10-Q 1 a2014032810-q.htm 10-Q 2014.03.28 10-Q


 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-Q
ý QUARTERLY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the quarterly period ended March 28, 2014
OR
¨ TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                                    to                                     
Commission File No. 001-02217
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its Charter)
Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
58-0628465
(IRS Employer
Identification No.)
One Coca-Cola Plaza
Atlanta, Georgia
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
30313
(Zip Code)
Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (404) 676-2121
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý    No o
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
 
Large accelerated filer ý
                
Accelerated filer o
 
Non-accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
                
Smaller reporting company o
Indicate by check mark if the Registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o    No ý
Indicate the number of shares outstanding of each of the issuer's classes of common stock as of the latest practicable date.
Class of Common Stock 
 
Outstanding at April 21, 2014
$0.25 Par Value
 
4,395,182,857 Shares
 




THE COCA-COLA COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
Table of Contents
 
 
Page Number
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income
Three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Condensed Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows
Three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
 
Item 3.
 
 
 
Item 4.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Item 1.
 
 
 
Item 1A.
 
 
 
Item 2.
 
 
 
Item 6.





FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This report contains information that may constitute "forward-looking statements." Generally, the words "believe," "expect," "intend," "estimate," "anticipate," "project," "will" and similar expressions identify forward-looking statements, which generally are not historical in nature. However, the absence of these words or similar expressions does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking. All statements that address operating performance, events or developments that we expect or anticipate will occur in the future — including statements relating to volume growth, share of sales and earnings per share growth, and statements expressing general views about future operating results — are forward-looking statements. Management believes that these forward-looking statements are reasonable as and when made. However, caution should be taken not to place undue reliance on any such forward-looking statements because such statements speak only as of the date when made. Our Company undertakes no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law. In addition, forward-looking statements are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from our Company's historical experience and our present expectations or projections. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those described in Part II, "Item 1A. Risk Factors" and elsewhere in this report and in our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013, and those described from time to time in our future reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

1



Part I. Financial Information
Item 1.  Financial Statements (Unaudited)
THE COCA-COLA COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME
(UNAUDITED)
(In millions except per share data)
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

NET OPERATING REVENUES
$
10,576

$
11,035

Cost of goods sold
4,083

4,324

GROSS PROFIT
6,493

6,711

Selling, general and administrative expenses
3,989

4,182

Other operating charges
128

121

OPERATING INCOME
2,376

2,408

Interest income
123

116

Interest expense
124

102

Equity income (loss) — net
71

87

Other income (loss) — net
(241
)
(165
)
INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES
2,205

2,344

Income taxes
579

575

CONSOLIDATED NET INCOME
1,626

1,769

Less: Net income attributable to noncontrolling interests
7

18

NET INCOME ATTRIBUTABLE TO SHAREOWNERS OF
THE COCA-COLA COMPANY
$
1,619

$
1,751

BASIC NET INCOME PER SHARE1
$
0.37

$
0.39

DILUTED NET INCOME PER SHARE1
$
0.36

$
0.39

DIVIDENDS PER SHARE
$
0.305

$
0.280

AVERAGE SHARES OUTSTANDING
4,401

4,455

Effect of dilutive securities
63

75

AVERAGE SHARES OUTSTANDING ASSUMING DILUTION
4,464

4,530

1 Calculated based on net income attributable to shareowners of The Coca-Cola Company.
Refer to Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

2



THE COCA-COLA COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
(UNAUDITED)
(In millions)
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

CONSOLIDATED NET INCOME
$
1,626

$
1,769

Other comprehensive income:
 
 
Net foreign currency translation adjustment
(389
)
70

Net gain (loss) on derivatives
(99
)
87

Net unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale securities
315

8

Net change in pension and other benefit liabilities
7

32

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
1,460

1,966

Less: Comprehensive income (loss) attributable to
noncontrolling interests
3

41

TOTAL COMPREHENSIVE INCOME ATTRIBUTABLE TO
SHAREOWNERS OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY
$
1,457

$
1,925

Refer to Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

3



THE COCA-COLA COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS
(UNAUDITED)
(In millions except par value)
 
March 28,
2014

December 31,
2013

ASSETS
 
 
CURRENT ASSETS
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
$
9,131

$
10,414

Short-term investments
6,918

6,707

TOTAL CASH, CASH EQUIVALENTS AND SHORT-TERM INVESTMENTS
16,049

17,121

Marketable securities
3,384

3,147

Trade accounts receivable, less allowances of $63 and $61, respectively
5,233

4,873

Inventories
3,357

3,277

Prepaid expenses and other assets
3,029

2,886

TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS
31,052

31,304

EQUITY METHOD INVESTMENTS
10,283

10,393

OTHER INVESTMENTS
2,844

1,119

OTHER ASSETS
4,655

4,661

 PROPERTY, PLANT AND EQUIPMENT, less accumulated depreciation of
$10,395 and $10,065, respectively
14,860

14,967

TRADEMARKS WITH INDEFINITE LIVES
6,745

6,744

BOTTLERS' FRANCHISE RIGHTS WITH INDEFINITE LIVES
7,403

7,415

GOODWILL
12,343

12,312

OTHER INTANGIBLE ASSETS
1,104

1,140

TOTAL ASSETS
$
91,289

$
90,055

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
 
 
CURRENT LIABILITIES
 
 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
$
9,959

$
9,577

Loans and notes payable
18,250

16,901

Current maturities of long-term debt
1,551

1,024

Accrued income taxes
296

309

TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES
30,056

27,811

LONG-TERM DEBT
18,640

19,154

OTHER LIABILITIES
3,414

3,498

DEFERRED INCOME TAXES
6,257

6,152

THE COCA-COLA COMPANY SHAREOWNERS' EQUITY
 
 
Common stock, $0.25 par value; Authorized — 11,200 shares;
Issued — 7,040 and 7,040 shares, respectively
1,760

1,760

Capital surplus
12,332

12,276

Reinvested earnings
61,937

61,660

Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)
(3,594
)
(3,432
)
Treasury stock, at cost — 2,648 and 2,638 shares, respectively
(39,781
)
(39,091
)
EQUITY ATTRIBUTABLE TO SHAREOWNERS OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY
32,654

33,173

EQUITY ATTRIBUTABLE TO NONCONTROLLING INTERESTS
268

267

TOTAL EQUITY
32,922

33,440

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND EQUITY
$
91,289

$
90,055

Refer to Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.

4



THE COCA-COLA COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS
(UNAUDITED)
(In millions)
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

OPERATING ACTIVITIES
 
 
Consolidated net income
$
1,626

$
1,769

Depreciation and amortization
473

473

Stock-based compensation expense
39

47

Deferred income taxes
13

157

Equity (income) loss — net of dividends
(65
)
(77
)
Foreign currency adjustments
280

184

Significant (gains) losses on sales of assets — net

(1
)
Other operating charges
84

74

Other items
46

36

Net change in operating assets and liabilities
(1,430
)
(2,184
)
Net cash provided by operating activities
1,066

478

INVESTING ACTIVITIES
 
 
Purchases of investments
(4,369
)
(3,506
)
Proceeds from disposals of investments
2,595

2,225

Acquisitions of businesses, equity method investments and nonmarketable securities
(85
)
(28
)
Proceeds from disposals of businesses, equity method investments and nonmarketable securities

690

Purchases of property, plant and equipment
(449
)
(498
)
Proceeds from disposals of property, plant and equipment
68

35

Other investing activities
27

(136
)
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities
(2,213
)
(1,218
)
FINANCING ACTIVITIES
 
 
Issuances of debt
10,926

12,585

Payments of debt
(9,567
)
(10,065
)
Issuances of stock
191

417

Purchases of stock for treasury
(875
)
(1,523
)
Dividends


Other financing activities
(470
)
21

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
205

1,435

EFFECT OF EXCHANGE RATE CHANGES ON CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
(341
)
25

CASH AND CASH EQUIVALENTS
 
 
Net increase (decrease) during the period
(1,283
)
720

Balance at beginning of period
10,414

8,442

Balance at end of period
$
9,131

$
9,162

Refer to Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.


5



THE COCA-COLA COMPANY AND SUBSIDIARIES
NOTES TO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
(UNAUDITED)
NOTE 1: SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES
Basis of Presentation
The accompanying unaudited Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States for interim financial information and with the instructions to Form 10-Q and Rule 10-01 of Regulation S-X. They do not include all information and notes required by generally accepted accounting principles for complete financial statements. However, except as disclosed herein, there has been no material change in the information disclosed in the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in the Annual Report on Form 10-K of The Coca-Cola Company for the year ended December 31, 2013.
When used in these notes, the terms "The Coca-Cola Company," "Company," "we," "us" or "our" mean The Coca-Cola Company and all entities included in our condensed consolidated financial statements. In the opinion of management, all adjustments (including normal recurring accruals) considered necessary for a fair presentation have been included. Operating results for the three months ended March 28, 2014, are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for the year ending December 31, 2014. Sales of our nonalcoholic ready-to-drink beverages are somewhat seasonal, with the second and third calendar quarters accounting for the highest sales volumes. The volume of sales in the beverage business may be affected by weather conditions.
Each of our interim reporting periods, other than the fourth interim reporting period, ends on the Friday closest to the last day of the corresponding quarterly calendar period. The first quarter of 2014 and 2013 ended on March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, respectively. Our fourth interim reporting period and our fiscal year end on December 31 regardless of the day of the week on which December 31 falls.
Effective January 1, 2014, the Company changed the name of the Pacific operating segment to Asia Pacific. Accordingly, the name has been updated for both the current and prior year disclosures in the notes to condensed consolidated financial statements.
Advertising Costs
The Company's accounting policy related to advertising costs for annual reporting purposes, as disclosed in Note 1 of our 2013 Annual Report on Form 10-K, is to expense production costs of print, radio, television and other advertisements as of the first date the advertisements take place. All other marketing expenditures are expensed in the annual period in which the expenditure is incurred.
For interim reporting purposes, we allocate our estimated full year marketing expenditures that benefit multiple interim periods to each of our interim reporting periods. We use the proportion of each interim period's actual unit case volume to the estimated full year unit case volume as the basis for the allocation. This methodology results in our marketing expenditures being recognized at a standard rate per unit case. At the end of each interim reporting period, we review our estimated full year unit case volume and our estimated full year marketing expenditures in order to evaluate if a change in estimate is necessary. The impact of any changes in these full year estimates is recognized in the interim period in which the change in estimate occurs. Our full year marketing expenditures are not impacted by this interim accounting policy.
Hyperinflationary Economies

A hyperinflationary economy is one that has cumulative inflation of 100 percent or more over a three-year period. Effective January 1, 2010, Venezuela was determined to be a hyperinflationary economy. In accordance with hyperinflationary accounting under accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, our local subsidiary was required to use the U.S. dollar as its functional currency.
In February 2013, the Venezuelan government devalued its currency to an official rate of exchange ("official rate") of 6.3 bolivars per U.S. dollar provided by the Commission for the Administration of Foreign Exchange ("CADIVI"). At that time, the Company remeasured the net monetary assets of our Venezuelan subsidiary at the official rate. As a result of the devaluation we recognized a loss of $140 million in the line item other income (loss) — net in our condensed consolidated statement of income during the three months ended March 29, 2013.
Beginning in October 2013, the government authorized certain companies that operate in designated industry sectors to exchange a limited volume of bolivars for U.S. dollars at a bid rate established via weekly auctions under a system referred to as "SICAD 1." During the first quarter of 2014, the government expanded the types of transactions that may be subject to the

6



weekly SICAD 1 auction process while retaining the official rate of 6.3 bolivars per U.S. dollar; replaced CADIVI with a new foreign currency administration, the National Center for Foreign Commerce ("CENCOEX"); and introduced another currency exchange mechanism ("SICAD 2"). The SICAD 2 rate is intended to more closely resemble a market-driven exchange rate than the official rate and SICAD 1. As a result of these changes, an entity may be able to convert bolivars to U.S. dollars at one of three legal exchange rates, which as of March 28, 2014, were 6.3 (official rate), 10.8 (SICAD 1) and 50.9 (SICAD 2). We analyzed the multiple rates currently available and the Company's estimates of the applicable rate at which future transactions could be settled, including the payment of dividends. Based on this analysis, we determined that the SICAD 1 rate is the most appropriate rate to use for remeasurement given our circumstances. Therefore, as of March 28, 2014, we remeasured the net monetary assets of our Venezuelan subsidiary using an exchange rate of 10.8 bolivars per U.S. dollar, which was the SICAD 1 rate on that date. We recorded a charge of $226 million related to the change in exchange rates in the line item other income (loss) — net in our condensed consolidated statement of income. The Company will continue to use the SICAD 1 rate to remeasure the net monetary assets of our Venezuelan subsidiary unless facts and circumstances change.
If the bolivar devalues further, or if we are able to access currency at different rates that are reasonable to the Company, it would result in our Company recognizing additional foreign currency exchange gains or losses in our condensed consolidated financial statements. As of March 28, 2014, our Venezuelan subsidiary held net monetary assets of $266 million, including $182 million of cash, cash equivalents, short-term investments and marketable securities. Despite the additional currency conversion mechanisms, the Company's ability to pay dividends from Venezuela is still restricted due to the low volume of U.S. dollars available for conversion.
In addition to the foreign currency exchange exposure related to our Venezuelan subsidiary's net monetary assets, we also sell concentrate to our bottling partner in Venezuela from outside the country. These sales are denominated in U.S. dollars and the carrying value of the receivables related to these sales was $222 million as of March 28, 2014. If a government-approved exchange rate mechanism is not available for our bottling partner in Venezuela to convert bolivars and pay for these receivables and for future concentrate sales, the receivables balance will continue to increase. We will continue to monitor the collectability and convertibility of these receivables. We also have certain U.S. dollar denominated intangible assets associated with products sold in Venezuela, which had a carrying value of $107 million as of March 28, 2014. If the bolivar further devalues, it could result in the impairment of these intangible assets.
NOTE 2: ACQUISITIONS AND DIVESTITURES
Acquisitions
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, our Company's acquisitions of businesses, equity method investments and nonmarketable securities totaled $85 million and $28 million, respectively, none of which were individually significant.
Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc.
On February 5, 2014, the Company and Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, Inc. ("GMCR"), now known as Keurig Green Mountain, Inc., entered into a 10-year global strategic agreement to collaborate on the development and introduction of the Company's global brand portfolio for use in GMCR's forthcoming Keurig ColdTM at-home beverage system. Under the agreement, the companies will cooperate to bring the Keurig ColdTM beverage system to consumers around the world and GMCR will be the Company's exclusive partner for the production and sale of our branded single-serve, pod-based cold beverages. Together we will also explore other future opportunities to collaborate on the Keurig® platform. In an effort to align long-term interests, we also entered into an agreement to purchase a 10 percent equity position in GMCR. On February 27, 2014, the Company purchased 16,684,139 newly issued shares in GMCR for approximately $1,265 million, including transaction costs of $14 million. The newly issued shares were priced at $74.98, which represented the trailing 50-trading-day volume weighted-average price on the agreement date of February 5, 2014. We account for this investment as an available-for-sale security and it was included in the line item other investments on our condensed consolidated balance sheet. The purchase of this investment was included in the line item purchases of investments in our condensed consolidated statement of cash flows.
Coca-Cola Erfrischungsgetränke AG
In conjunction with the Company's acquisition of 18 German bottling and distribution operations in 2007, the former owners received put options to sell their respective shares in Coca-Cola Erfrischungsgetränke AG ("CCEAG") back to the Company in January 2014. The Company paid $503 million to purchase these shares, which was included in the line item other financing activities in the condensed consolidated statement of cash flows, and now owns 100 percent of CCEAG.

7



Divestitures
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, there were no proceeds from disposals of businesses, equity method investments and nonmarketable securities. During the three months ended March 29, 2013, proceeds from disposals of businesses, equity method investments and nonmarketable securities totaled $690 million, which primarily included the sale of a majority ownership interest in our previously consolidated bottling operations in the Philippines ("Philippine bottling operations") to Coca-Cola FEMSA, S.A.B. de C.V. ("Coca-Cola FEMSA"), an equity method investee. The Company now accounts for our ownership interest in the Philippine bottling operations under the equity method of accounting. Following this transaction, we remeasured our investment in the Philippine bottling operations to fair value taking into consideration the sale price of the majority ownership interest. Coca-Cola FEMSA has an option to purchase our remaining ownership interest in the Philippine bottling operations at any time during the seven years following closing based on the initial purchase price plus a defined return. Coca-Cola FEMSA also has an option exercisable during the sixth year after closing to sell its ownership interest back to the Company at a price not to exceed the initial purchase price.
NOTE 3: INVESTMENTS
Investments in debt and marketable equity securities, other than investments accounted for under the equity method, are classified as trading, available-for-sale or held-to-maturity. Our marketable equity investments are classified as either trading or available-for-sale with their cost basis determined by the specific identification method. Realized and unrealized gains and losses on trading securities and realized gains and losses on available-for-sale securities are included in net income. Unrealized gains and losses, net of deferred taxes, on available-for-sale securities are included in our condensed consolidated balance sheets as a component of accumulated other comprehensive income ("AOCI"), except for the change in fair value attributable to the currency risk being hedged. Refer to Note 5 for additional information related to the Company's fair value hedges of available-for-sale securities.
Our investments in debt securities are carried at either amortized cost or fair value. Investments in debt securities that the Company has the positive intent and ability to hold to maturity are carried at amortized cost and classified as held-to-maturity. Investments in debt securities that are not classified as held-to-maturity are carried at fair value and classified as either trading or available-for-sale.
Trading Securities
As of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, our trading securities had a fair value of $377 million and $372 million, respectively, and consisted primarily of equity securities. The Company had net unrealized gains on trading securities of $22 million and $12 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively. The Company's trading securities were included in the following line items in our condensed consolidated balance sheets (in millions):
 
March 28,
2014

December 31,
2013

Marketable securities
$
290

$
286

Other assets
87

86

Total trading securities
$
377

$
372

Available-for-Sale and Held-to-Maturity Securities
As of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, the Company did not have any held-to-maturity securities. As of March 28, 2014, available-for-sale securities consisted of the following (in millions):
 
 
Gross Unrealized
 
 
Cost

Gains

Losses

Fair Value

Available-for-sale securities:1
 
 
 
 
Equity securities
$
2,406

$
845

$
(23
)
$
3,228

Debt securities
3,397

30

(16
)
3,411

Total available-for-sale securities
$
5,803

$
875

$
(39
)
$
6,639

1 Refer to Note 14 for additional information related to the estimated fair value.

8



As of December 31, 2013, available-for-sale securities consisted of the following (in millions):
 
 
Gross Unrealized
 
 
Cost

Gains

Losses

Fair Value

Available-for-sale securities:1
 
 
 
 
Equity securities
$
1,097

$
373

$
(17
)
$
1,453

Debt securities
3,388

24

(23
)
3,389

Total available-for-sale securities
$
4,485

$
397

$
(40
)
$
4,842

1 Refer to Note 14 for additional information related to the estimated fair value.
As of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, the Company had investments classified as available-for-sale securities in which our cost basis exceeded the fair value of our investment. Management assessed each of these investments on an individual basis to determine if the decline in fair value was other than temporary. Management’s assessment as to the nature of a decline in fair value is based on, among other things, the length of time and the extent to which the market value has been less than our cost basis; the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer; and our intent and ability to retain the investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in market value. As a result of these assessments, management determined that the decline in fair value of these investments was not other than temporary and did not record any impairment charges.
The sale and/or maturity of available-for-sale securities resulted in the following realized activity (in millions):
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Gross gains
$
3

$
5

Gross losses
(4
)
(5
)
Proceeds
1,365

1,137

The Company uses one of its insurance captives to reinsure group annuity insurance contracts that cover the pension obligations of certain of our European and Canadian pension plans. In accordance with local insurance regulations, our insurance captive is required to meet and maintain minimum solvency capital requirements. The Company elected to invest its solvency capital in a portfolio of available-for-sale securities, which are classified in the line item other assets in our condensed consolidated balance sheets because the assets are not available to satisfy our current obligations. As of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, the Company's available-for-sale securities included solvency capital funds of $748 million and $667 million, respectively.
The Company's available-for-sale securities were included in the following line items in our condensed consolidated balance sheets (in millions):
 
March 28,
2014

December 31,
2013

Cash and cash equivalents
$

$
245

Marketable securities
3,094

2,861

Other investments
2,681

958

Other assets
864

778

Total available-for-sale securities
$
6,639

$
4,842

The contractual maturities of these available-for-sale securities as of March 28, 2014, were as follows (in millions):
 
Cost

Fair Value

Within 1 year
$
1,279

$
1,279

After 1 year through 5 years
1,647

1,657

After 5 years through 10 years
143

150

After 10 years
328

325

Equity securities
2,406

3,228

Total available-for-sale securities
$
5,803

$
6,639


9



The Company expects that actual maturities may differ from the contractual maturities above because borrowers have the right to call or prepay certain obligations.
Cost Method Investments
Cost method investments are initially recorded at cost, and we record dividend income when applicable dividends are declared. Cost method investments are reported as other investments in our condensed consolidated balance sheets, and dividend income from cost method investments is reported in other income (loss) — net in our condensed consolidated statements of income. We review all of our cost method investments quarterly to determine if impairment indicators are present; however, we are not required to determine the fair value of these investments unless impairment indicators exist. When impairment indicators exist, we generally use discounted cash flow analyses to determine the fair value. We estimate that the fair values of our cost method investments approximated or exceeded their carrying values as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013. Our cost method investments had a carrying value of $163 million and $162 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.
NOTE 4: INVENTORIES
Inventories consist primarily of raw materials and packaging (which include ingredients and supplies) and finished goods (which include concentrates and syrups in our concentrate operations and finished beverages in our finished product operations). Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market. We determine cost on the basis of the average cost or first-in, first-out methods. Inventories consisted of the following (in millions):
 
March 28,
2014

December 31,
2013

Raw materials and packaging
$
1,718

$
1,692

Finished goods
1,279

1,240

Other
360

345

Total inventories
$
3,357

$
3,277

NOTE 5: HEDGING TRANSACTIONS AND DERIVATIVE FINANCIAL INSTRUMENTS
The Company is directly and indirectly affected by changes in certain market conditions. These changes in market conditions may adversely impact the Company's financial performance and are referred to as "market risks." When deemed appropriate, our Company uses derivatives as a risk management tool to mitigate the potential impact of certain market risks. The primary market risks managed by the Company through the use of derivative instruments are foreign currency exchange rate risk, commodity price risk and interest rate risk.
The Company uses various types of derivative instruments including, but not limited to, forward contracts, commodity futures contracts, option contracts, collars and swaps. Forward contracts and commodity futures contracts are agreements to buy or sell a quantity of a currency or commodity at a predetermined future date, and at a predetermined rate or price. An option contract is an agreement that conveys the purchaser the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell a quantity of a currency or commodity at a predetermined rate or price during a period or at a time in the future. A collar is a strategy that uses a combination of options to limit the range of possible positive or negative returns on an underlying asset or liability to a specific range, or to protect expected future cash flows. To do this, an investor simultaneously buys a put option and sells (writes) a call option, or alternatively buys a call option and sells (writes) a put option. A swap agreement is a contract between two parties to exchange cash flows based on specified underlying notional amounts, assets and/or indices. We do not enter into derivative financial instruments for trading purposes.
All derivatives are carried at fair value in our condensed consolidated balance sheets in the following line items, as applicable: prepaid expenses and other assets; other assets; accounts payable and accrued expenses; and other liabilities. The carrying values of the derivatives reflect the impact of legally enforceable master netting agreements and cash collateral held or placed with the same counterparties, as applicable. These master netting agreements allow the Company to net settle positive and negative positions (assets and liabilities) arising from different transactions with the same counterparty.

10



The accounting for gains and losses that result from changes in the fair values of derivative instruments depends on whether the derivatives have been designated and qualify as hedging instruments and the type of hedging relationships. Derivatives can be designated as fair value hedges, cash flow hedges or hedges of net investments in foreign operations. The changes in the fair values of derivatives that have been designated and qualify for fair value hedge accounting are recorded in the same line item in our condensed consolidated statements of income as the changes in the fair values of the hedged items attributable to the risk being hedged. The changes in the fair values of derivatives that have been designated and qualify as cash flow hedges or hedges of net investments in foreign operations are recorded in AOCI and are reclassified into the line item in our condensed consolidated statement of income in which the hedged items are recorded in the same period the hedged items affect earnings. Due to the high degree of effectiveness between the hedging instruments and the underlying exposures being hedged, fluctuations in the value of the derivative instruments are generally offset by changes in the fair values or cash flows of the underlying exposures being hedged. The changes in fair values of derivatives that were not designated and/or did not qualify as hedging instruments are immediately recognized into earnings.
For derivatives that will be accounted for as hedging instruments, the Company formally designates and documents, at inception, the financial instrument as a hedge of a specific underlying exposure, the risk management objective and the strategy for undertaking the hedge transaction. In addition, the Company formally assesses, both at inception and at least quarterly thereafter, whether the financial instruments used in hedging transactions are effective at offsetting changes in either the fair values or cash flows of the related underlying exposures. Any ineffective portion of a financial instrument's change in fair value is immediately recognized into earnings.
The Company determines the fair values of its derivatives based on quoted market prices or pricing models using current market rates. Refer to Note 14. The notional amounts of the derivative financial instruments do not necessarily represent amounts exchanged by the parties and, therefore, are not a direct measure of our exposure to the financial risks described above. The amounts exchanged are calculated by reference to the notional amounts and by other terms of the derivatives, such as interest rates, foreign currency exchange rates or other financial indices. The Company does not view the fair values of its derivatives in isolation, but rather in relation to the fair values or cash flows of the underlying hedged transactions or other exposures. Virtually all of our derivatives are straightforward over-the-counter instruments with liquid markets.
The following table presents the fair values of the Company's derivative instruments that were designated and qualified as part of a hedging relationship (in millions):
 
 
Fair Value1,2
Derivatives Designated as
Hedging Instruments
Balance Sheet Location1
March 28,
2014

December 31, 2013

Assets
 
 
 
Foreign currency contracts
Prepaid expenses and other assets
$
128

$
211

Foreign currency contracts
Other assets
127

109

Commodity contracts
Prepaid expenses and other assets
1

1

Interest rate contracts
Prepaid expenses and other assets
3


Interest rate contracts
Other assets
234

283

Total assets
 
$
493

$
604

Liabilities
 
 
 
Foreign currency contracts
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
$
141

$
84

Foreign currency contracts
Other liabilities
60

40

Commodity contracts
Accounts payable and accrued expenses

1

Total liabilities
 
$
201

$
125

1 All of the Company's derivative instruments are carried at fair value in our condensed consolidated balance sheets after considering the impact of legally enforceable master netting agreements and cash collateral held or placed with the same counterparties, as applicable. Current disclosure requirements mandate that derivatives must also be disclosed without reflecting the impact of master netting agreements and cash collateral. Refer to Note 14 for the net presentation of the Company's derivative instruments.
2 Refer to Note 14 for additional information related to the estimated fair value.

11



The following table presents the fair values of the Company's derivative instruments that were not designated as hedging instruments (in millions):
 
 
Fair Value1,2
Derivatives Not Designated as
Hedging Instruments
Balance Sheet Location1
March 28,
2014

December 31, 2013

Assets
 
 
 
Foreign currency contracts
Prepaid expenses and other assets
$
9

$
21

Foreign currency contracts
Other assets
170

171

Commodity contracts
Prepaid expenses and other assets
36

33

Commodity contracts
Other assets

1

Other derivative instruments
Prepaid expenses and other assets
2

9

Total assets
 
$
217

$
235

Liabilities
 
 
 
Foreign currency contracts
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
$
22

$
24

Foreign currency contracts
Other liabilities
6


Commodity contracts
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
16

23

Interest rate contracts
Other liabilities
3

3

Other derivative instruments
Accounts payable and accrued expenses
2


Total liabilities
 
$
49

$
50

1 All of the Company's derivative instruments are carried at fair value in our condensed consolidated balance sheets after considering the impact of legally enforceable master netting agreements and cash collateral held or placed with the same counterparties, as applicable. Current disclosure requirements mandate that derivatives must also be disclosed without reflecting the impact of master netting agreements and cash collateral. Refer to Note 14 for the net presentation of the Company's derivative instruments.
2 Refer to Note 14 for additional information related to the estimated fair value.
Credit Risk Associated with Derivatives
We have established strict counterparty credit guidelines and enter into transactions only with financial institutions of investment grade or better. We monitor counterparty exposures regularly and review any downgrade in credit rating immediately. If a downgrade in the credit rating of a counterparty were to occur, we have provisions requiring collateral in the form of U.S. government securities for substantially all of our transactions. To mitigate presettlement risk, minimum credit standards become more stringent as the duration of the derivative financial instrument increases. In addition, the Company's master netting agreements reduce credit risk by permitting the Company to net settle for transactions with the same counterparty. To minimize the concentration of credit risk, we enter into derivative transactions with a portfolio of financial institutions. Based on these factors, we consider the risk of counterparty default to be minimal.
Cash Flow Hedging Strategy
The Company uses cash flow hedges to minimize the variability in cash flows of assets or liabilities or forecasted transactions caused by fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, commodity prices or interest rates. The changes in the fair values of derivatives designated as cash flow hedges are recorded in AOCI and are reclassified into the line item in our condensed consolidated statement of income in which the hedged items are recorded in the same period the hedged items affect earnings. The changes in fair values of hedges that are determined to be ineffective are immediately reclassified from AOCI into earnings. The Company did not discontinue any cash flow hedging relationships during the three months ended March 28, 2014, or March 29, 2013. The maximum length of time for which the Company hedges its exposure to future cash flows is typically three years.
The Company maintains a foreign currency cash flow hedging program to reduce the risk that our eventual U.S. dollar net cash inflows from sales outside the United States and U.S. dollar net cash outflows from procurement activities will be adversely affected by fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. We enter into forward contracts and purchase foreign currency options (principally euros and Japanese yen) and collars to hedge certain portions of forecasted cash flows denominated in foreign currencies. When the U.S. dollar strengthens against the foreign currencies, the decline in the present value of future foreign currency cash flows is partially offset by gains in the fair value of the derivative instruments. Conversely, when the U.S. dollar weakens, the increase in the present value of future foreign currency cash flows is partially offset by losses in the fair value of the derivative instruments. The total notional values of derivatives that were designated and qualified for the Company's foreign currency cash flow hedging program were $9,382 million and $8,450 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.

12



The Company has entered into commodity futures contracts and other derivative instruments on various commodities to mitigate the price risk associated with forecasted purchases of materials used in our manufacturing process. These derivative instruments have been designated and qualify as part of the Company's commodity cash flow hedging program. The objective of this hedging program is to reduce the variability of cash flows associated with future purchases of certain commodities. The total notional values of derivatives that were designated and qualified for the Company's commodity cash flow hedging program were $17 million and $26 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.
Our Company monitors our mix of short-term debt and long-term debt regularly. From time to time, we manage our risk to interest rate fluctuations through the use of derivative financial instruments. The Company has entered into interest rate swap agreements and has designated these instruments as part of the Company's interest rate cash flow hedging program. The objective of this hedging program is to mitigate the risk of adverse changes in benchmark interest rates on the Company's future interest payments. The total notional value of these interest rate swap agreements that were designated and qualified for the Company's interest rate cash flow hedging program was $1,828 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013.
The following table presents the pretax impact that changes in the fair values of derivatives designated as cash flow hedges had on AOCI and earnings during the three months ended March 28, 2014 (in millions):
 
Gain (Loss) Recognized
in Other Comprehensive
Income ("OCI")

Location of Gain (Loss)
Recognized in Income1
Gain (Loss)
Reclassified from
AOCI into Income
(Effective Portion)

Gain (Loss) Recognized in Income (Ineffective Portion and Amount Excluded from Effectiveness Testing)

 
Foreign currency contracts
$
(61
)
Net operating revenues
$
25

$

2 
Foreign currency contracts
(12
)
Cost of goods sold
13


2 
Interest rate contracts
(51
)
Interest expense


 
Commodity contracts
1

Cost of goods sold
1


 
Total
$
(123
)
 
$
39

$

 
1 The Company records gains and losses reclassified from AOCI into income for the effective portion and the ineffective portion, if any, to the same line items in our condensed consolidated statements of income.
2 Includes a de minimis amount of ineffectiveness in the hedging relationship.
The following table presents the pretax impact that changes in the fair values of derivatives designated as cash flow hedges had on AOCI and earnings during the three months ended March 29, 2013 (in millions):
 
Gain (Loss)
Recognized
in OCI

Location of Gain (Loss)
Recognized in Income1
Gain (Loss)
Reclassified from
AOCI into Income
(Effective Portion)

Gain (Loss)
Recognized in Income
(Ineffective Portion and
Amount Excluded from
Effectiveness Testing)

 
Foreign currency contracts
$
131

Net operating revenues
$
19

$

2 
Foreign currency contracts
21

Cost of goods sold
2


 
Interest rate contracts
13

Interest expense
(3
)

2 
Commodity contracts
2

Cost of goods sold


 
Total
$
167

 
$
18

$

 
1 The Company records gains and losses reclassified from AOCI into income for the effective portion and the ineffective portion, if any, to the same line items in our condensed consolidated statements of income.
2 Includes a de minimis amount of ineffectiveness in the hedging relationship.
As of March 28, 2014, the Company estimates that it will reclassify into earnings during the next 12 months approximately $67 million of gains from the pretax amount recorded in AOCI as the anticipated cash flows occur.
Fair Value Hedging Strategy
The Company uses interest rate swap agreements designated as fair value hedges to minimize exposure to changes in the fair value of fixed-rate debt that results from fluctuations in benchmark interest rates. The changes in fair values of derivatives designated as fair value hedges and the offsetting changes in fair values of the hedged items are recognized in earnings. The ineffective portions of these hedges are immediately recognized in earnings. As of March 28, 2014, such adjustments had cumulatively increased the carrying value of our long-term debt by $55 million. When a derivative is no longer designated as a fair value hedge for any reason, including termination and maturity, the remaining unamortized difference between the carrying value of the hedged item at that time and the par value of the hedged item is amortized to earnings over the remaining life of the hedged item, or immediately if the hedged item has matured. The total notional value of derivatives that related to our fair value hedges of this type was $5,600 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013.
The Company also uses fair value hedges to minimize exposure to changes in the fair value of certain available-for-sale securities from fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. The changes in fair values of derivatives designated as fair

13



value hedges and the offsetting changes in fair values of the hedged items are recognized in earnings. As a result, any difference is reflected in earnings as ineffectiveness. The total notional values of derivatives that related to our fair value hedges of this type were $968 million and $996 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.
The following table summarizes the pretax impact that changes in the fair values of derivatives designated as fair value hedges had on earnings (in millions):
Fair Value Hedging Instruments
Location of Gain (Loss)
Recognized in Income
Gain (Loss)
Recognized in Income
 
Three Months Ended
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Interest rate swaps
Interest expense
$
5

$
(35
)
Fixed-rate debt
Interest expense
(3
)
45

Net impact to interest expense
 
$
2

$
10

Foreign currency contracts
Other income (loss) — net
$
18

$
10

Available-for-sale securities
Other income (loss) — net
(22
)
(16
)
Net impact to other income (loss) — net
 
$
(4
)
$
(6
)
Net impact of fair value hedging instruments
 
$
(2
)
$
4

Hedges of Net Investments in Foreign Operations Strategy
The Company uses forward contracts to protect the value of our investments in a number of foreign subsidiaries. For derivative instruments that are designated and qualify as hedges of net investments in foreign operations, the changes in fair values of the derivative instruments are recognized in net foreign currency translation gain (loss), a component of AOCI, to offset the changes in the values of the net investments being hedged. Any ineffective portions of net investment hedges are reclassified from AOCI into earnings during the period of change. The total notional values of derivatives that were designated and qualified for the Company's net investments hedging program were $1,746 million and $2,024 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.
The following table presents the pretax impact that changes in the fair values of derivatives designated as net investment hedges had on AOCI (in millions):
 
Gain (Loss) Recognized in OCI
 
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Foreign currency contracts
$
(68
)
$
(57
)
The Company did not reclassify any deferred gains or losses related to net investment hedges from AOCI to earnings during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013. In addition, the Company did not have any ineffectiveness related to net investment hedges during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013.
Economic (Nondesignated) Hedging Strategy
In addition to derivative instruments that are designated and qualify for hedge accounting, the Company also uses certain derivatives as economic hedges of foreign currency, interest rate and commodity exposure. Although these derivatives were not designated and/or did not qualify for hedge accounting, they are effective economic hedges. The changes in fair values of economic hedges are immediately recognized into earnings.
The Company uses foreign currency economic hedges to offset the earnings impact that fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates have on certain monetary assets and liabilities denominated in nonfunctional currencies. The changes in fair values of economic hedges used to offset those monetary assets and liabilities are immediately recognized into earnings in the line item other income (loss) — net in our condensed consolidated statements of income. In addition, we use foreign currency economic hedges to minimize the variability in cash flows associated with fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates. The changes in fair values of economic hedges used to offset the variability in U.S. dollar net cash flows are recognized into earnings in the line items net operating revenues or cost of goods sold in our condensed consolidated statements of income, as applicable. The total notional values of derivatives related to our foreign currency economic hedges were $4,003 million and $3,871 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.
The Company also uses certain derivatives as economic hedges to mitigate the price risk associated with the purchase of materials used in the manufacturing process and for vehicle fuel. The changes in fair values of these economic hedges are

14



immediately recognized into earnings in the line items cost of goods sold or selling, general and administrative expenses in our condensed consolidated statements of income, as applicable. The total notional values of derivatives related to our economic hedges of this type were $1,301 million and $1,441 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.
The following table presents the pretax impact that changes in the fair values of derivatives not designated as hedging instruments had on earnings (in millions):
 
 
Three Months Ended
Derivatives Not Designated
as Hedging Instruments
Location of Gain (Loss)
Recognized in Income
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Foreign currency contracts
Net operating revenues
$
(12
)
$
(2
)
Foreign currency contracts
Cost of goods sold

(2
)
Foreign currency contracts
Other income (loss) — net
2

67

Commodity contracts
Net operating revenues
(2
)

Commodity contracts
Cost of goods sold
22

(69
)
Commodity contracts
Selling, general and administrative expenses
(3
)

Other derivative instruments
Selling, general and administrative expenses
(3
)
20

Total
 
$
4

$
14

NOTE 6: DEBT AND BORROWING ARRANGEMENTS
During the first quarter of 2014, the Company retired $1,000 million of long-term debt upon maturity and issued $1,000 million total principal amount of notes due September 1, 2015, at a variable interest rate equal to the three-month London Interbank Offered Rate plus 0.01 percent.
NOTE 7: COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES
Guarantees
As of March 28, 2014, we were contingently liable for guarantees of indebtedness owed by third parties of $649 million, of which $284 million related to variable interest entities. These guarantees are primarily related to third-party customers, bottlers, vendors and container manufacturing operations and have arisen through the normal course of business. These guarantees have various terms, and none of these guarantees were individually significant. The amount represents the maximum potential future payments that we could be required to make under the guarantees; however, we do not consider it probable that we will be required to satisfy these guarantees.
We believe our exposure to concentrations of credit risk is limited due to the diverse geographic areas covered by our operations.
Legal Contingencies
The Company is involved in various legal proceedings. We establish reserves for specific legal proceedings when we determine that the likelihood of an unfavorable outcome is probable and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated. Management has also identified certain other legal matters where we believe an unfavorable outcome is reasonably possible and/or for which no estimate of possible losses can be made. Management believes that the total liabilities to the Company that may arise as a result of currently pending legal proceedings will not have a material adverse effect on the Company taken as a whole.
During the period from 1970 to 1981, our Company owned Aqua-Chem, Inc., now known as Cleaver-Brooks, Inc. ("Aqua-Chem"). During that time, the Company purchased over $400 million of insurance coverage, which also insures Aqua-Chem for some of its prior and future costs for certain product liability and other claims. A division of Aqua-Chem manufactured certain boilers that contained gaskets that Aqua-Chem purchased from outside suppliers. Several years after our Company sold this entity, Aqua-Chem received its first lawsuit relating to asbestos, a component of some of the gaskets. Aqua-Chem was first named as a defendant in asbestos lawsuits in or around 1985 and currently has approximately 40,000 active claims pending against it. In September 2002, Aqua-Chem notified our Company that it believed we were obligated for certain costs and expenses associated with its asbestos litigations. Aqua-Chem demanded that our Company reimburse it for approximately $10 million for out-of-pocket litigation-related expenses. Aqua-Chem also demanded that the Company acknowledge a continuing obligation to Aqua-Chem for any future liabilities and expenses that are excluded from coverage under the applicable insurance or for which there is no insurance. Our Company disputes Aqua-Chem's claims, and we believe we have no obligation to Aqua-Chem for any of its past, present or future liabilities, costs or expenses. Furthermore, we believe we have substantial legal and factual defenses to Aqua-Chem's claims. The parties entered into litigation in Georgia to resolve this dispute, which was stayed by agreement of the parties pending the outcome of litigation filed in Wisconsin by certain insurers

15



of Aqua-Chem. In that case, five plaintiff insurance companies filed a declaratory judgment action against Aqua-Chem, the Company and 16 defendant insurance companies seeking a determination of the parties' rights and liabilities under policies issued by the insurers and reimbursement for amounts paid by plaintiffs in excess of their obligations. During the course of the Wisconsin insurance coverage litigation, Aqua-Chem and the Company reached settlements with several of the insurers, including plaintiffs, who have or will pay funds into an escrow account for payment of costs arising from the asbestos claims against Aqua-Chem. On July 24, 2007, the Wisconsin trial court entered a final declaratory judgment regarding the rights and obligations of the parties under the insurance policies issued by the remaining defendant insurers, which judgment was not appealed. The judgment directs, among other things, that each insurer whose policy is triggered is jointly and severally liable for 100 percent of Aqua-Chem's losses up to policy limits. The court's judgment concluded the Wisconsin insurance coverage litigation. The Georgia litigation remains subject to the stay agreement. The Company and Aqua-Chem continued to negotiate with various insurers that were defendants in the Wisconsin insurance coverage litigation over those insurers' obligations to defend and indemnify Aqua-Chem for the asbestos-related claims. The Company anticipated that a final settlement with three of those insurers (the "Chartis insurers") would be finalized in May 2011, but such insurers repudiated their settlement commitments and, as a result, Aqua-Chem and the Company filed suit against them in Wisconsin state court to enforce the coverage-in-place settlement or, in the alternative, to obtain a declaratory judgment validating Aqua-Chem and the Company's interpretation of the court's judgment in the Wisconsin insurance coverage litigation. In February 2012, the parties filed and argued a number of cross-motions for summary judgment related to the issues of the enforceability of the settlement agreement and the exhaustion of policies underlying those of the Chartis insurers. The court granted defendants' motions for summary judgment that the 2011 Settlement Agreement and 2010 Term Sheet were not binding contracts, but denied their similar motions related to the plaintiffs' claims for promissory and/or equitable estoppel. On or about May 15, 2012, the parties entered into a mutually agreeable settlement/stipulation resolving two major issues: exhaustion of underlying coverage and control of defense. On or about January 10, 2013, the parties reached a settlement of the estoppel claims and all of the remaining coverage issues, with the exception of one disputed issue relating to the scope of the Chartis insurers' defense obligations in two policy years. The trial court granted summary judgment in favor of the Company and Aqua-Chem on that one open issue and entered a final appealable judgment to that effect following the parties' settlement. On January 23, 2013, the Chartis insurers filed a notice of appeal of the trial court's summary judgment ruling. On October 29, 2013, the Wisconsin Court of Appeals affirmed the grant of summary judgment in favor of the Company and Aqua-Chem. On November 27, 2013, the Chartis insurers filed a petition for review in the Supreme Court of Wisconsin, and on December 11, 2013, the Company filed its opposition to that petition. Whatever the outcome of the Chartis insurers' appeal to the Wisconsin Supreme Court, the Chartis insurers will remain subject to the court's judgment in the Wisconsin insurance coverage litigation.
The Company is unable to estimate at this time the amount or range of reasonably possible loss it may ultimately incur as a result of asbestos-related claims against Aqua-Chem. The Company believes that assuming (1) the defense and indemnity costs for the asbestos-related claims against Aqua-Chem in the future are in the same range as during the past five years, and (2) the various insurers that cover the asbestos-related claims against Aqua-Chem remain solvent, regardless of the outcome of the coverage-in-place settlement litigation but taking into account the issues resolved to date, insurance coverage for substantially all defense and indemnity costs would be available for the next 10 to 15 years.
Tax Audits
The Company is involved in various tax matters, with respect to some of which the outcome is uncertain. We establish reserves to remove some or all of the tax benefit of any of our tax positions at the time we determine that it becomes uncertain based upon one of the following conditions: (1) the tax position is not "more likely than not" to be sustained, (2) the tax position is "more likely than not" to be sustained, but for a lesser amount, or (3) the tax position is "more likely than not" to be sustained, but not in the financial period in which the tax position was originally taken. For purposes of evaluating whether or not a tax position is uncertain, (1) we presume the tax position will be examined by the relevant taxing authority that has full knowledge of all relevant information; (2) the technical merits of a tax position are derived from authorities such as legislation and statutes, legislative intent, regulations, rulings and case law and their applicability to the facts and circumstances of the tax position; and (3) each tax position is evaluated without consideration of the possibility of offset or aggregation with other tax positions taken. A number of years may elapse before a particular uncertain tax position is audited and finally resolved or when a tax assessment is raised. The number of years subject to tax assessments varies depending on the tax jurisdiction. The tax benefit that has been previously reserved because of a failure to meet the "more likely than not" recognition threshold would be recognized in our income tax expense in the first interim period when the uncertainty disappears under any one of the following conditions: (1) the tax position is "more likely than not" to be sustained, (2) the tax position, amount, and/or timing is ultimately settled through negotiation or litigation, or (3) the statute of limitations for the tax position has expired. Refer to Note 13.

16



Risk Management Programs
The Company has numerous global insurance programs in place to help protect the Company from the risk of loss. In general, we are self-insured for large portions of many different types of claims; however, we do use commercial insurance above our self-insured retentions to reduce the Company's risk of catastrophic loss. Our reserves for the Company's self-insured losses are estimated using actuarial methods and assumptions of the insurance industry, adjusted for our specific expectations based on our claim history. Our self-insurance reserves totaled $536 million and $537 million as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.
NOTE 8: COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
The following table summarizes the allocation of total comprehensive income between shareowners of The Coca-Cola Company and noncontrolling interests (in millions):
 
Three Months Ended March 28, 2014
 
Shareowners of
The Coca-Cola Company

Noncontrolling
Interests

Total

Consolidated net income
$
1,619

$
7

$
1,626

Other comprehensive income:
 
 
 
Net foreign currency translation adjustment
(385
)
(4
)
(389
)
Net gain (loss) on derivatives1
(99
)

(99
)
Net unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale securities2
315


315

Net change in pension and other benefit liabilities
7


7

Total comprehensive income
$
1,457

$
3

$
1,460

1 Refer to Note 5 for information related to the net gain or loss on derivative instruments classified as cash flow hedges.
2 Refer to Note 3 for information related to the net unrealized gain or loss on available-for-sale securities.
The following tables present OCI attributable to shareowners of The Coca-Cola Company, including our proportionate share of equity method investees' OCI (in millions):
Three Months Ended March 28, 2014
Before-Tax Amount

 
Income Tax

 
After-Tax Amount

Foreign currency translation adjustments:
 
 
 
 
 
Translation adjustment arising during the period
$
(484
)
 
$
99

 
$
(385
)
Reclassification adjustments recognized in net income

 

 

Net foreign currency translation adjustments
(484
)
 
99

 
(385
)
Derivatives:
 
 
 
 
 
Unrealized gains (losses) arising during the period
(123
)
 
48

 
(75
)
Reclassification adjustments recognized in net income
(39
)
 
15

 
(24
)
Net gain (loss) on derivatives1
(162
)
 
63

 
(99
)
Available-for-sale securities:
 
 
 
 
 
Unrealized gains (losses) arising during the period
480

 
(166
)
 
314

Reclassification adjustments recognized in net income
1

 

 
1

Net change in unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale securities2
481

 
(166
)
 
315

Pension and other benefit liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net pension and other benefits arising during the period
(3
)
 
1

 
(2
)
Reclassification adjustments recognized in net income
14

 
(5
)
 
9

Net change in pension and other benefit liabilities3
11

 
(4
)
 
7

Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to The Coca-Cola Company
$
(154
)
 
$
(8
)
 
$
(162
)
1 
Refer to Note 5 for additional information related to the net gain or loss on derivative instruments designated and qualifying as cash flow hedging instruments.
2 
Includes reclassification adjustments related to divestitures of certain available-for-sale securities. Refer to Note 3 for additional information related to these divestitures.
3 
Refer to Note 12 for additional information related to the Company's pension and other postretirement benefit liabilities.

17



Three Months Ended March 29, 2013
Before-Tax Amount

 
Income Tax

 
After-Tax Amount

Foreign currency translation adjustments:
 
 
 
 
 
Translation adjustment arising during the period
$
325

 
$
(60
)
 
$
265

Reclassification adjustments recognized in net income
(218
)
 

 
(218
)
Net foreign currency translation adjustments
107

 
(60
)
 
47

Derivatives:
 
 
 
 
 
Unrealized gains (losses) arising during the period
162

 
(64
)
 
98

Reclassification adjustments recognized in net income
(18
)
 
7

 
(11
)
Net gain (loss) on derivatives1
144

 
(57
)
 
87

Available-for-sale securities:
 
 
 
 
 
Unrealized gains (losses) arising during the period
5

 
3

 
8

Reclassification adjustments recognized in net income

 

 

Net change in unrealized gain (loss) on available-for-sale securities2
5

 
3

 
8

Pension and other benefit liabilities:
 
 
 
 
 
Net pension and other benefits arising during the period
7

 
(5
)
 
2

Reclassification adjustments recognized in net income
48

 
(18
)
 
30

Net change in pension and other benefit liabilities3
55

 
(23
)
 
32

Other comprehensive income (loss) attributable to The Coca-Cola Company
$
311

 
$
(137
)
 
$
174

1 
Refer to Note 5 for additional information related to the net gain or loss on derivative instruments designated and qualifying as cash flow hedging instruments.
2 
Includes reclassification adjustments related to divestitures of certain available-for-sale securities. Refer to Note 3 for additional information related to these divestitures.
3 
Refer to Note 12 for additional information related to the Company's pension and other postretirement benefit liabilities.
The following table presents the amounts and line items in our condensed consolidated statements of income where adjustments reclassified from AOCI into income were recorded during the three months ended March 28, 2014 (in millions):
 
 
Amount Reclassified from
AOCI into Income
 
Description of AOCI Component
Location of Gain (Loss)
Recognized in Income
Three Months Ended March 28, 2014
 
Derivatives:
 
 
 
Foreign currency contracts
Net operating revenues
$
(25
)
 
Foreign currency and commodity contracts
Cost of goods sold
(14
)
 
Interest rate contracts
Interest expense

 
 
Income before income taxes
$
(39
)
 
 
Income taxes
15

 
 
Consolidated net income
$
(24
)
 
Available-for-sale securities:
 
 
 
Sale of securities
Other income (loss) — net
$
1

 
 
Income before income taxes
$
1

 
 
Income taxes

 
 
Consolidated net income
$
1

 
Pension and other benefit liabilities:
 
 
 
Amortization of net actuarial loss
*
$
19

 
Amortization of prior service cost (credit)
*
(5
)
 
 
Income before income taxes
$
14

 
 
Income taxes
(5
)
 
 
Consolidated net income
$
9

 
*
This component of AOCI is included in the Company's computation of net periodic benefit cost and is not reclassified out of AOCI into a single line item in our condensed consolidated statements of income in its entirety. Refer to Note 12 for additional information.


18



NOTE 9: CHANGES IN EQUITY
The following table provides a reconciliation of the beginning and ending carrying amounts of total equity, equity attributable to shareowners of The Coca-Cola Company and equity attributable to noncontrolling interests (in millions):
 
 
Shareowners of The Coca-Cola Company  
 

 
Total

Reinvested
Earnings

Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)

Common
Stock

Capital
Surplus

Treasury
Stock

Non-
controlling
Interests

December 31, 2013
$
33,440

$
61,660

$
(3,432
)
$
1,760

$
12,276

$
(39,091
)
$
267

Comprehensive income (loss)
1,460

1,619

(162
)



3

Dividends paid/payable to shareowners of
     The Coca-Cola Company
(1,342
)
(1,342
)





Dividends paid to noncontrolling interests
(2
)





(2
)
Purchases of treasury stock
(804
)




(804
)

Impact of employee stock option and
     restricted stock plans
170




56

114


March 28, 2014
$
32,922

$
61,937

$
(3,594
)
$
1,760

$
12,332

$
(39,781
)
$
268

NOTE 10: SIGNIFICANT OPERATING AND NONOPERATING ITEMS
Other Operating Charges
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, the Company incurred other operating charges of $128 million. These charges consisted of $86 million due to the Company's productivity and reinvestment program and $42 million due to the Company's other restructuring and integration initiatives, including the integration of our German bottling and distribution operations. Refer to Note 11 for additional information on the Company's productivity, integration and restructuring initiatives. Refer to Note 15 for the impact these charges had on our operating segments.
During the three months ended March 29, 2013, the Company incurred other operating charges of $121 million. These charges primarily consisted of $102 million due to the Company's productivity and reinvestment program and $21 million due to the Company's other restructuring and integration initiatives, including the integration of our German bottling and distribution operations. Refer to Note 11 for additional information on the Company's productivity, integration and restructuring initiatives. Refer to Note 15 for the impact these charges had on our operating segments.
Other Nonoperating Items
Equity Income (Loss) — Net
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, the Company recorded net charges of $27 million and $39 million, respectively, in the line item equity income (loss) — net. These charges represent the Company's proportionate share of unusual or infrequent items recorded by certain of our equity method investees, including charges incurred by an equity method investee due to the devaluation of the Venezuelan bolivar. Refer to Note 15 for the impact these items had on our operating segments.
Other Income (Loss) — Net
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, the Company recorded a charge of $226 million in the line item other income (loss) — net due to the expansion of the Venezuelan government's currency conversion markets. Refer to Note 1 for more information related to this charge and Note 15 for the impact this charge had on our operating segments.
During the three months ended March 29, 2013, the Company recorded a charge of $140 million in the line item other income (loss) — net due to the Venezuelan government announcing a currency devaluation. As a result of this devaluation, the Company remeasured the net assets related to its operations in Venezuela. Refer to Note 1 for more information related to this charge and Note 15 for the impact this charge had on our operating segments.

19



NOTE 11: PRODUCTIVITY, INTEGRATION AND RESTRUCTURING INITIATIVES
Productivity and Reinvestment
In February 2012, the Company announced a four-year productivity and reinvestment program designed to further enable our efforts to strengthen our brands and reinvest our resources to drive long-term profitable growth. This program is focused on the following initiatives: global supply chain optimization; global marketing and innovation effectiveness; operating expense leverage and operational excellence; data and information technology systems standardization; and further integration of Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc.'s former North America business.
In February 2014, the Company announced that we are expanding our productivity and reinvestment program to drive an incremental $1 billion in productivity by 2016 that will primarily be redirected into increased media investments. Our incremental productivity goal consists of two relatively equal components. First, expanded savings through global supply chain optimization, data and information technology system standardization, and resource and cost reallocation. These savings will be reinvested in global brand-building initiatives, with an emphasis on increased media spending. Second, we will be increasing the effectiveness of our marketing investments by transforming our marketing and commercial model to redeploy resources into more consumer-facing marketing investments to accelerate growth.
As of March 28, 2014, the Company has incurred total pretax expenses of $850 million related to our productivity and reinvestment program since the plan commenced. These expenses were recorded in the line item other operating charges in our condensed consolidated statements of income. Refer to Note 15 for the impact these charges had on our operating segments. Outside services reported in the table below primarily relate to expenses in connection with legal, outplacement and consulting activities. Other direct costs reported in the table below include, among other items, internal and external costs associated with the development, communication, administration and implementation of these initiatives; accelerated depreciation on certain fixed assets; losses on disposal of certain assets; contract termination fees; and relocation costs.
The following table summarizes the balance of accrued expenses related to these productivity and reinvestment initiatives and the changes in the accrued amounts as of and for the three months ended March 28, 2014 (in millions):
 
Accrued
Balance
December 31,
2013

Costs
Incurred
Three Months Ended
March 28, 2014

Payments

Noncash
and
Exchange

Accrued
Balance
March 28, 2014

Severance pay and benefits
$
88

$
6

$
(27
)
$
1

$
68

Outside services
6

9

(9
)

6

Other direct costs
18

71

(56
)
(17
)
16

Total
$
112

$
86

$
(92
)
$
(16
)
$
90

Integration of Our German Bottling and Distribution Operations
In 2008, the Company began an integration initiative related to the 18 German bottling and distribution operations acquired in 2007. The Company incurred expenses of $42 million related to this initiative during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and has incurred total pretax expenses of $669 million related to this initiative since it commenced. These charges were recorded in the line item other operating charges in our condensed consolidated statements of income and impacted the Bottling Investments operating segment. The expenses recorded in connection with these integration activities have been primarily due to involuntary terminations. The Company had $124 million and $127 million accrued related to these integration costs as of March 28, 2014, and December 31, 2013, respectively.
The Company announced further plans in April 2014 which will result in future charges of approximately $50 million. We are currently reviewing additional restructuring opportunities within the German bottling and distribution operations, including integration costs related to information technology and other initiatives. If implemented, these initiatives will result in additional charges in future periods. However, as of March 28, 2014, the Company has not finalized any additional plans.

20



NOTE 12: PENSION AND OTHER POSTRETIREMENT BENEFIT PLANS
Net periodic benefit cost for our pension and other postretirement benefit plans consisted of the following (in millions):
 
Pension Benefits  
 
Other Benefits  
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Service cost
$
67

$
69

 
$
6

$
9

Interest cost
101

94

 
11

11

Expected return on plan assets
(178
)
(164
)
 
(3
)
(2
)
Amortization of prior service cost (credit)
(1
)
(1
)
 
(4
)
(3
)
Amortization of net actuarial loss
18

50

 
1

3

Total cost (credit) recognized in statements of income
$
7

$
48

 
$
11

$
18

During the three months ended March 28, 2014, the Company contributed $157 million to our pension plans, and we anticipate making additional contributions of approximately $18 million to our pension plans during the remainder of 2014. The Company contributed $558 million to our pension plans during the three months ended March 29, 2013.
NOTE 13: INCOME TAXES
Our effective tax rate reflects the benefits of having significant operations outside the United States, which are generally taxed at rates lower than the U.S. statutory rate of 35 percent. As a result of employment actions and capital investments made by the Company, certain tax jurisdictions provide income tax incentive grants, including Brazil, Costa Rica, Singapore and Swaziland. The terms of these grants expire from 2015 to 2023. We expect each of these grants to be renewed indefinitely. In addition, our effective tax rate reflects the benefits of having significant earnings generated in investments accounted for under the equity method of accounting, which are generally taxed at rates lower than the U.S. statutory rate.
At the end of each interim period, we make our best estimate of the effective tax rate expected to be applicable for the full fiscal year. This estimate reflects, among other items, our best estimate of operating results and foreign currency exchange rates. Based on current tax laws, the Company's estimated effective tax rate for 2014 is 23.0 percent. However, in arriving at this estimate we do not include the estimated impact of unusual and/or infrequent items, which may cause significant variations in the customary relationship between income tax expense and income before income taxes.
The Company recorded income tax expense of $579 million (26.2 percent effective tax rate) and $575 million (24.6 percent effective tax rate) during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, respectively. The following table illustrates the tax expense (benefit) associated with unusual and/or infrequent items for the interim periods presented (in millions):
 
Three Months Ended
 
 
March 28,
2014

 
March 29,
2013

 
Productivity and reinvestment program
$
(32
)
1 
$
(40
)
1 
Other productivity, integration and restructuring initiatives

2 

2 
Certain tax matters
5

3 
1

3 
Other — net
5

4 
4

5 
1 
Related to charges of $86 million and $102 million during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, respectively. These charges were due to the Company's productivity and reinvestment program. Refer to Note 10 and Note 11.
2 
Related to net charges of $42 million and $21 million during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, respectively. These charges were due to the Company's other restructuring and integration initiatives that are outside the scope of the Company's productivity and reinvestment program. Refer to Note 10 and Note 11.
3 
Related to amounts required to be recorded for changes to our uncertain tax positions, including interest and penalties. The components of the net change in uncertain tax positions were individually insignificant.
4 
Related to charges of $253 million that primarily consisted of $247 million due to the devaluation of the Venezuelan bolivar and $6 million due to our proportionate share of unusual or infrequent items recorded by certain of our equity method investees. Refer to Note 1 and Note 10.
5 
Related to charges of $176 million that primarily consisted of $149 million due to the devaluation of the Venezuelan bolivar and $30 million due to our proportionate share of unusual or infrequent items recorded by certain of our equity method investees. Refer to Note 1 and Note 10.


21



NOTE 14: FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS
Accounting principles generally accepted in the United States define fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. Additionally, the inputs used to measure fair value are prioritized based on a three-level hierarchy. This hierarchy requires entities to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. The three levels of inputs used to measure fair value are as follows:
Level 1 — Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
Level 2 — Observable inputs other than quoted prices included in Level 1. We value assets and liabilities included in this level using dealer and broker quotations, certain pricing models, bid prices, quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.
Level 3 — Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity and that are significant to the fair value of the assets or liabilities. This includes certain pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies and similar techniques that use significant unobservable inputs.
Recurring Fair Value Measurements
In accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, certain assets and liabilities are required to be recorded at fair value on a recurring basis. For our Company, the only assets and liabilities that are adjusted to fair value on a recurring basis are investments in equity and debt securities classified as trading or available-for-sale and derivative financial instruments. Additionally, the Company adjusts the fair value of long-term debt as a result of the Company's fair value hedging strategy.
Investments in Trading and Available-for-Sale Securities
The fair values of our investments in trading and available-for-sale securities using quoted market prices from daily exchange traded markets are based on the closing price as of the balance sheet date and are classified as Level 1. The fair values of our investments in trading and available-for-sale securities classified as Level 2 are priced using quoted market prices for similar instruments or nonbinding market prices that are corroborated by observable market data. Inputs into these valuation techniques include actual trade data, benchmark yields, broker/dealer quotes, and other similar data. These inputs are obtained from quoted market prices, independent pricing vendors or other sources.
Derivative Financial Instruments
The fair values of our futures contracts are primarily determined using quoted contract prices on futures exchange markets. The fair values of these instruments are based on the closing contract price as of the balance sheet date and are classified as Level 1.
The fair values of our derivative instruments other than exchange-traded contracts are determined using standard valuation models. The significant inputs used in these models are readily available in public markets or can be derived from observable market transactions and therefore have been classified as Level 2. Inputs used in these standard valuation models for derivative instruments other than futures include the applicable exchange rates, forward rates, interest rates and discount rates. The standard valuation model for options also uses implied volatility as an additional input. The discount rates are based on the historical U.S. Deposit or U.S. Treasury rates, and the implied volatility specific to options is based on quoted rates from financial institutions.
Included in the fair value of derivative instruments is an adjustment for nonperformance risk. The adjustment is based on the current one-year credit default swap ("CDS") rate applied to each contract, by counterparty. We use our counterparty's CDS rate when we are in an asset position and our own CDS rate when we are in a liability position. The adjustment for nonperformance risk did not have a significant impact on the estimated fair value of our derivative instruments.

22



The following table summarizes those assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of March 28, 2014 (in millions):
 
Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

 
Netting
Adjustment1

Fair Value
Measurements

 
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trading securities2
$
206

$
167

$
4

 
$

$
377

 
Available-for-sale securities2
3,228

3,298

113

3 

6,639

 
Derivatives4
26

684


 
(190
)
520

5 
Total assets
$
3,460

$
4,149

$
117

 
$
(190
)
$
7,536

 
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Derivatives4
$
1

$
249

$

 
$
(190
)
$
60

5 
Total liabilities
$
1

$
249

$

 
$
(190
)
$
60

 
1 Amounts represent the impact of legally enforceable master netting agreements that allow the Company to settle positive and negative positions and also cash collateral held or placed with the same counterparties. There are no amounts subject to legally enforceable master netting agreements that management has chosen not to offset or that do not meet the offsetting requirements.
2 
Refer to Note 3 for additional information related to the composition of our trading securities and available-for-sale securities.
3 Primarily related to long-term debt securities that mature in 2018.
4 Refer to Note 5 for additional information related to the composition of our derivative portfolio.
5 The Company's derivative financial instruments are recorded at fair value in our condensed consolidated balance sheet as follows: $520 million in the line item other assets; $4 million in the line item accounts payable and accrued expenses; and $56 million in the line item other liabilities. Refer to Note 5 for additional information related to the composition of our derivative portfolio.
The following table summarizes those assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of December 31, 2013 (in millions):
 
Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

 
Netting
Adjustment1

Fair Value
Measurements

 
Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trading securities2
$
206

$
163

$
3

 
$

$
372

 
Available-for-sale securities2
1,453

3,281

108

3 

4,842

 
Derivatives4
17

822


 
(150
)
689

5 
Total assets
$
1,676

$
4,266

$
111

 
$
(150
)
$
5,903

 
Liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Derivatives4
$
10

$
165

$

 
$
(151
)
$
24

5 
Total liabilities
$
10

$
165

$

 
$
(151
)
$
24

 
1 Amounts represent the impact of legally enforceable master netting agreements that allow the Company to settle positive and negative positions and also cash collateral held or placed with the same counterparties. There are no amounts subject to legally enforceable master netting agreements that management has chosen not to offset or that do not meet the offsetting requirements.
2 
Refer to Note 3 for additional information related to the composition of our trading securities and available-for-sale securities.
3 Primarily related to long-term debt securities that mature in 2018.
4 Refer to Note 5 for additional information related to the composition of our derivative portfolio.
5 The Company's derivative financial instruments are recorded at fair value in our condensed consolidated balance sheet as follows: $129 million in the line item prepaid expenses and other assets; $560 million in the line item other assets; $12 million in the line item accounts payable and accrued expenses; and $12 million in the line item other liabilities. Refer to Note 5 for additional information related to the composition of our derivative portfolio.
Gross realized and unrealized gains and losses on Level 3 assets and liabilities were not significant for the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013.
The Company recognizes transfers between levels within the hierarchy as of the beginning of the reporting period. Gross transfers between levels within the hierarchy were not significant for the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013.
Nonrecurring Fair Value Measurements
In addition to assets and liabilities that are recorded at fair value on a recurring basis, the Company records assets and liabilities at fair value on a nonrecurring basis as required by accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Generally, assets are recorded at fair value on a nonrecurring basis as a result of impairment charges.

23



The Company did not record any significant impairment charges related to assets measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013.
Other Fair Value Disclosures
The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents; short-term investments; receivables; accounts payable and accrued expenses; and loans and notes payable approximate their fair values because of the relatively short-term maturities of these instruments.
The fair value of our long-term debt is estimated using Level 2 inputs based on quoted prices for those or similar instruments. As of March 28, 2014, the carrying amount and fair value of our long-term debt, including the current portion, were $20,191 million and $20,547 million, respectively. As of December 31, 2013, the carrying amount and fair value of our long-term debt, including the current portion, were $20,178 million and $20,352 million, respectively.
NOTE 15: OPERATING SEGMENTS
Effective January 1, 2014, the Company changed the name of the Pacific segment to Asia Pacific. This change did not impact the results of the segments, but the name of the segment has been updated in all information presented herein.
Information about our Company's operations as of and for the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, by operating segment, is as follows (in millions):
 
Eurasia
& Africa

Europe

Latin
America

North
America

Asia Pacific

Bottling
Investments

Corporate

Eliminations

Consolidated

2014
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net operating revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Third party
$
658

$
1,134

$
1,094

$
4,790

$
1,210

$
1,657

$
33

$

$
10,576

Intersegment

159

17

3

105

16


(300
)

Total net revenues
658

1,293

1,111

4,793

1,315

1,673

33

(300
)
10,576

Operating income (loss)
303

719

668

428

557

(26
)
(273
)

2,376

Income (loss) before income taxes
308

731

667

425

560

22

(508
)

2,205

Identifiable operating assets
1,333

3,868

2,809

34,255

1,996

7,156

26,745


78,162

Noncurrent investments
1,145

109

602

50

145

9,183

1,893


13,127

2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net operating revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Third party
$
669

$
1,020

$
1,157

$
4,883

$
1,244

$
2,018

$
44

$

$
11,035

Intersegment

157

71

4

146

20


(398
)

Total net revenues
669

1,177

1,228

4,887

1,390

2,038

44

(398
)
11,035

Operating income (loss)
282

683

763

341

602

39

(302
)

2,408

Income (loss) before income taxes
289

694

764

342

604

109

(458
)

2,344

Identifiable operating assets
1,366

3,160

2,734

34,591

2,193

8,224

25,105


77,373

Noncurrent investments
1,172

278

567

38

128

8,828

66


11,077

As of December 31, 2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Identifiable operating assets
$
1,273

$
3,713

$
2,918

$
33,964

$
1,922

$
7,011

$
27,742

$

$
78,543

Noncurrent investments
1,157

106

545

49

143

9,424

88


11,512

During the three months ended March 28, 2014, the results of our operating segments were impacted by the following items:
Operating income (loss) and income (loss) before income taxes were reduced by $75 million for North America, $7 million for Asia Pacific, $42 million for Bottling Investments and $4 million for Corporate due to the Company's productivity and reinvestment program as well as other restructuring initiatives. Refer to Note 10 and Note 11 for additional information on each of the Company's productivity, restructuring and integration initiatives.
Income (loss) before income taxes was reduced by $21 million for Bottling Investments and $226 million for Corporate due to the devaluation of the Venezuelan bolivar, including our proportionate share of the charge incurred by an equity method investee that has operations in Venezuela. Refer to Note 1 and Note 10.
Income (loss) before income taxes was reduced by $6 million for Bottling Investments due to the Company's proportionate share of unusual or infrequent items recorded by certain of our equity method investees. Refer to Note 10.

24



During the three months ended March 29, 2013, the results of our operating segments were impacted by the following items:
Operating income (loss) and income (loss) before income taxes were reduced by $2 million for Eurasia and Africa, $82 million for North America, $8 million for Asia Pacific, $21 million for Bottling Investments and $10 million for Corporate due to the Company's productivity and reinvestment program as well as other restructuring initiatives. Refer to Note 10 and Note 11.
Income (loss) before income taxes was reduced by $9 million for Bottling Investments and $140 million for Corporate due to the devaluation of the Venezuelan bolivar, including our proportionate share of the charge incurred by an equity method investee that has operations in Venezuela. Refer to Note 1 and Note 10.
Income (loss) before income taxes was reduced by $30 million for Bottling Investments due to the Company's proportionate share of unusual or infrequent items recorded by certain of our equity method investees. Refer to Note 10.
Item 2.  Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
When used in this report, the terms "The Coca-Cola Company," "Company," "we," "us" or "our" mean The Coca-Cola Company and all entities included in our condensed consolidated financial statements.
CRITICAL ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND ESTIMATES
Recoverability of Current and Noncurrent Assets
Our Company faces many uncertainties and risks related to various economic, political and regulatory environments in the countries in which we operate, particularly in developing and emerging markets. Refer to the heading "Item 1A. Risk Factors" in Part I and "Our Business — Challenges and Risks" in Part II of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2013. As a result, management must make numerous assumptions that involve a significant amount of judgment when performing recoverability and impairment tests of noncurrent assets in various regions around the world.
We perform recoverability and impairment tests of noncurrent assets in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. For certain assets, recoverability and/or impairment tests are required only when conditions exist that indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. For other assets, impairment tests are required at least annually, or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate that an asset may be impaired.
Our equity method investees also perform such recoverability and/or impairment tests. If an impairment charge is recorded by one of our equity method investees, the Company records its proportionate share of the charge as a reduction of equity income (loss) — net in our condensed consolidated statement of income. However, the actual amount we record with respect to our proportionate share of such charges may be impacted by items such as basis differences, deferred taxes and deferred gains.
Investments in Equity and Debt Securities
Investments classified as trading securities are not assessed for impairment since they are carried at fair value with the change in fair value included in net income. We review our investments in equity and debt securities that are accounted for using the equity method or cost method or that are classified as available-for-sale or held-to-maturity each reporting period to determine whether a significant event or change in circumstances has occurred that may have an adverse effect on the fair value of each investment. When such events or changes occur, we evaluate the fair value compared to our cost basis in the investment. We also perform this evaluation every reporting period for each investment for which our cost basis has exceeded the fair value in the prior period. The fair values of most of our Company's investments in publicly traded companies are often readily available based on quoted market prices. For investments in non-publicly traded companies, management's assessment of fair value is based on valuation methodologies including discounted cash flows, estimates of sales proceeds, and appraisals, as appropriate. We consider the assumptions that we believe hypothetical marketplace participants would use in evaluating estimated future cash flows when employing the discounted cash flow or estimates of sales proceeds valuation methodologies. The ability to accurately predict future cash flows, especially in developing and emerging markets, may impact the determination of fair value.
In the event the fair value of an investment declines below our cost basis, management is required to determine if the decline in fair value is other than temporary. If management determines the decline is other than temporary, an impairment charge is recorded. Management's assessment as to the nature of a decline in fair value is based on, among other things, the length of time and the extent to which the market value has been less than our cost basis; the financial condition and near-term prospects of the issuer; and our intent and ability to retain the investment for a period of time sufficient to allow for any anticipated recovery in market value.

25



The following table presents the difference between calculated fair values, based on quoted closing prices of publicly traded shares, and our Company's cost basis in publicly traded bottlers accounted for as equity method investments (in millions):
March 28, 2014
Fair
Value

Carrying
Value

Difference

Coca-Cola FEMSA, S.A.B. de C.V.
$
6,025

$
2,223

$
3,802

Coca-Cola Amatil Limited
2,220

793

1,427

Coca-Cola HBC AG
2,133

1,472

661

Coca-Cola İçecek A.Ş.
1,154

203

951

Coca-Cola East Japan Bottling Company, Ltd.
987

504

483

Embotelladora Andina S.A.
453

342

111

Coca-Cola Bottling Co. Consolidated
212

85

127

Total
$
13,184

$
5,622

$
7,562

As of March 28, 2014, gross unrealized gains and losses on available-for-sale securities were $875 million and $39 million, respectively. Management assessed each investment with unrealized losses to determine if the decline in fair value was other than temporary. Based on these assessments, the Company did not record any significant impairment charges related to available-for-sale securities during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013. We will continue to monitor these investments in future periods. Refer to Note 3 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
Goodwill, Trademarks and Other Intangible Assets
Intangible assets are classified into one of three categories: (1) intangible assets with definite lives subject to amortization; (2) intangible assets with indefinite lives not subject to amortization; and (3) goodwill. For intangible assets with definite lives, tests for impairment must be performed if conditions exist that indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. For intangible assets with indefinite lives and goodwill, tests for impairment must be performed at least annually, or more frequently if events or circumstances indicate that an asset might be impaired.
Management's assessments of the recoverability and impairment tests of intangible assets involve critical accounting estimates. These estimates require significant management judgment, include inherent uncertainties and are often interdependent; therefore, they do not change in isolation. Factors that management must estimate include, among others, the economic life of the asset, sales volume, pricing, cost of raw materials, delivery costs, inflation, cost of capital, marketing spending, foreign currency exchange rates, tax rates, capital spending and proceeds from the sale of assets. These factors are even more difficult to predict when global financial markets are highly volatile. The estimates we use when assessing the recoverability of definite-lived intangible assets are consistent with those we use in our internal planning. When performing impairment tests of indefinite-lived intangible assets, we estimate the fair values of the assets using management's best assumptions, which we believe would be consistent with what a hypothetical marketplace participant would use. Estimates and assumptions used in these tests are evaluated and updated as appropriate. The variability of these factors depends on a number of conditions, including uncertainty about future events, and thus our accounting estimates may change from period to period. If other assumptions and estimates had been used when these tests were performed, impairment charges could have resulted. As mentioned above, these factors do not change in isolation and, therefore, we do not believe it is practicable or meaningful to present the impact of changing a single factor. Furthermore, if management uses different assumptions or if different conditions occur in future periods, future impairment charges could result. Refer to the heading "Operations Review" below for additional information related to our present business environment. Certain factors discussed above are impacted by our current business environment and are discussed throughout this report, as appropriate.
Intangible assets acquired in recent transactions are naturally more susceptible to impairment, primarily due to the fact that they are recorded at fair value based on recent operating plans and macroeconomic conditions present at the time of acquisition. Consequently, if operating results and/or macroeconomic conditions deteriorate shortly after an acquisition, this could result in the impairment of the acquired assets. A deterioration of macroeconomic conditions may not only negatively impact the estimated operating cash flows used in our cash flow models, but it may also negatively impact other assumptions used in our analyses, including, but not limited to, the estimated cost of capital and/or discount rates. Additionally, as discussed above, in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, we are required to ensure that assumptions used to determine fair value in our analyses are consistent with the assumptions a hypothetical marketplace participant would use. As a result, the cost of capital and/or discount rates used in our analyses may increase or decrease based on market conditions and trends, regardless of whether our Company's actual cost of capital has changed. Therefore, if the cost of capital and/or discount rates change, our Company may recognize an impairment of an intangible asset or assets in spite of realizing actual cash flows that are approximately equal to, or greater than, our previously forecasted amounts. The Company did not record any significant impairment charges related to intangible assets during the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013.

26



We perform impairment tests of goodwill at our reporting unit level, which is one level below our operating segments. Our operating segments are primarily based on geographic responsibility, which is consistent with the way management runs our business. Our operating segments are subdivided into smaller geographic regions or territories that we sometimes refer to as "business units." These business units are also our reporting units. The Bottling Investments operating segment includes all Company-owned or consolidated bottling operations, regardless of geographic location, except for bottling operations managed by Coca-Cola Refreshments ("CCR"), which are included in our North America operating segment. Generally, each Company-owned or consolidated bottling operation within our Bottling Investments operating segment is its own reporting unit. Goodwill is assigned to the reporting unit or units that benefit from the synergies arising from each business combination.
The goodwill impairment test consists of a two-step process, if necessary. The first step is to compare the fair value of a reporting unit to its carrying value, including goodwill. We typically use discounted cash flow models to determine the fair value of a reporting unit. The assumptions used in these models are consistent with those we believe hypothetical marketplace participants would use. If the fair value of the reporting unit is less than its carrying value, the second step of the impairment test must be performed in order to determine the amount of impairment loss, if any. The second step compares the implied fair value of the reporting unit's goodwill with the carrying amount of that goodwill. If the carrying amount of the reporting unit's goodwill exceeds its implied fair value, an impairment charge is recognized in an amount equal to that excess. The loss recognized cannot exceed the carrying amount of goodwill.
As of March 28, 2014, we did not have any reporting unit with a material amount of goodwill for which it is reasonably likely that it will fail step one of a goodwill impairment test in the near term. However, if macroeconomic conditions worsen, it is possible that we may experience significant impairments of some of our intangible assets, which would require us to recognize impairment charges. On June 7, 2007, our Company acquired Energy Brands Inc., also known as glacéau, for approximately $4.1 billion. The Company allocated $3.3 billion of the purchase price to various trademarks acquired in this business combination. While the combined fair value of the various trademarks acquired in this transaction significantly exceeds their combined carrying values as of March 28, 2014, the fair value of one trademark within the portfolio only slightly exceeds its carrying value. If the future operating results of this trademark do not achieve the current near-term financial projections or if macroeconomic conditions change causing the cost of capital and/or discount rate to increase without an offsetting increase in the operating results, it is likely that we would be required to recognize an impairment charge related to this trademark. Management will continue to monitor the fair value of our intangible assets in future periods.
OPERATIONS REVIEW
Sales of our nonalcoholic ready-to-drink beverages are somewhat seasonal, with the second and third calendar quarters accounting for the highest sales volumes. The volume of sales in the beverage business may be affected by weather conditions.
Our organizational structure as of March 28, 2014, consisted of the following operating segments, the first six of which are sometimes referred to as "operating groups" or "groups": Eurasia and Africa; Europe; Latin America; North America; Asia Pacific; Bottling Investments; and Corporate. Effective January 1, 2014, the Company changed the name of our Pacific operating segment to Asia Pacific. Accordingly, all references to the operating segment, including the prior period segment information, has been adjusted to reflect this change. For further information regarding our operating segments, refer to Note 15 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
Structural Changes, Acquired Brands and New License Agreements
In order to continually improve upon the Company's operating performance, from time to time we engage in buying and selling ownership interests in bottling partners and other manufacturing operations. In addition, we also acquire brands or enter into license agreements for certain brands to supplement our beverage offerings. These items impact our operating results and certain key metrics used by management in assessing the Company's performance.
Unit case volume growth is a key metric used by management to evaluate the Company's performance because it measures demand for our products at the consumer level. The Company's unit case volume represents the number of unit cases (or unit case equivalents) of Company beverage products directly or indirectly sold by the Company and its bottling partners to customers and, therefore, reflects unit case volume for both consolidated and unconsolidated bottlers. Refer to the heading "Beverage Volume" below.
Concentrate sales volume represents the amount of concentrates and syrups (in all cases expressed in equivalent unit cases) sold by, or used in finished products sold by, the Company to its bottling partners or other customers. Refer to the heading "Beverage Volume" below.
Our Bottling Investments operating segment and our other finished product operations, including our finished product operations in our North America operating segment, typically generate net operating revenues by selling sparkling beverages and a variety of still beverages, such as juices and juice drinks, energy and sports drinks, ready-to-drink teas and coffees, and

27



certain water products, to retailers or to distributors, wholesalers and bottling partners who distribute them to retailers. In addition, in the United States, we manufacture fountain syrups and sell them to fountain retailers such as restaurants and convenience stores who use the fountain syrups to produce beverages for immediate consumption, or to authorized fountain wholesalers or bottling partners who resell the fountain syrups to fountain retailers. For these consolidated finished product operations, we recognize the associated concentrate sales volume at the time the unit case or unit case equivalent is sold to the customer. Our concentrate operations typically generate net operating revenues by selling concentrates and syrups to authorized bottling and canning operations. For these concentrate operations, we recognize concentrate revenue and concentrate sales volume when we sell concentrate to the authorized unconsolidated bottling and canning operations, and we typically report unit case volume when finished products manufactured from the concentrates and syrups are sold to the customer. When we analyze our net operating revenues we generally consider the following four factors: (1) volume growth (unit case volume or concentrate sales volume, as appropriate), (2) structural changes, (3) changes in price, product and geographic mix and (4) foreign currency fluctuations. Refer to the heading "Net Operating Revenues" below.
"Structural changes" generally refers to acquisitions or dispositions of bottling, distribution or canning operations and consolidation or deconsolidation of bottling and distribution entities for accounting purposes. Typically, structural changes do not impact the Company's unit case volume on a consolidated basis or at the geographic operating segment level. We recognize unit case volume for all sales of Company beverage products regardless of our ownership interest in the bottling partner, if any. However, the unit case volume reported by our Bottling Investments operating segment is generally impacted by structural changes because it only includes the unit case volume of our consolidated bottling operations.
In 2013, the Company sold a majority interest in our previously consolidated bottling operations in the Philippines ("Philippine bottling operations"), deconsolidated our bottling operations in Brazil ("Brazilian bottling operations") as a result of their combination with an independent bottling partner and acquired bottling operations in Myanmar. Accordingly, the impact to net operating revenues related to these items has been included as a structural change in our analysis of changes to net operating revenues. Refer to the heading "Net Operating Revenues" below.
The Company sells concentrates and syrups to both consolidated and unconsolidated bottling partners. The ownership structure of our bottling partners impacts the timing of recognizing concentrate revenue and concentrate sales volume. When we sell concentrates or syrups to our consolidated bottling partners, we are not able to recognize the concentrate revenue or concentrate sales volume until the bottling partner has sold finished products manufactured from the concentrates or syrups to a third party or independent customer. When we sell concentrates or syrups to our unconsolidated bottling partners, we recognize the concentrate revenue and concentrate sales volume when the concentrates or syrups are sold to the bottling partner. The subsequent sale of the finished products manufactured from the concentrates or syrups to a customer does not impact the timing of recognizing the concentrate revenue or concentrate sales volume. When we account for an unconsolidated bottling partner as an equity method investment, we eliminate the intercompany profit related to these transactions until the equity method investee has sold finished products manufactured from the concentrates or syrups to a third party or independent customer.
"Acquired brands" refers to brands acquired during the past 12 months. Typically, the Company has not reported unit case volume or recognized concentrate sales volume related to acquired brands in periods prior to the closing of a transaction. Therefore, the unit case volume and concentrate sales volume from the sale of these brands is incremental to prior year volume. We do not generally consider acquired brands to be structural changes.
"License agreements" refers to brands not owned by the Company but for which we hold certain rights, generally including, but not limited to, distribution rights, and from which we derive an economic benefit when these brands are ultimately sold. Typically, the Company has not reported unit case volume or recognized concentrate sales volume related to these brands in periods prior to the beginning of the term of a license agreement. Therefore, the unit case volume and concentrate sales volume from the sale of these brands is incremental to prior year volume. We do not generally consider new license agreements to be structural changes.


28



Beverage Volume
We measure the volume of Company beverage products sold in two ways: (1) unit cases of finished products and (2) concentrate sales. As used in this report, "unit case" means a unit of measurement equal to 192 U.S. fluid ounces of finished beverage (24 eight-ounce servings); and "unit case volume" means the number of unit cases (or unit case equivalents) of Company beverage products directly or indirectly sold by the Company and its bottling partners to customers. Unit case volume primarily consists of beverage products bearing Company trademarks. Also included in unit case volume are certain products licensed to, or distributed by, our Company, and brands owned by Coca-Cola system bottlers for which our Company provides marketing support and from the sale of which we derive economic benefit. In addition, unit case volume includes sales by joint ventures in which the Company has an equity interest. We believe unit case volume is one of the measures of the underlying strength of the Coca-Cola system because it measures trends at the consumer level. The unit case volume numbers used in this report are derived based on estimates received by the Company from its bottling partners and distributors. Concentrate sales volume represents the amount of concentrates, syrups, beverage bases and powders (in all cases expressed in equivalent unit cases) sold by, or used in finished beverages sold by, the Company to its bottling partners or other customers. Unit case volume and concentrate sales volume growth rates are not necessarily equal during any given period. Factors such as seasonality, bottlers' inventory practices, the number of selling days in a reporting period, supply point changes, timing of price increases, new product introductions and changes in product mix can impact unit case volume and concentrate sales volume and can create differences between unit case volume and concentrate sales volume growth rates. In addition to the items mentioned above, the impact of unit case volume from certain joint ventures in which the Company has an equity interest, but to which the Company does not sell concentrates or syrups, may give rise to differences between unit case volume and concentrate sales volume growth rates.
Information about our volume growth worldwide and by operating segment for the three months ended March 28, 2014, is as follows:
 
Percent Change
2014 versus 2013
 
 
Unit Cases1,2,3

Concentrate
Sales4

 
Worldwide
2
%
2
%
5 
Eurasia & Africa
2
%
1
%
 
Europe
(4
)
(2
)
 
Latin America
1

(4
)
 
North America

(1
)
 
Asia Pacific
7

9

5 
Bottling Investments
(10
)
N/A

 
1 Bottling Investments operating segment data reflects unit case volume growth for consolidated bottlers only.
2 Geographic segment data reflects unit case volume growth for all bottlers in the applicable geographic areas, both consolidated and unconsolidated.
3 Unit case volume percent change is based on average daily sales. Unit case volume growth based on average daily sales is computed by comparing the average daily sales in each of the corresponding periods. Average daily sales are the unit cases sold during the period divided by the number of days in the period.
4 Concentrate sales volume represents the actual amount of concentrates, syrups, beverage bases and powders sold by, or used in finished beverages sold by, the Company to its bottling partners or other customers and is not based on average daily sales. Each of our interim reporting periods, other than the fourth interim reporting period, ends on the Friday closest to the last day of the corresponding quarterly calendar period. As a result, the first quarter of 2014 had one less day when compared to the first quarter of 2013, and the fourth quarter of 2014 will have one additional day when compared to the fourth quarter of 2013.
5 After considering the impact of structural changes, worldwide concentrate sales volume was even and Asia Pacific concentrate sales volume grew 8 percent.
Unit Case Volume
Although a significant portion of our Company's revenues is not based directly on unit case volume, we believe unit case volume is a measure of the underlying strength of the Coca-Cola system because it measures trends at the consumer level.
Three Months Ended March 28, 2014, versus Three Months Ended March 29, 2013
In Eurasia and Africa, unit case volume increased 2 percent, which consisted of 1 percent growth in sparkling beverages and 7 percent growth in still beverages. Growth in still beverages was led by our performance in juice and juice drinks, teas and packaged water. Russia reported unit case volume growth of 6 percent, including growth of 9 percent in brand Coca-Cola. Eurasia and Africa also benefited from unit case volume growth of 5 percent in the group's Middle East and North Africa

29



business unit and growth of 3 percent in the Central, East and West Africa business unit. This growth in these business units was partially offset by a decline in unit cases of 4 percent in the Southern Africa business unit, resulting from increased competition and poor weather including flooding in parts of South Africa.
Unit case volume in Europe declined 4 percent. The group's unit case volume in sparkling beverages declined 5 percent, partially offset by unit case volume growth in still beverages of 1 percent. The underlying macroeconomic environment in Europe continued to be volatile during the period reflecting ongoing weakness in consumer confidence and spending in several key markets. In addition, the results were impacted by the shift in timing of Easter holiday sales which negatively impacted the first quarter of 2014. The group's Central and Southern Europe business unit reported a volume decline of 6 percent and the Iberia business unit reported a decline of 4 percent. The Northwest Europe and Nordics business unit had a decline of 4 percent, which reflected the impact of a competitive pricing environment. The group continues to manage through difficult macroeconomic conditions with ongoing brand-building programs and an occasion, brand, price, package and channel segmentation strategy.
In Latin America, unit case volume growth was 1 percent, which consisted of growth in still beverages of 9 percent partially offset by a decline in sparkling beverages of 1 percent. The group's still beverage growth reflected increases in the packaged water and juice and juice drinks categories. The group reported volume growth of 5 percent in the Latin Center business unit, which was primarily a result of 6 percent growth in brand Coca-Cola. Brazil reported volume growth of 4 percent reflecting positive results from our marketing campaigns centered around the Carnival holiday and the upcoming FIFA World CupTM as well as favorable weather. These increases were offset by a low single-digit decline in unit case volume in Mexico. This decline was primarily due to the impact of a new excise tax that went into effect on January 1, 2014.
Unit case volume in North America was even. Sparkling beverage volume declined 1 percent during the period and still beverages grew 3 percent. Volume was impacted by the shift in timing of Easter holiday sales which negatively impacted the first quarter of 2014. North America's volume in sparkling beverages included growth of 3 percent and 1 percent in Trademark Fanta and Trademark Sprite, respectively, and brand Coca-Cola was even during the period. Growth in still beverages included strong performance in packaged water, sports drinks and teas. The growth in packaged water of 10 percent was primarily due to growth in Dasani. The increase in sports drinks reflected 9 percent growth in Trademark Powerade.
In Asia Pacific, unit case volume increased 7 percent. Sparkling beverages grew 3 percent, including 2 percent growth in brand Coca-Cola, 4 percent growth in Trademark Sprite and 2 percent growth in Trademark Fanta. Still beverages grew 13 percent during the period led by growth in packaged water of 24 percent. In addition, sports drinks, teas and juice and juice drinks grew 18 percent, 8 percent and 3 percent, respectively. India reported 6 percent unit case volume growth, including 5 percent growth in Trademark Sprite and growth in packaged water. Japan's unit case volume grew 3 percent, which reflected a 3 percent increase in sparkling beverages and a 4 percent increase in still beverages. China's unit case volume increased 12 percent during the period, reflecting 6 percent growth in sparkling beverages and 21 percent growth in still beverages. The growth in China's still beverages was driven by packaged water, reflecting the Company's focus on driving more profitable growth in the category through immediate consumption. The Asia Pacific group's volume results included a decline of 6 percent in Thailand as a result of current political unrest.
Unit case volume for Bottling Investments decreased 10 percent. This decrease primarily reflects the sale of a majority ownership interest in our previously consolidated bottling operations in the Philippines to Coca-Cola FEMSA, S.A.B. de C.V. ("Coca-Cola FEMSA") in January 2013 as well as the deconsolidation of our bottling operations in Brazil during July 2013. The unfavorable impact of these transactions on the group's unit case volume results was partially offset by growth in other key markets where we own or otherwise consolidate bottling operations. The Company's consolidated bottling operations accounted for 36 percent, 68 percent and 100 percent of the unit case volume in China, India and Germany, respectively, where unit case volume growth during the period was 12 percent, 6 percent and flat, respectively.
Concentrate Sales Volume
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, worldwide unit case volume grew 2 percent and concentrate sales volume grew 2 percent compared to the three months ended March 29, 2013. After considering the impact of structural changes, concentrate sales volume was even during the three months ended March 28, 2014. The difference between the consolidated unit case volume and concentrate sales volume growth rates during the three months ended March 28, 2014, was primarily due to having one less selling day during the first quarter of 2014 when compared to the first quarter of 2013.
In addition, this difference reflects the timing of concentrate shipments in various markets, including Mexico, Russia, Spain and Uzbekistan, and the impact of unit case volume from certain joint ventures in which the Company has an equity interest but to which the Company does not sell concentrates, syrups, beverage bases or powders. Concentrate sales volume growth is calculated based on the actual amount of concentrate sold during the reporting period, which is impacted by the number of selling days. Conversely, unit case volume growth is calculated based on average daily sales, which is not impacted by the number of selling days in a reporting period.

30




Net Operating Revenues
Three Months Ended March 28, 2014, versus Three Months Ended March 29, 2013
The Company's net operating revenues decreased $459 million, or 4 percent. The following table illustrates, on a percentage basis, the estimated impact of key factors resulting in the increase (decrease) in net operating revenues by operating segment:
 
Percent Change 2014 versus 2013
 
Volume1

Structural
Changes

Price, Product &
Geographic Mix

Currency
Fluctuations

Total

Consolidated
—%

(2
)%
2
%
(4
)%
(4
)%
Eurasia & Africa
1
%
—%

9
%
(12
)%
(2
)%
Europe
(2
)

10

2

10

Latin America
(4
)

11

(17
)
(10
)
North America
(1
)


(1
)
(2
)
Asia Pacific
8


(6
)
(7
)
(5
)
Bottling Investments
4

(17
)
(4
)
(1
)
(18
)
Corporate
*

*

*

*

*

*
Calculation is not meaningful.
1 Represents the percent change in net operating revenues attributable to the increase (decrease) in concentrate sales volume for our geographic operating segments (expressed in equivalent unit cases) after considering the impact of structural changes. For our Bottling Investments operating segment, this represents the percent change in net operating revenues attributable to the increase (decrease) in unit case volume after considering the impact of structural changes. Our Bottling Investments operating segment data reflects unit case volume growth for consolidated bottlers only. Refer to the heading "Beverage Volume" above.
Refer to the heading "Beverage Volume" above for additional information related to changes in our unit case and concentrate sales volumes.
Refer to the heading "Structural Changes, Acquired Brands and New License Agreements" above for additional information related to the structural changes that impacted our Bottling Investments operating segment.
Price, product and geographic mix favorably impacted our consolidated net operating revenues by 2 percent. Price, product and geographic mix for our operating segments was impacted by a variety of factors and events including, but not limited to, the following:
Eurasia and Africa was favorably impacted by price mix in the majority of our markets coupled with favorable geographic mix.
Europe was favorably impacted as a result of consolidating the juice and smoothie business of Fresh Trading Ltd. ("innocent") in May 2013 as well as favorable pricing in a majority of our business units and positive geographic mix.
Latin America was favorably impacted by price mix in all four of the segment's business units and the inflationary environments in several markets.
Asia Pacific was unfavorably impacted by geographic mix as well as shifts in product and package mix within individual markets.
Fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates decreased our consolidated net operating revenues by 4 percent. This unfavorable impact was primarily due to a stronger U.S. dollar compared to certain foreign currencies, including the South African rand, Mexican peso, Brazilian real, Australian dollar and Japanese yen, which had an unfavorable impact on our Eurasia and Africa, Latin America, Asia Pacific and Bottling Investments operating segments. The unfavorable impact of a stronger U.S. dollar compared to the currencies listed above was partially offset by the impact of a weaker U.S. dollar compared to certain other foreign currencies, including the euro and U.K. pound sterling, which had a favorable impact on our Europe and Bottling Investments operating segments. Refer to the heading "Liquidity, Capital Resources and Financial Position — Foreign Exchange" below.
Net operating revenue growth rates are impacted by sales volume; structural changes; price, product and geographic mix; and foreign currency fluctuations. The size and timing of future structural changes are not consistent from period to period. As a result, anticipating the impact of such events on future net operating revenues, and other financial statement line items, usually is not possible. However, we expect the structural changes discussed above to have an unfavorable 1 percent impact on our 2014 net operating revenues, with the full impact occurring in the first six months.

31



Gross Profit
As a result of our finished goods operations, which are primarily included in our North America and Bottling Investments operating segments, the following inputs represent a substantial portion of the company's total cost of goods sold: (1) sweeteners, (2) metals, (3) juices and (4) polyethylene terephthalate ("PET"). The Company enters into hedging activities related to certain commodities in order to mitigate a portion of the price risk associated with forecasted purchases. Many of the derivative financial instruments used by the Company to mitigate the risk associated with these commodity exposures, including any related foreign currency exposure, do not qualify for hedge accounting. As a result, the changes in fair value of these derivative instruments have been, and will continue to be, included as a component of net income in each reporting period. During the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, the Company recorded gains of $22 million and losses of $71 million, respectively, in the line item cost of goods sold in our condensed consolidated statements of income. Refer to Note 5 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
Our gross profit margin increased to 61.4 percent during the three months ended March 28, 2014, compared to 60.8 percent during the three months ended March 29, 2013. This increase is partially due to the deconsolidation of our Philippine bottling operations in January 2013 and the deconsolidation of our Brazilian bottling operations in July 2013. Refer to the heading "Structural Changes, Acquired Brands and New License Agreements" above for additional information regarding the impact of the deconsolidation of our Philippine and Brazilian bottling operations.
Selling, General and Administrative Expenses
The following table sets forth the significant components of selling, general and administrative expenses (in millions):
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Stock-based compensation expense
$
39

$
47

Advertising expenses
707

780

Bottling and distribution expenses1
2,073

2,162

Other operating expenses
1,170

1,193

Total selling, general and administrative expenses
$
3,989

$
4,182

1 Includes operating expenses as well as general and administrative expenses related to our Bottling Investments operating segment and our finished product operations in our North America operating segment.
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, selling, general and administrative expenses decreased $193 million versus the prior year comparable period. The decrease in advertising expenses during the three months ended March 28, 2014, was primarily due to a foreign currency exchange impact of 4 percent and the timing of certain marketing expenses primarily in the prior year. The decrease in bottling and distribution expenses during the three months ended March 28, 2014, reflects the impact of the Company's sale of a majority interest in our previously consolidated Philippine bottling operations in January 2013, the deconsolidation of our Brazilian bottling operations in July 2013 and the impact of having one less day in the first quarter of 2014 when compared to the first quarter of 2013. During the three months ended March 28, 2014, fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates decreased total selling, general and administrative expenses by 2 percent.
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, the Company contributed $157 million to our pension plans, and we anticipate making additional contributions of approximately $18 million to our pension plans during the remainder of 2014. Our full year pension expense is currently expected to decrease by approximately $160 million compared to 2013. The anticipated decrease is primarily due to the favorable impact of an increase in the weighted-average discount rate used to calculate the Company's benefit obligation, pension contributions and favorable returns on plan assets in 2013. Refer to the heading "Liquidity, Capital Resources and Financial Position" below and Note 12 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for information related to our pension contributions.
As of March 28, 2014, we had $686 million of total unrecognized compensation cost related to nonvested stock-based compensation arrangements granted under our plans, which we expect to recognize over a weighted-average period of 2.5 years. This expected cost does not include the impact of any future stock-based compensation awards.


32



Other Operating Charges
Other operating charges incurred by operating segment were as follows (in millions):
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Eurasia & Africa
$

$
2

Europe


Latin America


North America
75

79

Asia Pacific
7

8

Bottling Investments
42

21

Corporate
4

11

Total other operating charges
$
128

$
121

During the three months ended March 28, 2014, the Company incurred other operating charges of $128 million, which consisted of charges of $86 million due to the Company's productivity and reinvestment program and $42 million due to the Company's other restructuring and integration initiatives, including the integration of our German bottling and distribution operations. Refer to Note 11 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and see below for additional information on our productivity, integration and restructuring initiatives. Refer to Note 15 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information related to the impact these charges had on our operating segments.
During the three months ended March 29, 2013, the Company incurred other operating charges of $121 million. These charges primarily consisted of $102 million due to the Company's productivity and reinvestment program and $21 million due to the Company's other restructuring and integration initiatives, including the integration of our German bottling and distribution operations. Refer to Note 11 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements and below for additional information on our productivity and reinvestment program as well as the Company's integration initiative in Germany. Refer to Note 15 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information related to the impact these charges had on our operating segments.
Productivity and Reinvestment Program
In February 2012, the Company announced a four-year productivity and reinvestment program. This program will further enable our efforts to strengthen our brands and reinvest our resources to drive long-term profitable growth. The first component of this program is a global productivity initiative that will target annualized savings of $350 million to $400 million. This initiative is focused on four primary areas: global supply chain optimization; global marketing and innovation effectiveness; operating expense leverage and operational excellence; and data and information technology systems standardization. The second component of our productivity and reinvestment program involves beginning a new integration initiative in North America related to our acquisition of Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc.'s ("CCE") former North America business. The Company has identified incremental synergies, primarily in the area of our North American product supply operations, which will enable us to better service our customers and consumers. We believe these efforts will create annualized savings of $200 million to $250 million.
As a combined productivity and reinvestment program, the Company anticipates generating annualized savings of $550 million to $650 million. The savings generated by this program will be reinvested in brand-building initiatives.
In February 2014, the Company announced the expansion of our productivity and reinvestment program to drive an incremental $1 billion in productivity by 2016 that will primarily be redirected into increased media investments. Our incremental productivity goal consists of two relatively equal components. First, expanded savings through global supply chain optimization data and information technology system standardization, and resource and cost reallocation. These savings will be reinvested in global brand-building initiatives, with an emphasis on increased media spending. Second, we will be increasing the effectiveness of our marketing investments by transforming our marketing and commercial model to redeploy resources into more consumer-facing marketing investments to accelerate growth.
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, the Company incurred expenses of $86 million related to our productivity and reinvestment program. We have incurred total pretax expenses of $850 million since the initiative commenced in 2012. Refer to Note 11 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements for additional information.

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Integration of Our German Bottling and Distribution Operations
The Company's integration initiatives include costs related to the integration of 18 German bottling and distribution operations acquired in 2007. The expenses recorded in connection with these integration activities have been primarily due to involuntary terminations. The Company began these integration initiatives in 2008 and has incurred total pretax expenses of $669 million related to this initiative since it commenced. The Company announced further plans in April 2014 which will result in future charges of approximately $50 million. We are currently reviewing additional restructuring opportunities within the German bottling and distribution operations, including integration costs related to information technology and other initiatives. If implemented, these initiatives will result in additional charges in future periods. However, as of March 28, 2014, the Company has not finalized any additional plans. Refer to Note 11 of Notes to Condensed Consolidated Financial Statements.
Operating Income and Operating Margin
Information about our operating income by operating segment on a percentage basis is as follows:
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Eurasia & Africa
12.7
%
11.7
%
Europe
30.3

28.4

Latin America
28.2

31.7

North America
18.0

14.2

Asia Pacific
23.4

25.0

Bottling Investments
(1.1
)
1.6

Corporate
(11.5
)
(12.6
)
Total
100.0
%
100.0
%
Information about our operating margin on a consolidated basis and by operating segment is as follows:
 
Three Months Ended
 
March 28,
2014

March 29,
2013

Consolidated
22.5
%
21.8
%
Eurasia & Africa
46.0
%
42.2
%
Europe
63.4

67.0

Latin America
61.1

65.9

North America
8.9

7.0

Asia Pacific
46.0

48.4

Bottling Investments
(1.6
)
1.9

Corporate
*

*

*
Calculation is not meaningful.
Three Months Ended March 28, 2014, versus Three Months Ended March 29, 2013
During the three months ended March 28, 2014, foreign currency exchange rates unfavorably impacted consolidated operating income by 11 percent due to a stronger U.S. dollar compared to certain foreign currencies, including the South African rand, Mexican peso, Brazilian real, Australian dollar and Japanese yen, which had an unfavorable impact on our Eurasia and Africa, Latin America, Asia Pacific and Bottling Investments operating segments. The unfavorable impact of a stronger U.S. dollar compared to the currencies listed above was partially offset by the impact of a weaker U.S. dollar compared to certain other foreign currencies, including the euro and U.K. pound sterling, which had a favorable impact on our Europe and Bottling Investments operating segments. Refer to the heading "Liquidity, Capital Resources and Financial Position — Foreign Exchange" below.
Operating income for the three months ended March 28, 2014, was unfavorably impacted by one fewer selling day when compared to the first quarter of 2013. This impact was disproportionately more unfavorable for our finished goods businesses, particularly in our North America and Bottling Investments operating segments.
The Company's Eurasia and Africa segment reported operating income of $303 million and $282 million for the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, respectively. The segment's 2014 operating income was unfavorably impacted by

34



fluctuations in foreign currency exchange of 16 percent. The unfavorable impact of the foreign currency was offset by favorable pricing across many of our markets.
Operating income for Europe for the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, was $719 million and $683 million, respectively. In 2014, Europe was favorably impacted by foreign currency fluctuations of 1 percent.
Latin America reported operating income of $668 million and $763 million for the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, respectively. Operating income in 2014 was unfavorably impacted by foreign currency exchange fluctuations of 21 percent, offset by favorable price mix in all of the segment's business units.
Operating income for North America for the three months ended March 28, 2014, and March 29, 2013, was $428 million and $341 million, respectively. Foreign currency fluctuations had a 1 percent unfavorable impact on North America's operating income in 2014. The operating segment was unfavorably impacted by one less selling day in 2014 as well as the shift in timing of Easter holiday sales which negatively impacted the first quarter of 2014. These unfavorable impacts were favorably offset b