companies that make other types of semiconductor products, such as application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs), application-specific standard products (ASSPs), graphics processing units (GPUs), digital signal processors (DSPs), and CPUs. Targeted growth areas for our programmable solutions include communications, data center, and automotive applications. The FPGA life cycle is long, relative to other Intel products—from the time that a design win is secured, it generally takes three or more years before a customer starts volume production and we receive the associated revenue from such design win.

Our products primarily compete based on performance, energy efficiency, integration, innovative design, features, price, quality, reliability, brand recognition, technical support, and availability. The importance of these factors varies by the type of end system for the products. For example, performance might be among the most important factors for our products for data center servers, while price and integration might be among the most important factors for our products for tablets, phones, and other mobile devices.
Competitive Advantages
Our key competitive advantages include:
Well-positioned for growth in smart, connected world. We offer solutions across every segment of the smart, connected world—from the cloud, to the network, to devices—and believe that we are well-positioned for growth through our strategy of the Virtuous Cycle of Growth. The expansion and proliferation of the cloud and data center, Internet of Things, memory, and FPGAs—all of which are connected—help grow our business. As more devices connect to the cloud, we have increased opportunities for growth.
Transitions to next-generation technologies. We have a market lead in transitioning to the next-generation process technology and bringing products to market using such technology. Our products utilizing our 14-nanometer (nm) process technology are in the market and we are continuing to work on the development of our next-generation 10nm process technology. We believe that these advancements will offer significant improvements in one or more of the following areas: performance, new features, energy efficiency, and cost.
Combination of our network of manufacturing and assembly and test facilities with our global architecture design teams. We have made significant capital and research and development (R&D) investments into our integrated manufacturing network, which enables us to have more direct control over our design, development, and manufacturing processes; quality control; product cost; production timing; performance; power consumption; and manufacturing yield. The increased cost of constructing new fabrication facilities to support smaller transistor geometries and larger wafers has led to a reduced number of companies that can build and equip leading-edge manufacturing facilities. Most of our competitors rely on third-party foundries and subcontractors for manufacturing and assembly and test needs. We provide foundry services as an alternative to such foundries.

8


Manufacturing and Assembly and Test
In 2016, the majority of our wafer manufacturing was conducted within the U.S. Manufacturing conducted within and outside the U.S. may be impacted by the timing of a facility’s transition to a newer process technology, as well as a facility’s capacity utilization.
We manufacture our products in facilities at the following locations:
a17029esmapfin2a02.jpg
As of December 31, 2016, our microprocessors were manufactured on 300mm wafers, with a substantial majority manufactured using our 14nm and 22nm process technologies. We continue to develop new generations of manufacturing process technology and realize the benefits which enable silicon designs with less space per transistor, reduced heat output from each transistor, and increased number of integrated features on each chip. These advancements make possible innovations of new products with higher functionality while controlling power, cost, and size. We incur factory start-up costs as we ramp our facilities for a new process technology. In 2017, we announced plans to complete our Arizona facility which is targeted for 7nm process technology.
We use third-party foundries to manufacture wafers for certain components, including communications, connectivity, networking, FPGA, and memory products. In addition, we primarily use subcontractors to manufacture board-level products and systems. We purchase certain communications and connectivity products from external vendors primarily in the Asia-Pacific region. In addition to the assembly and test facilities presented on the map, we use subcontractors to augment capacity to perform assembly and test of certain products, primarily chipsets and communications, FPGAs, connectivity, and memory products.
We utilize a multi-source strategy for our memory business to enable a robust and flexible supply chain. In 2016, we began ramping our facility in Dalian, China to produce leading-edge non-volatile memory. This expansion enables us to maintain a cost-effective strategy to best serve our customers in 3D NAND. In addition to our strategic investments to manufacture memory internally, we have a supplemental supply agreement with Micron Technology, Inc. (Micron), as well as capacity from the joint venture, IM Flash Technologies, LLC (IMFT) factory in Lehi, Utah. For further information on IMFT, see "Note 9: Investments" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
Our employment and operating practices are consistent with, and we expect our suppliers and subcontractors to abide by, local country law. Intel expects all suppliers to comply with the Intel Code of Conduct and the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition (EICC) Code of Conduct, both of which set standards that address the rights of workers to safe and healthy working conditions, environmental responsibility, compliance with privacy and data security obligations, and compliance with applicable laws. For more information about supply-chain responsibility, refer to "Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability" below and our Corporate Responsibility Report available on Intel's website.

9


We have thousands of suppliers, including subcontractors, fulfilling our various materials, equipment, and service needs. We set expectations for supplier performance and reinforce those expectations with periodic assessments and audits. We regularly communicate those expectations and work with our suppliers to implement improvements when necessary. Where possible, we seek to have several sources of supply for all materials and resources. However, we may rely on a single or limited number of suppliers, or upon suppliers in a single country. In those cases, we develop and implement plans and actions to reduce the exposure that would result from a disruption in supply. We have entered into long-term contracts with certain suppliers to help ensure a stable supply of silicon and semiconductor manufacturing tools.
Our products are typically manufactured at multiple Intel facilities around the world or by subcontractors. However, some products are manufactured in only one Intel or subcontractor facility, and we seek to reduce the exposure that would result from a disruption at any such facility.
Employees
As of December 31, 2016, we had 106,000 employees worldwide, with approximately 50% of those employees located in the U.S.
Research and Development
We are committed to investing in world-class technology development, particularly in the design and manufacture of integrated circuits. R&D expenditures were $12.7 billion in 2016 ($12.1 billion in 2015 and $11.5 billion in 2014).
Our R&D activities are directed toward the delivery of solutions consisting of hardware and software platforms and supporting services across a wide range of computing devices. We are focused on developing the technology innovations that we believe will deliver our next generation of products, which will in turn enable new form factors and usage models for businesses and consumers. We focus our R&D efforts on advanced computing technologies, developing new microarchitectures, advancing our silicon manufacturing process technology, delivering the next generation of platforms, improving our platform initiatives, developing new solutions in emerging technologies (including memory and the Internet of Things), and developing software solutions and tools. Our R&D efforts are intended to enable new levels of performance and address areas such as energy efficiency, system-level integration, security, scalability for multi-core architectures, system manageability, and ease of use.
As part of our R&D efforts, we plan to introduce new microarchitectures for our various products on a regular cadence. We expect to lengthen the amount of time we will utilize our 14nm and our next-generation 10nm process technologies with multiple waves of product offerings, further optimizing our technologies while meeting the yearly market cadence for product introductions.
intelticktockwavelength2016a.jpg
Advances in our silicon technology have enabled us to continue making Moore’s Law a reality. In 2014, we began manufacturing our 5th generation Intel Core processor family using our 14 nm process technology. In 2015, we released a new microarchitecture (our 6th generation Intel Core processor family), using our 14nm process technology. We enhanced the 14nm process on our 7th generation Intel Core processor family in 2016 and plan to further optimize our technologies with the upcoming 8th generation Intel Core processor family in 2017. We continue to make progress on developing our next-generation 10nm manufacturing process technology.

10


We have continued expanding on the advances anticipated by Moore’s Law by bringing new capabilities into silicon and producing new products optimized for a wider variety of applications. We expect that these advances will result in a significant reduction in transistor leakage, lower active power, and an increase in transistor density. These advances in our process technologies will enable new classes of products, from smart and connected things and devices to high performance systems that power data centers. For instance, we offer the Intel® Atom™ processor-based Intel® Joule™ compute module, a high-performance system-on-module designed to enable developers and entrepreneurs to go from concept to prototype to production in less time and at lower cost than with traditional system development.
With our continued focus on silicon and manufacturing technology leadership, we entered into a series of agreements with ASML Holding N.V. (ASML) in 2012, certain of which were amended in 2014 to further define the commercial terms between the parties. These amended agreements, in which Intel agreed to provide R&D funding over five years, are intended to accelerate the development of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography projects and deep ultraviolet immersion lithography projects, including generic developments applicable to both 300mm and 450mm.
Our R&D activities include initiatives that further enhance our platform solutions, for example:
The development of multi-mode LTE* and 5G technology, which brings connectivity capability to smart and connected devices and will power the 5G network infrastructure;
Memory technology innovation with 3D XPoint™ and 3D NAND technologies, which enables higher density and high performance storage and system memory solutions;
Integration of FPGA technology, which enables new classes of products for the data center and Internet of Things market segments; and
Other initiatives, such as leading-edge foundry platforms, ecosystem partner development, graphics, and high-performance computing.
Our R&D model is based on a global organization that emphasizes a collaborative approach to identifying and developing new technologies, leading standards initiatives, and influencing regulatory policies to accelerate the adoption of new technologies, including joint pathfinding conducted between researchers at Intel Labs and our business groups. We centrally manage key cross-business group product initiatives to align and prioritize our R&D activities across these groups. In addition, we may augment our R&D activities by investing in companies or entering into agreements with companies that have similar R&D focus areas, as well as directly purchasing or licensing technology applicable to our R&D initiatives. To drive innovation and gain efficiencies, we intend to utilize our investments in intellectual property and R&D across our market segments.
Sales and Marketing
Customers
We sell our products primarily to OEMs and ODMs. ODMs provide design and manufacturing services to branded and unbranded private-label resellers. In addition, our customers include other manufacturers and service providers, such as industrial and communication equipment manufacturers and cloud service providers, who buy our products through distributor, reseller, retail, and OEM channels throughout the world. For more information about our customers, including customers who accounted for greater than 10% of our net consolidated revenue, see "Note 4: Operating Segments and Geographic Information" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
Our worldwide reseller sales channel consists of thousands of indirect customers—systems builders that purchase Intel® processors and other products from our distributors. We have a program that allows distributors to sell our microprocessors and other products in small quantities to customers of systems builders. Our microprocessors and other products are also available in direct retail outlets.

11


Sales Arrangements
Our products are sold through sales offices throughout the world. Sales of our products are frequently made via purchase order acknowledgments that contain standard terms and conditions covering matters such as pricing, payment terms, and warranties, as well as indemnities for issues specific to our products, such as patent and copyright indemnities. From time to time, we may enter into additional agreements with customers covering, for example, changes from our standard terms and conditions, new product development and marketing, private-label branding, and other matters. Our sales are routinely made using electronic and web-based processes that allow the customer to review inventory availability and track the progress of specific goods ordered. Pricing on particular products may vary based on volumes ordered and other factors. We also offer discounts, rebates, and other incentives to customers to increase acceptance of our products and technology.
Our products are generally shipped under terms that transfer title to the customer, even in arrangements for which the recognition of revenue and related cost of sales is deferred. Our standard terms and conditions of sale typically provide that payment is due at a later date, usually 30 days after shipment or delivery. We assess credit risk through quantitative and qualitative analysis. From this analysis, we establish shipping and credit limits, and determine whether we will seek to use one or more credit support protection devices, such as obtaining a parent guarantee, standby letter of credit, or credit insurance. Credit losses may still be incurred due to bankruptcy, fraud, or other failure of the customer to pay.
Our sales to distributors are typically made under agreements allowing for price protection on unsold merchandise and a right of return on stipulated quantities of unsold merchandise. Under the price protection program, we give distributors credits for the difference between the original price paid and the current price that we offer. Our products typically have no contractual limit on the amount of price protection, nor is there a limit on the time horizon under which price protection is granted. The right of return granted generally consists of a stock rotation program in which distributors are able to exchange certain products based on the number of qualified purchases made by the distributor.
Distribution
Distributors typically handle a wide variety of products, including those that compete with our products, and fill orders for many customers. Customers may place orders directly with us or through distributors. We have several distribution warehouses that are located in proximity to key customers.
Backlog
Over time, our larger customers have generally moved to lean-inventory or just-in-time operations rather than maintaining larger inventories of our products. As our customers continue to lower their inventories, our processes to fulfill their orders have evolved to meet their needs. As a result, our manufacturing production is based on estimates and advance non-binding commitments from customers as to future purchases. Our order backlog as of any particular date is a mix of these commitments and specific firm orders that are primarily made pursuant to standard purchase orders for delivery of products. Only a small portion of our orders are non-cancelable, and the dollar amount associated with the non-cancelable portion is not significant.
Seasonal Trends
Historically, our net revenue has typically been higher in the second half of the year than in the first half of the year, accelerating in the third quarter and peaking in the fourth quarter.
Marketing
Our global marketing objectives are to build a strong, well-known Intel corporate brand that connects with businesses and consumers, and to offer a limited number of meaningful and valuable brands in our portfolio to aid businesses and consumers in making informed choices about technology purchases. The Intel Core processor family and the Intel® Quark™, Intel® Atom™, Intel® Celeron®, Intel® Pentium®, Intel® Xeon®, Intel® Xeon Phi™, and Intel® Itanium® trademarks make up our processor brands.

12


We promote brand awareness and preference, and generate demand through our own direct marketing as well as through co-marketing programs. Our direct marketing activities primarily include advertising through digital and social media and television, as well as consumer and trade events, industry and consumer communications, and press relations. We market to consumer and business audiences, and focus on building awareness and generating demand for new form factors such as all-in-one devices and 2 in 1 systems powered by Intel. Our key messaging focuses on increased performance, improved energy efficiency, and other capabilities such as connectivity and communications.
Purchases by customers often allow them to participate in cooperative advertising and marketing programs such as the Intel Inside® program. This program broadens the reach of our brands beyond the scope of our own direct marketing. Through the Intel Inside program, certain customers are licensed to place Intel® logos on computing devices containing our microprocessors and processor technologies, and to use our brands in their marketing activities. The program includes a market development component that accrues funds based on purchases and partially reimburses customers for marketing activities for products featuring Intel® brands, subject to customers meeting defined criteria. These marketing activities primarily include advertising through digital and social media and television, as well as press relations. We have also entered into joint marketing arrangements with certain customers.
Intellectual Property Rights and Licensing
Intel owns significant intellectual property (IP) and related IP rights around the world that relate to our products, services, R&D, and other activities and assets. Our IP portfolio includes patents, copyrights, trade secrets, trademarks, trade dress rights, and maskwork rights. We actively seek to protect our global IP rights and to deter unauthorized use of our IP and other assets. Such efforts can be difficult, however, particularly in countries that provide less protection to IP rights and in the absence of harmonized international IP standards. While our IP rights are important to our success, our business as a whole is not significantly dependent on any single patent, copyright, or other IP right.
We have obtained patents in the U.S. and other countries. Because of the fast pace of innovation and product development, and the comparative pace of governments’ patenting processes, our products are often obsolete before the patents related to them expire; in some cases, our products may be obsolete before the patents related to them are granted. As we expand our products into new industries, we also seek to extend our patent development efforts to patent such products. In addition to developing patents based on our own R&D efforts, we purchase patents from third parties to supplement our patent portfolio. Established competitors in existing and new industries, as well as companies that purchase and enforce patents and other IP, may already have patents covering similar products. There is no assurance that we will be able to obtain patents covering our own products, or that we will be able to obtain licenses from other companies on favorable terms or at all.
The software that we distribute, including software embedded in our component-level and platform products, is entitled to copyright and other IP protection. To distinguish our products from our competitors’ products, we have obtained trademarks and trade names for our products, and we maintain cooperative advertising programs with customers to promote our brands and to identify products containing genuine Intel components. We also protect details about our processes, products, and strategies as trade secrets, keeping confidential the information that we believe provides us with a competitive advantage.

13


Corporate Responsibility and Sustainability
We have a long history of leadership in corporate responsibility and set ambitious goals and drive improvements in key focus areas of environmental sustainability, supply chain responsibility, diversity and inclusion, and social impact.
We are committed to environmental sustainability and take a leadership position in promoting voluntary environmental initiatives by working proactively with governments, environmental groups, and industry. To minimize the environmental impact of our global manufacturing operations, we invest in conservation projects and set company-wide environmental targets, seeking to drive reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, energy use, water use, and waste generation. For the past nine years, we have been the largest voluntary corporate purchaser of green power in the U.S. according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, helping to stimulate the market for green power and reduce energy costs. We seek to reduce the environmental impact of our products through product ecology and e-waste initiatives and by designing products with improved energy-efficient performance, which helps us meet customer needs and identify market expansion opportunities. We believe that technology will be fundamental to finding solutions to the world’s environmental challenges, and we are joining forces with others to find and promote ways that technology can be used as a tool to address climate change and water conservation.
We are committed to advancing supply chain responsibility, as we believe this creates value by reducing risk, improving product quality, and raising the overall performance of our suppliers. Our efforts are designed to protect vulnerable workers throughout the global supply chain and include setting clear supplier expectations, investing in assessments, audits, and capability-building programs, and collectively addressing issues through our leadership in the Electronic Industry Citizenship Coalition (EICC). We have also led the industry on the conflict minerals issue and have worked extensively since 2008 to put in place processes and systems to develop ethical sourcing of tin, tantalum, tungsten, and gold for Intel and to prevent profits from the sale of those minerals from funding conflict in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) and adjoining countries. Since 2013, we have manufactured microprocessors that are DRC conflict-free for tantalum, tin, tungsten, and gold. We continue our work to establish responsible mineral supply chains for our company as well as our industry.
Diversity and inclusion are integral parts of our corporate strategy and vision. We believe that investing in training, diversity, benefits programs, and education helps us to attract and retain a talented workforce. In 2015, Intel set a goal to achieve full representation of women and underrepresented minorities in our U.S. workforce by 2020, reflecting talent available in the marketplace. We plan to spend $300 million to support this goal and accelerate diversity and inclusion—not just at Intel, but across the technology industry at large.
We and the Intel Foundation, a charitable organization, advance social impact initiatives and collaborative engagements to empower the next generation of innovators and expand economic opportunity for young people around the world through programs that increase access to technology skills and provide hands-on innovation experiences. Our social impact initiatives build trust with key stakeholders, support our long-term talent and diversity objectives, and support expansion of future market opportunities.
For more information about our corporate responsibility efforts, refer to our Corporate Responsibility Report available on Intel's website.
Distribution of Company Information
Our Internet address is www.intel.com. We publish voluntary reports on our website that outline our performance with respect to corporate responsibility, including environmental, health, and safety compliance.
We use our Investor Relations website, www.intc.com, as a routine channel for distribution of important information, including news releases, analyst presentations, financial information, corporate governance practices, and corporate responsibility information. We post filings on our website the same day they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), including our annual and quarterly reports on Forms 10-K and 10-Q and current reports on Form 8-K; our proxy statements; and any amendments to those reports or statements. We post our quarterly and annual earnings results at www.intc.com/results.cfm, and do not distribute our financial results via a news wire service. All such postings and filings are available on our Investor Relations website free of charge. In addition, our Investor Relations website allows interested persons to sign up to automatically receive e-mail alerts when we post financial information. The SEC’s website, www.sec.gov, contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC. The content on any website referred to in this Form 10-K is not incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K unless expressly noted.

Executive Officers of the Registrant
Our executive officers are listed below:
Name
 
Age
 
Office(s)
Andy D. Bryant
 
66
 
Chairman of the Board
Brian M. Krzanich
 
56
 
Chief Executive Officer
Diane M. Bryant
 
54
 
Executive Vice President; General Manager, Data Center Group
Dr. Venkata S.M. (“Murthy”) Renduchintala
 
51
 
Executive Vice President; President, Client and Internet of Things Businesses and System Architecture Group
Stacy J. Smith
 
54
 
Executive Vice President, Manufacturing, Operations and Sales
Robert H. Swan
 
56
 
Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer
Andy D. Bryant has been Chairman of our Board of Directors since May 2012. Mr. Bryant served as Vice Chairman of the Board of Directors of Intel from July 2011 to May 2012. From 2007 to 2012, Mr. Bryant served as Chief Administrative Officer. He was Executive Vice President, Technology, Manufacturing, and Enterprise Services from 2009 to 2012. Mr. Bryant previously served as Executive Vice President, Finance and Enterprise Services from 2007 to 2009; Executive Vice President, Chief Financial and Enterprise Services Officer from 2001 to 2007; Senior Vice President, Chief Financial and Enterprise Services Officer from 1999 to 2001; Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer from January 1999 to December 1999; and Vice President, Chief Financial Officer from 1994 to 1999. Mr. Bryant joined Intel in 1981. Mr. Bryant also serves on the Board of Directors of Columbia Sportswear and McKesson Corporation.
Brian M. Krzanich has been Chief Executive Officer and a member of our Board of Directors since May 2013. Mr. Krzanich served as Executive Vice President, Chief Operating Officer from 2012 to 2013. From 2010 to 2012, he was Senior Vice President, General Manager of Manufacturing and Supply Chain. From 2006 to 2010, he was Vice President, General Manager of Assembly and Test. Prior to 2006, Mr. Krzanich held various senior leadership positions within Intel’s manufacturing organization. Mr. Krzanich joined Intel in 1982. Mr. Krzanich is also a member of Deere & Company’s board of directors, and chairman of the board of directors of the Semiconductor Industry Association.
Diane M. Bryant has been General Manager of DCG since February 2012, and Executive Vice President since April 2016. In her current role, she manages strategy and product development for enterprise and government, cloud service providers, and communications service providers, spanning server, storage, and network solutions. From May 2008 to February 2012, Ms. Bryant was Corporate Vice President and Chief Information Officer, responsible for corporate-wide information technology solutions and services. Ms. Bryant also serves on the board of directors of United Technologies Corp.
Dr. Venkata S.M. (“Murthy”) Renduchintala joined Intel in November 2015. Since then, he has served as our Executive Vice President and President, Client and Internet of Things Businesses and System Architecture Group. In this role, Dr. Renduchintala oversees Intel’s Platform Engineering, Client Computing, Internet of Things, Software and Services, and Design and Technology Solutions divisions. From 2004 to 2015, Dr. Renduchintala held various senior positions at Qualcomm Incorporated, most recently as Co-President of Qualcomm CDMA Technologies from June 2012 to November 2015 and Executive Vice President of Qualcomm Technologies Inc. from October 2012 to November 2015. Before joining Qualcomm, Dr. Renduchintala served as Vice President and General Manager of the Cellular Systems Division of Skyworks Solutions Inc./Conexant Systems Inc. and he spent a decade with Philips Electronics, where he held various positions, including Vice President of Engineering for its consumer communications business.
Stacy J. Smith has been Executive Vice President, Manufacturing, Operations and Sales of Intel since October 2016. In that role, Mr. Smith leads the global Technology and Manufacturing Group and worldwide sales organization. From November 2012 to October 2016, he served as Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer. Previously, Mr. Smith served as Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer from January 2010 to November 2012; Vice President, Chief Financial Officer from 2007 to 2010; and Vice President, Assistant Chief Financial Officer from 2006 to 2007. From 2004 to 2006, Mr. Smith served as Vice President, Finance and Enterprise Services and Chief Information Officer. Mr. Smith joined Intel in 1988. Mr. Smith also serves on the board of directors of Autodesk, Inc.

14


Robert H. Swan has been our Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer since joining Intel in October 2016. He oversees Intel’s global finance organization—including finance, accounting and reporting, tax, treasury, internal audit, and investor relations—information technology, and the Corporate Strategy Office. From September 2015 to September 2016, Mr. Swan served as an Operating Partner at General Atlantic LLC, a private equity firm. Prior to General Atlantic, he served as Senior Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer of eBay Inc. from March 2006 to July 2015. Previously, Mr. Swan served as Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer of Electronic Data Systems Corporation, Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer of TRW Inc., as well as Chief Financial Officer, Chief Operating Officer, and Chief Executive Officer of Webvan Group, Inc. Mr. Swan began his career in 1985 at General Electric, serving for 15 years in numerous senior finance roles. Mr. Swan also serves on the board of directors of eBay.
ITEM 1A.RISK FACTORS
The following risks could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations, and the trading price of our common stock could decline. These risk factors do not identify all risks that we face; our operations could also be affected by factors that are not presently known to us or that we currently consider to be immaterial to our operations. Due to risks and uncertainties, known and unknown, our past financial results may not be a reliable indicator of future performance, and historical trends should not be used to anticipate results or trends in future periods. Refer also to the other information set forth in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and our financial statements and the related notes.
Changes in product demand can adversely affect our financial results.
Demand for our products is variable and hard to predict. Changes in the demand for our products may reduce our revenue, increase our costs, lower our gross margin percentage, or require us to write down the value of our assets. Our platform products are used across different market segments, and demand for our platforms may vary within or among our client computing, data center, Internet of Things, and other market segments. It is difficult to anticipate the impact of these changes, as demand may increase in one or more market segments while decreasing in others. Important factors that could lead to variation in the demand for our products include changes in:
business conditions, including downturns in the computing industry, or in the global or regional economies;
consumer confidence or income levels caused by changes in market conditions, including changes in government borrowing, taxation, or spending policies; the credit market; or expected inflation, employment, and energy or other commodity prices;
the level of our customers’ inventories;
competitive and pricing pressures, including actions taken by competitors;
customer product needs;
market acceptance and industry support of our new and maturing products; and
the technology supply chain, including supply constraints caused by natural disasters or other events.
We face significant competition. The industry in which we operate is highly competitive and subject to rapid technological and market developments, changes in industry standards, changes in customer needs, and frequent product introductions and improvements. If we do not anticipate and respond to these developments, our competitive position may weaken, and our products or technologies might be uncompetitive or obsolete. Additionally, a number of business combinations, including mergers, asset acquisitions and strategic partnerships, in the semiconductor industry have occurred over the last several years, and more could occur in the future. Consolidation in the industry could lead to fewer customers, partners or suppliers, any of which could negatively affect our financial results.
In recent years, our business focus has expanded and now includes the design and production of platforms and other products for the data center, Internet of Things, and memory market segments, including FPGA products, connectivity products, and a number of other products and services for a wide range of connected devices. As a result, we face new sources of competition, including, in certain of these market segments, from incumbent competitors with established customer bases and greater brand recognition. To be successful, we need to cultivate new industry relationships with customers and partners in these market segments. In addition, we must continually improve the cost, integration, and energy efficiency of our products, as well as expand our software capabilities to provide customers with comprehensive computing solutions. Despite our ongoing efforts, there is no guarantee that we will achieve or maintain consumer and market demand or acceptance for our products and services in these various market segments.

15


To compete successfully, we must maintain a successful R&D effort, develop new products and production processes, and improve our existing products and processes ahead of competitors. For example, we invest substantially in our network of manufacturing and assembly and test facilities, including the construction of new fabrication facilities to support smaller transistor geometries and larger wafers. Our R&D efforts are critical to our success and are aimed at solving complex problems, and we do not expect all of our projects to be successful. We may be unable to develop and market new products successfully, and the products we invest in and develop may not be well-received by customers. Our R&D investments may not generate significant operating income or contribute to our future operating results for several years, and such contributions may not meet our expectations or even cover the costs of such investments. Additionally, the products and technologies offered by others may affect demand for, or pricing of, our products.
If we are not able to compete effectively, our financial results will be adversely affected, including increased costs and reduced revenue and gross margin, and we may be required to accelerate the write-down of the value of certain assets.
Changes in the mix of products sold may harm our financial results. Our pricing and margins vary across our products and market segments due to differences in product features or manufacturing costs. For example, our platform product offerings range from lower-priced and entry-level platforms, such as those based on Intel Quark or Intel Atom processors, to higher-end platforms based on Intel Xeon processors. If demand shifts from our higher-priced to lower-priced platforms in any of our market segments, our gross margin and revenue would decrease. In addition, when products are introduced, they tend to have higher costs because of initial development costs and lower production volumes relative to the previous product generation, which can impact gross margin.
We operate globally and are subject to significant risks in many jurisdictions.
Global or regional conditions may harm our financial results. We have manufacturing, assembly and test, R&D, sales, and other operations in many countries, and some of our business activities may be concentrated in one or more geographic areas. Moreover, sales outside the U.S. accounted for approximately 78% of our revenue for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016. As a result, our operations and our financial results, including our ability to manufacture, assemble and test, design, develop, or sell products, may be adversely affected by a number of factors outside of our control, including:
global and local economic conditions;
geopolitical and security issues, such as armed conflict and civil or military unrest, crime, political instability, human rights concerns, and terrorist activity;
natural disasters, public health issues, and other catastrophic events;
inefficient infrastructure and other disruptions, such as supply chain interruptions and large-scale outages or unreliable provision of services from utilities, transportation, data hosting, or telecommunications providers;
government restrictions on, or nationalization of our operations in any country, or restrictions on our ability to repatriate earnings from a particular country;
differing employment practices and labor issues;
formal or informal imposition of new or revised export and/or import and doing-business regulations, including trade sanctions and tariffs, which could be changed without notice;
ineffective legal protection of our IP rights in certain countries;
local business and cultural factors that differ from our normal standards and practices; and
increased uncertainty regarding social, political, immigration and trade policies in the U.S. and abroad, such as recent U.S. legislation and policies and the United Kingdom's referendum to withdraw from the European Union ("Brexit").
We are subject to laws and regulations worldwide, which may differ among jurisdictions, affecting our operations in areas including, but not limited to: IP ownership and infringement; tax; import and export requirements; anti-corruption; foreign exchange controls and cash repatriation restrictions; data privacy requirements; anti-competition; advertising; employment; product regulations; environment, health, and safety requirements; and consumer laws. Compliance with such requirements may be onerous and expensive, and may otherwise impact our business operations negatively. Although we have policies, controls, and procedures designed to help ensure compliance with applicable laws, there can be no assurance that our employees, contractors, suppliers, and/or agents will not violate such laws or our policies. Violations of these laws and regulations could result in fines; criminal sanctions against us, our officers, or our employees; prohibitions on the conduct of our business; and damage to our reputation.

16


We may be affected by fluctuations in currency exchange rates. We are potentially exposed to adverse as well as beneficial movements in currency exchange rates. Although most of our sales occur in U.S. dollars, expenses may be paid in local currencies. An increase in the value of the dollar could increase the real cost to our customers of our products in those markets outside the U.S. where we sell in dollars, and a weakened dollar could increase the cost of expenses such as payroll, utilities, tax, and marketing expenses, as well as overseas capital expenditures. We also conduct certain investing and financing activities in local currencies. Our hedging programs reduce, but do not eliminate, the impact of currency exchange rate movements; therefore, changes in exchange rates could harm our results of operations and financial condition.
Catastrophic events or geopolitical conditions could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial results. Our operations or systems could be disrupted by natural disasters; industrial accidents; geopolitical conditions; terrorist activity; public health issues; cybersecurity incidents; interruptions of service from utilities, transportation, or telecommunications providers; or other catastrophic events. Such events could make it difficult or impossible to manufacture or deliver products to our customers, receive production materials from our suppliers, or perform critical functions, which could adversely affect our revenue and require significant recovery time and expenditures to resume operations. While we maintain business recovery plans that are intended to enable us to recover from natural disasters or other events that can be disruptive to our business, some of our systems are not fully redundant and we cannot be sure that our plans will fully protect us from all such disruptions.
We maintain a program of insurance coverage for a variety of property, casualty, and other risks. The types and amounts of insurance we obtain vary depending on availability, cost, and decisions with respect to risk retention. Some of our policies have large deductibles and broad exclusions. In addition, one or more of our insurance providers may be unable or unwilling to pay a claim. Losses not covered by insurance may be large, which could harm our results of operations and financial condition.
We are vulnerable to product and manufacturing-related risks.
Due to the variability in demand for our products and the complexity of our manufacturing operations, we may be unable to timely respond to fluctuations in demand. Our operations have high costs that are either fixed or difficult to reduce in the short term, including our costs related to manufacturing, such as facility construction and equipment, R&D, and the employment and training of a highly skilled workforce. If product demand decreases or we fail to forecast demand accurately, we could be required to write off inventory or record excess capacity charges, which would lower our gross margin. Our manufacturing or assembly and test capacity could be underutilized, and we may be required to write down our long-lived assets, which would increase our expenses. Factory-planning decisions may shorten the useful lives of facilities and equipment and cause us to accelerate depreciation.
Conversely, if product demand increases, we may be unable to add capacity fast enough to meet market demand. Our revenue and gross margin can also be affected by the timing of our product introductions and related expenses, including marketing expenses.
We are subject to risks associated with the development and implementation of new manufacturing process technology. We may not be successful or efficient in developing or implementing new production processes. Production of integrated circuits is a complex process. We are continually engaged in the transition from our existing process to the next-generation process technology. This consistent innovation involves significant expense and carries inherent risks, including difficulties in designing and developing next-generation process technologies, development and production timing delays, lower than anticipated manufacturing yields, and product defects and errata. Disruptions in the production process can also result from errors, defects in materials, delays in obtaining or revising operating permits and licenses, interruption in our supply of materials or resources, and disruptions at our fabrication and assembly and test facilities due to accidents, maintenance issues, or unsafe working conditions—all of which could affect the timing of production ramps and yields. Production issues can lead to increased costs and may affect our ability to meet product demand, which could adversely impact our business and the results from operations.

17


We face supply chain risks. Thousands of suppliers provide materials and equipment that we use in production and other aspects of our business. Where possible, we seek to have several sources of supply for all of those materials. However, for certain materials, we may rely on a single or a limited number of suppliers, or upon suppliers in a single location. In addition, consolidation among suppliers could impact the nature, quality, availability, and pricing of the products and services available to us. The inability of suppliers to deliver adequate supplies of production materials or other supplies could disrupt our production processes or make it more difficult for us to implement our business strategy. Production could be disrupted by the unavailability of resources used in production, such as water, silicon, electricity, gases, and other materials. The unavailability or reduced availability of materials or resources may require us to reduce production or incur additional costs, which could harm our business and results of operations. Our manufacturing operations and ability to meet product demand may also be impacted by IP or other litigation between our suppliers, where an injunction against Intel or a supplier could interrupt the availability of goods or services supplied to Intel by others.
We also rely on third-party providers to manufacture and assemble and test certain components or products, particularly those related to networking, mobile and communications, programmable semiconductor solutions, and NAND flash memory. If any of these third parties are unable to perform these services on a timely or cost-effective basis, we may encounter supply delays or disruptions that could adversely affect our financial results.
In addition, there are regulatory and other requirements, restrictions, and requests from various constituencies regarding sourcing practices and supplier conduct, with a trend toward expanding the scope of materials and locations where materials originate, regulating supplier behaviors, and increasing the required disclosures regarding such matters by public companies. Increased regulation and public pressure in this area would cause our compliance costs to increase and could negatively affect our reputation given that we use many materials in the manufacturing of our products and rely on many suppliers to provide these materials, but do not directly control their procurement or employment practices.
We are subject to the risks of product defects, errata or other product issues. Product defects and errata (deviations from published specifications) may result from problems in our product design or our manufacturing and assembly and test processes. Components and products we purchase or license from third-party suppliers, or attain through acquisitions, may also contain defects. We could face risks if products that we design, manufacture or sell, or that include our technology, cause personal injury or property damage, even where the cause is unrelated to product defects or errata. These risks may increase as our products are introduced into new devices, markets, technologies, or applications through the Internet of Things, including wearables, drones and transportation, and industrial and consumer uses. Costs from defects, errata, or other product issues could include:
writing off some or all of the value of inventory;
recalling products that have been shipped;
providing product replacements or modifications;
reimbursing customers for certain costs they incur;
defending against litigation and/or paying resulting damages; and
paying fines imposed by regulatory agencies.
These costs could be large and may increase expenses and lower gross margin, and result in delay or loss of revenue. Any product defects, errata, or other issues could also damage our reputation, negatively affect product demand, delay product releases, or result in legal liability. The announcement of product defects or errata could cause customers to purchase products from competitors as a result of possible shortages of our components or for other reasons. Any of these occurrences could harm our business and financial results. In addition, although we maintain liability insurance, our coverage has certain exclusions and/or may not adequately cover liabilities incurred. Our insurance providers may be unable or unwilling to pay a claim, and losses not covered by insurance could be large, which could harm our financial condition.
We are subject to risks associated with environmental laws and regulations. The manufacturing and assembly and test of our products require the use of hazardous materials that are subject to a broad array of environmental, health, and safety laws and regulations. Our failure to comply with these laws or regulations could result in:
regulatory penalties, fines, and legal liabilities;
suspension of production;
alteration of our manufacturing and assembly and test processes;
reputational challenges; and
restrictions on our operations or sales.

18


Our failure to manage the use, transportation, emissions, discharge, storage, recycling, or disposal of hazardous materials could lead to increased costs or future liabilities. Our ability to expand or modify our manufacturing capability in the future may be impeded by environmental regulations, such as air quality and wastewater requirements. Environmental laws and regulations could also require us to acquire pollution abatement or remediation equipment, modify product designs, or incur other expenses. Many new materials that we are evaluating for use in our operations may be subject to regulation under environmental laws and regulations. These restrictions could harm our business and results of operations by increasing our expenses or requiring us to alter manufacturing and assembly and test processes.
Climate change may also pose regulatory and environmental risks that could harm our results of operations and affect the way we conduct business. For example, climate change regulation could result in increased manufacturing costs associated with air pollution control requirements, and increased or new monitoring, recordkeeping, and reporting of greenhouse gas emissions. We also see the potential for higher energy costs driven by climate change regulations if, for example, utility companies pass on their costs to their customers. Furthermore, many of our operations are located in semi-arid regions that may become increasingly vulnerable to prolonged droughts due to climate change. Our fabrication facilities require significant water use and, while we recycle and reuse a portion of the water used, we may have difficulties obtaining sufficient water to fulfill our operational needs due the lack of available infrastructure. 
We are subject to IP risks and risks associated with litigation and regulatory proceedings.
We may be unable to enforce or protect our IP rights. We regard our patents, copyrights, trade secrets, and other IP rights as important to the success of our business. We rely on IP law as well as confidentiality and licensing agreements with our customers, employees, technology development partners, and others to protect our IP rights. Our ability to enforce these rights is subject to general litigation risks, as well as uncertainty as to the enforceability of our IP rights in various countries. When we seek to enforce our rights, we may be subject to claims that the IP rights are invalid, not enforceable, or licensed to the opposing party. Our assertion of IP rights may result in the other party seeking to assert claims against us, which could harm our business. Governments may adopt regulations—and governments or courts may render decisions—requiring compulsory licensing of IP rights, or governments may require products to meet standards that serve to favor local companies. Our inability to enforce our IP rights under any of these circumstances may harm our competitive position and business. In addition, the theft or unauthorized use or publication of our trade secrets and other confidential business information could harm our competitive position and reduce acceptance of our products; as a result, the value of our investment in R&D, product development, and marketing could be reduced.
Our licenses with other companies and participation in industry initiatives may allow competitors to use our patent rights. Companies in our industry often bilaterally license patents between each other to settle disputes or as part of business agreements. Our competitors may have licenses to our patents, and under current case law, some of the licenses may exhaust our patent rights as to licensed product sales under some circumstances. Our participation in industry standards organizations or with other industry initiatives may require us to license our patents to companies that adopt industry-standard specifications. Depending on the rules of the organization, we might have to grant these licenses to our patents for little or no cost, and as a result, we may be unable to enforce certain patents against others, our costs of enforcing our licenses or protecting our patents may increase, and the value of our IP rights may be impaired.

19


Third parties may assert claims based on IP rights against us or our products, which could harm our business. We may face claims based on IP rights from individuals and companies, including those who have acquired patent portfolios to assert claims against other companies. We are normally engaged in a number of litigation matters involving IP rights. Claims that our products or processes infringe the IP rights of others, whether or not meritorious, could cause us to incur large costs to respond to, defend, and resolve, and they may divert the efforts and attention of management and technical personnel. In addition, we may face claims based on the theft or unauthorized use or disclosure of third-party trade secrets and other confidential business information or end-user data that we obtain in conducting our business. Any such incidents and claims could severely disrupt our business, and we could suffer losses, including the cost of product recalls and returns, and reputational harm. Furthermore, we have agreed to indemnify customers for certain IP rights claims against them. As a result of IP rights claims, we could:
pay monetary damages, including payments to satisfy indemnification obligations;
stop manufacturing, using, selling, offering to sell, or importing products or technology subject to claims;    
develop other products or technology not subject to claims, which could be time-consuming or costly; and/or
enter into settlement and license agreements, which agreements may not be available on commercially reasonable terms.
These IP rights claims could harm our competitive position, result in expenses, or require us to impair our assets. If we alter or stop production of affected items, our revenue could be harmed.
We rely on access to third-party IP, which may not be available to us on commercially reasonable terms or at all. Many of our products include third-party IP and/or implement industry standards, which may require licenses from third parties. Based on past experience and industry practice, we believe such licenses generally can be obtained on commercially reasonable terms. However, there is no assurance that the necessary licenses can be obtained on acceptable terms or at all. Failure to obtain the right to use third-party IP, or to use such IP on commercially reasonable terms, could preclude us from selling certain products or otherwise have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and operating results.
We are subject to the risks associated with litigation and regulatory proceedings. We may face legal claims or regulatory matters involving stockholder, consumer, competition, and other issues on a global basis. As described in "Note 20: Commitments and Contingencies" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K, we are engaged in a number of litigation and regulatory matters. Litigation and regulatory proceedings are inherently uncertain, and adverse rulings could occur, including monetary damages, or an injunction stopping us from manufacturing or selling certain products, engaging in certain business practices, or requiring other remedies, such as compulsory licensing of patents. An unfavorable outcome may result in a material adverse impact on our business, results of operations, financial position, and overall trends. In addition, regardless of the outcome, litigation can be costly, time-consuming, disruptive to our operations, and distracting to management.
We must attract, retain, and motivate key employees.
To be competitive, we must attract, retain, and motivate executives and other key employees. Hiring and retaining qualified executives, scientists, engineers, technical staff, and sales representatives are critical to our business, and competition for experienced employees can be intense. To help attract, retain, and motivate qualified employees, we use share-based and other performance-based incentive awards such as restricted stock units (RSUs) and cash bonuses. Also key to our employee hiring and retention is our ability to build and maintain an inclusive business culture and be viewed as an employer of choice. If our share-based or other compensation programs and workplace culture cease to be viewed as competitive, our ability to attract, retain, and motivate employees could be weakened, which could harm our results of operations.

20


We are subject to cybersecurity and privacy risks.
Third parties attempt to gain unauthorized access to our network, products, services, and infrastructure. We regularly face attempts by others to gain unauthorized access through the Internet or to introduce malicious software to our information technology (IT) systems. Additionally, malicious hackers may attempt to gain unauthorized access and corrupt the processes of hardware and software products that we manufacture and services we provide. Due to the widespread use of our products and the high profile of our commercial security products, we or our products and services are a frequent target of computer hackers and organizations that intend to sabotage, take control of, or otherwise corrupt our manufacturing or other processes, products, and services. We are also a target of malicious attackers who attempt to gain access to our network or data centers or those of our customers or end users; steal proprietary information related to our business, products, employees, and customers; or interrupt our systems and services or those of our customers or others. We believe such attempts are increasing in number and in technical sophistication. From time to time, we encounter intrusions or unauthorized access to our network, products, services, or infrastructure. To date, none have resulted in any material adverse impact to our business or operations. In some instances, we, our customers, and the users of our products and services might be unaware of an incident or its magnitude and effects. While we seek to detect and investigate all unauthorized attempts and attacks against our network, products, and services, and to prevent their recurrence where practicable through changes to our internal processes and tools and/or changes or patches to our products and services, we remain potentially vulnerable to additional known or unknown threats. Such incidents, whether successful or unsuccessful, could result in our incurring significant costs related to, for example, rebuilding internal systems, reduced inventory value, providing modifications to our products and services, defending against litigation, responding to regulatory inquiries or actions, paying damages, or taking other remedial steps with respect to third parties. In addition, these threats are constantly evolving, thereby increasing the difficulty of successfully defending against them or implementing adequate preventative measures. Publicity about vulnerabilities and attempted or successful incursions could damage our reputation with customers or users, and reduce demand for our products and services.
We may be subject to theft, loss, or misuse of personal data about our employees, customers, or other third parties, which could increase our expenses, damage our reputation, or result in legal or regulatory proceedings. The theft, loss, or misuse of personal data collected, used, stored, or transferred by us to run our business could result in significantly increased security costs or costs related to defending legal claims. Global privacy legislation, enforcement, and policy activity in this area are rapidly expanding and creating a complex regulatory compliance environment. Costs to comply with and implement these privacy-related and data protection measures could be significant. In addition, even our inadvertent failure to comply with federal, state, or international privacy-related or data protection laws and regulations could result in proceedings against us by governmental entities or others.
We are subject to risks associated with transactions.
We invest in companies for strategic reasons and may not realize a return on our investments. We make investments in public and private companies around the world to further our strategic objectives and support key business initiatives. Many of the instruments in which we invest are non-marketable at the time of our initial investment. Companies in which we invest range from early-stage companies still defining their strategic direction to mature companies with established revenue streams and business models. The success of our investment in any company is typically dependent on the availability to the company of additional funding on favorable terms, or a liquidity event, such as a public offering or acquisition. If any of the companies in which we invest fail, we could lose all or part of our investment.

21


Our acquisitions, divestitures, and other transactions could fail to achieve strategic objectives, disrupt our ongoing business, and harm our results of operations. In pursuing our business strategy, we routinely conduct discussions, evaluate opportunities, and enter into agreements for possible acquisitions, divestitures, and other transactions, such as joint ventures. Given that our resources are limited, our decision to pursue a transaction has opportunity costs; accordingly, if we pursue a particular transaction, we may need to forgo the prospect of entering into other transactions that could help us achieve our strategic objectives. In addition to opportunity costs, these transactions involve large challenges and risks, including risks that:
the transaction may not advance our business strategy;
we may be unable to identify opportunities on terms acceptable to us;
we may not realize a satisfactory return;
we may experience disruption of our ongoing operations;
we may be unable to retain key personnel;
we may experience difficulty in integrating new employees, business systems, and technology;
acquired businesses may not have adequate controls, processes, and procedures to ensure compliance with laws and regulations, and our due diligence process may not identify compliance issues or other liabilities;
we may have difficulty entering new market segments;
we may be unable to retain the customers and partners of acquired businesses; and/or
there may be unknown, underestimated, and/or undisclosed commitments or liabilities.
When we decide to sell assets or a business, we may have difficulty selling on acceptable terms in a timely manner, and the agreed-upon terms and financing arrangements could be renegotiated due to changes in business or market conditions. These circumstances could delay the achievement of our strategic objectives or cause us to incur additional expense, or we may sell a business at a price or on terms that are less favorable than we had anticipated, resulting in a loss on the transaction.
If we do enter into agreements with respect to acquisitions, divestitures, or other transactions, we may fail to complete them due to factors such as:
failure to obtain regulatory or other approvals;    
IP disputes or other litigation; or
difficulties obtaining financing for the transaction.
We are subject to sales-related risks.
We face risks related to sales through distributors and other third parties. We sell a significant portion of our products through third parties such as distributors, value-added resellers, and channel partners (collectively referred to as distributors) as well as OEMs, ODMs and Internet service providers. We depend on many distributors to help us create end customer demand, provide technical support and other value-added services to customers, fill customer orders, and stock our products. We may rely on one or more key distributors for a product, and a material change in our relationship with one or more of these distributors or their failure to perform as expected could reduce our revenue. Our ability to add or replace distributors for some of our products may be limited. In addition, our distributors' expertise in the determination and stocking of acceptable inventory levels for some of our products may not be easily transferable to a new distributor; as a result, end customers may be hesitant to accept the addition or replacement of a distributor. Using third parties for distribution exposes us to many risks, including competitive pressure, concentration, credit risk, and compliance risks. Distributors and other third parties may sell products that compete with our products, and we may need to provide financial and other incentives to focus them on the sale of our products. They may face financial difficulties, including bankruptcy, which could harm our collection of accounts receivable and financial results. Violations of the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act or similar laws by distributors or other third-party intermediaries could have a material impact on our business. Failure to manage risks related to our use of distributors and other third parties may reduce sales, increase expenses, and weaken our competitive position.

22


We face risks related to business transactions with U.S. government entities. We receive proceeds from services and products we provide to the U.S. government. U.S. government demand and payment may be affected by public sector budgetary cycles and funding authorizations. U.S. government contracts are subject to oversight, including special rules on accounting, IP rights, expenses, reviews, information handling, and security. Failure to comply with these rules could result in civil and criminal penalties and sanctions, including termination of contracts, fines, and suspensions, or debarment from future U.S. government business.
Our results of operations could vary as a result of the methods, estimates, and judgments that we use in applying accounting policies.
The methods, estimates, and judgments used in applying accounting policies are subject to significant risks, uncertainties, assumptions, and changes that could affect our financial position and results of operations. For more information, see "Critical Accounting Estimates" in Part II, Item 7 and "Note 2: Accounting Policies" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
Changes in our effective tax rate may reduce our net income.
A number of factors may increase our effective tax rates, which could reduce our net income, including:    
changes in jurisdictions in which our profits are determined to be earned and taxed;
the resolution of issues arising from tax audits;
changes in the valuation of our deferred tax assets and liabilities, and in deferred tax valuation allowances;
adjustments to income taxes upon finalization of tax returns;
increases in expenses not deductible for tax purposes, including impairments of goodwill;
changes in available tax credits;
changes in tax laws or their interpretation, including changes in the U.S. to the taxation of manufacturing enterprises and of non-U.S. income and expenses;
changes in U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; and
our decision to repatriate non-U.S. earnings for which we have not previously provided for U.S. taxes.
We may have fluctuations in the amount and frequency of our stock repurchases.
The amount, timing, and execution of our stock repurchase program may fluctuate based on our priorities for the use of cash for other purposes—such as investing in our business, including operational spending, capital spending, and acquisitions, and returning cash to our stockholders as dividend payments—and because of changes in cash flows and changes in tax laws.
Workforce restructuring actions may be disruptive to our operations and adversely affect our financial results.
In response to the business environment and to accomplish our strategic objectives, we have announced restructurings of our operations and have made other adjustments to our workforce. We may pursue similar actions in the future, and such workforce changes can result in restructuring charges in addition to those described in "Note 7: Restructuring and Other Charges" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K. Any such workforce changes can also temporarily reduce workforce productivity, which could be disruptive to our business and adversely affect our results of operations. In addition, if our restructurings are perceived negatively, our corporate reputation and ability to attract employees could suffer. Moreover, we may not achieve or sustain the expected cost savings or other benefits of our restructuring plans, or do so within the expected time frame.
Additional factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations with regard to our restructuring activity include:
timing and execution of plans and programs that may be subject to local labor law requirements, including consultation with appropriate works councils;
assumptions related to severance, post-retirement, and relocation costs;
future acquisitions, dispositions, or investments;
new business initiatives and changes in product roadmap, development, and manufacturing; and/or
assumptions related to cost savings, product demand, and operating efficiencies.

23


There are inherent limitations on the effectiveness of our controls.
We do not expect that our disclosure controls or our internal control over financial reporting will prevent or detect all errors and all fraud. A control system, no matter how well-designed and operated, can provide only reasonable, not absolute, assurance that the control system’s objectives will be met. The design of a control system must reflect the fact that resource constraints exist, and the benefits of controls must be considered relative to their costs. Further, because of the inherent limitations in all control systems, no evaluation of controls can provide absolute assurance that misstatements due to error or fraud will not occur or that all control issues and instances of fraud, if any, have been detected. The design of any system of controls is based in part on certain assumptions about the likelihood of future events, and there can be no assurance that any design will succeed in achieving its stated goals under all potential future conditions. Projections of any evaluation of the effectiveness of controls to future periods are subject to risks. Over time, controls may become inadequate due to changes in conditions or deterioration in the degree of compliance with policies or procedures. If our controls become inadequate, we could fail to meet our financial reporting obligations, our reputation may be adversely affected, our business and operating results could be harmed, and the market price of our stock could decline.
ITEM 1B.
UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
Not applicable.
ITEM 2.
PROPERTIES
As of December 31, 2016, our major facilities consisted of:
(Square Feet in Millions)
 
United
States
 
Other
Countries
 
Total
Owned facilities
 
31.5

 
19.2

 
50.7

Leased facilities
 
2.5

 
7.1

 
9.6

Total facilities
 
34.0

 
26.3

 
60.3

1 
Leases and municipal grants on portions of the land used for these facilities expire on varying dates through 2109.
2 
Leases expire on varying dates through 2058 and generally include renewals at our option.
Our principal executive offices are located in the U.S. and the majority of our wafer manufacturing activities in 2016 were also located in the U.S. One of our Arizona wafer fabrication facilities is currently on hold and held in a safe state, and we are reserving the building for additional capacity and future technologies. Incremental construction and equipment installation are required to ready the facility for its intended use. For more information on our wafer fabrication and our assembly and test facilities, see "Manufacturing and Assembly and Test" in Part I, Item 1 of this Form 10-K.
We believe that the facilities described above are suitable and adequate for our present purposes and that the productive capacity in our facilities is substantially being utilized or we have plans to utilize it.
We do not identify or allocate assets by operating segment. For information on net property, plant and equipment by country, see "Note 4: Operating Segments and Geographic Information" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
ITEM 3.
LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
For a discussion of legal proceedings, see "Note 20: Commitments and Contingencies" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
ITEM 4.
MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

24


PART II



ITEM 5.
MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
For information regarding the principal U.S. market on which Intel common stock is traded, including the market price range of Intel common stock and dividend information, see "Financial Information by Quarter (Unaudited)" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
As of February 7, 2017, there were approximately 125,000 registered holders of record of Intel’s common stock. A substantially greater number of holders of Intel common stock are "street name" or beneficial holders, whose shares of record are held by banks, brokers, and other financial institutions.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
We have an ongoing authorization, originally approved by our Board of Directors in 2005, and subsequently amended, to repurchase up to $65.0 billion in shares of our common stock in open market or negotiated transactions. As of December 31, 2016, $6.8 billion remained available for repurchase under the existing repurchase authorization limit.
Common stock repurchase activity under our stock repurchase plan during each quarter of 2016 was as follows:
Period
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased
(In Millions)
 
Average Price
Paid Per Share
 
Dollar Value of
Shares That May
Yet Be Purchased
(In Millions)
December 27, 2015 – April 2, 2016
 
26.9

 
$
29.80

 
$
8,592

April 3, 2016 – July 2, 2016
 
25.9

 
$
30.76

 
$
7,793

July 3, 2016 – October 1, 2016
 
13.1

 
$
35.29

 
$
7,332

October 2, 2016 – December 31, 2016
 
15.0

 
$
35.50

 
$
6,800

Total
 
80.9

 
$
32.05

 
 
Common stock repurchase activity under our stock repurchase plan during Q4 2016 was as follows:
Period
 
Total Number of
Shares Purchased
(In Millions)
 
Average Price
Paid Per Share
 
Dollar Value of
Shares That May
Yet Be Purchased
Under the Plans
(In Millions)
October 2, 2016 - October 29, 2016
 
4.2

 
$
36.36

 
$
7,180

October 30, 2016 - November 26, 2016
 
5.7

 
$
34.73

 
$
6,982

November 27, 2016 – December 31, 2016
 
5.1

 
$
35.66

 
$
6,800

Total
 
15.0

 
$
35.50

 
 
We issue RSUs as part of our equity incentive plans. In our consolidated financial statements, we treat shares of common stock withheld for tax purposes on behalf of our employees in connection with the vesting of RSUs as common stock repurchases because they reduce the number of shares that would have been issued upon vesting. These withheld shares of common stock are not considered common stock repurchases under our authorized common stock repurchase plan and accordingly are not included in the common stock repurchase totals in the preceding table.

25


Stock Performance Graph
The graph and table that follow compare the cumulative total stockholder return on Intel's common stock with the cumulative total return of the Dow Jones U.S. Technology Index* and the Standard & Poor’s 500 Stock Index (S&P 500 Index*) for the five years ended December 31, 2016. The graph and table assume that $100 was invested on the last day of trading for the fiscal year Dec 31, 2011 in Intel's common stock, the Dow Jones U.S. Technology Index, and the S&P 500 Index, and that all dividends were reinvested. The cumulative returns shown on the graph are based on Intel's fiscal year.
Comparison of Five-Year Cumulative Return for Intel,
the Dow Jones U.S. Technology Index*, and the S&P 500 Index*
a5yearcum2016a01.jpg
Years Ended
 
Dec 31,
2011
 
Dec 29,
2012
 
Dec 28,
2013
 
Dec 27,
2014
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 31,
2016
Intel Corporation
 
$
100

 
$
85

 
$
112

 
$
169

 
$
163

 
$
174

Dow Jones U.S. Technology Index
 
$
100

 
$
110

 
$
141

 
$
175

 
$
179

 
$
203

S&P 500 Index
 
$
100

 
$
114

 
$
153

 
$
177

 
$
178

 
$
198



26


ITEM 6.
SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
Years Ended
(Dollars in Millions, Except Per Share Amounts)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
 
Dec 28,
2013
 
Dec 29,
2012
Net revenue
 
$
59,387

 
$
55,355

 
$
55,870

 
$
52,708

 
$
53,341

Gross margin
 
$
36,191

 
$
34,679

 
$
35,609

 
$
31,521

 
$
33,151

Gross margin percentage
 
60.9
%
 
62.6
%
 
63.7
%
 
59.8
%
 
62.1
%
Research and development (R&D)
 
$
12,740

 
$
12,128

 
$
11,537

 
$
10,611

 
$
10,148

Marketing, general and administrative (MG&A)
 
$
8,397

 
$
7,930

 
$
8,136

 
$
8,088

 
$
8,057

R&D and MG&A as percentage of revenue
 
35.6
%
 
36.2
%
 
35.2
%
 
35.5
%
 
34.1
%
Operating income
 
$
12,874

 
$
14,002

 
$
15,347

 
$
12,291

 
$
14,638

Net income
 
$
10,316

 
$
11,420

 
$
11,704

 
$
9,620

 
$
11,005

Effective tax rate
 
20.3
%
 
19.6
%
 
25.9
%
 
23.7
%
 
26.0
%
Earnings per share of common stock
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
$
2.18

 
$
2.41

 
$
2.39

 
$
1.94

 
$
2.20

Diluted
 
$
2.12

 
$
2.33

 
$
2.31

 
$
1.89

 
$
2.13

Weighted average diluted shares of common stock outstanding
 
4,875

 
4,894

 
5,056

 
5,097

 
5,160

Dividends per share of common stock, declared and paid
 
$
1.04

 
$
0.96

 
$
0.90

 
$
0.90

 
$
0.87

Net cash provided by operating activities
 
$
21,808

 
$
19,017

 
$
20,418

 
$
20,776

 
$
18,884

Additions to property, plant and equipment
 
$
9,625

 
$
7,326

 
$
10,105

 
$
10,771

 
$
11,027

Repurchase of common stock
 
$
2,587

 
$
3,001

 
$
10,792

 
$
2,147

 
$
4,765

Payment of dividends to stockholders
 
$
4,925

 
$
4,556

 
$
4,409

 
$
4,479

 
$
4,350

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(Dollars in Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
 
Dec 28,
2013
 
Dec 29,
2012
Property, plant and equipment, net
 
$
36,171

 
$
31,858

 
$
33,238

 
$
31,428

 
$
27,983

Total assets1
 
$
113,327

 
$
101,459

 
$
90,012

 
$
89,789

 
$
82,228

Debt
 
$
25,283

 
$
22,670

 
$
13,655

 
$
13,385

 
$
13,382

Stockholders’ equity
 
$
66,226

 
$
61,085

 
$
55,865

 
$
58,256

 
$
51,203

Employees (in thousands)
 
106.0

 
107.3

 
106.7

 
107.6

 
105.0

1 
In Q1 2016, we elected to early adopt an amended standard requiring that we classify all deferred tax assets and liabilities as non-current on the consolidated balance sheet. The amended standard was adopted on a retrospective basis. As a result of the adoption, total assets in the preceding table have been restated for all years presented.

27


ITEM 7.
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
Our Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations (MD&A) is provided in addition to the accompanying consolidated financial statements and notes to assist readers in understanding our results of operations, financial condition, and cash flows. MD&A is organized as follows:
Overview. Discussion of our business and overall analysis of financial and other highlights affecting the company in order to provide context for the remainder of MD&A.
Critical Accounting Estimates. Accounting estimates that we believe are most important to understanding the assumptions and judgments incorporated in our reported financial results and forecasts.
Results of Operations. Analysis of our financial results comparing 2016 to 2015 and comparing 2015 to 2014.
Liquidity and Capital Resources. Analysis of changes in our balance sheets and cash flows, and discussion of our financial condition and potential sources of liquidity.
Contractual Obligations and Off-Balance-Sheet Arrangements. Overview of contractual obligations, contingent liabilities, commitments, and off-balance-sheet arrangements outstanding as of December 31, 2016, including expected payment schedule.



28

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Overview
(Dollars in Billions, Except Per Share Amounts)
a10kdocument_chart-11097.jpga10kdocument_chart-12098.jpga10kdocument_chart-12917.jpg
a10kdocument_chart-13718.jpga10kdocument_chart-14805.jpga10kdocument_chart-15681.jpg
a10kdocument_chart-16558.jpg

29

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

We achieved record revenue of $59.4 billion in 2016, up $4.0 billion, or 7%, from 2015. The increase was driven by the inclusion of PSG and growth in the DCG, CCG, and IOTG businesses. Net income for 2016 was $10.3 billion, and cash flow from operations was $21.8 billion.
CCG revenue was $32.9 billion, up 2%, with platform volume down 10% and platform average selling prices up 11%. DCG revenue was $17.2 billion, up 8%, with platform volume up 8% and platform average selling prices down 1%.
Gross margin dollars were $36.2 billion, up $1.5 billion from 2015. Gross margin of 60.9% was down 1.7 points from 2015. The gross margin percentage point decrease was driven primarily by Altera and other amortization of acquisition-related charges, lower NSG gross margin, higher factory start-up costs (primarily on 10nm), higher product warranty and intellectual property charges, and CCG non-platform products. The decrease was partially offset by lower platform unit costs, platform volume, and higher platform average selling prices.
R&D and MG&A totaled $21.1 billion, up 5% from a year ago. R&D and MG&A were 35.6% of revenue in 2016, down approximately 1 point from 2015.
Restructuring and other charges were $1.9 billion, primarily driven by our 2016 Restructuring Program.
Earnings per share of $2.12 were down 21 cents, or 9% from a year ago. This decrease was primarily driven by higher restructuring and other charges, higher spending, and higher amortization of acquisition-related intangibles. The decrease was partially offset by platform volume and higher platform average selling prices.
Record cash flow from operations in 2016 was approximately $21.8 billion. During 2016, we acquired Altera and other smaller acquisitions for $15.5 billion. We purchased $9.6 billion in capital assets, paid $4.9 billion in dividends, and repurchased $2.6 billion in stock. We issued $2.8 billion of long-term debt and assumed $1.5 billion as part of the Altera acquisition.
2016 has been a transformative year for Intel. We have made strides to move from a PC centric company to one that is powering the cloud and billions of smart, connected devices.
We are building on our strong position in client computing and are investing for growth in the data center, Internet of Things market segments, and disruptive differentiated memory technology. To accelerate our transformation, in Q2 2016, we announced the 2016 Restructuring Program, which is on track to reduce our headcount and generate savings. We are reallocating these savings to our growth segments, such as the data center and Internet of Things, and are continuing to invest in areas that extend our leadership in Moore's Law and expand market opportunities in areas such as memory and autonomous driving.
In Q1 2016, we completed the acquisition of Altera, a global semiconductor company that designs and sells programmable semiconductors and related products, and subsequently formed PSG. We have worked to integrate Altera throughout 2016 and the business continues to deliver new products and to grow. In September 2016, to further accelerate our transformation and focus our business on core strategic areas, we announced the planned divestiture of ISecG.
Our Business Outlook for Q1 2017 and full year 2017 includes, where applicable, our current expectations for revenue, gross margin percentage, spending (R&D plus MG&A), and capital expenditures. We publish our Business Outlook in our quarterly earnings release. Our Business Outlook and any updates thereto are publicly available on our Investor Relations website, www.intc.com. This Business Outlook is not incorporated by reference in this Form 10-K. We expect that our corporate representatives will, from time to time, meet publicly or privately with investors and others, and may reiterate the forward-looking statements contained in the Business Outlook or in this Form 10-K. The statements in the Business Outlook and forward-looking statements in this Form 10-K are subject to revision during the course of the year in our quarterly earnings releases and SEC filings and at other times. The forward-looking statements in the Business Outlook will be effective through the close of business on March 17, 2017, unless updated earlier. From the close of business on March 17, 2017 until our quarterly earnings release is published, currently scheduled for April 27, 2017, we will observe a "quiet period." During the quiet period, the Business Outlook and other forward-looking statements first published in our Form 8-K filed on January 26, 2017, and other forward-looking statements disclosed in the company's news releases and filings with the SEC, as reiterated or updated as applicable in this Form 10-K, should be considered historical, speaking as of prior to the quiet period only and not subject to update. During the quiet period, our representatives will not comment on our Business Outlook or our financial results or expectations. The exact timing and duration of the routine quiet period, and any others that we utilize from time to time, may vary at our discretion.

30

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Critical Accounting Estimates
The methods, estimates, and judgments that we use in applying our accounting policies have a significant impact on our financial position and the results that we report in our consolidated financial statements. Some of these policies require us to make subjective estimates and apply judgment regarding matters that are inherently uncertain.
Our most critical accounting estimates include:
the valuation of inventory, which impacts gross margin;
the determination of useful lives for our property, plant and equipment and the timing of when depreciation should begin, which impacts our gross margin, R&D expenses, and to a lesser extent MG&A expenses;
the determination of other-than-temporary impairments for non-marketable equity investments requires the use of estimates about their valuations, which impacts gains or losses on equity investments, net;
the valuation and the allocation of purchase price paid for assets acquired and liabilities assumed in connection with our acquisitions, which impacts our gross margin and operating expenses in periods subsequent to the acquisition;
the evaluation of recoverability of long-lived assets (property, plant and equipment; identified intangibles; and goodwill), which impacts gross margin or operating expenses when we record impairments or accelerate their depreciation or amortization;
the recognition and measurement of current and deferred income taxes (including the measurement of uncertain tax positions), which impact our provision for taxes as well as tax-related assets and liabilities; and
the recognition and measurement of loss contingencies, which impact gross margin or operating expenses when we recognize a loss contingency, revise the estimate for a loss contingency, or record an asset impairment.
Refer to "Note 2: Accounting Policies" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K for further information on our critical accounting estimates and policies.


31

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Results of Operations
Years Ended
(In Millions, Except Per Share Amounts)
 
December 31, 2016
 
December 26, 2015
 
December 27, 2014
 
Dollars
 
% of Net
Revenue
 
Dollars
 
% of Net
Revenue
 
Dollars
 
% of Net
Revenue
Net revenue
 
$
59,387

 
100.0
 %
 
$
55,355

 
100.0
 %
 
$
55,870

 
100.0
%
Cost of sales
 
23,196

 
39.1
 %
 
20,676

 
37.4
 %
 
20,261

 
36.3
%
Gross margin
 
36,191

 
60.9
 %
 
34,679

 
62.6
 %
 
35,609

 
63.7
%
Research and development
 
12,740

 
21.5
 %
 
12,128

 
21.9
 %
 
11,537

 
20.6
%
Marketing, general and administrative
 
8,397

 
14.0
 %
 
7,930

 
14.3
 %
 
8,136

 
14.6
%
Restructuring and other charges
 
1,886

 
3.2
 %
 
354

 
0.6
 %
 
295

 
0.5
%
Amortization of acquisition-related intangibles
 
294

 
0.5
 %
 
265

 
0.5
 %
 
294

 
0.5
%
Operating income
 
12,874

 
21.7
 %
 
14,002

 
25.3
 %
 
15,347

 
27.5
%
Gains (losses) on equity investments, net
 
506

 
0.9
 %
 
315

 
0.6
 %
 
411

 
0.7
%
Interest and other, net
 
(444
)
 
(0.8
)%
 
(105
)
 
(0.2
)%
 
43

 
0.1
%
Income before taxes
 
12,936

 
21.8
 %
 
14,212

 
25.7
 %
 
15,801

 
28.3
%
Provision for taxes
 
2,620

 
4.4
 %
 
2,792

 
5.1
 %
 
4,097

 
7.4
%
Net income
 
$
10,316

 
17.4
 %
 
$
11,420

 
20.6
 %
 
$
11,704

 
20.9
%
Diluted earnings per share of common stock
 
$
2.12

 
 
 
$
2.33

 
 
 
$
2.31

 
 
Our net revenue in 2016 increased by $4.0 billion, or 7%, compared to 2015. Our results in 2016 reflected the inclusion of PSG from the newly acquired Altera and an extra work week, compared to 2015. The higher revenue was also driven by higher unit sales from our DCG platform and higher average selling prices from our notebook and desktop platforms.
Our net revenue in 2015 decreased by $515 million, or 1%, compared to 2014. The decrease in revenue was due to challenging macroeconomic conditions, particularly in the first half of the year, and higher PC demand in 2014 driven by the Microsoft Windows XP* refresh. The decrease in revenue was partially offset by higher platform average selling prices on desktop and DCG platforms, higher DCG platform unit sales, along with higher NSG revenue.

32

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Our overall gross margin percentage was 60.9% in 2016, down from 62.6% in 2015, and down from 63.7% in 2014. We derived most of our overall gross margin dollars from the sale of platforms in the CCG and DCG operating segments. Our overall gross margin dollars in 2016 increased by $1.5 billion, or 4%, compared to 2015, and in 2015 decreased by $930 million, or 3%, compared to 2014. The following results drove the change in gross margin by approximately the amounts indicated:
(In Millions)
 
Gross Margin Reconciliation
$
36,191

 
2016 Gross Margin
1,830

 
Higher gross margin from platform revenue
1,150

 
PSG gross margin from acquisition of Altera
935

 
Lower platform unit cost
(1,045
)
 
Altera and other acquisition-related charges
(690
)
 
Lower NSG gross margin
(645
)
 
Higher factory start-up costs, primarily driven by the ramp of our 10nm process technology
(315
)
 
Period charges associated with product warranty and intellectual property agreements
292

 
Other
$
34,679

 
2015 Gross Margin
(1,965
)
 
Higher platform unit cost, primarily driven by the ramp of our 14nm process technology
400

 
Lower factory start-up costs, primarily driven by the ramp of our 14nm process technology
205

 
Lower production costs primarily on our 14nm products, which were treated as period charges in 2014, partially offset by higher pre-qualification product costs on 14nm products
430

 
Other
$
35,609

 
2014 Gross Margin
Client Computing Group
Segment Product Overview
The CCG operating segment is responsible for all aspects of the client computing continuum, which includes platforms that are incorporated in notebook, 2 in 1 systems, desktop computers for consumers and businesses, tablets, and phones. These platforms may be further enhanced by features such as Intel® vPro™ technology, a solution designed for better manageability, security, and business and consumer user experiences. In addition, CCG offers home gateway products and set-top box components, and focuses on a broad range of wireless connectivity options that combine Intel® WiFi technology with our cellular mobile communication technologies. We have an array of innovative wired solutions such as Thunderbolt™ technology and client Ethernet solutions.
In 2016, we released the 7th generation Intel Core processor family for use in notebooks and desktops. These processors use 14nm transistors and our Tri-Gate transistor technology. Our Tri-Gate transistor technology extends Moore’s Law, providing improved performance and energy efficiency. In combination, these enhancements can provide significant power savings and performance gains when compared to previous-generation processors.
Notebook. Our strategy for the notebook computing market segment is to offer notebook technologies designed to bring exciting new user experiences to life and improve performance, battery life, wireless connectivity, manageability, and security. In addition, we design for innovative smaller, lighter, and thinner form factors.
We have worked to help our customers develop advancements of personal computing devices, which include 2 in 1 systems. These computers combine the energy-efficient performance and capabilities of today’s notebooks and tablets with enhanced graphics and improved user interfaces such as touch and voice in thin, light form factors that are highly responsive and secure, and that can seamlessly connect to the Internet. We believe the renewed innovation in the PC industry that we fostered will continue with the further enhancements and capabilities of 2 in 1 systems.

33

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Desktop. Our strategy for the desktop computing market segment is to offer exciting new user experiences and products that provide increased manageability, security, and energy-efficient performance. We also focus on lowering the total cost of ownership for businesses. The desktop computing market segment includes all-in-one products, which combine traditionally separate desktop components into one form factor. Additionally, all-in-one computers have transformed into portable and flexible form factors that offer users increased portability and new multi-user applications and uses. For desktop consumers, we also focus on the design of products for high-end enthusiast PCs and mainstream PCs with rapidly increasing audio and media capabilities.
Operating Results


 
 
 
 
 
 
2016 compared to 2015

2015 compared to 2014
Years Ended
(In Millions)

Dec 31,
2016

Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014

%
Change

%
Change
Platform revenue

$
30,751


$
30,680

 
$
33,235


 %

(8
)%
Other revenue

2,157


1,539

 
1,637


40
 %

(6
)%
Net revenue

$
32,908


$
32,219

 
$
34,872


2
 %

(8
)%
Operating income

$
10,646


$
8,166

 
$
10,327


30
 %

(21
)%
CCG platform unit sales




 


(10
)%

(11
)%
CCG platform average selling prices






 



11
 %

4
 %
Our CCG platform average selling prices increased in 2016 compared to 2015, driven by a richer mix of our high-performance notebook and desktop platforms, while our CCG platform unit sales decreased due to lower demand in the PC market. In 2015 compared to 2014, our CCG platform unit sales decreased due to challenging macroeconomic conditions in the first half of the year and higher PC demand in 2014 driven by the Microsoft Windows XP refresh. The following results drove the changes in CCG revenue:
(In Millions)

Revenue Reconciliation
$
32,908


2016 CCG Revenue
618


Higher CCG non-platform revenue
389


Higher notebook platform average selling prices, up 2%
279


Higher desktop platform average selling prices, up 2%
222


Higher mobile platform revenue, primarily from reduction of cash consideration to our customers
(663
)

Lower desktop platform unit sales, down 6%
(156
)

Other
$
32,219


2015 CCG Revenue
(2,304
)
 
Lower desktop platform unit sales, down 16%
(1,695
)
 
Lower notebook platform unit sales, down 9%
760

 
Higher desktop platform average selling prices, up 6%
300

 
Higher notebook platform average selling prices, up 2%
272

 
Higher tablet platform average selling prices
14

 
Other
$
34,872

 
2014 CCG Revenue

34

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

The following results drove changes in CCG operating income by approximately the amounts indicated:
(In Millions)
 
Operating Income Reconciliation
$
10,646

 
2016 CCG Operating Income
1,250

 
Lower CCG platform unit cost
905

 
Lower CCG operating expense
625

 
Higher gross margin from CCG platform revenue1
(645
)
 
Higher factory start-up costs, primarily driven by the ramp of our 10nm process technology
345

 
Other
$
8,166

 
2015 CCG Operating Income
(2,060
)
 
Higher CCG platform unit costs
(1,565
)
 
Lower gross margin from CCG platform revenue2
435

 
Lower factory start-up costs, primarily driven by the ramp of our 14nm process technology
430

 
Lower production costs primarily on our 14nm products, treated as period charges in 2014
375

 
Lower operating expense
224

 
Other
$
10,327

 
2014 CCG Operating Income
1  
Higher gross margin from higher CCG platform revenue was driven by higher average selling prices on notebook and desktop platforms, offset by lower desktop and notebook platform unit sales.
2 
Lower gross margin from lower CCG platform revenue was driven by lower desktop and notebook platform unit sales, partially offset by higher average selling prices on desktop, notebook, and tablet platforms.
Data Center Group
Segment Product Overview
The DCG operating segment offers platforms designed to provide leading energy-efficient performance for all server, network, and storage applications. In addition, DCG focuses on lowering the total cost of ownership on other specific workload-optimizations for the enterprise, cloud service providers, and communications service provider market segments. In 2016, we launched the following platforms with an array of functionalities and advancements:
Intel® Xeon® processor E5 v4 family, the foundation for high performing clouds and delivers energy-efficient performance for server, network, and storage workloads.
Intel Xeon processor E7 v4 family, targeted at platforms requiring four or more CPUs; this processor family delivers high performance and is optimized for real-time analytics and in-memory computing, along with industry-leading reliability, availability, and serviceability.
Intel® Xeon Phi™ product family, formerly code-named Knights Landing, with up to 72 high-performance Intel processor cores, integrated memory and fabric, and a common software programming model with Intel Xeon processors. The Intel Xeon Phi product family is designed for highly parallel compute and memory bandwidth-intensive workloads. Intel Xeon Phi processors are positioned to increase the performance of supercomputers, enabling trillions of calculations per second, and to address emerging data analytics and artificial intelligence solutions. 
In 2017, we expect to release our next generation of Intel Xeon processors for compute, storage, and network; a next-generation Intel Xeon Phi processor optimized for deep learning; and a suite of single-socket products, including next-generation Intel Xeon E3 processors, next-generation Intel Atom processors, and next-generation Intel Xeon-D processors for dense solutions.

35

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Operating Results
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016 compared to 2015
 
2015 compared to 2014
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
 
% Change
 
% Change
Platform revenue
 
$
15,895

 
$
14,856

 
13,341

 
7
 %
 
11
%
Other revenue
 
1,341

 
1,125

 
1,055

 
19
 %
 
7
%
Net revenue
 
$
17,236

 
$
15,981

 
14,396

 
8
 %
 
11
%
Operating income
 
$
7,520

 
$
7,847

 
7,380

 
(4
)%
 
6
%
DCG platform unit sales
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8
 %
 
8
%
DCG platform average selling prices
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1
)%
 
3
%
Our DCG platform revenue increased, primarily due to growth in the cloud service provider and communication service provider market segments. The following results drove the changes in DCG revenue:
(In Millions)
 
Revenue Reconciliation
$
17,236

 
2016 DCG Revenue
1,149

 
Higher DCG platform unit sales
106

 
Other
$
15,981

 
2015 DCG Revenue
1,023

 
Higher DCG platform unit sales
493

 
Higher DCG platform average selling prices
69

 
Other
$
14,396

 
2014 DCG Revenue
The following results drove the changes in DCG operating income by approximately the amounts indicated:
(In Millions)
 
Operating Income Reconciliation
$
7,520

 
2016 DCG Operating Income
930

 
Higher gross margin from DCG platform revenue
(655
)
 
Higher DCG operating expense
(335
)
 
Higher DCG platform unit costs
(215
)
 
Period charges associated with product warranty and intellectual property agreements
(52
)
 
Other
$
7,847

 
2015 DCG Operating Income
1,415

 
Higher gross margin from DCG platform revenue
(725
)
 
Higher DCG operating expense
(223
)
 
Other
$
7,380

 
2014 DCG Operating Income

36

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Internet of Things Group
Segment Product Overview
The IOTG operating segment offers platforms designed for retail, transportation, industrial, video, buildings and smart cities, and a broad range of other market segments. In addition, IOTG focuses on establishing an end-to-end manageable architecture that captures actionable information resulting from connected "things." In 2016, we announced the following platforms:
SoFIA 3G-R SoC, the first IOTG product with an integrated modem and connectivity;
Next-generation Intel Atom processor family, formerly code-named Apollo Lake; and
7th generation Intel Core processor family, formerly code-named Kaby Lake.
Operating Results
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016 compared to 2015
 
2015 compared to 2014
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
 
% Change
 
% Change
Platform revenue
 
$
2,290

 
$
1,976

 
$
1,814

 
16
%
 
9
 %
Other revenue
 
348

 
322

 
328

 
8
%
 
(2
)%
Net revenue
 
$
2,638

 
$
2,298

 
$
2,142

 
15
%
 
7
 %
Operating income
 
$
585

 
$
515

 
$
583

 
14
%
 
(12
)%
The operating income for the IOTG operating segment increased by $70 million in 2016 compared to 2015, driven by higher gross margin from IOTG revenue primarily due to higher IOTG platform unit sales and higher IOTG platform average selling prices. The increase in revenue was partially offset by higher IOTG operating expense.
The operating income for the IOTG operating segment decreased by $68 million in 2015 compared to 2014, driven by higher IOTG operating expenses, partially offset by higher gross margin from IOTG revenue. The higher revenue was primarily due to higher IOTG platform unit sales, partially offset by lower IOTG platform average selling prices.
Non-Volatile Memory Solutions Group
Segment Product Overview
The NSG operating segment offers NAND flash memory primarily used in solid-state drives. NAND flash memory products are manufactured by IMFT and Micron. Our 3D NAND products are manufactured in our Dalian, China fabrication facility utilizing 16nm process technology. In 2017, we expect to release our jointly developed 3D XPoint technology, which combines the performance, density, power, non-volatility, and cost advantages of existing NAND with conventional memories like DRAM.
Operating Results
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016 compared to 2015
 
2015 compared to 2014
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
 
% Change
 
% Change
Net revenue
 
$
2,576

 
$
2,597

 
2,146

 
(1
)%
 
21
 %
Operating income (loss)
 
$
(544
)
 
$
239

 
255

 
(328
)%
 
(6
)%
The operating income for the NSG operating segment decreased by $783 million in 2016 to an operating loss compared to 2015, driven by lower revenue resulting from lower average selling prices on competitive pricing pressures, offset by higher volume. Decrease in operating income was also impacted by higher costs on the ramp of our 3D NAND flash memory in our Dalian, China facility, and higher spending on 3D XPoint technology, and partially offset by lower unit costs.
The operating income for the NSG operating segment decreased by $16 million in 2015 compared to 2014, driven by higher volume on market growth and improved unit cost, offset by lower average selling prices on competitive pricing pressures.

37

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Intel Security Group
Segment Product Overview
The ISecG operating segment offers McAfee® software security products designed to deliver innovative solutions that secure computers, mobile devices, and networks around the world from the latest malware and emerging online threats. These products are designed for the protection of consumers, small businesses, and enterprise market segment customers. In 2016, we launched our next generation of converged endpoint suites, which include cloud-based workloads and further enable new architecture for greater effectiveness.
During Q3 2016, we announced our decision to divest ISecG. The operating results of ISecG will be reported as continued operations until the close of the transaction. For further information, see "Note 10: Acquisitions and Divestitures."
Operating Results
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016 compared to 2015
 
2015 compared to 2014
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
 
% Change
 
% Change
Net revenue
 
$
2,161

 
$
1,985

 
$
2,010

 
9
%
 
(1
)%
Operating income
 
$
400

 
$
213

 
$
164

 
88
%
 
30
 %
The operating income for the ISecG operating segment increased in 2016 compared to 2015, driven by higher revenue and lower operating expenses.
Programmable Solutions Group
Segment Product Overview
The PSG operating segment was created in Q1 2016, subsequent to the acquisition of Altera. PSG offers Altera® products and consists of FPGAs—including SoC FPGAs, which incorporate hard embedded processor cores—and complex programmable logic devices (CPLDs) for a broad range of market segments including communications, data center, industrial, military, and automotive. FPGAs and CPLDs are standard semiconductor integrated circuits, or chips, that our customers program to desired logic and processing functions in their electronic systems. In 2016, PSG launched the Intel® Stratix® 10 FPGA product.
Operating Results
 
 
 
 
 
 
2016 compared to 2015
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
% Change
Net revenue
 
$
1,669

 
$

 
%
Operating loss
 
$
(104
)
 
$

 
%
The operating loss for the PSG operating segment was driven by acquisition-related charges, primarily deferred revenue write-down and inventory valuation adjustment. Due to the revaluation of deferred revenue to fair value, we excluded revenue of $99 million and associated costs that would have created $64 million of operating income in 2016. Additionally, we incurred approximately $387 million of additional cost of sales charges during the period that would have been excluded from the operating results in 2016 if the acquired inventory had not been remeasured to fair value upon acquisition and then sold to end customers, resulting in zero margin on that inventory for the period.

38

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Operating Expenses
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
Research and development (R&D)
 
$
12,740

 
$
12,128

 
$
11,537

Marketing, general and administrative (MG&A)
 
$
8,397

 
$
7,930

 
$
8,136

R&D and MG&A as percentage of net revenue
 
35.6
%
 
36.2
%
 
35.2
%
Restructuring and other charges
 
$
1,886

 
$
354

 
$
295

Amortization of acquisition-related intangibles
 
$
294

 
$
265

 
$
294

Research and Development
R&D spending increased by $612 million, or 5%, in 2016 compared to 2015. The increase was driven by the addition of PSG expenses from the acquisition of Altera, higher investment, net of 2016 restructuring program savings, in strategically important areas such as servers, Internet of Things, new devices, and memory, as well as higher process development costs for our new 7nm process technology. These increases were partially offset by lower depreciation expense due to a change at the beginning of fiscal year 2016 to the estimated useful life of our machinery and equipment in our wafer fabrication facilities.
R&D spending increased by $591 million, or 5%, in 2015 compared to 2014. The increase was due to higher investment in our products—primarily server, Internet of Things, and new devices—as well as expenses of newly acquired entities and higher process development costs for our 10nm process technology. This increase was partially offset by lower profit-dependent compensation and savings from the implementation of efficiencies within our CCG operating segment.
Marketing, General and Administrative
MG&A expenses increased by $467 million, or 6%, in 2016 compared to 2015. This increase was primarily due to PSG expenses from the acquisition of Altera.
MG&A expenses decreased by $206 million in 2015 compared to 2014. This decrease was due to lower profit-dependent compensation as well as lower expenses from businesses that have been divested.
Restructuring and Other Charges
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
2016 Restructuring Program
 
$
1,823

 
$

 
$

2015 Restructuring Program
 

 
264

 

2013 Restructuring Program
 

 
90

 
295

Other charges
 
63

 

 

Total restructuring and other charges
 
$
1,886

 
$
354

 
$
295

2016 Restructuring Program. In Q2 2016, our management approved and commenced the 2016 Restructuring Program to accelerate our transformation from a PC company to one that powers the cloud and billions of smart, connected computing devices. Under this program, we are in the process of closing certain facilities and reducing headcount globally to align our operations with evolving business needs by investing in our growth businesses and improving efficiencies. We expect these actions to be substantially completed by Q2 2017.

39

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Restructuring actions related to this program that were approved in 2016 are expected to impact approximately 15,000 employees. We estimate that the charges incurred to date as part of the 2016 restructuring program will result in net annual headcount savings of approximately $1.6 billion as we re-balance our workforce. On an annual basis, we expect $1.4 billion of these savings will reduce our R&D and MG&A spending, and the remainder will reduce our cost of sales. We began to realize these savings in Q2 2016 and expect to fully realize these savings by Q2 2017. We are reallocating these savings to our growth segments, such as the data center and Internet of Things, and are continuing to invest in areas that extend our leadership in Moore's Law and expand market opportunities in areas such as memory and autonomous driving.
For further information on the 2016 Restructuring Program, see "Note 7: Restructuring and Other Charges" in Part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.
2015 Restructuring Program. During 2015, management approved and commenced implementation of restructuring actions, primarily targeted workforce reductions, as we adjusted resources from areas of disinvestment to areas of investment. This program was completed in 2015.
2013 Restructuring Program. During 2013, management approved and commenced implementation of several restructuring actions, including targeted workforce reductions and the exit of certain businesses and facilities. These actions included the wind down of our 200mm wafer fabrication facility in Massachusetts and the closure of our assembly and test facility in Costa Rica. This program was completed in 2015.
Other Charges. Other charges consist primarily of expenses associated with the planned divestiture of ISecG that was announced in Q3 2016.
Share-Based Compensation
Share-based compensation totaled $1.4 billion in 2016 ($1.3 billion in 2015 and $1.1 billion in 2014). Share-based compensation was included in cost of sales and operating expenses.
As of December 31, 2016, unrecognized share-based compensation costs and the weighted average periods over which the costs are expected to be recognized were as follows:
(Dollars in Millions)
 
Unrecognized
Share-Based
Compensation
Costs
 
Weighted
Average
Period
Restricted stock units
 
$
1,903

 
1.2 years
Stock Purchase Plan
 
$
13

 
2 months
Gains (Losses) on Equity Investments and Interest and Other, Net
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
Gains (losses) on equity investments, net
 
$
506

 
$
315

 
$
411

Interest and other, net
 
$
(444
)
 
$
(105
)
 
$
43

We recognized higher net gains on equity investments in 2016 compared to 2015 primarily due to gains of $407 million related to sales of a portion of our interest in ASML.
We recognized lower net gains on equity investments in 2015 compared to 2014 due to lower gains on sales of equity investments partially offset by higher gains on third-party merger transactions.
We recognized a higher interest and other, net loss in 2016 compared to 2015 primarily due to higher interest expense from debt issued or acquired in 2015 and 2016 as well as lower capitalized interest due to lower eligible capital expenditures in 2016.
We recognized an interest and other, net loss in 2015 compared to a net gain in 2014 primarily due to higher interest expense, which resulted from the issuance of senior unsecured notes during 2015. For further information on these transactions, see "Note 14: Borrowings" in part II, Item 8 of this Form 10-K.

40

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Provision for Taxes
Years Ended
(Dollars in Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
Income before taxes
 
$
12,936

 
$
14,212

 
$
15,801

Provision for taxes
 
$
2,620

 
$
2,792

 
$
4,097

Effective tax rate
 
20.3
%
 
19.6
%
 
25.9
%
The majority of the increase in our effective tax rate in 2016 compared to 2015 was driven by one-time items and our 2015 decision to indefinitely reinvest some of our prior years' non-U.S. earnings, partially offset by higher proportion of our income in lower tax jurisdictions.
Most of the decrease in our effective tax rate in 2015 compared to 2014 was driven by one-time items, a higher proportion of our income from lower tax jurisdictions, and our decision to indefinitely reinvest certain prior years' non-U.S. earnings, which positively impacted our effective income tax rate.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
We consider the following when assessing our liquidity and capital resources:
(Dollars in Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
Cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, and trading assets
 
$
17,099

 
$
25,313

Other long-term investments
 
$
4,716

 
$
1,891

Loans receivable and other
 
$
996

 
$
1,170

Reverse repurchase agreements with original maturities greater than three months
 
$
250

 
$
1,000

Unsettled trade liabilities and other
 
$
119

 
$
99

Short-term and long-term debt
 
$
25,283

 
$
22,670

Temporary equity
 
$
882

 
$
897

Debt as percentage of permanent stockholders’ equity
 
38.2
%
 
37.1
%

41

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Sources and Uses of Cash
(In Millions)
cashutilization2016a04.jpg
In summary, our cash flows for each period were as follows:
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
Net cash provided by operating activities
 
$
21,808

 
$
19,017

 
$
20,418

Net cash used for investing activities
 
(25,817
)
 
(8,183
)
 
(9,905
)
Net cash provided by (used for) financing activities
 
(5,739
)
 
1,912

 
(13,611
)
Effect of exchange rate fluctuations on cash and cash equivalents
 

 
1

 
(15
)
Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents
 
$
(9,748
)
 
$
12,747

 
$
(3,113
)

42

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Operating Activities
Cash provided by operating activities is net income adjusted for certain non-cash items and changes in assets and liabilities.
For 2016 compared to 2015, the $2.8 billion increase in cash provided by operating activities was due to adjustments for non-cash items and changes in working capital, partially offset by lower net income. The adjustments for non-cash items were higher in 2016 primarily due to restructuring and other charges and the change in deferred taxes, partially offset by lower depreciation expense. Income taxes paid, net of refunds, in 2016 compared to 2015 were $2.6 billion lower due to bonus depreciation on capital assets placed in service, as well as timing of certain tax payments and refunds.
For 2015 compared to 2014, the $1.4 billion decrease in cash provided by operating activities was due to changes in working capital, adjustments for non-cash items, and lower net income. The adjustments for non-cash items were lower due primarily to deferred taxes, partially offset by higher depreciation.
Investing Activities
Investing cash flows consist primarily of capital expenditures; investment purchases, sales, maturities, and disposals; and proceeds from divestitures and cash used for acquisitions. Our capital expenditures were $9.6 billion in 2016 ($7.3 billion in 2015 and $10.1 billion in 2014).
The increase in cash used for investing activities in 2016 compared to 2015 was primarily due to our completed acquisition of Altera, net purchases of trading assets in 2016 compared to net sales of trading assets in 2015, and higher capital expenditures in 2016. This increase was partially offset by lower investments in non-marketable equity investments and collection of loans receivable and reverse repurchase agreements.
The decrease in cash used for investing activities in 2015 compared to 2014 was primarily due to cash generated by net trading asset activity and lower capital expenditures during 2015. This activity was partially offset by net available-for-sale activity (which was cash flow neutral in 2015 compared to a source of cash in 2014) and higher investments in non-marketable equity investments during 2015.
Financing Activities
Financing cash flows consist primarily of repurchases of common stock, payment of dividends to stockholders, issuance and repayment of short-term and long-term debt, and proceeds from the sale of shares of common stock through employee equity incentive plans.
Cash was used for financing activities in 2016 compared to cash provided by financing activities in 2015, primarily due to lower proceeds from debt issuances and the repayment of $1.5 billion of debt in 2016. These amounts were partially offset by repayment of commercial paper in 2015 and fewer repurchases of common stock under our authorized stock repurchase program. We have an ongoing authorization, originally approved by our Board of Directors in 2005, and subsequently amended, to repurchase up to $65.0 billion in shares of our common stock in the open market or negotiated transactions. During 2016, we repurchased $2.6 billion of common stock under our authorized common stock repurchase program, compared to $3.0 billion in 2015. As of December 31, 2016, $6.8 billion remained available for repurchasing common stock under the existing repurchase authorization limit. We base our level of common stock repurchases on internal cash management decisions, and this level may fluctuate. Proceeds from the sale of common stock through employee equity incentive plans totaled $1.1 billion in 2016 compared to $866 million in 2015. Our total dividend payments were $4.9 billion in 2016 compared to $4.6 billion in 2015. We have paid a cash dividend in each of the past 97 quarters. In January 2017, our Board of Directors declared a cash dividend of $0.26 per share of common stock for Q1 2017. The dividend is payable on March 1, 2017 to stockholders of record on February 7, 2017.
Cash was provided by financing activities in 2015 compared to cash used by financing activities in 2014, primarily due to the issuance of long-term debt in 2015 and fewer repurchases of common stock under our authorized stock repurchase program in 2015 compared to 2014. This activity was partially offset by lower proceeds from the sales of common stock in 2015 and repayments of short-term debt in 2015 compared to borrowings in 2014.

43

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Liquidity
Cash generated by operations is our primary source of liquidity. We maintain a diverse investment portfolio that we continually analyze based on issuer, industry, and country. When assessing our sources of liquidity we include investments as shown in the Liquidity and Capital Resources table. Substantially all of our investments in debt instruments and financing receivables are in investment-grade securities.
Other potential sources of liquidity include our commercial paper program and our automatic shelf registration statement on file with the SEC, pursuant to which we may offer an unspecified amount of debt, equity, and other securities. Under our commercial paper program, we have an ongoing authorization from our Board of Directors to borrow up to $5.0 billion. No commercial paper remained outstanding as of December 31, 2016. On December 21, 2015, we entered into a short-term credit facility to borrow up to $5.0 billion to facilitate the settlement of our acquisition of Altera. Under this credit facility we borrowed $4.0 billion, and the facility was closed in January 2016. In Q2 2016, we issued $2.8 billion aggregate principal amount of senior unsecured notes to refinance existing indebtedness, including our 1.95% senior notes due 2016 and a portion of our 1.35% senior notes due 2017.
As of December 31, 2016, $13.6 billion of our $17.1 billion of cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, and trading assets was held by our non-U.S. subsidiaries. Of the $13.6 billion held by our non-U.S. subsidiaries, approximately $1.5 billion was available for use in the U.S. without incurring additional U.S. income taxes in excess of the amounts already accrued in our financial statements as of December 31, 2016. The remaining amount of non-U.S. cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, and trading assets has been indefinitely reinvested and, therefore, no U.S. current or deferred taxes have been accrued. This amount is earmarked for near-term investment in our operations outside the U.S. and future acquisitions of non-U.S. entities. We believe our U.S. sources of cash and liquidity are sufficient to meet our business needs in the U.S., and do not expect that we will need to repatriate the funds we have designated as indefinitely reinvested outside the U.S. Under current tax laws, should our plans change and we were to choose to repatriate some or all of the funds we have designated as indefinitely reinvested outside the U.S., such amounts would be subject to U.S. income taxes and applicable non-U.S. income and withholding taxes.
We believe we have sufficient financial resources to meet our business requirements in the next 12 months, including capital expenditures for worldwide manufacturing and assembly and test; working capital requirements; and potential dividends, common stock repurchases, acquisitions, and strategic investments.

44

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Contractual Obligations
Significant contractual obligations as of December 31, 2016 were as follows:
  
 
Payments Due by Period
(In Millions)
 
Total
 
Less Than
1 Year
 
1–3 Years
 
3–5 Years
 
More Than
5 Years
Operating lease obligations
 
$
1,226

 
$
229

 
$
342

 
$
233

 
$
422

Capital purchase obligations
 
7,529

 
5,646

 
1,882

 
1

 

Other purchase obligations and commitments
 
3,038

 
1,825

 
1,154

 
59

 

Long-term debt obligations
 
42,020

 
4,391

 
2,459

 
5,854

 
29,316

Other long-term liabilities4, 5
 
1,763

 
841

 
707

 
114

 
101

Total
 
$
55,576

 
$
12,932

 
$
6,544

 
$
6,261

 
$
29,839

1 
Capital purchase obligations represent commitments for the construction or purchase of property, plant and equipment. They were not recorded as liabilities on our consolidated balance sheets as of December 31, 2016, as we had not yet received the related goods or taken title to the property.
2 
Other purchase obligations and commitments include payments due under various types of licenses and agreements to purchase goods or services, as well as payments due under non-contingent funding obligations.
3 
Amounts represent principal and interest cash payments over the life of the debt obligations, including anticipated interest payments that are not recorded on our consolidated balance sheets. Debt obligations are classified based on their stated maturity date, regardless of their classification on the consolidated balance sheets. Any future settlement of convertible debt would impact our cash payments.
4 
We are unable to reliably estimate the timing of future payments related to uncertain tax positions; therefore, $125 million of long-term income taxes payable has been excluded from the preceding table. However, long-term income taxes payable, recorded on our consolidated balance sheets, included these uncertain tax positions, reduced by the associated federal deduction for state taxes and U.S. tax credits arising from non-U.S. income taxes.
5 
Amounts represent future cash payments to satisfy other long-term liabilities recorded on our consolidated balance sheets, including the short-term portion of these long-term liabilities. Expected required contributions to our U.S. and non-U.S. pension plans and other postretirement benefit plans of $36 million to be made during 2017 are also included; however, funding projections beyond 2017 are not practicable to estimate. Derivative instruments are excluded from the preceding table, as they do not represent the amounts that may ultimately be paid.
6 
Total excludes contractual obligations already recorded on our consolidated balance sheets as current liabilities, except for the short-term portions of long-term debt obligations and other long-term liabilities.
The expected timing of payments of the obligations in the preceding table is estimated based on current information. Timing of payments and actual amounts paid may be different, depending on the time of receipt of goods or services, or changes to agreed-upon amounts for some obligations.
Contractual obligations for purchases of goods or services included in "Other purchase obligations and commitments" in the preceding table include agreements that are enforceable and legally binding on Intel and that specify all significant terms, including fixed or minimum quantities to be purchased; fixed, minimum, or variable price provisions; and the approximate timing of the transaction. For obligations with cancellation provisions, the amounts included in the preceding table were limited to the non-cancelable portion of the agreement terms or the minimum cancellation fee.
We have entered into certain agreements for the purchase of raw materials that specify minimum prices and quantities based on a percentage of the total available market or based on a percentage of our future purchasing requirements. Due to the uncertainty of the future market and our future purchasing requirements, as well as the non-binding nature of these agreements, obligations under these agreements have been excluded from the preceding table. Our purchase orders for other products are based on our current manufacturing needs and are fulfilled by our vendors within short time horizons. In addition, some of our purchase orders represent authorizations to purchase rather than binding agreements.

45

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS (Continued)

Contractual obligations that are contingent upon the achievement of certain milestones have been excluded from the preceding table. These obligations include milestone-based co-marketing agreements, contingent funding or payment obligations, and milestone-based equity investment funding (excluding investment funding that is pending regulatory approval). These arrangements are not considered contractual obligations until the milestone is met by the counterparty. As of December 31, 2016, assuming that all future milestones are met, excluding the ASML milestones mentioned below, the additional required payments would be approximately $694 million. During 2012, we entered into a series of agreements with ASML intended to accelerate the development of EUV lithography, certain of which were amended in 2014. Under the amended agreements, Intel agreed to provide R&D funding totaling €829 million over five years and committed to advance purchase orders for a specified number of tools from ASML. Our remaining obligation, contingent upon ASML achieving certain milestones, is approximately €193 million, or $202 million, as of December 31, 2016. As our obligation is contingent upon ASML achieving certain milestones, we have excluded this obligation from the preceding table.
For the majority of RSUs granted, the number of shares of common stock issued on the date the RSUs vest is net of the minimum statutory withholding requirements that we pay in cash to the appropriate taxing authorities on behalf of our employees. The obligation to pay the relevant taxing authority is excluded from the preceding table, as the amount is contingent upon continued employment. In addition, the amount of the obligation is unknown, as it is based in part on the market price of our common stock when the awards vest.
During 2014, we entered into a series of agreements with Tsinghua Unigroup Ltd. (Tsinghua Unigroup), an operating subsidiary of Tsinghua Holdings Co. Ltd., to, among other things, jointly develop Intel architecture- and communications-based solutions for phones. Subject to regulatory approvals and other closing conditions, we have also agreed to invest up to 9.0 billion Chinese yuan (approximately $1.5 billion as of the date of the agreement) for a minority stake of approximately 20% of Beijing UniSpreadtrum Technology Ltd. (UniSpreadtrum). During 2015, we invested $966 million to complete the first phase of the equity investment. The second phase of the investment will require additional funding of approximately $500 million; however, as our obligation is contingent upon regulatory approvals and other closing conditions, it has been excluded from the preceding table.
Off-Balance-Sheet Arrangements
As of December 31, 2016, we did not have any significant off-balance-sheet arrangements, as defined in Item 303(a)(4)(ii) of SEC Regulation S-K.

46


ITEM 7A.
QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
We are affected by changes in currency exchange and interest rates, as well as equity and commodity prices. Our risk management programs reduce, but may not entirely eliminate, the impact of these risks. All of the following potential changes are based on sensitivity analyses performed on our financial positions as of December 31, 2016 and December 26, 2015. Actual results may differ materially.
Currency Exchange Rates
We are exposed to currency exchange risks of non-U.S.-dollar-denominated investments in debt instruments and loans receivable, and may economically hedge this risk with foreign currency contracts, such as currency forward contracts or currency interest rate swaps. Gains or losses on these non-U.S.-currency investments are generally offset by corresponding losses or gains on the related hedging instruments. We are exposed to currency exchange risks from our non-U.S.-dollar-denominated debt indebtedness and may use foreign currency contracts designated as cash flow hedges to manage this risk.
Substantially all of our revenue is transacted in U.S. dollars. However, a significant portion of our operating expenditures and capital purchases are incurred in other currencies, primarily the euro, the Japanese yen, the Israeli shekel, and the Chinese yuan. We have established currency risk management programs to protect against currency exchange rate risks associated with non-U.S. dollar forecasted future cash flows and existing non-U.S. dollar monetary assets and liabilities. We may also hedge currency risk arising from funding of foreign currency-denominated future investments. We may utilize foreign currency contracts, such as currency forward or option contracts in these hedging programs. We considered the historical trends in currency exchange rates and determined that it was reasonably possible that a weighted average adverse change of 20% in currency exchange rates could be experienced in the near term. Such an adverse change, after taking into account balance sheet hedges only and offsetting recorded monetary asset and liability positions, would have resulted in an adverse impact on income before taxes of less than $80 million as of December 31, 2016 (less than $75 million as of December 26, 2015).
Interest Rates
We are exposed to interest rate risk related to our fixed-rate investment portfolio and outstanding debt. The primary objective of our investment policy is to preserve principal and the financial flexibility to fund our business while maximizing yields, which generally track the U.S. dollar three-month LIBOR. We generally enter into interest rate contracts to convert the returns on our fixed-rate debt investment with remaining maturities longer than six months into U.S. dollar three-month LIBOR-based returns. We may enter into swaps to convert fixed-rate coupon payments into floating-rate coupon payments for our existing indebtedness. Gains or losses on these instruments are generally offset by corresponding losses or gains on the related hedging instruments.
A hypothetical decrease in benchmark interest rates of up to 1.0%, after taking into account investment hedges, would have resulted in an increase in the fair value of our investment portfolio of approximately $100 million as of December 31, 2016 (an increase of approximately $15 million as of December 26, 2015). After taking into account interest rate and currency swaps, a hypothetical decrease in interest rates of up to 1.0% would have resulted in an increase in the fair value of our indebtedness of approximately $1.3 billion as of December 31, 2016 (an increase of approximately $1.6 billion as of December 26, 2015). The fluctuations in fair value of our investment portfolio and indebtedness reflect only the direct impact of the change in interest rates. Other economic variables, such as equity market fluctuations and changes in relative credit risk, could result in a significantly higher fluctuation in the fair value of our net investment position.
Equity Prices
Our investments include marketable equity securities and equity derivative instruments. We typically do not attempt to reduce or eliminate our equity market exposure through hedging activities at the inception of our investments. Before we enter into hedge arrangements, we evaluate legal, market, and economic factors, as well as the expected timing of disposal, to determine whether hedging is appropriate. Our equity market risk management program may include equity derivatives with or without hedge accounting designation that utilize warrants, equity options, or other equity derivatives.
We also utilize total return swaps to offset changes in liabilities related to the equity market risks of certain deferred compensation arrangements. Gains or losses from changes in fair value of these total return swaps are generally offset by the losses or gains on the related liabilities.

47


As of December 31, 2016, the fair value of our marketable equity investments and our equity derivative instruments, including hedging positions, was $6.2 billion ($6.0 billion as of December 26, 2015). Substantially all of our marketable equity investments portfolio as of December 31, 2016 was concentrated in our investment in ASML of $6.1 billion ($5.7 billion as of December 26, 2015). Our marketable equity method investments are excluded from our analysis, as the carrying value does not fluctuate based on market price changes unless an other-than-temporary impairment is deemed necessary. To determine reasonably possible decreases in the market value of our marketable equity investments, we have analyzed the historical market price sensitivity of our marketable equity investment portfolio. Assuming a decline of 30% in market prices, and after reflecting the impact of hedges and offsetting positions, the aggregate value of our marketable equity investments could decrease by approximately $1.9 billion, based on the value as of December 31, 2016 (a decrease in value of approximately $1.8 billion, based on the value as of December 26, 2015 using an assumed decline of 30%).
Many of the same factors that could result in an adverse movement of equity market prices affect our non-marketable equity investments, although we cannot always quantify the impact directly. Financial markets are volatile, which could negatively affect the prospects of the companies we invest in, their ability to raise additional capital, and the likelihood of our ability to realize value in our investments through liquidity events such as initial public offerings, mergers, and private sales. These types of investments involve a great deal of risk, and there can be no assurance that any specific company will grow or become successful; consequently, we could lose all or part of our investment. Our non-marketable cost method equity investments had a carrying amount of $3.1 billion as of December 31, 2016 ($2.9 billion as of December 26, 2015) and included our investment in UniSpreadtrum and Cloudera, Inc. (Cloudera) of $966 million and $454 million, respectively ($966 million and $454 million for UniSpreadtrum and Cloudera, respectively, as of December 26, 2015). The carrying amount of our non-marketable equity method investments was $1.3 billion as of December 31, 2016 ($1.6 billion as of December 26, 2015). A substantial majority of our non-marketable equity method investments balance as of December 31, 2016 was concentrated in our IMFT and Cloudera investments of $849 million and $225 million, respectively ($872 million and $256 million for IMFT and Cloudera, respectively, as of December 26, 2015).
Commodity Price Risk
Although we operate facilities that consume commodities, we are not directly affected by commodity price risk to a material degree. We have established forecasted transaction risk management programs to protect against fluctuations in commodity prices. We may use commodity derivatives contracts, such as commodity swaps, in these hedging programs. In addition, we have sourcing plans in place for our key commodities that mitigate the risk of a potential supplier concentration.


48


ITEM 8.
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
 
Page
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basis
 
Performance & Operations
 
Investments, Long-term Assets & Debt
 
Risk Management & Other
 
 
 

49


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
The Board of Directors and Stockholders of Intel Corporation
We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Intel Corporation as of December 31, 2016 and December 26, 2015, and the related consolidated statements of income, comprehensive income, stockholders' equity, and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2016. Our audits also included the financial statement schedule listed in the Index at Part IV, Item 15. These financial statements and schedule are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements and schedule based on our audits.
We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.
In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of Intel Corporation at December 31, 2016 and December 26, 2015, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2016, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles. Also, in our opinion, the related financial statement schedule, when considered in relation to the basic financial statements taken as a whole, presents fairly in all material respects the information set forth therein.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), Intel Corporation's internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2016, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) and our report dated February 17, 2017 expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.
/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

San Jose, California
February 17, 2017
 

50


REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM
 
The Board of Directors and Stockholders of Intel Corporation
We have audited Intel Corporation’s internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2016, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (2013 framework) (the COSO criteria). Intel Corporation’s management is responsible for maintaining effective internal control over financial reporting, and for its assessment of the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting included in the accompanying Management Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the company’s internal control over financial reporting based on our audit.
We conducted our audit in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether effective internal control over financial reporting was maintained in all material respects. Our audit included obtaining an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, assessing the risk that a material weakness exists, testing and evaluating the design and operating effectiveness of internal control based on the assessed risk, and performing such other procedures as we considered necessary in the circumstances. We believe that our audit provides a reasonable basis for our opinion.
A company’s internal control over financial reporting is a process designed to provide reasonable assurance regarding the reliability of financial reporting and the preparation of financial statements for external purposes in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles. A company’s internal control over financial reporting includes those policies and procedures that (1) pertain to the maintenance of records that, in reasonable detail, accurately and fairly reflect the transactions and dispositions of the assets of the company; (2) provide reasonable assurance that transactions are recorded as necessary to permit preparation of financial statements in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles, and that receipts and expenditures of the company are being made only in accordance with authorizations of management and directors of the company; and (3) provide reasonable assurance regarding prevention or timely detection of unauthorized acquisition, use, or disposition of the company’s assets that could have a material effect on the financial statements.
Because of its inherent limitations, internal control over financial reporting may not prevent or detect misstatements. Also, projections of any evaluation of effectiveness to future periods are subject to the risk that controls may become inadequate because of changes in conditions, or that the degree of compliance with the policies or procedures may deteriorate.
In our opinion, Intel Corporation maintained, in all material respects, effective internal control over financial reporting as of December 31, 2016, based on the COSO criteria.
We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the 2016 consolidated financial statements of Intel Corporation and our report dated February 17, 2017, expressed an unqualified opinion thereon.

/s/ Ernst & Young LLP

San Jose, California
February 17, 2017

51


INTEL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
Years Ended
(In Millions, Except Per Share Amounts)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
Net revenue
 
$
59,387

 
$
55,355

 
$
55,870

Cost of sales
 
23,196

 
20,676

 
20,261

Gross margin
 
36,191

 
34,679

 
35,609

Research and development
 
12,740

 
12,128

 
11,537

Marketing, general and administrative
 
8,397

 
7,930

 
8,136

Restructuring and other charges
 
1,886

 
354

 
295

Amortization of acquisition-related intangibles
 
294

 
265

 
294

Operating expenses
 
23,317

 
20,677

 
20,262

Operating income
 
12,874

 
14,002

 
15,347

Gains (losses) on equity investments, net
 
506

 
315

 
411

Interest and other, net
 
(444
)
 
(105
)
 
43

Income before taxes
 
12,936

 
14,212

 
15,801

Provision for taxes
 
2,620

 
2,792

 
4,097

Net income
 
$
10,316

 
$
11,420

 
$
11,704

Basic earnings per share of common stock
 
$
2.18

 
$
2.41

 
$
2.39

Diluted earnings per share of common stock
 
$
2.12

 
$
2.33

 
$
2.31

Weighted average shares of common stock outstanding:
 
 
 
 
 
 
Basic
 
4,730

 
4,742

 
4,901

Diluted
 
4,875

 
4,894

 
5,056

See accompanying notes.

52


INTEL CORPORATION
CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
Years Ended
(In Millions)
 
Dec 31,
2016
 
Dec 26,
2015
 
Dec 27,
2014
Net income
 
$
10,316

 
$
11,420

 
$
11,704

Other comprehensive income (loss), net of tax: