10-K 1 nee-12312014x10k.htm 10-K NEE-12.31.2014-10K
 
UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d)
OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2014
Commission
File
Number
 
Exact name of registrants as specified in their
charters, address of principal executive offices and
registrants' telephone number
 
IRS Employer
Identification
Number
1-8841
 
NEXTERA ENERGY, INC.
 
59-2449419
2-27612

 
FLORIDA POWER & LIGHT COMPANY
700 Universe Boulevard
Juno Beach, Florida 33408
(561) 694-4000
 
59-0247775

State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization: Florida
 
Name of exchange on which registered
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
 
NextEra Energy, Inc.:
Common Stock, $0.01 Par Value
New York Stock Exchange
 
5.889% Corporate Units
New York Stock Exchange
 
5.799% Corporate Units
New York Stock Exchange
Florida Power & Light Company: None
 
Indicate by check mark if the registrants are well-known seasoned issuers, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act of 1933.
NextEra Energy, Inc.    Yes þ    No o    Florida Power & Light Company    Yes þ    No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrants are not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
NextEra Energy, Inc.    Yes o    No þ    Florida Power & Light Company    Yes o    No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrants (1) have filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months, and (2) have been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.
NextEra Energy, Inc.    Yes þ    No o    Florida Power & Light Company    Yes þ    No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrants have submitted electronically and posted on their corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months.
NextEra Energy, Inc.    Yes þ    No o    Florida Power & Light Company    Yes þ    No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrants' knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrants are a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.
NextEra Energy, Inc.
Large Accelerated Filer þ
Accelerated Filer o
Non-Accelerated Filer o
Smaller Reporting Company o
Florida Power & Light Company
Large Accelerated Filer o
Accelerated Filer o
Non-Accelerated Filer þ
Smaller Reporting Company o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrants are shell companies (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934).  Yes ¨    No þ
Aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity of NextEra Energy, Inc. held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2014 (based on the closing market price on the Composite Tape on June 30, 2014) was $44,591,917,850.
There was no voting or non-voting common equity of Florida Power & Light Company held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2014.
Number of shares of NextEra Energy, Inc. common stock, $0.01 par value, outstanding as of January 31, 2015: 443,453,049
Number of shares of Florida Power & Light Company common stock, without par value, outstanding as of January 31, 2015, all of which were held, beneficially and of record, by NextEra Energy, Inc.: 1,000
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Portions of NextEra Energy, Inc.'s Proxy Statement for the 2014 Annual Meeting of Shareholders are incorporated by reference in Part III hereof.
________________________
This combined Form 10-K represents separate filings by NextEra Energy, Inc. and Florida Power & Light Company. Information contained herein relating to an individual registrant is filed by that registrant on its own behalf. Florida Power & Light Company makes no representations as to the information relating to NextEra Energy, Inc.'s other operations.
Florida Power & Light Company meets the conditions set forth in General Instruction I.(1)(a) and (b) of Form 10-K and is therefore filing this Form with the reduced disclosure format.



DEFINITIONS

Acronyms and defined terms used in the text include the following:

Term
Meaning
AFUDC
allowance for funds used during construction
AFUDC - debt
debt component of allowance for funds used during construction
AFUDC - equity
equity component of allowance for funds used during construction
AOCI
accumulated other comprehensive income
capacity clause
capacity cost recovery clause, as established by the FPSC
CFTC
U.S. Commodity Futures Trading Commission
CO2
carbon dioxide
DOE
U.S. Department of Energy
Duane Arnold
Duane Arnold Energy Center
EPA
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
ERCOT
Electric Reliability Council of Texas
FERC
U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission
Florida Southeast Connection
Florida Southeast Connection, LLC, a wholly-owned NEECH subsidiary
FPL
Florida Power & Light Company
FPL FiberNet
fiber-optic telecommunications business
FPSC
Florida Public Service Commission
fuel clause
fuel and purchased power cost recovery clause, as established by the FPSC
GAAP
generally accepted accounting principles in the U.S.
GHG
greenhouse gas(es)
IPO
initial public offering
ISO
independent system operator
ITC
investment tax credit
kW
kilowatt
kWh
kilowatt-hour(s)
Lone Star
Lone Star Transmission, LLC
Management's Discussion
Item 7. Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
MMBtu
One million British thermal units
mortgage
mortgage and deed of trust dated as of January 1, 1944, from FPL to Deutsche Bank Trust Company Americas, as supplemented and amended
MW
megawatt(s)
MWh
megawatt-hour(s)
NEE
NextEra Energy, Inc.
NEECH
NextEra Energy Capital Holdings, Inc.
NEER
NextEra Energy Resources, LLC
NEET
NextEra Energy Transmission, LLC
NEP
NextEra Energy Partners, LP
NERC
North American Electric Reliability Corporation
NHT
New Hampshire Transmission, LLC
Note __
Note __ to consolidated financial statements
NOx
nitrogen oxide
NRC
U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission
O&M expenses
other operations and maintenance expenses in the consolidated statements of income
OCI
other comprehensive income
OTC
over-the-counter
OTTI
other than temporary impairment
PJM
PJM Interconnection, L.L.C.
PMI
NextEra Energy Power Marketing, LLC
Point Beach
Point Beach Nuclear Power Plant
PTC
production tax credit
PUCT
Public Utility Commission of Texas
PURPA
Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, as amended
PV
photovoltaic
regulatory ROE
return on common equity as determined for regulatory purposes
RFP
request for proposal
ROE
return on common equity
RPS
renewable portfolio standards
RTO
regional transmission organization
Sabal Trail
Sabal Trail Transmission, LLC, an entity in which a NEECH subsidiary has a 33% ownership interest
Seabrook
Seabrook Station
SEC
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
SO2
sulfur dioxide
U.S.
United States of America
WCEC
FPL's West County Energy Center in western Palm Beach County, Florida

NEE, FPL, NEECH and NEER each has subsidiaries and affiliates with names that may include NextEra Energy, FPL, NextEra Energy Resources, NextEra, FPL Group, FPL Group Capital, FPL Energy, FPLE and similar references. For convenience and simplicity, in this report the terms NEE, FPL, NEECH and NEER are sometimes used as abbreviated references to specific subsidiaries, affiliates or groups of subsidiaries or affiliates. The precise meaning depends on the context.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
Page No.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This report includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Any statements that express, or involve discussions as to, expectations, beliefs, plans, objectives, assumptions, strategies, future events or performance (often, but not always, through the use of words or phrases such as may result, are expected to, will continue, is anticipated, aim, believe, will, could, should, would, estimated, may, plan, potential, future, projection, goals, target, outlook, predict and intend or words of similar meaning) are not statements of historical facts and may be forward looking. Forward-looking statements involve estimates, assumptions and uncertainties. Accordingly, any such statements are qualified in their entirety by reference to, and are accompanied by, important factors included in Part I, Item 1A. Risk Factors (in addition to any assumptions and other factors referred to specifically in connection with such forward-looking statements) that could have a significant impact on NEE's and/or FPL's operations and financial results, and could cause NEE's and/or FPL's actual results to differ materially from those contained or implied in forward-looking statements made by or on behalf of NEE and/or FPL in this combined Form 10-K, in presentations, on their respective websites, in response to questions or otherwise.

Any forward-looking statement speaks only as of the date on which such statement is made, and NEE and FPL undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statement to reflect events or circumstances, including, but not limited to, unanticipated events, after the date on which such statement is made, unless otherwise required by law. New factors emerge from time to time and it is not possible for management to predict all of such factors, nor can it assess the impact of each such factor on the business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained or implied in any forward-looking statement.

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PART I

Item 1. Business

OVERVIEW

NextEra Energy, Inc. (hereafter, NEE), with approximately 44,900 MW of generating capacity, is one of the largest electric power companies in North America with electric generating facilities located in 27 states in the U.S. and 4 provinces in Canada, and employing approximately 13,800 people as of December 31, 2014. NEE provides retail and wholesale electric services to over 5 million customers and owns generation, transmission and distribution facilities to support its services. It also purchases electric power for resale to its customers and provides risk management services related to power and gas consumption related to its own generation assets and for a limited number of wholesale customers in selected markets. NEE is the largest generator in North America of renewable energy from the wind and sun. NEE owns and operates approximately 17% of the installed base of U.S. wind power production capacity and owns and/or operates approximately 11% of the installed base of U.S. utility-scale solar power production capacity as of December 31, 2014. NEE also owns and operates one of the largest fleets of nuclear power stations in the U.S., with eight reactors at five sites located in four states, representing approximately 6% of U.S. nuclear power electric generating capacity as of December 31, 2014. NEE's business strategy has emphasized the development, acquisition and operation of renewable, nuclear and natural gas-fired generation facilities in response to long-term federal policy trends supportive of zero and low air emissions sources of power. NEE's generation fleet has significantly lower rates of emissions of CO2, SO2 and NOx than the average rates of the U.S. electric power industry with approximately 97% of its 2014 generation, measured by MWh produced, coming from renewable, nuclear and natural gas-fired facilities. Certain environmental attributes of the wholesale business' electric generating facilities, such as renewable energy credits (RECs), emissions reductions, offsets, allowances and the avoided emission of GHG pollutants, have been or likely will be sold or transferred to third parties, who are solely entitled to the reporting rights and ownership of the environmental attributes.

NEE was incorporated in 1984 under the laws of Florida and conducts its operations principally through two wholly-owned subsidiaries, Florida Power & Light Company (hereafter, FPL) and NextEra Energy Resources, LLC (hereafter, NEER). NextEra Energy Capital Holdings, Inc. (hereafter, NEECH), another wholly-owned subsidiary of NEE, owns and provides funding for NEER's and NEE's operating subsidiaries, other than FPL and its subsidiaries. NEE's two principal businesses also constitute NEE's reportable segments for financial reporting purposes. During 2014, NEE formed NEP to acquire, manage and own contracted clean energy projects with stable, long-term cash flows. See II. NEER for further discussion of NEP. NEE's and NEER's generating capacity discussed in this combined Form 10-K includes approximately 199 MW associated with noncontrolling interests related to NEP as of December 31, 2014. See Item 2. Properties.



FPL is a rate-regulated electric utility engaged primarily in the generation, transmission, distribution and sale of electric energy in Florida. FPL is the largest electric utility in the state of Florida and one of the largest electric utilities in the U.S. based on retail MWh sales. FPL is vertically integrated, with approximately 25,100 MW of generating capacity as of December 31, 2014. FPL's investments in its infrastructure since 2001, such as modernizing less-efficient fossil generating plants to produce more energy with less fuel and fewer air emissions, increasing generating capacity at its existing nuclear units and upgrading its transmission and distribution systems to deliver service reliability that is the best of the Florida investor-owned utilities, have provided significant benefits to FPL's customers, all while providing residential and commercial bills that were among the lowest in Florida and below the national average based on a rate per kWh as of July 2014 (the latest date for which this data is available). With approximately 95% of its power generation coming from natural gas, nuclear and solar, FPL is also one of the cleanest electric utilities in the nation. Based on 2014 information, FPL's emissions rates for CO2, SO2 and NOx were 38%, 95% and 73% lower, respectively, than the average rates of the U.S. electric power industry.

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NEER, with approximately 19,800 MW of generating capacity at December 31, 2014, is one of the largest wholesale generators of electric power in the U.S., with approximately 19,000 MW of generating capacity across 25 states, and with over 700 MW in 4 Canadian provinces. NEER produces the majority of its electricity from clean and renewable sources, including wind and solar. NEER also provides full energy and capacity requirements services, engages in power and gas marketing and trading activities, participates in natural gas, natural gas liquids and oil production and pipeline infrastructure development and owns a retail electricity provider.

NEECH's other business activities are primarily conducted through NEET and FPL FiberNet. NEET conducts its operations principally through two wholly-owned subsidiaries, Lone Star, a rate-regulated transmission service provider in Texas, and NHT, a rate-regulated transmission owner in New Hampshire. FPL FiberNet delivers wholesale and enterprise telecommunications services in Florida, Texas and certain areas of the South Central U.S. In addition, certain subsidiaries of NEECH are pursuing approvals to move forward with three natural gas pipeline projects.

NEE seeks to create value in its two principal businesses by meeting its customers' needs more economically and more reliably than its competitors, as described in more detail in the following sections. NEE's strategy has resulted in profitable growth over sustained periods at both FPL and NEER. Management seeks to grow each business in a manner consistent with the varying opportunities open to it; however, management believes that the diversification and balance represented by FPL and NEER is a valuable characteristic of the enterprise and recognizes that each business contributes to NEE's credit profile in different ways. FPL and NEER, as well as other NEE subsidiaries, share common support functions with the objective of lowering costs and creating efficiencies for their businesses. During 2013, NEE and its subsidiaries commenced an enterprise-wide initiative focused mainly on improving productivity and reducing O&M expenses (cost savings initiative), and management expects to continue those efforts over the near term.

In December 2014, NEE and Hawaiian Electric Industries, Inc. (HEI) announced a proposed merger pursuant to which Hawaiian Electric Company, Inc., HEI's wholly-owned electric utility subsidiary, will become a wholly-owned subsidiary of NEE. The companies are working to complete the merger by the end of 2015. However, completion of the merger and the actual closing date depend upon the satisfaction of a number of conditions, including approval by HEI's shareholders and the receipt of required regulatory approvals. See Note 1 - Proposed Merger for further discussion.


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NEE'S OPERATING SUBSIDIARIES

I. FPL

FPL was incorporated under the laws of Florida in 1925 and is a wholly-owned subsidiary of NEE. FPL is a rate-regulated electric utility and is the largest electric utility in the state of Florida and one of the largest electric utilities in the U.S. based on retail MWh sales. FPL, with 25,092 MW of generating capacity at December 31, 2014, supplies electric service throughout most of the east and lower west coasts of Florida, serving more than 9 million people through approximately 4.7 million customer accounts. At December 31, 2014, FPL's service territory and plant locations are as follows (see Item 2. Properties - Generating Facilities):


FRANCHISE AGREEMENTS AND COMPETITION

FPL's service to its retail customers is provided primarily under franchise agreements negotiated with municipalities or counties. Alternatively, municipalities and counties may form their own utility companies to provide service to their residents. In a very few cases, an FPL franchise agreement provides the respective municipality the right to buy the electrical assets serving local residents at the end of the agreement. However, during the term of a franchise agreement, which is typically 30 years, the municipality or county agrees not to form its own utility, and FPL has the right to offer electric service to residents. FPL currently holds 177 franchise agreements with various municipalities and counties in Florida with varying expiration dates through 2044. One of these franchise agreements expires in 2015, three expire in 2016 and 173 expire during the period 2017 through 2044. These franchise agreements cover approximately 86% of FPL's retail customer base in Florida. Negotiations are ongoing to renew the franchise agreements that expire in 2015 and 2016. FPL considers its franchises to be adequate for the conduct of its business. FPL also provides service to 12 other municipalities and to 22 unincorporated areas within its service area without franchise agreements pursuant to the general obligation to serve as a public utility. FPL relies upon Florida law for access to public rights of way.

Because any customer may elect to provide his/her own electric services, FPL effectively must compete for an individual customer's business. As a practical matter, few customers provide their own service at the present time since FPL's cost of service is substantially lower than the cost of self-generation for the vast majority of customers. Changing technology, economic conditions and other factors could alter the favorable relative cost position that FPL currently enjoys; however, FPL seeks as a matter of strategy to ensure that it delivers superior value, in the form of high reliability, low bills and excellent customer service.

In addition to self-generation by residential, commercial and industrial customers, FPL also faces competition from other suppliers of electrical energy to wholesale customers and from alternative energy sources. In each of 2014, 2013 and 2012, operating revenues from wholesale and industrial customers combined represented approximately 5%, 3% and 3%, respectively, of FPL's total operating revenues.

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The FPSC promotes cost competitiveness in the building of new steam and solar generating capacity of 75 MW or greater by requiring investor-owned electric utilities, including FPL, to issue an RFP except when the FPSC determines that an exception from the RFP process is in the public interest. The RFP process allows independent power producers and others to bid to supply the new generating capacity. If a bidder has the most cost-effective alternative, meets other criteria such as financial viability and demonstrates adequate expertise and experience in building and/or operating generating capacity of the type proposed, the investor-owned electric utility would seek to negotiate a purchased power agreement with the selected bidder and request that the FPSC approve the terms of the purchased power agreement and, if appropriate, provide the required authorization for the construction of the bidder's generating capacity. In January 2015, FPL announced plans to issue an RFP during the first quarter of 2015 for a new natural gas-fired combined-cycle unit in Okeechobee County, Florida.

New nuclear power plants are exempt from the RFP requirement. See FPL Sources of Generation - Nuclear Operations below.

CUSTOMERS AND REVENUE

FPL's primary source of operating revenues is from its retail customer base; it also serves a limited number of wholesale customers within Florida. FPL revenues from wholesale sales increased in 2014 primarily due to an increase in contracted load served under existing and new wholesale contracts. Beginning in 2013, operating revenues include gains associated with an incentive mechanism allowed under the 2012 rate agreement (see FPL Regulation - FPL Rate Regulation - Base Rates - Rates Effective January 2013 - December 2016); such gains are included in other in the chart below. The percentage of FPL's operating revenues and customer accounts by customer class were as follows:

 

For both retail and wholesale customers, the prices (or rates) that FPL may charge are approved by regulatory bodies, by the FPSC in the case of retail customers, and by the FERC in the case of wholesale customers. In general, under U.S. and Florida law, regulated rates are intended to cover the cost of providing service, including a reasonable rate of return on invested capital. Since the regulatory bodies have authority to determine the relevant cost of providing service and the appropriate rate of return on capital employed, there can be no guarantee that FPL will be able to earn any particular rate of return or recover all of its costs through regulated rates. See FPL Regulation below.


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FPL seeks to maintain attractive rates for its customers. Since rates are largely cost-based, maintaining low rates requires a strategy focused on developing and maintaining a low cost position. The ideas generated from the cost savings initiative discussed above are expected to keep FPL's O&M expenses recovered through base rates flat through 2016 as compared to 2012. A common benchmark used in the electric power industry for comparing rates across companies is the price of 1,000 kWh of consumption per month for a residential customer. FPL's 2014 average bill for 1,000 kWh of monthly residential usage was the lowest among reporting electric utilities within Florida as indicated below:


POWER DELIVERY

FPL provides service to its customers through an integrated transmission and distribution system that links its generation facilities to its customers. FPL also maintains interconnection facilities with neighboring utilities and non-utility generators inside its service territory, enabling it to buy and sell wholesale electricity and to enhance the reliability of its own network and support the reliability of neighboring networks. FPL's transmission system carries high voltage electricity from its generating facilities to substations where the electricity is stepped down to lower voltage levels and is sent through the distribution system to its customers.

A key element of FPL's strategy is to provide highly reliable service to its customers. The transmission and distribution system is susceptible to interruptions or outages from a wide variety of sources including weather, animal and vegetation interference, traffic accidents, equipment failure and many others, and FPL seeks to reduce or eliminate outages where economically practical and to restore service rapidly when outages occur. A common industry benchmark for transmission and distribution system reliability is the system average interruption duration index (SAIDI), which represents the number of minutes the average customer is without power during a time period. For the five years 2009 - 2013, FPL's average annual SAIDI was the best of the investor-owned utilities in Florida. FPL is accelerating its existing storm hardening and reliability program, to continue strengthening its infrastructure against tropical storms and hurricanes. Also, as part of its commitment to building a smarter, more reliable and efficient electric infrastructure, FPL has installed 4.8 million smart meters and 11,500 intelligent devices throughout the electric grid.

FPL SYSTEM CAPABILITY AND LOAD

At December 31, 2014, FPL's resources for serving load consisted of 27,055 MW, of which 25,092 MW were from FPL-owned facilities (see Item 2. Properties - Generating Facilities) and 1,963 MW were available through purchased power agreements (see FPL Sources of Generation - Purchased Power below). FPL customer usage and operating revenues are typically higher during the summer months, largely due to the prevalent use of air conditioning in FPL's service territory. Occasionally, unusually cold temperatures during the winter months result in significant increases in electricity usage for short periods of time. The highest peak load FPL has served to date was 24,346 MW, which occurred on January 11, 2010. FPL had adequate resources available at the time of this peak to meet customer demand.

FPL's projected reserve margin for the summer of 2015 is approximately 27%. This reserve margin is expected to be achieved through the combination of available output from FPL's active generating units, purchased power agreements and the capability to reduce peak demand through the implementation of demand side management programs, including load management which was estimated at December 31, 2014 to be capable of reducing demand by approximately 1,800 MW, and energy efficiency and conservation programs. See FPL Sources of Generation - Fossil Operations and - Nuclear Operations below regarding generation projects currently under construction.


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FPL SOURCES OF GENERATION

FPL relies upon a mix of fuel sources for its generating facilities, along with purchased power, in order to maintain the flexibility to achieve a more economical fuel mix by responding to market and industry developments. See descriptions of fossil, nuclear and solar operations below and a listing of FPL's generating facilities in Item 2. Properties - Generating Facilities.

FPL's 2014 fuel mix based on MWh produced, including purchased power, was as follows:

Oil and Solar are collectively less than 1%


Fossil Operations (Natural Gas, Coal and Oil)

At December 31, 2014, FPL owned and operated 70 units that used fossil fuels, primarily natural gas, and had a joint ownership interest in 3 coal units. Combined, the fossil fleet provided 21,604 MW of generating capacity for FPL. These fossil units are out of service from time to time for routine maintenance or on standby during periods of reduced electricity demand. A common industry benchmark for fossil unit reliability is the equivalent forced outage rate (EFOR), which represents a generating unit's inability to provide electricity when required to operate. For the five years 2009 - 2013, FPL's average annual EFOR was in the top decile among its electric utility fossil fleet peers in the U.S.

FPL's natural gas plants require natural gas transportation, supply and storage. FPL has firm transportation contracts in place for existing pipeline capacity with five different transportation suppliers. These agreements provide for an aggregate maximum delivery quantity of 2,069,000 MMBtu/day with expiration dates ranging from 2015 to 2036 that together are expected to satisfy substantially all of the currently anticipated needs for natural gas transportation through 2016. To the extent desirable, FPL also purchases interruptible natural gas transportation service from these natural gas transportation suppliers based on pipeline availability. FPL has several short- and medium-term natural gas supply contracts to provide a portion of FPL's anticipated needs for natural gas. The remainder of FPL's natural gas requirements is purchased in the spot market. FPL has an agreement for the storage of natural gas that expires in 2017. See Note 13 - Contracts.

In 2013, the FPSC approved FPL's 25-year natural gas transportation agreements with each of Sabal Trail and Florida Southeast Connection for a quantity of 400,000 MMBtu/day beginning on May 1, 2017 and increasing to 600,000 MMBtu/day on May 1, 2020. FPL's firm commitments under the agreements are contingent upon the occurrence of certain events, including FERC approval and completion of construction of the pipeline system to be built by Sabal Trail and Florida Southeast Connection. A FERC decision is expected in 2015. See Other NEE Operating Subsidiaries - Natural Gas Pipeline Systems - Florida Natural Gas Pipeline System below and Note 13 - Contracts. These new agreements, when combined with FPL's existing agreements, are expected to satisfy substantially all of FPL's natural gas transportation needs through at least 2020.

In December 2014, the FPSC approved FPL’s petition to invest in long-term natural gas supplies in the Woodford Shale region in southeastern Oklahoma and for the recovery of costs associated with the investment through the fuel clause. A wholly-owned subsidiary of FPL will partner with a third party to develop up to 38 natural gas production wells in the Woodford Shale region and receive its ownership share of the natural gas produced from these wells. FPL’s projected investment in these natural gas production

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wells as of December 31, 2014 is included in estimated capital expenditures set forth in Note 13 - Commitments. In 2015, the State of Florida Office of Public Counsel (OPC) and Florida Industrial Power Users Group each has filed notices of appeal to the Florida Supreme Court that relate to challenging the Woodford Shale natural gas reserves project, which appeals are pending. As part of FPL’s petition to invest in natural gas supplies in the Woodford Shale region, it also requested the FPSC approve a set of guidelines proposed by FPL under which FPL could participate in additional natural gas production projects and recover its costs through the fuel clause without prior FPSC approval. In 2015, the FPSC filed a motion with the Florida Supreme Court requesting that the Court issue an order confirming the FPSC has jurisdiction to consider and issue a decision on FPL’s proposed guidelines while the appeals regarding the Woodford Shale natural gas reserves project are pending. Also in 2015, the OPC filed a petition requesting the Florida Supreme Court prohibit the FPSC from ruling on the proposed guidelines while appeals concerning the Woodford Shale natural gas reserves project are pending.

St. Johns River Power Park (SJRPP) Units Nos. 1 and 2, coal-fired units in which FPL has a joint ownership interest, have firm coal supply and transportation contracts for a portion of their fuel and transportation needs through 2017. Scherer Unit No. 4, the other coal-fired unit in which FPL has a joint ownership interest, has firm coal supply and transportation contracts for a portion of its fuel needs and all of its transportation needs through 2016. Any of the remaining fuel requirements for these coal-fired units will be obtained in the spot market. See Note 13 - Contracts. With respect to its oil plants, FPL obtains its fuel requirements in the spot market.

Modernization Projects. In April 2013 and in April 2014, FPL placed in service, at each of its Cape Canaveral and Riviera Beach power plants, a natural gas-fired combined-cycle modernized unit with generating capacity of 1,210 MW and 1,212 MW, respectively. FPL is in the process of modernizing its Port Everglades power plant to a high-efficiency natural gas-fired unit that is expected to provide approximately 1,240 MW of capacity and be placed in service by mid-2016.

Nuclear Operations

At December 31, 2014, FPL owned, or had undivided interests in, and operated the following four nuclear units with a total net generating capacity of 3,453 MW.

Facility
 
MW
 
Operating License
Expiration Dates
St. Lucie Unit No. 1
 
981
 
2036
St. Lucie Unit No. 2
 
840
 
2043
Turkey Point Unit No. 3
 
811
 
2032
Turkey Point Unit No. 4
 
821
 
2033

FPL has several contracts for the supply of uranium and the conversion, enrichment and fabrication of nuclear fuel with expiration dates ranging from late February 2015 through 2030. See Note 13 - Commitments. NRC regulations require FPL to submit a plan for decontamination and decommissioning five years before the projected end of plant operation. FPL's current plans, under the applicable operating licenses, provide for prompt dismantlement of Turkey Point Units Nos. 3 and 4 with decommissioning activities commencing in 2032 and 2033, respectively. Current plans provide for St. Lucie Unit No. 1 to be mothballed beginning in 2036 with decommissioning activities to be integrated with the prompt dismantlement of St. Lucie Unit No. 2 commencing in 2043.

Projects to Add Additional Capacity. FPL's need petition for two additional nuclear units at its Turkey Point site was approved by the FPSC in 2008 and FPL is moving forward with activities necessary to obtain all permits, licenses and approvals necessary for construction and operation of the units. The two units are expected to add a total of approximately 2,200 MW of capacity. The timing of commercial operation will be subject to various regulatory approvals from the FPSC and other agencies which will be required throughout the licensing and development processes and the nuclear units are expected to be placed in-service in 2027 and 2028. The NRC has indicated that its consideration of the licenses for the two units will be complete by early 2017.

Nuclear Unit Scheduled Refueling Outages. FPL's nuclear units are periodically removed from service to accommodate normal refueling and maintenance outages, including inspections, repairs and certain other modifications. Scheduled nuclear refueling outages typically require the unit to be removed from service for variable lengths of time. The following table summarizes each unit's next scheduled refueling outage:

Facility
 
Next Scheduled
Refueling Outage
St. Lucie Unit No. 1
 
March 2015
St. Lucie Unit No. 2
 
September 2015
Turkey Point Unit No. 3
 
October 2015
Turkey Point Unit No. 4
 
March 2016

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Spent Nuclear Fuel. FPL's nuclear facilities use both on-site storage pools and dry storage casks to store spent nuclear fuel generated by these facilities, which are expected to provide sufficient storage of spent nuclear fuel at these facilities through license expiration. In August 2014, the NRC issued its Continued Storage of Spent Nuclear Fuel Rule which supports the NRC's determination that licensees can safely store spent nuclear fuel at nuclear power plants indefinitely. Petitions have been filed with the NRC and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit (D.C. Circuit) challenging the rule and requesting that the NRC suspend final reactor licensing decisions in all open NRC licensing proceedings (including the licensing proceeding for two additional nuclear units at FPL's Turkey Point site) alleging that the rule is deficient. The petitions filed with the NRC have been fully briefed and a decision by the NRC is pending. The NRC requested that the D.C. Circuit defer briefing on the appellate case until the NRC decides the petitions pending before it. 

Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as amended (Nuclear Waste Policy Act) - Under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, the DOE is responsible for the development of a repository for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. As required by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act, FPL is a party to contracts with the DOE to provide for disposal of spent nuclear fuel from its nuclear units.

The DOE was required to construct permanent disposal facilities and take title to and provide transportation and disposal for spent nuclear fuel by January 31, 1998 for a specified fee based on current generation from nuclear power plants which fee was subsequently set to zero effective May 2014. The DOE did not meet its statutory obligation for disposal of spent nuclear fuel under the Nuclear Waste Policy Act. In 2009, FPL and certain of FPL's nuclear plant joint owners entered into a settlement agreement (spent fuel settlement agreement) with the U.S. government agreeing to dismiss with prejudice lawsuits filed against the U.S. government seeking damages caused by the DOE's failure to dispose of spent nuclear fuel from FPL's nuclear plants. The spent fuel settlement agreement permits FPL to make annual filings to recover certain spent fuel storage costs incurred by FPL which are reimbursable by the U.S. government on an annual basis.

Yucca Mountain - In 2010, the DOE filed a motion with the NRC to withdraw its license application for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, which request was denied. In 2011, the NRC issued an order suspending the Yucca Mountain licensing proceeding, which order was challenged, and in 2013, the D.C. Circuit issued an order requiring the NRC to proceed with the legally mandated licensing process for a nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. As a result, the NRC has recently completed the technical review of the application and is planning to supplement the DOE's environmental impact statement. Certain requirements must be met before the NRC can issue a license for the repository.

Nuclear Regulatory Developments. Based on the NRC's comprehensive review of processes and regulations relating to nuclear facilities in the U.S. following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan, the NRC established, among other things, actions to be completed at each nuclear site and issued various orders and requests for information with a prescribed timeline for implementation and completion by the end of 2016. The NRC continues to monitor industry implementation of the orders for, among others, enhanced venting capabilities for boiling water reactors for which implementation is expected to go beyond 2016 (FPL's nuclear units do not use boiling water reactors; see NEER - Generation and Other Operations - Nuclear Facilities - Nuclear Regulatory Developments). FPL is currently working with the NRC on the approval and implementation of actions required to meet new NRC requirements. A portion of the costs for these actions is being recovered through base rates based on estimated costs for 2013, with any incremental costs being recovered through the capacity clause, all of which are included in estimated capital expenditures. See FPL Regulation - FPL Rate Regulation - Cost Recovery Clauses below and Note 13 - Commitments.

The lessons learned from the events in Japan and the results of the NRC's actions have and will continue to, among other things, result in new licensing and safety-related requirements for U.S. nuclear facilities. Any new requirements could, among other things, impact future licensing and operations of U.S. nuclear facilities, including FPL's existing nuclear facilities and NRC approval of two additional nuclear units at FPL's Turkey Point site, and could, among other things, result in increased cost and capital expenditures associated with the operation and maintenance of FPL's nuclear units.

Solar Operations

Solar generation can be provided primarily through two conventions: utility-owned and customer-owned or leased. In utility-owned solar generation, the energy generated goes directly to the transmission grid, whereas customer-owned or leased solar generation generally goes directly to the location it is serving with any excess over that local need being fed back to the transmission grid. There are two principal solar technologies used for utility-scale projects: PV and thermal. At December 31, 2014, FPL owned and operated two solar PV generating facilities, which provided a total of 35 MW of generation capacity, and a 75 MW solar thermal hybrid facility. FPL supports the advancement of solar generation primarily for its fuel diversity and emissions reduction benefits, and plans to continue to support, study and pursue solar generation that is beneficial for FPL's customers. FPL plans to build three solar PV projects that are expected to provide approximately 74 MW each and be placed into service by the end of 2016.

Purchased Power

In addition to owning generation facilities, FPL also purchases power and capacity from non-utility generators and other utilities to meet customer demand through long-term purchased power agreements. As of December 31, 2014, FPL's long-term purchased power agreements provided for the purchase of approximately 1,963 MW of power with expiration dates ranging from December

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2015 through 2032. See Note 13 - Contracts. On occasion, FPL may procure short-term power and capacity for both economic and reliability purposes.

FPL ENERGY MARKETING AND TRADING

FPL's Energy Marketing & Trading division (EMT) buys and sells wholesale energy commodities, such as natural gas, oil and electricity. EMT procures natural gas and oil for FPL's use in power generation and sells excess natural gas, oil and electricity. EMT also uses derivative instruments (primarily swaps, options and forwards) to manage the commodity price risk inherent in the purchase and sale of fuel and electricity. Substantially all of the results of EMT's activities are passed through to customers in the fuel or capacity clauses. See FPL Regulation - FPL Rate Regulation below, Management's Discussion - Energy Marketing and Trading and Market Risk Sensitivity and Note 3.

FPL REGULATION

FPL's operations are subject to regulation by a number of federal, state and other organizations, including, but not limited to, the following:

the FPSC, which has jurisdiction over retail rates, service territory, issuances of securities, planning, siting and construction of facilities, among other things;
the FERC, which oversees the acquisition and disposition of generation, transmission and other facilities, transmission of electricity and natural gas in interstate commerce, proposals to build interstate natural gas pipelines and storage facilities, and wholesale purchases and sales of electric energy, among other things;
the NERC, which, through its regional entities, establishes and enforces mandatory reliability standards, subject to approval by the FERC, to ensure the reliability of the U.S. electric transmission and generation system and to prevent major system blackouts;
the NRC, which has jurisdiction over the operation of nuclear power plants through the issuance of operating licenses, rules, regulations and orders; and
the EPA, which has the responsibility to maintain and enforce national standards under a variety of environmental laws. The EPA also works with industries and all levels of government, including federal and state governments, in a wide variety of voluntary pollution prevention programs and energy conservation efforts.

FPL Rate Regulation

The FPSC sets rates at a level that is intended to allow FPL the opportunity to collect from retail customers total revenues (revenue requirements) equal to FPL's cost of providing service, including a reasonable rate of return on invested capital. To accomplish this, the FPSC uses various ratemaking mechanisms, including, among other things, base rates and cost recovery clauses.

Base Rates. In general, the basic costs of providing electric service, other than fuel and certain other costs, are recovered through base rates, which are designed to recover the costs of constructing, operating and maintaining the utility system. These basic costs include O&M expenses, depreciation and taxes, as well as a return on FPL's investment in assets used and useful in providing electric service (rate base). At the time base rates are determined, the allowed rate of return on rate base approximates the FPSC's determination of FPL's estimated weighted-average cost of capital, which includes its costs for outstanding debt and an allowed ROE. The FPSC monitors FPL's actual regulatory ROE through a surveillance report that is filed monthly by FPL with the FPSC. The FPSC does not provide assurance that any regulatory ROE will be achieved. Base rates are determined in rate proceedings or through negotiated settlements of those proceedings. Proceedings can occur at the initiative of FPL or upon action by the FPSC. Base rates remain in effect until new base rates are approved by the FPSC.

Rates Effective January 2013 - December 2016 - In January 2013, the FPSC issued a final order approving a stipulation and settlement between FPL and several intervenors in FPL's base rate proceeding (2012 rate agreement). Key elements of the 2012 rate agreement, which is effective from January 2013 through December 2016, include, among other things, the following:

New retail base rates and charges were established in January 2013 resulting in an increase in retail base revenues of $350 million on an annualized basis.
FPL's allowed regulatory ROE is 10.50%, with a range of plus or minus 100 basis points. If FPL's earned regulatory ROE falls below 9.50%, FPL may seek retail base rate relief. If the earned regulatory ROE rises above 11.50%, any party to the 2012 rate agreement other than FPL may seek a review of FPL's retail base rates.
Retail base rates will be increased by the annualized base revenue requirements for FPL's three modernization projects (Cape Canaveral, Riviera Beach and Port Everglades) as each of the modernized power plants becomes operational. (Cape Canaveral and Riviera Beach became operational in April 2013 and April 2014, respectively, and Port Everglades is expected to be operational by mid-2016.)
Cost recovery of WCEC Unit No. 3, which was placed in service in May 2011, will continue to occur through the capacity clause; however, such recovery will not be limited to the projected annual fuel cost savings as was the case in the previous rate agreement discussed below.

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Subject to certain conditions, FPL may amortize, over the term of the 2012 rate agreement, a depreciation reserve surplus remaining at the end of 2012 under the 2010 rate agreement discussed below (approximately $224 million) and may amortize a portion of FPL's fossil dismantlement reserve up to a maximum of $176 million (collectively, the reserve), provided that in any year of the 2012 rate agreement, FPL must amortize at least enough reserve to maintain a 9.50% earned regulatory ROE but may not amortize any reserve that would result in an earned regulatory ROE in excess of 11.50%.
Future storm restoration costs would be recoverable on an interim basis beginning 60 days from the filing of a cost recovery petition, but capped at an amount that could produce a surcharge of no more than $4 for every 1,000 kWh of usage on residential bills during the first 12 months of cost recovery. Any additional costs would be eligible for recovery in subsequent years. If storm restoration costs exceed $800 million in any given calendar year, FPL may request an increase to the $4 surcharge to recover the amount above $800 million.
An incentive mechanism whereby customers will receive 100% of certain gains, including, but not limited to, gains from the purchase and sale of electricity and natural gas (including transportation and storage), up to a specified threshold; gains exceeding that specified threshold will be shared by FPL and its customers.

Rates Effective March 2010 - December 2012 - Effective March 1, 2010, pursuant to an FPSC final order (2010 FPSC rate order), new retail base rates for FPL were established, resulting in an increase in retail base revenues of approximately $75 million on an annualized basis. The 2010 FPSC rate order, among other things, also established a regulatory ROE of 10.0% with a range of plus or minus 100 basis points. In February 2011, the FPSC issued a final order approving a stipulation and settlement agreement between FPL and principal parties in FPL's 2009 rate case (2010 rate agreement). The 2010 rate agreement, which was effective through December 31, 2012, provided for, among other things, a reduction in depreciation expense (surplus depreciation credit) in any calendar year up to a cap in 2010 of $267 million, a cap in subsequent years of $267 million plus the amount of any unused portion from prior years, and a total cap of $776 million over the course of the 2010 rate agreement, provided that in any year of the 2010 rate agreement FPL was required to use enough surplus depreciation credit to maintain an earned regulatory ROE within the range of 9.0% - 11.0%. The 2010 rate agreement also permitted incremental cost recovery through FPL's capacity clause for WCEC Unit No. 3 up to the amount of the projected annual fuel savings for customers. See Cost Recovery Clauses below for additional information regarding the capacity clause.

Cost Recovery Clauses. Cost recovery clauses, which are designed to permit full recovery of certain costs and provide a return on certain assets allowed to be recovered through the various clauses, include substantially all fuel, purchased power and interchange costs, certain construction-related costs and conservation and certain environmental-related costs. Cost recovery clause costs are recovered through levelized monthly charges per kWh or kW, depending on the customer's rate class. These cost recovery clause charges are calculated at least annually based on estimated costs and estimated customer usage for the following year, plus or minus true-up adjustments to reflect the estimated over or under recovery of costs for the current and prior periods. An adjustment to the levelized charges may be approved during the course of a year to reflect revised estimates.

Fuel costs and energy charges under the purchased power agreements are recovered from customers through the fuel clause, the most significant of the cost recovery clauses in terms of operating revenues. FPL uses a risk management fuel procurement program which has been approved by the FPSC. The FPSC reviews the program activities and results for prudence annually as part of its review of fuel costs. The program is intended to manage fuel price volatility by locking in fuel prices for a portion of FPL's fuel requirements. See FPL Energy Marketing and Trading above, Note 1 - Regulation and Note 3. Costs associated with FPL’s investment in long-term natural gas supplies in the Woodford Shale region that have been approved by the FPSC will also be recovered through the fuel clause. See FPL Sources of Generation - Fossil Operations above.

Capacity payments to non-utility generators and other utilities are recovered from customers through the capacity clause. In accordance with the FPSC's nuclear cost recovery rule, FPL also recovers pre-construction costs and carrying charges (equal to a pretax AFUDC rate) on construction costs for new nuclear capacity through the capacity clause. As property related to the new nuclear capacity goes into service, construction costs and a return on investment are recovered through base rate increases effective beginning the following January. See FPL Sources of Generation - Nuclear Operations above. In January 2014, FPL began recovering, through the capacity clause, the incremental costs incurred to comply with new NRC requirements established following the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan. See FPL Sources of Generation - Nuclear Operations - Nuclear Regulatory Developments above. In accordance with the 2012 and 2010 rate agreements, cost recovery for WCEC Unit No. 3 is permitted during the term of the agreements through FPL's capacity clause and is reported as retail base revenues.

Costs associated with implementing energy conservation programs are recovered from customers through the energy conservation cost recovery clause. Certain costs of complying with federal, state and local environmental regulations enacted after April 1993 and costs associated with FPL's three solar facilities are recovered through the environmental cost recovery clause (environmental clause).

The FPSC has the authority to disallow recovery of costs that it considers excessive or imprudently incurred. These costs may include, among others, fuel and O&M expenses, the cost of replacing power lost when fossil and nuclear units are unavailable, storm restoration costs and costs associated with the construction or acquisition of new facilities.

FERC

The Federal Power Act gives the FERC exclusive ratemaking jurisdiction over wholesale sales of electricity and the transmission

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of electricity and natural gas in interstate commerce. Pursuant to the Federal Power Act, electric utilities must maintain tariffs and rate schedules on file with the FERC which govern the rates, terms and conditions for the provision of FERC-jurisdictional wholesale power and transmission services. The Federal Power Act also gives the FERC authority to certify and oversee a national electric reliability organization with authority to establish and independently enforce mandatory reliability standards applicable to all users, owners and operators of the bulk-power system. See NERC below. Electric utilities are subject to accounting, record-keeping and reporting requirements administered by the FERC. The FERC also places certain limitations on transactions between electric utilities and their affiliates.

NERC

The NERC has been certified by the FERC as the national electric reliability organization. The NERC's mandate is to ensure the reliability and security of the North American bulk-power system through the establishment and enforcement of reliability standards approved by FERC. The NERC's regional entities also enforce reliability standards approved by the FERC. FPL is subject to these reliability standards and incurs costs to ensure compliance with continually heightened requirements, and can incur significant penalties for failing to comply with them.

FPL Environmental Regulation

FPL is subject to environmental laws and regulations and is affected by some of the emerging issues described in the NEE Environmental Matters section below. FPL expects to seek recovery through the environmental clause for compliance costs associated with any new environmental laws and regulations.

FPL EMPLOYEES

FPL had approximately 8,700 employees at December 31, 2014. Approximately 33% of the employees are represented by the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) under a collective bargaining agreement with FPL that expires October 31, 2017.

II. NEER

NEER was formed in 1998 to aggregate NEE's competitive energy businesses. It is a limited liability company organized under the laws of Delaware and is a wholly-owned subsidiary of NEECH. Through its subsidiaries, NEER currently owns, develops, constructs, manages and operates electric generating facilities in wholesale energy markets primarily in the U.S., as well as in Canada and Spain. See Note 14. NEER is one of the largest wholesale generators of electric power in the U.S., with approximately 19,777 MW of generating capacity across 25 states, 4 Canadian provinces and 1 Spanish province as of December 31, 2014. NEER produces the majority of its electricity from clean and renewable sources as described more fully below. NEER is the largest owner of wind and utility-scale solar energy projects in North America.

NEER engages in energy-related commodity marketing and trading activities, including entering into financial and physical contracts, to hedge the production from its generating assets that is not sold under long-term power supply agreements. These activities primarily include power and gas commodities and their related products, as well as providing full energy and capacity requirements services primarily to distribution utilities in certain markets and offering customized power and gas and related risk management services to wholesale customers. NEER also participates in natural gas, natural gas liquids and oil production through non-operating ownership interests and in pipeline infrastructure development, hereafter referred to as the gas infrastructure business, and owns a retail electricity provider. NEER also hedges the expected output from its gas infrastructure production assets to protect against price movements.

As discussed in the Overview above, during 2014, NEP was formed to acquire, manage and own contracted clean energy projects with stable, long-term cash flows through a limited partnership interest in NextEra Energy Operating Partners, LP (NEP OpCo). On July 1, 2014, NEP closed its IPO by issuing 18,687,500 common units representing limited partnership interests. Through an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary, NEE retained 74,440,000 units of NEP OpCo representing a 79.9% interest in NEP's operating projects. Additionally, NEE owns a controlling general partnership interest in NEP and consolidates NEP for financial reporting purposes. See Note 1 - NextEra Energy Partners, LP. Upon completion of the IPO, NEP, through NEER's contribution of energy projects to NEP OpCo, owned a portfolio of ten wind and solar projects with generation capacity totaling approximately 990 MW. In addition, NEER has given NEP OpCo the right of first offer for certain of its assets (ROFO assets) if NEER should seek to sell the assets. These assets include contracted wind and solar projects, some of which are still under construction, with a combined capacity of 1,549 MW. In October 2014, NEP entered into agreements to expand its portfolio through two project acquisitions from NEER. The first acquisition, which closed in January 2015, is a 250 MW wind project that was not included in the ROFO assets. The second acquisition is a 20 MW solar project included in the ROFO assets, which is currently under construction and is expected to close in the first quarter of 2015.


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MARKETS AND COMPETITION

Electricity markets in the U.S. and Canada are regional and diverse in character. All are extensively regulated, and competition in these markets is shaped and constrained by regulation. The nature of the products offered varies based on the specifics of regulation in each region. Generally, in addition to the natural constraints on pricing freedom presented by competition, NEER may also face specific constraints in the form of price caps, or maximum allowed prices, for certain products. NEER's ability to sell the output of its generation facilities may also be constrained by available transmission capacity, which can vary from time to time and can have a significant impact on pricing.

The degree and nature of competition that NEER faces is different in wholesale markets and in retail markets. Approximately 90% of NEER's revenue is derived from wholesale markets.

Wholesale power generation is a capital-intensive, commodity-driven business with numerous industry participants. NEER primarily competes on the basis of price, but believes the green attributes of NEER's generating assets, its creditworthiness and its ability to offer and manage reliable customized risk solutions to wholesale customers are competitive advantages. Wholesale power generation is a regional business that is highly fragmented relative to many other commodity industries and diverse in terms of industry structure. As such, there is a wide variation in terms of the capabilities, resources, nature and identity of the companies NEER competes with depending on the market. In wholesale markets, customers' needs are met through a variety of means, including long-term bilateral contracts, standardized bilateral products such as full requirements service and customized supply and risk management services.

In general, U.S. electricity markets encompass three classes of services: energy, capacity and ancillary services. Energy services relate to the physical delivery of power; capacity services relate to the availability of MW capacity of a power generation asset; and ancillary services are other services related to power generation assets, such as load regulation and spinning and non-spinning reserves. The exact nature of these classes of services is defined in part by regional tariffs. Not all regions have a capacity services class, and the specific definitions of ancillary services vary from region to region.

RTOs and ISOs exist in a number of regions within which NEER operates to coordinate generation and transmission across wide geographic areas and to run markets. NEER also has operations that fall within the Western Electricity Coordinating Council reliability region that are not under the jurisdiction of an established RTO or ISO. Although each RTO and ISO may have differing objectives and structures, some benefits of these entities include regional planning, managing transmission congestion, developing larger wholesale markets for energy and capacity, maintaining reliability and facilitating competition among wholesale electricity providers. NEER has operations that fall within the following RTOs and ISOs:

Alberta Electric System Operator
California Independent System Operator
ERCOT
Independent Electricity System Operator (in Ontario)
ISO New England (ISO-NE)
Midcontinent Independent System Operator, Inc.
New York Independent System Operator
PJM
Southwest Power Pool

NEER competes in different regions to different degrees, but in general it seeks to enter into long-term bilateral contracts for the full output of its generating facilities, and, as of December 31, 2014, approximately 65% of NEER's generating capacity is fully committed under long-term contracts. Where long-term contracts are not in effect, NEER sells the output of its facilities into daily spot markets. In such cases, NEER will frequently enter into shorter term bilateral contracts, typically of less than three years duration, to hedge the price risk associated with selling into a daily spot market. Such bilateral contracts, which may be hedges either for physical delivery or for financial (pricing) offset, may only protect a portion of the revenue that NEER expects to derive from the associated generation facility and may not qualify for hedge accounting under GAAP. Contracts that serve the economic purpose of hedging some portion of the expected revenue of a generation facility but are not recorded as hedges under GAAP are referred to as “non-qualifying hedges” for adjusted earnings purposes. See Management's Discussion - Overview - Adjusted Earnings.

Certain facilities within the NEER wind and solar generation portfolio produce RECs and other environmental attributes which are typically sold along with the energy from the plants under long-term contracts. For the wind and solar generation not sold under long-term contracts, the RECs and other environmental attributes may be sold separately.

While the majority of NEER's revenue is derived from the output of its generating facilities, NEER is also an active competitor in several regions in the wholesale full requirements business and in providing structured and customized power and fuel products and services to a variety of customers. In the full requirements service, typically, the supplier agrees to meet the customer's needs for a full range of products for every hour of the day, at a fixed price, for a predetermined period of time, thereby assuming the risk of fluctuations in the customer's volume requirements.

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The deregulated retail energy business is typically a highly competitive business. In general, competition in the retail energy business is on the basis of price, service, brand image, product offerings and market perceptions of creditworthiness. Electricity is sold pursuant to a variety of product types, including fixed, indexed and renewable products, and customers elect terms of service typically ranging from one month to five years. Retail energy rates are market-based, and not subject to traditional cost-of-service regulation by public utility commissions. Transmission and distribution service companies provide, on a non-discriminatory basis, the wires and metering services necessary to deliver service to customers. Subsidiaries of NEER compete in certain states for retail customers, which can be divided into two principal segments: residential and commercial and industrial (C&I). Residential customers largely require only energy services, which may be purchased on a month-to-month basis or under a multi-year contract. Small commercial customers behave and contract similarly to residential customers for an energy-only product. Large C&I customers share many of the same characteristics as wholesale utility customers and may require similarly customized and structured products.

In general, competitive retail electric providers are exposed to both volume and price risk: customers' volumes will vary, and competitive retail providers are committed to supplying the customer's full needs at all times and are therefore responsible for purchases in wholesale markets to meet those needs. Wholesale prices will fluctuate in ways that do not necessarily match the retail prices committed to the customer.

Expanded competition in a frequently changing regulatory environment presents both opportunities and risks for NEER. Opportunities exist for the selective acquisition of generation assets and for the construction and operation of efficient facilities that can sell power in competitive markets. NEER seeks to reduce its market risk by having a diversified portfolio by fuel type and location, as well as by contracting for the future sale of a significant amount of the electricity output of its facilities.

GENERATION AND OTHER OPERATIONS

NEER sells products associated with its own generating facilities (energy, capacity, RECs and ancillary services) in competitive markets in regions where those facilities are located.  Customer transactions may be supplied from NEER generating facilities or from purchases in the wholesale markets, or from a combination thereof.

At December 31, 2014, the locations of NEER's generation facilities in North America are as follows:


At December 31, 2014, NEER managed or participated in the management of essentially all of its generation projects in which it has an ownership interest.


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NEER categorizes its portfolio in a number of different ways for different business purposes. See a listing of NEER's generating facilities in Item 2. Properties - Generating Facilities. The following presentation details NEER operations and fuel/technology mix, which NEE commonly uses in communicating its business:

Contracted, Merchant and Other Operations

NEER's portfolio of operations based on the presence/absence of long-term contracts and other operations is described below.

Contracted Assets. Contracted assets are projects with long-term power sales agreements for substantially all of their output and certain wind assets where long-term power contracts are expected to be executed. At December 31, 2014, NEER had 13,045 MW of contracted assets, substantially all of which have long-term power contracts. Essentially all of the output of these contracted assets were under power sales agreements, with a weighted-average remaining contract life of approximately 15 years, and some have firm fuel and transportation agreements with expiration dates ranging from April 2015 through 2022. See Note 13 - Contracts. Approximately 9,583 MW of this capacity is wind generation and 1,621 MW of this capacity is nuclear generation. The remaining 1,841 MW use a variety of fuels and technologies such as natural gas, oil and solar.

Merchant Assets. Merchant assets are projects that do not have long-term power sales agreements to sell their output, or, in the case of certain wind assets, are not expected to have long-term power contracts, and therefore require active marketing and hedging. At December 31, 2014, NEER's portfolio of merchant assets consists of 6,732 MW of owned wind, nuclear, natural gas, oil and solar generating facilities, including 846 MW of peak generating facilities. Approximately 60% (based on net MW capability) of the natural gas-fueled merchant assets have natural gas transportation agreements to provide for fluctuating natural gas requirements. See Note 13 - Contracts. Derivative instruments (primarily swaps, options, futures and forwards) are generally used to lock in pricing and manage the commodity price risk inherent in power sales and fuel purchases. Managing market risk through these instruments introduces other types of risk, primarily counterparty, credit and operational risks.

Other Operations. NEER's operations also include the gas infrastructure business and the customer supply and proprietary power and gas trading businesses. At December 31, 2014, the gas infrastructure business had non-operating ownership interests in investments located in oil and gas shale formations primarily in the Midwest and South regions of the U.S. NEER continues to pursue in a selective way opportunities in the upstream (exploration and production) area when it believes the return potential is attractive and to gain insight into the natural gas industry. Additionally, NEER has identified a small portfolio of projects that may provide additional opportunities to enter into the midstream area, primarily through the transportation of natural gas. See Other NEE Operating Subsidiaries - Natural Gas Pipeline Systems for a discussion of recent natural gas pipeline activity. See NEER Customer Supply and Proprietary Power and Gas Trading for a description of the customer supply and propriety power and gas trading businesses.

NEER Fuel/Technology Mix

NEER's generating output is produced using a variety of fuel sources as further described below.



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NEER's power generation in terms of MWh produced for the year ended December 31, 2014 by fuel type is as follows:



Wind Facilities

At December 31, 2014, NEER had ownership interests in wind generating facilities with a total generating capacity of 11,427 MW. NEER operates all of these wind facilities, which are located in 19 states in the U.S. and 4 provinces in Canada. During 2014, NEER added approximately 1,024 MW of new U.S. wind generation and 340 MW of new Canadian wind generation and sold or dismantled wind facilities with generation capacity totaling 147 MW. NEER is currently planning to add new contracted wind generation in 2015 and 2016 totaling approximately 175 MW in Canada and 980 MW in the U.S. See Policy Incentives for Renewable Energy Projects below for additional discussion of NEER's expectations regarding wind development and construction.

Natural Gas Facilities

At December 31, 2014, NEER had ownership interests in and operated natural gas facilities with net generating capacity (including only NEER's net ownership interest in facility capacity) of 3,991 MW. Approximately 1,004 MW of this net generating capacity is from contracted natural gas assets located throughout the Northeastern U.S.

Nuclear Facilities

At December 31, 2014, NEER owned, or had undivided interests in, and operated the following four nuclear units with a total net generating capacity of 2,721 MW.

Facility
 
Location
 
MW
 
Portfolio
Category
 
Operating License
Expiration Dates
Seabrook
 
New Hampshire
 
1,100

 
Merchant
 
2030
(a) 
Duane Arnold
 
Iowa
 
431

 
Contracted(b)
 
2034
 
Point Beach Unit No. 1
 
Wisconsin
 
595

 
Contracted(c)
 
2030
 
Point Beach Unit No. 2
 
Wisconsin
 
595

 
Contracted(c)
 
2033
 
______________________
(a)
In 2010, NEER filed an application with the NRC to renew Seabrook's operating license for an additional 20 years, which license renewal is dependent on NRC regulatory approvals.
(b)
NEER sells all of its share of the output of Duane Arnold under a long-term contract expiring in February 2025.
(c)
NEER sells all of the output of Point Beach Units Nos. 1 and 2 under long-term contracts through their current operating license expiration dates.

NEER's nuclear facilities have several contracts for the supply of uranium and the conversion, enrichment and fabrication of nuclear fuel with expiration dates ranging from late February 2015 through 2024. See Note 13 - Contracts. NEER is responsible for all nuclear unit operations and the ultimate decommissioning of the nuclear units, the cost of which is shared on a pro-rata basis by

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the joint owners for the jointly-owned units. NRC regulations require plant owners to submit a plan for decontamination and decommissioning five years before the projected end of plant operation.

Nuclear Unit Scheduled Refueling Outages. NEER's nuclear units are periodically removed from service to accommodate normal refueling and maintenance outages, including inspections, repairs and certain other modifications. Scheduled nuclear refueling outages typically require the unit to be removed from service for variable lengths of time. The following table summarizes each unit's next scheduled refueling outage:

Facility
 
Next Scheduled
Refueling Outage
Seabrook
 
October 2015
Duane Arnold
 
October 2016
Point Beach Unit No. 1
 
March 2016
Point Beach Unit No. 2
 
October 2015

Spent Nuclear Fuel. NEER's nuclear facilities use both on-site storage pools and dry storage casks to store spent nuclear fuel generated by these facilities, which are expected to provide sufficient storage of spent nuclear fuel at these facilities through license expiration.

As owners and operators of nuclear facilities, certain subsidiaries of NEER are subject to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act and are parties to the spent fuel settlement agreement described in FPL - FPL Sources of Generation - Nuclear Operations.

Nuclear Regulatory Developments. For discussion of developments regarding the impact of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami in Japan as it relates to U.S. nuclear facilities, see FPL - FPL Sources of Generation - Nuclear Operations - Nuclear Regulatory Developments. NEER's nuclear facilities are subject to the same NRC requirements as described for FPL. Duane Arnold is NEER's only boiling water reactor unit. NEER is currently working with the NRC on the approval and implementation of actions required to meet new NRC requirements, the costs of which are included in estimated capital expenditures. See Note 13 - Commitments.

Solar Facilities

At December 31, 2014, NEER had ownership interests in solar facilities with a total net generating capacity of approximately 742 MW which are located in 4 states in the U.S. and 1 province in Canada. During 2014, NEER completed the construction of a 20 MW solar PV project in Nevada, a 250 MW solar thermal project in California and a 550 MW solar PV project in California, in which NEER has a 50% equity investment. NEER is currently planning to add new contracted solar generation in 2015 and 2016 totaling approximately 960 MW. In addition, NEER and its affiliates own solar thermal facilities with generating capacity of 99.8 MW in Spain (Spain solar projects). See Note 13 - Spain Solar Projects for developments that impact the Spain solar projects.

Other Assets

At December 31, 2014, NEER had 796 MW of oil-fired generating facilities located in Maine.

Policy Incentives for Renewable Energy Projects

U.S. federal, state and local governments have established various incentives to support the development of renewable energy projects. These incentives include accelerated tax depreciation, PTCs, ITCs, cash grants, tax abatements and RPS programs. Wind and solar projects qualify for the U.S. federal Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System depreciation schedule. This schedule allows a taxpayer to recognize the depreciation of tangible property on a five-year basis even though the useful life of such property is generally greater than five years. The PTC currently provides an income tax credit for the production of electricity from utility-scale wind turbines for the first ten years of commercial operation. This incentive was created under the Energy Policy Act of 1992 and, under the Tax Increase Prevention Act of 2014, was extended for wind projects whose construction began before January 1, 2015. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) previously issued guidance related to which projects will qualify for the PTC including, among other things, criteria for the beginning of construction of a project and the continuous program of construction or the continuous efforts to advance the project to completion. Pursuant to the IRS guidance, NEER expects its projects currently in development or under construction in the U.S. will qualify for the PTC. Alternatively, wind project developers can choose to receive a 30% ITC, in lieu of the PTC, with the same requirement that construction of the wind project began before January 1, 2015. The IRS has not updated its guidance for the change in law extending the requirement for a wind project to be under construction from 2013 to 2014.

Solar project developers are also eligible to receive a 30% ITC for new solar projects that achieve commercial operation before 2017. Solar project developers can elect to receive an equivalent cash payment from the U.S. Department of Treasury for the value of the 30% ITC (convertible ITC) for qualifying solar projects where construction began before the end of 2011 and the projects are placed in service before 2017. Solar projects that achieve commercial operations after December 31, 2016 may qualify for an ITC of 10% of eligible installed costs.

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Other countries, including Canada and Spain, provide for incentives like feed-in-tariffs for renewable energy projects. The feed-in-tariffs promote renewable energy investments by offering long-term contracts to renewable energy producers, typically based on the cost of generation of each technology. See Note 13 - Spain Solar Projects for developments in Spain.

NEER CUSTOMER SUPPLY AND PROPRIETARY POWER AND GAS TRADING

NEER's customer supply and proprietary power and gas trading businesses engage in energy-related commodity marketing and trading activities, provide commodities-related products to customers and include the operations of a retail electricity provider. PMI, a subsidiary of NEER, buys and sells wholesale energy commodities, such as electricity, natural gas and oil. PMI sells the output from NEER's plants that is not sold under long-term contracts and procures the fossil fuel for use by NEER's generation fleet. One of its primary roles is to manage the commodity risk of NEER's portfolio. PMI uses derivative instruments such as swaps, options, futures and forwards to manage the risk associated with fluctuating commodity prices and to optimize the value of NEER's power generation and gas infrastructure assets. PMI also markets and trades energy-related commodity products and provides a wide range of electricity and gas commodity products as well as marketing and trading services to customers. PMI's customer supply business provides full energy and capacity requirements to customers.

The results of the customer supply and proprietary power and gas trading activities are included in NEER's operating results. See Management's Discussion - Energy Marketing and Trading and Market Risk Sensitivity, Note 1 - Energy Trading and Note 3.

NEER REGULATION

The energy markets in which NEER operates are subject to domestic and foreign regulation, as the case may be, including local, state and federal regulation, and other specific rules.

At December 31, 2014, NEER had ownership interests in operating independent power projects located in the U.S. that have received exempt wholesale generator status as defined under the Public Utility Holding Company Act of 2005, which represent approximately 97% of NEER's net generating capacity in the U.S. Exempt wholesale generators own or operate a facility exclusively to sell electricity to wholesale customers. They are barred from selling electricity directly to retail customers. NEER's exempt wholesale generators produce electricity from wind, fossil fuels, solar and nuclear facilities. Essentially all of the remaining 3% of NEER's net generating capacity has qualifying facility status under the PURPA. NEER's qualifying facilities generate electricity primarily from wind, solar and fossil fuels. Qualifying facility status exempts the projects from, among other things, many of the provisions of the Federal Power Act, as well as state laws and regulations relating to rates and financial or organizational regulation of electric utilities. While projects with qualifying facility and/or exempt wholesale generator status are exempt from various restrictions, each project must still comply with other federal, state and local laws, including, but not limited to, those regarding siting, construction, operation, licensing, pollution abatement and other environmental laws.

Additionally, most of the NEER facilities located in the U.S. are subject to FERC regulations and market rules, the NERC's mandatory reliability standards and the EPA's environmental laws, and its nuclear facilities are also subject to the jurisdiction of the NRC. See FPL - FPL Regulation for additional discussion of FERC, NERC, NRC and EPA regulations. With the exception of facilities located in ERCOT, the FERC has jurisdiction over various aspects of NEER's business in the U.S., including the oversight and investigation of competitive wholesale energy markets, regulation of the transmission and sale of natural gas, and oversight of environmental matters related to natural gas projects and major electricity policy initiatives. The PUCT has jurisdiction, including the regulation of rates and services, oversight of competitive markets, and enforcement of statutes and rules, over NEER facilities located in ERCOT.

NEER and its affiliates are also subject to federal and provincial or regional regulations in Canada and Spain related to energy operations, energy markets and environmental standards. In Canada, activities related to owning and operating wind and solar projects and participating in wholesale and retail energy markets are regulated at the provincial level. In Ontario, for example, electricity generation facilities must be licensed by the Ontario Energy Board and may also be required to complete registrations and maintain market participant status with the Independent Electricity System Operator, in which case they must agree to be bound by and comply with the provisions of the market rules for the Ontario electricity market as well as the mandatory reliability standards of the NERC.

NEER is subject to environmental laws and regulations, and is affected by some of the emerging issues related to renewable energy resources as described in the NEE Environmental Matters section below. In order to better anticipate potential regulatory changes, NEER continues to actively evaluate and participate in regional market redesigns of existing operating rules for the integration of renewable energy resources and for the purchase and sale of energy commodities.

NEER EMPLOYEES

NEER and its subsidiaries had approximately 4,700 employees at December 31, 2014. Certain subsidiaries of NEER have collective bargaining agreements with the IBEW, the Utility Workers Union of America, the Security Police and Fire Professionals of America and the International Union of Operating Engineers, which collectively represent approximately 20% of NEER's employees. The collective bargaining agreements have one- to three-year terms and expire between late February 2015 and 2016.


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III. OTHER NEE OPERATING SUBSIDIARIES

Corporate and Other represents other business activities, primarily NEET and FPL FiberNet, that are not separately reportable. See Note 14. In addition, certain subsidiaries of NEECH are pursuing approvals to invest in, build, own and operate an approximately 600-mile natural gas pipeline system to provide new natural gas transportation infrastructure in Florida and an approximately 300-mile natural gas pipeline to connect the natural gas supply in the Marcellus and Utica shale regions with markets in the Southeast region of the U.S.

NEET

NEET, a wholly-owned subsidiary of NEECH, is a limited liability company organized under the laws of Delaware. NEET conducts its business primarily through two subsidiaries, Lone Star and NHT, and is pursuing opportunities to develop, build and operate new transmission facilities throughout North America. In 2013, an entity in which an affiliate of NEET has a joint venture investment was selected to complete development work for a 250-mile transmission line in Northwestern Ontario, Canada. Once development is complete, subject to Ontario Energy Board approval, the NEET affiliate, through its joint venture, is expected to construct, own and operate the new transmission line that is projected to begin service in 2020.

Lone Star

Lone Star, a rate-regulated transmission service provider in Texas, is a limited liability company organized under the laws of Delaware. Lone Star owns and operates approximately 330 miles of 345 kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and other associated facilities that were placed in service in 2012 and 2013. Lone Star is subject to regulation by a number of federal, state and other agencies, including, but not limited to, the PUCT, the ERCOT, the NERC and the EPA, as well as certain limited regulations of the FERC. See FPL - FPL Regulation for further discussion of FERC, NERC and EPA regulations and NEE Environmental Matters. The PUCT has jurisdiction over a wide range of Lone Star's business activities, including, among others, rates charged to customers and certain aspects of the operation of transmission systems. The PUCT sets rates at a level that allows Lone Star the opportunity to collect from customers total revenues (revenue requirements) equal to Lone Star's cost of providing service, including a reasonable rate of return on invested capital.

In September 2014, the PUCT approved a stipulation and settlement between Lone Star and all intervenors relating to Lone Star’s base rate petition. The stipulation and settlement provides for an annual revenue requirement of approximately $102 million based on a $694 million rate base, a regulatory equity ratio of 45%, an allowed regulatory ROE of 9.6% and certain operating expenses.

NHT

NHT, a rate-regulated transmission owner in ISO-NE, is a limited liability company organized under the laws of Delaware. NHT owns transmission facilities which connect NEER's Seabrook nuclear facility to the New England transmission grid and interconnect three 345 kV transmission lines in New England. NHT is subject to regulation by a number of federal, state and other agencies, including, but not limited to, the New Hampshire Public Utility Commission, ISO-NE, the FERC, the NERC and the EPA. See FPL - FPL Regulation for further discussion of FERC, NERC and EPA regulations and NEE Environmental Matters. NHT wholesale transmission revenues are provided through an ISO-NE tariff.

FPL FIBERNET

FPL FiberNet conducts its business through two separate wholly-owned subsidiaries of NEECH. One subsidiary was formed in 2000 to enhance the value of NEE's fiber-optic network assets that were originally built to support FPL operations and the other was formed in 2011 to hold fiber-optic network assets which were acquired. Both subsidiaries are limited liability companies organized under the laws of Delaware. FPL FiberNet leases fiber-optic network capacity and dark fiber to FPL and other customers, primarily telephone, wireless, internet and other telecommunications companies. FPL FiberNet's networks cover most of the metropolitan areas in Florida and several in Texas. FPL FiberNet also has a long-haul network providing bandwidth at wholesale rates. The long-haul network connects major cities in Florida and Texas with additional connectivity to Atlanta, Georgia, New York and the South Central U.S., including Arkansas, Louisiana and Oklahoma. At December 31, 2014, FPL FiberNet's network consisted of approximately 9,050 route miles. FPL FiberNet is subject to regulation by the Federal Communications Commission which has jurisdiction over wire and wireless communication networks and by the public utility commissions in the states in which it provides intrastate telecommunication services.

NATURAL GAS PIPELINE SYSTEMS

Florida Natural Gas Pipeline System

In 2013, FPL announced the winning proposals from its 2012 RFP for an approximately 600-mile natural gas pipeline system for new natural gas transportation infrastructure in Florida. The proposed pipeline system will be composed of two pipelines, each of which is expected to be operational beginning in mid-2017. Sabal Trail, which is 33% owned by a wholly-owned NEECH subsidiary

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and will be a FERC-regulated entity, was selected to build, own and operate the northern pipeline that would originate in southwestern Alabama and end at a new hub to be built in Central Florida (Central Florida Hub). Florida Southeast Connection, which is a wholly-owned NEECH subsidiary and will be a FERC-regulated entity, was selected to build, own and operate the southern pipeline that would originate at the Central Florida Hub and end in Martin County, Florida at FPL's Martin power plant.

Total estimated capital expenditures for the 33% portion of the northern pipeline plus the entire southern pipeline are estimated to be approximately $1.5 billion. At December 31, 2014, NEE's investment in the proposed pipeline system totaled approximately $103 million. The obligations of Sabal Trail and Florida Southeast Connection to build and operate the northern pipeline and southern pipeline, respectively, are subject to certain conditions, including FERC approval. A FERC decision is expected by the end of 2015.

See FPL - FPL Sources of Generation - Fossil Operations and Note 13 - Commitments and - Contracts.

Mountain Valley Pipeline

In October 2014, a wholly-owned NEECH subsidiary committed to make an equity investment in a joint venture which plans to construct an approximately 300-mile natural gas pipeline to connect the natural gas supply in the Marcellus and Utica shale regions with markets in the Southeast region of the U.S. Based on the NEECH subsidiary's expected ownership share, expected equity contributions by the NEECH subsidiary are approximately $1.0 billion to $1.3 billion depending on the ultimate size and scope of the natural gas pipeline project. The pipeline is expected to be placed in service by the end of 2018. Construction of the natural gas pipeline is subject to certain conditions, including FERC approval.

NEE ENVIRONMENTAL MATTERS

NEE and FPL are subject to domestic and foreign environmental laws and regulations, including extensive federal, state and local environmental statutes, rules and regulations. The following is a discussion of certain existing and emerging federal and state initiatives and rules, some of which could potentially have a material effect (either positive or negative) on NEE and its subsidiaries. FPL expects to seek recovery through the environmental clause for compliance costs associated with any new environmental laws and regulations.

Clean Water Act Section 316(b). In May 2014, the EPA issued its final rule under Section 316(b) of the Clean Water Act outlining the process and framework for determining the Best Technology Available to reduce the impact on aquatic organisms from once-through cooling water intake systems. Under the rule, potentially eleven of FPL's facilities and five of NEER's facilities may be required to add additional controls and/or make operational changes to comply. NEE and FPL are analyzing the final rule, and the ultimate impacts will evolve over years of site specific studies, permit evaluations and negotiations. Therefore, the impact of any final compliance obligations is uncertain at this time. During the third quarter of 2014, several groups filed petitions for review of the EPA's final rule and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit will hear the case.

Avian/Bat Regulations and Wind Turbine Siting Guidelines. FPL, NEER and NEET are subject to numerous environmental regulations and guidelines related to threatened and endangered species and their habitats, as well as avian and bat species, for the siting, construction and ongoing operations of their facilities. The facilities most significantly affected are wind and solar facilities and transmission and distribution lines. The environmental laws in the U.S., including, among others, the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and the Bald and Golden Eagle Protection Act and similar environmental laws in Canada provide for the protection of migratory birds, eagles and bats and endangered species of birds and bats and their habitats. Regulations have been adopted under some of these laws that contain provisions that allow the owner/operator of a facility to apply for a permit to undertake specific activities including those associated with certain siting decisions, construction activities and operations. In addition to regulations, voluntary wind turbine siting guidelines established by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service set forth siting, monitoring and coordination protocols that are designed to support wind development in the U.S. while also protecting both birds and bats and their habitats. These guidelines include provisions for specific monitoring and study conditions which need to be met in order for projects to be in adherence with these voluntary guidelines. Complying with these environmental regulations and adhering to the provisions set forth in the voluntary wind turbine siting guidelines could result in additional costs or reduced revenues at existing and new wind and solar facilities and transmission and distribution facilities at FPL, NEER and NEET and, in the case of environmental regulations, failure to comply could result in fines and penalties.

Regulation of GHG Emissions. The U.S. Congress and certain states and regions continue to consider several legislative and regulatory proposals with respect to GHG emissions. The Government of Canada and its provinces are also taking certain actions, such as setting targets or goals, regarding the increase of renewable energy generation and the reduction of GHG emissions. The economic and operational impact of climate change legislation on NEE and FPL depends on a variety of factors, including, but not limited to, whether states choose a rate-based or mass-based (based on pounds of CO2) approach for the distribution of allowances, the allowed emissions cap, whether emission allowances will be allocated or auctioned, the cost to reduce emissions or buy allowances in the marketplace and the availability of offsets and mitigating factors to moderate the costs of compliance. Based on the most recent reference data available from government sources, NEE is among the lowest emitters, among electric generators, of GHG in the U.S. measured by its rate of emissions expressed as pounds of CO2 per MWh of generation. However, the legislative and regulatory proposals have differing methods of implementation and the impact on FPL's and NEER's generating units and/or the financial impact (either positive or negative) to NEE and FPL could be material,

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depending on the eventual structure of any specific implementation rules adopted.

In 2013, the EPA re-proposed standards for new fossil fuel-fired power units pursuant to a Presidential Memorandum related to the regulation of GHG emissions. The Presidential Memorandum also directed the EPA to issue a final rule for new fossil fuel-fired power units after considering all public comments and to propose a rule for existing fossil fuel-fired power units by June 2014 with a final rule by June 2015. In June 2014, as directed in the Presidential Memorandum, the EPA issued a proposed rule under Section 111(d) of the Clean Air Act to reduce carbon emissions from existing fossil fuel-fired power units. The proposed rule, named the Clean Power Plan, sets emission rate targets for each state and requires each state to develop a compliance plan by the summer of 2016 to meet these emissions targets. The proposed rule indicates that official compliance will start in 2020 with both interim and final target dates, each with specific emissions reductions. NEE and FPL are analyzing the proposed rule and the impact of any final compliance obligations is uncertain at this time. A final rule is expected in the summer of 2015.

NEER's plants operate in certain states and regions in the U.S. and provinces in Canada that continue to consider and implement regulatory proposals to reduce GHG emissions. RPS, currently in place in approximately 30 states and the District of Columbia, require electricity providers in the state or district to meet a certain percentage of their retail sales with energy from renewable sources. These standards vary, but the majority include requirements to meet 20% to 25% of the electricity providers' retail sales with energy from renewable sources by 2025. Approximately 7 other states in the U.S. have set renewable energy goals as well. Many Canadian provinces have enacted renewable energy goals and targets to reduce GHG emissions from historic levels which include various milestones and compliance mechanisms. NEER's plants operate in 24 states in the U.S. and 4 provinces in Canada that have a RPS or renewable energy goals and NEER believes that these standards and goals will create incremental demand for renewable energy in the future.

Other GHG reduction initiatives including, among others, the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative and the California Greenhouse Gas Regulation aim to reduce emissions through a variety of programs and under varying timelines. Based on its clean generating portfolio, NEER expects to continue experiencing a positive impact on earnings as a result of these GHG reduction initiatives. Additionally, these initiatives provide NEER opportunities with regards to wind and solar development as well as favorable energy pricing.

Waters of the U.S. In March 2014, the EPA issued a proposed rule redefining "waters of the U.S." under the Clean Water Act to expand the definition of waters of the U.S. to encompass previously unregulated waters, such as intermittent streams, non-navigable tributaries, isolated wetlands and adjacent other waters. Under the proposed rule, subsidiaries of NEE could incur increased costs for siting and permitting new projects or when maintaining or making modifications to existing facilities and transmission and distribution lines. The ultimate economic and operational impact of the provisions of the proposed rule cannot be determined at this time. A final rule is not expected before the second quarter of 2015.

WEBSITE ACCESS TO SEC FILINGS

NEE and FPL make their SEC filings, including the annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports, available free of charge on NEE's internet website, www.nexteraenergy.com, as soon as reasonably practicable after those documents are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC. The information and materials available on NEE's website (or any of its subsidiaries' websites) are not incorporated by reference into this combined Form 10-K. The SEC maintains an internet website that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other information regarding registrants that file electronically with the SEC at www.sec.gov.

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EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF NEE(a) 

Name
 
Age
 
Position
 
Effective Date
Miguel Arechabala
 
54
 
Executive Vice President, Power Generation Division of NEE
Executive Vice President, Power Generation Division of FPL
 
January 1, 2014
Deborah H. Caplan
 
52
 
Executive Vice President, Human Resources and Corporate Services of NEE
Executive Vice President, Human Resources and Corporate Services of FPL
 
April 15, 2013
Paul I. Cutler
 
55
 
Treasurer of NEE
Treasurer of FPL
Assistant Secretary of NEE
 
February 19, 2003
February 18, 2003
December 10, 1997
Moray P. Dewhurst
 
59
 
Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer, and Executive Vice President - Finance of NEE
Executive Vice President, Finance and Chief Financial Officer of FPL
 
October 5, 2011
Chris N. Froggatt
 
57
 
Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer of NEE
 
February 27, 2010
Joseph T. Kelliher
 
54
 
Executive Vice President, Federal Regulatory Affairs of NEE
 
May 18, 2009
Manoochehr K. Nazar
 
60
 
President Nuclear Division and Chief Nuclear Officer of NEE
President Nuclear Division and Chief Nuclear Officer of FPL
 
May 23, 2014
May 30, 2014
Armando Pimentel, Jr.
 
52
 
President and Chief Executive Officer of NEER
 
October 5, 2011
James L. Robo
 
52
 
Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer of NEE
Chairman of FPL
 
December 13, 2013
May 2, 2012
Charles E. Sieving
 
42
 
Executive Vice President & General Counsel of NEE
Executive Vice President of FPL
 
December 1, 2008
January 1, 2009
Eric E. Silagy
 
49
 
President and Chief Executive Officer of FPL
 
May 30, 2014
William L. Yeager
 
56
 
Executive Vice President, Engineering, Construction & Integrated Supply Chain of NEE
Executive Vice President, Engineering, Construction & Integrated Supply Chain of FPL
 
January 1, 2013
______________________
(a)
Information is as of February 20, 2015. Executive officers are elected annually by, and serve at the pleasure of, their respective boards of directors. Except as noted below, each officer has held his/her present position for five years or more and his/her employment history is continuous. Mr. Arechabala was president of NextEra Energy España, S.L., an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of NEE, from February 2010 to December 2013. Ms. Caplan was vice president and chief operating officer of FPL from May 2011 to April 2013 and vice president, integrated supply chain of NEE and FPL from July 2005 to May 2011. Mr. Dewhurst has been vice chairman of NEE since August 2009 and was chief of staff of NEE from August 2009 to October 2011. Mr. Dewhurst has announced his intention to retire from NEE and FPL in the spring of 2016. Mr. Froggatt has been vice president of NEE since October 2009. Mr. Nazar has been chief nuclear officer of NEE and FPL since January 2010 and was executive vice president, nuclear division of NEE and FPL from January 2010 to May 2014. Mr. Pimentel was chief financial officer of NEE and FPL from May 2008 to October 2011 and executive vice president, finance of NEE and FPL from February 2008 to October 2011. Mr. Robo has been president and chief executive officer of NEE since July 2012. Mr. Robo was the chief executive officer of FPL from May 2012 to May 2014 and president and chief operating officer of NEE from December 2006 to June 2012. Mr. Sieving was also assistant secretary of NEE from May 2010 to May 2011 and general counsel of FPL from January 2009 to May 2010. Mr. Silagy has been president of FPL since December 2011. Mr. Silagy was senior vice president, regulatory and state governmental affairs of FPL from May 2010 to December 2011 and vice president and chief development officer of FPL from July 2008 to May 2010. Mr. Yeager was vice president, engineering, construction and integrated supply chain services of NEE and FPL from October 2012 to December 2012 and vice president, integrated supply chain of NEE and FPL from May 2011 to October 2012. From January 2005 to May 2011, Mr. Yeager was vice president, engineering and construction of FPL.


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Item 1A. Risk Factors

Risks Relating to NEE's and FPL's Business

The business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects of NEE and FPL are subject to a variety of risks, many of which are beyond the control of NEE and FPL. The following is a description of important risks that may materially adversely affect the business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects of NEE and FPL and may cause actual results of NEE and FPL to differ substantially from those that NEE or FPL currently expects or seeks. In that event, the market price for the securities of NEE or FPL could decline. Accordingly, the risks described below should be carefully considered together with the other information set forth in this report and in future reports that NEE and FPL file with the SEC. The risks described below are not the only risks facing NEE and FPL. Additional risks and uncertainties may also materially adversely affect NEE's or FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Each of NEE and FPL has disclosed the material risks known to it to affect its business at this time. However, there may be further risks and uncertainties that are not presently known or that are not currently believed to be material that may in the future materially adversely affect the business, financial condition, results of operations or prospects of NEE and FPL.

Regulatory, Legislative and Legal Risks

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be materially adversely affected by the extensive regulation of their business.

The operations of NEE and FPL are subject to complex and comprehensive federal, state and other regulation. This extensive regulatory framework, portions of which are more specifically identified in the following risk factors, regulates, among other things and to varying degrees, NEE's and FPL's industries, businesses, rates and cost structures, operation of nuclear power facilities, construction and operation of electricity generation, transmission and distribution facilities and natural gas and oil production, natural gas, oil and other fuel transportation, processing and storage facilities, acquisition, disposal, depreciation and amortization of facilities and other assets, decommissioning costs and funding, service reliability, wholesale and retail competition, and commodities trading and derivatives transactions. In their business planning and in the management of their operations, NEE and FPL must address the effects of regulation on their business and any inability or failure to do so adequately could have a material adverse effect on their business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected if they are unable to recover in a timely manner any significant amount of costs, a return on certain assets or a reasonable return on invested capital through base rates, cost recovery clauses, other regulatory mechanisms or otherwise.

FPL is a regulated entity subject to the jurisdiction of the FPSC over a wide range of business activities, including, among other items, the retail rates charged to its customers through base rates and cost recovery clauses, the terms and conditions of its services, procurement of electricity for its customers, issuances of securities, and aspects of the siting, construction and operation of its generating plants and transmission and distribution systems for the sale of electric energy. The FPSC has the authority to disallow recovery by FPL of costs that it considers excessive or imprudently incurred and to determine the level of return that FPL is permitted to earn on invested capital. The regulatory process, which may be adversely affected by the political, regulatory and economic environment in Florida and elsewhere, limits FPL's ability to increase earnings and does not provide any assurance as to achievement of authorized or other earnings levels. NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected if any material amount of costs, a return on certain assets or a reasonable return on invested capital cannot be recovered through base rates, cost recovery clauses, other regulatory mechanisms or otherwise. Certain subsidiaries of NEET, which are indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries of NEE, are regulated electric transmission utilities subject to the jurisdiction of their regulators and subject to similar risks.

Regulatory decisions that are important to NEE and FPL may be materially adversely affected by political, regulatory and economic factors.

The local and national political, regulatory and economic environment has had, and may in the future have, an adverse effect on FPSC decisions with negative consequences for FPL. These decisions may require, for example, FPL to cancel or delay planned development activities, to reduce or delay other planned capital expenditures or to pay for investments or otherwise incur costs that it may not be able to recover through rates, each of which could have a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects of NEE and FPL. Certain subsidiaries of NEET are subject to similar risks.

FPL's use of derivative instruments could be subject to prudence challenges and, if found imprudent, could result in disallowances of cost recovery for such use by the FPSC.

The FPSC engages in an annual prudence review of FPL's use of derivative instruments in its risk management fuel procurement program and should it find any such use to be imprudent, the FPSC could deny cost recovery for such use by FPL. Such an outcome could have a material adverse effect on FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.


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Any reductions to, or the elimination of, governmental incentives that support utility scale renewable energy, including, but not limited to, tax incentives, RPS or feed-in tariffs, or the imposition of additional taxes or other assessments on renewable energy, could result in, among other items, the lack of a satisfactory market for the development of new renewable energy projects, NEER abandoning the development of renewable energy projects, a loss of NEER's investments in renewable energy projects and reduced project returns, any of which could have a material adverse effect on NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEER depends heavily on government policies that support utility scale renewable energy and enhance the economic feasibility of developing and operating wind and solar energy projects in regions in which NEER operates or plans to develop and operate renewable energy facilities. The federal government, a majority of the 50 U.S. states and portions of Canada and Spain provide incentives, such as tax incentives, RPS or feed-in tariffs, that support the sale of energy from utility scale renewable energy facilities, such as wind and solar energy facilities. As a result of budgetary constraints, political factors or otherwise, governments from time to time may review their policies that support renewable energy and consider actions that would make the policies less conducive to the development and operation of renewable energy facilities. Any reductions to, or the elimination of, governmental incentives that support renewable energy, such as those reductions that have been enacted in Spain and are applicable to NEER's solar generating facilities in that country, or the imposition of additional taxes or other assessments on renewable energy, could result in, among other items, the lack of a satisfactory market for the development of new renewable energy projects, NEER abandoning the development of renewable energy projects, a loss of NEER's investments in the projects and reduced project returns, any of which could have a material adverse effect on NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected as a result of new or revised laws, regulations or interpretations or other regulatory initiatives.

NEE's and FPL's business is influenced by various legislative and regulatory initiatives, including, but not limited to, new or revised laws, regulations or interpretations or other regulatory initiatives regarding deregulation or restructuring of the energy industry, regulation of the commodities trading and derivatives markets, and environmental regulation, such as regulation of air emissions, regulation of water consumption and water discharges, and regulation of gas and oil infrastructure operations, as well as associated environmental permitting. Changes in the nature of the regulation of NEE's and FPL's business could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. NEE and FPL are unable to predict future legislative or regulatory changes, initiatives or interpretations, although any such changes, initiatives or interpretations may increase costs and competitive pressures on NEE and FPL, which could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

FPL has limited competition in the Florida market for retail electricity customers. Any changes in Florida law or regulation which introduce competition in the Florida retail electricity market, such as government incentives that facilitate the installation of solar generating facilities on residential or other rooftops at below cost, or would permit third-party sales of electricity, could have a material adverse effect on FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. There can be no assurance that FPL will be able to respond adequately to such regulatory changes, which could have a material adverse effect on FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEER is subject to FERC rules related to transmission that are designed to facilitate competition in the wholesale market on practically a nationwide basis by providing greater certainty, flexibility and more choices to wholesale power customers. NEE cannot predict the impact of changing FERC rules or the effect of changes in levels of wholesale supply and demand, which are typically driven by factors beyond NEE's control. There can be no assurance that NEER will be able to respond adequately or sufficiently quickly to such rules and developments, or to any other changes that reverse or restrict the competitive restructuring of the energy industry in those jurisdictions in which such restructuring has occurred. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected if the rules implementing the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (Dodd-Frank Act) broaden the scope of its provisions regarding the regulation of OTC financial derivatives and make certain provisions applicable to NEE and FPL.

The Dodd-Frank Act, enacted into law in July 2010 provides for, among other things, substantially increased regulation of the OTC derivatives market and futures contract markets. While the legislation is broad and detailed, there are still portions of the legislation that either require implementing rules to be adopted by federal governmental agencies or otherwise require further interpretive guidance.

NEE and FPL continue to monitor the development of rules related to the Dodd-Frank Act and have taken steps to comply with those rules that affect their businesses. While a number of rules have been finalized and are effective, the rules related to margin requirements for OTC derivatives have yet to be finalized. If those rules, when finalized, require NEE and FPL to post significant amounts of cash collateral with respect to swap transactions, NEE's and FPL's liquidity could be materially adversely affected.


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NEE and FPL cannot predict the impact these proposed rules will have on their ability to hedge their commodity and interest rate risks or on OTC derivatives markets as a whole, but they could potentially have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's risk exposure, as well as reduce market liquidity and further increase the cost of hedging activities.

NEE and FPL are subject to numerous environmental laws, regulations and other standards that may result in capital expenditures, increased operating costs and various liabilities, and may require NEE and FPL to limit or eliminate certain operations.

NEE and FPL are subject to domestic and foreign environmental laws and regulations, including, but not limited to, extensive federal, state and local environmental statutes, rules and regulations relating to air quality, water quality and usage, climate change, emissions of greenhouse gases, including, but not limited to, CO2, waste management, hazardous wastes, marine, avian and other wildlife mortality and habitat protection, historical artifact preservation, natural resources, health (including, but not limited to, electric and magnetic fields from power lines and substations), safety and RPS, that could, among other things, prevent or delay the development of power generation, power or natural gas transmission, or other infrastructure projects, restrict the output of some existing facilities, limit the availability and use of some fuels required for the production of electricity, require additional pollution control equipment, and otherwise increase costs, increase capital expenditures and limit or eliminate certain operations.

There are significant capital, operating and other costs associated with compliance with these environmental statutes, rules and regulations, and those costs could be even more significant in the future as a result of new legislation, the current trend toward more stringent standards, and stricter and more expansive application of existing environmental regulations. For example, among other potential or pending changes, the use of hydraulic fracturing or similar technologies to drill for natural gas and related compounds used by NEE's gas infrastructure business is currently being discussed for regulation at state and federal levels.

Violations of current or future laws, rules, regulations or other standards could expose NEE and FPL to regulatory and legal proceedings, disputes with, and legal challenges by, third parties, and potentially significant civil fines, criminal penalties and other sanctions. Proceedings could include, for example, litigation regarding property damage, personal injury, common law nuisance and enforcement by citizens or governmental authorities of environmental requirements such as air, water and soil quality standards.

NEE's and FPL's business could be negatively affected by federal or state laws or regulations mandating new or additional limits on the production of greenhouse gas emissions.

Federal or state laws or regulations may be adopted that would impose new or additional limits on the emissions of greenhouse gases, including, but not limited to, CO2 and methane, from electric generating units using fossil fuels like coal and natural gas. The potential effects of such greenhouse gas emission limits on NEE's and FPL's electric generating units are subject to significant uncertainties based on, among other things, the timing of the implementation of any new requirements, the required levels of emission reductions, the nature of any market-based or tax-based mechanisms adopted to facilitate reductions, the relative availability of greenhouse gas emission reduction offsets, the development of cost-effective, commercial-scale carbon capture and storage technology and supporting regulations and liability mitigation measures, and the range of available compliance alternatives.

While NEE's and FPL's electric generating units emit greenhouse gases at a lower rate of emissions than most of the U.S. electric generation sector, the results of operations of NEE and FPL could be materially adversely affected to the extent that new federal or state laws or regulations impose any new greenhouse gas emission limits. Any future limits on greenhouse gas emissions could:

create substantial additional costs in the form of taxes or emission allowances;
make some of NEE's and FPL's electric generating units uneconomical to operate in the long term;
require significant capital investment in carbon capture and storage technology, fuel switching, or the replacement of high-emitting generation facilities with lower-emitting generation facilities; or
affect the availability or cost of fossil fuels.

There can be no assurance that NEE or FPL would be able to completely recover any such costs or investments, which could have a material adverse effect on their business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Extensive federal regulation of the operations of NEE and FPL exposes NEE and FPL to significant and increasing compliance costs and may also expose them to substantial monetary penalties and other sanctions for compliance failures.

NEE and FPL are subject to extensive federal regulation, which generally imposes significant and increasing compliance costs on NEE's and FPL's operations. Additionally, any actual or alleged compliance failures could result in significant costs and other potentially adverse effects of regulatory investigations, proceedings, settlements, decisions and claims, including, among other items, potentially significant monetary penalties. As an example, under the Energy Policy Act of 2005, NEE and FPL, as owners and operators of bulk-power transmission systems and/or electric generation facilities, are subject to mandatory reliability standards. Compliance with these mandatory reliability standards may subject NEE and FPL to higher operating costs and may result in increased capital expenditures. If FPL or NEE is found not to be in compliance with these standards, it may incur substantial monetary penalties and other sanctions. Both the costs of regulatory compliance and the costs that may be imposed as a result of any actual or alleged compliance failures could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

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Changes in tax laws, as well as judgments and estimates used in the determination of tax-related asset and liability amounts, could materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's provision for income taxes and reporting of tax-related assets and liabilities require significant judgments and the use of estimates. Amounts of tax-related assets and liabilities involve judgments and estimates of the timing and probability of recognition of income, deductions and tax credits, including, but not limited to, estimates for potential adverse outcomes regarding tax positions that have been taken and the ability to utilize tax benefit carryforwards, such as net operating loss and tax credit carryforwards. Actual income taxes could vary significantly from estimated amounts due to the future impacts of, among other things, changes in tax laws, regulations and interpretations, the financial condition and results of operations of NEE and FPL, and the resolution of audit issues raised by taxing authorities. Ultimate resolution of income tax matters may result in material adjustments to tax-related assets and liabilities, which could materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be materially adversely affected due to adverse results of litigation.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be materially affected by adverse results of litigation. Unfavorable resolution of legal proceedings in which NEE is involved or other future legal proceedings, including, but not limited to, class action lawsuits, may have a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects of NEE and FPL.

Operational Risks

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could suffer if NEE and FPL do not proceed with projects under development or are unable to complete the construction of, or capital improvements to, electric generation, transmission and distribution facilities, gas infrastructure facilities or other facilities on schedule or within budget.

NEE's and FPL's ability to complete construction of, and capital improvement projects for, their electric generation, transmission and distribution facilities, gas infrastructure facilities and other facilities on schedule and within budget may be adversely affected by escalating costs for materials and labor and regulatory compliance, inability to obtain or renew necessary licenses, rights-of-way, permits or other approvals on acceptable terms or on schedule, disputes involving contractors, labor organizations, land owners, governmental entities, environmental groups, Native American and aboriginal groups, and other third parties, negative publicity, transmission interconnection issues and other factors. If any development project or construction or capital improvement project is not completed, is delayed or is subject to cost overruns, certain associated costs may not be approved for recovery or recoverable through regulatory mechanisms that may otherwise be available, and NEE and FPL could become obligated to make delay or termination payments or become obligated for other damages under contracts, could experience the loss of tax credits or tax incentives, or delayed or diminished returns, and could be required to write off all or a portion of their investment in the project. Any of these events could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE and FPL may face risks related to project siting, financing, construction, permitting, governmental approvals and the negotiation of project development agreements that may impede their development and operating activities.

NEE and FPL own, develop, construct, manage and operate electric-generating and transmission facilities. A key component of NEE's and FPL's growth is their ability to construct and operate generation and transmission facilities to meet customer needs. As part of these operations, NEE and FPL must periodically apply for licenses and permits from various local, state, federal and other regulatory authorities and abide by their respective conditions. Should NEE or FPL be unsuccessful in obtaining necessary licenses or permits on acceptable terms, should there be a delay in obtaining or renewing necessary licenses or permits or should regulatory authorities initiate any associated investigations or enforcement actions or impose related penalties or disallowances on NEE or FPL, NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected. Any failure to negotiate successful project development agreements for new facilities with third parties could have similar results.

The operation and maintenance of NEE's and FPL's electric generation, transmission and distribution facilities, gas infrastructure facilities and other facilities are subject to many operational risks, the consequences of which could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's electric generation, transmission and distribution facilities, gas infrastructure facilities and other facilities are subject to many operational risks. Operational risks could result in, among other things, lost revenues due to prolonged outages, increased expenses due to monetary penalties or fines for compliance failures, liability to third parties for property and personal injury damage, a failure to perform under applicable power sales agreements and associated loss of revenues from terminated agreements or liability for liquidated damages under continuing agreements, and replacement equipment costs or an obligation to purchase or generate replacement power at higher prices.

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Uncertainties and risks inherent in operating and maintaining NEE's and FPL's facilities include, but are not limited to:

risks associated with facility start-up operations, such as whether the facility will achieve projected operating performance on schedule and otherwise as planned;
failures in the availability, acquisition or transportation of fuel or other necessary supplies;
the impact of unusual or adverse weather conditions and natural disasters, including, but not limited to, hurricanes, floods, earthquakes and droughts;
performance below expected or contracted levels of output or efficiency;
breakdown or failure, including, but not limited to, explosions, fires or other major events, of equipment, transmission and distribution lines or pipelines;
availability of replacement equipment;
risks of property damage or human injury from energized equipment, hazardous substances or explosions, fires or other events;
availability of adequate water resources and ability to satisfy water intake and discharge requirements;
inability to identify, manage properly or mitigate equipment defects in NEE's and FPL's facilities;
use of new or unproven technology;
risks associated with dependence on a specific type of fuel or fuel source, such as commodity price risk, availability of adequate fuel supply and transportation, and lack of available alternative fuel sources;
increased competition due to, among other factors, new facilities, excess supply and shifting demand; and
insufficient insurance, warranties or performance guarantees to cover any or all lost revenues or increased expenses from the foregoing.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be negatively affected by a lack of growth or slower growth in the number of customers or in customer usage.

Growth in customer accounts and growth of customer usage each directly influence the demand for electricity and the need for additional power generation and power delivery facilities. Customer growth and customer usage are affected by a number of factors outside the control of NEE and FPL, such as mandated energy efficiency measures, demand side management requirements, and economic and demographic conditions, such as population changes, job and income growth, housing starts, new business formation and the overall level of economic activity. A lack of growth, or a decline, in the number of customers or in customer demand for electricity may cause NEE and FPL to fail to fully realize the anticipated benefits from significant investments and expenditures and could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's growth, business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects can be materially adversely affected by weather conditions, including, but not limited to, the impact of severe weather.

Weather conditions directly influence the demand for electricity and natural gas and other fuels and affect the price of energy and energy-related commodities. In addition, severe weather and natural disasters, such as hurricanes, floods and earthquakes, can be destructive and cause power outages and property damage, reduce revenue, affect the availability of fuel and water, and require NEE and FPL to incur additional costs, for example, to restore service and repair damaged facilities, to obtain replacement power and to access available financing sources. Furthermore, NEE's and FPL's physical plant could be placed at greater risk of damage should changes in the global climate produce unusual variations in temperature and weather patterns, resulting in more intense, frequent and extreme weather events, abnormal levels of precipitation and, particularly relevant to FPL, a change in sea level. FPL operates in the east and lower west coasts of Florida, an area that historically has been prone to severe weather events, such as hurricanes. A disruption or failure of electric generation, transmission or distribution systems or natural gas production, transmission, storage or distribution systems in the event of a hurricane, tornado or other severe weather event, or otherwise, could prevent NEE and FPL from operating their business in the normal course and could result in any of the adverse consequences described above. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

At FPL and other businesses of NEE where cost recovery is available, recovery of costs to restore service and repair damaged facilities is or may be subject to regulatory approval, and any determination by the regulator not to permit timely and full recovery of the costs incurred could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Changes in weather can also affect the production of electricity at power generating facilities, including, but not limited to, NEER's wind and solar facilities. For example, the level of wind resource affects the revenue produced by wind generating facilities. Because the levels of wind and solar resources are variable and difficult to predict, NEER's results of operations for individual wind and solar facilities specifically, and NEE's results of operations generally, may vary significantly from period to period, depending on the level of available resources. To the extent that resources are not available at planned levels, the financial results from these facilities may be less than expected.


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Threats of terrorism and catastrophic events that could result from terrorism, cyber attacks, or individuals and/or groups attempting to disrupt NEE's and FPL's business, or the businesses of third parties, may materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE and FPL are subject to the potentially adverse operating and financial effects of terrorist acts and threats, as well as cyber attacks and other disruptive activities of individuals or groups. There have been cyber attacks on energy infrastructure such as substations, gas pipelines and related assets in the past and there may be such attacks in the future. NEE's and FPL's generation, transmission and distribution facilities, fuel storage facilities, information technology systems and other infrastructure facilities and systems could be direct targets of, or be indirectly affected by, such activities.

Terrorist acts, cyber attacks or other similar events affecting NEE's and FPL's systems and facilities, or those of third parties on which NEE and FPL rely, could harm NEE's and FPL's business, for example, by limiting their ability to generate, purchase or transmit power, by limiting their ability to bill customers and collect and process payments, and by delaying their development and construction of new generating facilities or capital improvements to existing facilities. These events, and governmental actions in response, could result in a material decrease in revenues, significant additional costs (for example, to repair assets, implement additional security requirements or maintain or acquire insurance), and reputational damage, could materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's operations (for example, by contributing to disruption of supplies and markets for natural gas, oil and other fuels), and could impair NEE's and FPL's ability to raise capital (for example, by contributing to financial instability and lower economic activity). In addition, the implementation of security guidelines and measures has resulted in and is expected to continue to result in increased costs. Such events or actions may materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

The ability of NEE and FPL to obtain insurance and the terms of any available insurance coverage could be materially adversely affected by international, national, state or local events and company-specific events, as well as the financial condition of insurers. NEE's and FPL's insurance coverage does not provide protection against all significant losses.

Insurance coverage may not continue to be available or may not be available at rates or on terms similar to those presently available to NEE and FPL. The ability of NEE and FPL to obtain insurance and the terms of any available insurance coverage could be materially adversely affected by international, national, state or local events and company-specific events, as well as the financial condition of insurers. If insurance coverage is not available or obtainable on acceptable terms, NEE or FPL may be required to pay costs associated with adverse future events. NEE and FPL generally are not fully insured against all significant losses. For example, FPL is not fully insured against hurricane-related losses, but would instead seek recovery of such uninsured losses from customers subject to approval by the FPSC, to the extent losses exceed restricted funds set aside to cover the cost of storm damage. A loss for which NEE or FPL is not fully insured could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE invests in gas and oil producing assets through NEER’s gas infrastructure business.  The gas infrastructure business is exposed to fluctuating market prices of natural gas, natural gas liquids, oil and other energy commodities.  A prolonged period of low gas and oil prices could impact NEER’s gas infrastructure business and cause NEER to delay or cancel certain gas infrastructure projects and for certain existing projects to be impaired, which could materially adversely affect NEE's results of operations.

Natural gas and oil prices are affected by supply and demand, both globally and regionally. Factors that influence supply and demand include operational issues, natural disasters, weather, political instability, conflicts, economic conditions and actions by major oil-producing countries. There can be significant volatility in market prices for gas and oil, and price fluctuations could have a material effect on the financial performance of gas and oil producing assets. For example, in a low gas and oil price environment, NEER would generate less revenue from its gas infrastructure investments in gas and oil producing properties, and as a result certain investments might become less profitable or incur losses. Prolonged periods of low oil and gas prices could also result in oil and gas production projects being delayed or cancelled and for certain existing projects to be impaired, which could materially adversely affect NEE's results of operations.

If supply costs necessary to provide NEER's full energy and capacity requirement services are not favorable, operating costs could increase and materially adversely affect NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEER provides full energy and capacity requirements services primarily to distribution utilities, which include load-following services and various ancillary services, to satisfy all or a portion of such utilities' power supply obligations to their customers. The supply costs for these transactions may be affected by a number of factors, including, but not limited to, events that may occur after such utilities have committed to supply power, such as weather conditions, fluctuating prices for energy and ancillary services, and the ability of the distribution utilities' customers to elect to receive service from competing suppliers. NEER may not be able to recover all of its increased supply costs, which could have a material adverse effect on NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Due to the potential for significant volatility in market prices for fuel, electricity and renewable and other energy commodities, NEER's inability or failure to manage properly or hedge effectively the commodity risks within its portfolios

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could materially adversely affect NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

There can be significant volatility in market prices for fuel, electricity and renewable and other energy commodities. NEE's inability or failure to manage properly or hedge effectively its assets or positions against changes in commodity prices, volumes, interest rates, counterparty credit risk or other risk measures, based on factors both from within, or wholly or partially outside of, NEE's control, may materially adversely affect NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Sales of power on the spot market or on a short-term contractual basis may cause NEE's results of operations to be volatile.

A portion of NEER's power generation facilities operate wholly or partially without long-term power purchase agreements. Power from these facilities is sold on the spot market or on a short-term contractual basis. Spot market sales are subject to market volatility, and the revenue generated from these sales is subject to fluctuation that may cause NEE's results of operations to be volatile. NEER and NEE may not be able to manage volatility adequately, which could then have a material adverse effect on NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Reductions in the liquidity of energy markets may restrict the ability of NEE to manage its operational risks, which, in turn, could negatively affect NEE's results of operations.

NEE is an active participant in energy markets. The liquidity of regional energy markets is an important factor in NEE's ability to manage risks in these operations. Over the past several years, other market participants have ceased or significantly reduced their activities in energy markets as a result of several factors, including, but not limited to, government investigations, changes in market design and deteriorating credit quality. Liquidity in the energy markets can be adversely affected by price volatility, restrictions on the availability of credit and other factors, and any reduction in the liquidity of energy markets could have a material adverse effect on NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's hedging and trading procedures and associated risk management tools may not protect against significant losses.

NEE and FPL have hedging and trading procedures and associated risk management tools, such as separate but complementary financial, credit, operational, compliance and legal reporting systems, internal controls, management review processes and other mechanisms. NEE and FPL are unable to assure that such procedures and tools will be effective against all potential risks, including, without limitation, employee misconduct. If such procedures and tools are not effective, this could have a material adverse effect on NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

If price movements significantly or persistently deviate from historical behavior, NEE's and FPL's risk management tools associated with their hedging and trading procedures may not protect against significant losses.

NEE's and FPL's risk management tools and metrics associated with their hedging and trading procedures, such as daily value at risk, earnings at risk, stop loss limits and liquidity guidelines, are based on historical price movements. Due to the inherent uncertainty involved in price movements and potential deviation from historical pricing behavior, NEE and FPL are unable to assure that their risk management tools and metrics will be effective to protect against material adverse effects on their business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

If power transmission or natural gas, nuclear fuel or other commodity transportation facilities are unavailable or disrupted, FPL's and NEER's ability to sell and deliver power or natural gas may be limited.

FPL and NEER depend upon power transmission and natural gas, nuclear fuel and other commodity transportation facilities, many of which they do not own. Occurrences affecting the operation of these facilities that may or may not be beyond FPL's and NEER's control (such as severe weather or a generation or transmission facility outage, pipeline rupture, or sudden and significant increase or decrease in wind generation) may limit or halt the ability of FPL and NEER to sell and deliver power and natural gas, or to purchase necessary fuels and other commodities, which could materially adversely impact NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE and FPL are subject to credit and performance risk from customers, hedging counterparties and vendors.

NEE and FPL are exposed to risks associated with the creditworthiness and performance of their customers, hedging counterparties and vendors under contracts for the supply of equipment, materials, fuel and other goods and services required for their business operations and for the construction and operation of, and for capital improvements to, their facilities. Adverse conditions in the energy industry or the general economy, as well as circumstances of individual customers, hedging counterparties and vendors, may affect the ability of some customers, hedging counterparties and vendors to perform as required under their contracts with NEE and FPL.

If any hedging, vending or other counterparty fails to fulfill its contractual obligations, NEE and FPL may need to make arrangements with other counterparties or vendors, which could result in financial losses, higher costs, untimely completion of power generation

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facilities and other projects, and/or a disruption of their operations. If a defaulting counterparty is in poor financial condition, NEE and FPL may not be able to recover damages for any contract breach.

NEE and FPL could recognize financial losses or a reduction in operating cash flows if a counterparty fails to perform or make payments in accordance with the terms of derivative contracts or if NEE or FPL is required to post margin cash collateral under derivative contracts.

NEE and FPL use derivative instruments, such as swaps, options, futures and forwards, some of which are traded in the OTC markets or on exchanges, to manage their commodity and financial market risks, and for NEE to engage in trading and marketing activities. Any failures by their counterparties to perform or make payments in accordance with the terms of those transactions could have a material adverse effect on NEE's or FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Similarly, any requirement for FPL or NEE to post margin cash collateral under its derivative contracts could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE and FPL are highly dependent on sensitive and complex information technology systems, and any failure or breach of those systems could have a material adverse effect on their business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE and FPL operate in a highly regulated industry that requires the continuous functioning of sophisticated information technology systems and network infrastructure. Despite NEE's and FPL's implementation of security measures, all of their technology systems are vulnerable to disability, failures or unauthorized access due to such activities. If NEE's or FPL's information technology systems were to fail or be breached, sensitive confidential and other data could be compromised and NEE and FPL could be unable to fulfill critical business functions.

NEE's and FPL's business is highly dependent on their ability to process and monitor, on a daily basis, a very large number of transactions, many of which are highly complex and cross numerous and diverse markets. Due to the size, scope and geographical reach of NEE's and FPL's business, and due to the complexity of the process of power generation, transmission and distribution, the development and maintenance of information technology systems to keep track of and process information is critical and challenging. NEE's and FPL's operating systems and facilities may fail to operate properly or become disabled as a result of events that are either within, or wholly or partially outside of, their control, such as operator error, severe weather or terrorist activities. Any such failure or disabling event could materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's ability to process transactions and provide services, and their business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE and FPL add, modify and replace information systems on a regular basis. Modifying existing information systems or implementing new or replacement information systems is costly and involves risks, including, but not limited to, integrating the modified, new or replacement system with existing systems and processes, implementing associated changes in accounting procedures and controls, and ensuring that data conversion is accurate and consistent. Any disruptions or deficiencies in existing information systems, or disruptions, delays or deficiencies in the modification or implementation of new information systems, could result in increased costs, the inability to track or collect revenues and the diversion of management's and employees' attention and resources, and could negatively impact the effectiveness of the companies' control environment, and/or the companies' ability to timely file required regulatory reports.

NEE and FPL also face the risks of operational failure or capacity constraints of third parties, including, but not limited to, those who provide power transmission and natural gas transportation services.

NEE's and FPL's retail businesses are subject to the risk that sensitive customer data may be compromised, which could result in a material adverse impact to their reputation and/or the results of operations of the retail business.

NEE's and FPL's retail businesses require access to sensitive customer data in the ordinary course of business. NEE's and FPL's retail businesses may also need to provide sensitive customer data to vendors and service providers who require access to this information in order to provide services, such as call center services, to the retail businesses. If a significant breach occurred, the reputation of NEE and FPL could be materially adversely affected, customer confidence could be diminished, or customer information could be subject to identity theft. NEE and FPL would be subject to costs associated with the breach and/or NEE and FPL could be subject to fines and legal claims, any of which may have a material adverse effect on the business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects of NEE and FPL.

NEE and FPL could recognize financial losses as a result of volatility in the market values of derivative instruments and limited liquidity in OTC markets.

NEE and FPL execute transactions in derivative instruments on either recognized exchanges or via the OTC markets, depending on management's assessment of the most favorable credit and market execution factors. Transactions executed in OTC markets have the potential for greater volatility and less liquidity than transactions on recognized exchanges. As a result, NEE and FPL may not be able to execute desired OTC transactions due to such heightened volatility and limited liquidity.


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In the absence of actively quoted market prices and pricing information from external sources, the valuation of derivative instruments involves management's judgment and use of estimates. As a result, changes in the underlying assumptions or use of alternative valuation methods could affect the reported fair value of these derivative instruments and have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE and FPL may be materially adversely affected by negative publicity.

From time to time, political and public sentiment may result in a significant amount of adverse press coverage and other adverse public statements affecting NEE and FPL. Adverse press coverage and other adverse statements, whether or not driven by political or public sentiment, may also result in investigations by regulators, legislators and law enforcement officials or in legal claims. Responding to these investigations and lawsuits, regardless of the ultimate outcome of the proceeding, can divert the time and effort of senior management from NEE's and FPL's business.

Addressing any adverse publicity, governmental scrutiny or enforcement or other legal proceedings is time consuming and expensive and, regardless of the factual basis for the assertions being made, can have a negative impact on the reputation of NEE and FPL, on the morale and performance of their employees and on their relationships with their respective regulators. It may also have a negative impact on their ability to take timely advantage of various business and market opportunities. The direct and indirect effects of negative publicity, and the demands of responding to and addressing it, may have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be materially adversely affected if FPL is unable to maintain, negotiate or renegotiate franchise agreements on acceptable terms with municipalities and counties in Florida.

FPL must negotiate franchise agreements with municipalities and counties in Florida to provide electric services within such municipalities and counties, and electricity sales generated pursuant to these agreements represent a very substantial portion of FPL's revenues. If FPL is unable to maintain, negotiate or renegotiate such franchise agreements on acceptable terms, it could contribute to lower earnings and FPL may not fully realize the anticipated benefits from significant investments and expenditures, which could materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Increasing costs associated with health care plans may materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's results of operations.

The costs of providing health care benefits to employees and retirees have increased substantially in recent years. NEE and FPL anticipate that their employee benefit costs, including, but not limited to, costs related to health care plans for employees and former employees, will continue to rise. The increasing costs and funding requirements associated with NEE's and FPL's health care plans may materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be negatively affected by the lack of a qualified workforce or the loss or retirement of key employees.

NEE and FPL may not be able to service customers, grow their business or generally meet their other business plan goals effectively and profitably if they do not attract and retain a qualified workforce. Additionally, the loss or retirement of key executives and other employees may materially adversely affect service and productivity and contribute to higher training and safety costs.

Over the next several years, a significant portion of NEE's and FPL's workforce, including, but not limited to, many workers with specialized skills maintaining and servicing the nuclear generation facilities and electrical infrastructure, will be eligible to retire. Such highly skilled individuals may not be able to be replaced quickly due to the technically complex work they perform. If a significant amount of such workers retire and are not replaced, the subsequent loss in productivity and increased recruiting and training costs could result in a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected by work strikes or stoppages and increasing personnel costs.

Employee strikes or work stoppages could disrupt operations and lead to a loss of revenue and customers. Personnel costs may also increase due to inflationary or competitive pressures on payroll and benefits costs and revised terms of collective bargaining agreements with union employees. These consequences could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NEE's ability to successfully identify, complete and integrate acquisitions is subject to significant risks, including, but not limited to, the effect of increased competition for acquisitions resulting from the consolidation of the power industry.

NEE is likely to encounter significant competition for acquisition opportunities that may become available as a result of the consolidation of the power industry in general. In addition, NEE may be unable to identify attractive acquisition opportunities at favorable prices and to complete and integrate them successfully and in a timely manner.


33


Nuclear Generation Risks

The construction, operation and maintenance of NEE's and FPL's nuclear generation facilities involve environmental, health and financial risks that could result in fines or the closure of the facilities and in increased costs and capital expenditures.

NEE's and FPL's nuclear generation facilities are subject to environmental, health and financial risks, including, but not limited to, those relating to site storage of spent nuclear fuel, the disposition of spent nuclear fuel, leakage and emissions of tritium and other radioactive elements in the event of a nuclear accident or otherwise, the threat of a terrorist attack and other potential liabilities arising out of the ownership or operation of the facilities. NEE and FPL maintain decommissioning funds and external insurance coverage which are intended to reduce the financial exposure to some of these risks; however, the cost of decommissioning nuclear generation facilities could exceed the amount available in NEE's and FPL's decommissioning funds, and the exposure to liability and property damages could exceed the amount of insurance coverage. If NEE or FPL is unable to recover the additional costs incurred through insurance or, in the case of FPL, through regulatory mechanisms, their business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be materially adversely affected.

In the event of an incident at any nuclear generation facility in the U.S. or at certain nuclear generation facilities in Europe, NEE and FPL could be assessed significant retrospective assessments and/or retrospective insurance premiums as a result of their participation in a secondary financial protection system and nuclear insurance mutual companies.

Liability for accidents at nuclear power plants is governed by the Price-Anderson Act, which limits the liability of nuclear reactor owners to the amount of insurance available from both private sources and an industry retrospective payment plan. In accordance with this Act, NEE maintains $375 million of private liability insurance per site, which is the maximum obtainable, and participates in a secondary financial protection system, which provides up to $13.2 billion of liability insurance coverage per incident at any nuclear reactor in the U.S. Under the secondary financial protection system, NEE is subject to retrospective assessments and/or retrospective insurance premiums of up to $1 billion ($509 million for FPL), plus any applicable taxes, per incident at any nuclear reactor in the U.S. or at certain nuclear generation facilities in Europe, regardless of fault or proximity to the incident, payable at a rate not to exceed $152 million ($76 million for FPL) per incident per year. Such assessments, if levied, could materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

NRC orders or new regulations related to increased security measures and any future safety requirements promulgated by the NRC could require NEE and FPL to incur substantial operating and capital expenditures at their nuclear generation facilities.

The NRC has broad authority to impose licensing and safety-related requirements for the operation and maintenance of nuclear generation facilities, the addition of capacity at existing nuclear generation facilities and the construction of nuclear generation facilities, and these requirements are subject to change. In the event of non-compliance, the NRC has the authority to impose fines or shut down a nuclear generation facility, or to take both of these actions, depending upon its assessment of the severity of the situation, until compliance is achieved. Any of the foregoing events could require NEE and FPL to incur increased costs and capital expenditures, and could reduce revenues.

Any serious nuclear incident occurring at a NEE or FPL plant could result in substantial remediation costs and other expenses. A major incident at a nuclear facility anywhere in the world could cause the NRC to limit or prohibit the operation or licensing of any domestic nuclear generation facility. An incident at a nuclear facility anywhere in the world also could cause the NRC to impose additional conditions or other requirements on the industry, or on certain types of nuclear generation units, which could increase costs, reduce revenues and result in additional capital expenditures.

The inability to operate any of NEER's or FPL's nuclear generation units through the end of their respective operating licenses could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

The operating licenses for NEE's and FPL's nuclear generation facilities extend through at least 2030. If the facilities cannot be operated for any reason through the life of those operating licenses, NEE or FPL may be required to increase depreciation rates, incur impairment charges and accelerate future decommissioning expenditures, any of which could materially adversely affect their business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Various hazards posed to nuclear generation facilities, along with increased public attention to and awareness of such hazards, could result in increased nuclear licensing or compliance costs which are difficult or impossible to predict and could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

The threat of terrorist activity, as well as recent international events implicating the safety of nuclear facilities, could result in more stringent or complex measures to keep facilities safe from a variety of hazards, including, but not limited to, natural disasters such as earthquakes and tsunamis, as well as terrorist or other criminal threats. This increased focus on safety could result in higher compliance costs which, at present, cannot be assessed with any measure of certainty and which could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.


34


NEE's and FPL's nuclear units are periodically removed from service to accommodate normal refueling and maintenance outages, and for other purposes. If planned outages last longer than anticipated or if there are unplanned outages, NEE's and FPL's results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.

NEE's and FPL's nuclear units are periodically removed from service to accommodate normal refueling and maintenance outages, including, but not limited to, inspections, repairs and certain other modifications. In addition, outages may be scheduled, often in connection with a refueling outage, to replace equipment, to increase the generation capacity at a particular nuclear unit, or for other purposes, and those planned activities increase the time the unit is not in operation. In the event that a scheduled outage lasts longer than anticipated or in the event of an unplanned outage due to, for example, equipment failure, such outages could materially adversely affect NEE's or FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Liquidity, Capital Requirements and Common Stock Risks

Disruptions, uncertainty or volatility in the credit and capital markets may negatively affect NEE's and FPL's ability to fund their liquidity and capital needs and to meet their growth objectives, and can also materially adversely affect the results of operations and financial condition of NEE and FPL.

NEE and FPL rely on access to capital and credit markets as significant sources of liquidity for capital requirements and other operations requirements that are not satisfied by operating cash flows. Disruptions, uncertainty or volatility in those capital and credit markets, including, but not limited to, the conditions of the most recent financial crises in the U.S. and abroad, could increase NEE's and FPL's cost of capital. If NEE or FPL is unable to access regularly the capital and credit markets on terms that are reasonable, it may have to delay raising capital, issue shorter-term securities and incur an unfavorable cost of capital, which, in turn, could adversely affect its ability to grow its business, could contribute to lower earnings and reduced financial flexibility, and could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Although NEE's competitive energy subsidiaries have used non-recourse or limited-recourse, project-specific financing in the past, market conditions and other factors could adversely affect the future availability of such financing. The inability of NEE's subsidiaries to access the capital and credit markets to provide project-specific financing for electric-generating and other facilities on favorable terms, whether because of disruptions or volatility in those markets or otherwise, could necessitate additional capital raising or borrowings by NEE and/or NEECH in the future.

The inability of subsidiaries that have existing project-specific financing arrangements to meet the requirements of various agreements relating to those financings could give rise to a project-specific financing default which, if not cured or waived, might result in the specific project, and potentially in some limited instances its parent companies, being required to repay the associated debt or other borrowings earlier than otherwise anticipated, and if such repayment were not made, the lenders or security holders would generally have rights to foreclose against the project assets and related collateral. Such an occurrence also could result in NEE expending additional funds or incurring additional obligations over the shorter term to ensure continuing compliance with project-specific financing arrangements based upon the expectation of improvement in the project's performance or financial returns over the longer term. Any of these actions could materially adversely affect NEE's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, as well as the availability or terms of future financings for NEE or its subsidiaries.

NEE's, NEECH's and FPL's inability to maintain their current credit ratings may materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's liquidity and results of operations, limit the ability of NEE and FPL to grow their business, and increase interest costs.

The inability of NEE, NEECH and FPL to maintain their current credit ratings could materially adversely affect their ability to raise capital or obtain credit on favorable terms, which, in turn, could impact NEE's and FPL's ability to grow their business and service indebtedness and repay borrowings, and would likely increase their interest costs. Some of the factors that can affect credit ratings are cash flows, liquidity, the amount of debt as a component of total capitalization, and political, legislative and regulatory actions. There can be no assurance that one or more of the ratings of NEE, NEECH and FPL will not be lowered or withdrawn entirely by a rating agency.

NEE's and FPL's liquidity may be impaired if their credit providers are unable to fund their credit commitments to the companies or to maintain their current credit ratings.

The inability of NEE's, NEECH's and FPL's credit providers to fund their credit commitments or to maintain their current credit ratings could require NEE, NEECH or FPL, among other things, to renegotiate requirements in agreements, find an alternative credit provider with acceptable credit ratings to meet funding requirements, or post cash collateral and could have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's liquidity.

Poor market performance and other economic factors could affect NEE's defined benefit pension plan's funded status, which may materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations and prospects.


35


NEE sponsors a qualified noncontributory defined benefit pension plan for substantially all employees of NEE and its subsidiaries. A decline in the market value of the assets held in the defined benefit pension plan due to poor investment performance or other factors may increase the funding requirements for this obligation.

NEE's defined benefit pension plan is sensitive to changes in interest rates, since, as interest rates decrease the funding liabilities increase, potentially increasing benefits costs and funding requirements. Any increase in benefits costs or funding requirements may have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, liquidity, results of operations and prospects.

Poor market performance and other economic factors could adversely affect the asset values of NEE's and FPL's nuclear decommissioning funds, which may materially adversely affect NEE's and FPL's liquidity and results of operations.

NEE and FPL are required to maintain decommissioning funds to satisfy their future obligations to decommission their nuclear power plants. A decline in the market value of the assets held in the decommissioning funds due to poor investment performance or other factors may increase the funding requirements for these obligations. Any increase in funding requirements may have a material adverse effect on NEE's and FPL's business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.

Certain of NEE's investments are subject to changes in market value and other risks, which may materially adversely affect NEE's liquidity, financial results and results of operations.

NEE holds other investments where changes in the fair value affect NEE's financial results. In some cases there may be no observable market values for these investments, requiring fair value estimates to be based on other valuation techniques. This type of analysis requires significant judgment and the actual values realized in a sale of these investments could differ materially from those estimated. A sale of an investment below previously estimated value, or other decline in the fair value of an investment, could result in losses or the write-off of such investment, and may have a material adverse effect on NEE's liquidity, financial condition and results of operations.

NEE may be unable to meet its ongoing and future financial obligations and to pay dividends on its common stock if its subsidiaries are unable to pay upstream dividends or repay funds to NEE.

NEE is a holding company and, as such, has no material operations of its own. Substantially all of NEE's consolidated assets are held by its subsidiaries. NEE's ability to meet its financial obligations, including, but not limited to, its guarantees, and to pay dividends on its common stock is primarily dependent on its subsidiaries' net income and cash flows, which are subject to the risks of their respective businesses, and their ability to pay upstream dividends or to repay funds to NEE.

NEE's subsidiaries are separate legal entities and have no independent obligation to provide NEE with funds for its payment obligations. The subsidiaries have financial obligations, including, but not limited to, payment of debt service, which they must satisfy before they can provide NEE with funds. In addition, in the event of a subsidiary's liquidation or reorganization, NEE's right to participate in a distribution of assets is subject to the prior claims of the subsidiary's creditors.

The dividend-paying ability of some of the subsidiaries is limited by contractual restrictions which are contained in outstanding financing agreements and which may be included in future financing agreements. The future enactment of laws or regulations also may prohibit or restrict the ability of NEE's subsidiaries to pay upstream dividends or to repay funds.

NEE may be unable to meet its ongoing and future financial obligations and to pay dividends on its common stock if NEE is required to perform under guarantees of obligations of its subsidiaries.

NEE guarantees many of the obligations of its consolidated subsidiaries, other than FPL, through guarantee agreements with NEECH. These guarantees may require NEE to provide substantial funds to its subsidiaries or their creditors or counterparties at a time when NEE is in need of liquidity to meet its own financial obligations. Funding such guarantees may materially adversely affect NEE's ability to meet its financial obligations or to pay dividends.

Disruptions, uncertainty or volatility in the credit and capital markets may exert downward pressure on the market price of NEE's common stock.

The market price and trading volume of NEE's common stock are subject to fluctuations as a result of, among other factors, general credit and capital market conditions and changes in market sentiment regarding the operations, business and financing strategies of NEE and its subsidiaries. As a result, disruptions, uncertainty or volatility in the credit and capital markets may, for example, have a material adverse effect on the market price of NEE's common stock.


Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None


36


Item 2. Properties

NEE and its subsidiaries maintain properties which are adequate for their operations; the principal properties are described below.

Generating Facilities

FPL

At December 31, 2014, the electric generating, transmission, distribution and general facilities of FPL represented approximately 51%,11%, 33% and 5%, respectively, of FPL's gross investment in electric utility plant in service and other property. At December 31, 2014, FPL had the following generating facilities:

FPL Facilities
 
Location
 
No.
of Units
 
Fuel
 
Net
Capability
(MW)(a)
Fossil
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Combined-cycle
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cape Canaveral
 
Cocoa, FL
 
1
 
Gas/Oil
 
1,210

 
Fort Myers
 
Fort Myers, FL
 
1
 
Gas
 
1,436

 
Lauderdale
 
Dania, FL
 
2
 
Gas/Oil
 
884

 
Manatee
 
Parrish, FL
 
1
 
Gas
 
1,143

 
Martin
 
Indiantown, FL
 
1
 
Gas/Oil/Solar Thermal
 
1,135

(b) 
Martin
 
Indiantown, FL
 
2
 
Gas
 
938

 
Riviera
 
Riviera Beach, FL
 
1
 
Gas/Oil
 
1,212

 
Sanford
 
Lake Monroe, FL
 
2
 
Gas
 
2,010

 
Turkey Point
 
Florida City, FL
 
1
 
Gas/Oil
 
1,192

 
West County
 
West Palm Beach, FL
 
3
 
Gas/Oil
 
3,657

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Steam turbines
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Manatee
 
Parrish, FL
 
2
 
Gas/Oil
 
1,618

 
Martin
 
Indiantown, FL
 
2
 
Gas/Oil
 
1,649

 
St. Johns River Power Park
 
Jacksonville, FL
 
2
 
Coal/Petroleum Coke
 
254

(c) 
Scherer
 
Monroe County, GA
 
1
 
Coal
 
643

(d) 
Turkey Point
 
Florida City, FL
 
1
 
Gas/Oil
 
396

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Simple-cycle combustion turbines
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fort Myers
 
Fort Myers, FL
 
2
 
Gas/Oil
 
319

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Gas turbines
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fort Myers
 
Fort Myers, FL
 
12
 
Oil
 
648

 
Lauderdale
 
Dania, FL
 
24
 
Gas/Oil
 
840

 
Port Everglades
 
Port Everglades, FL
 
12
 
Gas/Oil
 
420

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Nuclear
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
St. Lucie
 
Hutchinson Island, FL
 
2
 
Nuclear
 
1,821

(e) 
Turkey Point
 
Florida City, FL
 
2
 
Nuclear
 
1,632

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Solar PV
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DeSoto
 
Arcadia, FL
 
1
 
Solar PV
 
25

 
Space Coast
 
Cocoa, FL
 
1
 
Solar PV
 
10

 
TOTAL
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
25,092

(f) 
______________________
(a)
Represents FPL's net ownership interest in warm weather peaking capability.
(b)
The megawatts generated by the 75 MW solar thermal hybrid facility replace steam produced by this unit and therefore are not incremental.
(c)
Represents FPL's 20% ownership interest in each of SJRPP Units Nos. 1 and 2, which are jointly owned with JEA.
(d)
Represents FPL's approximately 76% ownership of Scherer Unit No. 4, which is jointly owned with JEA.
(e)
Excludes Orlando Utilities Commission's and the Florida Municipal Power Agency's combined share of approximately 15% of St. Lucie Unit No. 2.
(f)
Substantially all of FPL's properties are subject to the lien of FPL's mortgage.


37


NEER

At December 31, 2014, NEER had the following generating facilities:

NEER Facilities
 
Location
 
Geographic
Region
 
No.
of Units
 
Fuel
 
Net
Capability
(MW)(a)
Wind
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Adelaide Wind(b)
 
Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada
 
Canada
 
37

 
Wind
 
60
 
Ashtabula Wind(b)(c)
 
Barnes County, ND
 
Midwest
 
99

 
Wind
 
148
 
Ashtabula Wind II(c)(d)
 
Griggs & Steele Counties, ND
 
Midwest
 
80

 
Wind
 
120
 
Ashtabula Wind III
 
Barnes County, ND
 
Midwest
 
39

 
Wind
 
62
 
Baldwin Wind(b)
 
Burleigh County, ND
 
Midwest
 
64

 
Wind
 
102
 
Blackwell Wind(c)(d)
 
Kay County, OK
 
Other South
 
26

 
Wind
 
60
 
Blue Summit(c)(d)
 
Wilbarger County, TX
 
Texas
 
85

 
Wind
 
135
 
Bluewater Wind(b)(e)
 
Huron County, Ontario, Canada
 
Canada
 
37

 
Wind
 
60
 
Bornish Wind(b)
 
Middlesex County, Ontario, Canada
 
Canada
 
45

 
Wind
 
73
 
Buffalo Ridge
 
Lincoln County, MN
 
Midwest
 
73

 
Wind
 
26
 
Butler Ridge Wind(b)(c)
 
Dodge County, WI
 
Midwest
 
36

 
Wind
 
54
 
Cabazon(b)
 
Riverside County, CA
 
West
 
52

 
Wind
 
39
 
Callahan Divide(b)
 
Taylor County, TX
 
Texas
 
76

 
Wind
 
114
 
Capricorn Ridge(c)
 
Sterling & Coke Counties, TX
 
Texas
 
208

 
Wind
 
364
 
Capricorn Ridge Expansion(c)
 
Sterling & Coke Counties, TX
 
Texas
 
199

 
Wind
 
298
 
Cerro Gordo(b)
 
Cerro Gordo County, IA
 
Midwest
 
55

 
Wind
 
41
 
Cimarron(b)
 
Gray County, KS
 
Other South
 
72

 
Wind
 
166
 
Conestogo Wind(b)(e)
 
Wellington County, Ontario, Canada
 
Canada
 
10

 
Wind
 
23
 
Crystal Lake I(b)(c)
 
Hancock County, IA
 
Midwest
 
100

 
Wind
 
150
 
Crystal Lake II
 
Winnebago County, IA
 
Midwest
 
80

 
Wind
 
200
 
Crystal Lake III
 
Winnebago County, IA
 
Midwest
 
44

 
Wind
 
66
 
Day County Wind(b)
 
Day County, SD
 
Midwest
 
66

 
Wind
 
99
 
Diablo Wind(b)
 
Alameda County, CA
 
West
 
31

 
Wind
 
20
 
Elk City Wind(b)(e)
 
Roger Mills & Beckham Counties, OK
 
Other South
 
43

 
Wind
 
99
 
Elk City Wind II
 
Roger Mills & Beckham Counties, OK
 
Other South
 
66

 
Wind
 
101
 
Endeavor Wind
 
Osceola County, IA
 
Midwest
 
40

 
Wind
 
100
 
Endeavor Wind II
 
Osceola County, IA
 
Midwest
 
20

 
Wind
 
50
 
Ensign Wind
 
Gray County, KS
 
Other South
 
43

 
Wind
 
99
 
Ghost Pine Wind
 
Kneehill County, Alberta, Canada
 
Canada
 
51

 
Wind
 
82
 
Gray County
 
Gray County, KS
 
Other South
 
170

 
Wind
 
112
 
Green Mountain(b)
 
Somerset County, PA
 
Northeast
 
8

 
Wind
 
10
 
Green Power
 
Riverside County, CA
 
West
 
22

 
Wind
 
17
 
Green Ridge Power
 
Alameda & Contra Costa Counties, CA
 
West
 
803

 
Wind
 
87
 
Hancock County(b)
 
Hancock County, IA
 
Midwest
 
148

 
Wind
 
98
 
High Winds(b)
 
Solano County, CA
 
West
 
90

 
Wind
 
162
 
Horse Hollow Wind(b)
 
Taylor County, TX
 
Texas
 
142

 
Wind
 
213
 
Horse Hollow Wind II(b)
 
Taylor & Nolan Counties, TX
 
Texas
 
130

 
Wind
 
299
 
Horse Hollow Wind III(b)
 
Nolan County, TX
 
Texas
 
149

 
Wind
 
224
 
Indian Mesa
 
Pecos County, TX
 
Texas
 
125

 
Wind
 
83
 
Jericho Wind
 
Lambton & Middlesex Counties, Ontario, Canada
 
Canada
 
91

 
Wind
 
147
 
King Mountain(b)
 
Upton County, TX
 
Texas
 
214

 
Wind
 
278
 
Lake Benton II(b)
 
Pipestone County, MN
 
Midwest
 
137

 
Wind
 
103
 
Langdon Wind(b)(c)
 
Cavalier County, ND
 
Midwest
 
79

 
Wind
 
118
 
Langdon Wind II(b)(c)
 
Cavalier County, ND
 
Midwest
 
27

 
Wind
 
41
 
Lee / DeKalb Wind
 
Lee & DeKalb Counties, IL
 
Midwest
 
145

 
Wind
 
217
 
Limon I(c)(d)
 
Lincoln, Elbert & Arapahoe Counties, CO
 
West
 
125

 
Wind
 
200
 
Limon II(c)(d)
 
Lincoln, Elbert & Arapahoe Counties, CO
 
West
 
125

 
Wind
 
200
 
Limon III(c)(d)
 
Lincoln County, CO
 
West
 
117

 
Wind
 
201
 
Logan Wind(c)
 
Logan County, CO
 
West
 
134

 
Wind
 
201
 
Majestic Wind(b)(c)
 
Carson County, TX
 
Texas
 
53

 
Wind
 
79
 
Majestic Wind II(c)
 
Carson & Potter Counties, TX
 
Texas
 
51

 
Wind
 
80
 
Mammoth Plains Wind(c)
 
Dewey & Blaine Counties, OK
 
Other South
 
117

 
Wind
 
199
 
Meyersdale(b)
 
Somerset County, PA
 
Northeast
 
20

 
Wind
 
30
 
Mill Run(b)
 
Fayette County, PA
 
Northeast
 
10

 
Wind
 
15
 
Minco Wind(b)
 
Grady County, OK
 
Other South
 
62

 
Wind
 
99
 
Minco Wind II(b)
 
Grady & Caddo Counties, OK
 
Other South
 
63

 
Wind
 
101
 

38


NEER Facilities
 
Location
 
Geographic
Region
 
No.
of Units
 
Fuel
 
Net
Capability
(MW)(a)
Minco Wind III(c)(d)
 
Grady, Caddo & Canadian Counties, OK
 
Other South
 
63

 
Wind
 
101
 
Mojave 3/4/5
 
Kern County, CA
 
West
 
246

 
Wind
 
41
 
Montezuma Wind(b)
 
Solano County, CA
 
West
 
16

 
Wind
 
37
 
Montezuma Wind II(c)(d)
 
Solano County, CA
 
West
 
34

 
Wind
 
78
 
Mount Copper(b)
 
Gaspésie, Quebec, Canada
 
Canada
 
30

 
Wind
 
52
 
Mount Miller(b)
 
Gaspésie, Quebec, Canada
 
Canada
 
30

 
Wind
 
52
 
Mountaineer Wind(b)
 
Preston & Tucker Counties, WV
 
Northeast
 
44

 
Wind
 
66
 
Mower County Wind(c)
 
Mower County, MN
 
Midwest
 
43

 
Wind
 
99
 
New Mexico Wind(b)
 
Quay & Debaca Counties, NM
 
West
 
136

 
Wind
 
204
 
North Dakota Wind(b)
 
LaMoure County, ND
 
Midwest
 
41

 
Wind
 
62
 
North Sky River(b)
 
Kern County, CA
 
West
 
100

 
Wind
 
162
 
Northern Colorado(b)(e)
 
Logan County, CO
 
West
 
81

 
Wind
 
174
 
Oklahoma / Sooner Wind(b)
 
Harper & Woodward Counties, OK
 
Other South
 
68

 
Wind
 
102
 
Oliver County Wind I(c)
 
Oliver County, ND
 
Midwest
 
22

 
Wind
 
51
 
Oliver County Wind II(c)
 
Oliver County, ND
 
Midwest
 
32

 
Wind
 
48
 
Palo Duro Wind(c)(f)
 
Hansford & Ochiltree Counties, TX
 
Texas
 
147

 
Wind
 
250
 
Peetz Table Wind(c)
 
Logan County, CO
 
West
 
133

 
Wind
 
199
 
Perrin Ranch Wind(b)(e)
 
Coconino County, AZ
 
West
 
62

 
Wind
 
99
 
Pheasant Run I(b)
 
Huron County, MI
 
Midwest
 
44

 
Wind
 
75
 
Pubnico Point(b)
 
Yarmouth County, Nova Scotia, Canada
 
Canada
 
17

 
Wind
 
31
 
Red Canyon Wind(b)
 
Borden, Garza & Scurry Counties, TX
 
Texas
 
56

 
Wind
 
84
 
Red Mesa Wind
 
Cibola County, NM
 
West
 
64

 
Wind
 
102
 
Seiling Wind(c)
 
Dewey County, OK
 
Other South
 
117

 
Wind
 
199
 
Seiling Wind II(c)
 
Dewey & Woodward Counties, OK
 
Other South
 
59

 
Wind
 
100
 
Sky River(b)
 
Kern County, CA
 
West
 
322

 
Wind
 
73
 
Somerset Wind Power(b)
 
Somerset County, PA
 
Northeast
 
6

 
Wind
 
9
 
South Dakota Wind(b)
 
Hyde County, SD
 
Midwest
 
27

 
Wind
 
41
 
Southwest Mesa(b)
 
Upton & Crockett Counties, TX
 
Texas
 
106

 
Wind
 
74
 
Stateline(b)
 
Umatilla County, OR and Walla Walla County, WA
 
West
 
454

 
Wind
 
300
 
Steele Flats(c)(d)
 
Jefferson & Gage Counties, NE
 
Other South
 
44

 
Wind
 
75
 
Story County Wind(b)(c)
 
Story County, IA
 
Midwest
 
100

 
Wind
 
150
 
Story County Wind II(b)
 
Story & Hardin Counties, IA
 
Midwest
 
100

 
Wind
 
150
 
Summerhaven(b)(e)
 
Haldimand County, Ontario, Canada
 
Canada
 
56

 
Wind
 
124
 
Tuscola Bay(b)(e)
 
Tuscola, Bay & Saginaw Counties, MI
 
Midwest
 
75

 
Wind
 
120
 
Tuscola II
 
Tuscola & Bay Counties, MI
 
Midwest
 
59

 
Wind
 
100
 
Vansycle(b)
 
Umatilla County, OR
 
West
 
38

 
Wind
 
25
 
Vansycle II
 
Umatilla County, OR
 
West
 
43

 
Wind
 
99
 
Vasco Winds(c)(d)
 
Contra Costa County, CA
 
West
 
33

 
Wind
 
78
 
Waymart(b)
 
Wayne County, PA
 
Northeast
 
43

 
Wind
 
65
 
Weatherford Wind(b)
 
Custer & Washita Counties, OK
 
Other South
 
98

 
Wind
 
147
 
Wessington Springs Wind(b)(c)
 
Jerauld County, SD
 
Midwest
 
34

 
Wind
 
51
 
White Oak(c)(d)
 
McLean County, IL
 
Midwest
 
100

 
Wind
 
150
 
Wilton Wind(b)
 
Burleigh County, ND
 
Midwest
 
33

 
Wind
 
49
 
Wilton Wind II(c)(d)
 
Burleigh County, ND
 
Midwest
 
33

 
Wind
 
50
 
Windpower Partners 1990
 
Alameda & Contra Costa Counties, CA
 
West
 
141

 
Wind
 
14
 
Windpower Partners 1991
 
Alameda & Contra Costa Counties, CA
 
West
 
162

 
Wind
 
16
 
Windpower Partners 1991-92
 
Alameda & Contra Costa Counties, CA
 
West
 
223

 
Wind
 
22
 
Windpower Partners 1992
 
Alameda & Contra Costa Counties, CA
 
West
 
300

 
Wind
 
30
 
Windpower Partners 1993(c)(d)
 
Riverside County, CA
 
West
 
33

 
Wind
 
50
 
Wolf Ridge Wind(c)(d)
 
Cooke County, TX
 
Texas
 
75

 
Wind
 
112
 
Woodward Mountain
 
Upton & Pecos Counties, TX
 
Texas
 
242

 
Wind
 
160
 
Total Wind
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
11,427
 
Contracted
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bayswater(b)
 
Far Rockaway, NY
 
Northeast
 
2

 
Gas
 
56
 
Duane Arnold
 
Palo, IA
 
Midwest
 
1

 
Nuclear
 
431
(g) 
Genesis(b)(e)
 
Riverside County, CA
 
West
 
2

 
Solar Thermal
 
250
 
Hatch Solar
 
Hatch, NM
 
West
 
1

 
Solar CPV
 
5
 
Jamaica Bay(b)
 
Far Rockaway, NY
 
Northeast
 
2

 
Gas/Oil
 
54
 
Marcus Hook 750(b)
 
Marcus Hook, PA
 
Northeast
 
4

 
Gas
 
744
 
Moore Solar(b)(e)
 
Lambton County, Ontario, Canada
 
Canada
 
1

 
Solar PV
 
20
 
Mountain View Solar(b)
 
Clark County, NV
 
West
 
1

 
Solar PV
 
20
 

39


NEER Facilities
 
Location
 
Geographic
Region
 
No.
of Units
 
Fuel
 
Net
Capability
(MW)(a)
Planta Termosolar I & II(b)
 
Madrigalejo, Spain
 
Other
 
2

 
Solar Thermal
 
100
 
Point Beach
 
Two Rivers, WI
 
Midwest
 
2

 
Nuclear
 
1,190
 
Sombra Solar(b)(e)
 
Lambton County, Ontario, Canada
 
Canada
 
1

 
Solar PV
 
20
 
Investments in joint ventures:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Desert Sunlight(b)
 
Riverside County, CA
 
West
 
2

 
Solar PV
 
275
 
SEGS III-IX(b)
 
Kramer Junction & Harper Lake, CA
 
West
 
7

 
Solar Thermal
 
147
 
Bellingham
 
Bellingham, MA
 
Northeast
 
3

 
Gas
 
150
 
Total Contracted
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
3,462
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Merchant
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Forney(b)
 
Forney, TX
 
Texas
 
8

 
Gas
 
1,792
 
Lamar Power Partners(b)
 
Paris, TX
 
Texas
 
6

 
Gas
 
1,000
 
Maine - Cape, Wyman
 
Various - ME
 
Northeast
 
6

 
Oil
 
796
(h) 
Marcus Hook 50
 
Marcus Hook, PA
 
Northeast
 
1

 
Gas
 
50
 
Paradise Solar
 
West Deptford, NJ
 
Northeast
 
1

 
Solar PV
 
5
 
Seabrook
 
Seabrook, NH
 
Northeast
 
1

 
Nuclear
 
1,100
(i) 
Investment in joint venture - Sayreville
 
Sayreville, NJ
 
Northeast
 
3

 
Gas
 
145
 
Total Merchant
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4,888
 
Total Generating Capability
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19,777
 
Less noncontrolling interest
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(199)
 
Total Net Generating Capability
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
19,578
 
______________________
(a)
Represents NEER's net ownership interest in plant capacity.
(b)
These generating facilities are encumbered by liens against their assets securing various financings.
(c)
NEER owns these wind facilities together with third-party investors with differential membership interests. See Note 1 - Sale of Differential Membership Interests.
(d)
Various financings are secured by the pledge of NEER's membership interests in the entities owning these wind facilities.
(e)
These generating facilities are part of the NEP portfolio and subject to a 20.1% noncontrolling interest.
(f)
This facility became part of the NEP portfolio in January 2015 and is subject to a 20.1% noncontrolling interest.
(g)
Excludes Central Iowa Power Cooperative and Corn Belt Power Cooperative's combined share of 30%.
(h)
Excludes six other energy-related partners' combined share of 16%.
(i)
Excludes Massachusetts Municipal Wholesale Electric Company's, Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant's and Hudson Light & Power Department's combined share of 11.77%.

Transmission and Distribution

At December 31, 2014, FPL owned and operated 596 substations and the following electric transmission and distribution lines:

Nominal
Voltage
 
Overhead Lines
Circuit/Pole Miles
 
Trench and
Submarine
Cables Miles
500
kV
 
1,106

(a) 

230
kV
 
3,188

 
25

138
kV
 
1,580

 
52

115
kV
 
758

 

69
kV
 
164

 
14

Total circuit miles
 
6,796

 
91

Less than 69 kV (pole miles)
 
42,321

 
25,411

______________________
(a) Includes approximately 75 miles owned jointly with JEA.

At December 31, 2014, NEER owned and operated 171 substations and approximately 993 circuit miles of transmission lines ranging from 69 kV to 345 kV and NEET owned and operated 6 substations and approximately 624 circuit miles of 345 kV transmission lines.

Character of Ownership

Substantially all of FPL's properties are subject to the lien of FPL's mortgage, which secures most debt securities issued by FPL. The majority of FPL's real property is held in fee and is free from other encumbrances, subject to minor exceptions which are not of a nature as to substantially impair the usefulness to FPL of such properties. Some of FPL's electric lines are located on parcels of land which are not owned in fee by FPL but are covered by necessary consents of governmental authorities or rights obtained from owners of private property. The majority of NEER's generating facilities and transmission assets are owned by NEER

40


subsidiaries and a number of those facilities are encumbered by liens securing various financings. Additionally, the majority of NEER's generating facilities and transmission lines are located on land leased or under easement from owners of private property. The majority of NEET’s transmission assets are encumbered by liens securing financings and the majority of its transmission lines are located on land leased or under easement from owners of private property. See Generating Facilities and Note 1 - Electric Plant, Depreciation and Amortization.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

NEE and FPL are parties to various legal and regulatory proceedings in the ordinary course of their respective businesses. For information regarding legal proceedings that could have a material adverse effect on NEE or FPL, see Note 13 - Legal Proceedings. Such descriptions are incorporated herein by reference.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable
PART II

Item 5.  Market for Registrants' Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Common Stock Data. All of FPL's common stock is owned by NEE. NEE's common stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol "NEE." The high and low sales prices for the common stock of NEE as reported in the consolidated transaction reporting system of the New York Stock Exchange and the cash dividends per share declared for each quarter during the past two years are as follows:

 
 
2014
 
2013
Quarter
 
High
 
Low
 
Cash
Dividends
 
High
 
Low
 
Cash
Dividends
First
 
$
96.13

 
$
83.97

 
$
0.725

 
$
77.79

 
$
69.81

 
$
0.66

Second
 
$
102.51

 
$
93.28

 
$