EX-99.1 6 mux-20191231xex99d1.htm EX-99.1 We have audited the financial statements of Hochschild Mining plc for the year ended 31 December 2012 which comprise the Consolidated income statement, the Consolidated statement of comprehensive income, the Consolidated statement of financial position,

Exhibit 99.1

Graphic

Pistrelli, Henry Martin y Asociados S.R.L.

25 de mayo 487 - C1002ABI

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Tel: (54-11) 4318-1600/4311-6644

Fax: (54-11) 4510-2220

ey.com

Report of Independent Auditors

To the Board of Directors of Minera Santa Cruz S.A.:

We have audited the accompanying financial statements of Minera Santa Cruz S.A. which comprise the statements of financial position as at December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the related statements of  profit (loss) and other comprehensive profit (loss), changes in equity and cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2019, and the related notes to the financial statements.

Management’s Responsibility for the Financial Statements

Management is responsible for the preparation and fair presentation of these financial statements in conformity with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board; this includes the design, implementation, and maintenance of internal control relevant to the preparation and fair presentation of financial statements that are free of material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error.

Auditor’s Responsibility

Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these financial statements based on our audits. We conducted our audits in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement.

An audit involves performing procedures to obtain audit evidence about the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. The procedures selected depend on the auditor’s judgment, including the assessment of the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error. In making those risk assessments, the auditor considers internal control relevant to the entity’s preparation and fair presentation of the financial statements in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the entity’s internal control. Accordingly, we express no such opinion. An audit also includes evaluating the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the financial statements.

We believe that the audit evidence we have obtained is sufficient and appropriate to provide a basis for our audit opinion.

Opinion

In our opinion, the financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of Minera Santa Cruz S.A. as of December 31, 2019 and 2018, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2019, in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board.

City of Buenos Aires, Argentina
June 29, 2020

/S/ PISTRELLI, HENRY MARTIN Y ASOCIADOS S.R.L
Member of Ernst & Young Global

1


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Statements of profit (loss) and other comprehensive profit (loss)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

    

Notes

2019
US$000

  

2018
US$000

  

2017
US$000

Revenue

3

250,715

205,365

227,093

Cost of sales

4

(169,799)

(177,078)

(180,943)

Gross profit

80,916

28,287

46,150

Administrative expenses

5

(6,603)

(7,220)

(9,070)

Exploration expenses

6

(10,632)

(5,016)

(3,791)

Selling expenses

7

(19,444)

(7,997)

(2,990)

Other income

9

478

1,890

2,187

Other expenses

9

(5,721)

(8,086)

(4,720)

Profit before net finance income (costs), foreign exchange loss and income tax

38,994

1,858

27,766

Finance income

10

1,186

1,771

1,818

Finance costs

10

(5,042)

(2,612)

(2,306)

Foreign exchange

178

(8,036)

(5,172)

Profit (Loss) before income tax

35,316

(7,019)

22,106

Current and deferred income tax (expense) recovery

21

(9,297)

(4,791)

1,486

Profit (Loss) for the year

26,019

(11,810)

23,592

Other comprehensive income

-

-

-

Profit (Loss) and Comprehensive Profit (Loss) for the year

26,019

(11,810)

23,592

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

2


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Statements of financial position

As at 31 December 2019 and 2018

  

Notes 

  

As at
31 December

2019
US$000

  

As at
31 December

 2018
 US$000

ASSETS

Non-current assets

164,281

173,584

Property, plant and equipment

11

150,284

157,595

Evaluation and exploration assets

12

6,830

7,045

Intangible assets

13

5,539

6,841

Trade and other receivables

14

1,628

2,103

Current assets

81,562

67,315

Inventories

15

27,105

20,169

Trade and other receivables

14

37,023

36,833

Cash and cash equivalents

16

17,434

10,313

Total assets

245,843

240,899

EQUITY AND LIABILITIES

Capital and reserves

149,136

141,197

Equity share capital

20

110,132

110,132

Other reserves

136,235

163,696

Retained earnings

(97,231)

(132,631)

Non-current liabilities

57,973

59,373

Trade and other payables

17

835

924

Provisions

19

24,914

24,452

Deferred income tax liabilities

21

32,224

33,997

Current liabilities

38,734

40,329

Trade and other payables

17

38,734

34,282

Borrowings

18

-

6,047

Total liabilities

96,707

99,702

Total equity and liabilities

245,843

240,899

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

3


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Statements of cash flows

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

Year ended 31 December

Notes

  

2019
US$000

  

2018
US$000

  

2017
US$000

Cash flows from operating activities

Profit (Loss) before tax

35,316

(7,019)

22,106

Non-cash adjustment to reconcile profit for the year to net cash flows

Depreciation of property, plant and equipment

11

51,598

52,335

48,339

Amortization and depreciation of intangible assets

13

1,313

1,343

1,247

Disposal of property, plant and equipment

11

496

234

204

Other non cash

9

817

5,630

1,233

Impact of change of estimated discount rate for Value Added Tax (VAT) and other receivables

10

1,119

1,664

(1,481)

Other interest

10

(965)

-

-

Unwinding of rehabilitation provision (ARO)

10

68

121

107

Working capital adjustments

(Increase) Decrease in trade and other receivables

(74)

(1,396)

25,665

(Increase) Decrease in inventories

(7,252)

4,368

(64)

(Decrease) Increase in trade payables

(484)

3,404

7,590

Decrease in other payables

(853)

(8,496)

(4,772)

Income tax paid

(6,223)

(12,390)

(40,972)

Net cash flows generated from operating activities

74,876

39,798

59,202

Investing activities

Purchase of property, plant and equipment, evaluation and exploration and intangible assets

11,12,13

(43,591)

(44,008)

(36,463)

Net cash flows used in investing activities

(43,591)

(44,008)

(36,463)

Financing activities

Decrease of borrowings, net

18

(5,814)

(2,759)

6,628

Cash interest paid

18

(233)

(236)

(110)

Dividends paid

22

(18,117)

(21,193)

(25,034)

Net cash flows used in financing activities

(24,164)

(24,188)

(18,516)

Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents during the year

7,121

(28,398)

4,223

Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year

10,313

38,711

34,488

Cash and cash equivalents at end of year

16

17,434

10,313

38,711

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

4


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Statement of changes in equity

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

  

Notes

  

Equity share capital US$000

  

Legal reserve US$000

  

Other reserves US$000

  

Currency translation adjustment US$000

  

Total
other reserves US$000

  

Retained earnings US$000

  

Total
equity
US$000

Balance at 1 January 2017

110,132

12,513

113,941

2,685

129,139

(57,613)

181,658

Dividends

22

-

-

(25,633)

(25,633)

(25,633)

Legal reserve

-

-

-

Other reserves (*)

-

-

56,726

56,726

(56,726)

Profit for the year

-

-

-

23,592

23,592

Balance at 31 December 2017

110,132

12,513

145,034

2,685

160,232

(90,747)

179,617

Dividends

22

-

-

(26,610)

(26,610)

(26,610)

Legal reserve

-

-

-

Other reserves (*)

-

-

30,074

30,074

(30,074)

Loss for the year

-

-

-

(11,810)

(11,810)

Balance at 31 December 2018

110,132

12,513

148,498

2,685

163,696

(132,631)

141,197

Dividends

22

-

-

(18,080)

-

(18,080)

-

(18,080)

Legal reserve

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Other reserves (*)

-

-

(9,381)

-

(9,381)

9,381

-

Profit for the year

-

-

-

-

-

26,019

26,019

Balance at 31 December 2019

110,132

12,513

121,037

2,685

136,235

(97,231)

149,136

(*) In accordance to Shareholders meeting of April 17, 2017, March 26, 2018 and June 5, 2019 based on statutory purposes financial statements.

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements.

5


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

1. Company information

Minera Santa Cruz S.A. (the “Company” or “MSC”) was incorporated in 2001. The Company is a limited company incorporated and domiciled in Sargento Cabral 124, Comodoro Rivadavia, Chubut, Argentina.

The Company’s principal business is the mining, processing and sale of silver and gold.  Information on the parent is presented in Note 23.

For management purposes, the Company is organized into one business unit; therefore, there is only one reporting segment according to IFRS 8, ‘Operating Segments’.

The financial statements of Minera Santa Cruz S.A. for the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017 were authorized for issue in accordance with a resolution of the directors on 29 June 2020.

2. Basis of preparation and significant accounting policies

2.A Basis of preparation

2.A.1 Overview

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB).

The basis of preparation and accounting policies used in preparing the financial statements for the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017 are set out below. The financial statements have been prepared on a historical cost basis, except for derivative financial instruments which have been measured at fair value.

The financial statements are presented in US dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest thousand (US$ thousand), except where otherwise indicated.

2.A.2 Foreign currencies

The Company’s financial information is presented in US dollars, which is the Company’s functional currency. The functional currency for the Company is determined by the currency of the primary economic environment in which it operates.

Transactions denominated in currencies other than the functional currency of the entity are recorded in the functional currency using the exchange rate prevailing at the date of the transaction.

Monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies are remeasured at the exchange rate prevailing at the statement of financial position date. Exchange gains and losses on settlement of foreign currency transactions which are translated at the rate prevailing at the date of the transactions, or on the translation of monetary assets and liabilities which are translated at period-end exchange rates, are recorded in the income statement.

Non-monetary assets and liabilities denominated in foreign currencies that are stated at historical cost are translated to the functional currency at the foreign exchange rate prevailing at the date of the transaction. Non-monetary items measured at fair value in a foreign currency are translated using the exchange rates at the date when the fair value was determined.

2.B Significant accounting judgments, estimates and assumptions

The preparation of the Company´s financial statements requires management to make judgments, estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of revenues, expenses, assets and liabilities, and the accompanying disclosures, and the disclosure of contingent liabilities. Estimates and assumptions are continually evaluated and are based on management’s experience and other factors, including expectations of future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Uncertainty about these assumptions and estimates could result in outcomes that require a material adjustment to the carrying amount of the asset or liability affected in future periods.  The key assumptions concerning the future and other key sources of estimation uncertainty at the reporting date, that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year, are described below. The Company based its assumptions and estimates on information available at the time of financial statements preparations. These assumptions may change in the future due to market changes or circumstances arising beyond the control of the Company and the impact on the financial statements could be material.

Significant areas of estimation uncertainty and critical judgments made by management in preparing the financial statements include:

6


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

Significant estimates:

Useful lives of assets for depreciation and amortization purposes – Note 2.E (e), (f) and (h)

Estimates are required to be made by management as to the useful lives of assets. For depreciation calculated under the unit-of-production method, estimated recoverable reserves and resources are used in determining the depreciation and/or amortization of mine-specific assets. This results in a depreciation/amortization charge proportional to the depletion of the anticipated remaining life of-mine production. Each item’s life, which is assessed annually, has regard to both its physical life limitations and to present assessments of economically recoverable reserves and resources of the mine property at which the asset is located. These calculations require the use of estimates and assumptions, including the amount of recoverable reserves and resources. Changes are accounted for prospectively.

Ore reserves and resources – Note 2.E (g)

There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating ore reserves ansd resources. Assumptions that are valid at the time of estimation may change significantly when new information becomes available. Changes in the forecast prices of commodities, exchange rates, production costs or recovery rates may change the economic status of reserves and resources and may, ultimately, result in changes to reserves and resources.

Recoverable values of mining assetes – Notes 2.E (e), (f), (h) and Notes 11, 12 and 13

The company assesses, at each reporting date, whether there is an indication that an asset or cash-generating unit (‘CGU’) may be impaired. If any indication exists, or when annual impairment testing for an asset is required, the Company estimates the asset’s or CGU’s recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s or CGU’s fair value less costs of disposal (‘FVLCD’) and its value in use.

The assessment of asset carrying values requires the use of estimates and assumptions such as long-term commodity prices, discount rates, future capital requirements, exploration potential and operating performance. Changes in these assumptions will affect the recoverable amount of the property, plant and equipment and evaluation and exploration assets and intangibles assets.

Mine closure costs – Note 2.E (m)

The Company assesses its mine closure cost provision annually. Significant estimates and assumptions are made in determining the provision for mine closure cost as there are numerous factors that will affect the ultimate liability payable. These factors include estimates of the extent and costs of rehabilitation activities, technological changes, regulatory changes, cost increases, mine life and changes in discount rates. Those uncertainties may result in future actual expenditures differing from the amounts currently provided. The provision at the balance sheet date represents management’s best estimate of the present value of the future closure costs required. Changes to estimated future costs are recognized in the balance sheet by adjusting the mine closure cost liability and the related asset originally recognized.

Critical Judgements:

Determination of functional currency.

The determination of functional currency requires management judgement, particularly where there may be several currencies in which transactions are undertaken and which impact the economic environment in which the entity operates.

Income tax – Notes 2.E (b), 21 and 25.

Judgement is required in determining whether deferred tax assets are recognized on the balance sheet. Deferred tax is provided using the balance sheet method on temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts for financial reporting purposes at the reporting date. Deferred tax assets, including those arising from unutilized tax losses require management to assess the likelihood that the Company will generate taxable earnings in future periods, in order to utilize recognized deferred tax assets. Estimates of future taxable income are based on forecasted cash flows from operations and the application of existing tax laws. To the extent that future cash flows and taxable income differ significantly from estimates, the ability of the Company to realize the net deferred tax assets recorded at the balance sheet date could be impacted.

7


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

Recognition of evaluation and exploration assets and transfer to development costs – Note 2.E (f)

The application of the Company´s accounting policy for Exloration and Evaluation (“E&E”) expenditure requires judgement to determine whether future economic benefits are likely from either future exploitation or sale, or whether activities have not reached a stage that permits a reasonable assessment of the existence of reserves and resources.

In addition to applying judgement to determine whether future economic benefits are likely to arise from the Company E&E assets (reserves and resources), the Company has to apply numerous other estimates and assumptions. The determination of a resource is itself an estimation process that involves varying degrees of uncertainty depending on how the resources are classified (i.e., measured, indicated or inferred). These estimates directly impact  the  deferral (capitalization or not) of of E&E expenditures.

2.C Changes in accounting policies and disclosures

The Company adopted the requirements of IFRS 16 Leases and IFRIC 23 Uncertainty over Income Tax Treatments effective 1 January 2019 as described below.

Other than the changes described below, the accounting policies used in the preparation of the consolidated financial statements are consistent with those applied in the preparation of the consolidated financial statement for the year ended 31 December 2018.

IFRS 16 Leases, applicable for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2019.

IFRS 16 specifies how an IFRS reporter recognise, measure, present and disclose leases. The standard provides a single lessee accounting model, including the exemptions to recognise assets and liabilities for all leases unless the lease term is twelve months or less or when the underlying asset has a low value. Lease costs are recognised in the income statement over the lease term in the form of depreciation on the right of use asset and finance charges representing the unwinding of the discount on the lease liability. Lessors continue to classify leases as operating or finance, with IFRS 16’s approach to lessor accounting substantially unchanged from its predecessor, IAS 17 Leases.

The Company has concluded its implementation, focusing on a review of contracts and aggregation of data to support the evaluation of the accounting impacts of applying the new standard and the Company elected to use the exemptions proposed by the standard. The Company has leases of certain office equipment (i.e., personal computers, printing and photocopying machines) that are considered of low-value.

The adoption of IFRS 16 did not have a material impact to the financial statements.

IFRIC 23 Uncertainty over income tax treatments, applicable for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2019.

IFRIC 23 clarifies the accounting for uncertainties in income taxes. This interpretation is applied to the determination of taxable profit (loss), tax basis, unused tax losses, unused tax credits and tax rates, when there is uncertainty over income tax treatments under IAS 12. The Interpretation specifically addresses the following:

- Whether an entity considers uncertain tax treatments separately;

- The assumptions an entity makes about the examination of tax treatments by taxation authorities;

- How an entity determines taxable profit (loss), tax basis, unused tax losses, unused tax credits and tax rates; and

- How an entity considers changes in facts and circumstances

Upon adoption of the Interpretation, the Company considered whether it has any uncertain tax positions, which may be challenged by taxation authorities. The Company determined, based on its tax compliance, that it is probable that its tax treatments will be accepted by the taxation authorities.

Therefore, following IFRIC 23 the Company recognized a non current income tax asset at December 31, 2019 which expected value amounts to US$ 795. The gross amount of the undiscounted tax asset at December 31, 2019 arose to US$ 1,685 -including tax interest at that date-, as the Company expect to collect this amount in future years following expected judicial courts timing.

8


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

2.D Standards, interpretations and amendments to existing standards that are not yet effective

Certain new standards, amendments and interpretations to existing standards have been published and are mandatory for the accounting periods beginning on or after 1 January 2020 or later periods.

Those that are applicable to the Company are as follows:

Amendments to IFRS 9

The London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”) is the most commonly used reference rate in the global financial market. However, concerns about the sustainability of LIBOR and other interbank offered rates (“IBORs”) globally have led to an effort to identify alternative reference rates. On 2017 the United Kingdom’s Financial Conduct Authority announcing that it would no longer persuade, or compel, banks to submit to LIBOR as of the end of 2021. This applies to LIBOR in all jurisdictions and in all currencies.

In September 2019, the IASB issued amendments to IFRS 9, IAS 39 and IFRS 7 Financial Instruments: Disclosures, which conclude phase one of its work to respond to the effects of Interbank Offered Rates (“IBOR”) reform on financial reporting. The amendments provide temporary relief which enable hedge accounting to continue during the period of uncertainty before the replacement of an existing interest rate benchmark with an alternative nearly risk-free interest rate (an “RFR”).

The amendments are effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2020 and must be applied retrospectively.  

The Company is evaluating the potential impact of adopting the amendaments to the financial statements.

Definition of Material - Amendments to IAS 1 and IAS 8

In October 2018, the IASB issued amendments to IAS 1 Presentation of Financial Statements and IAS 8 to align the definition of ‘material’ across the standards and to clarify certain aspects of the definition. The new definition states that, ’Information is material if omitting, misstating or obscuring it could reasonably be expected to influence decisions that the primary users of general purpose financial statements make on the basis of those financial statements, which provide financial information about a specific reporting entity.

The amendments clarify that materiality will depend on the nature or magnitude of information, or both. An entity will need to assess whether the information, either individually or in combination with other information, is material in the context of the financial statements.

The amendments are effective on or after 1 January 2020 and must be applied prospectively. Early application is permitted. 

The amendments to the definition of material is not expected to have a significant impact on an entity’s financial statements, the introduction of the term ‘obscuring information’ in the definition could potentially impact how materiality judgements are made in practice, by elevating the importance of how information is communicated and organised in the financial statements.   

The Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting

The revised Conceptual Framework for Financial Reporting (the Conceptual Framework) is not a standard, and none of the concepts override those in any standard or any requirements in a standard.

For preparers who develop accounting policies based on the Conceptual Framework, it is effective for annual periods beginning on or after 1 January 2020.

There are exemptions in developing accounting policies for regulatory account balances for two standards, namely, IFRS 3 and for those applying IAS 8.

The changes to the Conceptual Framework may affect the application of IFRS in situations where no standard applies to a particular transaction or event.

2.E Summary of significant accounting policies

(a) Revenue recognition

The Company is involved in the production and sale of gold and silver from doré and concentrate containing both gold and silver. Concentrate and doré bars are sold directly to customers.

Revenue from contracts with customers is recognised when control of the goods or services are transferred to the customer at an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services.

Revenue value is determined net of refining and treatment charges but exclude selling expenses and any applicable sales taxes.

9


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

The revenue is subject to adjustments based on inspection of the product by the customer. Revenue is initially recognised on a provisional basis using the Company’s best estimate of contained gold and silver. Any subsequent adjustments to the initial estimate of metal content are recorded in revenue once they have been determined.

In addition, certain sales are ‘provisionally priced’ where the selling price is subject to final adjustment at the end of a period, normally ranging from 15 to 120 days after the start of the delivery process to the customer, based on the market price at the relevant quotation point stipulated in the contract. Revenue is initially recognised when the conditions set out above have been met, using market prices at that date. The provisionally priced metal is revalued based on the forward selling price for the quotational period stipulated in the contract until the quotational period ends. The selling price of gold and silver can be measured reliably as these metals are actively traded on international exchanges. The revaluation of provisionally priced contracts is recorded as revenue.

Doré Sale

The terms that apply for doré sales is Carriage and Insurance Paid To (‘CIP’), which indicate the moment in which the property and the risk of the MSC good is transferred to the client.

Concentrate Sale

For gold and silver concentrate, there are sales under Cost, Insurance and Freight (‘CIF’) or CIP terms. Revenue is recognized at a point in time when the control passes to the customer.

The Sales under CIP or CIF terms requires the Company to be responsible for providing freight/shipping services (as principal) after the date that the Company transfers control of the metal in concentrate to its customers. The Company, therefore, has separate performance obligations for freight/shipping services which are provided solely to facilitate sale of the commodities it produces.

For CIF arrangements, the transaction price (as determined above) is allocated to the metal in concentrate and freight/shipping services using the relative stand-alone selling price method. Under these arrangements, a portion of consideration may be received from the customer in cash at, or around, the date of shipment under a provisional invoice. Therefore, some of the upfront consideration that relates to the freight/shipping services yet to be provided, is deferred.

(b) Income tax

Income tax for the year comprises of current and deferred tax. Income tax is recognized in the income statement except to the extent that it relates to items charged or credited directly to equity, in which case it is recognized in equity.

Current income tax expense includes the expected tax payable for the year, using tax rates enacted at the statement of financial position date, and any adjustment to tax payable in respect of previous years.

 

Deferred income tax is estimated using the balance sheet method, providing for temporary differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities for financial reporting purposes and the amounts used for taxation purposes.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using tax rates that are expected to apply to the period when the asset is realized or the liability is settled based on tax rates (and tax laws) that have been enacted or substantively enacted at the statement of financial position date.

A deferred tax asset is recognized only to the extent that it is probable that future taxable profits will be available against which the asset can be utilized. Deferred tax assets are reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that the related tax benefit will be realized.

Additional see Note 31.(a).

(c) Tax contingencies

An estimate tax liabilitiy is is recognized when the Company has a present obligation as a result of a past event, it is probable that the Company will be required to settle that obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. The liability is the best estimate of the consideration required to settle the present obligation at the balance sheet date, taking into account risks and uncertainties surrounding the obligation. Separate liabilities for interest and penalties are also recorded if appropriate.

Tax liabilities are based on management´s interpretation of tax law and the likehood of settlement. This involves a significant amount of judgment as tax legislation can be complex and open to different interpretation. Management uses in-house tax experts, external professional service firms and previous experience when assessing tax risks.

(d) Leases

Right-of-use assets

10


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

The Company recognises right-of-use assets at the commencement date of the lease (i.e., the date the underlying asset is available for use). Right-of-use assets are measured at cost, less any accumulated depreciation and impairment losses, and adjusted for any remeasurement of lease liabilities. The cost of right-of-use assets includes the amount of lease liabilities recognised, initial direct costs incurred, and lease payments made at or before the commencement date less any lease incentives received. The right-of-use asset is depreciated over the shorter of the asset's useful life and the lease term on a straight-line basis. Right-of-use assets are subject to impairment.

Lease liabilities

At the commencement date of the lease, the Company recognises lease liabilities measured at the present value of lease payments to be made over the lease term. The lease payments include fixed payments (including in-substance fixed payments) less any lease incentives receivable, and amounts expected to be paid under residual value guarantees. The lease payments also include the exercise price of a purchase option reasonably certain to be exercised by the Company and payments of penalties for terminating a lease, if the lease term reflects the Company exercising the option to terminate. The variable lease payments are recognised as expense in the period on which the event or condition that triggers the payment occurs.

In calculating the present value of lease payments, the Company uses the incremental borrowing rate at the lease commencement date if the interest rate implicit in the lease is not readily determinable. After the commencement date, the amount of lease liabilities is increased to reflect the accretion of interest and reduced for the lease payments made. In addition, the carrying amount of lease liabilities is remeasured if there is a modification, a change in the lease term, a change in the in-substance fixed lease payments or a change in the assessment to purchase the underlying asset.

Short-term leases and leases of low-value assets

The Company applies the short-term lease recognition exemption to its short-term leases of machinery and equipment (i.e., those leases that have a lease term of twelve months or less from the commencement date and do not contain a purchase option). It also applies the lease of low-value assets recognition exemption to leases of office equipment that are considered of low value (i.e., below US$5,000). Lease payments on short-term leases and leases of low-value assets are recognised as expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

(e) Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment is stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and impairment losses. Cost comprises its purchase price and directly attributable costs of acquisition or construction required to bring the asset to the condition necessary for the asset to be capable of operating in the manner intended by management. Economical and physical conditions of assets have not changed substantially over this period.

The cost less residual value of each item of property, plant and equipment is depreciated over its useful life. Each item’s
estimated useful life has been assessed with regard to both its own physical life limitations and the present assessment of economically recoverable reserves and resources of the mine property at which the item is located. Estimates of remaining useful lives are made on a regular basis for all mine buildings, machinery and equipment, with annual reassessments for major items. Depreciation is charged to cost of production on a units of production (“UOP”) basis for mine buildings and installations and plant and equipment used in the mining production process, or charged directly to the income statement over the estimated useful life of the individual asset on a straight-line basis when not related to the mining production process. Changes in estimates, which mainly affect units of production calculations, are accounted for prospectively. Depreciation commences when assets are available for use. Land is not depreciated.

An asset’s carrying amount is written-down to its recoverable amount if the asset’s carrying amount is greater than its estimated recoverable amount.

Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing the proceeds with the carrying amount and are recognized within other income/expenses, in the income statement.

The expected useful lives under the straight-line method are as follows:

Years

Buildings

3 to end of mine life

Plant and equipment

4 to end of mine life

Vehicles

5

11


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition or construction of an asset that takes a substantial time to be ready for its intended use are capitalized as part of the cost of the asset. All other borrowing costs are expensed when incurred.

Mining properties and development costs

Purchased mining properties are recognized as assets at their cost of acquisition. Costs associated with developing of mining properties are capitalized and are depreciated upon commencement of commercial production, using the UOP method based.

When a mine construction project moves into the production stage, the capitalization of mine construction costs ceases and costs are either included in the cost of inventory or expensed, except for costs which qualify for capitalization. Revenue from production during the pre-operating stage is recognised as a deduction of the pre-production costs capitalised.

Construction in progress

Assets in the course of construction are capitalized as a separate component of property, plant and equipment. On completion, the cost of construction is transferred to the appropriate category. Construction in progress is not depreciated.

Subsequent expenditures

Expenditures incurred to replace a component of an item of property, plant and equipment are capitalized to replace the carrying amount of the component being written-off. Other subsequent expenditures are capitalized if future economic benefits will arise from the expenditure, otherwise are expensed in the income statement as incurred.

(f) Evaluation and exploration assets

Evaluation and exploration expenses are capitalized when the future economic benefit of the project can reasonably be regarded as assured, and / or from the date that the Board of Directors authorizes management to conduct a feasibility study.

Expenditures are transferred to mining properties and development costs once the work is completed.

Costs incurred in converting inferred resources to indicated and measured resources (of which reserves are a component) are capitalized as incurred. Costs incurred in identifying inferred resources are expensed as incurred.

(g) Determination of ore reserves and resources

The Company estimates its ore reserves and mineral resources based on information compiled by internal competent persons. Reports to support these estimates are prepared each year. It is the Company’s policy to have the report audited by a Qualified Person.

Reserves and resources are used in the UOP calculation for depreciation as well as the determination of the timing of mine closure cost and impairment analysis.

(h) Intangible assets

Right to use energy of transmission line

Transmission line costs represent the investment made by the Company during the period of its use. This is an asset with a finite useful life equal to that of the life and amortized applying the UOP method for the mine.

Other intangible assets

Other intangible assets are primarily computer software, which are capitalized at cost and amortized on a straight-line basis over their useful life of three years.

(i) Impairment of non-financial assets

The carrying amounts of property, plant and equipment, intangible assets and evaluation and exploration assets are reviewed for impairment if events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. If there are indicators of impairment, an exercise is undertaken to determine whether the carrying values are in excess of their recoverable amount. Such review is undertaken on an asset by asset basis, except where such assets do not generate cash flow independent of other assets, and then the review is undertaken at the cash-generating unit level.

The assessment requires the use of estimates and assumptions such as long-term commodity prices, discount rates, future capital requirements, exploration potential and operating performance. Changes in these assumptions will affect the recoverable amount of this group of assets.

If the carrying amount of an asset or its cash-generating unit exceeds the recoverable amount, a provision is recorded to reflect the asset at the lower amount. Impairment losses are recognized in the income statement.

12


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

Calculation of recoverable amount

The recoverable amount of assets is the greater of their value in use (‘VIU’) and fair value less costs of disposal (‘FVLCD’) to sell. FVLCD is based on an estimate of the amount that the Company may obtain in a sale transaction on an arm’s length basis. VIU is based on estimated future cash flows discounted to present value using a discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset. For an asset that does not generate cash inflows largely independent of those from other assets, the recoverable amount is determined for the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs. The Company’s CGU is the smallest identifiable groups of assets that generate cash inflows that are largely independent of the cash inflows from other assets or groups of assets. The Company considers the mine site as a CGU.

Reversal of impairment

An impairment loss is reversed if there has been a change in the estimates used to determine the recoverable amount. An impairment loss is reversed only to the extent that the asset’s carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined, net of depreciation or amortization, if no impairment loss had been recognized.

(j) Inventories

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or net realizable value. Cost is determined using the weighted average method. The cost of work in progress and finished goods (ore inventories) is based on the cost of production.

For this purpose, the cost of production includes:

costs, materials and contractor expenses which are directly attributable to the extraction and processing of dore;
depreciation of property, plant and equipment used in the extraction and processing of ore;

Net realizable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less applicable selling expenses.

(k) Financial instruments

A financial instrument is any contract that gives rise to a financial asset of one entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of another entity.

- Initial recognition and measurement

Financial assets are classified initially as assets at amortized cost and /or fair value through other comprenhesive income or loss (OCI), and fair value through profit or loss. The classification of financial assets at initial recognition depends on the financial asset´s contractual cash flow characteristics and the Company´s business model for managing them.

Financial assets are measured on initial recognition at fair value, plus, in the case of financial instruments other than those classified as fair value through profit or loss ("FVPL"), include the directly attributable transaction costs. Trade receivable that do not contain a significant financing component are measured at the transaction price.

Financial liabilities are classified, at initial recognition as financial liabilities at fair value through profit or loss, loans and borrowings, payables, or as derivatives designated as hedging instruments in a effective hedge, as appropriate. All financial liabilities are recognized initially at fair value and, in the case of loans and borrowings payables, net of directly attributable transaction costs.

Financial assets

- Subsequent measurement

- Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss

For the year ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, all the Company’s financial assets are classified as assets at FVPL. The Company considers whether a contract contains an embedded derivative when the entity first becomes a party to it. The embedded derivatives are no longer separated from the host and therefore the revaluation of provisionally priced contracts is disclosed within the receivable of the host contract in “trade and other receivables. Reassessment only occurs if there is a change in the terms of the contract that significantly modifies the cash flows that would otherwise be required.

- Derecognition

A financial asset (or, where applicable, a part of a financial asset) is primarily derecognised (i.e., removed from the Company’s statement of financial position) when:

13


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

• The rights to receive cash flows from the asset have expired, or

• The Company has transferred its rights to receive cash flows from the asset or has assumed an obligation to pay the received cash flows in full without material delay to a third party under a ‘pass-through’ arrangement; and either (a) the Company has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset, or (b) the Company has neither transferred nor retained substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset, but has transferred control of the asset.

When the Company has transferred its rights to receive cash flows from an asset or has entered into a pass-through arrangement, it evaluates if, and to what extent, it has retained the risks and rewards of ownership. When it has neither transferred nor retained substantially all of the risks and rewards of the asset, nor transferred control of the asset, the Company continues to recognise the transferred asset to the extent of its continuing involvement. In that case, the Company also recognises an associated liability. The transferred asset and the associated liability are measured on a basis that reflects the rights and obligations that the Company has retained.

- Impairment of financial assets

The Company assesses at each statement of financial position date whether a financial asset or group of financial assets is impaired.

Financial liabilities

- Subsequent measurement – Loans and borrowings

Loans and borrowings are recognized initially at fair value. After initial recognition, interest-bearing loans and borrowings are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest rate (EIR) method.

Gains and losses are recognised in profit or loss when the liabilities are derecognised as well as through the EIR amortisation process.

Amortised cost is calculated by taking into account any discount or premium on acquisition and fees or costs that are an integral part of the EIR. The EIR amortisation is included as finance costs in the statement of profit or loss.

-Derecognition

A financial liability is derecognised when the obligation under the liability is discharged or cancelled or expires. When an existing financial liability is replaced by another from the same lender on substantially different terms, or the terms of an existing liability are substantially modified, such an exchange or modification is treated as the derecognition of the original liability and the recognition of a new liability. The difference in the respective carrying amounts is recognised in the statement of profit or loss.

(l) Trade and other receivables

Current trade receivables are carried at the original invoice amount less provision made for impairment of these receivables. Non-current receivables are stated at amortised cost. A provision for impairment of trade receivables is established using the expected credit loss impairment model according to IFRS 9. The amount of the provision is the difference between the carrying amount and the recoverable amount and this difference is recognised in the income statement.

(m) Provisions

Provisions are recognized when the Company has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation. If the effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and, where appropriate, the risks specific to the liability. Where discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognized as a finance cost.

Mine closure costs

Provisions for mine closure costs are made in respect of the estimated future costs of closure and restoration and for environmental rehabilitation costs (which include the dismantling and demolition of infrastructure, removal of residual materials and remediation of disturbed areas) in the accounting period when the related environmental disturbance occurs.

The rehabilitation provision represents the present value of rehabilitation costs relating to the mine site, and expected to be incurred at the expected end of the mine life. Rehabilitation costs are based on the management estimates using assumptions based on the current economic environment.

The provision is reviewed on an annual basis for changes in cost estimates, discount rates and the expected life of mine.

14


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

Changes to estimated future costs are recognised in the statement of financial position by adjusting the mine closure cost liability and the related asset originally recognised. If, for mature mines, the related mine assets net of mine closure cost provisions exceed the recoverable value, thet portion of the increase ia charged directly to the income statement. Similarly, reductions to the estimated costs exceeding the carrying value of the mine asset, that portion of the decrease is credited directly to the income statement. For closed sites, changes to estimated costs are recognised immediately in the income statement.

Actual rehabilitation costs will ultimately depend upon future market prices for the necessary rehabilitation works required that will reflect market conditions at the relevant time. Furthermore, the timing of rehabilitation is likely to depend on when the mine ceases to produce at economically viable rates. This, in turn, will depend upon future gold and silver prices, which are inherently uncertain.

The discount rate used in the calculation of the provision as at 31 December 2019 equaled 0.0% (2018: 0.6%).

Other

Other provisions are accounted for when the Company has a legal or constructive obligation for which it is probable there will be an outflow of resources for which the amount can be reliably estimated.

(n) Cash-settled share-based payments

The fair value of cash-settled share plans is recognized as a liability over the vesting period of the awards. Movements in that liability between accounting dates are recognized as an expense. The fair value of the awards is taken to be the market value of the shares at the date of award adjusted by a factor for anticipated relative Total Shareholder Return (“TSR”) performance. Fair values are subsequently remeasured at each accounting date to reflect the number of awards expected to vest based on the current and anticipated TSR performance.

Uncertainties in estimating the award include potential changes in the TSR, the number of participants in the plan, and levels of interest rates.

(o) Finance income and costs

Finance income and costs mainly include interest expense on borrowings, the accumulation of interest on provisions, interest income on funds invested.

Interest income is recognized as it is incurred, taking into account the effective yield on the asset.

(p) Dividend distributions

Dividend distributions to the Company’s shareholders are recognized as a liability in the Company’s financial statements in the period in which the dividends are approved by the Company’s shareholders.

(q) Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents are carried in the statement of financial position at cost. For the purposes of the statement of financial position, cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand and deposits held with banks that are readily convertible into known amounts of cash and which are subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

Liquid investment are classified as cash equivalents if the amount of cash that will be received is known at the time of the initial investment and the risk of changes in value is considered insignificant.

15


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

3. Revenue

Year ended 31 December

2019
US$000

2018
US$000

2017
US$000

Doré bars

Gold

59,044

57,033

60,540

Silver

45,113

44,704

52,459

Freight/shipping services (note 2.E(a))

1,346

1,333

1,384

Concentrate

Gold

83,472

59,085

62,001

Silver

58,937

40,926

48,406

Freight/shipping services (note 2.E(a))

2,803

2,284

2,303

Total

250,715

205,365

227,093

All revenue from the sale of doré and concentrate is recognized at a point in time when control transfers and revenue from freight is recognized over time as services are provided.

Included within revenue is a gain of US$13 relating to provisional pricing adjustments (2018: gain of US$1,543, 2017: gain of US$1,272) arising on sales of concentrates and doré.

4. Cost of sales

Year ended 31 December

2019
US$000

2018
US$000

2017
US$000

Depreciation and amortization

50,892

50,993

47,224

Personnel expenses

46,547

49,605

55,902

Mining royalty (note 26)

6,412

5,296

5,792

Supplies

35,413

33,112

33,484

Third-party services

29,676

28,630

32,301

Others

2,831

2,660

3,674

Change in products in process and finished goods

(1,972)

6,782

2,566

Total

169,799

177,078

180,943

5. Administrative expenses

Year ended 31 December

2019
US$000

2018
US$000

2017
US$000

Personnel expenses

2,731

3,469

4,421

Professional fees

619

556

607

Social and community welfare expenses(1)

21

184

323

Travel expenses

231

259

240

Communications

81

60

78

Indirect taxes

1,144

985

1,719

Depreciation and amortization

88

61

68

Supplies

150

85

76

Other

1,538

1,561

1,538

Total

6,603

7,220

9,070

(1)

Represents amounts expended by the Company on social and community welfare activities surrounding its mining units.

16


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

6. Exploration expenses

Year ended 31 December

2019
US$000

2018
US$000

2017
US$000

Mine site exploration(1)

Third-party services

9,077

3,654

1,947

Personnel expenses

794

792

976

Others

761

570

868

Total

10,632

5,016

3,791

(1)Mine-site exploration is performed with the purpose of identifying potential minerals within the existing mine-site as well as properties surrounding the mine-site, to maintain and exted the mine’s life.

7. Selling expenses

Year ended 31 December

2019
US$000

2018
US$000

2017
US$000

Sales commissions

246

224

146

Warehouse services

1,219

1,237

1,385

Taxes

16,259

5,147

15

Other

1,720

1,389

1,444

Total

19,444

7,997

2,990

8. Personnel expenses

Year ended 31 December

2019
US$000

2018
US$000

2017
US$000

Salaries and wages

43,428

45,637

53,203

Other legal contributions

12,077

11,061

12,656

Statutory holiday payments

3,109

2,952

3,198

Long Term Incentive Plan

148

412

876

Termination benefits

586

1,739

1,463

Other

528

714

1,127

Total

59,876

62,515

72,523

Personel expenses are included in costs of sales, administrative and exploration expenses (notes 4,5 and 6) or capitalised to plant and equipment, E&E assets and inventory as follows: year ended December 31, 2019 - US$9,804 (2018: US$8,649, 2017: US$11,224).

Average number of employees for 2019, 2018 and 2017 were as follows:

Year ended 31 December

2019

2018

 

2017

Average number of employees

1,384

1,212

1,165

Total

1,384

1,212

1,165

17


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

9. Other income and expenses

Year ended 31 December

2019
US$000

2018
US$000

2017
US$000

Other income

Export refunds

262

1,287

1,613

Other

216

603

574

Total

478

1,890

2,187

Other expenses

VAT write-off

139

55

212

Customers write-off(1)

66

4,472

-

Supplies obsolescence

316

283

542

Corporate Social Responsibility

3,636

2,382

3,063

Other

1,564

894

903

Total

5,721

8,086

4,720

(1)Corresponds to Republic Metal Corporation, former customer, who has been under the USC Chapter 11 process since November, 2018.

Other income and expenses for the year ended December 31, 2019 include non cash charges of $817 (2018 - $5,630; 2017 - $1,233) which relate to writte-offs  and changes in provision for supplies obsolescenceas as well as certain non significant charges included in “Other”.

10. Finance income and costs

Year ended 31 December

2019
US$000

2018
US$000

2017
US$000

Finance income

Interest on deposits and liquidity funds

35

389

290

Non- cash gain on discount of VAT and other receivables

-

-

1,481

Other finance income

1,151

1,382

47

Total

1,186

1,771

1,818

Finance costs

Interest on bank loans (note 18)

186

241

128

Interest expense

212

40

1,393

Unwinding of ARO provision

68

121

107

Financial costs

3,235

3

(3)

Non- cash loss on discount of VAT assets and other receivables

1,119

1,664

-

Other

222

543

681

Total

5,042

2,612

2,306

Other finance income of $1,151 for the year ended December 31, 2019 includes a non cash gain of $965 as a result of implementing IFRIC 23 effective January 1, 2019. Other finance income for 2018 represents the reversal of certain interest expense contingency recorded in the year ended 2017; the amount was collected in 2018.

Financial costs of $3,235 for the year ended December 31, 2019 mainly represent charges for certain financing costs related to payments of dividends due to the impact of exchange regulations in Argentina.

18


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

11. Property, plant and equipment

Mining properties and development
costs
US$000

Land and buildings US$000

Plant and equipment
US$000

Vehicles US$000

Mine
closure
asset
US$000

Construction in progress and capital advances US$000

Total
US$000

Year ended 31 December 2019

Cost

Balance at 1 January 2019

367,028

159,585

111,975

4,540

20,966

3,798

667,892

Additions

27,100

-

11,315

-

-

5,174

43,589

Change in closure provision discount rate

-

-

-

-

988

-

988

Disposals

-

(9)

(1,494)

-

-

-

(1,503)

Transfers and other movements

-

4,460

1,204

510

-

(6,183)

(9)

Transfers from evaluation and exploration assets

233

-

-

-

-

-

233

Balance at 31 December 2019

394,361

164,036

123,000

5,050

21,954

2,789

711,190

Accumulated depreciation and impairment(2)

Balance at 1 January 2019

332,717

93,791

68,194

3,231

12,342

22

510,297

Depreciation for the year(1)

27,987

12,501

8,828

709

1,595

(22)

51,598

Disposals

-

-

(1,007)

-

-

-

(1,007)

Transfers from evaluation and exploration assets

18

-

-

-

-

-

18

Balance at 31 December 2019

360,722

106,292

76,015

3,940

13,937

-

560,906

Net book amount at 31 December 2019

33,639

57,744

46,985

1,110

8,017

2,789

150,284

(1)The depreciation for the year is included in cost of sales and administrative expenses in the income statement, the remaining amount is capitalized.
(2)Includes an impairment charge of $38,914 (gross value as of the date of its recognition) accrued in previous years, as determined using the fair value less cost to dispose (“FVLCD”) methodology.

Mining properties and development
costs
US$000

Land and buildings US$000

Plant and equipment
US$000

Vehicles US$000

Mine
closure
asset
US$000

Construction in progress and capital advances US$000

Total
US$000

Year ended 31 December 2018

Cost

Balance at 1 January 2018

342,879

150,238

98,042

4,440

21,446

5,997

623,042

Additions

21,626

-

7,279

-

-

14,702

43,607

Change in closure provision discount rate

-

-

-

-

(480)

-

(480)

Disposals

-

-

(480)

(296)

-

(21)

(797)

Transfers and other movements

-

9,347

7,134

396

-

(16,880)

(3)

Transfers from evaluation and exploration assets

2,523

-

-

-

-

-

2,523

Balance at 31 December 2018

367,028

159,585

111,975

4,540

20,966

3,798

667,892

Accumulated depreciation and impairment(3)

Balance at 1 January 2018

298,740

82,429

63,189

3,079

10,866

22

458,325

Depreciation for the year(4)

33,777

11,362

5,298

422

1,476

-

52,335

Disposals

-

-

(293)

(270)

-

-

(563)

Transfers from evaluation and exploration assets

200

-

-

-

-

-

200

Balance at 31 December 2018

332,717

93,791

68,194

3,231

12,342

22

510,297

Net book amount at 31 December 2018

34,311

65,794

43,781

1,309

8,624

3,776

157,595

(3)The depreciation for the year is included in cost of sales and administrative expenses in the income statement, the remaining amount is capitalized.
(4)Includes an impairment charge of $38,914 (gross value as of the date of its recognition) accrued in previous years, as determined using the fair value less cost to dispose (“FVLCD”) methodology.

19


Minera Santa Cruz S.A.

Notes to the financial statements (continued)

For the years ended 31 December 2019, 2018 and 2017

12. Evaluation and exploration assets

Total
US$000

Cost

Balance at 1 January 2018

9,305

Additions

868

Transfers to property, plant and equipment

(2,523)

Balance at 31 December 2018

7,650

Additions

-

Transfers to property plant and equipment

(233)

Balance at 31 December 2019

7,417

Accumulated impairment

Balance at 1 January 2018

805

Transfers to property, plant and equipment

(200)

Balance at 31 December 2018