10-K 1 rrc-10k_20161231.htm RRC-10K-20161231 rrc-10k_20161231.htm

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

(Mark one)

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2016

OR

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from            to            

Commission File Number: 001-12209

 

RANGE RESOURCES CORPORATION

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

 

Delaware

 

34-1312571

(State or Other Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)

 

(IRS Employer Identification No.)

 

 

100 Throckmorton Street, Suite 1200, Fort Worth, Texas

 

76102

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

(Zip Code)

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code

(817) 870-2601

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class

 

Name of each exchange on which registered

Common Stock, $.01 par value

 

New York Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.    Yes       No  

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files).    Yes      No  

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.  

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer” and “smaller reporting company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act (check one):

 

Large accelerated filer

 

  

Accelerated filer

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accelerated filer

 

(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)

  

Smaller reporting company

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Act).    Yes      No  

The aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2016 was $7,223,323,000. This amount is based on the closing price of registrant’s common stock on the New York Stock Exchange on that date. Shares of common stock held by executive officers and directors of the registrant are not included in the computation. However, the registrant has made no determination that such individuals are “affiliates” within the meaning of Rule 405 of the Securities Act of 1933.

As of February 20, 2017, there were 247,516,578 shares of Range Resources Corporation Common Stock outstanding.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement to be furnished to stockholders in connection with its 2017 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, which will be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year to which this report relates, are incorporated by reference in Part III, Items 10-14 of this report.

 

 

 

 


 

RANGE RESOURCES CORPORATION

Unless the context otherwise indicates, all references in this report to “Range,” “we,” “us” or “our” are to Range Resources Corporation and its directly and indirectly owned subsidiaries. Unless otherwise noted, all information in the report relating to natural gas, natural gas liquids and oil reserves and the estimated future net cash flows attributable to those reserves are based on estimates and are net to our interest. If you are not familiar with the oil and gas terms used in this report, please refer to the explanation of such terms under the caption “Glossary of Certain Defined Terms” at the end of Item 15 of this report.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 PART I

 

 

 

 

 

 

Page

ITEMS 1 & 2.

 

Business and Properties

2

 

 

General

 2

 

 

Available Information

 2

 

 

Our Business Strategy

 3

 

 

Significant Accomplishments in 2016

 4

 

 

Industry Operating Environment

 5

 

 

Segment and Geographical Information

 6

 

 

Outlook for 2017

 7

 

 

Production, Price and Cost History

 8

 

 

Proved Reserves

 9

 

 

Property Overview

 11

 

 

Divestitures

14

 

 

Producing Wells

 14

 

 

Drilling Activity

 14

 

 

Gross and Net Acreage

 15

 

 

Undeveloped Acreage Expirations

15

 

 

Title to Properties

 15

 

 

Delivery Commitments

 16

 

 

Employees

 16

 

 

Competition

 16

 

 

Marketing and Customers

 16

 

 

Seasonal Nature of Business

 17

 

 

Governmental Regulation

 17

 

 

Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety Matters

 18

 

 

 

 

ITEM 1A.

 

Risk Factors

22

 

ITEM 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

 36

 

ITEM 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

36

 

ITEM 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

 37

 

PART II

 

 

 ITEM 5.

 

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

 38

 

 

Market for Common Stock

 38

 

 

Holders of Record

 38

 

 

Dividends

 38

 

 

Stockholder Return Performance Presentation

 39

 

ITEM 6.

 

Selected Financial Data and Proved Reserve Data

40

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TABLE OF CONTENTS (continued)

 

 

 

 

Page

 

ITEM 7.

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

 41

 

 

Overview of Our Business

 41

 

 

Sources of Our Revenues

 41

 

 

Principal Components of Our Cost Structure

 41

 

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Results of Operations

 43

 

 

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition, Cash Flows, Capital Resources and Liquidity

 52

 

 

Management’s Discussion of Critical Accounting Estimates

 58

 

ITEM 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

64

 

 

Market Risk

 64

 

 

Commodity Price Risk

 64

 

 

Other Commodity Risk

 65

 

 

Commodity Sensitivity Analysis

66

 

 

Interest Rate Risk

 66

 

ITEM 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

 67

 

ITEM 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

 67

 

ITEM 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

 67

 

ITEM 9B.

 

Other Information

 68

 

PART III

 

 

ITEM 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

 69

 

ITEM 11.

 

Executive Compensation

 72

 

ITEM 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

 72

 

ITEM 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

 72

 

ITEM 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

 72

 

PART IV

 

 

ITEM 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

 73

 

 

Financial Statements

 73

 

 

Financial Statement Schedules

 73

 

 

Exhibits

 73

 

ITEM 16.

 

Form 10-K Summary

 73

 

 

 

 

GLOSSARY OF CERTAIN DEFINED TERMS

 74

SIGNATURES

 76

 

 

 

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Disclosures Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This Annual Report on Form 10-K, particularly Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties, Item 1A. Risk Factors, Item 3. Legal Proceedings, Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, and Item 7A. Quantitative Disclosures about Market Risk, includes forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (“Securities Act”) and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (“Exchange Act”). These statements typically contain words such as “may,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “expects,” “plans,” “predicts,” “targets,” “projects,” “should,” “would” or similar words, indicating that future outcomes are uncertain. In accordance with “safe harbor” provisions of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, these statements are accompanied by cautionary language identifying important factors, though not necessarily all such factors that could cause future outcomes to differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements.

While we believe that these forward-looking statements are reasonable as and when made, there can be no assurance that future developments affecting us will be those that we anticipate. For a description of known material factors that could cause our actual results to differ from those in the forward-looking statements, see “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”

Actual results may vary significantly from those anticipated due to many factors, including:

 

conditions in the oil and gas industry, including pricing and supply/demand levels for natural gas, crude oil and natural gas liquids (“NGLs”);

 

the availability and volatility of securities, capital or credit markets and the cost of capital to fund our operation and business strategy;

 

accuracy and fluctuations in our reserves estimates due to regulations or sustained low commodity prices;

 

ability to develop existing reserves or acquire new reserves;

 

changes in political or economic conditions in our key operating markets;

 

prices and availability of goods and services;

 

unforeseen hazards such as weather conditions, acts of war or terrorist acts;

 

electronic, cyber or physical security breaches;

 

the ability and willingness of current or potential lenders, derivative contract counterparties, customers and working interest owners to fulfill their obligations to us or to enter into transactions with us in the future on terms that are acceptable to us; or

 

other factors discussed in Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties, Item 1A. Risk Factors, Item 7. Management Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk and elsewhere in this report.

Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date hereof. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements after the date they are made, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise except as required by law.

 

 

 

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PART I

ITEMS 1 AND 2. BUSINESS AND PROPERTIES

General

Range Resources Corporation, a Delaware corporation, is a Fort Worth, Texas-based independent natural gas, NGLs and oil company, engaged in the exploration, development and acquisition of natural gas and oil properties, in the United States. Our principal areas of operation are the Marcellus Shale of Pennsylvania and the Lower Cotton Valley formation of North Louisiana. Our corporate offices are located at 100 Throckmorton Street, Suite 1200, Fort Worth, Texas 76102 (telephone (817) 870-2601). Our common stock is listed and trades on the New York Stock Exchange (the “NYSE”) under the ticker symbol “RRC”. We have been a member of the S&P 500 Index since 2007. Range Resources Corporation was incorporated in 1980. At December 31, 2016, we had 247.2 million shares outstanding.

Our 2016 production had the following characteristics:

 

average total production of 1,542.1 Mmcfe per day, an increase of 11% from 2015;

 

67% natural gas;

 

total natural gas production of 375.8 Bcf, an increase of 4% from 2015;

 

total NGLs production of 27.8 Mmbbls (including ethane), an increase of 37% from 2015;

 

total crude oil and condensate production of 3.6 Mmbbls, a decrease of 12% from 2015; and

 

88% of our total production was from the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania.

At year-end 2016, our proved reserves had the following characteristics:

 

12.1 Tcfe of proved reserves;

 

65% natural gas, 31% NGLs and 4% crude oil;

 

56% proved developed;

 

99% operated;

 

87% of proved reserves are in the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania;

 

a reserve life index of approximately 18 years (based on fourth quarter 2016 production);

 

a pretax present value of $3.7 billion of future net cash flows, discounted at 10% per annum (“PV-10”(a)); and

 

a standardized after-tax measure of discounted future net cash flows of $3.5 billion.

(a)

PV-10 is considered a non-GAAP financial measure as defined by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”). We believe that the presentation of PV-10 is relevant and useful to our investors as supplemental disclosure to the standardized measure, or after-tax amount, because it presents the discounted future net cash flows attributable to our proved reserves before taking into account future corporate income taxes and our current tax structure. While the standardized measure is dependent on the unique tax situation of each company, PV-10 is based on prices and discount factors that are consistent for all companies. Because of this, PV-10 can be used within the industry and by creditors and security analysts to evaluate estimated net cash flows from proved reserves on a more comparable basis. The difference between the standardized measure and the PV-10 amount is the discounted estimated future income tax of $275.5 million at December 31, 2016.

Available Information

Our corporate website is available at http://www.rangeresources.com. Information contained on or connected to our website is not incorporated by reference into this Form 10-K and should not be considered part of this report or any other filing we make with the SEC. We make available, free of charge, on our website, the annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports, as soon as reasonably practicable after filing such reports with the SEC. Other information such as presentations, our Corporate Governance Guidelines, the charters of the Audit Committee, the Compensation Committee, the Dividend Committee, and the Governance and Nominating Committee, and the Code of Business Conduct and Ethics are available on our website and in print to any stockholder who provides a written request to the Corporate Secretary at 100 Throckmorton Street, Suite 1200, Fort Worth, Texas 76102. Our Code of Business Conduct and Ethics applies to all directors, officers and employees, including the President and Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer.

The public may read and copy any materials that we file with the SEC at the SEC’s Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, NE, Washington, DC 20549. The public may obtain information on the operation of the Public Reference Room by calling the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. Also, the SEC maintains an internet website that contains reports, proxy and information statements, and other

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information regarding issuers, including Range, that file electronically with the SEC. The public can obtain any document we file with the SEC at http://www.sec.gov.

Our Business Strategy

Our overarching business objective is to build stockholder value through consistent growth in reserves and production on a cost-efficient basis. Our strategy to achieve our business objective is to increase reserves and production through internally generated drilling projects coupled with occasional acquisitions and divestitures of non-core assets. Our strategy requires us to make significant investments and financial commitments in technical staff, acreage, seismic data, drilling and completion technology and gathering and transportation arrangements to build drilling inventory and market our products. Our strategy has the following key elements:

 

commit to environmental protection and worker and community safety;

 

concentrate in core operating areas;

 

maintain a multi-year drilling inventory;

 

focus on cost efficiency;

 

maintain a long-life reserve base;

 

market our products to a large number of customers in different markets under a variety of commercial terms;

 

maintain operational and financial flexibility; and

 

provide employee equity ownership and incentive compensation.

Commit to Environmental Protection and Worker and Community Safety. We strive to implement the latest technologies and best commercial practices to minimize adverse impacts from the development of our properties on the environment, worker health and safety and the safety of the communities where we operate. We analyze and review performance while striving for continual improvement by working with peer companies, regulators, non-governmental organizations, industries not related to the oil and natural gas industry and other engaged stakeholders. We expect every employee to maintain safe operations, minimize environmental impact and conduct their daily business with the highest ethical standards.

Concentrate in Core Operating Areas. We currently operate primarily in two regions:  Pennsylvania and North Louisiana. Concentrating our drilling and producing activities in these core areas allows us to develop the regional expertise needed to interpret specific geological and operating conditions and develop economies of scale. Operating in core areas as large as the Marcellus Shale and the Lower Cotton Valley allows us to reach our goal of consistent production and reserve growth at attractive returns. We intend to further develop our acreage in both the Marcellus Shale and North Louisiana and improve our well results through the use of technology and detailed analysis of our properties. We periodically evaluate and pursue acquisition opportunities in the United States (including opportunities to acquire particular natural gas and oil properties or entities owning natural gas and oil assets) and at any given time we may be in various stages of evaluating such opportunities.

Maintain a Multi-Year Drilling Inventory. We focus on areas with multiple prospective and productive horizons and development opportunities. We use our technical expertise to build and maintain a multi-year drilling inventory. We believe that a large, multi-year inventory of drilling projects increases our ability to efficiently plan for the economic growth of production and reserves. Currently, we have over 9,000 proven and unproven drilling locations in inventory. We actively seek to find and develop new natural gas and oil plays with significant exploration and exploitation potential.

Focus on Cost Efficiency. We concentrate in areas which we believe to have sizeable hydrocarbon deposits in place that will allow us to consistently increase production while controlling costs. Because there is little long-term competitive sales price advantage available to a commodity producer, the costs to find, develop, and produce a commodity are important to organizational sustainability and long-term stockholder value creation. We endeavor to control costs such that our cost to find, develop and produce natural gas, NGLs and oil is one of the lowest in the industry. We operate almost all of our total net production and believe that our extensive knowledge of the geologic and operating conditions in the areas where we operate provides us with the ability to achieve operational efficiencies.

Maintain a Long-Life Reserve Base. Long-life natural gas and oil reserves provide a more stable growth platform than short-life reserves. Long-life reserves reduce reinvestment risk as they lessen the amount of reinvestment capital deployed each year to replace production. Long-life natural gas and oil reserves also assist us in minimizing costs as stable production makes it easier to build and maintain operating economies of scale. Long-life reserves also offer upside from technology enhancements. We use our drilling, divestiture and acquisition activities to assist in executing this strategy.

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Market Our Products to A Large Number of Customers in Different Markets Under a Variety of Commercial Terms. We market our natural gas, NGLs, and oil to a large number of customers in both domestic and international markets to maximize cash flow and diversify risk. We hold numerous firm transportation contracts on multiple pipelines to enable us to transport and sell natural gas and NGLs in the Midwest, Gulf Coast, Southeast, Northeast and international markets. We sell our products under a variety of price indexes and price formulas that assist us in optimizing regional price differentials and commodity price volatility.

Maintain Operational and Financial Flexibility. Because of the risks involved in drilling, coupled with changing commodity prices, we are flexible and adjust our capital budget throughout the year. If certain areas generate higher than anticipated returns, we may accelerate development in those areas and decrease expenditures elsewhere. We also believe in maintaining a strong balance sheet, ample liquidity and using commodity derivatives to help stabilize our realized prices. We believe this provides more predictable cash flows and financial results. We regularly review our asset base to identify nonstrategic assets, the disposition of which will increase capital resources available for other activities and create organizational and operational efficiencies.

Provide Employee Equity Ownership and Incentive Compensation. We want our employees to think and act like business owners. To achieve this, we reward and encourage them through equity ownership in Range. All full-time employees are eligible to receive equity grants. As of December 31, 2016, our employees and directors owned equity securities in our benefit plans (vested and unvested) that had an aggregate market value of approximately $180 million.

Significant Accomplishments in 2016

 

Production growth – In 2016, our production averaged 1,542.1 Mmcfe per day, an increase of 11% from 2015. Drilling in the Marcellus Shale play in Pennsylvania drove our production growth. In addition, our merger with Memorial Resource Development Corp. (“Memorial” or “MRD Merger”) in September 2016 also had a positive impact on production. Our capital program is designed to allocate investments based on growth projects that produce the highest returns.

 

Acquisition completed In September 2016, we completed our merger with Memorial through the issuance of 77.0 million shares of Range common stock in exchange for all outstanding shares of Memorial using an exchange ratio of 0.375 of a share of Range common stock for each share of Memorial common stock. This merger adds an additional premier onshore U.S. natural gas resource play to our existing core operating areas. The North Louisiana location provides geographic and marketing diversity to our high quality Appalachia basin assets. We anticipate continuing to improve drilling and well performance in this play by applying best practices from our Marcellus division and capitalizing on synergies.

 

Proved reserves – Total proved reserves increased 22% in 2016, from 9.9 Tcfe to 12.1 Tcfe. This achievement is the result of continued drilling success and acquisitions. The MRD Merger added 1.3 Tcfe to our proved reserves as of the acquisition date. While consistent growth is challenging to sustain, we believe the quality of our technical teams and our substantial inventory of high quality drilling locations provide the basis for future reserve and production growth.

 

Low price environment initiatives As a result of the significant drop in commodity prices, we took action to reduce operating costs and general and administrative costs through additional workforce reductions in early 2016. In February 2016, the board of directors also approved a reduction of our quarterly dividend from $0.04 per share to $0.02 per share.

 

Successful drilling program – In 2016, we drilled 108 gross natural gas and oil wells. We replaced 247% of our production through drilling in 2016 and our overall drilling success rate was 100%. We continue to build our drilling inventory which is critical to our ability to drill a large number of wells each year on a cost effective and efficient basis.

 

Large resource potential – Maintaining an exposure to large potential resources is important. We continued expansion of our shale plays in 2016. We have three large unconventional and prospective plays in Pennsylvania: the Marcellus, Utica/Point Pleasant and Upper Devonian shales. These plays cover expansive areas, provide multi-year drilling opportunities, are in many cases stacked pay and, collectively, have sustainable lower risk growth profiles. Our activity in the North Louisiana targets four of the stacked over-pressured pay zones in the Lower Cotton Valley formation. The economics of these plays have been enhanced by continued advancements in drilling and completion technologies.  

 

Focus on financial flexibility – We ended 2016 with more debt than year-end 2015, primarily due to the MRD Merger. As of September 16, 2016 (the date of the MRD Merger), we repaid the $597.0 million balance outstanding on the Memorial credit facility with funds borrowed under our bank credit facility. In addition, as of that same date, we completed a debt exchange offer to exchange all validly tendered and accepted Memorial senior notes assumed in the MRD Merger. We issued $329.2 million senior unsecured 5.875% notes due 2022 and also completed our concurrent offer to purchase for cash the senior notes assumed in the MRD Merger. We purchased $269.7 million principal amount of senior notes with funds borrowed under our credit facility. Debt per mcfe of proved reserves was $0.32 at December 31, 2016 compared to $0.27 at December 31, 2015. As of December 31, 2016, we maintained a $4.0 billion bank credit facility, with a borrowing base of $3.0 billion and committed borrowing capacity of $2.0 billion. As we have done historically, we may adjust our capital program, divest of non-strategic assets and use derivatives to protect a portion of

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our future production from commodity price volatility to ensure adequate funds to execute our drilling program and maintain liquidity.

 

Debt exchange completed – In September 2016, we also completed a debt exchange offer for substantially all of our outstanding senior subordinated notes for new senior notes. The new senior notes are unsecured. In addition to exchanging over 95% of face amount of our senior subordinated notes for new senior notes, we also received consents to amend the indentures that governed the existing senior subordinated notes. The amendments included eliminating certain of the covenants, restrictive provisions, reporting requirements and events of default. Once a majority of the consents was received, the amendments were accepted for all senior subordinated note holders, even if the remaining senior subordinated notes were not exchanged.

 

Dispositions completed – During 2016, we completed several divestitures. In first quarter 2016, we sold our non-operated interest in certain wells and gathering facilities in northeast Pennsylvania for proceeds of $111.5 million and we recorded a loss of $2.1 million related to this sale. In the first nine months 2016, we sold various properties in Western Oklahoma for proceeds of $78.6 million and we recorded a loss of $5.3 million. We also received $3.7 million of additional proceeds during the year related to the sale of miscellaneous proved and unproved property, inventory and other assets.

 

Leasing acquisitions completed – In 2016, we leased or renewed $33.1 million of acreage located in our core areas, primarily in the Marcellus Shale. We continue to see outstanding results in the Marcellus Shale. Production in the Marcellus Shale increased 14% and we continue to prove up acreage, acquire additional acreage and gain access to additional pipeline and processing capacity.

 

Continued development of processing, pipeline takeaway capacity and marketing of NGLs – We continue our efforts to ensure we have sufficient processing capacity and marketing agreements in place for our Pennsylvania production. In 2012, we entered into a fifteen year agreement to transport ethane and propane from the tailgate of a third-party processing plant to a terminal and dock facility near Philadelphia (“Mariner East”). At the end of December 2014, line fill on the propane portion of this pipeline was completed with propane delivered to storage caverns to be sold at a later date. Propane and ethane operations on Mariner East was fully functional by early 2016.

Industry Operating Environment

We operate entirely within the continental United States. The oil and natural gas industry is affected by many factors that we cannot control. Government regulations, particularly in the areas of taxation, energy, climate change and the environment, can have a significant impact on our operations and profitability. The impact of these factors is extremely difficult to accurately predict or anticipate. It is difficult for us to predict the occurrence of events that may affect commodity prices or the degree to which these prices will be affected; however, the prices we receive for the commodities we produce will generally approximate current market prices in the geographic region of the production, not including the impact of our derivative program.

Natural gas prices are primarily determined by North American supply and demand which is heavily influenced by weather and storage levels. The New York Mercantile Exchange (“NYMEX”) monthly settlement prices for natural gas averaged $2.51 per mcf in 2016, with a high of $3.23 per mcf in December and a low of $1.71 per mcf in March. In 2015, monthly NYMEX settlement prices averaged $2.65 per mcf. Since the end of 2016, natural gas prices have improved, with the monthly settlement price for natural gas increasing from $3.23 per mcf in December 2016 to $3.39 per mcf in February 2017. Natural gas prices may continue to be under pressure largely due to excess supply of natural gas caused by the high productivity of shale plays in the United States which recently has outpaced demand. Demand for drilling rigs, oilfield supplies and drill pipe have declined with falling commodity prices but such declines tend to lag behind the declines in natural gas and crude oil prices. Depressed natural gas prices reflect the expectation there will be an oversupply of natural gas in the future and storage levels will remain higher than normal. However, the oversupply is shrinking and if this trend continues, prices could rise.

Significant factors that will impact 2017 crude oil prices include worldwide economic conditions, political and economic developments in the Middle East, demand in Asian and European markets and the extent to which members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries and other oil exporting nations choose to manage oil supply through export quotas. NYMEX monthly settlement prices for oil averaged $43.69 per barrel in 2016, with a high of $52.17 per barrel in December and a low of $30.62 per barrel in February. In 2015, NYMEX monthly settlement oil averaged $49.21 per barrel. Since the end of 2016, crude oil prices have improved, with the monthly settlement price for crude oil rising from $52.17 per barrel in December 2016 to $52.61 per barrel in January 2017. The likelihood of a sustained recovery in worldwide demand for energy is difficult to predict. As a result, we expect crude oil commodity prices will continue to be volatile in 2017.

NGLs prices are generally determined by North American supply and demand. The growth of unconventional drilling has substantially increased the supply of NGLs, which until recently, caused a significant decline in NGLs component prices. Additional export facilities have been built and NGLs exports are increasing along with the expansion of ethane cracking capacity which has recently improved NGLs pricing in the United States. While NGLs component prices have improved in recent months, we expect prices will continue to be volatile in 2017.

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Natural gas, NGLs and oil prices affect:

 

our revenues, profitability and cash flow;

 

the quantity of natural gas, NGLs and oil that we can economically produce;

 

the quantity of natural gas, NGLs and oil shown as proved reserves;

 

the amount of cash flow available to us for capital expenditures; and

 

our ability to borrow and raise additional capital.

Natural gas and NGLs prices are likely to affect us more than oil prices because approximately 96% of our proved reserves is natural gas and NGLs. Any continued or extended decline in natural gas, NGLs and oil prices could have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations, cash flows and access to capital. To achieve more predictable cash flows and to reduce our exposure to downward price fluctuations, we currently, and may in the future, use derivative instruments to hedge future sales prices on our natural gas, NGLs and oil production. The use of derivative instruments has in the past, and may in the future, prevent us from realizing the full benefit of upward price movements but also partially protect us from declining price movements.

Segment and Geographical Information

Our operations consist of one reportable segment. We have a single, company-wide management team that administers all properties as a whole rather than by discrete operating segments. We track only basic operational data by area. We do not maintain complete separate financial statement information by area. We measure financial performance as a single enterprise and not on an area-by-area basis. Our operations are limited to the United States.

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Outlook for 2017

For 2017, we have established a $1.15 billion capital budget for natural gas, NGLs, crude oil and condensate related activities, excluding proved property acquisitions, for which we do not budget. As has been our historical practice, we will periodically review our capital expenditures throughout the year and may adjust the budget based on commodity prices, drilling success and other factors. Throughout the year, we allocate capital on a project-by-project basis, across our entire asset base to optimize returns without regard to individual areas. To the extent our 2017 capital requirements exceed our internally generated cash flow, proceeds from asset sales, drawing on our committed capacity under our bank credit facility, debt or equity may be used to fund these requirements. The prices we receive for our natural gas, NGLs and oil production are largely based on current market prices, which are beyond our control. The price risk on a portion of our forecasted natural gas, NGLs and oil production for 2017 is mitigated using commodity derivative contracts and we intend to continue to enter into these transactions.

 

 


7


 

Production, Price and Cost History

The following table sets forth information regarding natural gas, NGLs and oil production, realized prices and production costs for the last three years. For more information, see “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.”

 

Year Ended December 31,

 

 

2016

 

  

2015

 

  

2014

 

Production

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Natural gas (Mmcf)

 

375,811

 

  

 

362,687

  

  

 

286,926

  

Natural gas liquids (Mbbls)

 

27,826

 

  

 

20,356

  

  

 

18,821

  

Crude oil and condensate (Mbbls)

 

3,609

 

  

 

4,084

  

  

 

4,070

  

Total (Mmcfe) (a)

 

564,420

 

  

 

509,328

  

  

 

424,267

  

Average sales prices (excluding derivative settlements)

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Natural gas (per mcf)

$

2.01

  

  

$

2.13

  

  

$

3.98

  

Natural gas liquids (per bbl)

 

11.44

 

  

 

8.67

  

  

 

23.60

  

Crude oil and condensate (per bbl)

 

34.60

 

  

 

34.28

  

  

 

77.80

  

Total (per mcfe) (a)

 

2.12

 

  

 

2.14

  

  

 

4.48

  

Average realized prices (including derivative settlements that qualified for hedge accounting):

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Natural gas (per mcf)

$

2.01

  

  

$

2.13

  

  

$

3.99

  

Natural gas liquids (per bbl)

 

11.44

 

  

 

8.67

  

  

 

23.60

  

Crude oil and condensate (per bbl)

 

34.60

 

  

 

34.28

  

  

 

79.16

  

Total (per mcfe) (a)

 

2.12

 

  

 

2.14

  

  

 

4.51

  

Average realized prices (including all derivative settlements):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Natural gas (per mcf)

$

2.68

 

 

$

3.07

 

 

$

3.79

 

Natural gas liquids (per bbl)

 

13.16

 

 

 

10.73

 

 

 

24.31

 

Crude oil and condensate (per bbl)

 

47.82

 

 

 

71.28

 

 

 

79.75

 

Total (per mcfe) (a)

 

2.74

 

 

 

3.18

 

 

 

4.41

 

Average realized prices (including all derivative settlements and third party transportation costs)

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Natural gas (per mcf)

$

1.60

  

  

$

2.12

  

  

$

2.80

  

Natural gas liquids (per bbl)

 

7.33

 

  

 

8.12

  

  

 

22.04

  

Crude oil and condensate (per bbl)

 

47.82

 

  

 

71.28

  

  

 

79.75

  

Total (per mcfe) (a)

 

1.74

 

  

 

2.41

  

  

 

3.64

  

Direct operating costs

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Lease operating (per mcfe) (a)

$

0.16

  

  

$

0.25

  

  

$

0.31

  

Workovers (per mcfe) (a)

 

0.01

 

  

 

0.01

  

  

 

0.03

  

Stock-based compensation (per mcfe) (a)

 

  

  

 

0.01

  

  

 

0.01

  

Total (per mcfe) (a)

$

0.17

 

 

$

0.27

 

 

$

0.35

 

 

(a) 

Oil and NGLs are converted at the rate of one barrel equals six mcf based upon the approximate relative energy content of oil to natural gas, which is not indicative of the relationship of oil and natural gas prices.


8


 

Proved Reserves

The following table sets forth our estimated proved reserves for years ended 2016, 2015 and 2014 based on the average of prices on the first day of each month of the given calendar year, in accordance with SEC rules. Oil includes both crude oil and condensate. We have no natural gas, NGLs or oil reserves from non-traditional sources. Additionally, we do not provide optional disclosures of probable or possible reserves.

 

  

Summary of Oil and Gas Reserves as of Year-End
Based on Average Prices

 

Reserve Category

  

Natural Gas
(Mmcf)

 

  

NGLs
(Mbbls)

 

  

Oil
(Mbbls)

 

  

Total
(Mmcfe) (a)

 

  

%

 

2016:

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Proved

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Developed

  

 

4,352,141

 

  

 

363,852

 

 

 

39,110

 

 

 

6,769,908

 

 

 

56

Undeveloped

  

 

3,518,275

  

  

 

266,214

 

 

 

31,143

 

 

 

5,302,414

 

 

 

44

%

Total Proved

  

 

7,870,416

  

  

 

630,066

 

 

 

70,253

 

 

 

12,072,322

 

 

 

100

%

 

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2015:

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Proved

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Developed

  

 

3,376,165

 

  

 

309,306

 

 

 

31,679

 

 

 

5,422,075

 

 

 

55

Undeveloped

  

 

2,901,533

  

  

 

239,828

 

 

 

21,514

 

 

 

4,469,588

 

 

 

45

Total Proved

  

 

6,277,698

  

  

 

549,134

 

 

 

53,193

 

 

 

9,891,663

 

 

 

100

 

2014:

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Proved

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Developed

  

 

3,583,051

 

  

 

270,271

 

 

 

24,180

 

 

 

5,349,761

 

 

 

52

Undeveloped

  

 

3,339,785

  

  

 

245,636

 

 

 

24,478

 

 

 

4,960,468

 

 

 

48

Total Proved

  

 

6,922,836

  

  

 

515,907

 

 

 

48,658

 

 

 

10,310,229

 

 

 

100

 

(a)

Oil and NGLs are converted to mcfe at the rate of one barrel equals six mcf based upon the relative energy content of oil to natural gas, which is not indicative of the relationship of oil and natural gas prices.

The following table sets forth summary information by area with respect to estimated proved reserves at December 31, 2016:

 

Reserve Volumes

 

 

PV-10 (a)

 

 

Natural Gas
(Mmcf)

 

  

NGLs
(Mbbls)

 

  

Oil
(Mbbls)

 

  

Total
(Mmcfe)

 

  

%

 

 

Amount
(In thousands)

 

  

%

 

Appalachian Region

 

6,768,580

 

 

 

579,713

 

 

 

52,732

 

 

 

10,563,248

 

  

 

87

 

$

2,850,352

 

 

 

76

North Louisiana Region

 

975,912

 

 

 

40,080

 

 

 

11,613

 

 

 

1,286,068

 

 

 

11

%

 

 

817,794

 

 

 

22

%

Other

 

125,924

 

 

 

10,273

 

 

 

5,908

 

 

 

223,006

  

  

 

2

 

 

59,285

 

 

 

2

Total

 

7,870,416

 

 

 

630,066

 

 

 

70,253

 

 

 

12,072,322

  

  

 

100

 

$

3,727,431

 

 

 

100

 

(a) 

PV-10 was prepared using the twelve-month average prices for 2016, discounted at 10% per annum. Year-end PV-10 is a non-GAAP financial measure as defined by the SEC. We believe that the presentation of PV-10 is relevant and useful to our investors as supplemental disclosure to the standardized measure, or after tax amount, because it presents the discounted future net cash flows attributable to our proved reserves prior to taking into account future corporate income taxes and our current tax structure. While the standardized measure is dependent on the unique tax situation of each company, PV-10 is based on prices and discount factors that are consistent for all companies. Because of this, PV-10 can be used within the industry and by creditors and securities analysts to evaluate estimated net cash flows from proved reserves on a more comparable basis. Our total standardized measure was $3.5 billion at December 31, 2016. The difference between the standardized measure and the PV-10 amount is the discounted estimated future income tax of $275.5 million at December 31, 2016. Included in the $3.7 billion pretax PV-10 is $2.9 billion related to proved developed reserves.

Reserve Estimation

All reserve information in this report is based on estimates prepared by our petroleum engineering staff. We also have the following independent petroleum consultants conduct an audit of our year-end 2016 reserves:  Wright & Company, Inc. (Appalachian) and Netherland, Sewell & Associates, Inc. (North Louisiana). These engineering firms were selected for their geographic expertise and their historical experience in engineering certain properties. The proved reserve audits performed for 2016, 2015 and 2014, in the aggregate represented 96%, 94% and 96% of our proved reserves. The reserve audits performed for 2016, 2015 and 2014, in the aggregate represented 96%, 97% and 98% of our 2016, 2015 and 2014 associated pretax present value of proved reserves discounted

9


 

at ten percent. Copies of the summary reserve reports prepared by our independent petroleum consultants are included as an exhibit to this Annual Report on Form 10-K. The technical person at each independent petroleum consulting firm responsible for reviewing the reserve estimates presented herein meets the requirements regarding qualifications, independence, objectivity and confidentiality as set forth in the Standards Pertaining to the Estimating and Auditing of Oil and Gas Reserves Information promulgated by the Society of Petroleum Engineers. We maintain an internal staff of petroleum engineers and geoscience professionals who work closely with our independent petroleum consultants to ensure the integrity, accuracy and timeliness of data furnished during the reserve audit process. Throughout the year, our technical team meets periodically with representatives of our independent petroleum consultants to review properties and discuss methods and assumptions. While we have no formal committee specifically designated to review reserves reporting and the reserve estimation process, our senior management reviews and approves significant changes to our proved reserves. We provide historical information to our consultants for our largest producing properties such as ownership interest, natural gas, NGLs and oil production, well test data, commodity prices and operating and development costs. Our consultants perform an independent analysis and differences are reviewed with our Senior Vice President of Reservoir Engineering and Economics. In some cases, additional meetings are held to review identified reserve differences. The reserve auditor estimates of proved reserves and the pretax present value of such reserves discounted at 10% did not differ from our estimates by more than 10% in the aggregate. However, when compared on a lease-by-lease, field-by-field or area-by-area basis, some of our estimates may be greater than those of our auditor and some may be less than the estimates of the reserve auditors. When such differences do not exceed 10% in the aggregate, our reserve auditors are satisfied that the proved reserves and pretax present value of such reserves discounted at 10% are reasonable and will issue an unqualified opinion. Remaining differences are not resolved due to the limited cost benefit of continuing such analysis.

Historical variances between our reserve estimates and the aggregate estimates of our independent petroleum consultants have been less than 5%. All of our reserve estimates are reviewed and approved by our Senior Vice President of Reservoir Engineering and Economics, Mr. Alan Farquharson, who reports directly to our Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer. Our Senior Vice President of Reservoir Engineering and Economics holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Electrical Engineering from the Pennsylvania State University. Before joining Range, he held various technical and managerial positions with Amoco, Hunt Oil and Union Pacific Resources and has more than thirty-five years of engineering experience in the oil and gas industry. During the year, our reserves group may also perform separate, detailed technical reviews of reserve estimates for significant acquisitions or for properties with problematic indicators such as excessively long lives, sudden changes in performance or changes in economic or operating conditions. We did not file any reports during the year ended December 31, 2016 with any federal authority or agency with respect to our estimate of natural gas and oil reserves.

Reserve Technologies

Proved reserves are those quantities of natural gas, natural gas liquids and oil that by analysis of geoscience and engineering data can be estimated with reasonable certainty to be economically producible from a given date forward, from known reservoirs and under existing economic conditions, operating methods, and government regulations. The term “reasonable certainty” implies a high degree of confidence that the quantities of natural gas, NGLs and oil actually recovered will equal or exceed the estimate. To achieve reasonable certainty, our internal technical staff employs technologies that have been demonstrated to yield results with consistency and repeatability. The technologies and economic data used in the estimation of our proved reserves include, but are not limited to, empirical evidence through drilling results and well performance, well logs, geologic maps and available downhole and production data, seismic data, well test data and reservoir simulation modeling.

Reporting of Natural Gas Liquids

We produce NGLs as part of the processing of our natural gas. The extraction of NGLs in the processing of natural gas reduces the volume of natural gas available for sale. At December 31, 2016, NGLs represented approximately 31% of our total proved reserves on an mcf equivalent basis. NGLs are products priced by the gallon (and sold by the barrel) to the end-user. In reporting proved reserves and production of NGLs, we have included production and reserves in barrels. Prices for a barrel of NGLs in 2016 averaged approximately 67% lower than the average prices for equivalent volumes of oil. We report all production information related to natural gas net of the effect of any reduction in natural gas volumes resulting from the processing of NGLs. As of December 31, 2016, we have 308.9 Mmbbls of ethane reserves (1,367 Bcfe) associated with our Marcellus Shale properties, which are included in NGLs proved reserves and represent 49% of our total NGLs reserves. We currently include ethane in our proved reserves which match volumes to be delivered under our existing long-term, extendable ethane contracts.

10


 

Proved Undeveloped Reserves (PUDs)

As of December 31, 2016, our PUDs totaled 31.1 Mmbbls of crude oil, 266.2 Mmbbls of NGLs and 3.5 Tcf of natural gas, for a total of 5.3 Tcfe. Costs incurred in 2016 relating to the development of PUDs were approximately $245.6 million. Approximately 86% of our PUDs at year-end 2016 were associated with the Marcellus Shale. All PUD drilling locations are scheduled to be drilled prior to the end of 2021 with more than 90% of the future development costs expected to be spent in the next three years. Changes in PUDs that occurred during the year were due to:

 

conversion of approximately 1.1 Tcfe of PUDs into proved developed reserves;

 

addition of new PUDs from drilling consisting of 1.2 Tcfe;

 

addition of new PUDs from acquisitions of 568.7 Bcfe;

 

145.2 Bcfe net positive revision with 268.7 Bcfe of reserves reclassified to unproved because of previously planned wells not to be drilled within the original five-year development horizon offset by improved recovery and other positive performance revisions of 413.9 Bcfe; and

 

65.5 Bcfe reduction from the sale of properties.

For an additional description of changes in PUDs for 2016, see Note 19 to our consolidated financial statements. We believe our PUDs reclassified to unproved can be included in our future proved reserves as these locations are added back into our five-year development plan.

Proved Reserves (PV-10)

The following table sets forth the estimated future net cash flows, excluding open derivative contracts, from proved reserves, the present value of those net cash flows discounted at a rate of 10% (PV-10), and the expected benchmark prices and average field prices used in projecting net cash flows over the past five years. Our reserve estimates do not include any probable or possible reserves (in millions, except prices):

 

 

2016

 

 

 

2015

 

 

 

2014

 

 

 

2013

 

 

 

2012

 

Future net cash flows

$

10,301

 

 

$

8,666

 

 

$

26,993

 

 

$

21,029

 

 

$

11,156

 

Present value:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Before income tax

 

3,727

 

 

 

3,029

 

 

 

10,070

 

 

 

7,898

 

 

 

3,960

 

After income tax (Standardized Measure)

 

3,452

 

 

 

2,726

 

 

 

7,593

 

 

 

5,862

 

 

 

3,224

 

Benchmark prices (NYMEX):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gas price (per mcf)

 

2.48

 

 

 

2.59

 

 

 

4.35

 

 

 

3.67

 

 

 

2.76

 

Oil price (per bbl)

 

42.68

 

 

 

50.13

 

 

 

94.42

 

 

 

97.33

 

 

 

95.05

 

Wellhead prices:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gas price (per mcf)

 

2.07

 

 

 

2.07

 

 

 

4.14

 

 

 

3.75

 

 

 

2.75

 

Oil price (per bbl)

 

37.41

 

 

 

35.07

 

 

 

79.04

 

 

 

86.66

 

 

 

86.91

 

NGLs price (per bbl)

 

13.44

 

 

 

11.74

 

 

 

27.20

 

 

 

25.93

 

 

 

32.23

 

Future net cash flows represent projected revenues from the sale of proved reserves, net of production and development costs (including operating expenses and production taxes). Revenues are based on a twelve-month unweighted average of the first day of the month pricing, without escalation. Future cash flows are reduced by estimated production costs, administrative costs, costs to develop and produce the proved reserves and abandonment costs, all based on current economic conditions at each year-end. There can be no assurance that the proved reserves will be produced in the future or that prices, production or development costs will remain constant. There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating reserves and related information and different reservoir engineers often arrive at different estimates for the same properties.

Property Overview

Currently, our natural gas and oil operations are concentrated in the Appalachian and North Louisiana regions of the United States, primarily in the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania and the Lower Cotton Valley formation in Louisiana. Our North Louisiana properties were acquired in September 2016. Our properties consist of interests in developed and undeveloped natural gas and oil leases. These interests entitle us to drill for and produce natural gas, NGLs, crude oil and condensate from specific areas. Our interests are mostly in the form of working interests and, to a lesser extent, royalty and overriding royalty interests. We have a single company-wide management team that administers all properties as a whole. We track only basic operational data by area. We do not maintain complete separate financial statement information by area. We measure financial performance as a single enterprise and not on an area-by-area basis. The table below summarizes our operating data for the year ended December 31, 2016.

11


 

Region

 

 

Average
Daily
Production
(mcfe per day)

 

 

 

Production
(Mmcfe)

 

 

 

Percentage of
Production

 

 

 

Proved
Reserves
(Mmcfe)

 

 

 

Percentage of
Proved
Reserves

 

Appalachian

  

 

1,381,366

 

 

 

505,580

 

  

 

90

 

 

10,563,248

 

  

 

87

North Louisiana (a)

  

 

119,113

 

 

 

43,595

  

  

 

8

 

 

1,286,068

  

  

 

11

Other

  

 

41,653

 

 

 

15,245

  

  

 

2

 

 

223,005

  

  

 

2

Total

  

 

1,542,132

 

 

 

564,420

  

  

 

100

 

 

12,072,321

  

  

 

100

 

(a)

MRD Merger effective 9/16/2016.

The following table summarizes our costs incurred for the year ended December 31, 2016 (in thousands):

Region

 

 

 

Acreage
Purchases

 

 

 

Acquisitions

 

 

 

Development
Costs

 

 

 

Exploration
Costs

 

 

 

Gathering
Facilities

 

 

 

Asset
Retirement
Obligations

 

 

 

Total

 

Appalachian

 

$

30,038

 

 

$

 

 

$

427,950

 

 

$

60,643

 

 

$

3,453

 

 

$

(24,492

 

$

497,592

 

North Louisiana

 

 

3,132

 

 

 

3,120,680

 

 

 

62,334

 

 

 

9,060

 

 

 

14

 

 

 

403

 

 

 

3,195,623

 

Other

 

 

(28

 

 

 

 

 

7,511

 

 

 

302

 

 

 

128

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

7,938

 

Total costs incurred

 

$

33,142

 

 

$

3,120,680

 

 

$

497,795

 

 

$

70,005

 

 

$

3,595

 

 

$

(24,064

 

$

3,701,153

 

Approximately 87% of our proved reserves at December 31, 2016 is located in the Marcellus Shale in our Appalachian region. This play has a large portfolio of drilling opportunities. The following table below sets forth annual production volumes, average sales prices and production cost data for our wells in the Marcellus Shale which, as of December 31, 2016, is our only field in which reserves are greater than 15% of our total proved reserves.

 

Marcellus Shale

 

 

2016

 

  

2015

 

  

2014

 

Production:

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Natural gas (Mmcf)

 

327,000

 

  

 

301,721

 

  

 

224,034

 

NGLs (Mbbls)

 

25,666

 

  

 

19,389

 

  

 

17,093

 

Crude oil and condensate (Mbbls)

 

2,783

 

  

 

3,387

 

  

 

3,089

 

Total Mmcfe (a)

 

497,697

 

  

 

438,377

 

  

 

345,127

 

Sales Prices: (b)

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Natural gas (per mcf)

$

0.79

 

  

$

0.94

 

  

$

2.72

 

NGLs (per bbl)

 

5.00

 

  

 

5.66

 

  

 

20.32

 

Crude oil and condensate (per bbl)

 

32.24

 

  

 

31.78

 

  

 

73.77

 

Total (per mcfe)

 

0.96

 

  

 

1.14

 

  

 

3.43

 

Production Costs:

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

  

 

 

 

Lease operating (per mcfe)

 $

0.11

 

  

 $

0.16

 

  

$

0.19

 

Production and ad valorem tax (per mcfe) (c)

 

0.05

 

  

 

0.05

 

  

 

0.08

 

 

(a) 

Oil and NGLs are converted at the rate of one barrel equals six mcf based upon the approximate relative energy content of oil to natural gas, which is not indicative of the relationship of oil and natural gas prices.

(b) 

We do not record derivatives or the results of derivatives at the field level. Includes deductions for third party transportation, gathering and compression expense.

(c) 

Includes Pennsylvania impact fee.

Appalachian Region

Our properties in this area are located in the Appalachian Basin in the northeastern United States, predominantly in Pennsylvania. Currently, our reserves are primarily in the Marcellus Shale formation but also include the Utica/Point Pleasant, Medina and Upper Devonian formations which principally produce at depths ranging from 3,500 feet to 11,500 feet. We own 4,526 net producing wells, 99% of which we operate. Our average working interest in this region is 89%. As of December 31, 2016, we have approximately 975,000 gross (899,000 net) acres under lease.

Reserves at December 31, 2016 were 10.6 Tcfe, an increase of 966.7 Bcfe, or 10%, from 2015. Drilling additions of 1.3 Tcfe and favorable reserve revisions for performance and improved recovery were partially offset by production, downward revisions for

12


 

proved undeveloped reserves no longer in our current five year development plan of 245.5 Tcfe, sales of 137.5 Bcfe and negative pricing revisions. Annual production increased 4% from 2015. Annual production in 2015 includes production from our Virginia and West Virginia properties which were sold at the end of 2015.  During 2016, we spent $488.6 million in this region to drill 87 (82.3 net) development wells and 1.0 (1.0 net) exploratory well, all of which were productive. At December 31, 2016, the Appalachian region had an inventory of over 300 proven drilling locations and 3 proven recompletions. During the year, the Appalachian region drilled 91 proven locations, added 81 new proven drilling locations and deleted or sold 67 proven drilling locations with deleted reserves reclassified to unproved because of lower future capital spending in response to lower commodity prices. During the year, the region achieved a 100% drilling success rate.

Marcellus Shale

We began operations in the Marcellus Shale in Pennsylvania during 2004. The Marcellus Shale is an unconventional reservoir, which produces natural gas, NGLs and condensate. This has been our largest investment area over the last eight years. We had over 300 proven drilling locations at December 31, 2016. Our 2016 production from the Marcellus Shale increased 14% from 2015. During 2016, we drilled 87.0 (82.3 net) development wells and 1.0 (1.0 net) exploratory well, all of which were successful. In 2017, we plan to drill over 109 net wells. During 2016, we had approximately three drilling rigs in the field and expect to run an average of four rigs throughout 2017.

We have long-term agreements with third parties to provide gathering and processing services and infrastructure assets in the Marcellus Shale, which includes gathering and residue gas pipelines, compression, cryogenic processing, de-ethanization and NGL fractionation. We have executed an ethane sales contract in southwestern Pennsylvania whereby a third party purchases and transports ethane from the tailgate of third-party processing and fractionation facilities to the international border for further deliveries into Canada. Initial deliveries commenced in second half 2013. Also in 2011, we entered into an agreement to transport ethane to the Gulf Coast where initial deliveries also commenced in late 2013.

In 2012, we entered into a fifteen year agreement to transport ethane and propane from the tailgate of a third-party processing plant to a terminal and dock facility near Philadelphia. Propane and ethane operations became fully functional by the end of first quarter 2016. In the meantime, since 2012, we were transporting a portion of our propane by rail and truck to the terminal and dock facility near Philadelphia for sale to domestic and international customers. Also in 2012, we executed a fifteen year agreement relating to ethane sales from the same terminal near Philadelphia which also began operations in early 2016.  

North Louisiana

We began operations in North Louisiana in September 2016 as a result of the MRD Merger. These operations are focused on over-pressured, liquids-rich natural gas opportunities in multiple zones in the Lower Cotton Valley formation. The Lower Cotton Valley formation extends across East Texas, Louisiana and Southern Arkansas. The formation has been under development since the 1930’s and is characterized by thick, multi-zone natural gas and oil reservoirs with well-known geologic characteristics and long-lived, predictable production profiles. We own 392 net producing wells in these locations, 99% of which we operate. Our average working interest is 71%. As of December 31, 2016, we have approximately 210,000 gross (187,000 net) acres under lease.

Total proved reserves were 1.3 Tcfe at December 31, 2016. At December 31, 2016, this area had a development inventory of over 60 proven drilling locations and over 50 proven recompletions. Since the acquisition, this region spent $71.4 million to drill 20 (18.6 net) development wells, all of which were productive. Our operational focus in the Lower Cotton Valley will be on a horizontal development drilling program. We expect our redevelopment program to target four of the stacked over-pressured pay zones in the Lower Cotton Valley formation-zones we term the Upper Red, Lower Red, Lower Deep Pink and Upper Deep Pink. These four zones have an overall thickness ranging from 525 to 1,800 feet. We expect to run an average of four rigs throughout 2017.

We have long-term agreements with third parties to provide gathering, processing and transportation services and infrastructure assets in North Louisiana. We have entered into an area of mutual interest and exclusivity agreement with one of these parties whereby they have the exclusive right to provide midstream services to support our current and future production within such area.

Other

Our other operations include drilling, production and field operations in the Texas Panhandle, as well as in the Anadarko Basin of Western Oklahoma and the Nemaha Uplift of Northern Oklahoma and Kansas. We own 337 net producing wells in these locations, 97% of which we operate. Our average working interest is 79%. As of December 31, 2016, we have approximately 291,000 gross (209,000 net) acres under lease.

Total proved reserves decreased 72.1 Bcfe, or 24%, at December 31, 2016 when compared to year-end 2015. Reserves declined due to production, property sales (27.1 Bcfe), downward revisions for proved undeveloped reserves no longer in our current five year development plan (23.2 Bcfe) and negative pricing revisions. Annual production volumes decreased 37% from 2015. During 2016, this region spent $7.8 million related to three wells they began drilling in fourth quarter 2016.

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At December 31, 2016, this area had a development inventory of over 40 proven drilling locations and over 25 proven recompletions. During the year, we did not drill any proven locations or add or delete any proven locations in this area. Development projects include recompletions and infill drilling. These activities also include increasing reserves and production through cost control, upgrading lifting equipment, improving gathering systems and surface facilities, and performing restimulations and refracturing operations.

Divestitures

Over the last three years, we have divested over $1.2 billion of non-strategic assets in order to increase capital resources available for other activities, reduce our unit cost structure, create organizational and operating efficiencies and increase financial flexibility through reduced debt levels. In 2016, we sold the following assets:

Pennsylvania. In first quarter 2016, we closed the sale of our non-operated interest in certain natural gas and oil properties and gathering assets in Northeast Pennsylvania for cash proceeds of $111.5 million, before closing adjustments.

Western Oklahoma. In the first nine months 2016, we sold our properties in Western Oklahoma for proceeds of $78.6 million.

Miscellaneous. During the year ended December 31, 2016, we sold miscellaneous unproved property, inventory and other assets for proceeds of $3.7 million.

Producing Wells

The following table sets forth information relating to productive wells at December 31, 2016. If we own both a royalty and a working interest in a well, such interest is included in the table below. Wells are classified as natural gas or crude oil according to their predominant production stream. We do not have a significant number of dual completions.

 

 

 

 

Average

 

 

 

Total Wells

 

Working

 

 

 

Gross

 

Net

 

Interest

 

Natural gas

 

5,976

 

5,148

 

86%

 

Crude oil

 

114

 

107

 

94%

 

Total

 

6,090

 

5,255

 

86%

 

 

The day-to-day operations of natural gas and oil properties are the responsibility of the operator designated under pooling or operating agreements. The operator supervises production, maintains production records, employs or contracts for field personnel and performs other functions. An operator receives reimbursement for direct expenses incurred in the performance of its duties as well as monthly per-well producing and drilling overhead reimbursement at rates customarily charged by unaffiliated third parties. The charges customarily vary with the depth and location of the well being operated.

Drilling Activity

The following table summarizes drilling activity for the past three years. Gross wells reflect the sum of all wells in which we own an interest. Net wells reflect the sum of our working interests in gross wells. As of December 31, 2016, we were in the process of drilling 36 (33.7 net) wells.

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

2014

 

 

Gross

 

 

Net

 

 

Gross

 

 

Net

 

 

Gross

 

 

Net

 

Development wells

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Productive

 

107.0

 

 

 

100.9

 

 

 

133.0

  

 

 

122.3

  

 

 

228.0

  

 

 

215.7

  

Dry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

1.0

  

 

 

1.0

  

Exploratory wells

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Productive

 

1.0

 

 

 

1.0

 

 

 

19.0

  

 

 

19.0

  

 

 

25.0

  

 

 

21.4

  

Dry

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

1.0

  

 

 

1.0

  

Total wells

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Productive

 

108.0

 

 

 

101.9

 

 

 

152.0

  

 

 

141.3

  

 

 

253.0

  

 

 

237.1

  

Dry

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

2.0

  

 

 

2.0

  

Total

 

108.0

  

 

 

101.9

  

 

 

152.0

  

 

 

141.3

  

 

 

255.0

  

 

 

239.1

  

Success ratio

 

100

 

 

100

 

 

100

 

 

100

 

 

99.2

 

 

99.2

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Gross and Net Acreage

We own interests in developed and undeveloped natural gas and oil acreage. These ownership interests generally take the form of working interests in oil and natural gas leases that have varying terms. Developed acreage includes leased acreage that is allocated or assignable to producing wells or wells capable of production even though shallower or deeper horizons may not have been fully explored. Undeveloped acreage includes leased acres on which wells have not been drilled or completed to a point that would permit the production of commercial quantities of natural gas or oil, regardless of whether or not the acreage contains proved reserves. The following table sets forth certain information regarding the developed and undeveloped acreage in which we own a working interest as of December 31, 2016. Acreage related to option acreage, royalty, overriding royalty and other similar interests is excluded from this summary:

 

 

Developed Acres

 

 

 

Undeveloped Acres

 

 

 

Total Acres

 

 

Gross

 

 

 

Net

 

 

 

Gross

 

 

 

Net

 

 

 

Gross

 

 

 

Net

 

Kansas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22,348

 

 

 

22,236

 

 

 

22,348

 

 

 

22,236

 

Louisiana

 

89,523

 

 

 

69,247

 

 

 

120,753

 

 

 

118,006

 

 

 

210,276

 

 

 

187,253

 

Oklahoma

 

108,621

 

 

 

92,844

 

 

 

119,999

 

 

 

65,648

 

 

 

228,620

 

 

 

158,492

 

Pennsylvania

 

748,825

 

 

 

686,522

 

 

 

221,984

 

 

 

210,027

 

 

 

970,809

 

 

 

896,549

 

Texas

 

22,979

 

 

 

16,349

 

 

 

9,239

 

 

 

6,224

 

 

 

32,218

 

 

 

22,573

 

West Virginia

 

1,003

 

 

 

881

 

 

 

1,019

 

 

 

510

 

 

 

2,022

 

 

 

1,391

 

Wyoming

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7,464

 

 

 

5,758

 

 

 

7,464

 

 

 

5,758

 

 

 

970,951

 

 

 

865,843

 

 

 

502,806

 

 

 

428,409

 

 

 

1,473,757

 

 

 

1,294,252

 

Average working interest

 

 

 

 

 

89

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

85

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

88

%

Undeveloped Acreage Expirations

The table below summarizes by year our undeveloped acreage scheduled to expire in the next five years. Over 70% of the acres scheduled to expire in 2017 are in Oklahoma.

As of December 31,

  

Acres

  

% of Total

 

 

  

Gross

  

Net

  

Undeveloped

 

 

2017

  

141,247

 

101,016

  

 

23%

 

2018

  

57,070

 

47,004

  

 

11%

 

2019

  

33,038

 

28,957

  

 

7%

 

2020

  

13,392

 

12,182

  

 

3%

 

2021

  

27,928

 

24,682

  

 

6%

 

In all cases the drilling of a commercial well will hold acreage beyond the lease expiration date. We have leased acreage that is subject to lease expiration if initial wells are not drilled within a specified period, generally between three to five years. However, we have in the past and expect in the future, to be able to extend the lease terms of some of these leases and sell or exchange some of these leases with other companies. The expirations included in the table above do not take into account the fact that we may be able to extend the lease terms. We do not expect to lose significant lease acreage because of failure to drill due to inadequate capital, equipment or personnel. However, based on our evaluation of prospective economics, we have allowed acreage to expire from time to time and expect to allow additional acreage to expire in the future.

Title to Properties

We believe that we have satisfactory title to all of our producing properties in accordance with generally accepted industry standards. As is customary in the industry, in the case of undeveloped properties, often minimal investigation of record title is made at the time of lease acquisition. Investigations are made before the consummation of an acquisition of producing properties and before commencement of drilling operations on undeveloped properties. Individual properties may be subject to burdens that we believe do not materially interfere with the use or affect the value of the properties. Burdens on properties may include:

 

customary royalty or overriding royalty interests;

 

liens incident to operating agreements and for current taxes;

 

obligations or duties under applicable laws;

 

development obligations under oil and gas leases; or

 

net profit interests.

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Delivery Commitments

For a discussion of our delivery commitments, see “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations-Delivery Commitments.”

Employees

As of January 1, 2017, we had 762 full-time employees.  All full-time employees are eligible to receive equity awards approved by the compensation committee of the board of directors. No employees are currently covered by a labor union or other collective bargaining arrangement. We believe that the relationship with our employees is excellent.

Competition

Competition exists in all sectors of the oil and gas industry and in particular, we encounter substantial competition in developing and acquiring natural gas and oil properties, securing and retaining personnel, conducting drilling and field operations and marketing production. Competitors in exploration, development, acquisitions and production include the major oil and gas companies as well as numerous independent oil and gas companies, individual proprietors and others. Although our sizable acreage position and core area concentration provide some competitive advantages, many competitors have financial and other resources substantially exceeding ours. Therefore, competitors may be able to pay more for desirable leases and evaluate, bid for and purchase a greater number of properties or prospects than our financial or personnel resources allow. We face competition for pipeline and other services to transport our product to markets, particularly in the Northeastern portion of the United States. Our ability to replace and expand our reserve base depends on our ability to attract and retain quality personnel and identify and acquire suitable producing properties and prospects for future drilling. For more information, see “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”

Marketing and Customers

We market the majority of our natural gas, NGLs, crude oil and condensate production from the properties we operate for our interest, and that of the other working interest owners. We pay our royalty owners from the sales attributable to our working interest. Natural gas, NGLs and oil purchasers are selected on the basis of price, credit quality and service reliability. For a summary of purchasers of our natural gas, NGLs and oil production that accounted for 10% or more of consolidated revenue, see Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements. Because alternative purchasers of natural gas and oil are usually readily available, we believe that the loss of any of these purchasers would not have a material adverse effect on our operations. Production from our properties is marketed using methods that are consistent with industry practice. Sales prices for natural gas, NGLs and oil production are negotiated based on factors normally considered in the industry, such as index or spot price, distance from the well to the pipeline, commodity quality and prevailing supply and demand conditions. Our natural gas production is sold to utilities, marketing and midstream companies and industrial users. Our NGLs production is typically sold to natural gas processors or users of NGLs. Our oil and condensate production is sold to crude oil processors, transporters and refining and marketing companies in the area. Market volatility due to fluctuating weather conditions, international political developments, overall energy supply and demand, economic growth rates and other factors in the United States and worldwide have had, and will continue to have, a significant effect on energy prices.

We enter into derivative transactions with unaffiliated third parties for a varying portion of our production to achieve more predictable cash flows and to reduce our exposure to short-term fluctuations in natural gas, NGLs and oil prices. For a more detailed discussion, see “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk.”

We incur gathering and transportation expense to move our production from the wellhead and tanks to purchaser-specified delivery points. These expenses vary based on volume, distance shipped and the fee charged by the third-party gatherers and transporters. In Oklahoma and Texas, our production is transported primarily through purchaser-owned or third-party trucks, field gathering systems and transmission pipelines. Transportation capacity on these gathering and transportation systems and pipelines is occasionally constrained. Our Appalachian production is transported on third-party pipelines on which, in most cases, we hold long-term contractual capacity. We attempt to balance sales, storage and transportation positions, which can include purchase of commodities from third parties for resale, to satisfy transportation commitments. In Louisiana, we sell substantially all of our production, which is transported on third-party pipelines, to a variety of purchasers. We also have entered into gas processing agreements that have volumetric requirements.

We have not experienced significant difficulty to date in finding a market for all of our production as it becomes available or in transporting our production to those markets; however, there is no assurance that we will always be able to transport and market all of our production or obtain favorable prices.

We have entered into three ethane agreements to sell or transport ethane from our Marcellus Shale area. Initial deliveries commenced in late 2013 on two of these agreements. The remaining agreement began in early 2016. For more information, see “Item

16


 

1A. Risk Factors – Our business depends on natural gas and oil transportation and NGLs processing facilities, most of which are owned by others and depends on our ability to contract with those parties.”

Seasonal Nature of Business

Generally, but not always, the demand for natural gas and propane decreases during the summer months and increases during the winter months. Seasonal anomalies such as mild winters or hot summers also may impact this demand. In addition, pipelines, utilities, local distribution companies and industrial end-users utilize natural gas storage facilities and purchase some of their anticipated winter requirements during the summer. This can also impact the seasonality of demand.

Governmental Regulation

Enterprises that sell securities in public markets are subject to regulatory oversight by federal agencies such as the SEC. The NYSE, a private stock exchange also requires us to comply with listing requirements for our common stock. This regulatory oversight imposes on us the responsibility for establishing and maintaining disclosure controls and procedures and internal controls over financial reporting, and ensuring that the financial statements and other information included in submissions to the SEC do not contain any untrue statement of a material fact or omit to state a material fact necessary to make the statements made in such submissions not misleading. Failure to comply with the NYSE listing rules and regulations of the SEC could subject us to litigation from public or private plaintiffs. Failure to comply with the rules of the NYSE could result in the de-listing of our common stock, which could have an adverse effect on the market price of our common stock. Compliance with some of these rules and regulations is costly and regulations are subject to change or reinterpretation.

Exploration and development and the production and sale of oil and gas are subject to extensive federal, state and local regulations. An overview of these regulations is set forth below. We believe we are in substantial compliance with currently applicable laws and regulations and the continued substantial compliance with existing requirements will not have a material adverse effect on our financial position, cash flows or results of operations. However, current regulatory requirements may change, currently unforeseen environmental incidents may occur or past non-compliance with environmental laws or regulations may be discovered. See Item 1A. Risk Factors The natural gas and oil industry is subject to extensive regulation.” We do not believe we are affected differently by these regulations than others in the industry.

General Overview. Our oil and gas operations are subject to various federal, state, tribal and local laws and regulations. Generally speaking, these regulations relate to matters that include, but are not limited to:

 

leases;

 

acquisition of seismic data;

 

location of wells, pads, roads, impoundments, facilities, rights of way;

 

size of drilling and spacing units or proration units;

 

number of wells that may be drilled in a unit;

 

unitization or pooling of oil and gas properties;

 

drilling, casing and completion of wells;

 

issuance of permits in connection with exploration, drilling and production;

 

well production, maintenance, operations and security;

 

spill prevention and containment plans;

 

emissions permitting or limitations;

 

protection of endangered species;

 

use, transportation, storage and disposal of hazardous waste, fluids and materials incidental to oil and gas operations;

 

surface usage and the restoration of properties upon which wells have been drilled;

 

calculation and disbursement of royalty payments and production taxes;

 

plugging and abandoning of wells;

 

hydraulic fracturing;

 

water withdrawal;

 

operation of underground injection wells to dispose of produced water and other liquids;

17


 

 

the marketing of production;

 

transportation of production; and

 

health and safety of employees and contract service providers.

In August 2005, Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (“EPAct 2005”). Among other matters, EPAct 2005 amends the Natural Gas Act (“NGA”) to make it unlawful for “any entity,” including otherwise non-jurisdictional producers such as Range, to use any deceptive or manipulative device or contrivance in connection with the purchase or sale of natural gas or the purchase or sale of transportation services subject to regulation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (the “FERC”), in contravention of rules prescribed by the FERC. In January 2006, the FERC issued rules implementing this provision. The rules make it unlawful in connection with the purchase or sale of natural gas subject to the jurisdiction of the FERC, or the purchase or sale of transportation services subject to the jurisdiction of the FERC, for any entity, directly or indirectly, to use or employ any device, scheme or artifice to defraud; to make any untrue statement of material fact or omit any such statement necessary to make the statements not misleading; or to engage in any act or practice that operates as a fraud or deceit upon any person. EPAct 2005 also gives the FERC authority to impose civil penalties for violations of the NGA of up to $1,000,000 per day per violation. The anti-manipulation rule does not apply to activities that relate only to intrastate or other non-jurisdictional sales or gathering, but does apply to activities or otherwise non-jurisdictional entities to the extent the activities are conducted “in connection with” gas sales, purchases or transportation subject to the FERC’s jurisdiction which includes the reporting requirements under Order 704, defined and described below. It therefore was a significant expansion of the FERC’s enforcement authority. Range has not been affected differently than any other producer of natural gas by this act. Failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations can result in substantial penalties. The regulatory burden on the industry increases the cost of doing business and affects profitability. Although we believe we are in substantial compliance with all applicable laws and regulations, such laws and regulations are frequently amended or reinterpreted. Therefore, we are unable to predict the future costs or impact of compliance. Additional proposals and proceedings that affect the oil and natural gas industry are regularly considered by Congress, the states, the FERC and the courts. We cannot predict when or whether any such proposals may become effective.

In December 2007, the FERC issued a final rule on the annual natural gas transaction reporting requirements, as amended by subsequent orders on rehearing (“Order 704”). Under Order 704, wholesale buyers and sellers of more than 2.2 million MMBtus of physical natural gas in the previous calendar year, including natural gas gatherers and marketers, are required to report to the FERC, on May 1 of each year, aggregate volumes of natural gas purchased or sold at wholesale in the prior calendar year to the extent such transactions utilize, contribute to, or may contribute to the formation of price indices. It is the responsibility of the reporting entity to determine which individual transactions should be reported based on the guidance of Order 704. Order 704 also requires market participants to indicate whether they report prices to any index publishers and, if so, whether their reporting complies with the FERC’s policy statement on price reporting.

Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety Matters

Our operations are subject to numerous federal, state and local laws and regulations governing occupational health and safety, the discharge of materials into the environment or otherwise relating to environmental protection, some of which carry substantial administrative, civil and criminal penalties for failure to comply. These laws and regulations may include but are not limited to:  

 

the acquisition of a permit before drilling commences;

 

restriction of the types, quantities and concentrations of various substances that can be released into the environment in connection with drilling, production and transporting through pipelines;

 

governing the sourcing and disposal of water used in the drilling and completion process;

 

limiting or prohibiting drilling activities on certain lands lying within wilderness, wetlands, frontier and other protected areas;

 

requiring some form of remedial action to prevent or mitigate pollution from existing and former operations such as plugging abandoned wells or closing earthen impoundments; and

 

imposing substantial liabilities for pollution resulting from operations or failure to comply with regulatory filings.

These laws and regulations also may restrict the rate of production. Moreover, changes in environmental laws and regulations often occur, and any changes that result in more stringent and costly well construction, drilling, water management or completion activities or more restrictive waste handling, storage, transport, disposal or cleanup requirements for any substances used or produced in our operations could materially adversely affect our operations and financial position, as well as those of the oil and natural gas industry in general.

18


 

Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act. The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, as amended (“CERCLA”), also known as the “Superfund” law and comparable state laws impose liability, without regard to fault or the legality of the original conduct, on certain classes of persons who are considered to be responsible for the release of a “hazardous substance” into the environment. These persons may include owners or operators of the disposal site or sites where the hazardous substance release occurred and companies that disposed of or arranged for the disposal of the hazardous substances at the site where the release occurred. Under CERCLA, all of these persons may be subject to joint and several liability for the costs of cleaning up the hazardous substances that have been released into the environment, for damages to natural resources and for the costs of certain health studies. In addition, it is not uncommon for neighboring landowners and other third parties, pursuant to environmental statutes, common law or both, to file claims for personal injury and property damages allegedly caused by the release of hazardous substances or other pollutants into the environment. Although petroleum, including crude oil and natural gas, is not a “hazardous substance” under CERCLA, at least two courts have ruled that certain wastes associated with the production of crude oil may be classified as “hazardous substances” under CERCLA and that releases of such wastes may therefore give rise to liability under CERCLA. While we generate materials in the course of our operations that may be regulated as hazardous substances, we have not received notification that we may be potentially responsible for cleanup costs under CERCLA. In addition, certain state laws also regulate the disposal of oil and natural gas wastes. New state and federal regulatory initiatives that could have a significant adverse impact on us may periodically be proposed and enacted.

Waste handling. We also may incur liability under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act, as amended (“RCRA”) and comparable state laws, which impose requirements related to the handling and disposal of non-hazardous solid wastes and hazardous wastes. Drilling fluids, produced waters, and other wastes associated with the exploration, development or production of crude oil, natural gas or geothermal energy are currently regulated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (“EPA”) and state agencies under RCRA’s less stringent non-hazardous solid waste provisions. It is possible that these solid wastes could in the future be reclassified as hazardous wastes, whether by amendment of RCRA or adoption of new laws, which could significantly increase our costs to manage and dispose of such wastes. Moreover, ordinary industrial wastes, such as paint wastes, waste solvents, laboratory wastes and waste compressor oils, may be regulated as hazardous wastes. Although the costs of managing wastes classified as hazardous waste may be significant, we do not expect to experience more burdensome costs than similarly situated companies in our industry.

We currently own or lease, and have in the past owned or leased, properties that have been used for many years for the exploration and production of crude oil and natural gas. Petroleum hydrocarbons or wastes may have been disposed of or released on or under the properties owned or leased by us, or on or under other locations where such materials have been taken for disposal. In addition, some of these properties have been operated by third parties whose treatment and disposal or release of petroleum hydrocarbons and wastes was not under our control. These properties and the materials disposed or released on them may be subject to CERCLA, RCRA and comparable state laws and regulations. Under such laws and regulations, we could be required to remove or remediate previously disposed wastes or property contamination, or to perform remedial activities to prevent future contamination.

Water discharges and use. The Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended (the “CWA”), and comparable state laws impose restrictions and strict controls regarding the discharge of pollutants, including produced waters and other oil and natural gas wastes, into federal and state waters. The discharge of pollutants into regulated waters is prohibited, except in accordance with the terms of a permit issued by the EPA or the state. These laws also prohibit the discharge of dredge and fill material in regulated waters, including wetlands, unless authorized by permit. These laws and any implementing regulations provide for administrative, civil and criminal penalties for any unauthorized discharges of oil and other substances in reportable quantities and may impose substantial potential liability for the costs of removal, remediation and damages. Pursuant to these laws and regulations, we may be required to obtain and maintain approvals or permits for the discharge of wastewater or storm water and are required to develop and implement spill prevention, control and countermeasure plans, also referred to as “SPCC plans,” in connection with on-site storage of greater than threshold quantities of oil. We regularly review our natural gas and oil properties to determine the need for new or updated SPCC plans and, where necessary, we will be developing or upgrading such plans, the costs of which are not expected to be substantial.

The Oil Pollution Act of 1990, as amended (“OPA”), contains numerous requirements relating to the prevention of and response to oil spills into waters of the United States. The OPA subjects owners of facilities to strict, joint and several liability for all containment and cleanup costs and certain other damages arising from an oil spill, including, but not limited to, the costs of responding to a release of oil to surface waters. While we believe we have been in substantial compliance with OPA, noncompliance could result in varying civil and criminal penalties and liabilities.

The Underground Injection Control (“UIC”) Program authorized by the Safe Drinking Water Act prohibits any underground injection unless authorized by a permit. In connection with our operations, Range may dispose of produced water in underground wells, which are designed and permitted to place the water into deep geologic formations, isolated from fresh water sources. However, because some states have become concerned that the disposal of produced water could under certain circumstances contribute to seismicity, they have adopted or are considering adopting additional regulations governing such disposal. For example, in January 2016, Ohio lawmakers proposed new legislation that would, among other things, require injection wells be located more than 2,000

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feet from any occupied dwelling. While that particular legislation did not become law, should similar onerous regulations or bans relating to underground wells be placed in effect in areas where Range has significant operations, there could be an impact on Range’s ability to operate.

Hydraulic fracturing.  Hydraulic fracturing, which has been used by the industry for over 60 years, is an important and common practice to stimulate production of natural gas and/or oil from dense subsurface rock formations. The hydraulic fracturing process involves the injection of water, sand and chemicals under pressure into targeted subsurface formations to fracture the surrounding rock and stimulate production. We routinely apply hydraulic fracturing techniques as part of our operations. This process is typically regulated by state environmental agencies and oil and natural gas commissions; however, several federal agencies have asserted regulatory authority over certain aspects of the process. For example, the EPA has issued final Clean Air Act (as defined below) regulations governing performance standards, including standards for the capture of air emissions released during hydraulic fracturing; proposed effluent limit guidelines that wastewater from shale gas extraction operations must meet before discharging to a treatment plant; and issued in May 2014 a prepublication of its Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding Toxic Substances Control Act reporting of the chemical substances and mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing. Also, in March 2015, the Federal Bureau of Land Management (“BLM”) released a final rule setting forth disclosure requirements and other regulatory mandates for hydraulic fracturing on federal lands. Moreover, from time to time, Congress has considered adopting legislation intended to provide for federal regulation of hydraulic fracturing and to require disclosure of the chemicals used in the hydraulic fracturing process. In addition to any actions by Congress, certain states in which we operate, including Pennsylvania and Texas have adopted, and other states are considering adopting, regulations imposing or that could impose new or more stringent permitting, public disclosure, or well construction requirements on hydraulic fracturing operations. States could also elect to prohibit hydraulic fracturing altogether, such as in the State of New York. Local governments also may seek to adopt ordinances within their jurisdiction regulating the time, place or manner of drilling activities in general or hydraulic fracturing activities in particular. If new or more stringent federal, state or local legal restrictions relating to the hydraulic fracturing process are adopted in areas where we currently or in the future plan to operate, we may incur additional, more significant, costs to comply with such requirements and also could become subject to additional permitting requirements and experience added delays or curtailment in the pursuit of exploration, development, or production activities.

In addition, certain government reviews are underway that focus on environmental aspects of hydraulic fracturing practices. On December 13, 2016, the EPA issued its final report on the potential of hydraulic fracturing to impact drinking water resources through water withdrawals, spills, fracturing directly into such resources, underground migration of liquids and gases, and inadequate treatment and discharge of wastewater which did not find evidence that these mechanisms have led to widespread, systematic impacts on drinking water resources. Based on the EPA’s study, existing regulations and our practices, we do not believe our hydraulic fracturing operations are likely to impact drinking water resources but the EPA study could result in initiatives to further regulate hydraulic fracturing under the federal Safe Drinking Water Act or other regulatory mechanisms.

We believe that our hydraulic fracturing activities follow applicable industry practices and legal requirements for groundwater protection and that our hydraulic fracturing operations have not resulted in material environmental liabilities. We do not maintain insurance policies intended to provide coverage for losses solely related to hydraulic fracturing operations; however, we believe our existing insurance policies would cover any alleged third-party bodily injury and property damage caused by hydraulic fracturing including sudden and accidental pollution coverage.

Air emissions. The Clean Air Act of 1963 (as amended, the “Clean Air Act”), and comparable state laws restrict the emission of air pollutants from many sources, including compressor stations. These laws and any implementing regulations may require us to obtain pre-approval for the construction or modification of certain projects or facilities expected to produce air emissions, impose stringent air permit requirements, or use specific equipment or technologies to control emissions. We may be required to incur certain capital expenditures in the next few years for air pollution control equipment in connection with maintaining or obtaining operating permits and approvals for emissions of pollutants. For example, pursuant to then President Obama’s Strategy to Reduce Methane Emissions, the EPA finalized new regulations in May of 2016 that set methane emission standards for new and modified oil and natural gas production and natural gas processing and transmission facilities as part of the Obama Administration’s efforts to reduce methane emissions from the oil and natural gas sector by up to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. In a second example, in October 2015, the EPA finalized a rulemaking proposal that revises the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for ozone to 70 parts per billion for both the 8-hour primary and secondary standards. Compliance with one or both of these regulatory initiatives could directly impact us by requiring installation of new emission controls on some of our equipment, resulting in longer permitting timelines, and significantly increasing our capital expenditures and operating costs, which could adversely impact our business.

Climate change. In 2009, the EPA published its findings that emissions of carbon dioxide, methane and other greenhouse gases (“GHGs”) present a danger to public health and the environment because emissions of such gases are, according to the EPA, contributing to warming of the Earth’s atmosphere and other climatic conditions. Based on these findings, the EPA adopted regulations under the existing Clean Air Act establishing Title V and Prevention of Significant Deterioration (“PSD”) permitting reviews for GHG emissions from certain large stationary sources that already are potential major sources of certain principal, or

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criteria, pollutant emissions. We could become subject to these Title V and PSD permitting reviews and be required to install “best available control technology” to limit emissions of GHGs from any new or significantly modified facilities that we may seek to construct in the future if such facilities emitted volumes of GHGs in excess of threshold permitting levels. The EPA has also adopted rules requiring the reporting of GHG emissions from specified emission sources in the United States on an annual basis, including certain oil and natural gas production facilities, which include several of our facilities. We believe that our monitoring activities and reporting are in substantial compliance with applicable obligations.

While Congress has from time to time considered legislation to reduce emissions of GHGs, there has not been significant activity in the form of adopted legislation to reduce GHG emissions at the federal level in recent years. In the absence of federal climate legislation in the U.S., a number of state and regional efforts have emerged that are aimed at tracking and/or reducing GHG emissions by means of cap and trade programs that typically require major sources of GHG emissions, such as electric power plants, to acquire and surrender emission allowances in return for emitting those GHGs.

Although it is not possible at this time to predict how legislation or new regulations that may be adopted to address GHG emissions would impact our business, any such future laws and regulations, or international compacts, could require us to incur increased operating costs, such as costs to purchase and operate emissions control systems, to acquire emission allowances or comply with new regulatory or reporting requirements. For example, as noted above, the EPA instituted regulations in 2016 that will set methane emission standards for new and modified oil and natural gas production and natural gas processing and transmission facilities in an effort to reduce methane emissions from the oil and natural gas sector by up to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. Additionally, the United States officially entered into the Paris Agreement in September of 2016, which may drive the federal government to adopt further regulation in an effort to meet its emission reduction obligations under the international agreements.

While it is unclear at this time whether the new administration of President Trump or the newly elected Congress will pursue further legislation or regulation to address GHG emissions, any such legislation or regulatory programs could also increase the cost of consuming, and thereby could reduce demand for the oil and natural gas that we produce. Finally, it should be noted that some scientists have concluded that increasing concentrations of GHGs in the Earth’s atmosphere may produce climate changes that have significant physical effects, such as increased frequency and severity of storms, droughts and floods and other climatic events. If any such effects were to occur, they could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

Activities on federal lands. Oil and natural gas exploration, development and production activities on federal lands, including Indian lands and lands administered by the BLM, are subject to the National Environmental Policy Act, as amended (“NEPA”). NEPA requires federal agencies, including the BLM, to evaluate major agency actions having the potential to significantly impact the environment. In the course of such evaluations, an agency will prepare an Environmental Assessment that assesses the potential direct, indirect and cumulative impacts of a proposed project and, if necessary, will prepare a more detailed Environmental Impact Statement that may be made available for public review and comment. Currently, we have minimal exploration and production activities on federal lands. However, for those current activities as well as for future or proposed exploration and development plans on federal lands, governmental permits or authorizations that are subject to the requirements of NEPA are required. This process has the potential to delay or limit, or increase the cost of, the development of oil and natural gas projects. Authorizations under NEPA are also subject to protest, appeal or litigation, any or all of which may delay or halt projects.

Endangered species. The federal Endangered Species Act, as amended (the “ESA”), restricts activities that may affect endangered and threatened species or their habitats. If endangered species are located in an area where we wish to conduct seismic surveys, development activities or abandonment operations, or are located in an area where new pipelines are planned; the work could be prohibited or delayed or expensive mitigation may be required. Moreover, the designation of previously unidentified endangered or threatened species could cause us to incur additional costs or become subject to operating restrictions or bans in the affected areas. As a result of a settlement approved by the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia in September 2011, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (“FWS”) is required to make a determination on the listing of numerous species as endangered or threatened under the Endangered Species Act prior to the completion of the agency’s 2017 fiscal year. In March 2014, the FWS adopted a final rule that will limit regulatory impacts on landowners and businesses from the listing if those landowners and businesses have entered into certain range-wide conservation planning agreements. The designation of previously unprotected species in areas where we operate as threatened or endangered could cause us to incur increased costs arising from species protection measures or could result in limitations on our exploration and production activities that could have an adverse impact on our ability to develop and produce our reserves.

The Migratory Bird Treaty Act implements various treaties and conventions between the United States and certain other nations for the protection of migratory birds. In accordance with this law, the taking, killing or possessing of migratory birds covered under this act is unlawful without a permit. If there is the potential to adversely affect migratory birds as a result of our operations, we may be required to obtain necessary permits to conduct those operations, which may result in specified operating restrictions on a temporary, seasonal, or permanent basis in affected areas and an adverse impact on our ability to develop and produce our reserves.

We believe we are in substantial compliance with currently applicable environmental laws and regulations. Although we have not experienced any material adverse effect from compliance with environmental requirements, there is no assurance that this will

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continue. We did not have any material capital or other non-recurring expenditures in connection with complying with environmental laws or environmental remediation matters in 2016, nor do we anticipate that such expenditures will be material in 2017. However, we regularly have expenditures to comply with environmental laws and we anticipate those costs will continue to be incurred in the future.

Occupational health and safety. We are also subject to the requirements of the federal Occupational Safety and Health Act, as amended (“OSHA”), and comparable state laws that regulate the protection of the health and safety of employees. In addition, OSHA’s hazard communication standard requires that information be maintained about hazardous materials used or produced in our operations and that this information be provided to employees, state and local government authorities and citizens. We believe that our operations are in substantial compliance with the OSHA requirements.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

We are subject to various risks and uncertainties in the course of our business. The following summarizes the known material risks and uncertainties that may adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations. These risks are not the only risks we face. Our business could also be impacted by additional risks and uncertainties not currently known to us or that we currently deem to be immaterial.

Risks Related to Our Business

Volatility of natural gas, NGLs and oil prices significantly affects our cash flow and capital resources and could hamper our ability to operate economically. Natural gas, NGLs and oil prices are volatile, and a decline in prices adversely affects our profitability and financial condition. The oil and gas industry is typically cyclical and we expect the volatility to continue. Between 2013 and 2016, the average NYMEX monthly settlement price of natural gas has been as high as $4.86 per Mmbtu and as low as $1.71 per Mmbtu. During that same time frame, the average NYMEX monthly oil settlement price was as high as $106.54 per barrel and as low as $30.62 per barrel. Over the past few months, natural gas and oil prices have improved with the average NYMEX monthly settlement price for natural gas for February 2017 rising to $3.39 per Mmbtu and the monthly settlement for crude oil increasing to $52.61 per barrel in January 2017. Likewise, NGLs have suffered significant recent declines in realized prices. NGLs are made up of ethane, propane, isobutane, normal butane and natural gasoline, all of which have different uses and different pricing characteristics, which adds further volatility to the pricing of NGLs. A further or extended decline in commodity prices could materially and adversely affect our business, cash flow, financial condition and results of operations. Natural gas prices are likely to affect us more than oil prices because approximately 65% of our December 31, 2016 proved reserves are natural gas.

Natural gas, NGLs and oil prices fluctuate in response to changes in supply and demand, market uncertainty and other factors that are beyond our control. Long-term supply and demand for natural gas, NGLs and oil is uncertain and subject to a myriad of factors such as:

 

the domestic and foreign supply of natural gas, NGLs and oil;

 

the price, availability and demand for alternative fuels and sources of energy;

 

weather conditions;

 

the level of consumer demand for natural gas, NGLs and oil;

 

the price and level of foreign imports;

 

U.S. domestic and worldwide economic conditions;

 

the availability, proximity and capacity of transportation facilities, processing and storage facilities;

 

the effect of worldwide energy conservation efforts;

 

the ability of the members of the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries to agree and maintain oil price and production controls;

 

potential U.S. exports of oil, NGLs and/or liquefied natural gas;

 

political conditions in natural gas and oil producing regions; and

 

domestic (federal, state and local) and foreign governmental regulations and taxes.

Lower natural gas, NGLs and oil prices may not only decrease our revenues and cash flow on a per unit basis but also may reduce the amount of natural gas, NGLs and oil that we can economically produce. A reduction in production could result in a shortfall in expected cash flows and require a reduction in capital spending or require additional borrowing. Without the ability to fund capital expenditures, we would be unable to replace reserves which would negatively affect our future rate of growth. Lower natural gas, NGLs and oil prices may also result in a reduction in the borrowing base under our bank credit facility, taking into account the

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value of our estimated proved reserves, which is adversely affected by declines in natural gas, NGLs and oil prices. The borrowing base under our bank credit facility, which is determined by our lenders at their discretion, is subject to redetermination annually each May and for event driven unscheduled redeterminations.

Producing natural gas, NGLs and oil may involve unprofitable efforts. As of December 31, 2016, the relationship between the price of oil and the price of natural gas continues to be at a wide spread. Normally, NGLs production is a by-product of natural gas production. At times, we and other producers may choose to sell natural gas at below cost, or otherwise dispose of natural gas to allow for the profitable sale of only NGLs and condensate. However, the prices of NGLs can be unpredictable. For example, over the past four years, the average Mont Belvieu NGL composite price has been as high as $0.98 per gallon and as low as $0.30 per gallon. Such volatility in the pricing of NGLs complicates such decisions and may materially and adversely affect the profitability of such decisions.

Information concerning our reserves and future net cash flow estimates is uncertain. There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating quantities of proved natural gas and oil reserves and their values, including many factors beyond our control. Estimates of proved reserves are by their nature uncertain and depend on many assumptions relating to current and further economic conditions and commodity prices. To the extent we experience a sustained period of reduced commodity prices, there is a risk that a portion of our proved reserves could be deemed uneconomic and no longer be classified as proved. Although we believe these estimates are reasonable, actual production, revenues and costs to develop will likely vary from estimates and these variances could be material.

Reserve estimation is a subjective process that involves estimating volumes to be recovered from underground accumulations of natural gas and oil that cannot be directly measured. As a result, different petroleum engineers, each using industry-accepted geologic and engineering practices and scientific methods, may calculate different estimates of reserves and future net cash flows based on the same available data. Because of the subjective nature of natural gas, NGLs and oil reserve estimates, each of the following items may differ materially from the amounts or other factors estimated:

 

the amount and timing of natural gas, NGLs and oil production;

 

the revenues and costs associated with that production;

 

the amount and timing of future development expenditures; and

 

future commodity prices.

The discounted future net cash flows from our proved reserves included in this report should not be considered as the market value of the reserves attributable to our properties. As required by generally accepted accounting principles, the estimated discounted future net revenues from our proved reserves are based on a twelve month average price (first day of the month) while cost estimates are based on current year-end economic conditions. Actual future prices and costs may be materially higher or lower. In addition, the ten percent discount factor that is required to be used to calculate discounted future net cash flows for reporting purposes under generally accepted accounting principles is not necessarily the most appropriate discount factor based on the cost of capital in effect from time to time and risks associated with our business and the oil and gas industry in general.

If natural gas, NGLs and oil prices remain depressed or drilling efforts are unsuccessful, we may be required to record writedowns of our proved natural gas and oil properties. In the past we have been required to write down the carrying value of certain of our natural gas and oil properties, and there is a risk that we will be required to take additional writedowns in the future. Recent commodity price declines have resulted in an impairment of our proved oil and gas properties. For example, in third quarter 2015, we recorded a $502.2 million impairment of natural gas and oil properties in Northern Oklahoma and our legacy producing assets in Northwest Pennsylvania and, in fourth quarter 2015, we recorded additional impairment of $87.9 million primarily related to our natural gas and oil properties in the Texas Panhandle. In first quarter 2016, we recorded a $43.0 million proved property impairment in Western Oklahoma. These impairments were due to a significant decline in commodity prices and the potential sale of certain of these properties. Writedowns may occur in the future when natural gas and oil prices are low, or if we have downward adjustments to our estimated proved reserves, increases in our estimates of operating or development costs, deterioration in our drilling results or mechanical problems with wells where the cost to redrill or repair is not supported by the expected economics. Because our reserves are predominately natural gas, changes in natural gas prices have a more significant impact on our financial results.

Accounting rules require that the carrying value of natural gas and oil properties be periodically reviewed for possible impairment. Impairment is recognized for the excess of book value over fair value when the book value of a proven property is greater than the expected undiscounted future net cash flows from that property and on acreage when conditions indicate the carrying value is not recoverable. We may be required to write down the carrying value of a property based on natural gas and oil prices at the time of the impairment review, or as a result of continuing evaluation of drilling results, production data, economics, divestiture activity, and other factors. A write down constitutes a non-cash charge to earnings and does not impact cash or cash flows from operating activities;

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however, it reflects our long-term ability to recover an investment and reduces our reported earnings and increases certain leverage ratios. If commodity prices remain depressed, we may be required to further impair the carrying value of our natural gas and oil properties.

We evaluate our unproved oil and gas properties for impairment and could be required to recognize noncash charges in the earnings of future periods. At December 31, 2016, our unproved natural gas and oil properties were $2.9 billion. Our analysis of these costs is affected by the results of exploration activities, commodity price outlooks, planned future sales or expiration of all or a portion of the leases. Impairment of a significant portion of our unproved properties is assessed and amortized on an aggregate basis based on our average holding period, expected forfeiture rate and anticipated drilling success.

We periodically evaluate our goodwill for impairment and could be required to recognize noncash charges in the earnings of future periods. At December 31, 2016, we have goodwill of $1.7 billion. Goodwill is assessed for impairment annually during the fourth quarter and whenever facts or circumstances indicate that the carrying value of our goodwill may be impaired which may require an estimate of the fair values of our assets and liabilities. Those assessments may be affected by:  

 

additional reserve adjustments both positive and negative;

 

results of drilling activities;

 

management’s outlook for commodity prices and costs and expenses;

 

changes in our market capitalization;

 

changes in our weighted average cost of capital; and

 

changes in income taxes.

If the fair value of our net assets is not sufficient to fully support the goodwill balance in the future, we may be required to reduce the carrying value of goodwill for the impaired value and incur a corresponding noncash charge to earnings in the period in which goodwill is determined to be impaired.

Significant capital expenditures are required to replace our reserves. Our exploration, development and acquisition activities require substantial capital expenditures. Historically, we have funded our capital expenditures through a combination of cash flow from operations, our bank credit facility and debt and equity issuances. We have also engaged in asset monetization transactions. Future cash flows are subject to a number of variables, such as the level of production from existing wells, prices of natural gas, NGLs and oil and our success in developing and producing new reserves. If our access to capital were limited due to various factors, which could include a decrease in revenues due to lower natural gas, NGLs and oil prices or decreased production or deterioration of the credit and capital markets, we would have a reduced ability to replace our reserves. We may not be able to incur additional bank debt, issue debt or equity, engage in asset monetization or access other methods of financing on an economic basis to meet our reserve replacement requirements.

The amount available for borrowing under our bank credit facility is subject to a borrowing base, which is determined by our lenders, at their discretion, taking into account our estimated proved reserves and is subject to periodic redeterminations based on pricing models determined by the lenders at such time. Declines in natural gas, NGLs and oil prices adversely impact the value of our estimated proved reserves and, in turn, the market values used by our lenders to determine our borrowing base and could result in a determination to lower our borrowing base. In the past several years, natural gas, NGLs and oil prices declined significantly. A further or extended decline in commodity prices could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Our future success depends on our ability to replace reserves that we produce. Because the rate of production from natural gas and oil properties generally declines as reserves are depleted, our future success depends upon our ability to economically find or acquire and produce additional natural gas, NGLs and oil reserves. Except to the extent that we acquire additional properties containing proved reserves, conduct successful exploration and development activities or, through engineering studies, identify additional behind-pipe zones or secondary recovery reserves, our proved reserves will decline as reserves are produced. Future natural gas, NGLs and oil production, therefore, is highly dependent upon our level of success in acquiring or finding additional reserves that are economically recoverable. We cannot be certain that we will be able to find or acquire and develop additional reserves at an acceptable cost.

We acquire significant amounts of unproved property to further our development efforts. Development and exploratory drilling and production activities are subject to many risks, including the risk that no commercially productive reservoirs will be discovered. We acquire both producing and unproved properties as well as lease undeveloped acreage that we believe will enhance growth potential and increase our earnings over time. However, we cannot be certain that all prospects will be economically viable or that we will not abandon our initial investments. Additionally, there can be no assurance that unproved property acquired by us or

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undeveloped acreage leased by us will be profitably developed, that new wells drilled by us in prospects that we pursue will be productive or that we will recover all or any portion of our investment in such unproved property or wells. Low commodity prices may cause us to delay our drilling plans and as a result, we may lose our right to develop the related property.

Drilling is an uncertain and costly activity. The cost of drilling, completing, and operating a well is often uncertain, and many factors can adversely affect the economics of a well. Our efforts will be uneconomical if we drill dry holes or wells that are productive but do not produce enough natural gas, NGLs and oil to be commercially viable after drilling, operating and other costs. There is no way to conclusively know in advance of drilling and testing whether any particular prospect will yield natural gas, NGLs or oil in commercially viable quantities. Furthermore, our drilling and producing operations may be curtailed, delayed, or canceled as a result of a variety of factors, including, but not limited to:

 

increases in the costs, shortages or delivery delays of drilling rigs, equipment, water for hydraulic fracturing services, labor, or other services;

 

unexpected operational events and drilling conditions;

 

reductions in natural gas, NGLs and oil prices;

 

limitations in the market for natural gas, NGLs and oil;

 

adverse weather conditions;

 

facility or equipment malfunctions;

 

equipment failures or accidents;

 

title problems;

 

pipe or cement failures;

 

compliance with, or changes in, environmental, tax and other governmental requirements;

 

environmental hazards, such as natural gas leaks, oil spills, pipeline and tank ruptures, and unauthorized discharges of toxic gases;

 

lost or damaged oilfield drilling and service tools;

 

unusual or unexpected geological formations;

 

loss of drilling fluid circulation;

 

pressure or irregularities in formations;

 

fires;

 

natural disasters;

 

surface craterings and explosions;

 

uncontrollable flows of oil, natural gas or well fluids; and

 

civil unrest or protest activities.

If any of these factors were to occur, we could lose all or a part of our investment, or we could fail to realize the expected benefits, either of which could materially and adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

Our identified drilling locations are scheduled out over multiple years, making them susceptible to uncertainties that could materially alter the occurrence or timing of their drilling. Our management team has specifically identified and scheduled certain drilling locations as an estimation of our future multi-year drilling activities on our existing acreage. These drilling locations represent a significant part of our growth strategy. Our ability to drill and develop these locations depends on a number of uncertainties, including natural gas and oil prices, the availability and cost of capital, drilling and production costs, availability of drilling services and equipment, drilling results, lease expirations, transportation constraints, regulatory and zoning approvals and other factors. Because of these uncertain factors, we do not know if the numerous drilling locations we have identified will ever be drilled. In addition, unless production is established within the spacing units covering the undeveloped acres on which some of the drilling locations are obtained, the leases for such acreage will expire. As such, our actual drilling activities may materially differ from those presently identified. In addition, we will require significant additional capital over a prolonged period in order to pursue the development of these locations, and we may not be able to raise or generate the capital required to do so. Any drilling activities we are able to conduct on these locations may not be successful or result in our ability to add additional proved reserves to our overall proved reserves or may result in a downward revision of our estimated proved reserves, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

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Our producing properties are largely concentrated in the Appalachian Basin, making us vulnerable to risks associated with operating in a significant geographic area. Our producing properties are geographically concentrated in the Appalachian Basin in Pennsylvania. At December 31, 2016, 87% of our total estimated proved reserves were attributable to properties located in Pennsylvania. As a result of this concentration, we may be disproportionately exposed to the impact of regional supply and demand factors, delays or interruptions of production from wells in this area caused by governmental regulation, state politics, processing or transportation capacity constraints, market limitations, availability of equipment and personnel, water shortages or interruption of the processing or transportation of crude oil, condensate, natural gas or NGLs.

New technologies may cause our current exploration and drilling methods to become obsolete. There have been rapid and significant advancements in technology in the natural gas and oil industry, including the introduction of new products and services using new technologies. As competitors use or develop new technologies, we may be placed at a competitive disadvantage, and competitive pressures may force us to implement new technologies at a substantial increase in cost. Further, competitors may obtain patents which might prevent us from implementing new technologies. In addition, competitors may have greater financial, technical and personnel resources that allow them to enjoy technological advantages and may in the future allow them to implement new technologies before we can. One or more of the technologies that we currently use or that we may implement in the future may become obsolete. We cannot be certain that we will be able to implement technologies on a timely basis or at a cost that is acceptable to us. If we are unable to maintain technological advancements consistent with industry standards, our operations and financial condition may be adversely affected.

Our indebtedness could limit our ability to successfully operate our business. We are leveraged and our exploration and development program will require substantial capital resources depending on the level of drilling and the expected cost of services. Our existing operations will also require ongoing capital expenditures. In addition, if we decide to pursue additional acquisitions, our capital expenditures will increase, both to complete such acquisitions and to explore and develop any newly acquired properties.

The degree to which we are leveraged could have other important consequences, including the following:

 

we may be required to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flows from operations to the payment of our indebtedness, reducing the funds available for our operations;

 

a portion of our borrowings are at variable rates of interest, making us vulnerable to increases in interest rates;

 

we may be more highly leveraged than some of our competitors, which could place us at a competitive disadvantage;

 

our degree of leverage may make us more vulnerable to a downturn in our business or the general economy;

 

we are subject to numerous financial and other restrictive covenants contained in our existing debt agreements, which restrict our ability to engage in certain activities and could limit our growth, and the breach of such covenants, which could materially and adversely impact our financial performance;

 

our debt level could limit our flexibility to grow the business and in planning for, or reacting to, changes in our business and the industry in which we operate; and

 

we may have difficulties borrowing money in the future.

The risks described above may further increase in the event we incur additional debt. In addition to those risks above, we may not be able to obtain funding on acceptable terms.

Any failure to meet our debt obligations could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations. We expect our earnings and cash flow to fluctuate from year to year due to the cyclical nature of our business. If our cash flow and capital resources are insufficient to fund our debt obligations, we may be forced to sell assets, seek additional equity or restructure our debt. Our ability to restructure our debt will depend on the condition of the capital markets and our financial condition at such time. Any restructuring of debt could be at higher interest rates and may require us to comply with more onerous covenants, which could further restrict our operations. The terms of existing or future debt instruments may restrict us from adopting some of these alternatives. In addition, any failure to make scheduled payments of interest and principal on our outstanding indebtedness would likely result in a reduction of our credit rating, which could harm our ability to incur additional indebtedness on acceptable terms. Our cash flow and capital resources may be insufficient for payment of interest on and principal of our debt in the future and any such alternative measures may be unsuccessful or may not permit us to meet scheduled debt service obligations, which could cause us to default on our obligations and impair our liquidity.

We receive debt ratings from the major credit rating agencies in the United States. Factors that may impact our credit ratings include debt levels, planned asset purchases or sales and near-term and long-term growth opportunities. Liquidity, asset quality, cost structure, product mix and commodity pricing levels are also considered by the rating agencies. A ratings downgrade could adversely impact our ability to access debt markets in the future, increase the cost of future debt and potentially require us to post letters of credit or other forms of collateral for certain obligations.

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As a result of cross-default provisions in our borrowing arrangements, we may be unable to satisfy all of our outstanding obligations in the event of a default on our part. The terms of our senior indebtedness, including our revolving credit facility, contain cross-default provisions which provide that we will be in default under such agreements in the event of certain defaults under our indentures or other loan agreements. Accordingly, should an event of default above certain thresholds occur under any of those agreements, we face the prospect of being in default under all of our debt agreements, obliged in such instance to satisfy all of our outstanding indebtedness and unable to satisfy all of our outstanding obligations simultaneously. In such an event, we might not be able to obtain alternative financing or, if we are able to obtain such financing, we might not be able to obtain it on terms acceptable to us, which would negatively affect our ability to implement our business plan, make capital expenditures and finance our operations.

We are subject to financing and interest rate exposure risks. Our business and operating results can be harmed by factors such as the availability, terms of and cost of capital, increases in interest rates or a reduction in our credit rating. These changes could cause our cost of doing business to increase, limit our ability to pursue acquisition opportunities, reduce cash flow used for drilling and place us at a competitive disadvantage. For example, at December 31, 2016, approximately 77% of our debt is at fixed interest rates with the remaining 23% subject to variable interest rates.

Disruptions or volatility in the global finance markets may lead to a contraction in credit availability impacting our ability to finance our operations. We require continued access to capital. A significant reduction in cash flows from operations or the availability of credit could materially and adversely affect our ability to achieve our planned growth and operating results. We are exposed to some credit risk related to our bank credit facility to the extent that one or more of our lenders may be unable to provide necessary funding to us under our existing revolving line of credit if it experiences liquidity problems.

A financial downturn or negative credit market conditions may have lasting effects on our liquidity, business and financial condition that we cannot predict. Liquidity is essential to our business. Our liquidity could be substantially negatively affected by an inability to obtain capital in the long-term or short-term debt capital markets or equity capital markets or an inability to access bank financing. A prolonged credit crisis or turmoil in the domestic or global financial systems could materially affect our liquidity, business and financial condition. These conditions have adversely impacted financial markets previously and created substantial volatility and uncertainty, and could do so again, with the related negative impact on global economic activity and the financial markets. Negative credit market conditions could materially affect our liquidity and may inhibit our lenders from fully funding our bank credit facility or cause them to make the terms of our bank credit facility costlier and more restrictive. We are subject to annual reviews, as well as unscheduled reviews, of our borrowing base under our bank credit facility, and we do not know the results of future redeterminations or the effect of then-current oil and natural gas prices on that process. A weak economic environment could also adversely affect the collectability of our trade receivables or performance by our suppliers or other third parties that we contract with to operate our properties or provide facilities.  In addition, it may also cause our commodity derivative arrangements to be ineffective if our counterparties are unable to perform their obligations or seek bankruptcy protection. Additionally, negative economic conditions could lead to reduced demand or lower prices for natural gas, NGLs and oil, which could have a negative impact on our revenues.

Derivative transactions may limit our potential gains and involve other risks. To manage our exposure to price risk, we currently and may in the future enter into derivative arrangements, utilizing commodity derivatives with respect to a portion of our future production. Such hedges are designed to lock in prices so as to limit volatility and increase the predictability of cash flow. These transactions limit our potential gains if natural gas, NGLs and oil prices rise above the price established by the hedge. In addition, derivative transactions may expose us to the risk of financial loss in certain circumstances, including instances in which:

 

our production is less than expected;

 

the counterparties to our futures contracts fail to perform on their contract obligations; or

 

an event materially impacts natural gas, NGLs or oil prices or the relationship between the hedged price index and the natural gas or oil sales price.

We cannot be certain that any derivative transaction we may enter into will adequately protect us from declines in the prices of natural gas, NGLs or oil. Furthermore, where we choose not to engage in derivative transactions in the future, we may be more adversely affected by changes in natural gas, NGLs or oil prices than our competitors who engage in derivative transactions. Lower natural gas, NGLs and oil prices may also negatively impact our ability to enter into derivative contracts at favorable prices.

Many of our current and potential competitors have greater resources than we have and we may not be able to successfully compete in acquiring, exploring and developing new properties. We face competition in every aspect of our business, including, but not limited to, acquiring reserves and leases, obtaining goods, services and employees needed to operate and manage our business and marketing natural gas, NGLs or oil. Competitors include multinational oil companies, independent production companies and individual producers and operators. Many of our competitors have greater financial and other resources than we do. As a result, these competitors may be able to address these competitive factors more effectively than we can or withstand industry downturns more easily than we can. For more discussion regarding competition, see “Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties – Competition.”

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The natural gas and oil industry is subject to extensive regulation. The natural gas and oil industry is subject to various types of regulations in the United States by local, state and federal agencies. Legislation affecting the industry is under constant review for amendment or expansion, frequently increasing our regulatory burden. Numerous departments and agencies, both state and federal, are authorized by statute to issue rules and regulations binding on participants in the natural gas and oil industry. Compliance with such rules and regulations often increases our cost of doing business, delays our operations and, in turn, decreases our profitability.

Our operations are subject to numerous and increasingly strict federal, state and local laws, regulations and enforcement policies relating to the environment. We may incur significant costs and liabilities in complying with existing or future environmental laws, regulations and enforcement policies and may incur costs arising out of property or natural resource damage or injuries to employees and other persons. These costs may result from our current and former operations and even may be caused by previous owners of property we own or lease or relate to third party sites where we have taken materials for recycling or disposal. Failure to comply with these laws and regulations may result in the suspension or termination of our operations and subject us to administrative, civil and criminal penalties as well as corrective action orders. Matters subject to regulation include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

the amounts and types of substances and materials that may be released into the environment;

 

responding to unexpected releases to the environment;

 

reports and permits concerning exploration, drilling, production and other regulated activities;

 

the spacing of wells;

 

unitization and pooling of properties;

 

calculating royalties on oil and gas produced under federal and state leases; and

 

taxation.

Under such laws and regulations, we could be liable for personal injuries, property damages, oil spills, discharges of hazardous materials, remediation and clean-up costs, natural resource damages and other environmental damages. We also could be required to install expensive pollution control measures or limit or cease activities on lands located within wilderness, wetlands or other environmentally or politically sensitive areas. If we incur these costs or damages it may reduce or eliminate funds available for exploration, development or acquisitions or cause us to incur losses.

The subject of climate change continues to receive attention from scientists, legislators, governmental agencies and the general public. There is an ongoing debate as to the extent to which our climate is changing, the potential causes of this change and its potential impacts. Some attribute global warming to increased levels of GHGs, including carbon dioxide and methane, which has led to significant legislative and regulatory efforts to limit GHG emissions.

Congress has from time to time considered legislation to reduce emissions of GHGs. While there has not been significant activity in the form of adopted legislation to reduce GHG emissions at the federal level in recent years, there has been a number of regulatory initiatives to address GHG emissions. These include the establishing of Title V and PSD permitting reviews for GHG emissions from certain large stationary sources that are already major potential sources of certain principal, or criteria, pollutant emissions, and the implementation of a GHG monitoring and reporting program for certain sectors of the natural gas and oil industry, including onshore and production, which includes certain of our operations. Additionally, a number of state and regional efforts have emerged that are aimed at tracking and/or reducing GHG emissions by means of cap and trade programs, in which major sources of GHG emissions acquire and surrender emission allowances in return for emitting those GHGs. The outcome of federal and state actions to address global climate change could result in a variety of regulatory programs including potential new regulations to control or restrict emissions, taxes or other charges to deter emissions of GHGs, energy efficiency requirements to reduce demand, or other regulatory actions. For example, the EPA finalized new regulations that will set methane emission standards for new and modified oil and gas production and natural gas processing and transmission facilities in an effort to reduce methane emissions from the oil and gas sector by up to 45 percent from 2012 levels by 2025. These actions could:

 

result in increased costs associated with our operations;

 

increase other costs to our business;

 

affect the demand for natural gas; and

 

impact the prices we charge our customers.

Adoption of federal or state requirements mandating a reduction in GHG emissions could have far-reaching and significant impacts on the energy industry and the U.S. economy. We cannot predict the potential impact of such laws or regulations, or international compacts, on our future consolidated financial condition, results of operations or cash flows. For more information regarding the environmental regulation of our business, see “Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties – Environment and Occupational Health and Safety Matters.”

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Our business is subject to operating hazards that could result in substantial losses or liabilities that may not be fully covered under our insurance policies. Natural gas, NGLs and oil operations are subject to many risks, including well blowouts, craterings, explosions, uncontrollable flows of oil, natural gas or well fluids, fires, pipe or cement failures, pipeline ruptures or spills, vandalism, pollution, releases of toxic gases, adverse weather conditions or natural disasters, and other environmental hazards and risks. If any of these hazards occur, we could sustain substantial losses as a result of:

 

injury or loss of life;

 

severe damage to or destruction of property, natural resources and equipment;

 

pollution or other environmental damage;

 

investigatory and cleanup responsibilities;

 

regulatory investigations and penalties or lawsuits;

 

suspension of operations; and

 

repairs to resume operations.

We maintain insurance against many, but not all, potential losses or liabilities arising from our operations in accordance with what we believe are customary industry practices and in amounts and at costs that we believe to be prudent and commercially practicable. Our insurance includes deductibles that must be met prior to recovery, as well as sub-limits and/or self-insurance. Additionally, our insurance is subject to exclusions and limitations. Our insurance does not cover every potential risk associated with our operations, including the potential loss of significant revenues. We can provide no assurance that our coverage will adequately protect us against liability from all potential consequences, damages and losses.

We currently have insurance policies covering our operations that include coverage for general liability, excess liability, physical damage to our oil and gas properties, operational control of wells, oil pollution, third-party liability, workers’ compensation and employer’s liability and other coverages. Our insurance policies provide coverage for losses or liabilities relating to pollution, but are largely limited to coverage for sudden and accidental occurrences. For example, we maintain operator’s extra expense coverage for obligations, expenses or claims that we may incur from a sudden incident that results in negative environmental effects, including obligations, expenses or claims related to seepage and pollution, cleanup and containment, evacuation expenses and control of the well (subject to policy terms and conditions). In the specific event of a well blowout or out-of-control well resulting in negative environmental effects, such operator’s extra expense coverage would be our primary source of coverage, with the general liability and excess liability coverage referenced above also providing certain coverage.

We may elect not to obtain insurance if we believe that the cost of available insurance is excessive relative to the risks presented. Some forms of insurance may become unavailable in the future or unavailable on terms that we believe are economically acceptable. No assurance can be given that we will be able to maintain insurance in the future at rates that we consider reasonable, and we may elect to maintain minimal or no insurance coverage. If we incur substantial liability from a significant event and the damages are not covered by insurance or are in excess of policy limits, then we would have lower revenues and funds available to us for our operations, that could, in turn, have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Additionally, we rely to a large extent on facilities owned and operated by third parties, and damage to or destruction of those third-party facilities could affect our ability to process, transport and sell our production. To a limited extent, we maintain business interruption insurance related to a third-party processing plant in Pennsylvania where we are insured for potential losses from the interruption of production caused by loss of or damage to the processing plant.

A change in the jurisdictional characterization of some of our assets by federal, state or local regulatory agencies or a change in policy by those agencies may result in increased regulation of our assets, which may cause our revenues to decline and operating expenses to increase. Section 1(b) of the NGA exempts natural gas gathering facilities from regulation by the FERC as a natural gas company under the NGA. We believe that the natural gas pipelines in our gathering systems meet the traditional tests the FERC has used to establish a pipeline’s status as a gatherer not subject to regulation as a natural gas company. However, we have not received a declaratory order from the FERC regarding our natural gas gathering pipelines and the distinction between FERC-regulated transmission services and federally unregulated gathering services is the subject of ongoing litigation, so the classification and regulation of our gathering facilities are subject to change based on future determinations by the FERC, the courts or Congress.

While we believe our natural gas gathering operations are generally exempt from FERC regulation under the NGA, our gas gathering operations may be subject to certain FERC reporting and posting requirements in a given year. The FERC requires certain participants in the natural gas market, including certain gathering facilities and natural gas marketers that engage in a minimum level of natural gas sales or purchases, to submit annual reports to the FERC on the aggregate volumes of natural gas purchased or sold at

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wholesale in the prior calendar year to the extent such transactions utilize, contribute to, or may contribute to, the formation of price indices.

Other FERC regulations may indirectly impact our operations and the markets for products derived from these operations. The FERC’s policies and practices across the range of its natural gas regulatory activities, including, for example, its policies on open access transportation, gas quality, ratemaking, capacity release and market-center promotion, may indirectly affect the intrastate natural gas market. In recent years, the FERC has pursued pro-competitive policies in its regulation of interstate natural gas pipelines. However, we cannot be certain that the FERC will continue this approach as it considers matters such as pipelines rates and rules and policies that may affect rights of access to transportation capacity. For more information regarding the regulation of our operations, see “Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties – Governmental Regulation.”  

Should we fail to comply with all applicable FERC administered statutes, rules, regulations and orders, we could be subject to substantial penalties and fines. Under EPAct 2005, the FERC has civil penalty authority under the NGA to impose penalties for current violations of up to $1 million per day for each violation and disgorgement of profits associated with any violation. While our operations have not been regulated as a natural gas company by the FERC under the NGA, the FERC has adopted regulations that may subject certain of our otherwise non-FERC jurisdictional facilities to the FERC annual reporting requirements. We also must comply with the anti-market manipulation rules enforced by the FERC. Additional rules and legislation pertaining to those and other matters may be considered or adopted by the FERC from time to time. Failure to comply with those regulations in the future could subject Range to civil penalty liability. For more information regarding the regulation of our operations, see “Items 1 and 2. Business and Properties – Governmental Regulation.”

Certain federal income tax deductions currently available with respect to natural gas and oil exploration and development may be eliminated, and additional state taxes on natural gas extraction may be imposed, as a result of future legislation. Legislation previously has been proposed that would, if enacted into law, make significant changes to U.S. federal income tax laws, including the elimination of certain U.S. federal income tax benefits currently available to oil and gas exploration and production companies. Such changes include, but are not limited to, (i) the repeal of the percentage depletion allowance for oil and gas properties; (ii) the elimination of current deductions for intangible drilling and development costs; (iii) the elimination of the deduction for certain U.S. production activities; and (iv) an extension of the amortization period for certain geological and geophysical expenditures. It is unclear, however, whether any such changes will be enacted or how soon such changes could be effective. As of December 31, 2016, we had a tax basis of $2.1 billion related to prior years’ capitalized intangible drilling costs, which will be amortized over the next five years.

The passage of this legislation or any other similar change in U.S. federal income tax law could eliminate or postpone certain tax deductions that are currently available with respect to natural gas and oil exploration and development, and any such change could negatively affect our financial condition and results of operations.

In February 2012, the state legislature of Pennsylvania passed legislation creating a natural gas impact fee applicable to production in Pennsylvania. As noted above, the majority of our acreage in the Marcellus Shale is located in Pennsylvania. The legislation imposes an annual fee on natural gas and oil operators for each well drilled for a period of fifteen years. Much like a severance tax, the fee is on a sliding scale set by the Public Utility Commission and is based on two factors: changes in the Consumer Price Index and the average NYMEX natural gas prices on the last day of each month. The impact fee increases the financial burden on our operations in the Marcellus Shale. There can be no assurance that the impact fee will remain as currently structured or that additional taxes will not be imposed. There are currently proposals by the Pennsylvania Governor and various Pennsylvania state lawmakers to enact a severance tax in substitution for, or as an addition to, the impact fee already in place. In addition, a recent court case in Pennsylvania has challenged the state’s authority to impose a limit on the utilization of net operating loss carryforwards at the greater of $5 million or 30 percent of apportioned Pennsylvania taxable income. We will be monitoring the appeals process of this case and its impact on our ability to utilize our Pennsylvania net operating loss carryforwards.

Changes in laws or regulations relating to hydraulic fracturing could result in increased costs and additional operating restrictions or delays and adversely affect our production. The use of hydraulic fracturing is necessary to produce commercial quantities of natural gas and oil from many reservoirs, especially shale formations such as the Marcellus Shale. The process is typically regulated by state environmental agencies and oil and gas commissions. However, several federal agencies have asserted regulatory authority over certain aspects of the process. For example, the EPA has issued final Clean Air Act regulations governing performance standards, including standards for the capture of air emissions released during hydraulic fracturing; proposed effluent limit guidelines that wastewater from shale gas extraction operations must meet before discharging to a treatment plant; and issued in May 2014 a prepublication of its Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking regarding Toxic Substances Control Act reporting of the chemical substances and mixtures used in hydraulic fracturing. Additionally, in 2015 the BLM enacted a new rule setting forth disclosure requirements and other regulatory mandates for hydraulic fracturing on federal lands.

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From time to time, legislation has been introduced, but not enacted, in Congress to provide for federal regulation of hydraulic fracturing and to require disclosure of the chemicals used in the fracturing process. Certain states, in which we operate, including Pennsylvania and Texas, have adopted, and other states are considering adopting, regulations that could impose new or more stringent permitting, disclosure or well-construction requirements on hydraulic fracturing operations. States could elect to prohibit hydraulic fracturing altogether, as Governor Andrew Cuomo of the State of New York announced in December 2014 with regard to fracturing activities in New York. Local land use restrictions, such as city ordinances, may restrict or prohibit drilling in general and/or hydraulic fracturing in particular. In the event federal, state or local restrictions or prohibitions are adopted in areas where we conduct operations, we may incur significant costs to comply with such requirements or we may experience delays or curtailment in the pursuit of exploration, development, or production activities, and possibly be limited or precluded in the drilling of wells or in the amounts that we are ultimately able to produce from our reserves. Moreover, a number of federal entities are analyzing a variety of environmental issues associated with hydraulic fracturing. For example, the White House Council on Environmental Quality is coordinating an administration-wide review of hydraulic fracturing and the EPA is receiving public commentary on its study of the potential environmental effects of hydraulic fracturing on drinking water and groundwater. These studies and initiatives, or any future studies, depending on their degree of pursuit and any meaningful results obtained, could spur efforts to further regulate hydraulic fracturing.

We use a significant amount of water in our hydraulic fracturing operations. Our inability to locate sufficient amounts of water, or dispose of or recycle water used in our operations, could adversely impact our operations. Moreover, new environmental initiatives and regulations could include restrictions on our ability to conduct certain operations such as hydraulic fracturing or disposal of waste, including, but not limited to, produced water, drilling fluids and other wastes associated with the exploration, development or production of natural gas. Compliance with environmental regulations and permit requirements governing the withdrawal, storage and use of surface water or groundwater necessary for hydraulic fracturing of wells may increase our operating costs and cause delays, interruptions or termination of our operations, the extent of which cannot be predicted, all of which could have an adverse effect on our operations and financial condition.

Legislation or regulatory initiatives intended to address seismic activity in Oklahoma and elsewhere could increase our costs of compliance or lead to operational delays, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations or financial condition. We dispose of large volumes of water produced alongside natural gas and oil (or produced water) in connection with our drilling and production operations, pursuant to permits issued to us by governmental authorities overseeing such disposal activities. While these permits are issued under existing laws and regulations, these legal requirements are subject to change, which could result in the imposition of more stringent operating constraints or new monitoring and reporting requirements, owing to, among other things, concerns of the public or governmental authorities regarding such gathering or disposal activities.

There exists a growing concern that the injection of produced water into belowground disposal wells triggers seismic events in certain areas, including Oklahoma and Texas, where we have limited operations. In response to these concerns, regulators in some states are pursuing initiatives designed to impose additional requirements in the permitting and operating of produced water disposal wells or otherwise to assess any relationship between seismicity and the use of such wells. For example, Oklahoma has taken numerous regulatory actions in response to concerns related to the operation of produced water disposal wells and induced seismicity. Oklahoma has adopted a “traffic light” system, wherein the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) reviews new or existing disposal wells for proximity to faults, seismicity in the area and other factors in determining whether such wells should be permitted, permitted only with special restrictions, or not permitted. The granting of a permit may be conditioned upon the operator complying with several additional regulatory requirements including, without limitation:

 

monitoring and recording well pressure and injected volume on a daily basis;

 

conducting more frequent mechanical integrity testing;

 

reducing the depth of, or “plugging back” such well; and/or

 

reducing injection volumes for such well by as much as 50%.

Additional regulatory action in this area is likely and the Oklahoma legislature has introduced new legislation to expand the Oklahoma Corporation Commission’s authority to address concerns related to disposal wells and induced seismicity.

In Texas, in 2014, the Texas Railroad Commission (“TRC”) published a new rule governing permitting of disposal wells that would require, among other things, the submission of information on seismic events occurring within a specified radius of the disposal well location, as well as logs, geologic cross sections and structure maps relating to the disposal area in question.

Restriction on the volumes permissible for injection or a lack of alternative waste disposal sites could cause us to delay, curtail or discontinue our exploration and development plans. Increased costs associated with the transportation and disposal of produced water, including the cost of complying with regulations concerning produced water disposal, such as mandated produced water recycling in some portion of all of our operations, may reduce our profitability. These developments may result in additional

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regulation, or increased complexity and costs with respect to existing regulations, that could lead to operational delays or increased operating and compliance costs, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows or financial condition.

The enactment of derivatives legislation could have an adverse effect on our ability to use derivative instruments to reduce the effect of commodity price, interest rate and other risks associated with our business. The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Act”), enacted in July 2010, established federal oversight and regulation of the over-the-counter derivatives market and entities, including Range, that participate in that market. The Act requires the Commodities Futures Trading Commission (the “CFTC”) and the SEC to promulgate rules and regulations implementing the Act. Although the CFTC has finalized certain regulations, others remain to be finalized or implemented and it is not possible at this time to predict when this will be accomplished.

In October 2011, the CFTC issued regulations to set position limits for certain futures and option contracts in the major energy markets and for swaps that are their economic equivalents. The initial position limits rule was vacated by the United States District Court for the District of Columbia in September 2012. However, in November 2013, the CFTC proposed new rules that would place limits on positions in certain core futures and equivalent swaps contracts for or linked to certain physical commodities, subject to exceptions for certain bona fide hedging transactions. As these new position limit rules are not yet final, the impact of those provisions on us is uncertain at this time.

The CFTC has designated certain interest rate swaps and credit default swaps for mandatory clearing and the associated rules also will require us, in connection with covered derivative activities, to comply with clearing and trade-execution requirements or take steps to qualify for an exemption to such requirements. The CFTC has not yet proposed rules designating any other classes of swaps, including physical commodity swaps, for mandatory clearing. Although we expect to qualify for the end-user exception from the mandatory clearing requirements for swaps entered to hedge our commercial risks, the application of the mandatory clearing and trade execution requirements to other market participants, such as swap dealers, may change the cost and availability of the swaps that we use for hedging. In addition, the Act requires that regulators establish margin rules for uncleared swaps. Rules that require end-users to post initial or variation margin could impact our liquidity and reduce cash available to us for capital expenditures, therefore reducing our ability to execute hedges to reduce risk and protect cash flows.

The full impact of the Act and related regulatory requirements upon our business will not be known until the regulations are implemented and the market for derivatives contracts has adjusted. The Act and new regulations could significantly increase the cost of derivative contracts or