10-K 1 ed10k2004_final.htm DECEMBER 31, 2004 FORM 10-K - FINAL December 31, 2004 Form 10-K - Final



UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K

(Mark One)
[X] Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2004

OR

[ ] Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934
For the transition period from   to __

Commission File Number 1-3492

HALLIBURTON COMPANY
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
75-2677995
(State or other jurisdiction of
(I.R.S. Employer
incorporation or organization)
Identification No.)
5 Houston Center
1401 McKinney, Suite 2400
Houston, Texas 77010
(Address of principal executive offices)
Telephone Number - Area code (713) 759-2600
   
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
   
 
Name of each Exchange on
Title of each class
which registered
Common Stock par value $2.50 per share
New York Stock Exchange
   
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes X No______

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. [X]

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an accelerated filer (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).
Yes X No ____

The aggregate market value of Common Stock held by nonaffiliates on June 30, 2004, determined using the per share closing price on the New York Stock Exchange Composite tape of $30.26 on that date was approximately $13,290,000,000.

As of February 17, 2005, there were 504,455,647 shares of Halliburton Company Common Stock, $2.50 par value per share, outstanding.

Portions of the Halliburton Company Proxy Statement for our 2005 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (File No. 1-3492) are incorporated by reference into Part III of this report.



     

 


HALLIBURTON COMPANY
Index to Form 10-K
For the Year Ended December 31, 2004

PART I
 
PAGE
Item 1.
Business
 1
Item 2.
Properties
 9
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
 10
Item 4.
Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders
 10
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF REGISTRANT
 11
PART II
   
Item 5.
Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity and Related
 
 
Stockholder Matters
 13
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
 13
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial
 
 
Condition and Results of Operations
 13
Item 7(a).
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
 13
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
 14
Item 9.
Changes in and disagreements with Accountants on
 
 
Accounting and financial Disclosure
 14
Item 9(a).
Controls and Procedures
 14
Item 9(b).
Other Information
 14
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS and MD&A
 
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and
 
Results of Operations
 15
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
 62
Reports of Registered Public Accounting Firm
 63
Consolidated Statements of Operations
 65
Consolidated Balance Sheets
 66
Consolidated Statements of Shareholder’s Equity
 67
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
 68
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 69
Selected Financial Data (Unaudited)
 120
Quarterly Data and Market Price Information
 121
PART III
   
Item 10.
Directors and Executive Officers of Registrant
 122
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
 122
Item 12(a).
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners
 122
Item 12(b).
Security Ownership of Management
 122
Item 12(c).
Changes in Control
 122
Item 12(d).
Securities Authorized for Issuance Under Equity
 
 
Compensation Plans
 122
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions
 122
Item 14.
Principal Accountant Fees and Services
 122
PART IV
   
Item 15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
 123
SIGNATURES
 135




  (i)   

 


PART I

Item 1. Business.
General description of business. Halliburton Company’s predecessor was established in 1919 and incorporated under the laws of the State of Delaware in 1924. Halliburton Company provides a variety of services, products, maintenance, engineering, and construction to energy, industrial, and governmental customers.
Our six business segments are organized around how we manage the business: Production Optimization, Fluid Systems, Drilling and Formation Evaluation, Digital and Consulting Solutions (formerly Landmark and Other Energy Services), Government and Infrastructure, and Energy and Chemicals. We refer to the combination of Production Optimization, Fluid Systems, Drilling and Formation Evaluation, and Digital and Consulting Solutions segments as our Energy Services Group and to the Government and Infrastructure and Energy and Chemicals segments as KBR. See Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements for financial information about our business segments.
Asbestos and silica settlement and prepackaged Chapter 11 resolution. In December 2003, eight of our subsidiaries sought Chapter 11 protection to avail themselves of the provisions of Sections 524(g) and 105 of the Bankruptcy Code to discharge current and future asbestos and silica personal injury claims against us and our subsidiaries. The order confirming the plan of reorganization became final and nonappealable on December 31, 2004, and the plan of reorganization became effective in January 2005. Under the plan of reorganization, all current and future asbestos and silica personal injury claims against us and our affiliates were channeled into trusts established for the benefit of asbestos and silica claimants, thus releasing us from those claims.
In accordance with the plan of reorganization, in January 2005 we contributed the following to trusts for the benefit of current and future asbestos and silica personal injury claimants:
- approximately $2.3 billion in cash;
- 59.5 million shares of Halliburton common stock; and
- notes currently valued at approximately $55 million.
During 2004, we settled insurance disputes with substantially all insurance companies for asbestos- and silica-related claims and all other claims under the applicable insurance policies and terminated all the applicable insurance policies. Under the terms of our insurance settlements, we will receive cash proceeds with a nominal amount of approximately $1.5 billion and with a present value of approximately $1.4 billion for our asbestos- and silica-related insurance receivables. Cash payments of approximately $1.0 billion related to these receivables were received in January 2005. Under the terms of the settlement agreements, we will receive cash payments of the remaining amounts in several installments beginning in July 2005 through 2009.
See Note 11 to the consolidated financial statements for further information regarding the resolution of our asbestos and silica settlement and prepackaged Chapter 11 proceedings.
Description of services and products. We offer a broad suite of products and services through our six business segments. The following summarizes our services and products for each business segment.
ENERGY SERVICES GROUP
Our Energy Services Group provides a wide range of discrete services and products, as well as bundled services and integrated services and solutions to customers for the exploration, development, and production of oil and gas. The Energy Services Group serves major, national, and independent oil and gas companies throughout the world.
Production Optimization
Our Production Optimization segment primarily tests, measures, and provides means to manage and/or improve well production once a well is drilled and, in some cases, after it has been producing. This segment consists of production enhancement services and completion tools and services.

 
 

  1  

 

Production enhancement services include stimulation services, pipeline process services, sand control services, coiled tubing tools and services, and hydraulic workover services. Stimulation services optimize oil and gas reservoir production through a variety of pressure pumping services, and chemical processes, commonly known as fracturing and acidizing. Pipeline process services include pipeline and facility testing, commissioning, and cleaning via pressure pumping, chemical systems, specialty equipment, and nitrogen, and are provided to the midstream and downstream sectors of the energy business. Sand control services include fluid and chemical systems and pumping services for the prevention of formation sand production.
Completion tools and services include subsurface safety valves and flow control equipment, surface safety systems, packers and specialty completion equipment, intelligent completion systems, production automation, expandable liner hanger systems, sand control systems, slickline equipment and services, self-elevated workover platforms, tubing-conveyed perforating products and services, well servicing tools, and reservoir performance services. Reservoir performance services include drill stem and other well testing tools and services, underbalanced applications and real-time reservoir analysis, data acquisition services, and production applications.
Also included in this segment is WellDynamics, an intelligent well completions joint venture. In January 2004, Halliburton and Shell Technology Ventures (Shell) agreed to restructure two joint venture companies, WellDynamics B.V. (WellDynamics) and Enventure Global Technology LLC (Enventure), in an effort to more closely align the ventures with near-term priorities in the core businesses of the venture owners. We acquired an additional 1% of WellDynamics from Shell, giving us 51% ownership. With our resulting control of day-to-day operations, we believe we are now able to achieve more opportunities to leverage existing complementary businesses, reduce costs, and ensure global availability.
Additionally, subsea operations conducted by Subsea 7, Inc., of which we formerly owned 50%, are included in this segment. In January 2005, we completed the sale of this joint venture to our partner, Siem Offshore (formerly DSND Subsea ASA). See Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information related to this disposition.
Fluid Systems
Our Fluid Systems segment focuses on providing services and technologies to assist in the drilling and construction of oil and gas wells. This segment offers cementing and drilling fluids systems.
Cementing is the process used to bond the well and well casing while isolating fluid zones and maximizing wellbore stability. Cement and chemical additives are pumped to fill the space between the casing and the side of the wellbore. Our cementing service line also provides casing equipment and services.
Our Baroid Fluid Services product line provides drilling fluid systems, performance additives, solids control, and waste management services for oil and gas drilling, completion, and workover operations. In addition, Baroid Fluid Services sells products to a wide variety of industrial customers. Drilling fluids usually contain bentonite or barite in a water or oil base. Drilling fluids primarily improve wellbore stability and facilitate the transportation of cuttings from the bottom of a wellbore to the surface. Drilling fluids also help cool the drill bit, seal porous well formations, and assist in pressure control within a wellbore. Drilling fluids are often customized by onsite engineers for optimum stability and enhanced oil production.
Also included in this segment is our investment in Enventure, which is an expandable casing joint venture. As discussed above, in January 2004, Halliburton and Shell agreed to restructure this joint venture. Enventure was owned equally by Halliburton and Shell. Shell acquired an additional 33.5% of Enventure, leaving us with 16.5% ownership in return for enhanced and extended agreements and licenses with Shell for its Poroflex™ expandable sand screens and a distribution agreement for its Versaflex™ expandable liner hangers, in addition to a 1% increase in our ownership of WellDynamics.

 
 

2

 

Drilling and Formation Evaluation
Our Drilling and Formation Evaluation segment is primarily involved in drilling and evaluating the formations during the bore-hole construction process. Major products and services offered include:
- drilling systems and services;
- drill bits; and
- logging services.
Our Sperry Drilling Services product line provides drilling systems and services. These services include directional and horizontal drilling, measurement-while-drilling, logging-while-drilling, multilateral completion systems, and rig site information systems. Our drilling systems offer directional control while providing important measurements about the characteristics of the drill string and geological formations while drilling directional wells. Real-time operating capabilities enable the monitoring of well progress and aid decision-making processes.
Our Security DBS Drill Bits product line provides roller cone rock bits, fixed cutter bits, and related downhole tools used in drilling oil and gas wells. In addition, coring equipment and services are provided to acquire cores of the formations drilled for evaluation.
Logging services include open-hole wireline services which provide information on formation evaluation, including resistivity, porosity, and density; rock mechanics; and fluid sampling. Cased-hole services are also offered which provide cement bond evaluation, reservoir monitoring, pipe evaluation, pipe recovery, and perforating. Our Magnetic Resonance Imaging Logging (MRIL®) tools apply magnetic resonance imaging technology to the evaluation of subsurface rock formations in newly drilled oil and gas wells.
Digital and Consulting Solutions
Our Digital and Consulting Solutions segment provides integrated exploration and production software information systems, consulting services, real-time operations, subsea operations, and other integrated solutions.
Landmark Graphics is a supplier of integrated exploration and production software information systems as well as professional and data management services for the upstream oil and gas industry. Landmark Graphics software transforms vast quantities of seismic, well log, and other data into detailed computer models of petroleum reservoirs. The models are used by our customers to achieve optimal business and technical decisions in exploration, development, and production activities. Data management services provide efficient storage, browsing, and retrieval of large volumes of exploration and petroleum data. The products and services offered by Landmark Graphics integrate data workflows and operational processes across disciplines, including geophysics, geology, drilling, engineering, production, economics, finance and corporate planning, and key partners and suppliers.
This segment also provides value-added oilfield project management and integrated solutions to independent, integrated, and national oil companies. These offerings make use of all of Halliburton’s oilfield services, products, technologies, and project management capabilities to assist our customers in optimizing the value of their oil and gas assets.
KBR
KBR provides a wide range of services to energy and industrial customers and government entities worldwide and consists of two segments, Government and Infrastructure and Energy and Chemicals.
Government and Infrastructure
Our Government and Infrastructure segment focuses on:
- construction, maintenance, and logistics services for government operations, facilities, and installations;
- civil engineering, construction, consulting, and project management services for state and local government agencies and private industries;

 
 

3

 

- integrated security solutions, including threat definition assessments, mitigation, and consequence management; design, engineering and program management; construction and delivery; and physical security, operations, and maintenance;
- dockyard operation and management through the Devonport Royal Dockyard Limited (DML) subsidiary, with services that include design, construction, surface/subsurface fleet maintenance, nuclear engineering and refueling, and weapons engineering; and
- privately financed initiatives, in which KBR funds the development or provision of an asset, such as a facility, service, or infrastructure for a government client, which we then own, operate and maintain, enabling our clients to utilize new assets at a reasonable cost.
Energy and Chemicals
Our Energy and Chemicals segment is a global engineering, procurement, construction, technology, and services provider for the energy and chemicals industries. Working both upstream and downstream in support of our customers, Energy and Chemicals offers the following:
- downstream engineering and construction capabilities, including global engineering execution centers, as well as engineering, construction, and program management of liquefied natural gas, ammonia, petrochemicals, crude oil refineries, and natural gas plants;
- upstream deepwater engineering, marine technology, and project management;
- Production Services provides plant operations, maintenance, and start-up services for upstream oil and gas facilities worldwide;
- in the United States, Industrial Services provides maintenance services to the petrochemical, forest product, power, and commercial markets;
- industry-leading licensed technologies in the areas of fertilizers and synthesis gas, olefins, refining, and chemicals and polymers; and
- consulting services in the form of expert technical and management advice that include studies, conceptual and detailed engineering, project management, construction supervision and design, and construction verification or certification in both upstream and downstream markets.
Also included in this segment are two joint ventures: TSKJ, in which we have a 25% interest, and M. W. Kellogg, Ltd., in which we have a 55% interest. TSKJ was formed to construct and subsequently expand a large natural gas liquefaction complex in Nigeria.
Dispositions in 2004. In August 2004, we sold our surface well testing and subsea test tree operations within our Production Optimization segment to Power Well Service Holdings, LLC, an affiliate of First Reserve Corporation. This disposition will have an immaterial impact on our future operations. See Note 4 to the consolidated financial statements for additional information related to this disposition.
Business strategy. Our business strategy is to maintain global leadership in providing energy services and products and engineering and construction services. We provide these services and products to our customers as discrete services and products and, when combined with project management services, as integrated solutions. Our ability to be a global leader depends on meeting four key goals:
- establishing and maintaining technological leadership;
- achieving and continuing operational excellence;
- creating and continuing innovative business relationships; and
- preserving a dynamic workforce.
Now that we have resolved our asbestos and silica liability and our affected subsidiaries have exited Chapter 11 reorganization proceedings, we intend to separate KBR from Halliburton, which could include a transaction involving a spin-off, split-off, public offering, or sale of KBR or its operations. In order to maximize KBR’s value for our shareholders and to determine the most appropriate form of the transaction and its components, it may be necessary for KBR to establish a track record of positive earnings for a number of quarters and to seek resolution of governmental issues, investigations, and other disputes.

 
 

4

 

Markets and competition. We are one of the world’s largest diversified energy services and engineering and construction services companies. We believe that our future success will depend in large part upon our ability to offer a wide array of services and products on a global scale. Our services and products are sold in highly competitive markets throughout the world. Competitive factors impacting sales of our services and products include:
- price;
- service delivery (including the ability to deliver services and products on an “as needed, where needed” basis);
- health, safety, and environmental standards and practices;
- service quality;
- product quality;
- warranty; and
- technical proficiency.
While we provide a wide range of discrete services and products, a number of customers have indicated a preference for bundled services and integrated services and solutions. In the case of the Energy Services Group, integrated services and solutions relate to all phases of exploration, development, and production of oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids. In the case of KBR, integrated services and solutions relate to all phases of design, procurement, construction, project management, and maintenance of facilities primarily for energy and government customers.
We conduct business worldwide in over 100 countries. In 2004, based on the location of services provided and products sold, 26% of our consolidated revenue was from Iraq, primarily related to our work for the United States Government, and 22% of our consolidated revenue was from the United States. In 2003, 27% of our consolidated revenue was from the United States and 15% of our consolidated revenue was from Iraq. No other country accounted for more than 10% of our consolidated revenue during these periods. See Note 5 to the consolidated financial statements for additional financial information about geographic operations in the last three years. Since the markets for our services and products are vast and cross numerous geographic lines, a meaningful estimate of the total number of competitors cannot be made. The industries we serve are highly competitive and we have many substantial competitors. Largely all of our services and products are marketed through our servicing and sales organizations.
Operations in some countries may be adversely affected by unsettled political conditions, acts of terrorism, civil unrest, expropriation or other governmental actions, and exchange control and currency problems. Except for our government services work in Iraq discussed above, we believe the geographic diversification of our business activities reduces the risk that loss of operations in any one country would be material to the conduct of our operations taken as a whole.
Information regarding our exposures to foreign currency fluctuations, risk concentration, and financial instruments used to minimize risk is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Financial Instrument Market Risk and in Note 18 to the consolidated financial statements.
Customers and backlog. Our revenue during the past three years was mainly derived from the sale of services and products to the energy industry, including 54% in 2004, 66% in 2003, and 86% in 2002. Revenue from the United States Government, resulting primarily from the work performed in the Middle East by our Government and Infrastructure segment, represented 39% of our 2004 consolidated revenue and 26% of our 2003 consolidated revenue. Revenue from the United States Government during 2002 represented less than 10% of consolidated revenue. No other customer represented more than 10% of consolidated revenue in any period presented.

 

5

 

The following schedule summarizes our project backlog:

   
December 31
 
Millions of dollars
 
2004
 
2003
 
Firm orders:
             
Government and Infrastructure
 
$
3,968
 
$
5,025
 
Energy and Chemicals
   
3,643
   
3,625
 
Energy Services Group segments
   
64
   
278
 
Total
   
7,675
   
8,928
 
Government orders firm but not yet funded,
             
letters of intent, and contracts awarded
             
but not signed:
             
Government and Infrastructure
   
816
   
1,076
 
Energy and Chemicals
   
-
   
19
 
Energy Services Group segments
   
-
   
43
 
Total
   
816
   
1,138
 
Total backlog
 
$
8,491
 
$
10,066
 

Backlog related to Subsea 7, Inc. is not included in the table above at December 31, 2004 since it was sold subsequent to year-end. We estimate that 74% of backlog existing within the Government and Infrastructure segment and 51% of backlog existing within the Energy and Chemicals segment at December 31, 2004 will be completed during 2005. Approximately 75% of total backlog relates to cost-reimbursable contracts with the remaining 25% relating to fixed-price contracts. For contracts that are not for a specific amount, backlog is estimated as follows:
- operations and maintenance contracts that cover multiple years are included in backlog based upon an estimate of the work to be provided over the next twelve months; and
- government contracts that cover a broad scope of work up to a maximum value are included in backlog at the estimated amount of work to be completed under the contract based upon periodic consultation with the customer.
For projects where we act as project manager, we only include our scope of each project in backlog. For projects related to unconsolidated joint ventures, we only include our percentage ownership of each joint venture’s backlog, which totaled $1.1 billion at December 31, 2004. Our backlog excludes contracts for recurring hardware and software maintenance and support services offered by Landmark Graphics. Backlog is not indicative of future operating results because backlog figures are subject to substantial fluctuations. Arrangements included in backlog are in many instances extremely complex, nonrepetitive in nature, and may fluctuate in contract value and timing. Many contracts do not provide for a fixed amount of work to be performed and are subject to modification or termination by the customer. The termination or modification of any one or more sizeable contracts or the addition of other contracts may have a substantial and immediate effect on backlog.
Raw materials. Raw materials essential to our business are normally readily available. Where we rely on a single supplier for materials essential to our business, we are confident that we could make satisfactory alternative arrangements in the event of an interruption in supply.
Research and development costs. We maintain an active research and development program. The program improves existing products and processes, develops new products and processes, and improves engineering standards and practices that serve the changing needs of our customers. Our expenditures for research and development activities were $234 million in 2004, $221 million in 2003, and $233 million in 2002, of which over 96% was company-sponsored in each year.

 
 

6

 

Patents. We own a large number of patents and have pending a substantial number of patent applications covering various products and processes. We are also licensed to utilize patents owned by others. We do not consider any particular patent or group of patents to be material to our business operations.
Seasonality. On an overall basis, our operations are not generally affected by seasonality. Weather and natural phenomena can temporarily affect the performance of our services, but the widespread geographical locations of our operations serve to mitigate those effects. Examples of how weather can impact our business include:
- the severity and duration of the winter in North America can have a significant impact on gas storage levels and drilling activity for natural gas;
- the timing and duration of the spring thaw in Canada directly affects activity levels due to road restrictions;
- typhoons and hurricanes can disrupt offshore operations; and
- severe weather during the winter months normally results in reduced activity levels in the North Sea.
Due to higher spending near the end of the year on capital expenditures by customers for software, Landmark Graphics results of operations are generally stronger in the fourth quarter of the year than at the beginning of the year.
Employees. At December 31, 2004, we employed approximately 97,000 people worldwide compared to 101,000 at December 31, 2003. At December 31, 2004, approximately 6% of our employees were subject to collective bargaining agreements. Based upon the geographic diversification of these employees, we believe any risk of loss from employee strikes or other collective actions would not be material to the conduct of our operations taken as a whole.
Environmental regulation. We are subject to numerous environmental, legal, and regulatory requirements related to our operations worldwide. In the United States, these laws and regulations include, among others:
- the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act;
- the Resources Conservation and Recovery Act;
- the Clean Air Act;
- the Federal Water Pollution Control Act; and
- the Toxic Substances Control Act.
In addition to the federal laws and regulations, states and other countries where we do business may have numerous environmental, legal, and regulatory requirements by which we must abide. We evaluate and address the environmental impact of our operations by assessing and remediating contaminated properties in order to avoid future liabilities and comply with environmental, legal, and regulatory requirements. On occasion, we are involved in specific environmental litigation and claims, including the remediation of properties we own or have operated, as well as efforts to meet or correct compliance-related matters. Our Health, Safety and Environment group has several programs in place to maintain environmental leadership and to prevent the occurrence of environmental contamination.
We do not expect costs related to these remediation requirements to have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial position or our results of operations.
Website access. Our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act of 1934 are made available free of charge on our internet website at www.halliburton.com as soon as reasonably practicable after we have electronically filed the material with, or furnished it to, the Securities and Exchange Commission. We have posted on our website our Code of Business Conduct, which applies to all of our employees and Directors and serves as a code

 
 

7

 

of ethics for our principal executive officer, principal financial officer, principal accounting officer or controller, and other persons performing similar functions. Any amendments to our Code of Business Conduct or any waivers from provisions of our Code of Business Conduct granted to the specified officers above are disclosed on our website within four business days after the date of any amendment or waiver pertaining to these officers.

 
 

8

 

Item 2. Properties.
We own or lease numerous properties in domestic and foreign locations. The following locations represent our major facilities:

 
Location
Owned/Leased
 
Description
Energy Services Group
   
North America
   
Production Optimization Segment:
   
     
Carrollton, Texas
Owned
Manufacturing facility
     
Alvarado, Texas
Owned/Leased
Manufacturing facility
     
Drilling and Formation
   
Evaluation Segment:
   
     
The Woodlands, Texas
Leased
Manufacturing facility
     
Shared Facilities:
   
     
Duncan, Oklahoma
Owned
Manufacturing, technology, and campus
   
facilities
     
Houston, Texas
Owned
Manufacturing and campus facilities
     
Houston, Texas
Owned/Leased
Campus facility
     
Houston, Texas
Leased
Campus facility
     
KBR
   
North America
   
Energy and Chemicals Segment:
   
     
Houston, Texas
Leased
Campus facility
     
Shared Facilities:
   
     
Houston, Texas
Owned
Campus facility
     
Europe/Africa
   
Shared Facilities:
   
     
Leatherhead, United Kingdom
Owned
Campus facility
     
Corporate
   
Houston, Texas
Leased
Corporate executive offices

All of our owned properties are unencumbered.
In addition, we have 155 international and 106 United States field camps from which the Energy Services Group delivers its products and services. We also have numerous small facilities that include sales offices, project offices, and bulk storage facilities throughout the world. We own or lease marine fabrication facilities covering approximately 519 acres in Texas, England (primarily related to DML), and Scotland, which are used by KBR. Our marine facilities located in Texas and Scotland are currently for sale.

 
 

9

 

We have mineral rights to proven and probable reserves of barite and bentonite. These rights include leaseholds, mining claims, and owned property. We process barite and bentonite for use in our Fluid Systems segment in addition to supplying many industrial markets worldwide. Based on the number of tons of bentonite consumed in fiscal year 2004, we estimate that our 20 million tons of proven reserves in areas of active mining are sufficient to fulfill our internal and external needs for the next 15 years. We estimate that our 2.8 million tons of proven reserves of barite in areas of active mining equate to a 16-year supply based on current rates of production. These estimates are subject to change based on periodic updates to reserve estimates and to the extent future consumption differs from current levels of consumption.
We believe all properties that we currently occupy are suitable for their intended use.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings.
Information relating to various commitments and contingencies is described in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Forward-Looking Information and Risk Factors” and in Notes 3, 11, 12, and 13 to the consolidated financial statements.

Item 4. Submission of Matters to a Vote of Security Holders.
There were no matters submitted to a vote of security holders during the fourth quarter of 2004.

 
 

10

 

Executive Officers of the Registrant.

The following table indicates the names and ages of the executive officers of the registrant as of February 15, 2005, along with a listing of all offices held by each during the past five years:

Name and Age
Offices Held and Term of Office
*     Albert O. Cornelison, Jr.
Executive Vice President and General Counsel of Halliburton Company,
(Age 55)
since December 2002
 
Vice President and General Counsel of Halliburton Company, May
 
2002 to December 2002
 
Vice President and Associate General Counsel of Halliburton Company,
 
October 1998 to May 2002
   
*  C. Christopher Gaut
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Halliburton
(Age 48)
Company, since March 2003
 
Senior Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Member - Office of
 
the President and Chief Operating Officer of ENSCO International
 
Incorporated, January 2002 to February 2003
 
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of ENSCO
 
International Incorporated, December 1987 to December 2001
   
W. Preston Holsinger
Vice President and Treasurer of Halliburton Company, since
(Age 63)
October 2004
 
Director, Special Projects, May 2002 to October 2004
 
Shared Services Director HED/IS, November 1998 to May 2002
   
*  Andrew R. Lane
Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, since
(Age 45)
December 2004
 
President and Chief Executive Officer of KBR, July 2004 to
 
November 2004
 
Senior Vice President, Global Operations of Halliburton Energy
 
Services, April 2004 to July 2004
 
President, Landmark Division of Halliburton Energy Services Group,
 
May 2003 to March 2004
 
President and Chief Executive Officer of Landmark Graphics, April
 
2002 to April 2003
 
Chief Operating Officer of Landmark Graphics, January 2002 to
 
March 2002
 
Vice President, Production Enhancement PSL, Completion Products
 
PSL and Tools/Testing/TCP of Halliburton Energy Services Group,
 
January 2000 to December 2001

 
 

11

 


Name and Age
Offices Held and Term of Office
*  David J. Lesar
Chairman of the Board, President and Chief Executive Officer of
(Age 51)
Halliburton Company, since August 2000
 
Director of Halliburton Company, since August 2000
 
President and Chief Operating Officer of Halliburton Company, May
 
1997 to August 2000
 
Chairman of the Board of Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc., January 1999 to
 
August 2000
 
Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Halliburton
 
Company, August 1995 to May 1997
   
Mark A. McCollum
Senior Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer, since August 2003
(Age 45)
Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer, Tenneco
 
Automotive, Inc., November 1999 to August 2003
   
*  Weldon J. Mire
Vice President, Human Resources of Halliburton Company, since May
(Age 57)
2002
 
Division Vice President of Halliburton Energy Services, January 2001
 
to May 2002 (Country Vice President Indonesia)
 
Asia Pacific Sales Manager of Halliburton Energy Services, November
 
1999 to January 2001
 
Director of Business Development, September 1999 to November 1999
 
Global Director of Strategic Business Development, January 1999 to
 
November 1999
 
Senior Shared Services Manager Houston, November 1998 to
 
January 1999
   
David R. Smith
Vice President, Tax of Halliburton Company, since May 2002
(Age 58)
Vice President, Tax of Halliburton Energy Services, Inc., September
 
1998 to May 2002


* Members of the Policy Committee of the registrant.

There are no family relationships between the executive officers of the registrant or between any director and any executive officer of the registrant.

 
 

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PART II

Item 5. Market for the Registrant’s Common Equity and Related Stockholder Matters.
Halliburton Company’s common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange. Information relating to the high and low market prices of common stock and quarterly dividend payments is included under the caption “Quarterly Data and Market Price Information” on page 121 of this annual report. Cash dividends on common stock for 2004 and 2003 in the amount of $0.125 per share were paid in March, June, September, and December of each year. Our Board of Directors intends to consider the payment of quarterly dividends on the outstanding shares of our common stock in the future. The declaration and payment of future dividends, however, will be at the discretion of the Board of Directors and will depend upon, among other things, future earnings, general financial condition and liquidity, success in business activities, capital requirements, and general business conditions.
At February 15, 2005, there were approximately 22,573 shareholders of record. In calculating the number of shareholders, we consider clearing agencies and security position listings as one shareholder for each agency or listing.
Following is a summary of our repurchases of our common stock during the three-month period ended December 31, 2004.

               
           
Total Number
 
            of Shares   
             Purchased  
           
as Part of
 
   
 
 
 
 
Publicly
 
    Total Number    Average    Announced  
   
of Shares
 
Price Paid
 
Plans or
 
Period
 
Purchased (a)
 
per Share
 
 Programs
 
October 1-31
   
4,145
 
$
31.57
   
-
 
November 1-30
   
20,414
 
$
33.81
   
-
 
December 1-31
   
8,219
 
$
36.32
   
-
 
Total
   
32,778
 
$
34.16
   
-
 

(a)      All of the shares repurchased during the three-month period ended December 31, 2004 were acquired from employees in connection with the settlement of income tax and related benefit withholding obligations arising from vesting in restricted stock grants. These share purchases were not part of a publicly announced program to purchase common shares.

On April 25, 2000, our Board of Directors approved plans to implement a share repurchase program for up to 44 million shares of our common stock, of which 22,385,700 shares may yet be purchased.

Item 6. Selected Financial Data.
Information relating to selected financial data is included on page 120 of this annual report.

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.
Information relating to Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations is included on pages 15 through 61 of this annual report.

Item 7(a). Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk.
Information relating to market risk is included in Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations under the caption “Financial Instrument Market Risk” on page 48 of this annual report.

 
 

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Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.

 
Page No.
Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting
 62
Reports of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
 63-64
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the years ended
 
December 31, 2004, 2003, and 2002
 65
Consolidated Balance Sheets at December 31, 2004 and 2003
 66
Consolidated Statements of Shareholders’ Equity for the years ended
 
December 31, 2004, 2003, and 2002
 67
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the years ended
 
December 31, 2004, 2003, and 2002
 68
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
 69-119
Selected Financial Data (Unaudited)
 120
Quarterly Data and Market Price Information (Unaudited)
 121

The related financial statement schedules are included under Part IV, Item 15 of this annual report.

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure.
None.

Item 9(a). Controls and Procedures.
In accordance with Exchange Act Rules 13a-15 and 15d-15, we carried out an evaluation, under the supervision and with the participation of management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures as of the end of the period covered by this report. Based on that evaluation, our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer concluded that our disclosure controls and procedures were effective as of December 31, 2004 to provide reasonable assurance that information required to be disclosed in our reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized, and reported within the time periods specified in the Securities and Exchange Commission’s rules and forms. Our disclosure controls and procedures include controls and procedures designed to ensure that information required to be disclosed in reports filed or submitted under the Exchange Act is accumulated and communicated to our management, including our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer, as appropriate, to allow timely decisions regarding required disclosure.
There has been no change in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the three months ended December 31, 2004 that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal control over financial reporting.
See page 62 for Management’s Report on Internal Control Over Financial Reporting and page 64 for Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm on our assessment of internal control over financial reporting and opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting.

Item 9(b). Other Information.
None.

 
 

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HALLIBURTON COMPANY
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations


EXECUTIVE OVERVIEW

The past year was marked with several milestones, including:
- the finalization of our asbestos and silica settlements and our subsidiaries’ related emergence from Chapter 11 proceedings. We funded the trusts in January 2005 with $2.3 billion in cash and 59.5 million shares of our common stock. We received approximately $1.0 billion in cash during January 2005 under the terms of our insurance settlement agreements;
- achieving record revenue of over $20 billion, driven by our government services work in the Middle East and strong performance in our Energy Services Group, where we increased our international presence. Our Energy Services Group also had record levels of revenue, operating income, and operating margins;
- reaching an important agreement with our customer for the Barracuda-Caratinga project, which settled all claims and change orders, as well as adjusted the project scope and various milestone dates. We also achieved 92% project completion as a result of the Barracuda vessel producing first oil and the Caratinga vessel moving offshore for sea trials and final inspections. Subsequently, the Caratinga vessel achieved first oil in February 2005;
- restructuring KBR, which we expect will yield between $80 million and $100 million in annual savings; and
- addressing our liquidity needs in anticipation of funding the asbestos and silica trusts while managing our working capital position related to our government services work in the Middle East. This included utilizing two accounts receivable facilities during 2004, issuing $500 million of senior notes due 2007 in January 2004, maintaining one revolving credit facility, and arranging a new $500 million revolving credit facility during 2004. As of December 31, 2004, the two revolving credit facilities had available credit totaling $1.028 billion.
During 2004, we continued to provide substantial work under our government contracts business to the United States Department of Defense and other governmental agencies, including worldwide United States Army logistics contracts, known as LogCAP, and contracts to rebuild Iraq’s petroleum industry, known as RIO and PCO Oil South. Total revenue from the United States Government for 2004 includes $8.0 billion, or 39% of consolidated revenue, and revenue related to Iraq (which includes Kuwait) totaled approximately $7.1 billion, or 35% in 2004.
Detailed discussions of asbestos and silica, our United States government contract work, the Nigerian joint venture and investigations, the Barracuda-Caratinga project, and our liquidity and capital resources follow. Our operating performance, including our recent restructuring of KBR, is described in “Business Environment and Results of Operations” below.
Looking ahead, the outlook for our business is positive. Current market conditions for our energy services business are good with strong commodity prices, and our customers are increasing their exploration and production budgets. We are well-positioned in sectors that are experiencing particularly strong activity, such as United States onshore gas, and in areas that could experience increased activity in the near term, such as the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. In addition to the benefits expected from our recent restructuring initiative at KBR, we will continue to pursue our natural gas monetization strategy and push forward on the definitization process of our United States government contracts in the Middle East. Finally, now that we have resolved our asbestos and silica liability and our affected subsidiaries have exited Chapter 11 reorganization

 
 

15

 

proceedings, we intend to separate KBR from Halliburton, which could include a transaction involving a spin-off, split-off, public offering, or sale of KBR or its operations. In order to maximize KBR’s value for our shareholders and to determine the most appropriate form of the transaction and its components, it may be necessary for KBR to establish a track record of positive earnings for a number of quarters and to seek resolution of governmental issues, contract investigations, and other disputes.

Asbestos and Silica Obligations and Insurance Recoveries
Prepackaged Chapter 11 proceedings. DII Industries, Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (Kellogg Brown & Root), and six other subsidiaries (Mid-Valley, Inc.; KBR Technical Services, Inc.; Kellogg Brown & Root Engineering Corporation; Kellogg Brown & Root International, Inc. (a Delaware corporation); Kellogg Brown & Root International, Inc. (a Panamanian corporation); and BPM Minerals, LLC) filed Chapter 11 proceedings on December 16, 2003 in bankruptcy court in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Each of these entities was a wholly owned subsidiary of Halliburton before, during, and after the bankruptcy proceedings became final.
Our subsidiaries sought Chapter 11 protection to avail themselves of the provisions of Sections 524(g) and 105 of the Bankruptcy Code to discharge current and future asbestos and silica personal injury claims against us and our subsidiaries. The order confirming the plan of reorganization became final and nonappealable on December 31, 2004, and the plan of reorganization became effective in January 2005. Under the plan of reorganization, all current and future asbestos and silica personal injury claims against us and our affiliates were channeled into trusts established for the benefit of asbestos and silica claimants, thus releasing us from those claims.
In accordance with the plan of reorganization, in January 2005 we contributed the following to trusts for the benefit of current and future asbestos and silica personal injury claimants:
- approximately $2.345 billion in cash, which represents the remaining portion of the $2.775 billion total cash settlement after payments of $311 million in December 2003 and $119 million in June 2004;
- 59.5 million shares of Halliburton common stock;
- a one-year non-interest-bearing note of $31 million for the benefit of asbestos claimants. We prepaid the initial installment on the note of approximately $8 million in January 2005. The remaining note will be paid in three equal quarterly installments starting in the second quarter of 2005; and
- a silica note with an initial payment into a silica trust of $15 million. Subsequently, the note provides that we will contribute an amount to the silica trust at the end of each year for the next 30 years of up to $15 million. The note also provides for an extension of the note for 20 additional years under certain circumstances. We have estimated the value of this note to be approximately $24 million. We will periodically reassess our valuation of this note based upon our projections of the amounts we believe we will be required to fund into the silica trust.
As a result of the filing of the Chapter 11 proceedings, we adjusted the asbestos and silica liability to reflect the amount of the proposed settlement and certain related costs, which resulted in a pre-tax charge of approximately $1.016 billion to discontinued operations in the fourth quarter of 2003. The tax effect on this charge was minimal, as a valuation allowance was established against the liability to reflect the expected net tax benefit from the future deductions the liability will create.
In accordance with the definitive settlement agreements entered in early 2003, we reviewed plaintiff files to establish a medical basis for payment of settlement amounts and to establish that the claimed injuries were based on exposure to our products. In 2003, we concluded that substantially all of the asbestos and silica liability related to claims filed against our

 
 

16

 

former operations that have been divested and included in discontinued operations. Consequently, all 2003 and 2004 changes in our estimates related to the asbestos and silica liability were recorded through discontinued operations.
Our plan of reorganization called for a portion of our total asbestos liability to be settled by contributing 59.5 million shares of Halliburton common stock to the trust. As of December 31, 2004, we revalued our shares to approximately $2.335 billion ($39.24 per share), an increase of $778 million from December 31, 2003, and this amount was charged to discontinued operations on our consolidated statement of operations during 2004. Effective December 31, 2004, concurrent with receiving final and nonappealable confirmation of our plan of reorganization, we reclassified from a long-term liability to shareholders’ equity the final value of the 59.5 million shares of Halliburton common stock. If the shares had been included in the calculation of earnings per share as of the beginning of 2004, our diluted earnings per share from continuing operations would have been reduced by $0.11 for 2004.
Insurance settlements. During 2004, we settled insurance disputes with substantially all the insurance companies for asbestos- and silica-related claims and all other claims under the applicable insurance policies and terminated all the applicable insurance policies. Under the terms of our insurance settlements, we will receive cash proceeds with a nominal amount of approximately $1.5 billion and with a present value of approximately $1.4 billion for our asbestos- and silica-related insurance receivables. The present value was determined by discounting the expected future cash payments with a discount rate implicit in the settlements, which ranged from 4.0% to 5.5%. Beginning in the third quarter of 2004, this discount is being accreted as interest income (classified as discontinued operations) over the life of the expected future cash payments. Cash payments of approximately $1.0 billion related to these receivables were received in January 2005. Under the terms of the settlement agreements, we will receive cash payments of the remaining amounts in several installments beginning in July 2005 through 2009.
Our December 31, 2003 estimate of our asbestos- and silica-related insurance receivables already included a charge for the settlement amount under an agreement reached in January 2004, as well as certain other probable settlements with companies for which we could reasonably estimate the amount of the settlement. During 2004, we reduced the amount recorded as insurance receivables for asbestos- and silica-related liabilities insured by other companies based upon the final agreements, resulting in pretax charges to discontinued operations of approximately $698 million.

United States Government Contract Work
We provide substantial work under our government contracts business to the United States Department of Defense and other governmental agencies, including worldwide United States Army logistics contracts, known as LogCAP, and contracts to rebuild Iraq’s petroleum industry, known as RIO and PCO Oil South. Our government services revenue related to Iraq totaled approximately $7.1 billion in 2004 and approximately $3.6 billion in 2003.
Our operations under United States government contracts are regularly reviewed and audited by the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) and other governmental agencies. The DCAA serves in an advisory role to our customer. When issues are found during the governmental agency audit process, these issues are typically discussed and reviewed with us. The DCAA then issues an audit report with their recommendations to our customer’s contracting officer. In the case of management systems and other contract administrative issues, the contracting officer is generally with the Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA). We then work with our customer to resolve the issues noted in the audit report.
Given the demands of working in Iraq and elsewhere for the United States government, we expect that from time to time we will have disagreements or experience performance issues with the various government customers for which we work. If our performance is unacceptable to our customer under any of our government contracts, the government retains the right to pursue remedies under any affected contract, which remedies could include threatened termination or termination. If any contract were so terminated, we may not receive award fees under the affected contract, and our ability to

 
 

17

 

secure future contracts could be adversely affected, although we would receive payment for amounts owed for our allowable costs under cost-reimbursable contracts.
Fuel. In December 2003, the DCAA issued a preliminary audit report that alleged that we may have overcharged the Department of Defense by $61 million in importing fuel into Iraq. The DCAA questioned costs associated with fuel purchases made in Kuwait that were more expensive than buying and transporting fuel from Turkey. We responded that we had maintained close coordination of the fuel mission with the Army Corps of Engineers (COE), which was our customer and oversaw the project, throughout the life of the task order and that the COE had directed us to use the Kuwait sources. After a review, the COE concluded that we obtained a fair price for the fuel. However, Department of Defense officials thereafter referred the matter to the agency’s inspector general, which we understand has commenced an investigation.
The DCAA has issued various audit reports related to task orders under the RIO contract that reported $304 million in questioned and unsupported costs. The majority of these costs are associated with the humanitarian fuel mission. In these reports, the DCAA has compared fuel costs we incurred during the duration of the RIO contract in 2003 and early 2004 to fuel prices obtained by the Defense Energy Supply Center (DESC) in April 2004 when the fuel mission was transferred to that agency. We are working with our customer to resolve this issue.
Investigations. On January 22, 2004, we announced the identification by our internal audit function of a potential overbilling of approximately $6 million by La Nouvelle Trading & Contracting Company, W.L.L. (La Nouvelle), one of our subcontractors, under the LogCAP contract in Iraq, for services performed during 2003. In accordance with our policy and government regulation, the potential overcharge was reported to the Department of Defense Inspector General’s office as well as to our customer, the AMC. On January 23, 2004, we issued a check in the amount of $6 million to the AMC to cover that potential overbilling while we conducted our own investigation into the matter. Later in the first quarter of 2004, we determined that the amount of overbilling was $4 million, and the subcontractor billing should have been $2 million for the services provided. As a result, we paid La Nouvelle $2 million and billed our customer that amount. We subsequently terminated La Nouvelle’s services under the LogCAP contract. In October 2004, La Nouvelle filed suit against us alleging $224 million in damages as a result of its termination. We are continuing to investigate whether La Nouvelle paid, or attempted to pay, one or two of our former employees in connection with the billing. See Note 13 to our consolidated financial statements for further discussion.
In October 2004, we reported to the Department of Defense Inspector General’s office that two former employees in Kuwait may have had inappropriate contacts with individuals employed by or affiliated with two third-party subcontractors prior to the award of the subcontracts. The Inspector General’s office may investigate whether these two employees may have solicited and/or accepted payments from these third-party subcontractors while they were employed by us.
In October 2004, a civilian contracting official in the COE asked for a review of the process used by the COE for awarding some of the contracts to us. We understand that the Department of Defense Inspector General’s office may review the issues involved.
We understand that the United States Department of Justice, an Assistant United States Attorney based in Illinois, and others are investigating these and other individually immaterial matters we have reported relating to our government contract work in Iraq. We also understand that current and former employees of KBR have received subpoenas and have given or may give grand jury testimony relating to some of these matters. If criminal wrongdoing were found, criminal penalties could range up to the greater of $500,000 in fines per count for a corporation, or twice the gross pecuniary gain or loss.
Dining Facility and Administration Centers (DFACs). During 2003, the DCAA raised issues relating to our invoicing to the Army Materiel Command (AMC) for food services for soldiers and supporting civilian personnel in Iraq and Kuwait. We believe the issues raised by the DCAA relate to the difference between the number of troops the AMC

 
 

18

 

directed us to support and the number of soldiers counted at dining facilities for United States troops and supporting civilian personnel. In the first quarter of 2004, we reviewed our DFAC subcontracts in our Iraq and Kuwait areas of operation and have billed and continue to bill for all current DFAC costs. During 2004, we received notice from the DCAA that it was recommending withholding a portion of our DFAC billings. For DFAC billings relating to subcontracts entered into prior to February 2004, the DCAA has recommended withholding 19.35% of the billings until it completes its audits. Subsequent to February 2004, we renegotiated our DFAC subcontracts to address the specific issues raised by the DCAA and advised the AMC and the DCAA of the new terms of the arrangements. We have had no objection by the government to the terms and conditions associated with these new DFAC subcontract agreements. During the third quarter of 2004, we received notification that, for three Kuwait DFACs, the DCAA recommended to our customer that costs be disallowed because the DCAA is not satisfied with the level of documentation provided by us. The amount withheld related to suspended and recommended disallowed DFAC costs for work performed prior to February 2004 and totaled approximately $224 million as of December 31, 2004. The amount withheld could change as the DCAA continues their audits of the remaining DFAC facilities. We are negotiating with our customer, the AMC, to resolve this issue. We are currently withholding a proportionate amount of these billings from our subcontractors.
Laundry. During the third quarter of 2004, we received notice from the DCAA that it recommended withholding $16 million of subcontract costs related to the laundry service for one task order in southern Iraq for which it believes we and our subcontractors have not provided adequate levels of documentation supporting the quantity of the services provided. The DCAA recommended that the cost be withheld pending receipt of additional explanation or documentation to support subcontract cost. This $16 million was withheld from the subcontractor in the fourth quarter of 2004. We are working with the AMC to resolve this issue.
Withholding of payments. During 2004, the AMC issued a determination that a particular contract clause could cause it to withhold 15% from our invoices until our task orders under the LogCAP contract are definitized. The AMC delayed implementation of this withholding pending further review. The Army Field Support Command (AFSC) has now been delegated authority by the AMC to determine whether or not to implement the withholding. The AFSC has informed us that it will assess the situation on a task order by task order basis and, currently, withholding will continue to be delayed. We do not believe any potential 15% withholding will have a significant or sustained impact on our liquidity because any withholding is temporary and ends once the definitization process is complete. During the third quarter of 2004, we and the AMC identified three senior management teams to facilitate negotiation under the LogCAP task orders, and these teams are working to negotiate outstanding issues and definitize task orders as quickly possible. We are continuing to work with our customer to resolve outstanding issues. As of January 18, 2005, 25 task orders for LogCAP totaling over $636 million have been definitized.
As of December 31, 2004, the COE had withheld $85 million of our invoices related to a portion of our RIO contract pending completion of the definitization process. All 10 definitization proposals required under this contract have been submitted by us, and three have been finalized through a task order modification. After review by the DCAA, we have resubmitted five of the unfinalized seven proposals and are in the process of developing revised proposals for the remaining two. These withholdings represent the amount invoiced in excess of 85% of the funding in the task order. The COE also could withhold similar amounts from future invoices under our RIO contract until agreement is reached with the customer and task order modifications are issued. Approximately $2 million was withheld from our PCO Oil South project as of December 31, 2004. The PCO Oil South project has definitized 15 of the 28 task orders and withholdings are not continuing on those task orders. We do not believe the withholding will have a significant or sustained impact on our liquidity because the withholding is temporary and ends once the definitization process is complete.

 
 

19

 

In addition, we had unapproved claims totaling $93 million at December 31, 2004 for the LogCAP, RIO, and PCO Oil South contracts. These unapproved claims related to contracts where our costs have exceeded the funded value of the task order or were related to lost, damaged and destroyed equipment.
We are working diligently with our customers to proceed with significant new work only after we have a fully definitized task order, which should limit withholdings on future task orders.
Cost reporting. We have received notice that a contracting officer for our PCO Oil South project considers our monthly categorization and detail of costs and our ability to schedule and forecast costs to be inadequate, and he has requested corrections be made by March 10, 2005. We expect to be able to make the requested corrections. If we were unable to satisfy our customer, our customer may pursue remedies under the applicable federal acquisition regulations, including terminating the affected contract. Although there can be no assurances, we do not expect that our work on the PCO Oil South project will be terminated for default. We are in the process of developing an acceptable management cost reporting system and are supplementing the existing PCO cost reporting team with additional manpower.
Report on estimating system. On December 27, 2004, the DCMA granted continued approval of our estimating system, stating that our estimating system is “acceptable with corrective action.” We are in process of completing these corrective actions. Specifically, based on the unprecedented level of support our employees are providing the military in Iraq, Kuwait, and Afghanistan, we needed to update our estimating policies and procedures to make them better suited to such contingency situations. Additionally, we are in process of developing a detailed training program that will be made available to all estimating personnel to ensure that employees are adequately prepared to deal with the challenges and unique circumstances associated with a contingency operation.
Report on purchasing system. As a result of a Contractor Purchasing System Review by the DCMA during the second quarter of 2004, the DCMA granted the continued approval of our government contract purchasing system. The DCMA’s approval letter, dated September 7, 2004, stated that our purchasing system’s policies and practices are “effective and efficient, and provide adequate protection of the Government’s interest.”
The Balkans. We have had inquiries in the past by the DCAA and the civil fraud division of the United States Department of Justice into possible overcharges for work performed during 1996 through 2000 under a contract in the Balkans, which inquiry has not yet been completed by the Department of Justice. Based on an internal investigation, we credited our customer approximately $2 million during 2000 and 2001 related to our work in the Balkans as a result of billings for which support was not readily available. We believe that the preliminary Department of Justice inquiry relates to potential overcharges in connection with a part of the Balkans contract under which approximately $100 million in work was done. We believe that any allegations of overcharges would be without merit.

Nigerian joint venture and investigations
Foreign Corrupt Practices Act investigation. The United States Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is conducting a formal investigation into payments made in connection with the construction and subsequent expansion by TSKJ of a multibillion dollar natural gas liquefaction complex and related facilities at Bonny Island in Rivers State, Nigeria. The United States Department of Justice is also conducting an investigation. TSKJ is a private limited liability company registered in Madeira, Portugal whose members are Technip SA of France, Snamprogetti Netherlands B.V., which is an affiliate of ENI SpA of Italy, JGC Corporation of Japan, and Kellogg Brown & Root, each of which owns 25% of the venture.
The SEC and the Department of Justice have been reviewing these matters in light of the requirements of the United States Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA). We have produced documents to the SEC both voluntarily and pursuant to subpoenas, and intend to make our employees available to the SEC for testimony. In addition, we understand that the SEC has issued a subpoena to A. Jack Stanley, who most recently served as a consultant and chairman of Kellogg Brown &

 

 
20

 

Root, and to other current and former Kellogg Brown & Root employees. We further understand that the Department of Justice has invoked its authority under a sitting grand jury to obtain letters rogatory for the purpose of obtaining information abroad.
TSKJ and other similarly owned entities entered into various contracts to build and expand the liquefied natural gas project for Nigeria LNG Limited, which is owned by the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation, Shell Gas B.V., Cleag Limited (an affiliate of Total), and Agip International B.V., which is an affiliate of ENI SpA of Italy. Commencing in 1995, TSKJ entered into a series of agency agreements in connection with the Nigerian project. We understand that a French magistrate has officially placed Jeffrey Tesler, a principal of Tri-Star Investments, an agent of TSKJ, under investigation for corruption of a foreign public official. In Nigeria, a legislative committee of the National Assembly and the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, which is organized as part of the executive branch of the government, are also investigating these matters. Our representatives have met with the French magistrate and Nigerian officials and expressed our willingness to cooperate with those investigations. In October 2004, representatives of TSKJ voluntarily testified before the Nigerian legislative committee.
As a result of our continuing investigation into these matters, information has been uncovered suggesting that, commencing at least 10 years ago, the members of TSKJ considered payments to Nigerian officials. We provided this information to the United States Department of Justice, the SEC, the French magistrate, and the Nigerian Economics and Financial Crimes Commission. We also notified the other owners of TSKJ of the recently uncovered information and asked each of them to conduct their own investigation.
We understand from the ongoing governmental and other investigations that payments may have been made to Nigerian officials. In addition, TSKJ has suspended the receipt of services from and payments to Tri-Star Investments and is considering instituting legal proceedings to declare all agency agreements with Tri-Star Investments terminated and to recover all amounts previously paid under those agreements.
We also understand that the matters under investigation by the Department of Justice involve parties other than Kellogg Brown & Root and M.W. Kellogg, Ltd. (a joint venture in which Kellogg Brown & Root has a 55% interest), cover an extended period of time (in some cases significantly before our 1998 acquisition of Dresser Industries (which included M.W. Kellogg, Ltd.)), and possibly include the construction of a fertilizer plant in Nigeria in the early 1990s and the activities of agents and service providers.
In June 2004, we terminated all relationships with Mr. Stanley and another consultant and former employee of M.W. Kellogg, Ltd. The terminations occurred because of violations of our Code of Business Conduct that allegedly involve the receipt of improper personal benefits in connection with TSKJ’s construction of the natural gas liquefaction facility in Nigeria.
In February 2005, TSKJ notified the Attorney General of Nigeria that TSKJ would not oppose the Attorney General’s efforts to have sums of money held on deposit in banks in Switzerland transferred to Nigeria and to have the legal ownership of such sums determined in the Nigerian courts.
If violations of the FCPA were found, we could be subject to civil penalties of $500,000 per violation, and criminal penalties could range up to the greater of $2 million per violation or twice the gross pecuniary gain or loss.
There can be no assurance that any governmental investigation or our investigation of these matters will not conclude that violations of applicable laws have occurred or that the results of these investigations will not have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Bidding practices investigation. In connection with the investigation into payments made in connection with the Nigerian project, information has been uncovered suggesting that Mr. Stanley and other former employees may have

 
 

21

 

engaged in coordinated bidding with one or more competitors on certain foreign construction projects and that such coordination possibly began as early as the mid-1980s, which was significantly before our 1998 acquisition of Dresser Industries.
On the basis of this information, we and the Department of Justice have broadened our investigations to determine the nature and extent of any improper bidding practices, whether such conduct violated United States antitrust laws, and whether former employees may have received payments in connection with bidding practices on some foreign projects.
If violations of applicable United States antitrust laws occurred, the range of possible penalties includes criminal fines, which could range up to the greater of $10 million in fines per count for a corporation, or twice the gross pecuniary gain or loss, and treble civil damages in favor of any persons financially injured by such violations. If such violations occurred, the United States government also would have the discretion to deny future government contracts business to KBR or affiliates or subsidiaries of KBR. Criminal prosecutions under applicable laws of relevant foreign jurisdictions and civil claims by or relationship issues with customers are also possible.
There can be no assurance that the results of these investigations will not have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

Barracuda-Caratinga Project
In June 2000, Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. entered into a contract with Barracuda & Caratinga Leasing Company B.V., the project owner, to develop the Barracuda and Caratinga crude oilfields, which are located off the coast of Brazil. The construction manager and project owner’s representative is Petrobras, the Brazilian national oil company. When completed, the project will consist of two converted supertankers, Barracuda and Caratinga, which will be used as floating production, storage, and offloading units, commonly referred to as FPSOs. In addition, there will be 32 hydrocarbon production wells, 22 water injection wells, and all subsea flow lines, umbilicals, and risers necessary to connect the underwater wells to the FPSOs. The original completion date for the Barracuda vessel was December 2003, and the original completion date for the Caratinga vessel was April 2004. The project has been significantly behind the original schedule, due in part to change orders from the project owner, and is in a financial loss position.
In December 2004, the Barracuda vessel achieved first oil after being moved offshore for sea trials and final inspections in October 2004 and the Caratinga vessel was moved offshore for sea trials and final inspections. The Caratinga vessel achieved first oil in February 2005. Pursuant to the settlement agreement with Petrobras described below, the Barracuda vessel must be completed by March 31, 2006, and the Caratinga vessel must be completed by June 30, 2006. While we anticipate meeting these completion targets, there can be no assurance that further delays will not occur.
Also in December 2004, Kellogg Brown & Root and Petrobras, on behalf of the project owner, reached an agreement to settle various claims between the parties. The agreement provides for:
- the release of all claims of all parties that arise prior to the effective date of a final definitive agreement;
- a payment to us in 2005 of $79 million as a result of change orders for remaining claims;
- payment by Petrobras of applicable value added taxes on the project, except for $8 million which has been paid by us;
- the performance by Petrobras of certain work under the original contract;
- the repayment by Kellogg Brown & Root of $300 million of advance payments by the end of February 2005, with interest on $74 million. Of this amount, $79 million was paid in 2004; and
- revised milestones and other dates, including settlement of liquidated damages and an extension of time to the FPSO final acceptance dates.

 

 
22

 

As of December 31, 2004:
- the project was approximately 92% complete;
- we have recorded an inception-to-date loss of $762 million related to the project, of which $407 million was recorded in 2004, $238 million was recorded in 2003, and $117 million was recorded in 2002;
- the losses recorded include an estimated $24 million in liquidated damages based on the final agreement with Petrobras; and
- the probable unapproved claims were reduced from $114 million at December 31, 2003 to zero based upon the final agreement with Petrobras.
Cash flow considerations. We have now begun to fund operating cash shortfalls on the project and are obligated to fund total shortages over the remaining project life. Estimated cash flows relating to the losses are as follows:

Millions of dollars
     
Amount funded through December 31, 2004
 
$
586
 
Amounts to be paid/(received) in 2005:
       
Remaining repayment of $300 million advance
   
221
 
Payment to us relating to change orders
   
(138
)
Remaining project costs, net of revenue to be
       
received
   
93
 
Total cash shortfalls
 
$
762
 

LIQUIDITY AND CAPITAL RESOURCES

We ended 2004 with cash and cash equivalents of $2.8 billion compared to $1.8 billion at the end of 2003. Our cash and cash equivalents balance at the end of January 2005, after funding of the asbestos and silica liability trusts and receipt of insurance proceeds discussed below, was approximately $1.7 billion.
Significant sources of cash. Our liquidity position was strong at the end of 2004 due to our positive cash flow from operations, new debt financing, sales of accounts receivable, and our controlled capital spending in 2004. Our operations provided approximately $928 million in cash flow in 2004, including the sale of accounts receivables discussed below. In addition, our cash flow was supplemented by cash totaling $126 million from the sale of our surface well testing operations in August 2004 and $20 million from the sale of our remaining shares of National Oilwell, Inc. in February 2004.
In January 2004, we issued senior notes due 2007 totaling $500 million, which were issued in anticipation of funding the asbestos and silica liability trusts. Our combined short-term notes payable and long-term debt was 50% of total capitalization at December 31, 2004, compared to 58% at the end of 2003 and 30% at the end of 2002. While our debt balance increased, the decrease in our ratio of debt-to-total-capitalization was due to the reclassification to shareholders’ equity of the value of the 59.5 million shares to be contributed to the asbestos trust in our consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2004.
In May 2004, we entered into an agreement to sell, assign, and transfer the entire title and interest in specified United States government accounts receivable of KBR to a third party. The total amount outstanding under this agreement as of December 31, 2004 was approximately $263 million. Subsequent to year-end 2004, these receivables were collected and the balance retired, and we are not currently selling further receivables, although the facility continues to be available.
In June 2004, we sold undivided interests totaling $268 million under our Energy Services Group securitization facility. As of December 31, 2004, we have $256 million outstanding under this facility. See “Off Balance Sheet Risk” below for further discussion regarding these facilities.

 

 
23

 

Future sources of cash. We have available to us significant sources of cash in the near term should we need them.
Revolving credit facilities. In the fourth quarter of 2003, we entered into a secured $700 million three-year revolving credit facility for general working capital purposes. In July 2004, we entered into an additional secured $500 million 364-day revolving credit facility for general working capital purposes with terms substantially similar to our $700 million revolving credit facility. As of December 31, 2004, we had issued a letter of credit for approximately $172 million under the $700 million revolving credit facility, which replaced a letter of credit expiring on our Barracuda-Caratinga project, thus reducing the availability under that revolving credit facility to $528 million. There were no cash drawings under the $700 million revolving credit facility or the $500 million 364-day revolving credit facility as of December 31, 2004.
Asbestos and silica settlements with insurance companies. During 2004, we settled insurance disputes with substantially all the insurance companies for asbestos- and silica-related claims and all other claims under the applicable insurance policies and terminated all the applicable insurance policies. Under the terms of our insurance settlements, we expect to receive cash proceeds with a nominal value of $1.5 billion and a present value of approximately $1.4 billion for our asbestos- and silica-related insurance receivables as follows:

Millions of dollars
     
2005
 
$
1,066
 
2006
   
162
 
2007
   
40
 
2008
   
45
 
2009
   
131
 
Thereafter
   
16
 
Total
 
$
1,460
 

We received approximately $1.0 billion in insurance proceeds in January 2005. We intend to use a substantial portion of these proceeds to reduce debt.
Other. In January 2005, we received approximately $200 million in cash proceeds from the sale of our 50% interest in Subsea 7, Inc.
In June 2004, a Texas district court jury returned a verdict in our favor in connection with a patent infringement lawsuit we filed against Smith International (Smith) in September 2002. We were awarded $41 million in damages and legal fees by the court. Because the verdict is currently under appeal by Smith, the timing of ultimate collection of this award is uncertain.
Significant uses of cash. Our liquidity and cash balance during 2004 was significantly affected by our government services work in Iraq. Our working capital requirements for our Iraq-related work, excluding cash and equivalents, were down from $885 million at the end of 2003 to approximately $700 million at December 31, 2004. We do not expect a further increase in our working capital investments above that amount.
In connection with reaching an agreement with representatives of asbestos and silica claimants to limit the cash required to settle pending claims to $2.775 billion, DII Industries paid $311 million to the claimants in December 2003, plus an additional $22 million in lieu of interest. We also agreed to guarantee the payment of certain claims, and, in accordance with settlement agreements, we made additional payments of $119 million, plus an additional $4 million in lieu of interest, in June 2004.
Capital expenditures of $575 million in 2004 were 12% higher than in 2003. Capital spending in 2004 continued to be primarily directed to the Energy Services Group for Production Optimization, Drilling and Formation Evaluation, and manufacturing capacity.

 

 
24

 

We paid $221 million in dividends to our shareholders in 2004 compared to $219 million in 2003 and 2002.
In April 2004, we paid the $107 million judgment amount in the BJ Services Company patent litigation, including pre- and post-judgment interest, with the funds that had been used to post bond in the case. In April 2004, we also reached a settlement with the plaintiffs in the Anglo-Dutch (Tenge) litigation and made all payments pursuant to the settlement agreement. During the second quarter of 2004, we recovered the $25 million cash-in-lieu-of-bond deposit for the Anglo-Dutch (Tenge) litigation formerly included in restricted cash.
Future use of cash. In January 2005, we made the following payments for our asbestos and silica liability settlement:

Millions of dollars
     
Cash payments made in January 2005:
       
Payment to the asbestos and silica trust in accordance with
       
the plan of reorganization
 
$
2,345
 
Cash payment related to insurance partitioning agreement
       
reached with Federal-Mogul in October 2004 - first
       
of three installments
   
16
 
First installment payment for the silica note
   
15
 
Payments related to RHI Refractories agreement
   
11
 
First of four installments for the one-year non-interest-
       
bearing note of $31 million for the benefit of
       
asbestos claimants
   
8
 
Total cash payments made in January 2005
 
$
2,395
 

The following table summarizes our significant contractual obligations and other long-term liabilities as of December 31, 2004:

   
Payments due
         
Millions of dollars
 
2005
 
2006
 
2007
 
2008
 
2009
 
Thereafter
 
Total
 
Long-term debt (1)
 
$
347
 
$
293
 
$
518
 
$
156
 
$
-
 
$
2,625
 
$
3,939
 
Asbestos and silica
                                           
settlement
                                           
payment
   
2,345
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
2,345
 
Operating leases
   
158
   
125
   
104
   
92
   
82
   
453
   
1,014
 
Purchase obligations (3)
   
363
   
18
   
18
   
18
   
12
   
11
   
440
 
Barracuda-Caratinga
   
176
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
176
 
Pension funding
                                           
obligations
   
77
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
77
 
Asbestos insurance
                                           
partitioning
                                           
agreement
   
16
   
15
   
15
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
46
 
Asbestos note
   
31
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
31
 
Silica note (2)
   
15
   
1
   
1
   
1
   
1
   
5
   
24
 
RHI Refractories
   
11
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
-
   
11
 
Total
 
$
3,539
 
$
452
 
$
656
 
$
267
 
$
95
 
$
3,094
 
$
8,103
 


 

 
25

 

(1)   Long-term debt excludes the effect of a terminated interest rate swap of approximately $5 million. See Note 10 to the consolidated financial statements for further discussion.
(2)   Subsequent to the initial payment of $15 million, the silica note provides that we will contribute an amount to the silica trust at the end of each year for the next 30 years of up to $15 million. The note also provides for an extension of the note for 20 additional years under certain circumstances. We have recorded the note at our estimated amount of approximately $24 million. We will periodically reassess our valuation of this note based upon our projections of the amounts we believe we will be required to fund into the silica trust.
(3)   The purchase obligations disclosed above do not include purchase obligations that KBR enters into with its vendors in the normal course of business that support existing contracting arrangements with its customers. The purchase obligations with their vendors can span several years depending on the duration of the projects. In general, the costs associated with the purchase obligations are expensed as the revenue is earned on the related projects.

Capital spending for 2005 is expected to be approximately $650 million. The capital expenditures budget for 2005 includes increased activities at our DML shipyard, software spending as KBR moves forward with the implementation of SAP, and higher spending in the Energy Services Group to accommodate increased business.
As of December 31, 2004, we had commitments to fund approximately $58 million to certain of our related companies. These commitments arose primarily during the start-up of these entities or due to losses incurred by them. We expect approximately $42 million of the commitments to be paid during the next year.
Other factors affecting liquidity
Letters of credit. In the normal course of business, we have agreements with banks under which approximately $1.1 billion of letters of credit or bank guarantees were outstanding as of December 31, 2004 including $264 million which relate to our joint ventures’ operations. Also included in letters of credit outstanding as of December 31, 2004 and related to the Barracuda-Caratinga project were $277 million of performance letters of credit and $176 million of retainage letters of credit. Certain of the outstanding letters of credit have triggering events which would entitle a bank to require cash collateralization.
In the fourth quarter of 2003, we entered into a senior secured master letter of credit facility (Master LC Facility) with a syndicate of banks which covered at least 90% of the face amount of our existing letters of credit. The facility expired on December 31, 2004 due to our plan of reorganization becoming final and nonappealable. We did not have any outstanding advances under the Master LC Facility when it expired. Upon the expiration of the Master LC Facility, all letters of credit under the facility reverted back to the original agreements with the individual banks.
Debt covenants. Certain of our letters of credit, our $700 million revolving credit facility, and our $500 million 364-day revolving credit facility contain restrictive covenants including covenants that require us to maintain certain financial ratios as defined by the agreements. For certain of our letters of credit and the two revolving credit facilities we are required to maintain an interest coverage ratio of 3.5 or greater and a leverage ratio less than or equal to 0.55. At December 31, 2004, our interest coverage ratio was 7.18 and our leverage ratio was 0.42. Borrowings under the revolving credit facilities will be secured by certain of our assets until our long-term senior unsecured debt is rated BBB or higher (stable outlook) by Standard & Poor’s and Baa2 or higher (stable outlook) by Moody’s Investors Service.
To the extent that the aggregate principal amount of all secured indebtedness exceeds 5% of the consolidated net tangible assets of Halliburton and its subsidiaries, all collateral will be shared pro rata with holders of Halliburton’s 8.75% debentures due 2021, 3.125% convertible senior notes due 2023, senior notes due 2005, 5.5% senior notes due 2010, medium-term notes, 7.6% debentures due 2096, senior notes issued in January 2004 due 2007 and any other new issuance to the extent that the issuance contains a requirement that the holders thereof be equally and ratably secured with

 

 
26

 

Halliburton’s other secured creditors. At December 31, 2004, 5% of our consolidated net tangible assets as calculated based on the agreement was $392 million, and the total aggregate amount of our secured debt outstanding was approximately $50 million.

BUSINESS ENVIRONMENT AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

We currently operate in over 100 countries throughout the world, providing a comprehensive range of discrete and integrated products and services to the energy industry and to other industrial and governmental customers. The majority of our consolidated revenue is derived from the sale of services and products, including engineering and construction activities. We sell services and products primarily to major, national, and independent oil and gas companies and the United States government. The products and services provided to the major national, and independent oil and gas companies are used throughout the energy industry from the earliest phases of exploration, development, and production of oil and gas resources through refining, processing, and marketing. Our six business segments are organized around how we manage the business: Production Optimization, Fluid Systems, Drilling and Formation Evaluation, Digital and Consulting Solutions, Government and Infrastructure, and Energy and Chemicals. We refer to the combination of Production Optimization, Fluid Systems, Drilling and Formation Evaluation, and Digital and Consulting Solutions segments as the Energy Services Group, and the combination of Government and Infrastructure and Energy and Chemicals as KBR.
The industries we serve are highly competitive with many substantial competitors for each segment. In 2004, based upon the location of the services provided and products sold, 26% of our consolidated revenue was from Iraq, primarily related to our work for the United States government, and 22% of our consolidated revenue was from the United States. In 2003, 27% of our consolidated revenue was from the United States and 15% of our consolidated revenue was from Iraq. No other country accounted for more than 10% of our revenue during these periods.
Operations in some countries may be adversely affected by unsettled political conditions, acts of terrorism, civil unrest, force majeure, war or other armed conflict, expropriation or other governmental actions, inflation, exchange controls, or currency devaluation. Except for our government services work in Iraq discussed above, we believe the geographic diversification of our business activities reduces the risk that loss of operations in any one country would be material to our consolidated results of operations.
Halliburton Company
Activity levels within our business segments are significantly impacted by the following:
- spending on upstream exploration, development, and production programs by major, national, and independent oil and gas companies;
- capital expenditures for downstream refining, processing, petrochemical, and marketing facilities by major, national, and independent oil and gas companies; and
- government spending levels.
Also impacting our activity is the status of the global economy, which indirectly impacts oil and gas consumption, demand for petrochemical products, and investment in infrastructure projects.
Energy Services Group
Some of the more significant barometers of current and future spending levels of oil and gas companies are oil and gas prices, exploration and production activities by international and national oil companies, the world economy, and global stability, which together drive worldwide drilling activity. Our Energy Services Group financial performance is significantly affected by oil and gas prices and worldwide rig activity which are summarized in the following tables.

 

 
27

 

This table shows the average oil and gas prices for West Texas Intermediate crude oil and Henry Hub natural gas prices:

Average Oil and Gas Prices
 
2004
 
2003
 
2002
 
West Texas Intermediate oil
                   
prices (dollars per barrel)
 
$
41.31
 
$
31.14
 
$
25.92
 
Henry Hub gas prices (dollars per
                   
million cubic feet)
 
$
5.85
 
$
5.63
 
$
3.33
 

The yearly average rig counts based on the Baker Hughes Incorporated rig count information are as follows:

Average Rig Counts
 
2004
 
2003
 
2002
 
Land vs. Offshore
                   
United States:
                   
Land
   
1,093
   
924
   
718
 
Offshore
   
97
   
108
   
113
 
Total
   
1,190
   
1,032
   
831
 
Canada:
                   
Land
   
365
   
368
   
260
 
Offshore
   
4
   
4
   
6
 
Total
   
369
   
372
   
266
 
International (excluding Canada):
                   
Land
   
594
   
544
   
507
 
Offshore
   
242
   
226
   
225
 
Total
   
836
   
770
   
732
 
Worldwide total
   
2,395
   
2,174
   
1,829
 
Land total
   
2,052
   
1,836
   
1,485
 
Offshore total
   
343
   
338
   
344
 

Average Rig Counts
 
2004
 
2003
 
2002
 
Oil vs. Gas
                   
United States:
                   
Oil
   
165
   
157
   
137
 
Gas
   
1,025
   
875
   
694
 
Total
   
1,190
   
1,032
   
831
 
*    Canada:
   
369
   
372
   
266
 
International (excluding Canada):
                   
Oil
   
648
   
576
   
561
 
Gas
   
188
   
194
   
171
 
Total
   
836
   
770
   
732
 
Worldwide total
   
2,395
   
2,174
   
1,829
 

* Canadian rig counts by oil and gas were not available.

Our customers’ cash flows, in many instances, depend upon the revenue they generate from sale of oil and gas. With higher prices, they may have more cash flow, which usually translates into higher exploration and production budgets. Higher prices may also mean that oil and gas exploration in marginal areas can become attractive, so our customers may

 

 
28

 

consider investing in such properties when prices are high. When this occurs, it means more potential work for us. The opposite is true for lower oil and gas prices.
Over 2004, oil prices trended upward to over $50 per barrel in October due to low petroleum inventory levels in the United States and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development countries, uncertainties caused by potential disruption of crude supplies in Iraq, Russia, Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, Norway, and Venezuela, and increased demand in the United States and Asia markets reflecting improved year-over-year economies. Since October, prices have retreated somewhat as the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries increased production in order to restock low inventories, and more than half of the production capacity that was closed because of Hurricane Ivan in September has been reopened. On average, natural gas prices in 2004 gained some ground compared to the already-elevated prices of 2003. As high oil costs have promoted switching to natural gas as a fuel substitute, demand for natural gas has strengthened. Thus, higher petroleum prices have lifted natural gas prices, despite the fact that natural gas in storage is at the upper end of the five-year average. Additionally, there are still large volumes of Gulf Coast gas supply which remain offline due to Hurricane Ivan damage.
Most of our work in the Energy Services Group closely tracks the number of active rigs. As rig count increases or decreases, so does the total available market for our services and products. Further, our margins associated with services and products for offshore rigs are generally higher than those associated with land rigs.
Heightened demand coupled with high petroleum and natural gas prices in 2004 contributed to a 10% increase in average worldwide rig count compared to 2003. This increase was primarily driven by the United States rig count, which grew 15% year-over-year. Land gas drilling in the United States rose sharply, as gas prices remained high due to economic demand growth, severe weather disruptions in the Gulf of Mexico, and higher fuel oil prices that discouraged switching to a lower-priced fuel source to minimize cost. Average Canadian rig counts remained relatively flat year-over-year. Outside of North America, average rig counts increased in Latin America, Asia Pacific, and the Middle East, with the entire increase related to oil production. In Europe, where average rig counts declined compared to 2003, oil company dissatisfaction with high operating costs and inconsistent government policies impeded exploration and production recovery.
It is common practice in the United States oilfield services industry to sell services and products based on a price book and then apply discounts to the price book based upon a variety of factors. The discounts applied typically increase to partially or substantially offset price book increases in the weeks immediately following a price increase. The discount applied normally decreases over time if the activity levels remain strong. During periods of reduced activity, discounts normally increase, reducing the net revenue for our services and conversely, during periods of higher activity, discounts normally decline resulting in net revenue increasing for our services.
In May 2004, we implemented United States price book increases ranging between 5% and 8%, followed in October by an 11% United States price book increase in our pumping services. We worked diligently to minimize the impact of inflationary pressures in our cost base in 2004 and are maintaining a steady focus on capital discipline. Consequently, we expect to realize continued benefits of these price book increases in 2005.
We have made a decision to be very selective about pursuing turn-key drilling projects in the future. As has been experienced within the energy services industry, these types of projects are inherently risky and may not provide sufficient upside to offset this risk.
Overall outlook. Strong growth in the demand for oil worldwide, particularly in China, India, and other developing countries, is generally cited as the driving force behind the sharp oil price increases seen over the past three years. The single most important factor behind high prices in 2004 was the largest annual gain in world oil demand since 1978. The Energy Information Administration forecasts world petroleum demand growth for 2005-2006 to remain strong but down from the demand growth seen in 2004.

 

 
29

 

Based on its exploration and production expenditure survey for 2005, Lehman Brothers expects worldwide exploration and production spending in 2005 to increase over 2004 spending, predominantly in the United States and Canada. Spears and Associates predicted that operators as a group will increase their activity in terms of rigs, wells, and footage in the range of 4% to 6% in most regions in 2005. Spears and Associates forecasted a 4% increase in United States rigs, with a 5% rise offshore. Thus, the three-year downturn in the United States offshore rig count is expected to end in 2005. International drilling activity is predicted to turn in another solid year of growth in 2005, with Spears and Associates projecting a 5% increase in international rig count.
We are well-positioned in the strong growth sectors noted above. In pressure pumping, we have a leading share of the United States onshore gas market. We are also well-positioned in the offshore segments that could experience a rebound over the next several quarters, particularly the deepwater Gulf of Mexico. Furthermore, given the tightness of service company capacity, customers are increasingly seeking to secure oilfield services with longer-term contracts. In the fourth quarter of 2004, we won a series of major contracts onshore in the United States gas sector, and internationally in Russia, Algeria, and the Middle East.
Finally, technology is an important aspect of our business, and we have focused on improving the development and introduction of new technologies. In 2004, we realized growth in our new product and service sales. In 2005, we expect to continue to invest in technology at the same level as 2004.
KBR
KBR provides a wide range of services to energy and industrial customers and government entities worldwide. KBR projects are generally longer term in nature than our Energy Services Group work and are impacted by more diverse drivers than short term fluctuations in oil and gas prices and drilling activities.
Effective October 1, 2004, we restructured KBR into two segments, Government and Infrastructure and Energy and Chemicals. As a result of the reorganization and in a continued effort to better position KBR for the future, we made several strategic organizational changes. We eliminated certain internal expenditures; we refocused our research and development expenditures with emphasis on the more profitable liquefied natural gas (LNG) market; and, we took appropriate steps to streamline the entire organization. We expect to yield between $80 million and $100 million in annual savings due to our reorganization.
In our Government and Infrastructure segment, our government services work is forecasted to grow in all regions, with United States government spending in Iraq outpacing other markets. Our work in Iraq continues to be our largest revenue contributor within this segment. We continue to make progress with our LogCAP, RIO, and PCO Oil South customers on definitizing our cost proposals. Going forward, we expect activity in Iraq to decline, but not as much as we had previously anticipated.
Within our Energy and Chemicals segment, the major focus is on our gas monetization work. Forecasted LNG market growth remains strong in a range of 7% to 10% annual growth through 2010, with demand indicated to double in the period through 2015. Significant numbers of new LNG liquefaction plant and LNG receiving terminal projects are proposed worldwide and are in various stages of development. Committed LNG liquefaction engineering, procurement, and construction projects are now yielding substantial growth in worldwide LNG liquefaction capacity. This trend is expected to continue through 2007 and beyond.
Outsourcing of operations and maintenance work by industrial and energy companies has been increasing worldwide. Even greater opportunities in this area are anticipated as the aging infrastructure in United States refineries and chemical plants require more maintenance and repairs to minimize production downtime. More stringent industry safety standards and environmental regulations also tend to lead to higher maintenance standards and costs.

 

 
30

 

Contract structure. Engineering and construction contracts can be broadly categorized as either cost-reimbursable or fixed-price, sometimes referred to as lump sum. Some contracts can involve both fixed-price and cost-reimbursable elements. Fixed-price contracts are for a fixed sum to cover all costs and any profit element for a defined scope of work. Fixed-price contracts entail more risk to us as we must predetermine both the quantities of work to be performed and the costs associated with executing the work.
Cost-reimbursable contracts include contracts where the price is variable based upon actual costs incurred for time and materials, or for variable quantities of work priced at defined unit rates. Profit elements on cost-reimbursable contracts may be based upon a percentage of costs incurred and/or a fixed amount. Cost-reimbursable contracts are generally less risky, since the owner retains many of the risks. While fixed-price contracts involve greater risk, they also are potentially more profitable for the contractor, since the owners pay a premium to transfer many risks to the contractor.
The approximate percentages of revenue attributable to fixed-price and cost-reimbursable contracts within KBR are as follows:

   
Fixed-Price
 
Cost-Reimbursable
 
2004
   
17
%
 
83
%
2003
   
24
%
 
76
%
2002
   
47
%
 
53
%

The increase in percentage of revenue attributable to cost-reimbursable contracts over the past two years reflects increased revenue from our government services work in Iraq as well as our continuing strategy to move away from fixed-price contracts within our Energy and Chemical segment.
We have two remaining major fixed-price engineering, procurement, installation, and commissioning, or EPIC, offshore projects. As of December 31, 2004, they are substantially complete.
The reshaping of our offshore business away from lump-sum EPIC contracts to cost reimbursement services has been marked by some significant new work. During the first quarter of 2004 we signed a major reimbursable engineering, procurement, and construction management, or EPCM, contract for a West African oilfield development. This is a major award under our new EPCM strategy. We are also pursuing program management opportunities in deepwater locations around the world. These efforts, implemented under our new strategy, are allowing us to utilize our global resources to continue to be a leader in the offshore business.

 

 
31

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS IN 2004 COMPARED TO 2003

REVENUE:
         
Increase/
 
Percentage
 
Millions of dollars
 
2004
 
2003
 
(Decrease)
 
Change
 
Production Optimization
 
$
3,303
 
$
2,758
 
$
545
   
20
%
Fluid Systems
   
2,324
   
2,039
   
285
   
14
 
Drilling and Formation Evaluation
   
1,782
   
1,643
   
139
   
8
 
Digital and Consulting Solutions
   
589
   
555
   
34
   
6
 
Total Energy Services Group
   
7,998
   
6,995
   
1,003
   
14
 
Government and Infrastructure
   
9,393
   
5,417
   
3,976
   
73
 
Energy and Chemicals
   
3,075
   
3,859
   
(784
)
 
(20
)
Total KBR
   
12,468
   
9,276
   
3,192
   
34
 
Total revenue
 
$
20,466
 
$
16,271
 
$
4,195
   
26
%
                           
Geographic - Energy Services Group segments only:
           
Production Optimization:
                         
North America
 
$
1,694
 
$
1,337
 
$
357
   
27
%
Latin America
   
335
   
317
   
18
   
6
 
Europe/Africa
   
695
   
562
   
133
   
24
 
Middle East/Asia
   
579
   
542
   
37
   
7
 
Subtotal
   
3,303
   
2,758
   
545
   
20
 
Fluid Systems:
                         
North America
   
1,104
   
990
   
114
   
12
 
Latin America
   
338
   
258
   
80
   
31
 
Europe/Africa
   
502
   
452
   
50
   
11
 
Middle East/Asia
   
380
   
339
   
41
   
12
 
Subtotal
   
2,324
   
2,039
   
285
   
14
 
Drilling and Formation Evaluation:
                         
North America
   
610
   
558
   
52
   
9
 
Latin America
   
281
   
261
   
20
   
8
 
Europe/Africa
   
344
   
312
   
32
   
10
 
Middle East/Asia
   
547
   
512
   
35
   
7
 
Subtotal
   
1,782
   
1,643
   
139
   
8
 
Digital and Consulting Solutions:
                         
North America
   
201
   
200
   
1
   
1
 
Latin America
   
128
   
71
   
57
   
80
 
Europe/Africa
   
124
   
116
   
8
   
7
 
Middle East/Asia
   
136
   
168
   
(32
)
 
(19
)
Subtotal
   
589
   
555
   
34
   
6
 
Total Energy Services Group revenue
                         
by region:
                         
North America
   
3,609
   
3,085
   
524
   
17
 
Latin America
   
1,082
   
907
   
175
   
19
 
Europe/Africa
   
1,665
   
1,442
   
223
   
15
 
Middle East/Asia
   
1,642
   
1,561
   
81
   
5
 
Total Energy Services Group revenue
 
$
7,998
 
$
6,995
 
$
1,003
   
14
%
 

 

 
32

 
 
 
OPERATING INCOME (LOSS):
         
Increase/
 
Percentage
 
Millions of dollars
 
2004
 
2003
 
(Decrease)
 
Change
 
Production Optimization
$
633
 
$
413
 
$
220
   
53
%
Fluid Systems
 
348
   
251
   
97
   
39
 
Drilling and Formation Evaluation
 
225
   
177
   
48
   
27
 
Digital and Consulting Solutions
 
60
   
(15
)
 
75
   
NM
 
Total Energy Services Group
 
1,266
   
826
   
440
   
53
 
Government and Infrastructure
 
84
   
194
   
(110
)
 
(57
)
Energy and Chemicals
 
(426
)
 
(225
)
 
(201
)
 
(89
)
Shared KBR
 
-
   
(5
)
 
5
   
100
 
Total KBR
 
(342
)
 
(36
)
 
(306
)
 
NM
 
General corporate
 
(87
)
 
(70
)
 
(17
)
 
(24
)
Operating income
$
837
 
$
720
 
$
117
   
16
%
             
Geographic - Energy Services Group segments only:
           
Production Optimization:
                     
North America
$376
$
194
 
$
182
   
94
%
Latin America
 
56
 
75
   
(19
)
 
(25
)
Europe/Africa
 
99
 
52
   
47
   
90
 
Middle East/Asia
 
102
 
92
   
10
   
11
 
Subtotal
 
633
 
413
   
220
   
53
 
Fluid Systems:
                     
North America
 
186
 
104
   
82
   
79
 
Latin America
 
55
 
52
   
3
   
6
 
Europe/Africa
 
61
 
48
   
13
   
27
 
Middle East/Asia
 
46
 
47
   
(1
)
 
(2
)
Subtotal
 
348
 
251
   
97
   
39
 
Drilling and Formation Evaluation:
                     
North America
 
102
 
60
   
42
   
70
 
Latin America
 
24
 
30
   
(6
)
 
(20
)
Europe/Africa
 
31
 
30
   
1
   
3
 
Middle East/Asia
 
68
 
57
   
11
   
19
 
Subtotal
 
225
 
177
   
48
   
27
 
Digital and Consulting Solutions:
                     
North America
 
58
 
(52
)
 
110
   
212
 
Latin America
 
(5)
 
8
   
(13
)
 
(163
)
Europe/Africa
 
(5)
 
17
   
(22
)
 
(129
)
Middle East/Asia
 
12
 
12
   
-
   
-
 
Subtotal
 
60
 
(15
)
 
75
   
NM
 
Total Energy Services Group
                     
operating income by region:
                     
North America
 
722
 
306
   
416
   
136
 
Latin America
 
130
 
165
   
(35
)
 
(21
)
Europe/Africa
 
186
 
147
   
39
   
27
 
Middle East/Asia
 
228
 
208
   
20
   
10
 
Total Energy Services Group
                     
operating income
 
$1,266
$
826
 
$
440
   
53
%
NM - Not Meaningful

 

 
33

 

The increase in consolidated revenue in 2004 compared to 2003 was largely attributable to activity in our government services projects, primarily in the Middle East, and to increased sales of our Energy Services Group products and services as a result of the overall increase in worldwide rig counts. International revenue was 78% of consolidated revenue in 2004 and 73% of consolidated revenue in 2003, with the increase attributable to our government services projects abroad. Revenue from the United States Government for all geographic areas was approximately $8.0 billion or 39% of consolidated revenue in 2004 compared to $4.2 billion or 26% of consolidated revenue in 2003.
The increase in consolidated operating income was primarily due to stronger performance in our Energy Services Group resulting from favorable changes in oil and gas prices, which increased worldwide rig counts, and pricing improvements in the United States in the current year. The table below provides significant items included in segment operating income.

   
Years ended December 31
 
Millions of dollars
 
2004
 
2003
 
Production Optimization:
             
Surface well testing gain on sale
 
$
54
 
$
-
 
HMS gain on sale
   
-
   
24
 
Drilling and Formation Evaluation:
             
Mono Pumps gain on sale
   
-
   
36
 
Digital and Consulting Solutions:
             
Integrated solutions project
             
losses in Mexico
   
(33
)
 
-
 
Anglo-Dutch lawsuit
   
13
   
(77
)
Intellectual property settlement
   
(11
)
 
-
 
Wellstream loss on sale
   
-
   
(15
)
Government and Infrastructure:
             
Restructuring charge
   
(12
)
 
-
 
Energy and Chemicals:
             
Barracuda-Caratinga project loss
   
(407
)
 
(238
)
Restructuring charge
   
(28
)
 
-
 

In 2004, Iraq-related work contributed approximately $7.1 billion to consolidated revenue and $78 million to consolidated operating income, a 1.1% margin before corporate costs and taxes.
Following is a discussion of our results of operations by reportable segment.
Production Optimization increase in revenue compared to 2003 was largely attributable to production enhancement services, which yielded $430 million in higher revenue. This was driven by a higher average land gas rig count and price increases in the United States, increased activity in Canada and Russia, and increases in pipeline process services and hydraulic workover activity in the United Kingdom. Completion tools and services activities contributed $59 million to the segment revenue increase on improved activity in the Middle East/Asia and Europe/Africa regions. WellDynamics contributed $49 million to segment revenue, driven by the consolidation of the joint venture during the first quarter of 2004 and increased demand for intelligent well completions services in the Middle East and North America. Prior to 2004, WellDynamics was accounted for under the equity method in the Digital and Consulting Solutions segment. The segment’s improved revenue was partially offset by a significant reduction in sand control and completions activity in Nigeria and a $32 million decline compared to 2003 in revenue from our surface well testing operations sold in the third quarter of 2004. International revenue was 54% of total segment revenue in 2004 compared to 56% in 2003.

 

 
34

 

The increase in Production Optimization operating income for 2004 compared to 2003 was primarily driven by the higher production enhancement revenues described above, which contributed $155 million. Completion tools and services activities increase of $17 million primarily reflects higher sales of completions and sand control services in the United Kingdom and Norway and a more favorable product mix in Eurasia and Saudi Arabia, offset by a significant reduction in sand control tool sales in Nigeria in the current year. Included in the results were gains of $24 million from the sale of Halliburton Measurement Systems in the second quarter of 2003 and $54 million from the sale of our surface well testing operations in the third and fourth quarters of 2004. Segment results for 2003 also included a $9 million equity loss from our Subsea 7, Inc. joint venture, largely attributable to changes in estimated project costs and claims recoveries.
Fluid Systems revenue increase in 2004 compared to 2003 was driven by a $177 million improvement in revenue from cementing activities, due primarily to increased land rig count and pricing improvements in the United States and start-up activity on recent contract awards in Mexico and Norway. Drilling fluids contributed $95 million to the segment revenue increase, resulting largely from new land work in Mexico and land rig growth in the United States and Canada. These increases in segment revenue were partially offset by significantly decreased activity in the Gulf of Mexico. International revenue was 58% of total segment revenue in 2004 compared to 56% in 2003.
The Fluid Systems segment operating income increase compared to 2003 resulted from a cementing services increase of $68 million and drilling fluids increase of $22 million. These improved results occurred primarily in the United States due to increased land rig activity, improved pricing, and better utilization and cost management. Partially offsetting improved segment operating income in 2004 was a $17 million impact of reduced higher margin activity in the Gulf of Mexico. Included in 2003 results were equity losses of $7 million from the Enventure expandable casing joint venture, which did not reoccur in 2004. This joint venture is currently accounted for on a cost basis since reducing our ownership in the first quarter of 2004.
Drilling and Formation Evaluation revenue improvement in 2004 compared to 2003 was driven by a $66 million increase in logging and perforating services due to higher land rig activity and pricing improvements in the United States and direct sales to China. Drilling services contributed $40 million to the segment revenue increase, resulting principally from new contracts in Norway and Brazil and higher activity in Canada, Venezuela, and Argentina. The increase in drilling services revenue was partially offset by a substantial decline in logging-while-drilling activity in the Gulf of Mexico. Drill bits sales increased $29 million, benefiting from increases in land rig activity, improved pricing, and better market penetration with fixed cutter and roller cone bits primarily in the United States, as well as sales growth in the Caspian Sea region and China. International revenue was 72% of total segment revenue in 2004 and in 2003.
The increase in Drilling and Formation Evaluation segment operating income was due to improved results in drilling services, which benefited from a lower depreciation expense of $35 million in 2004 compared to 2003 primarily due to extending depreciable asset lives in the second quarter of 2004. Logging and perforating services contributed $33 million to the increase, due to improved pricing and land rig activity in the United States and direct sales in China. Drill bits contributed $12 million to improved segment results on higher revenue in the United States and the Caspian Sea region. Operating income for 2003 included a $36 million gain on the disposition of Mono Pumps in the first quarter of 2003.
Digital and Consulting Solutions revenue increased in 2004 compared to 2003 primarily due to a $27 million increase in Landmark Graphics. During 2004, Landmark Graphics achieved its highest revenue since we acquired it. Software-related sales in Landmark Graphics increased in the current year due to strong acceptance of the new real-time (drilling) and GeoProbe offerings. The increase in segment revenue was partially offset by a decline in subsea operations in the first half of 2004 and the absence of $11 million of revenue from Wellstream prior to the sale of this business in the first quarter of 2003. International revenue was 69% of total segment revenue in 2004 compared to 67% in 2003.

 

 
35

 

Segment operating income increased $75 million from a loss position in 2003. This segment recorded a $77 million charge related to the Anglo-Dutch lawsuit in the third quarter of 2003 and a $15 million loss on the disposition of Wellstream in the first quarter of 2003. For 2004, results were positively impacted by a $13 million release of legal liability accruals in the first quarter of 2004 pertaining to the April 2004 Anglo-Dutch settlement and increased integrated solutions operating income stemming from higher commodity prices. The increase in the segment was partially offset by a $33 million loss recorded in the fourth quarter of 2004 on two integrated solutions projects in Mexico. The loss resulted from operational start-up and subsurface problems on the initial wells, third-party and other cost increases, increased drilling times, and a work stoppage due to community blockage. The charge reflects the estimated total project loss through completion of the drilling program in mid-2006. Segment results for 2004 also included an $11 million charge for an intellectual property settlement.
Government and Infrastructure revenue increased $4.0 billion compared to 2003. The increase was primarily due to $3.7 billion higher revenue from government services contracts in the Middle East. Activities in the DML shipyard projects also contributed $108 million to increased revenue in 2004 compared to 2003.
The Government and Infrastructure operating income decrease resulted from $94 million in write-downs on infrastructure projects in Europe and Africa, a government project in Afghanistan, completion of the construction phase of a rail project in Australia, and reduction in activities in the government project in the Balkans. Current year results were also impacted by a restructuring charge of $12 million due to the reorganization of KBR. The charge related to personnel termination benefits. Partially offsetting the decreases was an increase in income of $14 million from Iraq-related activities primarily due to the LogCAP contract.
Energy and Chemicals decrease in revenue compared to 2003 was primarily due to lower revenue of $1.1 billion on the Barracuda-Caratinga project in Brazil, the Belanak project in Indonesia, completion of refining facilities in the United States, gas projects in Africa, offshore projects in Mexico, and a hydrocarbon project in Europe. The decrease was partially offset by higher revenue of $391 million on refining projects in Canada, an olefins project in the United States, operations and maintenance projects in the United States and the United Kingdom, and new offshore program management projects.
The operating loss for the segment in 2004 primarily resulted from $407 million of losses on the Barracuda-Caratinga project in Brazil, $47 million of losses on a gas project in Africa, and $29 million of losses on the Belanak project in Indonesia. The losses recognized on the Barracuda-Caratinga project were primarily due to the agreement with Petrobras, higher cost estimates, schedule delays, and increased contingencies for the balance of the project until completion. Specifically, in the second quarter, with the integration phase of the Barracuda vessel we experienced a significant reduction in productivity and rework required from the vessel conversion. Also included in the 2004 results was a restructuring charge of $28 million due to the reorganization of KBR. The charge related to personnel termination benefits and asset impairments. Operating losses in 2004 were partially offset by a $59 million increase on an LNG project in Egypt, a refining project in Canada, operations and maintenance projects in the United States and United Kingdom, and new offshore program management projects. The operating loss for 2003 included losses recognized on the Barracuda-Caratinga project of $238 million and losses on a hydrocarbon project in Belgium.
General corporate expenses for 2004 increased primarily due to a $7.5 million charge related to a settlement with the SEC, financing fees on outstanding credit facilities, Sarbanes-Oxley compliance expenses, and increased legal fees.

 

 
36

 

NONOPERATING ITEMS

Interest expense increased $90 million in 2004 compared to 2003, due primarily to interest on $1.2 billion convertible notes issued in June 2003, $1.05 billion senior floating and fixed notes issued in October 2003, $500 million senior floating-rate notes issued in January 2004, and interest on tax deficiencies in Indonesia and Mexico.
Interest income increased $14 million in 2004 compared to the same period in 2003, attributable to higher average daily cash balances during the year and interest on tax refunds in various jurisdictions.
Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax in 2004 included, on a pretax basis, a $778 million charge for the revaluation of 59.5 million shares of Halliburton common stock to be contributed to the asbestos claimant trust as part of the proposed settlement, a $698 million charge related to the write-down of the asbestos and silica insurance receivable, a $44 million charge related to our October 2004 partitioning agreement, and an $11 million charge related to the delayed-draw term facility, which expired in June 2004. The remaining amount primarily consisted of professional and administrative fees related to various aspects of the proposed asbestos and silica settlement, accretion on the asbestos insurance receivables, and our October 2004 partitioning agreement. The loss from discontinued operations was $1.145 billion in 2003. The benefit for income taxes on discontinued operations was $180 million in 2004, compared to a provision of $6 million for 2003. We have established a valuation allowance against the deferred tax asset arising from the asbestos and silica charges to reflect the expected net tax benefit from the future deductions the charges will create. In 2004, we increased the valuation allowance by $449 million to a balance of $1.073 billion. The balance at the end of 2003 was $624 million.
Cumulative effect of change in accounting principle, net for the year ended 2003 was an $8 million after-tax charge, or $0.02 per diluted share, related to our January 1, 2003 adoption of Statement of Financial Accounting Standards (SFAS) No. 143, “Accounting for Asset Retirement Obligations.” SFAS No. 143 addresses the financial accounting and reporting for obligations associated with the retirement of tangible long-lived assets and the associated assets’ retirement costs. The asset retirement obligations primarily relate to the removal of leasehold improvements upon exiting certain lease arrangements and restoration of land associated with the mining of bentonite.

 

 
37

 

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS IN 2003 COMPARED TO 2002

REVENUE:
         
Increase/
 
Percentage
 
Millions of dollars
 
2003
 
2002
 
(Decrease)
 
Change
 
Production Optimization
 
$
2,758
 
$
2,544
 
$
214
   
8
%
Fluid Systems
   
2,039
   
1,815
   
224
   
12
 
Drilling and Formation Evaluation
   
1,643
   
1,633
   
10
   
1
 
Digital and Consulting Solutions
   
555
   
844
   
(289
)
 
(34
)
Total Energy Services Group
   
6,995
   
6,836
   
159
   
2
 
Government and Infrastructure
   
5,417
   
1,539
   
3,878
   
252
 
Energy and Chemicals
   
3,859
   
4,197
   
(338
)
 
(8
)
Total KBR
   
9,276
   
5,736
   
3,540
   
62
 
Total revenue
 
$
16,271
 
$
12,572
 
$
3,699
   
29
%
                           
Geographic - Energy Services Group segments only:
           
Production Optimization:
                         
North America
 
$
1,337
 
$
1,254
 
$
83
   
7
%
Latin America
   
317
   
277
   
40
   
14
 
Europe/Africa
   
562
   
556
   
6
   
1
 
Middle East/Asia
   
542
   
457
   
85
   
19
 
Subtotal
   
2,758
   
2,544
   
214
   
8
 
Fluid Systems:
                         
North America
   
990
   
934
   
56
   
6
 
Latin America
   
258
   
216
   
42
   
19
 
Europe/Africa
   
452
   
381
   
71
   
19
 
Middle East/Asia
   
339
   
284
   
55
   
19
 
Subtotal
   
2,039
   
1,815
   
224
   
12
 
Drilling and Formation Evaluation:
                         
North America
   
558
   
549
   
9
   
2
 
Latin America
   
261
   
251
   
10
   
4
 
Europe/Africa
   
312
   
344
   
(32
)
 
(9
)
Middle East/Asia
   
512
   
489
   
23
   
5
 
Subtotal
   
1,643
   
1,633
   
10
   
1
 
Digital and Consulting Solutions:
                         
North America
   
200
   
294
   
(94
)
 
(32
)
Latin America
   
71
   
102
   
(31
)
 
(30
)
Europe/Africa
   
116
   
297
   
(181
)
 
(61
)
Middle East/Asia
   
168
   
151
   
17
   
11
 
Subtotal
   
555
   
844
   
(289
)
 
(34
)
Total Energy Services Group
                         
revenue by region:
                         
North America
   
3,085
   
3,031
   
54
   
2
 
Latin America
   
907
   
846
   
61
   
7
 
Europe/Africa
   
1,442
   
1,578
   
(136
)
 
(9
)
Middle East/Asia
   
1,561
   
1,381
   
180
   
13
 
Total Energy Services Group
                         
revenue
 
$
6,995
 
$
6,836
 
$
159
   
2
%

 

 
38

 


<
OPERATING INCOME (LOSS):
         
Increase/
 
Percentage
 
Millions of dollars
 
2003
 
2002
 
(Decrease)
 
Change
 
Production Optimization
 
$
413
 
$
374
 
$
39
   
10
%
Fluid Systems
   
251
   
202
   
49
   
24
 
Drilling and Formation Evaluation
   
177
   
160
   
17
   
11
 
Digital and Consulting Solutions
   
(15
)
 
(98
)
 
83
   
85
 
Total Energy Services Group
   
826
   
638
   
188
   
29
 
Government and Infrastructure
   
194
   
75
   
119
   
159
 
Energy and Chemicals
   
(225
)
 
(131
)
 
(94
)
 
(72
)
Shared KBR
   
(5
)
 
(629
)
 
624
   
99
 
Total KBR
   
(36
)
 
(685
)
 
649
   
95
 
General corporate
   
(70
)
 
(65
)
 
(5
)
 
(8
)
Operating income (loss)
 
$
720
 
$
(112
)
$
832
   
NM
 
             
Geographic - Energy Services Group segments only:
           
Production Optimization:
                         
North America
 
$
194
 
$
218
 
$
(24
)
 
(11
)%
Latin America
   
75
   
41
   
34
   
83
 
Europe/Africa
   
52
   
46
   
6
   
13
 
Middle East/Asia
   
92
   
69
   
23
   
33
 
Subtotal
   
413
   
374
   
39
   
10