S-1/A 1 forms-1a.htm

 

As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on September 29, 2023

 

Registration No. 333-270558

 

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

 

 

AMENDMENT NO. 6

TO

FORM S-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

 

 

AI TRANSPORTATION ACQUISITION CORP

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

 

 

Cayman Islands   6770   N/A

(State or other jurisdiction of

incorporation or organization)

 

(Primary Standard Industrial

Classification Code Number)

 

(I.R.S. Employer

Identification Number)

 

10 East 53rd Street, Suite 3001

New York, NY 10022

+ (86) 1350 1152063

(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)

 

Yongjin Chen

Chief Executive Officer

AI TRANSPORTATION ACQUISITION CORP

10 East 53rd Street, Suite 3001

New York, NY 10022

+ (86) 1350 1152063

(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)

 

Copies to:

 

Debbie A. Klis, Esq.

Rimon, P.C.

1990 K. Street, NW, Suite 420

Washington, DC 20006

Telephone: (202) 935-3390

 

Mitchell S. Nussbaum, Esq.
David J. Levine, Esq.
Loeb & Loeb LLP
345 Park Avenue
New York, NY 10154

Telephone: (212) 407-4000

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this registration statement.

 

If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933 check the following box. ☐

 

If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large-accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large-accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large-accelerated filer Accelerated filer
       
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
       
    Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act. ☐

 

The registrant hereby amends this registration statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this registration statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act, or until the registration statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 

 
 

 

The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.

 

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS   SUBJECT TO COMPLETION DATED SEPTEMBER 29, 2023

 

$50,000,000

 

 

AI TRANSPORTATION ACQUISITION CORP

 

5,000,000 Units

 

AI TRANSPORTATION ACQUISITION CORP is a newly incorporated blank check company incorporated as a Cayman Islands exempted company for the purpose of effecting a merger, share exchange, asset acquisition, share purchase, reorganization or similar business combination with one or more businesses or entities, which we refer to throughout this prospectus as our initial business combination. We have not selected any potential business combination target and we have not, nor has anyone on our behalf, initiated any substantive discussions, directly or indirectly, with any potential business combination target with respect to an initial business combination with us.

 

While we may pursue a target in any industry, section or geography, we intend to focus our search for a target business in the transportation field, including but not limited to logistics, new energy vehicles, smart parking, on-board chips and AI algorithms, automotive services and related areas of intelligent transportation. Artificial intelligence is shaping the future of humanity across nearly every industry; it is already the main driver of emerging technologies like big data, robotics and IoT (i.e., Internet of Things), and we believe it will continue to act as a technological innovator for the foreseeable future. We seek to identify, acquire and operate an intelligent transportation business using AI that may provide opportunities for attractive risk-adjusted returns, with a particular focus on opportunities aligned with these industries. Global population growth and continuing improvement in global living standards, particularly in developing nations, is expected to drive ongoing growth in demand for intelligent transportation through AI and AI-powered technologies both for commercial and personal uses.

 

We intend to source initial business combination opportunities through our management team’s extensive network of automotive and automotive-related sector business owners, public and private company executives and board members, investment bankers, private equity and debt investors, high net worth families and their advisors, commercial bankers, attorneys, management consultants, accountants and other transaction intermediaries. We believe this approach, as well as our management team’s recognized track record of completing acquisitions across a variety of subsectors within the automotive and automotive-related sector will provide meaningful opportunities to drive value creation for shareholders.

 

This is an initial public offering of our securities. Each unit has an offering price of $10.00 and consists of one ordinary share and one right entitling the holder thereof to receive one-eighth (1/8) of one ordinary share of upon consummation of our initial business combination, subject to adjustment as described in this prospectus. The underwriters have a 45-day option from the date of this prospectus to purchase up to an additional 750,000 units to cover over-allotments, if any.

 

 
 

 

We will provide our public shareholders with the opportunity to redeem all or a portion of their ordinary shares upon the completion of our initial business combination, subject to the limitations described herein. If we are unable to complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (or up to 18 months by means of up to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case), we will redeem 100% of the public shares at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account, including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our taxes (less up to $50,000 of interest to pay dissolution expenses), divided by the number of then outstanding public shares, subject to applicable law and certain conditions, as further described herein. In addition, we intend to issue a press release the day after the applicable deadline announcing whether the funds have been timely deposited. Public shareholders, in this situation, will not be offered the opportunity to vote on or redeem their shares.

 

Our Sponsor, AI TRANSPORTATION CORP, a newly-formed British Virgin Islands company, has agreed to purchase an aggregate of 259,000 placement units (or 277,750 placement units if the over-allotment option is exercised in full) at a price of $10.00 per unit, for an aggregate purchase price of $2,590,000 ($2,777,500 if the over-allotment option is exercised in full). Each placement unit will be identical to the units sold in this offering, except as described in this prospectus. The placement units will be sold in a private placement that will close simultaneously with the closing of this offering. Our Sponsor and certain of our officers and directors own an aggregate of 1,437,500 founder shares, up to 187,500 shares of which are subject to forfeiture depending on the extent to which the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised.

 

Our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC” or “China”). We face various legal and operational risks and uncertainties related to our significant ties to China. We are subject to complex and evolving laws and regulations in China. The PRC government has indicated an intent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, and initiated various regulatory actions and made various public statements, some of which are published with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, enhancing supervision over China-based companies listed overseas, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement. Moreover, PRC laws and regulations governing the PRC based business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain.

 

Because our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC, and due the various legal uncertainties arising in the PRC, we will face certain legal and operational risks following our initial public offering. As a result of these risks, a significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares may occur. Further, these risks could result in a material change in the value of our securities that we are registering for sale. In addition, these legal and operational risks could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors. Further, these legal and operational risks cause result in a material adverse change in our operations which could cause the value of our securities to decline significantly or even be worthless.

 

We may consider a business combination with an entity or business with a physical presence or other significant ties to China which may subject the post-business combination business to the laws, regulations and policies of China (including Hong Kong and Macao). In addition, given the risks and uncertainties of doing business in China discussed elsewhere in this prospectus, the location and ties of our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management to China may make us a less attractive partner to a target company not based in China, which may thus increase the likelihood that we will consummate a business combination with a target company that is located in China or not consummate a business combination at all. Our ties to the PRC may make us less likely to consummate a business combination with any target company outside of the PRC which may result in non-PRC target businesses having increased leverage over us in negotiating an initial business combination knowing that if we do not complete our initial business combination within a certain timeframe, we may be unable to complete our initial business combination with any target business. See “Risk Factors — The requirement that we complete an initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination may give potential target businesses leverage over us in negotiating a business combination and may limit the time we have in which to conduct due diligence on potential business combination targets as we approach our dissolution deadline, which could undermine our ability to complete our initial business combination on terms that would produce value for our shareholders.” on page 44 of this prospectus. If we fail to complete an initial business combination in the prescribed timeframe, we will cease all our operations and would redeem our public shares and liquidate, in which case our public shareholders may receive only $10.10 per share, or less than such amount in certain circumstances, based on the amount available in our trust account on a per share basis, and our rights will expire worthless. See “Risk Factors — We may not be able to complete our initial business combination within the prescribed time frame, in which case we would cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up and we would redeem our public shares and liquidate, in which case our public shareholders may receive only $10.10 per share, or less than such amount in certain circumstances, and our rights will expire worthless.” on page 45 of this prospectus.

 

Since a majority of our directors and officers have significant ties to China, the Chinese government may have potential oversight and discretion over the conduct of our directors’ and officers’ search for a target company. The Chinese government may intervene or influence our operations at any time through the directors and officers who have significant ties in China, which could result in a material change in our search for a target business and/or the value of the securities we are offering. Changes in the policies, regulations, rules, and the enforcement of laws of the PRC government may be adopted quickly with little advance notice and could have a significant impact upon our ability to operate and may limit or completely undermine our ability to search for a target company. Recently, the PRC government adopted a series of regulatory actions and issued statements to regulate business operations in China with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding the efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement. These recently enacted measures, and additional pending or future new measures which may be implemented, could materially and adversely affect our operations following our initial public offering and the operations of any post-business combination company, which we may acquire as our initial business combination, assuming we are able to complete our business combination successfully.

 

Further, our initial shareholders, including our Sponsor, will own approximately 20% of our issued and outstanding shares following this offering. As a result, we may be considered a “foreign person” under rules promulgated by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (“CFIUS”) and may not be able to complete an initial business combination with a U.S. target company since such initial business combination may be subject to U.S. foreign investment regulations and review by a U.S. government entity such as CFIUS), or ultimately prohibited. As a result, the pool of potential targets with which we could complete an initial business combination may be limited. See “Risk Factors — We may not be able to complete an initial business combination with a U.S. target company if such initial business combination is subject to U.S. foreign investment regulations and review by a U.S. government entity such as the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), or ultimately prohibited.” on page 71 of this prospectus. However, we will not conduct an initial business combination with any target company that conducts operations through variable interest entities (“VIEs”), which are a series of contractual arrangements used to provide the economic benefits of foreign investment in Chinese-based companies where Chinese law prohibits direct foreign investment in the operating companies.

 

If we were to complete a business combination with a Chinese entity, we could be subject to certain legal and operational risks associated with or having the majority of post-business combination operations in China. PRC laws and regulations governing the PRC based business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain, and as a result these risks may result in material changes in the operations of any post-business combination subsidiaries, significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares, or a complete hindrance of our ability to offer, or continue to offer, our securities to investors, including investors in the United States. Recently, the PRC government adopted a series of regulatory actions and issued statements to regulate business operations in China with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding the efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement. These recently enacted measures, and additional pending or future new measures which may be implemented, could materially and adversely affect the operations of any post-business combination company which we may acquire as our initial business combination.

 

As a result of our absolute position against doing a business combination with a company that conducts operations through a VIE, it may limit the pool of acquisition candidates we may acquire in the PRC, in particular, due to the relevant PRC laws and regulations against foreign ownership of and investment in certain assets and industries, known as restricted industries. Furthermore, this may also limit the pool of acquisition candidates we may acquire in the PRC relative to other special purpose acquisition companies that are not subject to such restrictions, which could make it more difficult and costly for us to consummate a business combination with a target business operating in the PRC relative to such other companies. See “Risk Factors — We will not conduct an initial business combination with any target company that conducts operations through VIEs, which may limit the pool of acquisition candidates we may acquire in the PRC and make it more difficult and costly for us to consummate a business combination with a target business operating in the PRC” on page 72.

 

 

 

 

The members of our Board of Directors and management team are located in China, they are citizens of China and/or their assets are located in China, and following completion of a business combination, we may conduct most of our operations in China and most of our assets may be located in China. Yongjin Chen, our Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Executive Director and Yun Wu, our Chief Financial Officer and Executive Director reside in mainland China. Our three independent director nominees, Wong Ping Kuen, Ka Cheong Leung and Dick Wai Mak, reside in Hong Kong. As a result, it may be difficult for you to effect service of process upon us or those persons residing in mainland China. Even with service of process, there is uncertainty as to whether courts in China would (i) recognize or enforce judgments of United States courts obtained against us or our directors or officers predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States or (ii) entertain original actions brought in China against us or our directors or officers predicated upon the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States.

 

Our Chief Executive Officer, Yongjin Chen, is a beneficial owner of our Sponsor, who is located in China and is a citizen of China. The Sponsor’s assets are located in China and, as a result, it may be difficult for you to effect service of process upon the Sponsor or those persons owning the Sponsor residing in mainland China. Our significant ties to China would make us a less attractive partner to a non-China-based target company and such perception may potentially limit or negatively impact our search for an initial business combination; or may therefore make it more likely for us to consummate a business combination with a company being based in or having the majority of the company’s operations in China (a “PRC Target Company”). Because we have significant ties to China, it is uncertain whether that would make us a less attractive partner to a non-China-based target company and such perception may potentially limit or negatively impact our search for an initial business combination; or may therefore make it more likely for us to consummate a business combination with a PRC Target Company.

 

PRC laws and regulations are sometimes vague and uncertain. If we complete a business combination with a PRC Target Company governed by PRC laws and regulations, such vagueness and uncertainty would result in significant depreciation of the value of our securities, or a complete hindrance of our ability to offer or continue to offer our securities to investors. Further, the Chinese government may intervene or influence the operations of a PRC Target Company or post-combination entity at any time and may exert more control over offerings conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in a PRC Target Company or post-combination entity, which could result in a material change in the operations of the PRC Target Company or post-combination entity, and/or the value of our securities.

 

In addition, any actions by the Chinese government to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based companies could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

Recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are provided for under China’s Civil Procedure Law. China’s courts may recognize and enforce foreign judgments in accordance with the requirements of the Civil Procedures Law based either on treaties between China and the country where the judgment is made or on reciprocity between jurisdictions. There are no treaties between China and the United States for the mutual recognition and enforcement of court judgments, thus making the recognition and enforcement of a U.S. court judgment against us or our directors or officers in China difficult. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Acquiring or Operating Businesses in the PRC” under the subheading “You may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments, or bringing actions in China against us or our management and directors named in the prospectus based on foreign laws. It may also be difficult for you or overseas regulators to conduct investigations or collect evidence within China” on page 75.

 

We are also subject to other risks and uncertainties about any future actions of the PRC government, which may result in a material change in operations of a target business. PRC laws and regulations are sometimes vague and uncertain, and therefore, these risks may result in a material change in operations of a target business, significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares, or a complete hindrance of our ability to offer or continue to offer our securities to investors. Recently, the PRC government initiated a series of regulatory actions and statements to regulate business operations in China with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, enhancing supervision over China-based companies listed overseas that use a VIE structure, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement.

 

Since these statements and regulatory actions are new, it is highly uncertain how soon legislative or administrative regulation-making bodies will respond and what existing or new laws or regulations or detailed implementations and interpretations will be modified or promulgated, if any, and the potential impact such modified or new laws and regulations will have on a China-based target company’s daily business operation, the ability to accept foreign investments and list on a U.S. or other foreign exchange. Additionally, if we effect our initial business combination with a business located in the PRC, the laws applicable to such business will likely govern all of our material agreements and we may not be able to enforce our legal rights.

 

There are uncertainties regarding the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws, rules and regulations which may have a material adverse impact on the value of our securities. If we enter into a business combination with a target business operating in China, cash proceeds raised from overseas financing activities, including this offering, may be transferred by us to any future PRC subsidiaries via capital contribution or shareholder loans, as the case may be. All these risks could result in a material change in our or the target company’s post-combination operations and/or the value of our ordinary shares or could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or become worthless.

 

Furthermore, the PRC government has significant authority to exert influence on the ability of a China-based company to conduct its business, make or accept foreign investments or list on a U.S. stock exchange. For example, if we enter into a business combination with a target business operating in China, the combined company may face risks associated with regulatory approvals of the proposed business combination between us and the target, offshore offerings, anti-monopoly regulatory actions, cybersecurity and data privacy. The PRC government may also intervene with or influence the combined company’s operations at any time as the government deems appropriate to further regulatory, political and societal goals.

 

The PRC government has recently published new policies that significantly affected certain industries such as the education and internet industries, and we cannot rule out the possibility that it will in the future release regulations or policies regarding any industry that could adversely affect our potential business combination with a PRC operating business and the business, financial condition and results of operations of the combined company. Any such action, once taken by the PRC government, could make it more difficult and costly for us to consummate a business combination with a target business operating in the PRC, result in material changes in the combined company’s post-combination operations and cause the value of the combined company’s securities to significantly decline, or in extreme cases, become worthless or completely hinder the combined company’s ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors. See “Risk Factors” beginning at page 41 and specifically at page 68 under the sub-heading “Risks Related to Acquiring or Operating Businesses in the PRC.”

 

 

 

 

On February 17, 2023, the China Securities Regulatory Commission (the “CSRC”) promulgated the Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Trial Measures”), which took effect on March 31, 2023. The Trial Measures supersede prior rules and clarified and emphasized several aspects, which include but are not limited to: (1) comprehensive determination of the “indirect overseas offering and listing by PRC domestic companies” in compliance with the principle of “substance over form” and particularly, an issuer will be required to go through the filing procedures under the Trial Measures if the following criteria are met at the same time: (a) 50% or more of the issuer’s operating revenue, total profit, total assets or net assets as documented in its audited consolidated financial statements for the most recent accounting year comes from PRC domestic companies, and (b) the main parts of the issuer’s business activities are conducted in mainland China, or its main places of business are located in mainland China, or the senior managers in charge of its business operation and management are mostly Chinese citizens or domiciled in mainland China; (2) exemptions from immediate filing requirements for issuers that (a) have already been listed or registered but not yet listed in foreign securities markets, including U.S. markets, prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, (b) are not required to re-perform the regulatory procedures with the relevant overseas regulatory authority or the overseas stock exchange, and (c) whose such overseas securities offering or listing shall be completed before September 30, 2023, provided however that such issuers shall carry out filing procedures as required if they conduct refinancing or are involved in other circumstances that require filing with the CSRC; (3) a negative list of types of issuers banned from listing or offering overseas, such as (a) issuers whose listing or offering overseas has been recognized by the State Council of the PRC as a possible threat to national security, (b) issuers whose affiliates have been recently convicted of bribery and corruption, (c) issuers under ongoing criminal investigations, and (d) issuers under major disputes regarding equity ownership; (4) issuers’ compliance with web security, data security, and other national security laws and regulations; (5) issuers’ filing and reporting obligations, such as the obligation to file with the CSRC after it submits an application for initial public offering to overseas regulators, and the obligation after offering or listing overseas to report to the CSRC material events including a change of control or voluntary or forced delisting of the issuer; and (6) the CSRC’s authority to fine both issuers and their shareholders between 1 and 10 million RMB for failure to comply with the Trial Measures, including failure to comply with filing obligations or committing fraud and misrepresentation.

 

We believe we are not required to obtain approvals from any PRC government authorities, including the CSRC or the Cyberspace Administration of China, or any other government entity, to issue our securities to foreign investors and to list on a U.S. exchange. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, sanctions or regulatory objection to this offering from the CSRC or any other PRC governmental authorities. However, applicable laws, regulations, or interpretations of the PRC may change, and the relevant PRC government agencies could reach a different conclusion and may subject us to a stringent approval process from the relevant government entities in connection with this offering, continued listing on a U.S. exchange, the potential business combination, the issuance of shares or the maintenance of our status as a publicly listed company outside China, and the post business combination entity’s PRC operations if our business combination target is a PRC Target Company. We may also be subject to registration with the CSRC following this Offering pursuant to the Trial Measures. It is uncertain when and whether we will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to continue to list on a U.S. exchange in the future and offer our securities to foreign investors. If approval is required in the future, including pursuant to the Trial Measures, and we are denied permission from Chinese authorities to list on U.S. exchanges or offer our securities to foreign investors, we may not be able to continue listing on a U.S. exchange or be subject to other severe consequences, which would materially affect the interest of the investors. In addition, any changes in PRC law, regulations, or interpretations may severely affect our operations after this offering. The use of the term “operate” and “operations” includes the process of searching for a target business and conducting related activities. To that extent, we may not be able to conduct the process of searching for a potential target company in China.

 

If we decide to consummate our initial business combination with a China-based company, the combined company may make capital contributions or extend loans to any future PRC subsidiaries through intermediate holding companies subject to compliance with relevant PRC foreign exchange control regulations. From our inception to the date of this prospectus, no dividends or distributions have been made. After the initial business combination, the combined company’s ability to pay dividends, if any, to the shareholders and to service any debt it may incur will depend upon dividends paid by any future PRC subsidiaries. Under PRC laws and regulations, PRC companies are subject to certain restrictions with respect to paying dividends or otherwise transferring any of their net assets to offshore entities. In particular, under the current PRC laws and regulations, dividends may be paid only out of distributable profits. Distributable profits are the net profit as determined under Chinese accounting standards and regulations, less any recovery of accumulated losses and appropriations to statutory and other reserves required to be made.

 

The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of Chinese currency (RMB) into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC and vice versa. Therefore, the post-combination entity may experience difficulties in completing the administrative procedures necessary to obtain and remit foreign currency for the payment of dividends from its profits, if any; or limit its ability to make loans to or inject capital into its WFOE if it wishes to transfer cash proceeds raised from overseas financing activities to the WFOE and then the VIE, if any.

 

A PRC company is required to set aside at least 10% of its after-tax profits each year to fund certain statutory reserve funds (up to an aggregate amount equal to half of its registered capital). As a result, the combined company’s PRC subsidiaries may not have sufficient distributable profits to pay dividends to the combined company. Furthermore, if certain procedural requirements are satisfied, the payment in foreign currencies on current account items, including profit distributions and trade and service related foreign exchange transactions, can be made without prior approval from the State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, or its local branches. However, where Renminbi (“RMB”), the legal currency of the PRC, is to be converted into foreign currency and remitted out of China to pay capital expenses, such as the repayment of loans denominated in foreign currencies, approval from or registration with competent government authorities or its authorized banks is required. The PRC government may take measures at its discretion from time to time to restrict access to foreign currencies for current account or capital account transactions.

 

If the foreign exchange control regulations prevent the PRC subsidiaries of the combined company from obtaining sufficient foreign currencies to satisfy their foreign currency demands, the PRC subsidiaries of the combined company may not be able to pay dividends or repay loans in foreign currencies to their offshore intermediary holding companies and ultimately to the combined company. We cannot assure you that new regulations or policies will not be promulgated in the future, which may further restrict the remittance of RMB into or out of the PRC. We cannot assure you, in light of the restrictions in place, or any amendment to be made from time to time, that the PRC subsidiaries of the combined company will be able to satisfy their respective payment obligations that are denominated in foreign currencies, including the remittance of dividends outside of the PRC.

 

For a detailed description of risks associated with the cash transfer through the post combination organization if we acquire a China-based target company, see “Transfers of Cash to and from our Post Business Combination Subsidiaries” on page 113 and “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Acquiring or Operating Businesses in the PRC” under the subheadings “Cash-Flow Structure of a Post-Acquisition Company Based in China” on page 76 and “Exchange controls that exist in the PRC may restrict or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to acquire a target company in the PRC and limit our ability to utilize our cash flow effectively following our initial business combination” on page 77. To date, we have not pursued an initial business combination and there have not been any capital contribution or shareholder loans by us to any PRC entities, we do not yet have any subsidiaries, and we have not received, declared or made any dividends or distributions.

 

 
 

 

Pursuant to the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (“HFCA Act”), the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (the “PCAOB”) issued a Determination Report on December 16, 2021 which found that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms headquartered in (1) mainland China of the PRC because of a position taken by one or more authorities in mainland China and (2) Hong Kong, a Special Administrative Region and dependency of the PRC, because of a position taken by one or more authorities in Hong Kong. In addition, the PCAOB’s report identified the specific registered public accounting firms which are subject to these determinations.

 

In December 2020, Congress enacted the HFCA Act, and the SEC released interim final amendments that begin to address the components of this Act. In November 2021, the SEC approved PCAOB Rule 6100, which establishes a process for determining which registered public accounting firms the board is unable to inspect or investigate completely. In December 2021, the SEC adopted amendments to finalize its rules under the HFCA Act that set forth submission and disclosure requirements for commission-identified issuers identified under the Act, specify the processes by which the SEC will identify and notify Commission-Identified Issuers, and implement trading prohibitions after three consecutive years of identification.

 

In December 2022, Congress passed the omnibus spending bill and the President signed it into law. This spending bill included the enactment of provisions to accelerate the timeline for implementation of trading prohibitions from three years to two years. Separately, on December 15, 2022, the PCAOB published its determination that in 2022, the PCAOB was able to inspect and investigate completely registered public accounting firms headquartered in mainland China and Hong Kong. This determination reset the now two-year clock for compliance with the trading prohibitions for identified issuers audited by these firms. The amendment had originally been passed by the U.S. Senate in June 2021, as the “Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act.”

 

Our auditor, MaloneBailey, LLP, is a United States accounting firm and is subject to regular inspection by the PCAOB. MaloneBailey, LLP is not headquartered in mainland China or Hong Kong and was not identified as a firm subject to the PCAOB’s Determination Report announced on December 16, 2021. As a result, we do not believe that HFCA Act and related regulations will affect us. Nevertheless, trading in our securities may be prohibited under the HFCA Act if the PCAOB determines that it cannot inspect or fully investigate our auditor, and that as a result an exchange may determine to delist our securities. Moreover, on August 26, 2022, the PCAOB signed a Statement of Protocol with the China Securities Regulatory Commission and the Ministry of Finance of the People’s Republic of China – the first step toward opening access for the PCAOB to inspect and investigate registered public accounting firms headquartered in mainland China and Hong Kong completely, consistent with U.S. law. The Statement of Protocol is intended to grant to the PCAOB complete access to the audit work papers, audit personnel, and other information it needs to inspect and investigate any firm it chooses, with no loopholes and no exceptions.

 

Currently, there is no public market for our units, ordinary shares or rights. We intend to apply to have our units approved for listing on The Nasdaq Capital Market (“Nasdaq”) under the symbol “AITRU” on or promptly after the date of this prospectus. We expect the ordinary share and rights comprising the units will begin separate trading on the 52nd day following the date of this prospectus (or if such date is not a business day, the following business day) unless EF Hutton, informs us of its decision to allow earlier separate trading, subject to our filing a Current Report on Form 8-K with the Securities and Exchange Commission containing an audited balance sheet reflecting our receipt of the gross proceeds of this offering and issuing a press release announcing when such separate trading will begin. Once the securities comprising the units begin separate trading, we expect that the ordinary shares and rights will be listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “AITR,” and “AITRR” respectively.

 

We are an “emerging growth company” and a “smaller reporting company” under applicable federal securities laws and will be subject to reduced public company reporting requirements. Investing in our securities involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 43 for a discussion of information that should be considered in connection with an investment in our securities. Investors will not be entitled to protections normally afforded to investors in blank check offerings by Rule 419 under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

 
 

 

No offer or invitation to subscribe for securities is being made to the public in the Cayman Islands.

 

   Per Unit   Total 
Public offering price  $10.00   $50,000,000 
Underwriting discounts and commissions(1)  $0.45   $2,250,000 
Proceeds, before expenses, to AI TRANSPORTATION ACQUISITION CORP  $9.55   $47,550,000 

 

(1) Includes $0.20 per unit, or $1,000,000 (or $1,150,000 if the over-allotment option is exercised in full) in the aggregate, payable to the underwriters for deferred underwriting commissions to be placed in a trust account located in the United States as described herein. The deferred commissions will be released to the representative of the underwriters only on completion of an initial business combination, as described in this prospectus, which does not include certain fees and expenses payable to the underwriters in connection with this offering. In addition, designees of the representative of the underwriters will receive an aggregate of 50,000 ordinary shares (or up to 57,500 ordinary shares if the over-allotment option is exercised in full), which we refer to herein as the “representative shares” as compensation in connection with this offering. See the section of this prospectus entitled “Underwriting” beginning on page 177 for a description of compensation and other items of value payable to the underwriters.

 

Of the proceeds we receive from this offering and the sale of the placement units described in this prospectus, $50,500,000 or $58,075,000 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($10.10 per unit in either case), will be deposited into a segregated trust account located in the United States with JP Morgan Chase and with Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company acting as trustee.

 

Except with respect to interest earned on the funds held in the trust account that may be released to us to pay our taxes, our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that the proceeds from this offering and the sale of the placement units, will not be released from the trust account until the earliest of (a) the completion of our initial business combination; and (b) the redemption of all of our public shares if we have not completed our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriter exercises the overallotment in full). The proceeds deposited in the trust account could become subject to the claims of our creditors, if any, which could have priority over the claims of our public shareholders.

 

The underwriters expect to deliver the units to the purchasers on or about ________, 2023.

 

EF Hutton

 

division of Benchmark Investments, LLC

 

The date of this prospectus is ________, 2023

 

 
 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS 1
SUMMARY 2
RISK FACTORS 43
USE OF PROCEEDS 88
DIVIDEND POLICY 91
DILUTION 91
CAPITALIZATION 93
MANAGEMENTS DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 94
PROPOSED BUSINESS 100
MANAGEMENT 134
PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS 145
CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS 147
DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES 149
TAXATION 166
UNDERWRITING 177
LEGAL MATTERS 185
EXPERTS 185
WHERE YOU CAN FIND ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 185
INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS F-1

 

We are responsible for the information contained in this prospectus. We have not authorized anyone to provide you with different information, and we take no responsibility for any other information others may give to you. We are not, and the underwriters are not, making an offer to sell securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than the date on the front of this prospectus.

 

Trademarks

 

This prospectus contains references to trademarks and service marks belonging to other entities. Solely for convenience, trademarks and trade names referred to in this prospectus may appear without the ® or TM symbols, but such references are not intended to indicate, in any way, that the applicable licensor will not assert, to the fullest extent under applicable law, its rights to these trademarks and trade names. We do not intend our use or display of other companies’ trade names, trademarks or service marks to imply a relationship with, or endorsement or sponsorship of us by, any other companies.

 

 
 

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

Some of the statements contained in this prospectus may constitute “forward-looking statements.” Our forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements regarding our or our management team’s expectations, hopes, beliefs, intentions or strategies regarding the future. In addition, any statements that refer to projections, forecasts or other characterizations of future events or circumstances, including any underlying assumptions, are forward-looking statements. The words “anticipate,” “believe,” “continue,” “could,” “estimate,” “expect,” “intends,” “may,” “might,” “plan,” “possible,” “potential,” “predict,” “project,” “should,” “would” and similar expressions may identify forward-looking statements, but the absence of these words does not mean that a statement is not forward-looking. Forward-looking statements in this prospectus may include, for example, statements about:

 

  our ability to complete our initial business combination;
     
  our success in retaining or recruiting, or changes required in, our officers, key employees or directors following our initial business combination;
     
  our ability to consummate an initial business combination due to the uncertainty resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic;
     
  our officers and directors allocating their time to other businesses and potentially having conflicts of interest with our business or in approving our initial business combination;
     
  our potential ability to obtain additional financing to complete our initial business combination;
     
  our pool of prospective target businesses;
     
  the ability of our officers and directors to generate a number of potential investment opportunities;
     
  our public securities’ potential liquidity and trading;
     
  the lack of a market for our securities;
     
  negative interest rate for securities in which we invest the funds held in the trust account;
     
  the use of proceeds not held in the trust account or available to us from interest income on the trust account balance;
     
  the trust account not being subject to claims of third parties; or
     
  our financial performance following this offering.

 

The forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus are based on our current expectations and beliefs concerning future developments and their potential effects on us. There can be no assurance that future developments affecting us will be those that we have anticipated. These forward-looking statements involve a number of risks, uncertainties (some of which are beyond our control) or other assumptions that may cause actual results or performance to be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, those factors described under the section of this prospectus entitled “Risk Factors.” Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should any of our assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary in material respects from those projected in these forward-looking statements. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable securities laws.

 

1

 

 

SUMMARY

 

This summary only highlights the more detailed information appearing elsewhere in this prospectus. You should read this entire prospectus carefully, including the information under “Risk Factors” and our financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus, before investing.

 

Unless otherwise stated in this prospectus, or the context otherwise requires, references to:

 

  “Companies Act” are to the Companies Act (Revised) of the Cayman Islands, as the same may be amended from to time;
     
 

“company” are to AI TRANSPORTATION ACQUISITION CORP;

     
  “directors” are to our current directors and our independent director nominees named in this prospectus;
     
  “equity-linked securities” are to any debt or equity securities that are convertible, exercisable or exchangeable for our ordinary shares issued in connection with our initial business combination including but not limited to a private placement of equity or debt;
     
  “founder” are to Mr. Yongjin Chen, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Executive Director of the company;
     
  “founder shares” are to the 1,437,500 ordinary shares initially issued to our sponsor in a private placement prior to this offering, which include up to an aggregate of 187,500 ordinary shares subject to forfeiture by our insiders to the extent that the underwriters’ over-allotment option is not exercised in full or only in part (for the avoidance of doubt, the founder shares will not be “public shares”);
     
  “initial shareholders” are to our sponsor and any other holders of our founder shares prior to this offering (or their permitted transferees);
     
  “insiders” refer to our officers, directors, our sponsor and any future holder of our founder shares;
     
  “letter agreement” refer to the letter agreement, the form of which is filed as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part;
     
  “management” or “management team” are to our executive officers, directors, director nominees, and to our advisors unless otherwise specified;
     
  “memorandum and articles of association” are to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to be in effect upon the effectiveness of this offering;
     
  “ordinary shares” are to our ordinary shares, par value $0.0001;
     
  “period to consummate the initial business combination” are to the period of within 12 months from the closing of this offering subject to extension to a maximum of 18 months by up to six one-month extensions as specifically set forth in our proxy statement;
     
  “placement rights” are to our rights which are included within the placement units being purchased by our sponsor in the private placement;
     
  “placement shares” are to our ordinary shares included within the placement units being purchased by our sponsor in the private placement;
     
  “placement units” are to the units being purchased by our sponsor, with each placement unit consisting of one placement share and one placement right to acquire 1/8th of one ordinary share;

 

2

 

 

  “private placement” are to the private placement of 259,000 placement units at a price of $10.00 per unit, for an aggregate purchase price of $2,590,000 (or up to 277,750 units for an aggregate purchase price of up to $2,777,500 if the over-allotment option is exercised in full), which will occur simultaneously with the completion of this offering;
     
  “public rights” are to the rights sold as part of the units in this offering (whether they are subscribed for in this offering or acquired in the open market;
     
  “public shares” are to our ordinary shares sold as part of the units in this offering (whether they are purchased in this offering or thereafter in the open market);
     
  “public shareholders” are to the holders of our public shares, including our sponsor and management team to the extent our sponsor and/or members of our management team purchase public shares, provided that our sponsor’s and each member of our management team’s status as a “public shareholder” will only exist with respect to such public shares;
     
  “representative” are to EF Hutton, division of Benchmark Investments, LLC, which is the representative of the underwriters in this offering;
     
  “representative shares” are to the 50,000 ordinary shares to be issued (or 57,500 ordinary shares if the over-allotment option is exercised in full) to the representative and/or its designees in connection with this offering;
     
  “rights” are to our rights, which include the public rights as well as the placement rights to the extent they are no longer held by the initial purchasers of the placement units or their permitted transferee;
     
 

“sponsor” are to AI TRANSPORTATION CORP, a British Virgin Islands company, of which our Chief Executive Officer, Yongjin Chen, is a beneficial owner;

     
  “trust account” are to the segregated trust account located in the United States with JP Morgan Chase and with Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company acting as trustee, into which we will deposit certain proceeds from this offering and the sale of the placement units;
     
  “underwriter” are to EF Hutton, division of Benchmark Investments, LLC, the representative of the underwriters of this offering; and
     
 

“we,” “us,” “Company” or “our company” are to AI TRANSPORTATION ACQUISITION CORP, a Cayman Islands exempted company.

 

Any forfeiture of shares described in this prospectus will take effect as a surrender of shares for no consideration of such shares as a matter of Cayman Islands law. Any conversion of the founder shares described in this prospectus will take effect as a compulsory redemption of founder shares and an issuance of ordinary shares as a matter of Cayman Islands law. Any share dividends described in this prospectus will take effect as share capitalizations as a matter of Cayman Islands law. Unless we tell you otherwise, the information in this prospectus assumes that the underwriters will not exercise their over-allotment option and that our sponsor will forfeit 187,500 founder shares following the closing of this offering.

 

3

 

 

GENERAL

 

Overview

 

We are a newly organized blank check company incorporated as a Cayman Islands exempted company formed for the purpose of effecting a merger, capital share exchange, asset acquisition, share purchase, reorganization or similar business combination with one or more businesses, which we refer to throughout this prospectus as our “initial business combination.” We intend to focus our search for a target business in the AI transportation industry, specifically focused on logistics, new energy vehicles, smart parking, on-board chips, AI algorithms, automotive services, and other types of “intelligent transportation.” We believe that deep learning, reinforced learning, big data, cloud computing, IoT, and other cutting-edge technologies, such as that promoted by the Institute for AI Research in the field of AI+Transportation, which focuses on self-driving, smart traffic network and cooperative vehicle infrastructure, will facilitate overcoming key technological obstacles to building intelligence into cities’ transportation network, restructuring the smart transportation ecosystem, and realizing safer, greener, more comfortable and efficient travel. To date, our efforts have been limited to organizational activities as well as activities related to our offering. We have not selected any potential business combination target and we have not, nor has anyone on our behalf, initiated any substantive discussions, directly or indirectly, with any potential business combination target.

 

Our Objective

 

Mobility is the lifeblood of communities, but it is not just about building roads, transport is about creating thriving communities and propelling economies. We see transport quickly evolving, adapting and shaping megatrends, from urbanization to climate change to digital transformation. Transport, data, and income are growing inseparable. Already, we see this in ride sharing and the doorstep delivery of goods purchased online. GPS is driving GDP in a very real sense. No vision for mobility is transformative or possible if it does not encompass the world’s most pressing challenges.

 

Our management team believes that the AI era will not only profoundly change and influence the consumer sector, but also revolutionize it. Under the persistent influence of disruptive technologies, aspects of society can improve through new levels of efficiency, productivity and convenience. Presently, AI is the main trend of future scientific and technological development.1 Many in the transportation sector have already identified the infinite potential of AI, with the global market forecast to reach $3,870,000,000 by 2026.2 Transportation is fundamental to supporting economic growth, creating jobs and connecting people to essential services such as healthcare or education. But in many developing countries, the benefits are not being realized, as more than one billion people still live more than 2 kilometers from an all-weather road, where lack of access is inextricably linked to poverty and one in six women globally do not look for jobs out of fear of harassment in transit.3 Road crashes claim more than 1.35 million lives annually, however 93% of the deaths occur in developing countries.4 There is also an urgent need to reduce the climate impact of transport, as domestic and international transport already contribute to more than 23% of global greenhouse gas (“GHG”) emissions.5 As populations, economies, and the need for mobility grow, GHG emissions from transport could increase by as much as 60% by 2050 if left unchecked.6

 

When it comes to transportation, developing countries face a dual challenge: ensuring everyone has access to efficient, safe, and affordable mobility, and doing so with a much smaller climate footprint. Ambitious investments in solutions such as high-quality public transport, well-connected cities, non-motorized transport options, and cleaner technologies can help achieve development progress and climate targets simultaneously.7

 

 

1 The Future of AI: How Artificial Intelligence Will Change the World | Built In

2 AI In Transportation Market | Size, Share, Growth | 2022 to 2027 (marketdataforecast.com)

3 WBTransportNarrative.pdf (worldbank.org)

4 Global Road Safety Facility | GRSF

5 Decarbonising Transport initiative | ITF (itf-oecd.org)

6 See Id.

7 Global Facility to Decarbonize Transport (GFDT) (worldbank.org)

 

4

 

 

Our management team, as well as industry experts, believe that technological innovation through intelligent transportation has endless possibilities with a pressing need to decrease congestion, increase efficiency, transition to the use of sustainable materials, reduce contribution to pollution and increase transportation availability to those in underserved communities. The application of AI in the transportation industry can be seen as a process from internet technology to operational technology to evolutionary technology. Initially, the transportation industry must invest significant resources to realize informationization and digitization, in order to mine data value, export products and services, and form a standardized operation process and model in order to achieve intelligence. Digitalization, intelligence and automation are the main themes of global industrial development and the mainstream trends in the digital information era. Our management team believes that future investment, construction and application of the intelligent transportation to this industry will need comply with this trend.

 

Global population growth and continuing improvement in global living standards, particularly in developing nations, is expected to drive ongoing growth in demand for AI and AI powered technologies, including in the automobile sector, both for commercial and personal uses. In light of this, we intend to capitalize on the team’s broader experience and connections in the AI and technology industries to identify, acquire and operate a business that may provide opportunities for attractive risk-adjusted returns, with a particular focus on opportunities aligned with AI, technology and transportation. Our management team believes this area of focus represents a growing, favorable and highly fragmented market opportunity to consummate a business combination.

 

We have not identified any particular geographical area or country in which we may seek a business combination. However, our sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in China. We may consider a business combination with an entity or business with a physical presence or other significant ties to China, including Hong Kong and Macau, which may subject the post-business combination business to the laws, regulations and policies of China. Any target for a business combination may conduct operations through subsidiaries in China. The legal and regulatory risks associated with doing business in China discussed in this prospectus may make us a less attractive partner in an initial business combination than other special purpose acquisition companies that do not have any ties to China. As such, our ties to China may make it harder for us to complete an initial business combination with a target company without any such ties.

 

Since a majority of our directors and officers have significant ties to China, the Chinese government may have potential oversight and discretion over the conduct of our directors’ and officers’ search for a target company. The Chinese government may intervene or influence our operations at any time through the directors and officers who have significant ties in China, which could result in a material change in our search for a target business and/or the value of the securities we are offering. Changes in the policies, regulations, rules, and the enforcement of laws of the PRC government may be adopted quickly with little advance notice and could have a significant impact upon our ability to operate and may limit or completely stop our ability to search for a target company.

 

We face various legal and operational risks and uncertainties related to our significant ties to China. We are subject to complex and evolving laws and regulations in China. The PRC government has indicated an intent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, and initiated various regulatory actions and made various public statements, some of which are published with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, enhancing supervision over China-based companies listed overseas, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement. Moreover, PRC laws and regulations governing the PRC based business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain.

 

Because our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC, and due the various legal uncertainties arising in the PRC, we will face certain legal and operational risks following our initial public offering. As a result of these risks, a significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares may occur. Further, these risks could result in a material change in the value of our securities that we are registering for sale. In addition, these legal and operational risks could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors. Further, these legal and operational risks cause result in a material adverse change in our operations which could cause the value of our securities to decline significantly or even be worthless.

 

Further, our initial shareholders, including our Sponsor, will own approximately 20% of our issued and outstanding shares following this offering. As a result, we may be considered a “foreign person” under rules promulgated by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (“CFIUS”) and may not be able to complete an initial business combination with a U.S. target company since such initial business combination may be subject to U.S. foreign investment regulations and review by a U.S. government entity such as CFIUS), or ultimately prohibited. As a result, the pool of potential targets with which we could complete an initial business combination may be limited. In addition, we will not conduct a business combination with any target company that conducts operations through variable interest entities (“VIEs”), which are a series of contractual arrangements used to provide the economic benefits of foreign investment in Chinese-based companies where Chinese law prohibits direct foreign investment in the operating companies. As a result, this may limit the pool of acquisition candidates we may acquire in the PRC, in particular, relative to other special purpose acquisition companies that are not subject to such restrictions, which could make it more difficult and costly for us to consummate a business combination with a target business operating in the PRC relative to such other companies.

 

The members of our Board of Directors and management team are located in China, they are citizens of China and/or their assets are located in China, and following completion of a business combination, we may conduct most of our operations in China and most of our assets may be located in China. Yongjin Chen, our Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Board of Directors and Executive Director and Yun Wu, our Chief Financial Officer and Executive Director reside in mainland China. Our three independent director nominees, Wong Ping Kuen, Ka Cheong Leung and Dick Wai Mak, reside in Hong Kong. As a result, it may be difficult for you to effect service of process upon us or those persons residing in mainland China. Even with service of process, there is uncertainty as to whether courts in China would (i) recognize or enforce judgments of United States courts obtained against us or our directors or officers predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States or (ii) entertain original actions brought in China against us or our directors or officers predicated upon the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States.

 

Our Chief Executive Officer, Yongjin Chen, is a beneficial owner of our Sponsor, who is located in China and is a citizen of China. The Sponsor’s assets are located in China and, as a result, it may be difficult for you to effect service of process upon the Sponsor or those persons owning the Sponsor residing in mainland China. Our significant ties to China would make us a less attractive partner to a non-China-based target company and such perception may potentially limit or negatively impact our search for an initial business combination; or may therefore make it more likely for us to consummate a business combination with a company being based in or having the majority of the company’s operations in China (a “PRC Target Company”). Because we have significant ties to China, it is uncertain whether that would make us a less attractive partner to a non-China-based target company and such perception may potentially limit or negatively impact our search for an initial business combination; or may therefore make it more likely for us to consummate a business combination with a PRC Target Company.

 

PRC laws and regulations are sometimes vague and uncertain. If we complete a business combination with a PRC Target Company governed by PRC laws and regulations, such vagueness and uncertainty would result in significant depreciation of the value of our securities, or a complete hindrance of our ability to offer or continue to offer our securities to investors. Further, the Chinese government may intervene or influence the operations of a PRC Target Company or post-combination entity at any time and may exert more control over offerings conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in a PRC Target Company or post-combination entity, which could result in a material change in the operations of the PRC Target Company or post-combination entity, and/or the value of our securities.

 

In addition, any actions by the Chinese government to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based companies could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

If we were to complete a business combination with a Chinese entity, we could be subject to certain legal and operational risks associated with or having the majority of post-business combination operations in China. PRC laws and regulations governing PRC based business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain, and as a result these risks may result in material changes in the operations of any post-business combination subsidiaries, significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares, or a complete hindrance of our ability to offer, or continue to offer, our securities to investors, including investors in the United States. Recently, the PRC government adopted a series of regulatory actions and issued statements to regulate business operations in China with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding the efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement.

 

Since these statements and regulatory actions are new, it is highly uncertain how soon legislative or administrative regulation-making bodies will respond and what existing or new laws or regulations or detailed implementations and interpretations will be modified or promulgated, if any, and the potential impact such modified or new laws and regulations will have on a China-based target company’s daily business operation, the ability to accept foreign investments and list on a U.S. or other foreign exchange. Additionally, if we effect our initial business combination with a business located in the PRC, the laws applicable to such business will likely govern all of our material agreements and we may not be able to enforce our legal rights. There are uncertainties regarding the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws, rules and regulations which may have a material adverse impact on the value of our securities. If we enter into a business combination with a target business operating in China, cash proceeds raised from overseas financing activities, including this offering, may be transferred by us to any future PRC subsidiaries via capital contribution or shareholder loans, as the case may be. All these risks could result in a material change in our or the target company’s post-combination operations and/or the value of our ordinary shares or could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors and cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or become worthless.

 

Furthermore, the PRC government has significant authority to exert influence on the ability of a China-based company to conduct its business, make or accept foreign investments or list on a U.S. stock exchange. For example, if we enter into a business combination with a target business operating in China, the combined company may face risks associated with regulatory approvals of the proposed business combination between us and the target, offshore offerings, anti-monopoly regulatory actions, cybersecurity and data privacy. The PRC government may also intervene with or influence the combined company’s operations at any time as the government deems appropriate to further regulatory, political and societal goals.

 

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The PRC government has recently published new policies that significantly affected certain industries such as the education and internet industries, and we cannot rule out the possibility that it will in the future release regulations or policies regarding any industry that could adversely affect our potential business combination with a PRC operating business and the business, financial condition and results of operations of the combined company. Any such action, once taken by the PRC government, could make it more difficult and costly for us to consummate a business combination with a target business operating in the PRC, result in material changes in the combined company’s post-combination operations and cause the value of the combined company’s securities to significantly decline, or in extreme cases, become worthless or completely hinder the combined company’s ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors. See “Risk Factors” beginning at page 41 and specifically at page 68 under the sub-heading “Risks Related to Acquiring or Operating Businesses in the PRC.”

 

On February 17, 2023, the China Securities Regulatory Commission (the “CSRC”) promulgated the Trial Administrative Measures of Overseas Securities Offering and Listing by Domestic Companies (the “Trial Measures”), which took effect on March 31, 2023. The Trial Measures supersede the prior rules and clarified and emphasized several aspects, which include but are not limited to: (1) comprehensive determination of the “indirect overseas offering and listing by PRC domestic companies” in compliance with the principle of “substance over form” and particularly, an issuer will be required to go through the filing procedures under the Trial Measures if the following criteria are met at the same time: (a) 50% or more of the issuer’s operating revenue, total profit, total assets or net assets as documented in its audited consolidated financial statements for the most recent accounting year comes from PRC domestic companies, and (b) the main parts of the issuer’s business activities are conducted in mainland China, or its main places of business are located in mainland China, or the senior managers in charge of its business operation and management are mostly Chinese citizens or domiciled in mainland China; (2) exemptions from immediate filing requirements for issuers that (a) have already been listed or registered but not yet listed in foreign securities markets, including U.S. markets, prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, (b) are not required to re-perform the regulatory procedures with the relevant overseas regulatory authority or the overseas stock exchange, and (c) whose such overseas securities offering or listing shall be completed before September 30, 2023, provided however that such issuers shall carry out filing procedures as required if they conduct refinancing or are involved in other circumstances that require filing with the CSRC; (3) a negative list of types of issuers banned from listing or offering overseas, such as (a) issuers whose listing or offering overseas has been recognized by the State Council of the PRC as a possible threat to national security, (b) issuers whose affiliates have been recently convicted of bribery and corruption, (c) issuers under ongoing criminal investigations, and (d) issuers under major disputes regarding equity ownership; (4) issuers’ compliance with web security, data security, and other national security laws and regulations; (5) issuers’ filing and reporting obligations, such as the obligation to file with the CSRC after it submits an application for initial public offering to overseas regulators, and the obligation after offering or listing overseas to report to the CSRC material events including a change of control or voluntary or forced delisting of the issuer; and (6) the CSRC’s authority to fine both issuers and their shareholders between 1 and 10 million RMB for failure to comply with the Trial Measures, including failure to comply with filing obligations or committing fraud and misrepresentation.

 

We believe we are not required to obtain approvals from any PRC government authorities, including the CSRC or the Cyberspace Administration of China (“CAC”), or any other government entity, to issue our securities to foreign investors and to list on a U.S. exchange. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, sanctions or regulatory objection to this offering from the CSRC or any other PRC governmental authorities. However, applicable laws, regulations, or interpretations of the PRC may change or we could be mistaken about these rules applicability, and the relevant PRC government agencies could reach a different conclusion and may subject us to a stringent approval process from the relevant government entities in connection with this offering, continued listing on a U.S. exchange, the potential business combination, the issuance of shares or the maintenance of our status as a publicly listed company outside China, and the post business combination entity’s PRC operations if our business combination target is a PRC Target Company. If the CSRC or the CAC, or any other governmental or regulatory body subsequently determines that its approval is needed for this offering, a business combination, the issuance of our ordinary shares upon exercise of the rights, or maintaining our status as a publicly listed company outside China, we may face approval delays, adverse actions or sanctions by the CSRC, CAC and/or other PRC regulatory agencies. It is uncertain whether we will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to continue to list on a U.S. exchange in the future and offer our securities to foreign investors. If approval is required in the future, including pursuant to the Trial Measures, and we are denied permission from Chinese authorities to list on U.S. exchanges or offer our securities to foreign investors, we may not be able to continue listing on a U.S. exchange or be subject to other severe consequences, which would materially affect our ability to complete a business combination in which case we may have to liquidate which would be adverse to the interests of the investors. In addition, any changes in PRC law, regulations, or interpretations may severely affect our operations after this offering. The use of the term “operate” and “operations” includes the process of searching for a target business and conducting related activities. To that extent, we may not be able to conduct the process of searching for a potential target company in China.

 

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China, or any other government entity, to issue our securities to foreign investors and to list on a U.S. exchange. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, sanctions or regulatory objection to this offering from the CSRC or any other PRC governmental authorities. However, applicable laws, regulations, or interpretations of the PRC may change, and the relevant PRC government agencies could reach a different conclusion and may subject us to a stringent approval process from the relevant government entities in connection with this offering, continued listing on a U.S. exchange, the potential business combination, the issuance of shares or the maintenance of our status as a publicly listed company outside China, and the post business combination entity’s PRC operations if our business combination target is a PRC Target Company. We may also be subject to registration with the CSRC following this Offering pursuant to the Trial Measures. It is uncertain when and whether we will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to continue to list on a U.S. exchange in the future and offer our securities to foreign investors. If approval is required in the future, including pursuant to the Trial Measures, and we are denied permission from Chinese authorities to list on U.S. exchanges or offer our securities to foreign investors, we may not be able to continue listing on a U.S. exchange or be subject to other severe consequences, which would materially affect the interest of the investors. In addition, any changes in PRC law, regulations, or interpretations may severely affect our operations after this offering. The use of the term “operate” and “operations” includes the process of searching for a target business and conducting related activities. To that extent, we may not be able to conduct the process of searching for a potential target company in China.

 

If we decide to consummate our initial business combination with a China-based company, the combined company may make capital contributions or extend loans to any future PRC subsidiaries through intermediate holding companies subject to compliance with relevant PRC foreign exchange control regulations. From our inception to the date of this prospectus, no dividends or distributions have been made. After the initial business combination, the combined company’s ability to pay dividends, if any, to the shareholders and to service any debt it may incur will depend upon dividends paid by any future PRC subsidiaries. Under PRC laws and regulations, PRC companies are subject to certain restrictions with respect to paying dividends or otherwise transferring any of their net assets to offshore entities. In particular, under the current PRC laws and regulations, dividends may be paid only out of distributable profits. Distributable profits are the net profit as determined under Chinese accounting standards and regulations, less any recovery of accumulated losses and appropriations to statutory and other reserves required to be made.

 

The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of Chinese currency (RMB) into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC and vice versa. Therefore, the post-combination entity may experience difficulties in completing the administrative procedures necessary to obtain and remit foreign currency for the payment of dividends from its profits, if any; or limit its ability to make loans to or inject capital into its WFOE if it wishes to transfer cash proceeds raised from overseas financing activities to the WFOE and then the VIE, if any.

 

In summary, there are numerous risks and uncertainties related to doing business in China including:

 

  The approval of the CSRC, CAC or other PRC government authorities may be required in connection with our offshore offerings, in connection with this registration statement, under PRC law, and, if required, we cannot predict whether or for how long we will be able to obtain such approval;
     
  Adverse changes in political and economic policies or political or social conditions of the PRC government could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth of China, which could reduce the demand for our services and adversely affect our competitive position;
     
  Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could limit legal protections available to you and us;
     
  PRC government has significant oversight over the conduct of our business; and
     
  It may be difficult for overseas regulators to conduct investigations or collect evidence within China
     
  PRC companies in certain business sectors are required to undergo national security review or obtain clearance from relevant authorities if necessary before making any filings with the CSRC.
     
  PRC companies must comply with national secrecy and data security laws with respect to any data disclosure.
     
  CSRC has the authority to and may block offshore listings that: (1) are explicitly prohibited by laws; (2) may endanger national security; (3) involve criminal offenses such as corruption, bribery, embezzlement, misappropriation of property by the issuer, its controlling persons (with a three-year lookback); (4) involve the issuer under investigations for suspicion of criminal offenses or major violations of laws and regulations; or (5) involve material ownership disputes.

 

For a detailed description of risks associated with our significant ties to or a potential acquisition of a target business in China, see “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Acquiring or Operating Businesses in the PRC” commencing on page 68.

 

Our Management Team

 

Our management team is led by Yongjin Chen, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Executive Director, and Yun Wu, Chief Financial Officer and Executive Director.

 

Yongjin Chen, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman and Executive Director. Mr. Chen resides in Beijing, China, and brings more than two decades of experience in finance and technology. He is currently a partner at ShuiMu United (Beijing) Investment Management Co., Ltd., where he has served since July 2017. At ShuiMu United, Mr. Chen has worked with investors in the technology space. Prior to that, Mr. Chen was a founding partner responsible for fundraising, investment management and other aspects of funds at Beijing D&S Capital Management Co., Ltd., where he served from February 2014 to July 2017. From November 2015 to December 2016, Mr. Chen was the CEO of Beijing Heima Financial and a Managing Partner at the Beijing Heima Fund. From November 2014 to November 2015, he was an Executive Director at Yajie Angel Investment Management (Beijing) Co., Ltd. Mr. Chen started his career as the founder and general manager of HanYu Century (Beijing) Information Technology Co., Ltd. where he developed and operated a web-based virtual community called “Giant Bubble” from January 2007 to November 2014.

 

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Mr. Chen holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Tsinghua University’s School of Mechanical Engineering (2000), an MBA from Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management (2015) and a Master’s Degree from Peking University’s Guanghua School of Management (2022).

 

Yun Wu, Chief Financial Officer and Executive Director. Ms. Wu resides in Beijing, China and brings more than two decades of experience in finance, e-commerce and technology companies. She is currently an accounting supervisor at ShuiMu United (Beijing) Investment Management Co., Ltd., where she has served since April 2018 establishing and improving the company’s accounting management and financial management system, preparing and summarizing financial statements and working with audits. At ShuiMu United, Ms. Wu has also undertaken the due diligence review of government guide funds and has formulated tax financial plans for the company. Prior to that, she was a general ledger accountant at Beijing Dong Qiu Di Technology Co., Ltd. from August 2015 to April 2018, where she was responsible for the financial processing of the e-commerce department, amongst other duties.

 

At Beijing Dong, Ms. Wu also handled and maintained financial aspects of the business including high-tech management and subsequent maintenance and annual audits and tax settlements of domestic and foreign companies. From March 2015 to July 2015, Ms. Wu was a finance supervisor at Beijing Tiantian Fresh Technology Co., Ltd. and from March 2010 to February 2015, she was a finance supervisor at Reisi Interactive (Beijing) Consulting Co., Ltd. At Beijing Tiantian, Ms. Wu was responsible for improving the company’s financial system and sales performance rules, daily business transaction contracts, and daily accounting treatment, among other obligations. At Reisi Interactive, Ms. Wu was responsible for the daily tax work of the company, outsourcing project financial analysis and preparing annual, quarterly and monthly cash flow budgets, among other obligations.

 

Ms. Wu holds a Bachelor’s Degree from Nanjing University (2006) and various accounting certificates, including an intermediate accounting qualification certificate (2022), a fund qualification certificate (2018), an accounting primary qualification certificate (2013) and an accounting professional qualification certificate (2012).

 

Our Independent Director Nominees

 

Wong Ping Kuen (Ricky), Independent Director Nominee and Chair of the Audit Committee. Mr. Kuen resides in Hong Kong and is currently the Managing Director at Ceres Asset Management Limited, where he has been in charge of information systems since September 2019. Mr. Kuen is also currently a Managing Director of Credito Capital Group, which he founded in September 2015, and which manages various funds, including Beijing Credito Capital Investment Fund Management Co Ltd. and Nanjing Credito Capital Investment Fund Management Co Ltd. Nanjing Credito Capital established, managed and exited a semiconductor early stage fund and Credito Capital Consulting and Appraisal Limited, another one of Credito Capital Group’s entities, provides bond issuances, IPOs, M&A and restructuring consulting for clients in China, Hong Kong and the US. Mr. Kuen is also currently an Executive Director at Dolphio Tech Limited and an Independent Director at Sino Harbour Holdings Group Limited, where he has served since June 2022 and June 2020, respectively. From December 2011 to July 2014, Mr. Kuen was a financial controller at Sunz (China) Holdings Group, where he was involved on various M&A projects, and from September 2008 to November 2011, he was a Senior Associate at Deloitte Touche Tohmatsu. At Sunz, Mr. Kuen also sourced, analyzed and executed various merger and acquisition projects, and at Deloitte, Mr. Kuen engaged in statutory assurance services for public and private companies including Hong Kong-listed and multinational corporations in China.

 

Mr. Kuen holds a Bachelor of Business Administration in Accounting and Information Science from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (2008), an MBA from Peking University (2013), an MBA from National University of Singapore (2015) and is a Certified Public Accountant of the Hong Kong Institute of Certified Public Accountants (since 2011).

 

Ka Cheong Leung (Alex), Independent Director Nominee and Chair of the Compensation Committee. Mr. Leung resides in Hong Kong and is currently the Chief Operating Officer of Ceres Asset Management Limited, where he has been since September 2021. As the COO of Ceres, Mr. Leung manages and supervises daily fund operations, procedures and risk control guidelines and oversees middle office and funds control along with the company’s investment team. Prior to that, Mr. Leung was the Vice President of Beijing Credito Capital Investment Fund Management Limited, from August 2018 to September 2021, where he conducted research and performed due diligence on investment targets and consulted and advised on business strategy and investments. From January 2017 to July 2018, Mr. Leung was a corporate finance analyst at Cypress House Capital Limited where he advised on transactions under Hong Kong Listing Rules and Codes on Takeovers and Mergers. At Cypress House, Mr. Leung also structured and executed corporate finance engagements for Hong Kong listed companies. Mr. Leung was also an assistant manager for audit financial services at KPMG from April 2015 to January 2017 and a senior associate at PricewaterhouseCoopers from September 2012 to April 2015.

 

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Mr. Leung holds a Bachelors of Business Administration in Professional Accounting from The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (2012) and is a qualified member of the HKICPA (2017).

 

Dick Wai Mak (David), Independent Director Nominee and Chair of the Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee. Mr. Mak resides in Hong Kong and is currently the Chief Operating Officer of Yao Teng Investment Fund SPC where he has been since April 2020. At Yao Teng, a mutual fund established in the Cayman Islands, Mr. Mak is involved in the operation of the fund in collaboration with the investment manager, fund administrator and fund advisor. Mr. Mak is also responsible for identifying potential projects, valuation and structure investment. Mr. Mak is also currently an external consultant and Senior Vice President at Credito Capital Group, where he has been since April 2017. Credito focuses on setup and management of industry specific private equity funds in logistics, technology and smart retails. Mr. Mak is responsible at Credito for identifying potential projects, valuation and fundraising strategy.

 

From March 2014 to February 2017, Mr. Mak was the Chief Operating Officer at KIDBOT, an interactive content, service and technology product provider for children. At KIDBOT, Mr. Mak was in charge of education hardware development and business channel networks in China and Hong Kong. Prior to that, Mr. Mak was the Managing Director at Wisefield Consulting Group Ltd. and Nippon Circuits Ltd., from November 2010 to February 2014 and May 2003 to October 2010, respectively. At Wisefield Consulting, Mr. Mak implemented marketing strategy and channel sales programs to support clients, among other roles, and at Nippon Circuits, Mr. Mak and his team successfully developed major global EMS (Electronics Manufacturing Services) and OEM (Original Equipment Manufacturer) accounts, including for many technology companies.

 

Mr. Mak holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics from the University of San Diego (1994) and a Master of Science in Financial Management from the University of London (2003).

 

We believe that our independent director nominees will provide public company governance, executive leadership, operational oversight, private equity investment management and capital markets experience. Our directors have experience with acquisitions, divestitures and corporate strategy and implementation, which we believe will significantly benefit us as we evaluate potential acquisition or merger candidates as well as following the completion of our initial business combination.

 

We believe our management team is well positioned to take advantage of the growing set of acquisition opportunities focused on the intelligent transportation sector and that our contacts and relationships, ranging from owners and management teams of private and public companies, private equity funds, investment bankers, attorneys, to accountants and business brokers will allow us to generate an attractive transaction for our shareholders.

 

In addition, our sponsor has engaged the services of ARC Group Limited to provide financial advisory services to our sponsor in connection with this offering, which services include an analysis of markets, positioning, financial models, organizational structure and capital requirements as well as assistance with the public offering process including assisting in the preparation of financial information and statements.

 

The past performance of the members of our management team, our sponsor’s financial advisor or their affiliates is not a guarantee that we will be able to identify a suitable candidate for our initial business combination or of success with respect to any business combination we may consummate. You should not rely on the historical record of the performance of our management team or any of its affiliates’ performance as indicative of our future performance.

 

Each of our officers and directors may become an officer or director of another special purpose acquisition company with a class of securities intended to be registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act, even before we have entered into a definitive agreement regarding our initial business combination. For more information, see the section of this prospectus entitled “Management — Conflicts of Interest” and see “Risk Factors.”

 

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Market and Industry Opportunity

 

The transportation industry has undergone multiple changes and revolutions over the last few hundred years—and we are now at the stage where major breakthroughs are being achieved in the form of AI in transportation. Whether via self-driving cars for more reliability, road condition monitoring for improved safety, or traffic flow analysis for more efficiency, AI is catching the eye of transportation bosses around the world. Transportation is becoming increasingly intelligent as automobile companies, cities and infrastructure have begun to deploy technology and data in order to achieve better products, services and utilization. These trends are propelling shifts and the formation of new and exciting trends in the industry, including new types of vehicle manufacturers, sensor technology that mimics and surpasses human capabilities, and much more.

 

We believe that our integrated AI transportation industry opportunities include:

 

Smart city construction involves AI. AI in the promotion and development of smart transportation products in various application fields. From the start of intelligent transportation construction, to the expansion of smart transportation concepts, the industry application has gradually become deeper and more comprehensive. Smart cities take in data from every available input— intelligent sensors, microphones, traffic signals, cameras, embedded devices on public transit—then analyze the data with AI and share it through open data pools. This creates a constant awareness of conditions that can be used for traffic management, route planning, public safety, and emergency response.

 

Together, these intelligent sensors, microphones, and cameras can power a model of what’s happening on a city’s streets, highways, and rail lines in near-real time. With the help of AI, this awareness can transform passive traffic management into active intelligent transportation systems. These systems can anticipate congestion, automatically reroute traffic, retime lights, and apply dynamic tolling to help keep the city moving. The city of Bangkok, Thailand, is saving more than 51,000 commuter hours a year and reducing traffic delays up to 24.5 percent with just three smart intersections.8

 

AI technology helps industry intelligence to upgrade. The transportation products in smart cities has been continuously improved, and digital monitoring technology has become increasingly mature. The large-scale application of AI technology in the transportation market has promoted the upgrading of traditional transportation industrialization and further promoted the scale of the AI transportation industry. In the AI transportation industry chain, upstream software algorithms are the basis for the development of AI transportation based on the development of AI technology.

 

AI transportation information safety issues will become key targets. In the context of global network integration, the use of new generation information technologies such as big data, the Internet of Things and AI has made the world enter the information age, and information security issues have gradually attracted the attention of countries, enterprises and individuals. The protection of information security has become an important key factor in the development and construction of intelligent transportation. In the future, as technologies such as AI, big data and information security gradually mature, the construction and development of intelligent transportation will become safer and more stable.

 

Intelligent transportation is a new generation of smart civil infrastructure that integrates IoT, big data, AI, advanced sensing technologies, automated piloting, green energy, and sustainable and resilient materials working together to achieve high-quality road service and efficient operations. As a future trend, it will significantly change the form of traditional transportation infrastructures. Intelligent transportation systems involve advanced applications that aim to provide innovative services relating to different modes of transport and traffic management and enable users to be better informed and make safer, more coordinated, and “smarter” use of transport networks.

 

Key Technologies for Upgrading Urban Mobility

 

  Embedded Smart City Devices and Systems – Cities already collect massive amounts of data through existing systems like traffic and public safety cameras. Incremental upgrades can transform them into intelligent nodes in a smart city fabric.
     
  Everywhere AI – To function in near-real time, intelligent transportation systems need immediate insight and analysis. That requires processing AI workloads at the edge, on a smart device itself, or on a nearby AI appliance.
     
  Faster, More-Reliable Connectivity – 5G promises to speed cellular data transfer rates and improve stability. Software can help orchestrate and manage edge network services for even better performance.

 

  Open, Integrated Data Pools – Smart city and intelligent transportation data isn’t worth much if citizens, first responders, and businesses can’t access it. Ingesting, cleaning, aggregating, and sharing data through a single shared pool is critical to improving mobility and reducing congestion and pollution.
     
  Hardware-Based Data Security – As intelligent technologies spread and interconnect, cities have to secure thousands of embedded devices and protect public and private data as it moves through the system. Hardware-based security protocols harden systems and help protect data.

 

 

8 Intel. “Paving the Way Forward.” May 2020.

 

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However, due to the high complexity of intelligent transportation systems, the challenges are also tremendous. The basic theories, key methods, and technologies are still developing. The construction of a large-scale, usable, and complete intelligent transportation systems are still being explored. To promote such processes, the cross-disciplinary cooperation, complex system simulation and control, ultra-large-scale data communication and processing, and distributed management will be highly involved.

 

Mobility is one of the greatest challenges for smart cities. While technologies like the IoT have paved the way for intelligent transportation systems that leverage data and sensors to create smart mobility solutions, gaps still remain. Leveraging the capabilities of IoT-enabled intelligent transportation systems with Virtual Reality (“VR”) and predictive analytics, a team in China combined the artificial and physical elements of a transportation system to develop a Parallel Transportation System (“PTS”) aimed at transforming how city planners approach urban mobility. These IoT-driven systems have already made headway in many cities. They connect physical assets, such as connected vehicles, traffic systems, and infrastructure elements, and also connect social systems, such as economic development, emergency management, and urban planning.

 

Leveraging these deep sensing capabilities, the team’s PTS creates an artificial or virtual model of a city’s physical transportation system that runs and interacts parallel to the actual system. Instead of having the artificial model follow the physical system, like in most transportation simulations, the team’s approach instead opts for the physical transport system to live up to the artificial one. By conducting computational experiments, the team is able to predict changes in mobility and evaluate traffic control plans. Not only does this improve current transportation management, but it also expands the opportunities for building smarter and better connected cities.

 

Outline of the Architecture of the Parallel Transportation System

 

 

As with any intelligent transportation systems, IoT acts as the main driving force for seamlessly integrating the physical world with the virtual one. In the physical world, sensors around the city or embedded in mobile devices communicate with each other to form a distributed sensor network that collects regional traffic information, including traffic flow, occupancy, average speed, vehicle trajectory, and more.9 Data is also collected from social sensors, signals, and networking platforms such as Facebook and Twitter, where citizens share information in real-time. The data collected from the surrounding environments is then used to build an accurate representation in the virtual world using VR and AI. Creating artificial traffic scenarios also allowed the team to generate and experiment with extensive virtual data, saving them time and minimizing costs when compared to the relatively “small” information collected from a city’s physical transport system.

 

 

9 Creating Smarter Cities Using Artificial Transportation Systems | Innovate (ieee.org)

 

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North America is expected to dominate the intelligent transportation systems market in the next few years due to the development of various regulations to ensure safety, compliance and accountability. Strong economic conditions and high disposable income in North America are also dominant factors in the industry’s growth including with a source of funding for research and development. To ensure the safety of passengers, some new features are becoming mandatory in car manufacturing that involve intelligent transportation systems, which means the AI market is expected to grow in the next few years.

 

Analysis and market development in the United States show that robots and AI have unlimited economic potential globally, especially for the European Union (“EU”). The latest 2019-2024 edition of the Non-European Cost Map estimates that the efficiency of the European economy could increase by $20.6 billion by 2025 if appropriate EU policies are introduced to promote and regulate AI technologies. The latest report by the McKinsey Global European Commission Institute estimates that the various high-impact technologies with net economic impact on the EU through 2030 will shape Europe’s economy and society with a possible value of 2.2 billion cumulative additional GDP or an increase of 14.1% compared to 2017. Many of these high-impact technologies are critical to artificial intelligence and robotics in the transportation sector. Examples of technologies and infrastructure include AI, big data analytics, the internet of things and the internet and infrastructure (such as 5G and above), while examples of high-impact application technologies include autonomous mobility and smart cities.10

 

Key trends and areas of development include:

 

  Autonomous Driving — AD technology aims to minimize human negligence and errors to create safer roads. Comprehensive AI algorithms aim to take over the task of driving with advanced driver assistance systems (“ADAS”) to push the industry towards fully autonomous vehicles. AI, combined with smart sensors accelerate advancements in the mobility industry.
     
  Internet of Things — Vehicles exchange data with a central hub, as well as each other, through cellular, Wi-Fi, and satellite communications. There are various ways to enable connectivity in mobility, for example, “built-in” with embedded original equipment manufacturer, or OEM, solutions or “brought-in” with smartphone-based apps. IoT connectivity enables easy tracking of vehicular data for various use cases such as insurance, driver safety, predictive maintenance, and fleet management.
     
  Electric Mobility Advancements — To accelerate the growth of e-mobility and promote sustainable mobility, advances have to be spurred in electric drive solutions, electric vehicle, or EV, charging, and infrastructure, as well as data analytics and security. Despite the numerous benefits of EVs to the environment, there still remain many hurdles for their adoption. Startups globally develop solutions to enable the widespread adoption of EVs by providing efficient batteries and charging infrastructure. At the same time, emerging companies are manufacturing electric vehicles of all sizes to streamline the logistics sector and reduce harmful emissions.
     
  Mobility as a Service — Integrating various modes of transportation into a single mobility service presents a user-centric approach to mobility. Mobility-as-a-Service, or MaaS, offers value-added services through the use of a single application to adopt and maintain a user-centric approach. Customers use a sole payment channel instead of multiple ticketing and payment operations, allowing for convenience and efficient planning. MaaS also introduces new business models to operate different transport options, reduce congestion and remove capacity constraints. Among the multiple benefits that MaaS offers, easy route planning and simplified payments are the keys that make this an emerging mobility trend. According to Emergen Research, the Global Mobility as a Service Market will reach $523.61 billion by 2027, driven by the convergence and the growth of the telecom sector and the transportation industry. Transport authorities, governments, customers, and businesses have started understanding the ample potential for unlocking various opportunities. There has been a surge in the awareness for the adoption of a user-centric approach to look at the mobility opportunities provided to customers as a part of a wider, integrated system.
     
  Micromobility — Micromobility solutions are also fuel-efficient and do not use fossil fuel-based energy. Bicycles, which are conventionally popular for urban commuting, also help solve the first and last-mile commute and delivery challenges by providing a low cost, easily accessible means of short distance transport. Furthermore, e-bikes, which are lightweight and faster than bicycles, may attract more city-dwellers to switch to a more convenient form of transportation for their daily commute.

 

 

10 Tatjana Evas and Aleksandra Heflich, Artificial intelligence in road transport, Jan 2021.

 

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  Artificial Intelligence — AI is gaining in functionality and applicability with the refinement of machine learning algorithms. AI creates new applications in the mobility industry with robotic automation and advanced data analytics. Particularly, AI is the base for fully autonomous driving, image recognition, predictive maintenance, and in-vehicle experiences. These solutions guide self-driving cars, manage fleets, assist drivers to improve safety and improve services such as vehicle inspection or insurance. AI also finds applications in automotive manufacturing, where it accelerates the rate of production and helps reduce costs. As in many other industries, AI is also part of the top mobility industry trends.
     
  Smart Infrastructure — This is widely acknowledged as the foundation for building smart cities. It extends not only to smart roads, automated parking, and IoT but also to all the various signals and signs along the roadside that provide information to drivers and vehicles. AI-based driving systems utilize a broad range of advanced sensors to understand their environment and make data-driven decisions. For example, sensors factor in road signs and other visual information to make an optimal driving decision. Startups develop many solutions for smart infrastructure and smart roads to enable vehicles to communicate with their environment and reduce the burden on drivers.
     
  Augmented & Virtual Reality — A big challenge for the mobility industry is reducing road accidents due to human negligence. Startups may develop AR solutions to restrict the number of distractions for a driver. For example, heads-up displays (“HUDs”) limit the attention of drivers from their dashboards to their windshields by providing the required information on their windshields. AR-based applications also allow automotive companies to provide simulations when the customers or cars are not present in a showroom. These applications may improve customer experiences by allowing car owners to remotely inspect their cars. Startups may also work on AR/VR solutions to ease the complications encountered by a technician during maintenance.

 

Analysts are also forecasting substantial growth in key sectors of the mobility industry, for example:

 

Electric Vehicles — According to Meticulous Research®, the EV market is expected to grow at a CAGR of 33.6% from 2020 to reach $2,495.4 billion by 2027. By volume, it is expected to reach 233.9 million units by 2027 (CAGR of 21.7%). Growth of the EV market is mainly attributed to factors such as supportive government policies and regulations promoting the adoption of EVs, increasing investments by leading automotive OEMs, rising environmental concerns regarding automotive emissions, and the decreasing prices of batteries. However, the lack of charging infrastructure and standardization remains a challenge. The increasing adoption of electric mobility in emerging economies and the growing adoption of autonomous driving vehicles are projected to provide significant growth opportunities for vendors operating in this market. Some of the major trends that may support the growth of this market are the growing deployment of charging stations by retail multinational corporations, or MNCs, increasing adoption of shared mobility, and increasing deployment of smart charging systems. The market research firm IDTechEx estimates EVs will constitute up to 80% of the global market by 2040 (Electric Vehicles, Land, Sea & Air, 2021-2024, IDTech Master Report).

 

Advanced Driver Assistance — ADAS are electronic systems in a vehicle that use advanced technologies to assist drivers and increase car and road safety. These technologies work to mitigate accidents due to human error and are among the fastest-growing segments in automotive electronics. The ADAS sensor market is predicted to grow to $40.8 billion in 2030 from $11.5 billion in 2019 (CAGR of 11.7%)11.

 

In addition, in the last decade, energy storage technology has been extensively researched and developed in the long term.12 Energy storage technology is no longer limited to being a mobile power source. It has many applications in all aspects of the power system. For the power generation side, energy storage units consume renewable energy and provide virtual rotational inertia to the power system as backup capacity on the grid side. Energy storage units are mainly used for frequency regulation of the power system and to achieve spatial and temporal load balancing. For the customer side, energy storage units are mainly used for emergency backup and tariff management, and energy storage technology can also improve the power quality on the customer side.

 

 

11 Prescient & Strategic Intelligence, ADAS Sensor Market.

12 See e.g., Boicea, V.A., Energy storage technologies: The past and the present, 2014; Ursua, A.; Gandia, L.M.; Sanchis, P., Hydrogen Production from Water Electrolysis: Current Status and Future Trends, 2012; Rajeshwar, K.; McConnell, R.; Licht, S., Solar Hydrogen Generation. Toward A Renewable Energy Future, 2008; Wu, X.; Li, H.; Wang, X.; Zhao, W., Cooperative Operation for Wind Turbines and Hydrogen Fueling Stations With On-Site Hydrogen Production, 2020.

 

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With the development of power transmission technology and power electronics, the electrification of rail transit has become a vital crossover direction and a hot technological growth point in the transport sector and the electrical sector.13 On the one hand, electrified drives reduce the use of mechanical structures such as drive bearings and internal combustion engines, reducing the size of the powertrain. The superior speed control performance of electric motors is unmatched by internal combustion engines, which brings technical advantages to the performance indicators of electrified transport. On the other hand, transportation electrification reduces the direct use of fossil fuels and greenhouse gas emissions, achieving good environmental benefits. The cost of power transmission is lower than that of fossil fuel transportation, which significantly reduces the energy cost of electrified transportation.

 

Intelligent transportation systems technologies have the potential to integrate vehicles (transit, trucks, and personal vehicles), system users, and infrastructure (roads and transit). Automated and in-vehicle technologies include precision docking for buses, automated guideways, and collision avoidance systems. Many intelligent transportation systems technologies can help to optimize trips (route guidance), diminish unnecessary miles traveled, increase other mode use, reduce time spent in congestion, reduce dependence on foreign oil, and improve air quality. Furthermore, when intelligent transportation systems technologies are applied to system management (transit and highways) and vehicle design, they can reduce fuel consumption by:

 

  facilitating optimal route planning and timing;
  smoothing accelerations/decelerations and stop-and-go driving;
  reducing congestion;
  enabling pricing and demand management strategies;
  increasing the attractiveness of public transportation mode use;
  adjusting vehicle transmission for varying road conditions and terrain;
  facilitating small platoons of closely spaced vehicles (i.e., safer vehicles could enable weight reduction without compromising occupant safety).

 

Acquisition Strategy

 

In line with our strategy, we have identified the following general criteria and guidelines that we believe are important to assess future business objectives. We intend to use these standards and guidelines to assess acquisition opportunities, but we may decide to conduct our initial business merger with target businesses that does not meet these standards and guidelines.

 

We believe that in the AI transportation industry, a considerable number of target companies can benefit from the large-scale operation of new capital and the integration of production and transportation, which we believe will bring considerable revenue and revenue growth.

 

We intend to acquire one or more businesses that have one or more of the following characteristics:

 

  AI transportation businesses. We will look for companies that are or may enter the AI transportation field, and these companies can benefit from the deep operating experience of our management team and the huge industry network. In addition, our operational and financial experience in automotive and automotive related areas will enable us to effectively assess the reliability of potential target business plans, the ability to manage execution, and the potential impact of future mobility trends. The collective image of our management team enables us to effectively work diligently, quickly evaluate opportunities and identify opportunities for shareholder value creation.
     
  Growth of the business. We believe that growth focuses on future growth, not the past, and we must look at the future from the perspective of ceiling theory. Growth needs to be qualitative and cannot be accurately quantified. For emerging industries, the reference of historical data is of little significance. For mature industries, longer historical data (preferably covering a complete economic cycle) can provide some clues, which is still necessary as a reference.

 

 

13 See e.g., D’Ovidio, G.; Masciovecchio, C.; Rotondale, N., City Bus Powered by Hydrogen Fuel Cell and Flywheel Energy Storage System; In Proceedings of the Electric Vehicle Conference, 2014; Abdelrahman, A.S.; Attia, Y.; Woronowicz, K.; Youssef, M. Z., Hybrid Fuel Cell/Battery Rail Car: A Feasibility Study, 2016.

 

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  Barriers to entry. We believe that companies need to find their own position, find their core competitiveness, or competitive advantage, and build their own competitive barriers.
     
  Core competencies. We believe that only companies with core and competitive capabilities can succeed. Core competitiveness includes shareholder structure, founders, core teams, research and development capabilities, professionalism, and business management models. For example, the founder and core team, the personnel matching team has more advantages, in addition, the quality, character, and business capabilities of enterprise leaders are the core influencing factors in the development of the enterprise.
     
  Consolidation opportunities. We will seek businesses that can lay a solid foundation for industry consolidation and expansion.
     
  Can benefit from becoming a listed company. We will seek businesses that can benefit from listed companies, including wider access to equity and debt capital markets, a public image related to listed companies, and stricter governance disciplines compared with private companies.

 

The foregoing standards and guidelines are not exhaustive. Any assessment relating to the benefits of a particular initial business merger may be based on these general criteria and guidelines as well as other considerations, criteria and guidelines that our management may consider relevant.

 

Our acquisition strategy is to identify an untapped opportunity within the intelligent transportation systems and mobility industry and offer a public-ready business, a facility through which to enter the public sphere, access capital markets, and advance its priorities. We intend to focus on companies that have a solid technological foundation and promising market opportunities, which have so far refrained from becoming public for a variety of reasons. We hope to serve as an attractive partner for those companies, enabling them to go public in an alternate, more easily accessible manner — a business combination transaction — and to thereby benefit from the capital-raising options available for a publicly traded company in the U.S.

 

Our sponsor’s participants and their affiliates have extensive experience and expertise in strategic investments in public and private companies where they have a strong investment conviction driven by clearly identifiable growth opportunities. We will apply a similar investment philosophy and approach to analyze prospective targets and identify an attractive business combination.

 

Investment Strategy

 

The experience and networks of the members of our team represents one of the key elements in our investment strategy. We believe that we can provide target companies with significant added value, which may represent a decisive competitive advantage when compared to other SPACS. Our management team has experience as well as knowledge of technology industries having developed, built and been actively involved in companies building solutions in the transportation and related sectors. We recognize that often company founders who conceive and develop outstanding technologies do not have the necessary market knowledge and business experience to build a strong team and successfully convert their technology into commercial products. We believe we can provide relevant experience to the founders of a target company in a business combination.

 

We are confident of our ability to bring significant added value to acquisition targets, including:

 

  Access to our Networks. We have well established contacts at the senior level with executives in technology and other relevant sectors, which relationships could be relied upon to open doors and facilitate business development opportunities, receive feedback on the attractiveness and potential of the products and so on.
     
  Management Mentoring. Relying on our management team and affiliates’ deep management and technology experience, we can advise and participate in management discussions, giving the benefit of our experience and technological knowledge.
     
  Facilitate Capital Market Opportunities. Considering and implementing corporate finance activities, including identifying and executing merger opportunities between companies in the transportation and technology sectors with strong synergies where the pooling of resources could well bring about economies of scale and significant increases in enterprise value.

 

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We have identified the following general, non-exclusive criteria and guidelines that we believe are important in evaluating prospective targets for our initial business combination. We will use these criteria and guidelines in evaluating acquisition opportunities, but we may decide to enter into our initial business combination with a target that does not meet one or more of these criteria and guidelines. Essentially we will seek good companies, with strong growth potential, having a management team that demonstrates openness to accept advice and to reassess objectives in light of changing market circumstances. We intend to focus on target businesses or assets with the following attributes:

 

  Large Markets. We intend to target companies that operate or will operate in a large addressable market in the AI and transportation sectors and related technologies.
     
  Middle-Market Businesses. We believe that the middle-market segment provides the greatest number of opportunities for investment and is consistent with our sponsor’s participants’ investment history across the various technology segments. These segments are where our management team has the strongest capability to identify attractive opportunities. We will seek to acquire potential target businesses which can use the funding we bring to achieve value-creating milestones.
     
  Established Platform at Inflection Point of Growth. Collectively, our management team and board has meaningful experience operating and investing in a broad range of technology businesses. We believe that our broad understanding of companies operating in the transportation ecosystem, including connected, autonomous, shared and electric focused mobility businesses, uniquely positions us to identify companies at the center of AI and transportation trends and identify opportunities where capital deployment can be most impactful.
     
  Benefit from Being a Public Company. We will seek potential target businesses with technological or other competitive advantages in the markets in which they operate that can benefit from a broader access to capital, and the heightened public profile associated with being a publicly traded company. It is likely that companies will have been planning a public issue as their preferred medium-long term financing strategy.
     
  Technology-Driven Business Model. We will seek to acquire potential target businesses with pioneering technologies in the AI and transportation sectors, where we are able to utilize our industry knowledge and contacts to validate the value proposition and provide added value.
     
  Competitive Edge. We aim to target companies that are set up for long term growth and as such, have a competitive edge. This may include first to market, network effects, lead in technology or access to the key customers.
     
  Experienced Management Team. A target company’s management team and engineering/technical teams will be a key part of our evaluation. The right combination of management and technical expertise at a target company will be the key to long term success for these types of companies. Our management team and our board have significant experience in understanding such companies and evaluating a company’s management and technical expertise. The team must be suitable as a candidate for a public listing.
     
  Significant Growth Prospects. We will look to select a target business expected to have significant embedded and/or underexploited growth opportunities; with near- and longer-term valuation inflection points that will allow them to reap the advantages and acceleration of having access to public capital markets. It will be important to see that the availability of investment will accelerate the growth path.

 

We may use other criteria and guidelines as well. Any evaluation relating to the merits of a particular initial business combination may be based on these general criteria and guidelines as well as other considerations, factors, and criteria that our management may deem relevant. If we decide to enter an initial business combination with a target business that does not meet the above criteria and guidelines, we will disclose that fact in our shareholder communications related to the acquisition. As discussed elsewhere in this prospectus, this would be in the form of proxy solicitation materials or tender offer documents that we would file with the SEC.

 

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In evaluating a prospective target business, we expect to conduct a comprehensive due diligence review. That due diligence review may include, among other things, financial statement analysis, IPO readiness assessment, business practices integration analysis, document reviews, meetings with the target’s management and other employees, inspection of facilities, consultations with relevant industry experts, competitors, customers, and suppliers, as well as a review of additional information (operational, financial, legal and otherwise) that we will seek to obtain as part of our analysis of a target company.

 

Transfers of Cash to and from our Post Business Combination Subsidiaries

 

To date, we have not pursued an initial business combination and there have not been any capital contributions or shareholder loans by us to any PRC entities, we do not yet have any subsidiaries, and we have not received, declared or made any dividends or distributions. Although we do not have any specific business combination under consideration and we have not (nor has anyone on our behalf), directly or indirectly, contacted any prospective target business or had any substantive discussions, formal or otherwise, with respect to such a transaction, our initial business combination target company may include a company based in the PRC. If we decide to consummate our initial business combination with a target business based in and primarily operating in the PRC, the combined company, whose securities will be listed on a U.S. stock exchange, may make capital contributions or extend loans to its PRC subsidiaries through intermediate holding companies subject to compliance with relevant PRC foreign exchange control regulations.

 

After the initial business combination, the combined company’s ability to pay dividends, if any, to the shareholders and to service any debt it may incur will depend upon dividends paid by its PRC subsidiaries. Under PRC laws and regulations, PRC companies are subject to certain restrictions with respect to paying dividends or otherwise transferring any of their net assets to offshore entities. In particular, under the current PRC laws and regulations, dividends may be paid only out of distributable profits. Distributable profits are the net profit as determined under Chinese accounting standards and regulations, less any recovery of accumulated losses and appropriations to statutory and other reserves required to be made.

 

Current PRC regulations permit a potential PRC target company’s indirect PRC subsidiaries to pay dividends to an overseas subsidiary, for example, a subsidiary located in Hong Kong, only out of their accumulated profits, if any, determined in accordance with Chinese accounting standards and regulations. In addition, each of the target’s subsidiaries in China is required to set aside at least 10% of its after-tax profits each year, if any, to fund a statutory reserve until such reserve reaches 50% of its registered capital. As a result, the combined company’s PRC subsidiaries may not have sufficient distributable profits to pay dividends to the combined company. Furthermore, each such entity in China is also required to further set aside a portion of its after-tax profits to fund the employee welfare fund, although the amount to be set aside, if any, is determined at the discretion of its board of directors. Although the statutory reserves can be used, among other ways, to increase the registered capital and eliminate future losses in excess of retained earnings of the respective companies, the reserve funds are not distributable as cash dividends except in the event of liquidation.

 

The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of the Renminbi (“RMB”), the legal currency of the PRC, into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC. Our initial business combination target may be a PRC company with substantially all of its revenues in RMB. Shortages in the availability of foreign currency may restrict the ability of the PRC subsidiaries to remit sufficient foreign currency to pay dividends or other payments to us, or otherwise satisfy their foreign currency denominated obligations. Under existing PRC foreign exchange regulations, payments of current account items, including profit distributions, interest payments and expenditures from trade-related transactions can be made in foreign currencies without prior approval from SAFE by complying with certain procedural requirements. However, approval from appropriate government authorities is required where RMB is to be converted into foreign currency and remitted out of China to pay capital expenses such as the repayment of loans denominated in foreign currencies. The PRC government may also at its discretion restrict access in the future to foreign currencies for current account transactions. If the foreign exchange control system prevents us from obtaining sufficient foreign currency to satisfy our currency demands post business combination, we may not be able to pay dividends in foreign currencies to our security-holders. Furthermore, if our target’s subsidiaries in the PRC incur debt on their own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay dividends or make other payments.

 

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Cash dividends, if any, on our ordinary shares will be paid in U.S. dollars. If we are considered a PRC tax resident enterprise for tax purposes, any dividends we pay to our overseas shareholders may be regarded as China-sourced income and, as a result, may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10.0%.

 

The PRC government may take measures at its discretion from time to time to restrict access to foreign currencies for current account or capital account transactions. If the foreign exchange control regulations prevent the PRC subsidiaries of the combined company from obtaining sufficient foreign currencies to satisfy their foreign currency demands, the PRC subsidiaries of the combined company may not be able to pay dividends or repay loans in foreign currencies to their offshore intermediary holding companies and ultimately to the combined company. We cannot assure you that new regulations or policies will not be promulgated in the future, which may further restrict the remittance of RMB into or out of the PRC. We cannot assure you, in light of the restrictions in place, or any amendment to be made from time to time, that the PRC subsidiaries of the combined company will be able to satisfy their respective payment obligations that are denominated in foreign currencies, including the remittance of dividends outside of the PRC. See “Risk Factors — Risks Related to Acquiring or Operating Businesses in the PRC” under the subheadings “Cash-Flow Structure of a Post-Acquisition Company Based in China” and “Exchange controls that exist in the PRC may restrict or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to acquire a target company in the PRC and limit our ability to utilize our cash flow effectively following our initial business combination.”

 

Initial Business Combination

 

Nasdaq rules require that we complete one or more initial business combinations having an aggregate fair market value of at least 80% of the value of the assets held in the trust account (excluding the deferred underwriting commissions and taxes payable on interest earned on the trust account) at the time of our signing a definitive agreement in connection with our initial business combination. Our board of directors will make the determination as to the fair market value of our initial business combination. If our board of directors is not able to independently determine the fair market value of the target business or businesses, we will obtain an opinion from an independent investment banking firm that is a member of the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority, Inc. (“FINRA”), or an independent valuation or appraisal firm with respect to the satisfaction of such criteria.

 

While we consider it unlikely that our board will not be able to make an independent determination of the fair market value of a target business or businesses, it may be unable to do so if the board is less familiar or experienced with the target company’s business, there is a significant amount of uncertainty as to the value of the company’s assets or prospects, including if such company is at an early stage of development, operations or growth, or if the anticipated transaction involves a complex financial analysis or other specialized skills and the board determines that outside expertise would be helpful or necessary in conducting such analysis. Since any opinion, if obtained, would merely state that the fair market value of the target business meets the 80% of net assets threshold, unless such opinion includes material information regarding the valuation of a target business or the consideration to be provided, it is not anticipated that copies of such opinion would be distributed to our shareholders. However, if required under applicable law, any proxy statement that we deliver to shareholders and file with the SEC in connection with a proposed transaction will include such opinion.

 

We anticipate structuring our initial business combination so that the post-business combination company in which our public shareholders own shares will own or acquire 100% of the equity interests or assets of the target business or businesses. We may, however, structure our initial business combination such that the post-business combination company owns or acquires less than 100% of such interests or assets of the target business in order to meet certain objectives of the target management team or shareholders or for other reasons, but we will only complete such business combination if the post-business combination company owns or acquires 50% or more of the outstanding voting securities of the target or otherwise acquires a controlling interest in the target sufficient for it not to be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended.

 

Even if the post-business combination company owns or acquires 50% or more of the voting securities of the target, our shareholders prior to the business combination may collectively own a minority interest in the post-business combination company, depending on valuations ascribed to the target and us in the business combination. For example, we could pursue a transaction in which we issue a substantial number of new shares in exchange for all of the outstanding capital stock of a target. In this case, we would acquire a 100% controlling interest in the target. However, as a result of the issuance of a substantial number of new shares, our shareholders immediately prior to our initial business combination could own less than a majority of our outstanding shares subsequent to our initial business combination. If less than 100% of the equity interests or assets of a target business or businesses are owned or acquired by the post-business combination company, the portion of such business or businesses that is owned or acquired is what will be valued for purposes of the 80% of net assets test. If the business combination involves more than one target business, the 80% of net assets test will be based on the aggregate value of all of the target businesses. In addition, we have agreed not to enter into a definitive agreement regarding an initial business combination without the prior consent of our sponsor.

 

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To the extent we effect our initial business combination with a company or business that may be financially unstable or in its early stages of development or growth, we may be affected by numerous risks inherent in such company or business. Although our management will endeavor to evaluate the risks inherent in a particular target business, we cannot assure you that we will properly ascertain or assess all significant risk factors.

 

The time required to select and evaluate a target business and to structure and complete our initial business combination, and the costs associated with this process, are not currently ascertainable with any degree of certainty. Any costs incurred with respect to the identification and evaluation of a prospective target business with which our initial business combination is not ultimately completed will result in our incurring losses and will reduce the funds we can use to complete another business combination.

 

The net proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units released to us from the trust account upon the closing of our initial business combination may be used as consideration to pay the sellers of a target business with which we complete our initial business combination. If our initial business combination is paid for using equity or debt securities, or not all of the funds released from the trust account are used for payment of the consideration in connection with our initial business combination or used for redemption of our public shares, we may use the balance of the cash released to us from the trust account following the closing for general corporate purposes, including for maintenance or expansion of operations of the post-transaction businesses, the payment of principal or interest due on indebtedness incurred in completing our initial business combination, to fund the purchase of other companies or for working capital. In addition, we may be required to obtain additional financing in connection with the closing of our initial business combination to be used following the closing for general corporate purposes as described above.

 

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that, following this offering and prior to the consummation of our initial business combination, we will be prohibited from issuing additional securities that would entitle the holders thereof to (i) receive funds from the trust account, or (ii) vote as a class with our public shares (a) on any initial business combination, or (b) to approve an amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to (x) extend the time we have to consummate a business combination beyond 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case), or (y) amend the foregoing provisions, unless (in connection with any such amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association) we offer our public shareholders the opportunity to redeem their public shares.

 

Prior to the date of this prospectus, we will file a registration statement on Form 8-A with the SEC to voluntarily register our securities under Section 12 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, or the Exchange Act. As a result, we will be subject to the rules and regulations of the SEC promulgated under the Exchange Act. We have no current intention of filing a Form 15 to suspend our reporting or other obligations under the Exchange Act prior or subsequent to the consummation of our business combination.

 

Our Sponsor

 

Our Sponsor is AI TRANSPORTATION CORP, a British Virgin Islands business company managed by Mr. Yongjin Chen, Chief Executive Officer, Chairman of the Board and Executive Director of the company, a resident of Beijing, China, who brings nearly twenty years of accounting, finance and senior management experience in various industries to the sponsor and the company.

 

On January 1, 2023, we issued our Sponsor 1,437,500 founder shares for an aggregate purchase price of $25,000, or approximately $0.017 per unit. Our officers and directors have a significant economic interest in our Sponsor. As a result of the low acquisition cost of our founder shares, our Sponsor, its affiliates and our management team could make a substantial profit even if we select and consummate an initial business combination with an acquisition target that subsequently declines in value or is unprofitable for our public shareholders. Thus, such parties may have more of an economic incentive for us to enter into an initial business combination with a riskier, weaker-performing or financially unstable business, or an entity lacking an established record of revenues or earnings, than would be the case if such parties had paid the full offering price for their founder shares.

 

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Each of our directors, director nominees and officers presently has and any of them in the future may have additional, fiduciary or contractual obligations to other entities pursuant to which such officer or director is or will be required to present a business combination opportunity. Accordingly, if any of our officers or directors becomes aware of a business combination opportunity which is suitable for an entity to which he or she has then-current fiduciary or contractual obligations, he or she will honor his or her fiduciary or contractual obligations to present such opportunity to such entity. We do not believe, however, that the fiduciary duties or contractual obligations of our officers or directors will materially affect our ability to complete our initial business combination.

 

Notwithstanding our founder’s and management team’s past experiences, past performance is not a guarantee (i) that we will be able to identify a suitable candidate for our initial business combination or (ii) that we will provide an attractive return to our shareholders from any business combination we may consummate. You should not rely on the historical record of the members of our management team or our sponsor or their respective affiliates or any related investment’s performance as indicative of our future performance of an investment in the company or the returns the company will, or is likely to, generate going forward. Each of our officers and directors may become an officer or director of another special purpose acquisition company with a class of securities intended to be registered under the Exchange Act, even before we have entered into a definitive agreement regarding our initial business combination.

 

Our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC” or “China”). We face various legal and operational risks and uncertainties related to our significant ties to China. We are subject to complex and evolving laws and regulations in China. The PRC government has indicated an intent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, and initiated various regulatory actions and made various public statements, some of which are published with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, enhancing supervision over China-based companies listed overseas, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement. Moreover, PRC laws and regulations governing the PRC based business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain.

 

Because our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC, and due the various legal uncertainties arising in the PRC, we will face certain legal and operational risks following our initial public offering. As a result of these risks, a significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares may occur. Further, these risks could result in a material change in the value of our securities that we are registering for sale. In addition, these legal and operational risks could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors. Further, these legal and operational risks cause result in a material adverse change in our operations which could cause the value of our securities to decline significantly or even be worthless. For more information, see the section of this prospectus entitled “Management — Conflicts of Interest” and see “Risk Factors.”

 

Other Considerations

 

There is no limitation on our ability to raise funds through the issuance of equity or equity-linked securities or through loans, advances or other indebtedness in connection with our initial business combination, including pursuant to forward purchase agreements or backstop agreements we may enter into following consummation of this offering. Subject to compliance with applicable securities laws, we would only complete such financing simultaneously with the completion of our initial business combination. At this time, we are not a party to any arrangement or understanding with any third party with respect to raising any additional funds through the sale of securities or otherwise. None of our sponsors, officers, directors or shareholders is required to provide any financing to us in connection with or after our initial business combination. We may also obtain financing prior to the closing of our initial business combination to fund our working capital needs and transaction costs in connection with our search for and completion of our initial business combination.

 

Corporate Information

 

Our executive offices are located at No. 1092, Building 1, Yard 10, XiXiaoying South Ring Road, SuJiatuo Town, HaiDian District, Beijing China 100084 and our telephone number is + (86) 1350 1152063.

 

We are a Cayman Islands exempted company incorporated on May 9, 2022, with limited liability. Cayman Islands exempted companies are Cayman Islands companies conducting business mainly outside the Cayman Islands and, as such, are exempted from complying with certain provisions of the Companies Act. As an exempted company, we have applied for and have received a tax exemption undertaking from the Cayman Islands government that, in accordance with Section 6 of the Tax Concessions Act (Revised) of the Cayman Islands, for a period of 20 years from the date of the undertaking, no law which is enacted in the Cayman Islands imposing any tax to be levied on profits, income, gains or appreciations will apply to us or our operations and, in addition, that no tax to be levied on profits, income, gains or appreciations or which is in the nature of estate duty or inheritance tax will be payable (i) on or in respect of our shares, debentures or other obligations or (ii) by way of the withholding in whole or in part of a payment of dividend or other distribution of income or capital by us to our shareholders or a payment of principal or interest or other sums due under a debenture or other obligation of us.

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in Section 2(a) of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”). As such, we are eligible to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”), reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements and exemptions from the requirements of holding a non-binding advisory vote on executive compensation and shareholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. If some investors find our securities less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our securities and the prices of our securities may be more volatile.

 

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In addition, an “emerging growth company” can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an “emerging growth company” can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We intend to take advantage of the benefits of this extended transition period.

 

We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion (as adjusted for inflation pursuant to SEC rules from time to time), or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our ordinary shares that is held by non-affiliates equals or exceeds $700.0 million as of the prior June 30, and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt securities during the prior three-year period.

 

Additionally, we are a “smaller reporting company” as defined Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act. Smaller reporting companies may take advantage of certain reduced disclosure obligations, including, among other things, providing only two years of audited financial statements. We will remain a smaller reporting company until the last day of any fiscal year for so long as either (1) the market value of our ordinary shares held by non-affiliates did not equal or exceed $250.0 million as of the prior June 30, or (2) our annual revenues did not exceed $100.0 million during such completed fiscal year and the market value of our ordinary shares held by non-affiliates did not equal or exceed $700.0 million as of the prior June 30. To the extent we take advantage of such reduced disclosure obligations, it may also make comparison of our financial statements with other public companies difficult or impossible.

 

THE OFFERING

 

In deciding whether to invest in our securities, you should take into account not only the backgrounds of the members of our management team, but also the special risks we face as a blank check company and the fact that this offering is not subject to Rule 419 under the Securities Act. You will not be entitled to protections normally afforded to investors in blank check offerings subject to and made in compliance on Rule 419 under the Securities Act. You should carefully consider these and the other risks set forth in the section below of this prospectus entitled “Risk Factors.”

 

Securities offered   5,000,000 units, at $10.00 per unit, each unit consisting of:
     
    one ordinary share; and
       
    one right entitling the holder thereof to receive one-eighth (1/8) of one ordinary share of upon consummation of our initial business combination.

 

Proposed Nasdaq symbols  

Units: “AITRU”

 

Ordinary shares: “AITR”

 

Rights: “AITRR”

     
Trading commencement and separation of ordinary shares and rights:   The units are expected to begin trading on or promptly after the date of this prospectus. We expect the ordinary shares and rights comprising the units will begin separate trading on the 52nd day following the date of this prospectus (or if such date is not a business day, the following business day, unless the underwriter permits earlier trading), subject to our having filed the Current Report on Form 8-K described below and having issued a press release announcing when such separate trading will begin.

 

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    Once the ordinary shares and rights commence separate trading, holders will have the option to continue to hold units or separate their units into the component securities. Holders will need to have their brokers contact our transfer agent in order to separate the units into ordinary shares and rights.
     
    Additionally, the units will automatically separate into their component parts and will not be traded after completion of our initial business combination.
     
Separate trading of the ordinary shares and rights is prohibited until we have filed a Current Report on Form 8-K:   In no event will the ordinary shares and rights be traded separately until we have filed a Current Report on Form 8-K with the SEC containing an audited balance sheet reflecting our receipt of the gross proceeds at the closing of this offering. We will file the Current Report on Form 8-K promptly after the closing of this offering, which closing is anticipated to take place three business days from the date of this prospectus. If the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised following the initial filing of such Current Report on Form 8-K, a second or amended Current Report on Form 8-K will be filed to provide updated financial information to reflect the exercise of the underwriters’ over-allotment option.

 

Units:

 

Number units outstanding before this offering:   0
     
Number of placement units to be sold in a private placement simultaneously this offering:   259,000(1)
     
Number of units outstanding after this offering   5,259,000(1)
     
Ordinary shares:    
     
Number issued and outstanding before this offering:   1,437,500 founder shares(2)
     
Number issued and outstanding after this offering:   6,559,000 ordinary shares(1)(3)

 

Rights included as part of units:    
     
Number outstanding before this offering   0
     
Number to be outstanding after this offering and sale of placement units   5,259,000(4)

 

1 Assumes no exercise of the underwriters’ over-allotment option and the forfeiture by our sponsor of an aggregate of 187,500 founder shares.

 

2 Includes up to an aggregate of 187,500 shares that are subject to forfeiture by our sponsor depending on the extent to which the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised.

 

3 Comprised of 5,259,000 ordinary shares (including 259,000 placement shares), 1,250,000 founder shares and 50,000 representative shares.

 

4 Assumes the over-allotment option has not been exercised. Includes 5,000,000 public rights and 259,000 placement rights.

 

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Terms of rights  

Each holder of a right will receive one-eighth (1/8) of an ordinary share upon consummation of our initial business combination. Except in cases where we are not the surviving company in a business combination, each holder of a public right will automatically receive one- eighth (1/8) of an ordinary share upon consummation of our initial business combination. In the event we will not be the surviving company upon completion of our initial business combination, each holder of a right will be required to affirmatively convert his, her or its rights in order to receive the one- eighth (1/8) of a share underlying each right upon consummation of the business combination.

 

We will not issue fractional shares in connection with an exchange of rights. Fractional shares will either be rounded down to the nearest whole share or otherwise addressed in accordance with the applicable provisions of the Companies Act. As a result, you must hold rights in multiples of 10 in order to receive shares for all of your rights upon closing of a business combination. If we are unable to complete an initial business combination within the required time period, and we redeem the public shares for the funds held in the trust account, holders of rights will not receive any of such funds for their rights and the rights will expire worthless.

     
Founder shares  

As of the date hereof, our sponsor holds 1,437,500 founder shares, 187,500 of which are subject to forfeiture if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is not exercised. The number of founder shares issued and outstanding was determined based on the expectation that the founder shares would represent 20% of the outstanding shares after this offering (excluding the placement units and underlying securities).

 

As such, our initial shareholders will collectively own approximately 20.0% of our issued and outstanding shares after this offering (including the placement shares to be issued to the sponsor and assuming they do not purchase any units in this offering). None of our sponsor, officers or directors have expressed an intention to purchase any units in this offering. Up to an aggregate 187,500 founder shares will be subject to forfeiture by our sponsor depending on the extent to which the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised so that our initial shareholders will maintain ownership of at least 20% of our ordinary shares after this offering.

 

Our sponsor transferred a total of 50,000 founder shares among our Chief Executive Officer, our Chief Financial Officer and our three independent director nominees at their original purchase price pursuant to executed securities assignment agreements, on January 31, 2023.

 

    We will effect a share capitalization or other appropriate mechanism prior to this offering should the size of the offering change, in order to maintain such percentage ownership. The founder shares are identical to the ordinary shares included in the units being sold in this offering, except that:
       
    the founder shares are subject to certain transfer restrictions, as described in more detail below;
       
    the founder shares are entitled to registration rights; and

 

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    our sponsor, officers and directors have entered into a letter agreement with us, pursuant to which they have agreed to (i) waive their redemption rights with respect to their founder shares and public shares in connection with the completion of our initial business combination, (ii) waive their redemption rights with respect to their founder shares and public shares in connection with a shareholder vote to approve an amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to (A) modify the substance or timing of our obligation to provide for the redemption of our public shares in connection with an initial business combination or to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case) or (B) with respect to any other material provisions relating to shareholders’ rights or pre-initial business combination activity, (iii) waive their rights to liquidating distributions from the trust account with respect to their founder shares if we fail to complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case), although they will be entitled to liquidating distributions from the trust account with respect to any public shares they hold if we fail to complete our initial business combination within the prescribed time frame and (iv) vote any founder shares held by them and any public shares purchased during or after this offering (including in open market and privately-negotiated transactions) in favor of our initial business combination.

 

    If we submit our initial business combination to our public shareholders for a vote, we will complete our initial business combination only if we receive an ordinary resolution under Cayman Islands law, which requires the affirmative vote of a majority of the shareholders who attend and vote at a general meeting of the company. As a result of an agreement in which we have agreed not to enter into a definitive agreement regarding an initial business combination without the prior consent of our sponsor, our sponsor, officers and directors are expected to vote their shares in favor of our initial business combination. As a result, in the event that only the minimum number of shares representing a quorum is present at a shareholders’ meeting held to vote on our initial business combination, in addition to our initial shareholders’ founder shares and placement shares, and the 50,000 ordinary shares issued to underwriter, as the representative shares, we would need only 80,751, or 1.62% of the 5,000,000 public shares sold in this offering to be voted in favor of an initial business combination in order to have our initial business combination approved. Additionally, each public shareholder may elect to redeem its public shares irrespective of whether they vote for or against, or abstain from voting on, the proposed transaction (subject to the limitations described in this prospectus).
     
Transfer restrictions on founder shares:   Our initial shareholders have agreed not to transfer, assign or sell any of their founder shares until the earlier to occur of: (A) six (6) months after the completion of our initial business combination and (B) subsequent to our initial business combination, if the reported last sale price of our ordinary shares equals or exceeds $12.00 per share (as adjusted for share subdivisions, share dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within any 30-trading day period commencing at least 150 days after our initial business combination or if we complete a transaction after our initial business combination which results in all of our shareholders having the right to exchange their shares for cash, securities or other property after our initial business combination (except as described herein under “Principal Shareholders — Restrictions on Transfers of Founder Shares and placement units”). Any permitted transferees will be subject to the same restrictions and other agreements of our initial shareholders with respect to any founder shares. We refer to such transfer restrictions throughout this prospectus as the lock-up.

 

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Voting rights; Appointment of Directors:  

Holders of record of the ordinary shares and holders of record of the founder shares will vote together as a single class on all matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders, with each ordinary share entitling the holder to one vote except as required by law.

 

Unless specified in our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association or as required by the Companies Act or Nasdaq rules, an ordinary resolution under Cayman Islands law, which requires the affirmative vote of a majority of the shareholders who attend and vote at a general meeting of the company is generally required to approve any matter voted on by our shareholders. Approval of certain actions require a special resolution under Cayman Islands law, which requires the affirmative vote of a majority of at least two-thirds of the shareholders who attend and vote at a general meeting of the company, and pursuant to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, such actions include amending our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association and approving a statutory merger or consolidation with another company. There is no cumulative voting with respect to the appointment of directors, meaning, following our initial business combination, the holders of more than 50% of our ordinary shares voting for the appointment of directors can elect all of the directors. Only holders of founder shares will have the right to appoint directors in any election held prior to or in connection with the completion of our initial business combination. Holders of our public shares will not be entitled to vote on the appointment of directors during such time. In addition, prior to the completion of an initial business combination, holders of a majority of our founder shares may remove a member of the board of directors for any reason. These provisions of our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association relating to the rights of holders of founder shares to appoint directors may be amended by a special resolution by the holders of at least 90% of the outstanding founder shares. With respect to any other matter submitted to a vote of our shareholders, including any vote in connection with our initial business combination, except as required by law, holders of the founder shares and holders of our public shares will vote together as a single class, with each ordinary share entitling the holder to one vote.

 

If we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination, we will complete our initial business combination only if we receive an ordinary resolution under Cayman Islands law, which requires the affirmative vote of a majority of the shareholders who attend and vote at a general meeting of the company. In such case, our sponsor, officers and directors have agreed to vote their founder shares and any public shares purchased during or after this offering (including in open market and privately negotiated transactions) in favor of our initial business combination. As a result, in the event that only the minimum number of shares representing a quorum is present at a shareholders’ meeting held to vote on our initial business combination, in addition to our initial shareholders’ founder shares, and the 50,000 ordinary shares issued to underwriter, as the representative shares, we would need 80,751, or 1.62%, of the 5,000,000 public shares sold in this offering to be voted in favor of an initial business combination in order to have our initial business combination approved.

 

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Placement units:  

Simultaneously with the consummation of this offering, our sponsor has committed to purchase an aggregate of 259,000 placement units (or 277,750 placement units if the over-allotment option is exercised in full).

 

These additional placement units will be purchased in a private placement that will occur simultaneously with the purchase of units resulting from the exercise of the over-allotment option. The placement units (and underlying placement shares) are identical to the units sold in this offering. Our initial shareholders have agreed (A) to vote their placement shares in favor of any proposed business combination, (B) not to convert any placement shares in connection with a shareholder vote to approve a proposed initial business combination or sell any placement shares to us in a tender offer in connection with a proposed initial business combination and (C) that the placement shares shall not participate in any liquidating distribution from our trust account upon winding up if a business combination is not consummated. In the event of a liquidation prior to our initial business combination, the placement units will likely be worthless.

 

Each placement unit is identical to the units offered by this prospectus except as described below. There will be no redemption rights or liquidating distributions from the trust account with respect to the founder shares or placement shares, which will expire worthless if we do not consummate a business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case). Our initial shareholders have agreed to waive their redemption rights with respect to any founder shares or placement shares (i) in connection with the consummation of a business combination, (ii) in connection with a shareholder vote to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to modify the substance or timing of our obligation to allow redemption in connection with our initial business combination or certain amendments to our charter prior thereto, to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the completion of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case) or with respect to any other provision relating to shareholders’ rights or pre-initial business combination activity and (iii) if we fail to consummate a business combination within 12 months from the completion of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case) or if we liquidate prior to the expiration of the 18-month period. However, our initial shareholders will be entitled to redemption rights with respect to any public shares held by them if we fail to consummate a business combination or liquidate within the 18-month period. A portion of the purchase price of the placement units will be added to the proceeds from this offering to be held in the trust account such that, at the time of closing, $50,500,000 (or $58,075,000 if the underwriters exercise their over-allotment option in full) will be held in the trust account. If we do not complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case), the proceeds from the sale of the placement units held in the trust account will be used to fund the redemption of our public shares (subject to the requirements of applicable law) and the placement units and placement shares will expire worthless.

 

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Transfer restrictions on Placement Units:   The placement units and their component securities will not be transferable, assignable or salable until 30 days after the completion of our initial business combination (except as described under the section of this prospectus entitled “Principal Shareholders — Restrictions on Transfers of Founder Shares and Placement Units”).
     
Proceeds to be held in trust account:  

Nasdaq rules provide that at least 90% of the gross proceeds from this offering and the sale of the placement units be deposited in a trust account. Of the net proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units, $50,500,000, or $10.10 per unit ($58,075,000, or $10.10 per unit, if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full) will be placed into a trust account in the United States at JP Morgan Chase, with Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company acting as trustee, and $900,000 will be used to pay expenses in connection with the closing of this offering and for working capital following this offering.

 

These proceeds include $1,000,000 (or $1,150,000 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full) in deferred underwriting commissions.

 

Except with respect to interest earned on the funds held in the trust account that may be released to us to pay our taxes, our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that the proceeds from this offering and the sale of the placement units, will not be released from the trust account until the earliest of (a) the completion of our initial business combination, (b) the redemption of any public shares properly submitted in connection with a shareholder vote to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to (i) modify the substance or timing of our obligation to provide for the redemption of our public shares in connection with an initial business combination or to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case) or (ii) with respect to any other material provisions relating to shareholders’ rights or pre-initial business combination activity, and (c) the redemption of our public shares if we are unable to complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions of time by depositing into the trust account for each six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case), subject to applicable law. The proceeds deposited in the trust account could become subject to the claims of our creditors, if any, which could have priority over the claims of our public shareholder.

 

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Anticipated expenses and funding sources:   Unless and until we complete our initial business combination, no proceeds held in the trust account will be available for our use, except the withdrawal of interest to pay our taxes and/or to redeem our public shares in connection with an amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, as described above. The proceeds held in the trust account will be invested only in U.S. government securities with a maturity of 180 days or less or in money market funds meeting certain conditions under Rule 2a-7 under the Investment Company Act, that invest only in direct U.S. government treasury obligations. We will disclose in each quarterly and annual report filed with the SEC prior to our initial business combination whether the proceeds deposited in the trust account are invested in U.S. government treasury obligations or money market funds or a combination thereof. Assuming an interest rate of 0.1%, we estimate the trust account will generate approximately $51,000 of interest annually; however, we can provide no assurances regarding this amount. Unless and until we complete our initial business combination, we may pay our expenses only from:

 

    the net proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units not held in the trust account, which will be approximately $900,000 in working capital after the payment of approximately $440,000 in expenses relating to this offering; and
       
    any loans or additional investments from our sponsor, or an affiliate of our sponsor or certain of our officers and directors, although they are under no obligation to advance funds or invest in us, and provided that any such loans will not have any claim on the proceeds held in the trust account unless such proceeds are released to us upon completion of our initial business combination. Up to $1,500,000 of such loans may be convertible into units, at a price of $10.00 per unit at the option of the lender, upon consummation of our initial business combination. The units would be identical to the placement units.

 

Conditions to completing our initial business combination:   Nasdaq rules require that we consummate an initial business combination with one or more operating businesses or assets with a fair market value equal to at least 80% of the net assets held in the trust account (net of amounts disbursed to management for working capital purposes, if permitted, and excluding the amount of any deferred underwriting commissions). Our board of directors will make the determination as to the fair market value of our initial business combination. If our board of directors is not able to independently determine the fair market value of our initial business combination, we will obtain an opinion from an independent investment banking firm or another independent entity that ordinarily renders valuation opinions with respect to the satisfaction of such criteria. While we consider it unlikely that our board of directors will not be able to make an independent determination of the fair market value of our initial business combination, it may be unable to do so if it is less familiar or experienced with the business of a particular target or if there is a significant amount of uncertainty as to the value of a target’s assets or prospects.

 

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    We anticipate structuring our initial business combination so that the post-transaction company in which our public shareholders own shares will own or acquire 100% of the equity interests or assets of the target business or businesses. However, we may structure our initial business combination so that the post-transaction company owns or acquires less than 100% of such interests or assets of the target business in order to meet certain objectives of the target management team or shareholders, or for other reasons. However, we will only complete an initial business combination if the post-transaction company owns or acquires 50% or more of the outstanding voting securities of the target or otherwise acquires a controlling interest in the target sufficient for it not to be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act.
     
    Even if the post-transaction company owns or acquires 50% or more of the voting securities of the target, our shareholders prior to the initial business combination may collectively own a minority interest in the post-transaction company, depending on valuations ascribed to the target and us in the initial business combination. For example, we could pursue a transaction in which we issue a substantial number of new shares in exchange for all of the outstanding capital stock of a target. In this case, we would acquire a 100% controlling interest in the target. However, as a result of the issuance of a substantial number of new shares, our shareholders immediately prior to our initial business combination could own less than a majority of our outstanding shares subsequent to our initial business combination. If less than 100% of the equity interests or assets of a target business or businesses are owned or acquired by the post-transaction company, the portion of such business or businesses that is owned or acquired is what will be taken into account for purposes of Nasdaq’s 80% of net assets test. If the initial business combination involves more than one target business, the 80% of net assets test will be based on the aggregate value of all of the transactions and we will treat the target businesses together as our initial business combination for purposes of seeking shareholder approval or conducting a tender offer, as applicable.

 

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Permitted purchases of public shares by our affiliates:   If we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination and we do not conduct redemptions in connection with our initial business combination pursuant to the tender offer rules, our sponsor, initial shareholders, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates may purchase public shares in privately negotiated transactions or in the open market either prior to or following the completion of our initial business combination. There is no limit on the number of shares our initial shareholders, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates may purchase in such transactions, subject to compliance with applicable law and Nasdaq rules. If they engage in such transactions, they will not make any such purchases when they are in possession of any material non-public information not disclosed to the seller or if such purchases are prohibited by Regulation M under the Exchange Act. We do not currently anticipate that such purchases, if any, would constitute a tender offer subject to the tender offer rules under the Exchange Act or a going-private transaction subject to the going-private rules under the Exchange Act; however, if the purchasers determine at the time of any such purchases that the purchases are subject to such rules, the purchasers will comply with such rules. To the extent that any public shares are purchased, such public shares will be voted as required by Tender Offers and Schedules Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 166.01 promulgated by the SEC. Further, any such purchases will be reported pursuant to Section 13 and Section 16 of the Exchange Act to the extent such purchasers are subject to such reporting requirements. None of the funds held in the trust account will be used to purchase shares in such transactions prior to completion of our initial business combination. Subsequent to the consummation of this offering, we will adopt an insider trading policy which will require insiders to: (i) refrain from purchasing our securities during certain blackout periods when they are in possession of any material non-public information and (ii) clear all trades of company securities with a compliance officer prior to execution. We cannot currently determine whether our insiders will make such purchases pursuant to a Rule 10b5-1 plan, as it will be dependent upon several factors, including but not limited to, the timing and size of such purchases. Depending on such circumstances, our insiders may either make such purchases pursuant to a Rule 10b5-1 plan or determine that such a plan is not necessary.
     
    The purpose of any such purchases of shares could be to satisfy a closing condition in an agreement with a target that requires us to have a minimum net worth or a certain amount of cash at the closing of our initial business combination, where it appears that such requirement would otherwise not be met.
     
    Our sponsor, officers, directors and/or any of their affiliates anticipate that they may identify the shareholders with whom our sponsor, officers, directors or their affiliates may pursue privately negotiated purchases by either the shareholders contacting us directly or by our receipt of redemption requests tendered by shareholders following our mailing of proxy materials in connection with our initial business combination. To the extent that our sponsor, officers, directors, advisors or their affiliates enter into a private purchase, they would identify and contact only potential selling shareholders who have expressed their election to redeem their shares for a pro rata share of the trust account or vote against our initial business combination, whether or not such shareholder has already submitted a proxy with respect to our initial business combination. Such persons would select the shareholders from whom to acquire shares based on the number of shares available, the negotiated price per share and such other factors as any such person may deem relevant at the time of purchase. The price per share paid in any such transaction may be different than the amount per share a public shareholder would receive if it elected to redeem its shares in connection with our initial business combination. Our sponsor, officers, directors, advisors or their affiliates will only purchase shares if such purchases comply with Regulation M under the Exchange Act and the other federal securities laws.
     
    Any purchases by our sponsor, officers, directors and/or their respective affiliates who are affiliated purchasers under Rule 10b-18 under the Exchange Act will only be made to the extent such purchases are able to be made in compliance with Rule 10b-18, which is a safe harbor from liability for manipulation under Section 9(a)(2) and Rule 10b-5 of the Exchange Act. Rule 10b-18 has certain technical requirements that must be complied with in order for the safe harbor to be available to the purchaser. Our sponsor, officers, directors and/or their respective affiliates will not make purchases of shares if the purchases would violate Section 9(a)(2) or Rule 10b-5 of the Exchange Act. To the extent that any public shares are purchased, such public shares will be voted as required by Tender Offers and Schedules Compliance and Disclosure Interpretations Question 166.01 promulgated by the SEC. Further, any such purchases will be reported pursuant to Section 13 and Section 16 of the Exchange Act to the extent such purchasers are subject to such reporting requirements.

 

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Redemption rights for public shareholders upon completion of our initial business combination:  

We will provide our public shareholders with the opportunity to redeem all or a portion of their public shares upon the completion of our initial business combination at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account as of two business days prior to the consummation of our initial business combination, including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our taxes, divided by the number of then outstanding public shares, subject to the limitations described herein.

 

The amount in the trust account is initially anticipated to be $10.10 per public share, however, there is no guarantee that investors will receive $10.10 per share upon redemption. The per-share amount we will distribute to investors who properly redeem their shares will not be reduced by deferred underwriting commissions we will pay to the underwriters. Our sponsor, officers and directors have entered into a letter agreement with us, pursuant to which they have agreed to waive their redemption rights with respect to any founder shares and placement shares held by them and any public shares they may acquire during or after this offering in connection with the completion of our initial business combination or otherwise.

     
Limitation on redemptions:  

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that in no event will we redeem our public shares in an amount that would cause our net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001 (so that we are not subject to the SEC’s “penny stock” rules). However, a greater net tangible asset or cash requirement may be contained in the agreement relating to our initial business combination. For example, the proposed business combination may require: (i) cash consideration to be paid to the target or its owners, (ii) cash to be transferred to the target for working capital or other general corporate purposes or (iii) the retention of cash to satisfy other conditions in accordance with the terms of the proposed business combination. Furthermore, although we will not redeem shares in an amount that would cause our net tangible assets to fall below $5,000,001, we do not have a maximum redemption threshold based on the percentage of shares sold in this offering, as many blank check companies do.

 

In the event the aggregate cash consideration we would be required to pay for all ordinary shares that are validly submitted for redemption plus any amount required to satisfy cash conditions pursuant to the terms of the proposed business combination exceed the aggregate amount of cash available to us, we will not complete the business combination or redeem any shares, and all ordinary shares submitted for redemption will be returned to the holders thereof.

     
Manner of conducting redemptions:   We will provide our public shareholders with the opportunity to redeem all or a portion of their public shares upon the completion of our initial business combination either (i) in connection with a shareholder meeting called to approve the initial business combination or (ii) by means of a tender offer. The decision as to whether we will seek shareholder approval of a proposed business combination or conduct a tender offer will be made by us, solely in our discretion, and will be based on a variety of factors such as the timing of the transaction and whether the terms of the transaction would require us to seek shareholder approval under applicable law or stock exchange listing requirements. Asset acquisitions and stock purchases would not typically require shareholder approval, while direct mergers with our company where we do not survive and any transactions where we issue more than 20% of our outstanding ordinary shares or seek to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association would require shareholder approval. So long as we obtain and maintain a listing for our securities on Nasdaq, we will be required to comply with such rules.

 

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    If a shareholder vote is not required and we do not decide to hold a shareholder vote for business or other reasons, we will, pursuant to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association:

 

    conduct the redemptions pursuant to Rule 13e-4 and Regulation 14E of the Exchange Act, which regulate issuer tender offers, and
       
    file tender offer documents with the SEC prior to completing our initial business combination which contain substantially the same financial and other information about the initial business combination and the redemption rights as is required under Regulation 14A of the Exchange Act, which regulates the solicitation of proxies.

 

    Upon the public announcement of our initial business combination, if we elect to conduct redemptions pursuant to the tender offer rules, we or our sponsor will terminate any plan established in accordance with Rule 10b5-1 under the Exchange Act to purchase ordinary shares in the open market, in order to comply with Rule 14e-5 under the Exchange Act.
     
    In the event that we conduct redemptions pursuant to the tender offer rules, our offer to redeem will remain open for at least 20 business days, in accordance with Rule 14e-1(a) under the Exchange Act, and we will not be permitted to complete our initial business combination until the expiration of the tender offer period. In addition, the tender offer will be conditioned on public shareholders not tendering more than a specified number of public shares, which number will be based on the requirement that we may not redeem public shares in an amount that would cause our net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001 upon completion of our initial business combination (so that we are not subject to the SEC’s “penny stock” rules) or any greater net tangible asset or cash requirement which may be contained in the agreement relating to our initial business combination. If public shareholders tender more shares than we have offered to purchase, we will withdraw the tender offer and not complete the initial business combination.
     
    If, however, shareholder approval of the transaction is required by law or stock exchange listing requirements, or we decide to obtain shareholder approval for business or other reasons, we will:

 

    conduct the redemptions in conjunction with a proxy solicitation pursuant to Regulation 14A of the Exchange Act, which regulates the solicitation of proxies, and not pursuant to the tender offer rules, and
       
    file proxy materials with the SEC.

 

    If we seek shareholder approval, we will complete our initial business combination only if we receive an ordinary resolution under Cayman Islands law, which requires the affirmative vote of a majority of the shareholders who attend and vote at a general meeting of the company. Our sponsor will count towards this quorum and has agreed to vote its founder shares and any public shares purchased during or after this offering in favor of our initial business combination. For purposes of seeking approval of the majority of our outstanding ordinary shares voted, non-votes will have no effect on the approval of our initial business combination once a quorum is obtained.

 

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    As a result, in the event that only the minimum number of shares representing a quorum is present at a shareholders’ meeting held to vote on our initial business combination, in addition to our initial shareholder’s founder shares and placement shares, and the 50,000 ordinary shares issued to underwriter, as the representative shares, we would need 80,751, or 1.62% of the 5,000,000 public shares sold in this offering to be voted in favor of an initial business combination in order to have our initial business combination approved. Additionally, each public shareholder may elect to redeem its public shares irrespective of whether they vote for or against the proposed transaction (subject to the limitation described in this prospectus). We intend to give approximately 30 days (but not less than ten days nor more than 60 days) prior written notice of any such meeting, if required, at which a vote shall be taken to approve our initial business combination. The quorum and voting thresholds, and the voting agreement of our sponsor, may make it more likely that we will consummate our initial business combination.
     
    Each public shareholder may elect to redeem its public shares irrespective of whether they vote for or against, or abstain from voting on, the proposed transaction.
     
    We may require our public shareholders seeking to exercise their redemption rights, whether they are record holders or hold their shares in “street name,” to either tender their certificates to our transfer agent prior to the date set forth in the tender offer documents or proxy materials mailed to such holders, or up to two business days prior to the vote on the proposal to approve the initial business combination in the event we distribute proxy materials, or to deliver their shares to the transfer agent electronically. We believe that this will allow our transfer agent to efficiently process any redemptions without the need for further communication or action from the redeeming public shareholders, which could delay redemptions and result in additional administrative cost. If the proposed business combination is not approved and we continue to search for a target company, we will promptly return any certificates delivered, or shares tendered electronically, by public shareholders who elected to redeem their shares.
     
    Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that in no event will we redeem our public shares in an amount that would cause our net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001 upon completion of our initial business combination (so that we are not subject to the SEC’s “penny stock” rules) or any greater net tangible asset or cash requirement which may be contained in the agreement relating to our initial business combination. For example, the proposed business combination may require: (i) cash consideration to be paid to the target or its owners, (ii) cash to be transferred to the target for working capital or other general corporate purposes or (iii) the retention of cash to satisfy other conditions in accordance with the terms of the proposed business combination.
     
    In the event the aggregate cash consideration we would be required to pay for all ordinary shares that are validly submitted for redemption plus any amount required to satisfy cash conditions pursuant to the terms of the proposed business combination exceed the aggregate amount of cash available to us, we will not complete the initial business combination or redeem any shares, and all ordinary shares submitted for redemption will be returned to the holders thereof.

 

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Limitation on redemption rights of shareholders holding 15% or more of the shares sold in this offering if we hold shareholder vote:   Notwithstanding the foregoing redemption rights, if we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination and we do not conduct redemptions in connection with our initial business combination pursuant to the tender offer rules, our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that a public shareholder, together with any affiliate of such shareholder or any other person with whom such shareholder is acting in concert or as a “group” (as defined under Section 13 of the Exchange Act), will be restricted from redeeming its shares with respect to more than an aggregate of 15% of the shares sold in this offering, without our prior consent. We believe the restriction described above will discourage shareholders from accumulating large blocks of shares, and subsequent attempts by such holders to use their ability to redeem their shares as a means to force us or our management to purchase their shares at a significant premium to the then-current market price or on other undesirable terms. Absent this provision, a public shareholder holding more than an aggregate of 15% of the shares sold in this offering could threaten to exercise its redemption rights against a business combination if such holder’s shares are not purchased by us or our management at a premium to the then-current market price or on other undesirable terms.
     
    By limiting our shareholders’ ability to redeem to no more than 15% of the shares sold in this offering, we believe we will limit the ability of a small group of shareholders to unreasonably attempt to block our ability to complete our initial business combination, particularly in connection with a business combination with a target that requires as a closing condition that we have a minimum net worth or a certain amount of cash. However, we would not be restricting our shareholders’ ability to vote all of their shares (including all shares held by those shareholders that hold more than 15% of the shares sold in this offering) for or against our initial business combination.
     
Redemption rights in connection with proposed amendments to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association:   Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that any of its provisions related to pre-business combination activity (including the requirement to deposit proceeds of this offering and the private placement of units into the trust account and not release such amounts except in specified circumstances, and to provide redemption rights to public shareholders as described herein) may be amended if approved by a special resolution, being a resolution of a duly constituted general meeting of the Company that is passed by a majority of two thirds of the votes cast by, or on behalf of, the shareholders entitled to vote thereon, and corresponding provisions of the trust agreement governing the release of funds from our trust account may be amended if approved by holders of 65% of our ordinary shares entitled to vote thereon. Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that we may not issue additional shares that would entitle the holders thereof to receive funds from the trust account or vote on any initial business combination or on matters related to our pre-initial business combination activity. Our initial shareholders, who will collectively beneficially own 20% of our outstanding ordinary shares upon the closing of this offering (assuming they do not purchase any units in this offering), will participate in any vote to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association and/or trust agreement and will have the discretion to vote in any manner they choose. Our sponsor, executive officers, and directors have agreed, pursuant to a written agreement with us, that they will not propose any amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to (A) modify the substance or timing of our obligation to provide for the redemption of our public shares in connection with an initial business combination or to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case) or (B) with respect to any other material provisions relating to shareholders’ rights or pre-initial business combination activity, unless we provide our public shareholders with the opportunity to redeem their ordinary shares upon approval of any such amendment at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account, including interest (which interest shall be net of taxes payable) divided by the number of then outstanding public shares. Our sponsor, officers and directors have entered into a letter agreement with us pursuant to which they have agreed to waive their redemption rights with respect to any founder shares, placement shares and any public shares held by them in connection with the completion of our initial business combination.

 

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Release of funds in trust account on closing of our initial business combination:   On the completion of our initial business combination, all amounts held in the trust account will be disbursed directly by the trustee to pay amounts due to any public shareholders who exercise their redemption rights as described above under “Redemption rights for public shareholders upon completion of our initial business combination,” to pay the underwriters their deferred underwriting commissions, to pay all or a portion of the consideration payable to the target or owners of the target of our initial business combination and to pay other expenses associated with our initial business combination.
     

 

 

 

  If our initial business combination is paid for using equity or debt securities, or not all of the funds released from the trust account are used for payment of the consideration in connection with our initial business combination or used for redemptions of our ordinary shares, we may apply the balance of the cash released to us from the trust account for general corporate purposes, including for maintenance or expansion of operations of the post-transaction businesses, the payment of principal or interest due on indebtedness incurred in completing our initial business combination, to fund the purchase of other assets, companies or for working capital.
     
Redemption of public shares and distribution and liquidation if no initial business combination:  

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that we will have only 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case), to complete our initial business combination.

 

If we are unable to complete our initial business combination within such time period, we will (i) cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up, (ii) as promptly as reasonably possible but not more than ten business days thereafter, redeem the public shares, at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes as well as expenses relating to the administration of the trust account (less up to $50,000 of interest released to us to pay taxes and potentially, dissolution expenses), divided by the number of then outstanding public shares, which redemption will completely extinguish public shareholders’ rights as shareholders (including the right to receive further liquidating distributions, if any), subject to applicable law, and (iii) as promptly as reasonably possible following such redemption, subject to the approval of our remaining shareholders and our board of directors, dissolve and liquidate, subject in each case to our obligations under the Companies Act to provide for claims of creditors and the requirements of other applicable law.

 

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    However, if we anticipate that we may not be able to consummate our initial business combination within 12 months, our sponsor may, but is not obligated to, extend the period of time to consummate a business combination up to six times by an additional one month each time (for a total of up to 18 months to complete a business combination, as set forth in this registration statement). Pursuant to the terms of our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association and the trust agreement to be entered into between us and Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company on the date of this prospectus, in order to extend the time available for us to consummate our initial business combination, our sponsor, upon five days advance notice prior to the applicable deadline, must deposit into the trust account for each six one-month extension after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case), on or prior to the date of the applicable deadline.
     
    Our sponsor, officers and directors have entered into a letter agreement with us, pursuant to which they have waived their rights to liquidating distributions from the trust account with respect to any founder shares and placement shares held by them if we fail to complete our initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination. However, if our sponsor, officers or directors acquire public shares in or after this offering, they will be entitled to liquidating distributions from the trust account with respect to such public shares if we fail to complete our initial business combination within the allotted time period.
     
    The underwriters have agreed to waive their rights to their deferred underwriting commission held in the trust account in the event we do not complete our initial business combination and subsequently liquidate, and, in such event, such amounts will be included with the funds held in the trust account that will be available to fund the redemption of our public shares.
     
    Our sponsor, officers and directors have agreed, pursuant to letter agreements with us, that they will not propose any amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association that would affect the substance or timing of our obligation to allow redemption in connection with our initial business combination or to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete an initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination, or with respect to any other provisions relating to shareholders’ rights or pre-initial business combination activity, unless we provide our public shareholders with the opportunity to redeem their ordinary shares upon approval of any such amendment at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account, including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our taxes, if any (less up to $50,000 of interest to pay dissolution expenses) divided by the number of the then outstanding public shares, subject to the limitations described above under “Proposed Business — Limitations on Redemptions.”

 

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    For example, our board of directors may propose such an amendment if it determines that additional time is necessary to complete our initial business combination. In such event, we will conduct a proxy solicitation and distribute proxy materials pursuant to Regulation 14A of the Exchange Act seeking shareholder approval of such proposal and, in connection therewith, provide our public shareholders with the redemption rights described above upon shareholder approval of such amendment. This redemption right shall apply in the event of the approval of any such amendment, whether proposed by our sponsor, any executive officer, director or director nominee, or any other person.
     
Limited payments to insiders:   Our sponsor transferred a total of 50,000 founder shares among our Chief Executive Officer, our Chief Financial Officer and our three independent director nominees at their original purchase price pursuant to executed securities assignment agreements, on January 31, 2023. In addition, the following payments will be made to our sponsor, officers or directors, or our or their respective affiliates, none of which will be made from the proceeds of this offering held in the trust account, prior to the completion of our initial business combination:

 

    Repayment of a loan of up to an aggregate of $300,000 if drawn from the sponsor to cover offering related and organizational expenses, unless sooner paid in accordance with the terms of the promissory note dated June 1, 2022;
       
   

Payment to AI TRANSPORTATION CORP, our sponsor, of $10,000 per month for 12 months which may be extended up to 18 months for office space, utilities and secretarial and administrative;

       
    Reimbursement for any out-of-pocket expenses related to our formation and initial public offering and to identifying, investigating and completing an initial business combination; and
       
    Repayment of any other loans from our sponsor, an affiliate of our sponsor or certain of our officers and directors to finance transaction costs in connection with an intended initial business combination, the terms of which have not been determined, except as described below, nor have any written agreements been executed with respect thereto. Up to $1,500,000 of such loans may be convertible into units, at a price of $10.00 per unit at the option of the lender, upon consummation of our initial business combination. The units would be identical to the placement units.

 

    Additionally, in connection with the successful completion of our initial business combination, we may determine to provide a payment to our sponsor, officers, directors, advisors, or our or their respective affiliates; however, any such payment would not be made from the proceeds of this offering held in the trust account and we currently do not have any arrangement or agreement with our sponsor, officers, directors, advisors, or our or their respective affiliates, to do so. Our audit committee will review on a quarterly basis all payments that were or are to be made to our sponsor, officers or directors, or our or their respective affiliates.

 

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Audit Committee:   We will establish and maintain an audit committee, which will be composed of at least three independent directors under Nasdaq Rule 5605 who also satisfy the requirements of SEC Rule 10A-3 and who can read and understand fundamental financial statements including a balance sheet, income statement and cash flow statement. If any noncompliance is identified, then the audit committee will be charged with the responsibility to immediately take all action necessary to rectify such noncompliance or otherwise to cause compliance with the terms of this offering. For more information, see the section of this prospectus entitled “Management — Committees of the Board of Directors — Audit Committee.”
     
Conflicts of Interest:  

Certain of our officers and directors presently have, and any of them in the future may have additional, fiduciary or contractual obligations to other entities pursuant to which such officer or director is or will be required to present business combination opportunities to such entity. Accordingly, in the future, if any of our officers or directors becomes aware of a business combination opportunity which is suitable for an entity to which he or she has then-current fiduciary or contractual obligations under Cayman Islands law, he or she will honor his or her fiduciary or contractual obligations to present such opportunity to such entity. We do not believe, however, that any fiduciary duties or contractual obligations of our officers arising in the future would materially undermine our ability to complete our initial business combination.

 

In addition, our sponsor, officers, directors and advisors may participate in the formation of, or become an officer or director of, any other blank check company prior to completion of our initial business combination. As a result, our sponsor, officers, directors and advisors could have conflicts of interest in determining whether to present business combination opportunities to us or to any other blank check company with which they may become involved. However, we do not believe that any potential conflicts would materially affect our ability to complete our initial business combination.

     

 

 

 

 

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law: (i) no individual serving as a director or an officer shall have any duty, except and to the extent expressly assumed by contract, to refrain from engaging directly or indirectly in the same or similar business activities or lines of business as us; and (ii) we renounce any interest or expectancy in, or in being offered an opportunity to participate in, any potential transaction or matter which may be a corporate opportunity for any director or officer, on the one hand, and us, on the other.

 

Further, our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that we renounce our interest in any corporate opportunity offered to any director or officer unless such opportunity is expressly offered to such person solely in his or her capacity as a director or officer of our company and such opportunity is one that we are legally and contractually permitted to undertake and would otherwise be reasonable for us to pursue.

 

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Indemnity:   Our sponsor has agreed that it will be liable to us, if and to the extent any claims by a vendor for services rendered or products sold to us, or a prospective target business with which we have discussed entering into a transaction agreement, reduce the amounts in the trust account to below $10.10 per share (whether or not the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full), except as to any claims by a third party who executed a waiver of any and all rights to seek access to the trust account and except as to any claims under our indemnity of the underwriters of this offering against certain liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act. In the event that an executed waiver is deemed to be unenforceable against a third party, our sponsor will not be responsible to the extent of any liability for such third-party claims. We have not independently verified whether our sponsor has sufficient funds to satisfy its indemnity obligations and believe that their only assets are securities of our company. We believe the likelihood of our sponsor having to indemnify the trust account is limited because we will endeavor to have all vendors and prospective target businesses as well as other entities execute agreements with us waiving any right, title, interest or claim of any kind in or to monies held in the trust account.
     
    We have not requested that our sponsor reserve funds for this indemnity and we have not independently verified whether our sponsor has sufficient funds to satisfy its indemnity obligations and believe that our sponsor’s only assets are securities of our company. We have not asked our sponsor to reserve for such indemnification obligations. None of our officers will indemnify us for claims by third parties including, without limitation, claims by vendors and prospective target businesses.

 

SUMMARY FINANCIAL DATA

 

The following table summarizes the relevant financial data for our business and should be read with our financial statements, which are included in this prospectus. Because we have not had any significant operations to date, only balance sheet data is presented.

 

   December 31, 2022   June 30, 2023 
Balance Sheet Data:          
Working capital (deficiency)  $(29,237)  $(143,686)
Total assets  $25,000   $165,837 
Total liabilities  $29,237   $145,074 
Shareholder’s equity  $(4,237)  $20,763

 

If no business combination is completed within the period to consummate the initial business combination, the proceeds then on deposit in the trust account including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our franchise and income taxes as well as expenses relating to the administration of the trust account (less up to $50,000 of interest to pay our expenses, taxes and potentially dissolution expenses), will be used to fund the redemption of our public shares. Our sponsor, directors and each member of our management team have entered into a letter agreement with us, pursuant to which they have agreed to waive their rights to liquidating distributions from the trust account with respect to any founder shares held by them if we do not complete our initial business combination within such 18-month time period.

 

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SUMMARY OF RISK FACTORS

 

We are a newly incorporated company that has conducted no operations and has generated no revenues. Until we complete our initial business combination, we will have no operations and will generate no operating revenues. In making your decision whether to invest in our securities, you should take into account not only the background of our management team, but also the special risks we face as a blank check company. This offering is not subject to Rule 419 promulgated under the Securities Act. Accordingly, you will not be entitled to protections normally afforded to investors in Rule 419 blank check offerings. For additional information concerning how Rule 419 blank check offerings differ from this offering, please see the section of this prospectus entitled “Proposed Business — Comparison of This Offering to Those of Blank Check Companies Subject to Rule 419.” You should carefully consider these, and the other risks set forth in the section of this prospectus entitled “Risk Factors.” Such risks include, but are not limited to the following:

 

Risks Relating to Our Search for, and Consummation of or Inability to Consummate, a Business Combination

 

  Our public shareholders may not be afforded an opportunity to vote on our proposed initial business combination, which means we may complete our initial business combination even though a majority of our public shareholders do not support such a combination. See “Risk Factors,” page 43 for further information.
     
  If we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination, our initial shareholders and members of our management team have agreed to vote in favor of such initial business combination, regardless of how our public shareholders vote. See “Risk Factors,” page 43 for further information.
     
 

Your only opportunity to affect the investment decision regarding a potential business combination may be limited to the exercise of your right to redeem your shares from us for cash. See “Risk Factors,” page 43 for further information.

 

  The ability of our public shareholders to redeem their shares for cash may make our financial condition unattractive to potential business combination targets, which may make it difficult for us to enter into a business combination with a target. See “Risk Factors,” page 44 for further information.
     
  The ability of our public shareholders to exercise redemption rights with respect to a large number of our shares may not allow us to complete the most desirable business combination and could increase the probability that our initial business combination would be unsuccessful. See “Risk Factors,” page 44 for further information.
     
  The requirement that we complete an initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination may give potential target businesses leverage over us in negotiating a business combination and may limit the time we have in which to conduct due diligence on potential business combination targets as we approach our dissolution deadline, which could undermine our ability to complete our initial business combination on terms that would produce value for our shareholders. See “Risk Factors,” page 44 for further information.
     
 

We may not be able to complete our initial business combination within the prescribed time frame, in which case we would cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up and we would redeem our public shares and liquidate, in which case our public shareholders may receive only $10.10 per share, or less than such amount in certain circumstances, and our rights will expire worthless. See “Risk Factors,” page 45 for further information.

 

  Because we are incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands, you may face difficulties in protecting your interests, and your ability to protect your rights through courts in the United States may be limited.

 

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Risks Related to Acquiring or Operating Businesses in the PRC

 

  We may undertake our initial business combination with an entity or business which is based in a foreign country, including China, and the laws and regulations of such foreign countries may not afford U.S. investors or regulatory agencies access to information normally available to them with respect to U.S. based entities. See “Risk Factors,” page 68 for further information.
     
  Trading in our securities may be prohibited under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act (the “HFCA Act”) if the PCAOB determines that it cannot inspect or fully investigate our auditor. In that case, Nasdaq would delist our securities. The delisting of our securities, or the threat of their being delisted, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections may deprive our investors with the benefits of such inspections. See “Risk Factors,” page 69 for further information.
     
 

U.S. laws and regulations, including the HFCA Act, may restrict or eliminate our ability to complete a business combination with certain companies, particularly those acquisition candidates with substantial operations in China. See “Risk Factors,” page 70 for further information.

     
 

We may not be able to complete an initial business combination with a U.S. target company if such initial business combination is subject to U.S. foreign investment regulations and review by a U.S. government entity such as the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), or ultimately prohibited. See “Risk Factors,” page 71 for further information.

     
  Recent regulatory actions by the government of the People’s Republic of China with respect to foreign capital efforts and activities, including Business Combinations with offshore shell companies such as SPACS, may adversely impact our ability to consummate a business combination with a China based entity or business, or materially impact the value of our securities following any such business combination. See “Risk Factors,” page 71 for further information.
     
  The Chinese government has exercised and continues to exercise substantial control over virtually every sector of the Chinese economy through regulation and state ownership. See “Risk Factors,” page 72 for further information.
     
 

Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws and regulations and changes in policies, rules, and regulations in China, which may be quick with little advance notice, could limit the legal protection available to you and us. See “Risk Factors,” page 72 for further information.

 

 

We will not conduct an initial business combination with any target company that conducts operations through VIEs, which may limit the pool of acquisition candidates we may acquire in the PRC and make it more difficult and costly for us to consummate a business combination with a target business operating in the PRC. See “Risk Factors,” page 72 for further information.

 

  PRC M&A Rules governing mergers and acquisitions (“PRC M&A Rules”) and other PRC regulations may make it more difficult for us to complete an acquisition of a target business. See “Risk Factors,” page 73 for further information.
     
  If the Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC), the Cyberspace Administration of China (CAC) or another PRC regulatory body subsequently determines that its approval is needed for this offering, for a business combination, the issuance of our ordinary shares upon exercise of the rights, or maintaining our status as a publicly listed company outside of China, we may face approval delays, adverse actions or sanctions by applicable PRC regulatory agencies. See “Risk Factors,” page 74 for further information.
     
 

You may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments, or bringing actions in China against us or our management and directors named in the prospectus based on foreign laws. It may also be difficult for you or overseas regulators to conduct investigations or collect evidence within China. See “Risk Factors,” page 75 for further information.

 

 

Any actions by the Chinese government, including any decision to intervene or influence the operations of any future PRC subsidiary or to exert control over any offering of securities conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, may cause us to make material changes to the operations of any future PRC subsidiary, may limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors, and may cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless. See “Risk Factors,” page 76 for further information.

 

 

Cash-Flow Structure of a Post-Acquisition Company Based in China. See “Risk Factors,” page 76 for further information.

 

 

Exchange controls that exist in the PRC may restrict or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to acquire a target company in the PRC and limit our ability to utilize our cash flow effectively following our initial business combination. See “Risk Factors,” page 77 for further information.

     
  Because our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC, we will face certain legal and operational risks following our initial public offering, which could cause a significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares including rendering them worthless. See “Risk Factors,” page 77 for further information.
     
  Since a majority of our directors and officers have significant ties to China, the Chinese government may have potential oversight and discretion over our directors’ and officers’ search for a target company, which could adversely impact our initial business combination, future business and any future offering of securities. See “Risk Factors,” page 77 for further information.
     
  Recent greater oversight by the PRC government and Cyberspace Administration of China over data security, particularly for companies seeking to list on a foreign exchange, could adversely impact our initial business combination, future business and any future offering of securities. See “Risk Factors,” page 78 for further information.
     
  In July 2021, the Communist Party of China Central Committee and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued a document to promote the high-quality development of the capital market, which, among other things, requires the relevant governmental authorities to strengthen cross-border oversight. If a PRC regulatory body subsequently determines that its approval is needed for this offering, we cannot predict whether we will be able to obtain such approval. See “Risk Factors,” page 78 for further information.

 

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Risks Relating to the Post-Business Combination Company

 

  Subsequent to the completion of our initial business combination, we may be required to take write-downs or write-offs, restructuring and impairment or other charges that could have a significant negative effect on our financial condition, results of operations and our share price, which could cause you to lose some or all of your investment. See “Risk Factors,” page 79 for further information.
     
  The officers and directors of an acquisition candidate may resign upon completion of our initial business combination. The loss of a business combination target’s key personnel could negatively impact the operations and profitability of our post-combination business. See “Risk Factors,” page 79 for further information.
     
  Our management may not be able to maintain control of a target business after our initial business combination. Upon the loss of control of a target business, new management may not possess the skills, qualifications or abilities necessary to profitably operate such business. See “Risk Factors,” page 80 for further information.

 

Risks Relating to Our Management Team

 

  Our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC” or “China”). See “Risk Factors,” page 80 for further information.
     
  Since a majority of our directors and officers have significant ties to China, the Chinese government may have potential oversight and discretion over the conduct of our directors’ and officers’ search for a target company. See “Risk Factors,” page 80 for further information.
     
  The members of our Board of Directors and management team are located in China, they are citizens of China and/or their assets are located in China, and following completion of a business combination, we may conduct most of our operations in China and most of our assets may be located in China. See “Risk Factors,” page 80 for further information.
     
  We are dependent upon our executive officers and directors and their loss could adversely affect our ability to operate. See “Risk Factors,” page 80 for further information.
     
  Our ability to successfully effect our initial business combination and to be successful thereafter will be totally dependent upon the efforts of our key personnel, some of whom may join us following our initial business combination. The loss of key personnel could negatively impact the operations and profitability of our post-combination business. See “Risk Factors,” page 80 for further information.

 

Risks Relating to Our Securities

 

  Nasdaq may delist our securities from trading on its exchange, which could limit investors’ ability to make transactions in our securities and subject us to additional trading restrictions. See “Risk Factors,” page 83 for further information.
     
  Our sponsor paid an aggregate of $25,000, or approximately $0.017 per founder share, and, accordingly, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution from the purchase of the ordinary shares. See “Risk Factors,” page 83 for further information.
     
  Since our sponsor paid approximately $0.017 per share for the founder shares, our officers and directors could potentially make a substantial profit even if we acquire a target business that subsequently declines in value. See “Risk Factors,” page 84 for further information.

 

General Risk Factors

 

  We are a recently incorporated company with no operating history and no revenues, and you have no basis on which to evaluate our ability to achieve our business objective. See “Risk Factors,” page 87 for further information.
     
  Past performance by our sponsor and our management team including their affiliates and including the businesses referred to herein, may not be indicative of future performance of an investment in us or in the future performance of any business that we may acquire. See “Risk Factors,” page 87 for further information.

 

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RISK FACTORS

 

An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should consider all of the risks described below carefully, together with the other information contained in this prospectus, before making a decision to invest in our public shares. If any of the following events occur, our business, financial condition and operating results may be materially adversely affected. In that event, the trading price of our securities could decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment.

 

Risks Relating to Our Search for, and Consummation of or Inability to Consummate, a Business Combination

 

Our public shareholders may not be afforded an opportunity to vote on our proposed initial business combination, which means we may complete our initial business combination even though a majority of our public shareholders do not support such a combination.

 

We may choose not to hold a shareholder vote before we complete our initial business combination if the initial business combination would not require shareholder approval under applicable law or stock exchange listing requirement. For instance, if we were seeking to acquire a target business where the consideration, we were paying in the transaction was all cash, we would not be required to seek shareholder approval to complete such a transaction. Except as required by law or stock exchange, the decision as to whether we will seek shareholder approval of a proposed business combination or will allow shareholders to sell their shares to us in a tender offer will be made by us, solely in our discretion, and will be based on a variety of factors, such as the timing of the transaction and whether the terms of the transaction would otherwise require us to seek shareholder approval. Accordingly, we may complete our initial business combination even if a majority of our public shareholders do not approve of the initial business combination we complete.

 

If we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination, our initial shareholders and members of our management team have agreed to vote in favor of such initial business combination, regardless of how our public shareholders vote.

 

Pursuant to a letter agreement, our sponsor, officers and directors have agreed to vote their founder shares, as well as any public shares purchased during or after this offering (including in open market and privately negotiated transactions), in favor of our initial business combination. As a result, in the event that only the minimum number of shares representing a quorum is present at a shareholders’ meeting held to vote on our initial business combination, in addition to our initial shareholders’ founder shares and placement shares, and the 50,000 ordinary shares issued to underwriter, as the representative shares, we would need 80,751, or 1.62% of the 5,000,000 public shares sold in this offering to be voted in favor of an initial business combination approved in favor of our initial business combination in order to have our initial business combination approved. Additionally, each public shareholder may elect to redeem its public shares irrespective of whether they vote for or against, or abstain from voting on, the proposed transaction (subject to the limitations described in this prospectus). Our initial shareholders will own shares representing 23.59% of our outstanding ordinary shares immediately following the completion of this offering (assuming they do not purchase any units in this offering and the over-allotment option is not exercised). Accordingly, if we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination, the agreement by our initial shareholders to vote in favor of our initial business combination will increase the likelihood that we will receive the requisite shareholder approval for such initial business combination.

 

Your only opportunity to affect the investment decision regarding a potential business combination may be limited to the exercise of your right to redeem your shares from us for cash.

 

At the time of your investment in us, you will not be provided with an opportunity to evaluate the specific merits or risks of one or more target businesses. Since our board of directors may complete a business combination without seeking shareholder approval, public shareholders may not have the right or opportunity to vote on the initial business combination, unless we seek such shareholder vote. Accordingly, your only opportunity to affect the investment decision regarding a potential business combination may be limited to exercising your redemption rights within the period of time (which will be at least 20 business days) set forth in our tender offer documents mailed to our public shareholders in which we describe our initial business combination.

 

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The ability of our public shareholders to redeem their shares for cash may make our financial condition unattractive to potential business combination targets, which may make it difficult for us to enter into a business combination with a target.

 

We may seek to enter into a business combination transaction agreement with a prospective target that requires as a closing condition that we have a minimum net worth or a certain amount of cash. If too many public shareholders exercise their redemption rights, we would not be able to meet such closing condition and, as a result, would not be able to proceed with the initial business combination. Furthermore, in no event will we redeem our public shares in an amount that would cause our net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001 (so that we are not subject to the SEC’s “penny stock” rules) or any greater net tangible asset or cash requirement which may be contained in the agreement relating to our initial business combination. Consequently, if accepting all properly submitted redemption requests would cause our net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001 or such greater amount necessary to satisfy a closing condition as described above, we would not proceed with such redemption and the related business combination and may instead search for an alternate business combination. Prospective targets will be aware of these risks and, thus, may be reluctant to enter into a business combination transaction with us.

 

The ability of our public shareholders to exercise redemption rights with respect to a large number of our shares may not allow us to complete the most desirable business combination and could increase the probability that our initial business combination would be unsuccessful.

 

At the time we enter into an agreement for our initial business combination, we will not know how many shareholders may exercise their redemption rights, and therefore will need to structure the transaction based on our expectations as to the number of shares that will be submitted for redemption. If our initial business combination agreement requires us to use a portion of the cash in the trust account to pay the purchase price or requires us to have a minimum amount of cash at closing, we will need to reserve a portion of the cash in the trust account to meet such requirements or arrange for third party financing. In addition, if a larger number of shares are submitted for redemption than we initially expected, we may need to restructure the transaction to reserve a greater portion of the cash in the trust account or arrange for third party financing. Raising additional third-party financing may involve dilutive equity issuances or the incurrence of indebtedness at higher than desirable levels. The above considerations may limit our ability to complete the most desirable business combination available to us or optimize our capital structure. The amount of the deferred underwriting commissions payable to the underwriters will not be adjusted for any shares that are redeemed in connection with an initial business combination. The per-share amount we will distribute to shareholders who properly exercise their redemption rights will not be reduced by the deferred underwriting commission and after such redemptions, the per-share value of shares held by non-redeeming shareholders will reflect our obligation to pay the deferred underwriting commissions.

 

The requirement that we complete an initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination may give potential target businesses leverage over us in negotiating a business combination and may limit the time we have in which to conduct due diligence on potential business combination targets as we approach our dissolution deadline, which could undermine our ability to complete our initial business combination on terms that would produce value for our shareholders.

 

Any potential target business with which we enter into negotiations concerning an initial business combination will be aware that we must complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case). Target businesses outside of the PRC will further be aware that given our substantial ties to the PRC, we may have difficulties attracting non-PRC target companies. Consequently, such target business may have leverage over us in negotiating an initial business combination, knowing that if we do not complete our initial business combination with that particular target business, we may be unable to complete our initial business combination with any target business. This risk will increase as we get closer to the timeframe described above. In addition, we may have limited time to conduct due diligence and may enter into our initial business combination on terms that we would have rejected upon a more comprehensive investigation.

 

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We may not be able to complete our initial business combination within the prescribed time frame, in which case we would cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up and we would redeem our public shares and liquidate, in which case our public shareholders may receive only $10.10 per share, or less than such amount in certain circumstances, and our rights will expire worthless.

 

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that we must complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case). We may not be able to find a suitable target business and complete our initial business combination within such time period. Our ability to complete our initial business combination may be negatively impacted by general market conditions, political considerations, volatility in the capital and debt markets and the other risks described herein. If we have not completed our initial business combination within such time period, we will (i) cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up, (ii) as promptly as reasonably possible but not more than 10 business days thereafter, redeem the public shares, at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account, including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our taxes (less up to $50,000 of interest to pay dissolution expenses), divided by the number of then outstanding public shares, which redemption will completely extinguish public shareholders’ rights as shareholders (including the right to receive further liquidating distributions, if any), and (iii) as promptly as reasonably possible following such redemption, subject to the approval of our remaining shareholders and our board of directors, liquidate and dissolve, subject in the case of clauses (ii) and (iii) to our obligations under the Companies Act to provide for claims of creditors and the requirements of other applicable law. In such case, our public shareholders may receive only $10.10 per share (whether or not the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full) or potentially less than $10.10 per share on our redemption, and our rights will expire worthless. See “— If third parties bring claims against us, the proceeds held in the trust account could be reduced and the per-share redemption amount received by shareholders may be less than $10.10 per share” and other risk factors below.

 

Our search for a business combination, and any target business with which we ultimately consummate a business combination, may be materially adversely affected by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

 

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that we must complete our initial business combination within 12 months (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case). We may not be able to find a suitable target business and complete an initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination. Our ability to complete our initial business combination may be negatively impacted by general market conditions, volatility in the capital and debt markets and the other risks described herein. For example, the outbreak of coronavirus (“COVID-19”) continues to grow both in the U.S. and globally and, while the extent of the impact of the outbreak on us will depend on future developments, it could limit our ability to complete our initial business combination, including as a result of increased market volatility, decreased market liquidity and third-party financing being unavailable on terms acceptable to us or at all.

 

Additionally, the outbreak of COVID-19 may continue to negatively impact businesses we may seek to acquire. If we have not completed an initial business combination within such applicable time period, we will (i) cease all operations except for the purpose of winding up; (ii) as promptly as reasonably possible but not more than ten business days thereafter, redeem the public shares, at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account, including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our taxes, if any (less up to $50,000 of interest to pay dissolution expenses), divided by the number of then outstanding public shares, which redemption will completely extinguish public shareholders’ rights as shareholders (including the right to receive further liquidating distributions, if any), subject to applicable law; and (iii) as promptly as reasonably possible following such redemption, subject to the approval of our remaining shareholders and our board of directors, liquidate and dissolve, subject in each case to our obligations under the Companies Act to provide for claims of creditors and the requirements of other applicable law.

 

If we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination, our sponsor, directors, officers, advisors and their affiliates may elect to purchase shares from public holders, which may influence a vote on a proposed initial business combination and reduce the public “float” of our ordinary shares.

 

If we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination and we do not conduct redemptions in connection with our initial business combination pursuant to the tender offer rules, our sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates may purchase shares or a combination thereof, in privately-negotiated transactions or in the open market, either prior to or following the completion of our initial business combination, although they are under no obligation to do so and they have no current commitments, plans or intentions to engage in such transactions and have not formulated any terms or conditions for any such transactions. Moreover, none of the funds in the trust account will be used to purchase shares in such transactions. See “Proposed Business — Permitted Purchases of Our Securities” for a description of how our sponsor, initial shareholders, directors, officers, advisors or any of their affiliates will select which shareholders to purchase securities from in any private transaction.

 

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Such a purchase may include a contractual acknowledgement that such shareholder, although still the record holder of our shares, is no longer the beneficial owner thereof and therefore agrees not to exercise its redemption rights. In the event that our sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates purchase shares in privately negotiated transactions from public shareholders who have already elected to exercise their redemption rights, such selling shareholders would be required to revoke their prior elections to redeem their shares. The purpose of such purchases could be to satisfy a closing condition in an agreement with a target that requires us to have a minimum net worth or a certain amount of cash at the closing of our initial business combination, where it appears that such requirement would otherwise not be met. Any such purchases of our securities may result in the completion of our initial business combination that may not otherwise have been possible. Further, any such purchases will be reported pursuant to Section 13 and Section 16 of the Exchange Act to the extent such purchasers are subject to such reporting requirements.

 

In addition, if such purchases are made, the public “float” of our ordinary shares and the number of beneficial holders of our securities may be reduced, possibly making it difficult to obtain or maintain the quotation, listing or trading of our securities on a national securities exchange. However, in the event our sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates were to purchase shares from public stockholders, such purchases would by structured in compliance with the requirements of Rule 14e-5 under the Exchange Act including, in pertinent part, through adherence to the following:

 

  the Company’s registration statement/proxy statement filed for its business combination transaction would disclose the possibility that the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates may purchase shares from public stockholders outside the redemption process, along with the purpose of such purchases;
     
  if the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates were to purchase shares from public stockholders, they would do so at a price no higher than the price offered through the Company’s redemption process;
     
  the Company’s registration statement/proxy statement filed for its business combination transaction would include a representation that any of the Company’s securities purchased by the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates would not be voted in favor of approving the business combination transaction;
     
  the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates would not possess any redemption rights with respect to the Company’s securities or, if they do acquire and possess redemption rights, they would waive such rights; and
     
  the Company would disclose in its Form 8-K, before to the Company’s security holder meeting to approve the business combination transaction, the following material items:

 

  the amount of the Company’s securities purchased outside of the redemption offer by the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates, along with the purchase price;
     
  the purpose of the purchases by the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates;
     
  the impact, if any, of the purchases by the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates on the likelihood that the business combination transaction will be approved;
     
  the identities of Company security holders who sold to the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates (if not purchased on the open market) or the nature of Company security holders (e.g., 5% security holders) who sold to the Company’s sponsor, directors, officers, advisors or their affiliates; and
     
  the number of Company securities for which the Company has received redemption requests pursuant to it.

 

If a shareholder fails to receive notice of our offer to redeem our public shares in connection with our initial business combination or fails to comply with the procedures for tendering its shares, such shares may not be redeemed.

 

We will comply with the proxy rules or tender offer rules, as applicable, when conducting redemptions in connection with our initial business combination. Despite our compliance with these rules, if a shareholder fails to receive our proxy materials or tender offer documents, as applicable, such shareholder may not become aware of the opportunity to redeem its shares. In addition, proxy materials or tender offer documents, as applicable, that we will furnish to holders of our public shares in connection with our initial business combination will describe the various procedures that must be complied with in order to validly tender or submit public shares for redemption. For example, we intend to require our public shareholders seeking to exercise their redemption rights, whether they are record holders or hold their shares in “street name,” to, at the holder’s option, either deliver their share certificates to our transfer agent, or to deliver their shares to our transfer agent electronically prior to the date set forth in the proxy materials or tender offer documents, as applicable. In the case of proxy materials, this date may be up to two business days prior to the vote on the proposal to approve the initial business combination. In addition, if we conduct redemptions in connection with a shareholder vote, we intend to require a public shareholder seeking redemption of its public shares to also submit a written request for redemption to our transfer agent two business days prior to the vote in which the name of the beneficial owner of such shares is included. In the event that a shareholder fails to comply with these, or any other procedures disclosed in the proxy or tender offer materials, as applicable, its shares may not be redeemed. See the section of this prospectus entitled “Proposed Business — Tendering Share Certificates in Connection with a Tender Offer or Redemption Rights.”

 

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You will not have any rights or interests in funds from the trust account, except under certain limited circumstances. Therefore, to liquidate your investment, you may be forced to sell your public shares, potentially at a loss.

 

Our public shareholders will be entitled to receive funds from the trust account only upon the earliest to occur of (i) our completion of an initial business combination, and then only in connection with those ordinary shares that such shareholder properly elected to redeem, subject to the limitations described herein, (ii) the redemption of any public shares properly submitted in connection with a shareholder vote to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to (A) modify the substance or timing of our obligation to provide for the redemption of our public shares in connection with an initial business combination or to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case) or (B) with respect to any other material provisions relating to shareholders’ rights or pre-initial business combination activity, and (iii) the redemption of our public shares if we are unable to complete an initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case), subject to applicable law and as further described herein. In addition, if we are unable to complete an initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions, as set forth in this prospectus) for any reason, and we are required to wind-up, liquidate the trust account and distribute such amount therein, pro rata, to our public shareholders, as part of any liquidation process, such winding up, liquidation and distribution must comply with the applicable provisions of the Companies Act. In that case, investors may be forced to wait beyond 18 months from the closing of this offering before the redemption proceeds of our trust account become available to them, and they receive the return of their pro rata portion of the proceeds from our trust account. In no other circumstances will a public shareholder have any right or interest of any kind in the trust account. Holders of right will not have any right to the proceeds held in the trust account with respect to the rights. Accordingly, to liquidate your investment, you may be forced to sell your public shares, potentially at a loss.

 

You will not be entitled to protections normally afforded to investors of many other blank check companies.

 

Since the net proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units are intended to be used to complete an initial business combination with a target business that has not been identified, we may be deemed to be a “blank check” company under the U.S. securities laws. However, because we will have net tangible assets in excess of $5,000,001 upon the successful completion of this offering and the sale of the placement units and will file a Current Report on Form 8-K, including an audited balance sheet demonstrating this fact, we are exempt from rules promulgated by the SEC to protect investors in blank check companies, such as Rule 419. Accordingly, investors will not be afforded the benefits or protections of those rules. Among other things, this means our units will be immediately tradable and we will have a longer period of time to complete our initial business combination than companies subject to Rule 419. Moreover, if this offering were subject to Rule 419, that rule would prohibit the release of any interest earned on funds held in the trust account to us unless and until the funds in the trust account were released to us in connection with our completion of an initial business combination. For a more detailed comparison of our offering to offerings that comply with Rule 419, please see the section of this prospectus entitled “Proposed Business — Comparison of This Offering to Those of Blank Check Companies Subject to Rule 419.”

 

Because of our limited resources and the significant competition for business combination opportunities, it may be more difficult for us to complete our initial business combination. If we are unable to complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may receive only approximately $10.10 per share on our redemption of our public shares, or less than such amount in certain circumstances, and our rights will expire worthless.

 

We expect to encounter competition from other entities having a business objective similar to ours, including private investors (which may be individuals or investment partnerships), other blank check companies and other entities, domestic and international, competing for the types of businesses we intend to acquire. Many of these individuals and entities are well established and have extensive experience in identifying and effecting, directly or indirectly, acquisitions of companies operating in or providing services to various industries. Many of these competitors possess similar or greater technical, human and other resources to ours, and our financial resources will be relatively limited when contrasted with those of many of these competitors. While we believe there are numerous target businesses we could potentially acquire with the net proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units, our ability to compete with respect to the acquisition of certain target businesses that are sizable will be limited by our available financial resources. This inherent competitive limitation gives others an advantage in pursuing the acquisition of certain target businesses. Furthermore, because we are obligated to pay cash for the ordinary shares that our public shareholders redeem in connection with our initial business combination, target companies will be aware that this may reduce the resources available to us for our initial business combination. Any of these obligations may place us at a competitive disadvantage in successfully negotiating an initial business combination. If we are unable to complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may receive only approximately $10.10 per share (whether or not the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full) or potentially less than $10.10 per share on our redemption, and our rights will expire worthless. See “— If third parties bring claims against us, the proceeds held in the trust account could be reduced and the per-share redemption amount received by shareholders may be less than $10.10 per share” and other risk factors below.

 

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If the net proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units not being held in the trust account are insufficient to allow us to operate for at least the next 12 months, we may be unable to complete our initial business combination, in which case our public shareholders may only receive $10.10 per share, or less than such amount in certain circumstances, and our rights will expire worthless.

 

We believe that, upon the closing of this offering, the funds available to us outside of the trust account will be sufficient to allow us to operate for at least the next 12 months; however, we cannot assure you that our estimate is accurate. Of the funds available to us, we could use a portion of the funds available to us to pay fees to consultants to assist us with our search for a target business. We could also use a portion of the funds as a down payment or to fund a “no-shop” provision (a provision in letters of intent or merger agreements designed to keep target businesses from “shopping” around for transactions with other companies or investors on terms more favorable to such target businesses) with respect to a particular proposed initial business combination, although we do not have any current intention to do so. If we entered into a letter of intent or merger agreement where we paid for the right to receive exclusivity from a target business and were subsequently required to forfeit such funds (whether as a result of our breach or otherwise), we might not have sufficient funds to continue searching for, or conduct due diligence with respect to, a target business.

 

Of the net proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units, only approximately $900,000 will be available to us initially outside the trust account to fund our working capital requirements. In the event that our offering expenses exceed our estimate of $440,000, we may fund such excess with funds not to be held in the trust account. In such case, the amount of funds we intend to be held outside the trust account would decrease by a corresponding amount. Conversely, in the event that the offering expenses are less than our estimate of $440,000, the amount of funds we intend to be held outside the trust account would increase by a corresponding amount. If we are required to seek additional capital, we would need to borrow funds from our sponsor, management team or other third parties to operate or may be forced to liquidate. None of our sponsor, or any affiliate of our sponsor or any of our officers and directors is under any obligation to advance funds to us in such circumstances except with respect to the promissory note for up to $300,000 executed on June 1, 2022, between the sponsor and us. Any such advances would be repaid only from funds held outside the trust account or from funds released to us upon completion of our initial business combination. Up to $1,500,000 of such loans may be convertible into units, at a price of $10.00 per unit at the option of the lender, upon consummation of our initial business combination. The units would be identical to the placement units.

 

Prior to the completion of our initial business combination, we do not expect to seek advances or loans from parties other than our sponsor or an affiliate of our sponsor as we do not believe third parties will be willing to loan such funds and provide a waiver against any and all rights to seek access to funds in our trust account. If we are unable to obtain these loans, we may be unable to complete our initial business combination. If we are unable to complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may receive only approximately $10.10 per share (whether or not the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full) or potentially less than $10.10 per share on our redemption, and our rights will expire worthless. See “— If third parties bring claims against us, the proceeds held in the trust account could be reduced and the per-share redemption amount received by shareholders may be less than $10.10 per share” and other risk factors below.

 

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If third parties bring claims against us, the proceeds held in the trust account could be reduced and the per-share redemption amount received by shareholders may be less than $10.10 per unit.

 

Our placing of funds in the trust account may not protect those funds from third-party claims against us. Although we will seek to have all vendors, service providers (other than our independent registered public accounting firm), prospective target businesses and other entities with which we do business execute agreements with us waiving any right, title, interest or claim of any kind in or to any monies held in the trust account for the benefit of our public shareholders, such parties may not execute such agreements, or even if they execute such agreements, they may not be prevented from bringing claims against the trust account, including, but not limited to, fraudulent inducement, breach of fiduciary responsibility or other similar claims, as well as claims challenging the enforceability of the waiver, in each case in order to gain advantage with respect to a claim against our assets, including the funds held in the trust account. If any third party refuses to execute an agreement waiving such claims to the monies held in the trust account, our management will perform an analysis of the alternatives available to it and will only enter into an agreement with a third party that has not executed a waiver if management believes that such third party’s engagement would be significantly more beneficial to us than any alternative. Making such a request of potential target businesses may make our acquisition proposal less attractive to them and, to the extent prospective target businesses refuse to execute such a waiver, it may limit the field of potential target businesses that we might pursue.

 

Examples of possible instances where we may engage a third party that refuses to execute a waiver include the engagement of a third-party consultant whose particular expertise or skills are believed by management to be significantly superior to those of other consultants that would agree to execute a waiver or in cases where management is unable to find a service provider willing to execute a waiver. In addition, there is no guarantee that such entities will agree to waive any claims they may have in the future as a result of, or arising out of, any negotiations, contracts or agreements with us and will not seek recourse against the trust account for any reason. Upon redemption of our public shares, if we have not completed an initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination, or upon the exercise of a redemption right in connection with our initial business combination, we will be required to provide for payment of claims of creditors that were not waived that may be brought against us within the ten years following redemption.

 

Accordingly, the per-share redemption amount received by public shareholders could be less than the $10.10 per public share initially held in the trust account, due to claims of such creditors. Pursuant to the letter agreement the form of which is filed as an exhibit to the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part, our sponsor has agreed that it will be liable to us if and to the extent any claims by a third party (other than our independent registered public accounting firm) for services rendered or products sold to us, or a prospective target business with which we have discussed entering into a transaction agreement, reduce the amounts in the trust account to below the lesser of (i) $10.10 per public share and (ii) the actual amount per unit held in the trust account as of the date of the liquidation of the trust account if less than $10.10 per unit due to reductions in the value of the trust assets, in each case net of the interest that may be withdrawn to pay our taxes, if any, provided that such liability will not apply to any claims by a third party or prospective target business that executed a waiver of any and all rights to seek access to the trust account nor will it apply to any claims under our indemnity of the underwriters of this offering against certain liabilities, including liabilities under the Securities Act. Moreover, in the event that an executed waiver is deemed to be unenforceable against a third party, our sponsor will not be responsible to the extent of any liability for such third-party claims. However, we have not asked our sponsor to reserve for such indemnification obligations, nor have we independently verified whether our sponsor has sufficient funds to satisfy its indemnity obligations and believe that our sponsor’s only assets are securities of our company. Therefore, we cannot assure you that our sponsor would be able to satisfy those obligations. As a result, if any such claims were successfully made against the trust account, the funds available for our initial business combination and redemptions could be reduced to less than $10.10 per share (whether or not the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full). In such event, we may not be able to complete our initial business combination, and you would receive such lesser amount per unit in connection with any redemption of your public shares. None of our officers or directors will indemnify us for claims by third parties including, without limitation, claims by vendors and prospective target businesses.

 

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Our directors may decide not to enforce the indemnification obligations of our sponsor, resulting in a reduction in the amount of funds in the trust account available for distribution to our public shareholders.

 

In the event that the proceeds in the trust account are reduced below the lesser of (i) $10.10 per unit and (ii) the actual amount per unit held in the trust account as of the date of the liquidation of the trust account if less than $10.10 per unit due to reductions in the value of the trust assets, in each case net of the interest that may be withdrawn to pay our taxes, if any, and our sponsor asserts that it is unable to satisfy its obligations or that it has no indemnification obligations related to a particular claim, our independent directors would determine whether to take legal action against our sponsor to enforce its indemnification obligations. While we currently expect that our independent directors would take legal action on our behalf against our sponsor to enforce its indemnification obligations to us, it is possible that our independent directors in exercising their business judgment and subject to their fiduciary duties may choose not to do so in any particular instance. If our independent directors choose not to enforce these indemnification obligations, the amount of funds in the trust account available for distribution to our public shareholders may be reduced below $10.10 per unit.

 

We may not have sufficient funds to satisfy indemnification claims of our directors and executive officers. We have agreed to indemnify our officers and directors to the fullest extent permitted by law. However, our officers and directors have agreed to waive any right, title, interest or claim of any kind in or to any monies in the trust account and to not seek recourse against the trust account for any reason whatsoever (except to the extent they are entitled to funds from the trust account due to their ownership of public shares). Accordingly, any indemnification provided will be able to be satisfied by us only if (i) we have sufficient funds outside of the trust account or (ii) we complete an initial business combination. Our obligation to indemnify our officers and directors may discourage shareholders from bringing a lawsuit against our officers or directors for breach of their fiduciary duty. These provisions also may have the effect of reducing the likelihood of derivative litigation against our officers and directors, even though such an action, if successful, might otherwise benefit us and our shareholders. Furthermore, a shareholder’s investment may be adversely affected to the extent we pay the costs of settlement and damage awards against our officers and directors pursuant to these indemnification provisions.

 

If, after we distribute the proceeds in the trust account to our public shareholders, we file a bankruptcy or winding-up petition or an involuntary bankruptcy or winding-up petition is filed against us that is not dismissed, a bankruptcy or insolvency court may seek to recover such proceeds, and the members of our board of directors may be viewed as having breached their fiduciary duties to our creditors, thereby exposing the members of our board of directors and us to claims of punitive damages.

 

If, after we distribute the proceeds in the trust account to our public shareholders, we file a bankruptcy or winding-up petition or an involuntary bankruptcy or winding-up petition is filed against us that is not dismissed, any distributions received by shareholders could be viewed under applicable debtor/creditor and/or bankruptcy or insolvency laws as either a “preferential transfer” or a “fraudulent conveyance.” As a result, a bankruptcy or insolvency court could seek to recover some or all amounts received by our shareholders. In addition, our board of directors may be viewed as having breached its fiduciary duty to our creditors and/or having acted in bad faith, thereby exposing itself and us to claims of punitive damages, by paying public shareholders from the trust account prior to addressing the claims of creditors.

 

If, before distributing the proceeds in the trust account to our public shareholders, we file a bankruptcy or winding-up petition or an involuntary bankruptcy or winding-up petition is filed against us that is not dismissed, the claims of creditors in such proceeding may have priority over the claims of our shareholders and the per-share amount that would otherwise be received by our shareholders in connection with our liquidation may be reduced.

 

If, before distributing the proceeds in the trust account to our public shareholders, we file a bankruptcy or winding-up petition or an involuntary bankruptcy or winding-up petition is filed against us that is not dismissed, the proceeds held in the trust account could be subject to applicable bankruptcy or insolvency law and may be included in our bankruptcy estate and subject to the claims of third parties with priority over the claims of our shareholders. To the extent any bankruptcy claims deplete the trust account, the per-share amount that would otherwise be received by our shareholders in connection with our liquidation may be reduced.

 

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Holders of rights will not have redemption rights.

 

If we are unable to complete an initial business combination within the required time period and we redeem the funds held in the trust account, the rights will expire and holders will not receive any of the amounts held in the trust account in exchange for such rights.

 

Our initial business combination or related reincorporation may result in taxes imposed on shareholders.

 

We may, in connection with our initial business combination and subject to requisite shareholder approval under the Companies Act, effect a business combination with a target company in another jurisdiction, reincorporate in the jurisdiction in which the partner company or business is located or in another jurisdiction. Such transactions may require a holder of our securities to recognize taxable income in the jurisdiction in which the holder of such securities is a tax resident (or in which its members are resident if it is a tax transparent entity), in which the target company is located, or in which we reincorporate. We do not intend to make any cash distributions to holders of our securities to pay such taxes. Holders of our securities may be subject to withholding taxes or other taxes with respect to their ownership of us after the reincorporation.

 

As the number of special purpose acquisition companies evaluating targets increases, attractive targets may become scarcer and there may be more competition for attractive targets. This could increase the cost of our initial business combination and could even result in our inability to find a target or to consummate an initial business combination.

 

In recent years, the number of special purpose acquisition companies that have been formed has increased substantially. Many potential targets for special purpose acquisition companies have already entered into an initial business combination, and there are still many special purpose acquisition companies seeking targets for their initial business combination, as well as many such companies currently in registration. As a result, at times, fewer attractive targets may be available, and it may require more time, more effort and more resources to identify a suitable target and to consummate an initial business combination.

 

In addition, because there are more special purpose acquisition companies seeking to enter into an initial business combination with available targets, the competition for available targets with attractive fundamentals or business models may increase, which could cause target companies to demand improved financial terms. Attractive deals could also become scarcer for other reasons, such as economic or industry sector downturns, geopolitical tensions, or increases in the cost of additional capital needed to close business combinations or operate targets post-business combination. This could increase the cost of, delay or otherwise complicate or frustrate our ability to find and consummate an initial business combination and may result in our inability to consummate an initial business combination on terms favorable to our investors altogether.

 

The SEC has issued proposed rules relating to certain activities of special purpose acquisition companies (“SPACs”). Certain of the procedures that we, a potential business combination target, or others may determine to undertake in connection with such proposals may increase our costs and the time needed to complete our initial business combination and may constrain the circumstances under which we could complete an initial business combination. The need for compliance with the SPAC Rule Proposals may cause us to liquidate the funds in the Trust Account or liquidate our company at an earlier time than we might otherwise choose.

 

On March 30, 2022, the SEC issued proposed rules (the “SPAC Rule Proposals”) relating, among other items, to disclosures in business combination transactions between SPACS such as us and private operating companies; the condensed financial statement requirements applicable to transactions involving shell companies; the use of projections by SPACs in SEC filings in connection with proposed business combination transactions; the potential liability of certain participants in proposed business combination transactions; and the extent to which SPACs could become subject to regulation under the Investment Company Act, including a proposed rule that would provide SPACs a safe harbor from treatment as an investment company if they satisfy certain conditions that limit a SPAC’s duration, asset composition, business purpose and activities. The SPAC Rule Proposals have not yet been adopted, and may be adopted in the proposed form or in a different form that could impose additional regulatory requirements on SPACs. Certain of the procedures that we, a potential business combination target, or others may determine to undertake in connection with the SPAC Rule Proposals, or pursuant to the SEC’s views expressed in the SPAC Rule Proposals, may increase the costs and time of negotiating and completing an initial business combination, and may constrain the circumstances under which we could complete an initial business combination. The need for compliance with the SPAC Rule Proposals may cause us to liquidate the funds in the Trust Account or liquidate our company at an earlier time than we might otherwise choose.

 

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The excise tax included in the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 may decrease the value of our securities following our initial business combination, hinder our ability to consummate an initial business combination, and decrease the amount of funds available for distribution in connection with a liquidation.

 

On August 16, 2022, President Biden signed into law the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022, which, among other things, imposes a 1% excise tax on the fair market value of stock repurchased by a domestic corporation beginning in 2023, with certain exceptions (the “Excise Tax”). Because there is a possibility that we may acquire a U.S. domestic corporation or engage in a transaction in which a domestic corporation becomes our parent or our affiliate and our securities will trade on Nasdaq following the date of this prospectus, we may become a “covered corporation” within the meaning of the Inflation Reduction Act following the consummation of our initial business combination, and while not free from doubt, it is possible that the Excise Tax will apply to any redemptions of our ordinary shares after December 31, 2022, including redemptions in connection with an initial business combination and any amendment to our memorandum and articles of association to extend the time to consummate an initial business combination, unless an exemption is available.

 

As an entity incorporated as a Cayman Islands exempted company, the 1% Excise Tax is not expected to apply to redemptions of our public Ordinary Shares (absent any regulations and other additional guidance that may be issued in the future with retroactive effect).

 

However, in connection with an initial business combination involving a company organized under the laws of the United States, it is possible that we domesticate and continue as a Delaware corporation prior to certain redemptions and, because our securities are trading on the Nasdaq, it is possible that we will be subject to the Excise Tax with respect to any subsequent redemptions that are treated as repurchases for this purpose, that is partial liquidations under Section 331 of the Internal Revenue Code (i.e., other than, pursuant to recently issued guidance from the U.S. Department of the Treasury, redemptions in complete liquidation of the company). If we are subject to the Excise Tax, any shareholders that do not elect to redeem their shares in connection with the initial business combination may economically bear the impact of the Excise Tax.

 

In all cases, the extent of the Excise Tax that may be incurred will depend on a number of factors, including the fair market value of our public Ordinary Shares redeemed, the extent such redemptions could be treated as dividends and not repurchases, and the content of any regulations and other additional guidance from the U.S. Department of the Treasury that may be issued and applicable to the redemptions.

 

Issuances of shares by a repurchasing corporation in a year in which such corporation repurchases shares may reduce the amount of Excise Tax imposed with respect to such repurchase. The Excise Tax is imposed on the repurchasing corporation itself, not the shareholders from whom the shares are repurchased. The imposition of the Excise Tax could, however, reduce the amount of cash available to the company (or the cash contribution to the target business in connection with our initial business combination).

 

Consequently, the value of your investment in our securities may decrease as a result of the Excise Tax. In addition, the Excise Tax may make a transaction with us less appealing to potential business combination targets, and thus, potentially hinder our ability to enter into and consummate an initial business combination. Further, the application of the Excise Tax in the event of a liquidation is uncertain, and the proceeds held in the trust account could be subject to the Excise Tax, in which case the per-share amount that would otherwise be received by our shareholders in connection with our liquidation may be reduced.

 

We face risks related to the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine and any other conflicts that may arise on a global or regional scale which may adversely affect the business and results of operations of the post-combination entity.

 

On February 24, 2022, the Russian Federation launched an invasion of Ukraine that has had an immediate impact on the global economy resulting in higher energy prices and higher prices for certain raw materials and goods and services which in turn is contributing to higher inflation in the United States and other countries across the globe with significant disruption to financial markets and supply and distribution chains for certain raw materials and goods and services on an unprecedented scale. The impact of the sanctions has also included disruptions to financial markets, an inability to complete financial or banking transactions, restrictions on travel and an inability to service existing or new customers in a timely manner in the affected areas of Europe. The Russian invasion of Ukraine has continued to escalate without any resolution of the invasion foreseeable in the near future with the short and long-term impact on financial and business conditions in Europe remaining highly uncertain.

 

The U.S. and the European Union responded to Russia’s invasion of Ukraine by imposing various economic sanctions on the Russian Federation to which the Russian Federation has responded in kind. The United Kingdom, Japan, South Korea, Australia and other countries across the globe have imposed their own sanctions on the Russian Federation. The United States, the European Union and such other countries acting together or separately could impose wider sanctions or take further actions against the Russian Federation if the conflict continues to escalate. Multinational corporations and other corporations and businesses with business and financial ties to the Russian Federation have either reduced or eliminated their ties to the Russian Federation in a manner that often exceeds what is required pursuant to sanctions by these countries.

 

Further, the Russian Federation’s cyberattacks and other action may impact businesses across the United States, the European Union and other nations across the globe including those without any direct business ties to the Russian Federation.

 

It is uncertain if the post-combination entity’s business, operation, or financial conditions could be materially impacted in the event of a downturn in the worldwide economy resulting from the Russian invasion of Ukraine and other conflicts with a global impact.

 

If we are deemed to be an investment company under the Investment Company Act, we may be required to institute burdensome compliance requirements and our activities may be restricted, which may make it difficult for us to complete our initial business combination.

 

If we are deemed to be an investment company under the Investment Company Act, our activities may be restricted, including:

 

  restrictions on the nature of our investments; and
  restrictions on the issuance of securities, each of which may make it difficult for us to complete our initial business combination.

 

In addition, we may have imposed upon us burdensome requirements, including:

 

  registration as an investment company;
  adoption of a specific form of corporate structure; and
  reporting, record keeping, voting, proxy and disclosure requirements and other rules and regulations.

 

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In order not to be regulated as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, unless we can qualify for an exclusion, we must ensure that we are engaged primarily in a business other than investing, reinvesting or trading of securities and that our activities do not include investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading “investment securities” constituting more than 40% of our assets (exclusive of U.S. government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis. Our business will be to identify and complete a business combination and thereafter to operate the post-transaction business or assets for the long term. We do not plan to buy businesses or assets with a view to resale or profit from their resale. We do not plan to buy unrelated businesses or assets or to be a passive investor.

 

We do not believe that our anticipated principal activities will subject us to the Investment Company Act. To this end, the proceeds held in the trust account may only be invested in United States “government securities” within the meaning of Section 2(a)(16) of the Investment Company Act having a maturity of 180 days or less or in money market funds meeting certain conditions under Rule 2a-7 promulgated under the Investment Company Act which invest only in direct U.S. government treasury obligations. Pursuant to the trust agreement, the trustee is not permitted to invest in other securities or assets. By restricting the investment of the proceeds to these instruments, and by having a business plan targeted at acquiring and growing businesses for the long term (rather than on buying and selling businesses in the manner of a merchant bank or private equity fund), we intend to avoid being deemed an “investment company” within the meaning of the Investment Company Act.

 

This offering is not intended for persons who are seeking a return on investments in government securities or investment securities. The trust account is intended as a holding place for funds pending the earliest to occur of either: (a) the completion of our initial business combination; (b) the redemption of any public shares properly tendered in connection with a shareholder vote to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association (i) to modify the substance or timing of our obligation to allow redemption in connection with our initial business combination or to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete an initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination or (ii) with respect to any other provisions relating to the rights of holders of our ordinary shares; or (c) absent our completing an initial business combination within the period to consummate the initial business combination, our return of the funds held in the trust account to our public shareholders as part of our redemption of the public shares. If we do not invest the proceeds as discussed above, we may be deemed to be subject to the Investment Company Act. If we were deemed to be subject to the Investment Company Act, compliance with these additional regulatory burdens would require additional expenses for which we have not allotted funds and may hinder our ability to complete a business combination. If we do not complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may only receive their pro rata portion of the funds in the trust account that are available for distribution to public shareholders.

 

Changes in laws or regulations, or a failure to comply with any laws and regulations, may adversely affect our business, including our ability to negotiate and complete our initial business combination and results of operations.

 

We are subject to laws and regulations enacted by national, regional and local governments. In particular, we will be required to comply with certain SEC and other legal requirements. Compliance with, and monitoring of, applicable laws and regulations may be difficult, time consuming and costly. Those laws and regulations and their interpretation and application may also change from time to time and those changes could have a material adverse effect on our business, investments and results of operations. In addition, a failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations, as interpreted and applied, could have a material adverse effect on our business, including our ability to negotiate and complete our initial business combination, and results of operations.

 

The securities in which we invest the funds held in the trust account could bear a negative rate of interest, which could reduce the value of the assets held in trust such that the per-share redemption amount received by public shareholders may be less than approximately $10.10 per share.

 

The proceeds held in the trust account will be invested only in U.S. government treasury obligations with a maturity of 180 days or less or in money market funds meeting certain conditions under Rule 2a-7 under the Investment Company Act, which invest only in direct U.S. government treasury obligations. While short-term U.S. government treasury obligations currently yield a positive rate of interest, they have briefly yielded negative interest rates in recent years. Central banks in Europe and Japan pursued interest rates below zero in recent years, and the Open Market Committee of the Federal Reserve has not ruled out the possibility that it may in the future adopt similar policies in the United States. In the event that we do not to complete our initial business combination or make certain amendments to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, our public shareholders are entitled to receive their pro-rata share of the proceeds held in the trust account, plus any interest income, net of franchise and income tax (less, in the case we are unable to complete our initial business combination, $50,000 of dissolution expenses). Negative interest rates could reduce the value of the assets held in trust such that the per-share redemption amount received by public shareholders may be less than approximately $10.10 per share.

 

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If we have not completed an initial business combination within 12 months (subject to six one-month extensions, as set forth in this prospectus), our public shareholders may be forced to wait beyond such period to consummate the initial business combination before redemption from our trust account.

 

If we have not completed an initial business combination within 12 months (subject to six one-month extensions, as set forth in this prospectus), the proceeds then on deposit in the trust account, including interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our taxes, if any (less up to $50,000 of the interest to pay dissolution expenses), will be used to fund the redemption of our public shares, as further described herein. Any redemption of public shareholders from the trust account will be effected automatically by function of our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association prior to any voluntary winding up. If we are required to wind-up, liquidate the trust account and distribute such amount therein, pro rata, to our public shareholders, as part of any liquidation process, such winding up, liquidation and distribution must comply with the applicable provisions of the Companies Act. In that case, investors may be forced to wait beyond the period to consummate the initial business combination before the redemption proceeds of our trust account become available to them, and they receive the return of their pro rata portion of the proceeds from our trust account. We have no obligation to return funds to investors prior to the date of our redemption or liquidation unless we complete our initial business combination prior thereto and only then in cases where investors have sought to redeem their ordinary shares. Only upon our redemption or any liquidation will public shareholders be entitled to distributions if we do not complete our initial business combination.

 

Our shareholders may be held liable for claims by third parties against us to the extent of distributions received by them upon redemption of their shares.

 

If we are forced to enter an insolvent liquidation, any distributions received by shareholders could be viewed as an unlawful payment if it was proved that immediately following the date on which the distribution was made, we were unable to pay our debts as they fall due in the ordinary course of business. As a result, a liquidator could seek to recover some, or all amounts received by our shareholders. Furthermore, our directors may be viewed as having breached their fiduciary duties to us or our creditors and/or may have acted in bad faith, thereby exposing themselves and our company to claims, by paying public shareholders from the trust account prior to addressing the claims of creditors. We cannot assure you that claims will not be brought against us for these reasons. We and our directors and officers who knowingly and willfully authorized or permitted any distribution to be paid out of our share premium account while we were unable to pay our debts as they fall due in the ordinary course of business would be guilty of an offence and may be liable to a fine and imprisonment in the Cayman Islands.

 

We may not hold an annual meeting of shareholders until after the completion of our initial business combination.

 

In accordance with the Nasdaq corporate governance requirements, we are not required to hold an annual general meeting until no later than one year after our first fiscal year end following our listing on Nasdaq. There is no requirement under the Companies Act for us to hold annual or extraordinary general meetings to appoint directors. Until we hold an annual general meeting, public shareholders may not be afforded the opportunity to appoint directors and to discuss company affairs with management.

 

The grant of registration rights to our initial shareholders may make it more difficult to complete our initial business combination, and the future exercise of such rights may adversely affect the market price of the ordinary shares.

 

Pursuant to an agreement to be entered into concurrently with the issuance and sale of the securities in this offering, our initial shareholders and their permitted transferees can demand that we register the resale of the founder shares. We will bear the cost of registering these securities. The registration and availability of such a significant number of securities for trading in the public market may have an adverse effect on the market price of our ordinary shares. In addition, the existence of the registration rights may make our initial business combination more costly or difficult to conclude. This is because the shareholders of the target business may increase the equity stake they seek in the combined entity or ask for more cash consideration to offset the negative impact on the market price of our ordinary shares that is expected when the securities owned by our initial shareholders or holders of working capital loans or their respective permitted transferees are registered for resale.

 

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Because we are neither limited to evaluating a target business in a particular industry sector nor have we selected any specific target businesses with which to pursue our initial business combination, you will be unable to ascertain the merits or risks of any particular target business’s operations.

 

While we aim to target businesses on intelligent transportation, we may pursue business combination opportunities in any sector, except that we will not, under our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, be permitted to effectuate our initial business combination with another blank check company or similar company with nominal operations. Because we have not yet selected or approached any specific target business with respect to a business combination, there is no basis to evaluate the possible merits or risks of any particular target business’s operations, results of operations, cash flows, liquidity, financial condition or prospects. To the extent we complete our initial business combination, we may be affected by numerous risks inherent in the business operations with which we combine. Although our officers and directors will endeavor to evaluate the risks inherent in a particular target business, we cannot assure you that we will properly ascertain or assess all of the significant risk factors or that we will have adequate time to complete due diligence.

 

Furthermore, some of these risks may be outside of our control and leave us with no ability to control or reduce the chances that those risks will adversely impact a target business. We also cannot assure you that an investment in our public shares will ultimately prove to be more favorable to investors than a direct investment, if such opportunity were available, in a business combination target. Accordingly, any shareholders who choose to remain shareholders following our initial business combination could suffer a reduction in the value of their securities. Such shareholders are unlikely to have a remedy for such reduction in value unless they are able to successfully claim that the reduction was due to the breach by our officers or directors of a duty of care or other fiduciary duty owed to them, or if they are able to successfully bring a private claim under securities laws that the proxy solicitation or tender offer materials, as applicable, relating to the initial business combination contained an actionable material misstatement or material omission.

 

We may seek acquisition opportunities in industries or sectors which may or may not be outside of our management’s area of expertise.

 

We will consider a business combination outside of our management’s area of expertise if a business combination candidate is presented to us and we determine that such candidate offers an attractive acquisition opportunity for our company. Although our management will endeavor to evaluate the risks inherent in any particular business combination candidate, we cannot assure you that we will adequately ascertain or assess all of the significant risk factors. We also cannot assure you that an investment in our public shares will not ultimately prove to be less favorable to investors in this offering than a direct investment, if an opportunity were available, in a business combination candidate. In the event we elect to pursue an acquisition outside of the areas of our management’s expertise, our management’s expertise may not be directly applicable to its evaluation or operation, and the information contained in this prospectus regarding the areas of our management’s expertise would not be relevant to an understanding of the business that we elect to acquire. As a result, our management may not be able to adequately ascertain or assess all of the significant risk factors. Accordingly, any shareholders who choose to remain shareholders following our initial business combination could suffer a reduction in the value of their shares. Such shareholders are unlikely to have a remedy for such reduction in value.

 

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Although we have identified general criteria and guidelines that we believe are important in evaluating prospective target businesses and our strategy will be to identify, acquire and build a company in our target investment area, we may enter into our initial business combination with a target that does not meet such criteria and guidelines, and as a result, the target business with which we enter into our initial business combination may not have attributes entirely consistent with our general criteria and guidelines.

 

Although we have identified general criteria and guidelines for evaluating prospective target businesses, it is possible that a target business with which we enter into our initial business combination will not have all of these positive attributes. If we complete our initial business combination with a target that does not meet some or all of these guidelines, such combination may not be as successful as a combination with a business that does meet all of our general criteria and guidelines. In addition, if we announce a prospective business combination with a target that does not meet our general criteria and guidelines, a greater number of shareholders may exercise their redemption rights, which may make it difficult for us to meet any closing condition with a target business that requires us to have a minimum net worth or a certain amount of cash. In addition, if shareholder approval of the transaction is required by applicable law or stock exchange requirements, or we decide to obtain shareholder approval for business or other legal reasons, it may be more difficult for us to attain shareholder approval of our initial business combination if the target business does not meet our general criteria and guidelines. If we are unable to complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may receive only approximately $10.10 per share (whether or not the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full) or potentially less than $10.10 per share on our redemption, and our rights will expire worthless. See “— If third parties bring claims against us, the proceeds held in the trust account could be reduced and the per-share redemption amount received by shareholders may be less than $10.10 per share” and other risk factors herein.

 

We may seek business combination opportunities with a financially unstable business or an entity lacking an established record of revenue, cash flow or earnings, which could subject us to volatile revenues, cash flows or earnings or difficulty in retaining key personnel.

 

To the extent we complete our initial business combination with a financially unstable business or an entity lacking an established record of revenues or earnings, we may be affected by numerous risks inherent in the operations of the business with which we combine. These risks include volatile revenues or earnings and difficulties in obtaining and retaining key personnel. Although our officers and directors will endeavor to evaluate the risks inherent in a particular target business, we may not be able to properly ascertain or assess all of the significant risk factors and we may not have adequate time to complete due diligence. Furthermore, some of these risks may be outside of our control and leave us with no ability to control or reduce the chances that those risks will adversely impact a target business.

 

We are not required to obtain an opinion from an independent accounting or investment banking firm, and consequently, you may have no assurance from an independent source that the price we are paying for the business is fair to our shareholders from a financial point of view.

 

Unless we complete our initial business combination with an affiliated entity or our board cannot independently determine the fair market value of the target business or businesses, we are not required to obtain an opinion from an independent accounting firm or independent investment banking firm which is a member of FINRA or other firm that ordinarily renders valuation opinions that the price we are paying is fair to our company or fair to our shareholders from a financial point of view. If no opinion is obtained, our shareholders will be relying on the judgment of our board of directors, who will determine fair market value based on standards generally accepted by the financial community. Such standards used will be disclosed in our proxy solicitation or tender offer materials, as applicable, related to our initial business combination.

 

Our independent registered public accounting firm’s report contains an explanatory paragraph that expresses substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a “going concern.”

 

As of December 31, 2022, we had $0 in cash and cash equivalents and a working capital deficiency of $29,237. As of June 30, 2023, we had $1,388 in cash which was held in escrow bank account with legal counsel and a working capital deficiency of $143,686. Further, we expect to incur significant costs in pursuit of our acquisition plans. Management’s plans to address this need for capital through this offering are discussed in the section of this prospectus titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations.” Our plans to raise capital and to consummate our initial business combination may not be successful. In addition, management is currently evaluating the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the industry and its effect on our financial position, results its operations and/or search for a target company. These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern. The financial statements contained elsewhere in this prospectus do not include any adjustments that might result from our inability to consummate this offering or our inability to continue as a going concern.

 

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Resources could be wasted in researching business combinations that are not completed, which could materially adversely affect subsequent attempts to locate and acquire or merge with another business. If we are unable to complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may receive only approximately $10.10 per share, or less than such amount in certain circumstances, on the liquidation of our trust account and our rights will expire worthless.

 

We anticipate that the investigation of each specific target business and the negotiation, drafting and execution of relevant agreements, disclosure documents and other instruments will require substantial management time and attention and substantial costs for accountants, attorneys, consultants and others. If we decide not to complete a specific initial business combination, the costs incurred up to that point for the proposed transaction likely would not be recoverable. Furthermore, if we reach an agreement relating to a specific target business, we may fail to complete our initial business combination for any number of reasons including those beyond our control. Any such event will result in a loss to us of the related costs incurred which could materially adversely affect subsequent attempts to locate and acquire or merge with another business. If we are unable to complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may receive only approximately $10.10 per share on the liquidation of our trust account and our rights will expire worthless. In certain circumstances, our public shareholders may receive less than $10.10 per share on the redemption of their shares. See “— If third parties bring claims against us, the proceeds held in the trust account could be reduced and the per-share redemption amount received by shareholders may be less than $10.10 per share” and other risk factors herein.

 

We may engage in a business combination with one or more target businesses that have relationships with entities that may be affiliated with our sponsor, executive officers, directors or existing holders which may raise potential conflicts of interest.

 

In light of the involvement of our sponsor, its members and our executive officers and directors with other entities, we may decide to acquire one or more businesses affiliated with our sponsor, executive officers, directors or existing holders. Our directors also serve as officers and board members for other entities, including, without limitation, those described under the section of this prospectus entitled “Management — Conflicts of Interest.” Our sponsor and our directors and officers, or their respective affiliates may sponsor, form or participate in other blank check companies similar to ours during the period in which we are seeking an initial business combination. Such entities may compete with us for business combination opportunities. Our sponsor, officers and directors are not currently aware of any specific opportunities for us to complete our initial business combination with any entities with which they are affiliated, and there have been no substantive discussions concerning a business combination with any such entity or entities. Although we will not be specifically focusing on, or targeting, any transaction with any affiliated entities, we would pursue such a transaction if we determined that such affiliated entity met our criteria for a business combination as set forth in the section of this prospectus entitled “Proposed Business — Evaluation of a Target Business and Structuring of our Initial Business Combination” and such transaction was approved by a majority of our independent and disinterested directors. Despite our agreement to obtain an opinion from an independent investment banking firm which is a member of FINRA, or from an independent accounting firm, regarding the fairness to our company from a financial point of view of a business combination with one or more domestic or international businesses affiliated with our sponsor, executive officers, directors or existing holders, potential conflicts of interest still may exist and, as a result, the terms of the initial business combination may not be as advantageous to our public shareholders as they would be absent any conflicts of interest.

 

Since our sponsor, officers and directors will lose their entire investment in us if our initial business combination is not completed (except with respect to any public shares they may hold), a conflict of interest may arise in determining whether a particular business combination target is appropriate for our initial business combination.

 

On January 1, 2023, the Company issued to our sponsor 1,437,500 founder shares. The number of founder shares issued was determined based on the expectation that such founder shares would represent approximately 20% of the issued and outstanding shares after this offering (without giving effect to the private placement and assuming they do not purchase units in this offering). In addition, our sponsor has committed to purchase an aggregate of 259,000 of the placement units (or 277,750 of the units if the over-allotment option is exercised in full) at a price of $10.00 per unit, for an aggregate purchase price of $2,590,000 ($2,777,500 if the over-allotment option is exercised in full). Each placement unit consists of one ordinary share and one right to purchase one-eighth (1/8th) of one right.

 

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Holders of founder shares have agreed (A) to vote any shares owned by them in favor of any proposed initial business combination and (B) not to redeem any founder shares in connection with a shareholder vote to approve a proposed initial business combination or in connection with a shareholder vote to approve an amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association. In addition, we may obtain loans from our sponsor, affiliates of our sponsor or an officer or director. The personal and financial interests of our officers and directors may influence their motivation in identifying and selecting a target business combination, completing an initial business combination and influencing the operation of the business following the initial business combination. This risk may become more acute as the 18-month anniversary of the closing of this offering nears, which is the deadline for entering into an agreement to complete an initial business combination.

 

Since our officers and directors will share in any appreciation of the founder shares purchased at approximately $0.017 per share, a conflict of interest may arise in determining whether a particular target business is appropriate for our initial business combination.

 

Each of the officers and directors who will assist us in sourcing potential acquisition targets has an interest in the founder shares as of the date hereof. These officers and directors will not receive any cash compensation from us prior to a business combination but will share in any appreciation of the founder shares purchased and subsequently assigned to them by the Sponsor, provided that we successfully complete a business combination. We believe that this structure aligns the incentives of these officers and directors with the interests of our shareholders. However, investors should be aware that this structure also creates an incentive whereby our officers and directors could potentially make a substantial profit even if we complete a business combination with a target that ultimately declines in value and is not profitable for our public shareholders.

 

We may issue notes or other debt securities, or otherwise incur substantial debt, to complete a business combination, which may adversely affect our leverage and financial condition and thus negatively impact the value of our shareholders’ investment in us.

 

Although we have no commitments as of the date of this prospectus to issue any notes or other debt securities, or to otherwise incur outstanding debt following this offering, we may choose to incur substantial debt to complete our initial business combination. We and our officers have agreed that we will not incur any indebtedness unless we have obtained from the lender a waiver of any right, title, interest or claim of any kind in or to the monies held in the trust account. As such, no issuance of debt will affect the per-share amount available for redemption from the trust account. Nevertheless, the incurrence of debt could have a variety of negative effects, including:

 

  default and foreclosure on our assets if our operating revenues after an initial business combination are insufficient to repay our debt obligations;
     
  acceleration of our obligations to repay the indebtedness even if we make all principal and interest payments when due if we breach certain covenants that require the maintenance of certain financial ratios or reserves without a waiver or renegotiation of that covenant;
     
  our immediate payment of all principal and accrued interest, if any, if the debt security is payable on demand;
     
  our inability to obtain necessary additional financing if the debt security contains covenants restricting our ability to obtain such financing while the debt security is outstanding;
     
  our inability to pay dividends on our ordinary shares;
     
  using a substantial portion of our cash flow to pay principal and interest on our debt, which will reduce the funds available for dividends on our ordinary shares if declared, our ability to pay expenses, make capital expenditures and acquisitions and fund other general corporate purposes;
     
  limitations on our flexibility in planning for and reacting to changes in our business and in the industry in which we operate;

 

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  increased vulnerability to adverse changes in general economic, industry and competitive conditions and adverse changes in government regulation; and
     
  limitations on our ability to borrow additional amounts for expenses, capital expenditures, acquisitions, debt service requirements and execution of our strategy and other purposes and other disadvantages compared to our competitors who have less debt.

 

We may only be able to complete one business combination with the proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units, which will cause us to be solely dependent on a single business which may have a limited number of products or services. This lack of diversification may negatively impact our operations and profitability. Of the net proceeds from this offering and the sale of the placement units, $49,000,000 (or $56,350,000 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full) will be available to complete our initial business combination and pay related fees and expenses, after taking into account $1,000,000 (or $1,150,000 if the over-allotment option is exercised in full) of deferred underwriting commissions being held in the trust account and the estimated offering expenses.

 

We may effectuate our initial business combination with a single target business or multiple target businesses simultaneously or within a short period of time. However, we may not be able to effectuate our initial business combination with more than one target business because of various factors, including the existence of complex accounting issues and the requirement that we prepare and file pro forma financial statements with the SEC that present operating results and the financial condition of several target businesses as if they had been operated on a combined basis. By completing our initial business combination with only a single entity, our lack of diversification may subject us to numerous economic, competitive and regulatory developments. Further, we would not be able to diversify our operations or benefit from the possible spreading of risks or offsetting of losses, unlike other entities which may have the resources to complete several business combinations in different industries or different areas of a single industry. Accordingly, the prospects for our success may be:

 

  solely dependent upon the performance of a single business, property or asset; or
     
  dependent upon the development or market acceptance of a single or limited number of products, processes or services.

 

This lack of diversification may subject us to numerous economic, competitive and regulatory risks, any or all of which may have a substantial adverse impact upon the particular industry in which we may operate subsequent to our initial business combination.

 

In evaluating a prospective target business for our initial business combination, our management will rely on the availability of all of the funds from the sale of the placement units to be used as part of the consideration to the sellers in the initial business combination. If the sale of some or all of the placement units fails to close, for any reason, we may lack sufficient funds to consummate our initial business combination.

 

Our sponsor has agreed to purchase an aggregate of up to 259,000 placement units (or 277,750 placement units if the over-allotment option is exercised in full) at a price of $10.00 per unit, for an aggregate purchase price of $2,590,000 ($2,777,500 if the over-allotment option is exercised in full), in a private placement that will close simultaneously with the closing of our initial business combination. Each placement unit consists of one ordinary share and one-eighth (1/8th) of one right. These securities will also be worthless if we do not complete an initial business combination. The funds from the sale of these placement units may be used as part of the consideration to the sellers in our initial business combination, expenses in connection with our initial business combination or for working capital in the post-transaction company. The obligations under the placement agreement do not depend on whether any public shareholders elect to redeem their shares and provide us with a minimum funding level for the initial business combination.

 

If the sale of the placement units does not close for any reason, including by reason of the failure by the sponsor to fund the purchase price for its units, we may lack sufficient funds to consummate our initial business combination.

 

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We may be able to complete only one business combination with the proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units, which will cause us to be solely dependent on a single business, which may have a limited number of products or services and limited operating activities. This lack of diversification may negatively impact our operating results and profitability.

 

Of the net proceeds from this offering and the sale of the placement units, $50,500,000 (or $58,075,000 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full) will be available to complete our initial business combination and pay related fees and expenses (which includes up to $1,000,000 (or $1,150,000 if the over-allotment option is exercised in full, for the payment of deferred underwriting commissions being held in the trust account). We may effectuate our initial business combination with a single target business or multiple target businesses simultaneously or within a short period of time. However, we may not be able to effectuate our initial business combination with more than one target business because of various factors, including the existence of complex accounting issues and the requirement that we prepare and file pro forma financial statements with the SEC that present operating results and the financial condition of several target businesses as if they had been operated on a combined basis. By completing our initial business combination with only a single entity, our lack of diversification may subject us to numerous economic, competitive and regulatory developments.

 

Further, we would not be able to diversify our operations or benefit from the possible spreading of risks or offsetting of losses, unlike other entities that may have the resources to complete several business combinations in different industries or different areas of a single industry. Accordingly, the prospects for our success may be:

 

  solely dependent upon the performance of a single business, property or asset, or
     
  dependent upon the development or market acceptance of a single or limited number of products, processes or services.

 

This lack of diversification may subject us to numerous economic, competitive and regulatory risks, any or all of which may have a substantial adverse impact upon the particular industry in which we may operate subsequent to our initial business combination.

 

We may attempt to simultaneously complete business combinations with multiple prospective targets, which may hinder our ability to complete our initial business combination and give rise to increased costs and risks that could negatively impact our operations and profitability.

 

If we determine to simultaneously acquire several businesses that are owned by different sellers, we will need for each of such sellers to agree that our purchase of its business is contingent on the simultaneous closings of the other business combinations, which may make it more difficult for us, and delay our ability, to complete our initial business combination. With multiple business combinations, we could also face additional risks, including additional burdens and costs with respect to possible multiple negotiations and due diligence (if there are multiple sellers) and the additional risks associated with the subsequent assimilation of the operations and services or products of the acquired companies in a single operating business. If we are unable to adequately address these risks, it could negatively impact our profitability and results of operations.

 

We may issue our shares to investors in connection with our initial business combination at a price that is less than the prevailing market price of our shares at that time.

 

In connection with our initial business combination, we may issue shares to investors in private placement transactions (so-called PIPE transactions). The purpose of such issuances will be to enable us to provide sufficient liquidity to the post-business combination entity. The price of the shares we issue may be less, and potentially significantly less, than the market price for our shares at such time.

 

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We may attempt to complete our initial business combination with a private company about which little information is available, which may result in a business combination with a company that is not as profitable as we suspected, if at all.

 

In pursuing our acquisition strategy, we may seek to effectuate our initial business combination with a privately held company. By definition, very little public information generally exists about private companies, and we could be required to make our decision on whether to pursue a potential initial business combination on the basis of limited information, which may result in a business combination with a company that is not as profitable as we suspected, if at all.

 

We may seek business combination opportunities with a high degree of complexity that require significant operational improvements, which could delay or prevent us from achieving our desired results.

 

We may seek business combination opportunities with large, highly complex companies that we believe would benefit from operational improvements. While we intend to implement such improvements, to the extent that our efforts are delayed or we are unable to achieve the desired improvements, the initial business combination may not be as successful as we anticipate. To the extent we complete our initial business combination with a large complex business or entity with a complex operating structure, we may also be affected by numerous risks inherent in the operations of the business with which we combine, which could delay or prevent us from implementing our strategy. Although our management team will endeavor to evaluate the risks inherent in a particular target business and its operations, we may not be able to properly ascertain or assess all of the significant risk factors until we complete our initial business combination. If we are not able to achieve our desired operational improvements, or the improvements take longer to implement than anticipated, we may not achieve the gains that we anticipate. Furthermore, some of these risks and complexities may be outside of our control and leave us with no ability to control or reduce the chances that those risks and complexities will adversely impact a target business. Such combination may not be as successful as a combination with a smaller, less complex organization.

 

We do not have a specified maximum redemption threshold. The absence of such a redemption threshold may make it possible for us to complete our initial business combination with which a substantial majority of our shareholders do not agree.

 

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will not provide a specified maximum redemption threshold, except that in no event will we redeem our public shares in an amount that would cause our net tangible assets to be less than $5,000,001 (such that we are not subject to the SEC’s “penny stock” rules) or any greater net tangible asset or cash requirement which may be contained in the agreement relating to our initial business combination. As a result, we may be able to complete our initial business combination even though a substantial majority of our public shareholders do not agree with the transaction and have redeemed their shares or, if we seek shareholder approval of our initial business combination and do not conduct redemptions in connection with our initial business combination pursuant to the tender offer rules, have entered into privately negotiated agreements to sell their shares to our sponsor, officers, directors, advisors or any of their respective affiliates. In the event the aggregate cash consideration we would be required to pay for all ordinary shares that are validly submitted for redemption plus any amount required to satisfy cash conditions pursuant to the terms of the proposed business combination exceed the aggregate amount of cash available to us, we will not complete the initial business combination or redeem any shares, all ordinary shares submitted for redemption will be returned to the holders thereof, and we instead may search for an alternate business combination.

 

In order to effectuate an initial business combination, blank check companies have, in the recent past, amended various provisions of their charters and other governing instruments. We cannot assure you that we will not seek to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association or governing instruments in a manner that will make it easier for us to complete our initial business combination that our shareholders may not support.

 

In order to effectuate an initial business combination, blank check companies have, in the recent past, amended various provisions of their charters and modified governing instruments, including their rights agreements. For example, blank check companies have amended the definition of business combination, increased redemption thresholds, changed industry focus and extended the time to consummate an initial business combination and, with respect to their rights, amended their rights agreements to require the rights to be automatically converted at the closing of the business combination even if the issuer is not the survivor of the initial business combination. Amending our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will require the approval of a special resolution, being a resolution of a duly constituted general meeting of the Company that is passed by a majority of two thirds of the votes cast by, or on behalf of, the shareholders entitled to vote thereon and amending our rights agreement will require a vote of holders of at least a majority of the shareholders entitled to vote thereon and, solely with respect to any amendment to the terms of the placement rights or any provision of our rights agreement with respect to the placement rights, a majority of the number of the then outstanding placement rights.

 

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In addition, our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will require us to provide our public shareholders with the opportunity to redeem their public shares for cash if we propose an amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to (A) modify the substance or timing of our obligation to provide for the redemption of our public shares in connection with an initial business combination or to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case) or (B) with respect to any other material provisions relating to shareholders’ rights or pre-initial business combination activity. To the extent any such amendments would be deemed to fundamentally change the nature of any securities offered through this registration statement, we would register, or seek an exemption from registration for, the affected securities. We cannot assure you that we will not seek to amend our charter or governing instruments or extend the time to consummate an initial business combination in order to effectuate our initial business combination.

 

The provisions of our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association that relate to our pre-business combination activity (and corresponding provisions of the agreement governing the release of funds from our trust account) may be amended with the approval of a special resolution, being a resolution of a duly constituted general meeting of the Company that is passed by a majority of two thirds of the votes cast by, or on behalf of, the shareholders entitled to vote thereon, which is a lower amendment threshold than that of some other blank check companies. It may be easier for us, therefore, to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to facilitate the completion of an initial business combination that some of our shareholders may not support.

 

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will provide that any of its provisions related to pre-initial business combination activity (including the requirement to deposit proceeds of this offering and the private placement of units into the trust account and not release such amounts except in specified circumstances, and to provide redemption rights to public shareholders as described herein and including to permit us to withdraw funds from the trust account such that the per share amount investors will receive upon any redemption or liquidation is substantially reduced or eliminated) may be amended if approved by a special resolution, being a resolution of a duly constituted general meeting of the Company that is passed by a majority of two thirds of the votes cast by, or on behalf of, the shareholders entitled to vote thereon, and corresponding provisions of the trust agreement governing the release of funds from our trust account may be amended if approved by holders of 65% of our ordinary shares entitled to vote thereon. We may not issue additional securities that can vote on amendments to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association.

 

Our initial shareholders, who will collectively beneficially own up to 20% of our ordinary shares upon the closing of this offering (assuming they do not purchase any units in this offering), will participate in any vote to amend our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association and/or trust agreement and will have the discretion to vote in any manner they choose. As a result, we may be able to amend the provisions of our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, which govern our pre-initial business combination behavior more easily than some other blank check companies, and this may increase our ability to complete an initial business combination with which you do not agree. Our shareholders may pursue remedies against us for any breach of our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association.

 

Our sponsor, officers and directors have agreed, pursuant to a written agreement with us, that they will not propose any amendment to our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association to (A) modify the substance or timing of our obligation to provide for the redemption of our public shares in connection with an initial business combination or to redeem 100% of our public shares if we do not complete our initial business combination within 12 months from the closing of this offering (subject to six one-month extensions after the closing of the offering by depositing into the trust account, for each one-month extension, $166,500, or $191,475 if the underwriters’ over-allotment option is exercised in full ($0.0333 per unit in either case) or (B) with respect to any other material provisions relating to shareholders’ rights or pre-initial business combination activity, unless we provide our public shareholders with the opportunity to redeem their ordinary shares upon approval of any such amendment at a per-share price, payable in cash, equal to the aggregate amount then on deposit in the trust account (including interest, net of taxes), divided by the number of then outstanding public shares. These agreements are contained in a letter agreement that we have entered into with our sponsor, officers and directors. Our shareholders are not parties to, or third-party beneficiaries of, these agreements and, as a result, will not have the ability to pursue remedies against our sponsor, officers or directors for any breach of these agreements. As a result, in the event of a breach, our shareholders would need to pursue a shareholder derivative action, subject to applicable law.

 

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Our letter agreement with our sponsor, directors and officers may be amended without shareholder approval.

 

Our letter agreement with our sponsor, directors and officers contains provisions relating to transfer restrictions of our founder shares and sponsor rights, indemnification of the trust account, waiver of redemption rights and participation in liquidation distributions from the trust account. This letter agreement may be amended without shareholder approval (although releasing the parties from the restriction not to transfer our founder shares for 180 days following the date of this prospectus will require the prior written consent of the underwriters). Moreover, certain other agreements relating to this offering may be amended without shareholder approval. While we do not expect our board to approve any amendment to these agreements prior to our initial business combination, it may be possible that our board, in exercising its business judgment and subject to its fiduciary duties, chooses to approve one or more amendments to this agreement. Any such amendments to the letter agreement would not require approval from our shareholders and may have an adverse effect on the value of an investment in our securities.

 

We may be unable to obtain additional financing to complete our initial business combination or to fund the operations and growth of a target business, which could compel us to restructure or abandon a particular business combination. If we do not complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may only receive their pro rata portion of the funds in the trust account that are available for distribution to public shareholders.

 

We have not selected any specific business combination target but intend to target businesses with enterprise values that are greater than we could acquire with the net proceeds of this offering and the sale of the placement units. As a result, if the cash portion of the purchase price exceeds the amount available from the trust account, net of amounts needed to satisfy any redemption by public shareholders, we may be required to seek additional financing to complete such proposed initial business combination. We cannot assure you that such financing will be available on acceptable terms, if at all. To the extent that additional financing proves to be unavailable when needed to complete our initial business combination, we would be compelled to either restructure the transaction or abandon that particular business combination and seek an alternative target business candidate. Further, we may be required to obtain additional financing in connection with the closing of our initial business combination for general corporate purposes, including for maintenance or expansion of operations of the post-transaction businesses, the payment of principal or interest due on indebtedness incurred in completing our initial business combination, or to fund the purchase of other companies. If we are unable to complete our initial business combination, our public shareholders may receive only approximately $10.10 per share plus any pro rata interest earned on the funds held in the trust account and not previously released to us to pay our taxes on the liquidation of our trust account and our rights will expire worthless. In addition, even if we do not need additional financing to complete our initial business combination, we may require such financing to fund the operations or growth of the target business. The failure to secure additional financing could have a material adverse effect on the continued development or growth of the target business. None of our sponsor, officers, directors or shareholders is required to provide any financing to us in connection with or after our initial business combination. Further, as described in the risk factor entitled “— If third parties bring claims against us, the proceeds held in the trust account could be reduced and the per-share redemption amount received by shareholders may be less than $10.10 per share,” under certain circumstances our public shareholders may receive less than $10.10 per share upon the liquidation of the trust account.

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Because we must furnish our shareholders with target business financial statements, we may lose the ability to complete an otherwise advantageous initial business combination with some prospective target businesses.

 

The federal proxy rules require that a proxy statement with respect to a vote on a business combination meeting certain financial significance tests include historical and/or pro forma financial statement disclosure in periodic reports. We will include the same financial statement disclosure in connection with our tender offer documents, whether or not they are required under the tender offer rules. These financial statements may be required to be prepared in accordance with, or be reconciled to, accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America (“GAAP”), or international financial reporting standards as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (“IFRS”), depending on the circumstances and the historical financial statements may be required to be audited in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (the “PCAOB”). These financial statement requirements may limit the pool of potential target businesses we may acquire because some targets may be unable to provide such statements in time for us to disclose such statements in accordance with federal proxy rules and complete our initial business combination within the prescribed time frame.

 

Compliance obligations under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act may make it more difficult for us to effectuate a business combination, require substantial financial and management resources, and increase the time and costs of completing an acquisition.

 

Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires that we evaluate and report on our system of internal controls beginning with our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ending June 30, 2024. Only in the event we are deemed to be a large-accelerated filer or an accelerated filer, and no longer qualify as an emerging growth company, will we be required to comply with the independent registered public accounting firm attestation requirement on our internal control over financial reporting. Further, for as long as we remain an emerging growth company, we will not be required to comply with the independent registered public accounting firm attestation requirement on our internal control over financial reporting. The fact that we are a blank check company makes compliance with the requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act particularly burdensome on us as compared to other public companies because a target business with which we seek to complete our initial business combination may not be in compliance with the provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act regarding adequacy of its internal controls. The development of the internal control of any such entity to achieve compliance with the Sarbanes-Oxley Act may increase the time and costs necessary to complete any such acquisition.

 

Provisions in our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association and the Companies Act may inhibit a takeover of us, which could limit the price investors might be willing to pay in the future for ordinary shares and could entrench management. Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association will contain provisions that may discourage unsolicited takeover proposals that shareholders may consider to be in their best interests. These provisions will include a staggered board of directors which may make more difficult the removal of management and may discourage transactions that otherwise could involve payment of a premium over prevailing market prices for our securities.

 

We are also subject to anti-takeover provisions under the Companies Act, which could delay or prevent a change of control. Together these provisions may make the removal of management more difficult and may discourage transactions that otherwise could involve payment of a premium over prevailing market prices for our securities.

 

Because we are incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands, you may face difficulties in protecting your interests, and your ability to protect your rights through courts in the United States may be limited.

 

We are an exempted company incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands. As a result, it may be difficult for investors to effect service of process within the United States upon our directors or officers, or enforce judgments obtained in the United States courts against our directors or officers.

 

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Our corporate affairs will be governed by our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, the Companies Act (as the same may be supplemented or amended from time to time) and the common law of the Cayman Islands. We will also be subject to the federal securities laws of the United States. The rights of shareholders to take action against the directors, actions by minority shareholders and the fiduciary responsibilities of our directors to us under Cayman Islands law are to a large extent governed by the common law of the Cayman Islands. The common law of the Cayman Islands is derived in part from comparatively limited judicial precedent in the Cayman Islands as well as from English common law, the decisions of whose courts are of persuasive authority, but are not binding on a court in the Cayman Islands. The rights of our shareholders and the fiduciary responsibilities of our directors under Cayman Islands law are different from what they would be under statutes or judicial precedent in some jurisdictions in the United States. In particular, the Cayman Islands has a different body of securities laws as compared to the United States, and certain states, such as Delaware, may have more fully developed and judicially interpreted bodies of corporate law. In addition, Cayman Islands companies may not have standing to initiate a shareholders derivative action in a federal court of the United States.

 

We have been advised by our Cayman Islands legal counsel that there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the Cayman Islands would (i) recognize or enforce against us judgments of courts of the United States predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States or any state; and (ii) in original actions brought in the Cayman Islands, impose liabilities against us predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States or any state, so far as the liabilities imposed by those provisions are penal in nature. We have been advised by our Cayman Islands legal counsel that the courts of the Cayman Islands would recognize as a valid judgment, a final and conclusive judgment in personam obtained in the federal or state courts of the United States against our company under which a sum of money is payable (other than a sum of money payable in respect of multiple damages, taxes or other charges of a like nature or in respect of a fine or other penalty) or, in certain circumstances, an in personam judgment for non-monetary relief, and would give a judgment based thereon provided that (a) such courts had proper jurisdiction over the parties subject to such judgment, (b) such courts did not contravene the rules of natural justice of the Cayman Islands, (c) such judgment was not obtained by fraud, (d) the enforcement of the judgment would not be contrary to the public policy of the Cayman Islands, (e) no new admissible evidence relevant to the action is submitted prior to the rendering of the judgment by the courts of the Cayman Islands, and (f) there is due compliance with the correct procedures under the laws of the Cayman Islands.

 

As a result of all of the above, public shareholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests in the face of actions taken by management, members of the board of directors or controlling shareholders than they would as public shareholders of a United States company.

 

Risks Associated with Acquiring and Operating a Business in Foreign Countries

 

If we pursue a target company with operations or opportunities outside of the United States for our initial business combination, we may face additional burdens in connection with investigating, agreeing to and completing such initial business combination, and if we effect such initial business combination, we would be subject to a variety of additional risks that may negatively impact our operations.

 

If we pursue a target a company with operations or opportunities outside of the United States for our initial business combination, we would be subject to risks associated with cross-border business combinations, including in connection with investigating, agreeing to and completing our initial business combination, conducting due diligence in a foreign jurisdiction, having such transaction approved by any local governments, regulators or agencies and changes in the purchase price based on fluctuations in foreign exchange rates. If we effect our initial business combination with such a company, we would be subject to any special considerations or risks associated with companies operating in an international setting, including any of the following:

 

  costs and difficulties inherent in managing cross-border business operations and complying with different commercial and legal requirements of overseas markets;
     
  rules and regulations regarding currency redemption;
     
  complex corporate withholding taxes on individuals;

 

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  laws governing the manner in which future business combinations may be effected;
     
  exchange listing and/or delisting requirements;
     
  tariffs and trade barriers;
     
  regulations related to customs and import/export matters;
     
  local or regional economic policies and market conditions;
     
  export limits of raw materials and related in-country value-added processing requirements
     
  unexpected changes in regulatory requirements;
     
  longer payment cycles;
     
  tax issues, such as tax law changes and variations in tax laws as compared to the United States;
     
  currency fluctuations and exchange controls, including devaluations and other exchange rate movements;
     
  rates of inflation;
     
  liquidity of domestic capital and lending markets and challenges in collecting accounts receivable;
     
  compliance with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, as amended (the “FCPA”) and similar laws in other countries, which prohibit U.S. companies and their intermediaries from engaging in bribery or other prohibited payments to foreign officials and require companies to keep books and records that accurately and fairly reflect the transactions of the company and to maintain an adequate system of internal accounting controls;
     
  cultural and language differences;
     
  employment regulations;
     
  underdeveloped or unpredictable legal or regulatory systems;
     
  corruption;
     
  protection of intellectual property;
     
  social unrest, crime, strikes, riots and civil disturbances;
     
  regime changes and political upheaval;
     
  terrorist attacks, natural disasters and wars;
     
  deterioration of political relations with the United States; and
     
  government appropriation of assets.

 

We may not be able to adequately address these additional risks. If we were unable to do so, we may be unable to complete such initial business combination, or, if we complete such combination, our operations might suffer, either of which may adversely impact our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

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If our management following our initial business combination is unfamiliar with United States securities laws, they may have to expend time and resources becoming familiar with such laws, which could lead to various regulatory issues.

 

Following our initial business combination, our management may resign from their positions as officers or directors of the company and the management of the target business at the time of the business combination will remain in place. Management of the target business may not be familiar with United States securities laws. If new management is unfamiliar with United States securities laws, they may have to expend time and resources becoming familiar with such laws. This could be expensive and time-consuming and could lead to various regulatory issues which may adversely affect our operations.

 

After our initial business combination, substantially all of our assets may be located in a foreign country and substantially all of our revenue may be derived from our operations in such country. Accordingly, our results of operations and prospects may be subject, to a significant extent, to the economic, political and legal policies, developments and conditions in the country in which we operate.

 

The economic, political and social conditions, as well as government policies, of the country in which our operations are located could affect our business. Economic growth could be uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy and such growth may not be sustained in the future. If in the future such country’s economy experiences a downturn or grows at a slower rate than expected, there may be less demand for spending in certain industries. A decrease in demand for spending in certain industries could materially and adversely affect our ability to find an attractive target business with which to consummate our initial business combination and if we effect our initial business combination, the ability of that target business to become profitable.

 

Exchange rate fluctuations and currency policies may cause a target business’ ability to succeed in the international markets to be diminished.

 

In the event we acquire a non-U.S. target, all revenues and income would likely be received in a foreign currency, and the dollar equivalent of our net assets and distributions, if any, could be adversely affected by reductions in the value of the local currency. The value of the currencies in our target regions fluctuate and are affected by, among other things, changes in political and economic conditions. Any change in the relative value of such currency against our reporting currency may affect the attractiveness of any target business or, following consummation of our initial business combination, our financial condition and results of operations. Additionally, if a currency appreciates in value against the dollar prior to the consummation of our initial business combination, the cost of a target business as measured in dollars will increase, which may make it less likely that we are able to consummate such transaction.

 

We may reincorporate in another jurisdiction in connection with our initial business combination, and the laws of such jurisdiction may govern some or all of our future material agreements and we may not be able to enforce our legal rights.

 

In connection with our initial business combination, we may relocate the home jurisdiction of our business from the Cayman Islands to another jurisdiction. If we determine to do this, the laws of such jurisdiction may govern some or all of our future material agreements. The system of laws and the enforcement of existing laws in such jurisdiction may not be as certain in implementation and interpretation as in the United States. The inability to enforce or obtain a remedy under any of our future agreements could result in a significant loss of business, business opportunities or capital.

 

We are subject to changing law and regulations regarding regulatory matters, corporate governance and public disclosure that have increased both our costs and the risk of non-compliance.

 

We are subject to rules and regulations by various governing bodies, including, for example, the SEC, which are charged with the protection of investors and the oversight of companies whose securities are publicly traded, and to new and evolving regulatory measures under applicable law. Our efforts to comply with new and changing laws and regulations have resulted in and are likely to continue to result in, increased general and administrative expenses and a diversion of management time and attention from revenue-generating activities to compliance activities.

 

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Moreover, because these laws, regulations and standards are subject to varying interpretations, their application in practice may evolve over time as new guidance becomes available. This evolution may result in continuing uncertainty regarding compliance matters and additional costs necessitated by ongoing revisions to our disclosure and governance practices. If we fail to address and comply with these regulations and any subsequent changes, we may be subject to penalty and our business may be harmed.

 

Risks Related to Acquiring or Operating Businesses in the PRC

 

We do not currently operate in the PRC. However, our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC and Hong Kong. We may consider a business combination with an entity or business with a physical presence or other significant ties to the PRC which may subject the post-business combination business to the laws, regulations and policies of the PRC. We may consider a business combination with an entity or business with a physical presence or other significant ties to China which may subject the post-business combination business to the laws, regulations and policies of China (including Hong Kong and Macao). In addition, given the risks and uncertainties of doing business in China discussed elsewhere in this prospectus, the location and ties of our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management to China may make us a less attractive partner to a target company not based in China, which may thus increase the likelihood that we will consummate a business combination with a target company that is located in China or not consummate a business combination at all. Our ties to the PRC may make us less likely to consummate a business combination with any target company outside of the PRC which may result in non-PRC target businesses having increased leverage over us in negotiating an initial business combination knowing that if we do not complete our initial business combination within a certain timeframe, we may be unable to complete our initial business combination with any target business. As a result, we may be subject to risks related to the PRC, as discussed below.

 

We may undertake our initial business combination with an entity or business which is based in a foreign country, including China, and the laws and regulations of such foreign countries may not afford U.S. investors or regulatory agencies access to information normally available to them with respect to U.S. based entities.

 

In November 2020, the SEC Staff issued guidance regarding certain risks and considerations that should be considered by investors regarding foreign entities, specifically the limited ability of U.S. investors and regulatory agencies to rely upon or obtain information from foreign based entities, specifically China based entities, under the laws and regulations of such foreign countries. As stated by the SEC Staff, “[A]lthough China-based Issuers that access the U.S. public capital markets generally have the same disclosure obligations and legal responsibilities as other non-U.S. issuers, the Commission’s ability to promote and enforce high-quality disclosure standards for China-based Issuers may be materially limited. As a result, there is substantially greater risk that their disclosures may be incomplete or misleading. In addition, in the event of investor harm, investors generally will have substantially less access to recourse, in comparison to U.S. domestic companies and foreign issuers in other jurisdictions.” Among other potential issues and risks cited by the SEC Staff, the SEC Staff identified restrictions in China which restricted the PCAOB’s ability to inspect audit work and practices of PCAOB-registered public accounting firms in China and on the PCAOB’s ability to inspect audit work with respect to China-based issuer audits by PCAOB-registered public accounting firms in Hong Kong. However, we will not conduct an initial business combination with a target company that has an auditor that PCAOB is unable to inspect for two consecutive years at the time of our business combination, and will not engage an auditor following an initial business combination that PCAOB is unable to inspect for two consecutive years.

 

Further, current laws and regulations in China as well as other potential target countries, can limit or restrict investigations and similar activities by U.S. regulatory agencies such as the SEC to gather information regarding the securities and other activities of issuers based in the foreign countries where such laws or regulations exist. According to Article 177 of the newly amended PRC Securities Law which became effective in March 2020 (the “Article 177”), the securities regulatory authority of the PRC State Council may collaborate with securities regulatory authorities of other countries or regions in order to monitor and oversee cross border securities activities. Article 177 further provides that overseas securities regulatory authorities are not allowed to carry out investigation and evidence collection directly within the territory of the PRC, and that any Chinese entities and individuals are not allowed to provide documents or materials related to securities business activities to overseas agencies without prior consent of the securities regulatory authority of the PRC State Council and the competent departments of the PRC State Council. Although we have not identified a potential target business nor any particular country in which a business combination may occur, we intend to consider potential target business in foreign jurisdictions, including China based entities and businesses, and therefore investors should be aware of risks related to the ability to obtain information and conduct investigations and be afforded protections by U.S. based agencies such as the SEC related to any such business combination with a target business in a foreign country and consider such risks prior to investing in our securities.

 

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Trading in our securities may be prohibited under the HFCA Act if the PCAOB determines that it cannot inspect or fully investigate our auditor. In that case, Nasdaq would delist our securities. The delisting of our securities, or the threat of their being delisted, may materially and adversely affect the value of your investment. Additionally, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections may deprive our investors with the benefits of such inspections.

 

The HFCA Act, or the HFCA Act, was enacted on December 18, 2020. The HFCA Act states if the SEC determines that we have filed audit reports issued by a registered public accounting firm that has not been subject to inspection by the PCAOB for three consecutive years, the SEC shall prohibit our shares or other securities from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over-the-counter trading market in the U.S.

 

Our current auditor, MaloneBailey, LLP is an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, and is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess its compliance with the applicable professional standards. However, if it is later determined that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely our auditor because of a position taken by an authority in a foreign jurisdiction, Nasdaq would delist our securities, and the SEC shall prohibit them from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over-the-counter trading market in the U.S. For example, if we effect our initial business combination with a business located in the PRC and if our new auditor is located in China, with operations in and which performs audit operations of registrants in China, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB has been unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese authorities, the work of our new auditor as it relates to those operations may not be inspected by the PCAOB. Although we will not conduct an initial business combination with a target company that has an auditor that PCAOB is unable to inspect for two consecutive years at the time of our business combination, and will not engage an auditor following an initial business combination that PCAOB is unable to inspect for two consecutive years, which requirements will be included as a condition to closing our initial business combination, if applicable laws, regulations or interpretations change that prevent any such auditor from being inspected by the PCAOB in the future, we may suffer adverse consequences including the delisting of our securities. If our securities are delisted and prohibited from being traded on a national securities exchange or in the over-the-counter trading market in the U.S. due to the PCAOB not being able to conduct inspections or full investigations of our auditor, it would substantially impair your ability to sell or purchase our securities when you wish to do so, and the risk and uncertainty associated with potential delisting and prohibition would have a negative impact on the price of our securities. Also, such delisting and prohibition could significantly affect the Company’s ability to raise capital on acceptable terms, or at all, which would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and prospects.

 

On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final rules relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements under the HFCA Act. We will be required to comply with these rules if the SEC identifies us as having a “non-inspection” year under a process to be subsequently established by the SEC. On June 22, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, which would amend the HFCA Act and require the SEC to prohibit an issuer’s securities from trading on any U.S. stock exchanges if its auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspections for two consecutive years instead of three consecutive years.

 

On November 5, 2021, the SEC approved the PCAOB’s Rule 6100, Board Determinations Under the HFCA Act. Rule 6100 provides a framework for the PCAOB to use when determining, as contemplated under the HFCA Act, whether it is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms located in a foreign jurisdiction because of a position taken by one or more authorities in that jurisdiction. On December 2, 2021, the SEC issued amendments to finalize rules implementing the submission and disclosure requirements of the HFCA Act. The rules apply to registrants that the SEC identifies as having filed an annual report with an audit report issued by a registered public accounting firm that is located in a foreign jurisdiction and that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely because of a position taken by an authority in a foreign jurisdiction.

 

On December 16, 2021, the PCAOB issued a report in which it determined that it is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms headquartered in China, because of positions taken by Chinese authorities in those jurisdictions. The PCAOB made its determination pursuant to its Rule 6100, which provides the framework for how the PCAOB fulfills its responsibilities under the HFCA Act. In addition, the PCAOB’s report also identified the specific registered public accounting firms which are subject to the PCAOB’s determination that it is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms headquartered in China. Our auditor, MaloneBailey, LLP, is headquartered in Houston, Texas, and was not identified in the report as a firm subject to the PCAOB’s determination.

 

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In December 2021, the SEC adopted amendments to finalize its rules under the HFCA Act that set forth submission and disclosure requirements for commission-identified issuers identified under the Act, specify the processes by which the SEC will identify and notify Commission-Identified Issuers, and implement trading prohibitions after three consecutive years of identification. On December 2022, Congress passed the omnibus spending bill and the President signed it into law. This spending bill included the enactment of provisions to accelerate the timeline for implementation of trading prohibitions from three years to two years. Separately, on December 15, 2022 the PCAOB published its determination that in 2022 the PCAOB was able to inspect and investigate completely registered public accounting firms headquartered in mainland China and Hong Kong. This determination reset the now two-year clock for compliance with the trading prohibitions for identified issuers audited by these firms. The amendment had originally been passed by the U.S. Senate in June 2021, as the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act.

 

The SEC may propose additional rules or guidance that could impact us if our auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspection. For example, on August 6, 2020, the President’s Working Group (“PWG”) on Financial Markets, or the PWG, issued the Report on Protecting United States Investors from Significant Risks from Chinese Companies to the then President of the United States. This report recommended the SEC implement five recommendations to address companies from jurisdictions that do not provide the PCAOB with sufficient access to fulfill its statutory mandate. Some of the concepts of these recommendations were implemented with the enactment of the HFCA Act. However, some of the recommendations were more stringent than the HFCA Act. For example, if a company was not subject to PCAOB inspection, the report recommended that the transition period before a company would be delisted would end on January 1, 2022.

 

The SEC has announced that the SEC staff is preparing a consolidated proposal for the rules regarding the implementation of the HFCA Act and to address the recommendations in the PWG report. It is unclear when the SEC will complete its rulemaking and when such rules will become effective and what, if any, of the PWG recommendations will be adopted. The SEC has also announced amendments to various annual report forms to accommodate the certification and disclosure requirements of the HFCA Act. There could be additional regulatory or legislative requirements or guidance that could impact us if our auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspection. The implications of these possible regulations in addition to the requirements of the HFCA Act are uncertain, and such uncertainty could cause the market price of our securities to be materially and adversely affected. If, for whatever reason, the PCAOB is unable to conduct inspections or full investigations of our auditor, the Company could be delisted or prohibited from being traded over the counter earlier than would be required by the HFCA Act. If our securities are unable to be listed on another securities exchange by then, such delisting and prohibition would substantially impair your ability to sell or purchase our securities when you wish to do so, and the risk and uncertainty associated with potential delisting and prohibition would have a negative impact on the price of our securities. Also, such delisting and prohibition could significantly affect the Company’s ability to raise capital on acceptable terms, or at all, which would have a material adverse effect on the Company’s business, financial condition and prospects.

 

Inspections of audit firms that the PCAOB has conducted have identified deficiencies in those firms’ audit procedures and quality control procedures, which may be addressed as part of the inspection process to improve future audit quality. If the PCAOB were unable to conduct inspections or full investigations of the Company’s auditor, investors in our securities would be deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. In addition, the inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections or full investigations of auditors would may make it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of the Company’s independent registered public accounting firm’s audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors that are subject to the PCAOB inspections, which could cause investors and potential investors in our stock to lose confidence in the audit procedures of our auditor and reported financial information and the quality of our financial statements.

 

U.S. laws and regulations, including the HFCA Act, may restrict or eliminate our ability to complete a business combination with certain companies, particularly those acquisition candidates with substantial operations in China.

 

The PCAOB is currently unable to conduct inspections on accounting firms in the PRC without the approval of the Chinese government authorities. Future developments in U.S. laws may restrict our ability or willingness to complete certain business combinations with companies that are affected. For instance, the enacted HFCA Act would restrict our ability to consummate a business combination with a target company unless that business met certain standards of the PCAOB and would require delisting of a company from U.S. national securities exchanges if the PCAOB is unable to inspect its public accounting firm for three consecutive years. The HFCA Act also requires public companies to disclose, among other things, whether they are owned or controlled by a foreign government, specifically, those based in China. While we will not conduct a business combination with a target company that has an auditor that PCAOB is unable to inspect for two consecutive years beginning at the time of our business combination, and will not engage an auditor following a business combination that PCAOB is unable to inspect for two consecutive years, we may not be able to consummate a business combination with a favored target company due to these laws.

 

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In the event that we complete a business combination with a company with substantial operations in China and any of the legislative actions or regulatory changes discussed above were to proceed in ways that are detrimental to China-based issuers, it could cause us to fail to be in compliance with U.S. securities laws and regulations, we could cease to be listed on a U.S. securities exchange, and U.S. trading of our shares could be prohibited. Any of these actions, or uncertainties in the market about the possibility of such actions, could adversely affect our prospects to successfully complete a business combination with a China-based company.

 

Other developments in U.S. laws and regulatory environment, including but not limited to executive orders such as Executive Order (E.O.) 13959, “Addressing the Threat from Securities Investments That Finance Communist Chinese Military Companies,” may further restrict our ability to complete a business combination with certain China-based businesses.

 

We may not be able to complete an initial business combination with a U.S. target company if such initial business combination is subject to U.S. foreign investment regulations and review by a U.S. government entity such as the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), or ultimately prohibited.

 

Mr. Chen, our Chief Executive Officer, is the beneficial owner with respect to our ordinary shares held by our Sponsor. Mr. Chen is not a U.S. person, resides in China, and immediately following the consummation of the offering, our Sponsor and our initial shareholders will own approximately 20% of our issued and outstanding shares following this offering. Controlling or non-controlling investments in U.S. businesses that produce, design, test, manufacture, fabricate or develop one or more critical technologies in one of 27 identified industries – including aviation, defense, semiconductors, telecommunications and biotechnology – are subject to a mandatory filing with the Committee on Foreign Investment in the U.S. (“CFIUS”). In addition, CFIUS is an interagency committee authorized to review certain transactions involving foreign investment in the United States by foreign persons in order to determine the effect of such transactions on the national security of the United States. Because we may be considered a “foreign person” under such rules and regulations, any proposed business combination between us and a U.S. business engaged in a regulated industry or which may affect national security, we could be subject to such foreign ownership restrictions and/or CFIUS review. The scope of CFIUS was expanded by the Foreign Investment Risk Review Modernization Act of 2018 (“FIRRMA”) to include certain non-passive, non-controlling investments in sensitive U.S. businesses and certain acquisitions of real estate even with no underlying U.S. business. FIRRMA, and subsequent implementing regulations that are now in force, also subject certain categories of investments to mandatory filings. If our potential initial business combination with a U.S. business falls within the scope of foreign ownership restrictions, we may be unable to consummate a business combination with such business. In addition, if our potential business combination falls within CFIUS’s jurisdiction, we may be required to make a mandatory filing or determine to submit a voluntary notice to CFIUS, or to proceed with the initial business combination without notifying CFIUS and risk CFIUS intervention, before or after closing the initial business combination. CFIUS may decide to block or delay our initial business combination, impose conditions to mitigate national security concerns with respect to such initial business combination or order us to divest all or a portion of a U.S. business of the combined company if we had proceeded without first obtaining CFIUS clearance. The foreign ownership limitations, and the potential impact of CFIUS, may limit the attractiveness of a transaction with us or prevent us from pursuing certain initial business combination opportunities that we believe would otherwise be beneficial to us and our shareholders. As a result, the pool of potential targets with which we could complete an initial business combination may be limited and we may be adversely affected in terms of competing with other special purpose acquisition companies which do not have similar foreign ownership issues.

 

Moreover, the process of government review, whether by CFIUS or otherwise, could be lengthy. Because we have only a limited time to complete our initial business combination our failure to obtain any required approvals within the requisite time period may require us to liquidate. If we liquidate, our rights will expire worthless. This will also cause you to lose any potential investment opportunity in a target company and the chance of realizing future gains on your investment through any price appreciation in the combined company.

 

Recent regulatory actions by the government of the People’s Republic of China with respect to foreign capital efforts and activities, including Business Combinations with offshore shell companies such as SPACS, may adversely impact our ability to consummate a business combination with a China based entity or business, or materially impact the value of our securities following any such business combination.

 

Although we have not identified any potential business combination target or any country in which we may source any target business, we may eventually identify and submit for shareholder approval a business combination with a target business located or based in China. On July 30, 2021, the Chairman of the SEC issued a statement highlighting potential issues resulting from recent China regulatory changes and guidance that may impact investors’ investments in China based entities. According to the SEC’s Chairman, the PRC provided new guidance to and placed restrictions on China-based companies raising capital offshore, including through associated offshore shell companies. These developments include China government-led cybersecurity reviews of certain companies raising capital through offshore entities. This is relevant to U.S. investors. In a number of sectors in China, companies are not allowed to have foreign ownership and cannot directly list on exchanges outside of China. To raise money on such exchanges, many China-based operating companies are structured as Variable Interest Entities (VIEs). In such an arrangement, a China-based operating company typically establishes an offshore shell company in another jurisdiction to issue stock to public shareholders. For U.S. investors, this arrangement creates “exposure” to the China-based operating company, though only through a series of service contracts and other contracts. To be clear, though, neither the investors in the shell company’s stock, nor the offshore shell company itself, has stock ownership in the China-based operating company.

 

On March 15, 2019, the National People’s Congress approved the Foreign Investment Law, which took effect on January 1, 2020 and replaced three existing laws on foreign investments in China, namely, the PRC Equity Joint Venture Law, the PRC Cooperative Joint Venture Law and the Wholly Foreign-owned Enterprise Law, together with their implementation rules and ancillary regulations. The Foreign Investment Law embodies an expected PRC regulatory trend to rationalize its foreign investment regulatory regime in line with prevailing international practice and the legislative efforts to unify the corporate legal requirements for both foreign and domestic invested enterprises in China. The Foreign Investment Law establishes the basic framework for access to, and the promotion, protection and administration of foreign investments in view of investment protection and fair competition.

 

According to the China Foreign Investment Law, “foreign investment” refers to investment activities directly or indirectly conducted by one or more natural persons, business entities, or otherwise organizations of a foreign country (collectively referred to as “foreign investor”) within China, and the investment activities include the following situations: (i) a foreign investor, individually or collectively with other investors, establishes a foreign-invested enterprise within China; (ii) a foreign investor acquires stock shares, equity shares, shares in assets, or other like rights and interests of an enterprise within China; (iii) a foreign investor, individually or collectively with other investors, invests in a new project within China; and (iv) investments in other means as provided by laws, administrative regulations, or the State Council. The “variable interest entity” structure, or VIE structure, has been adopted by many PRC-based companies to obtain necessary licenses and permits in the industries that are currently subject to foreign investment restrictions in China. However, we will not conduct a business combination with any target company that conducts operations through VIEs.

 

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The Chinese government has exercised and continues to exercise substantial control over virtually every sector of the Chinese economy through regulation and state ownership.

 

If we were to complete a business combination with a Chinese entity, we could be subject to certain legal and operational risks associated with or having the majority of post-business combination operations in China. PRC laws and regulations governing the PRC based business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain, and as a result these risks may result in material changes in the operations of any post-business combination subsidiaries, significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares, or a complete hindrance of our ability to offer, or continue to offer, our securities to investors, including investors in the United States. Recently, the PRC government adopted a series of regulatory actions and issued statements to regulate business operations in China with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding the efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement. These recently enacted measures, and additional pending or future new measures which may be implemented, could materially and adversely affect the operations of any post-business combination company which we may acquire as our initial business combination.

 

If we were to undertake a business combination with a China based business, our ability to operate in China may be harmed by changes in its laws and regulations, including those relating to taxation, cyber security, environmental regulations, land use rights, property and other matters. The central or local governments of jurisdictions such as China may impose new, stricter regulations or interpretations of existing regulations that would require additional expenditures and efforts on our part to ensure our compliance with such regulations or interpretations.

 

There are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations. The laws and regulations are sometimes vague and new laws and regulations that affect existing and proposed future businesses may also be applied retroactively. We cannot predict what effect the interpretation of existing or new PRC laws or regulations may have on our business. In connection with any business combination with a China based entity, we will be required to provide additional risk disclosure related to any such possible transaction and would be expected to incur additional costs related to compliance with such laws and regulations, if such compliance can be obtained.

 

Uncertainties in the interpretation and enforcement of PRC laws and regulations and changes in policies, rules, and regulations in China, which may be quick with little advance notice, could limit the legal protection available to you and us.

 

The PRC legal system is based on written statutes. Unlike common law systems, it is a system in which legal cases have limited value as precedents. In the late 1970s, the PRC government began to promulgate a comprehensive system of laws and regulations governing economic matters in general. The legislation over the past three decades has significantly increased the protection afforded to various forms of foreign or private-sector investment in China. Any future PRC subsidiary would be subject to various PRC laws and regulations generally applicable to companies in China. Since these laws and regulations are relatively new and the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, however, the interpretations of many laws, regulations, and rules are not always uniform and enforcement of these laws, regulations, and rules involve uncertainties.

 

From time to time, we may have to resort to administrative and court proceedings to enforce our legal rights. Since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, however, it may be more difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy in the PRC legal system than in more developed legal systems. Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies, internal rules, and regulations that may have retroactive effect and may change quickly with little advance notice. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. Such uncertainties, including uncertainties over the scope and effect of our contractual, property (including intellectual property), and procedural rights, and any failure to respond to changes in the regulatory environment in China could materially and adversely affect our business and impede our ability to continue our operations. In addition, the legal and regulatory risks associated with doing business in China may make us a less attractive partner in an initial business combination than other special purpose acquisition companies that do not have ties to China. As such, our ties to China — including through our sponsor, officers and directors – may make it harder for us to complete an initial business combination with a target company without any such ties.

 

We will not conduct an initial business combination with any target company that conducts operations through VIEs, which may limit the pool of acquisition candidates we may acquire in the PRC and make it more difficult and costly for us to consummate a business combination with a target business operating in the PRC.

 

Our sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC and we may consider a business combination with an entity or business with a physical presence or other significant ties to the PRC. Where Chinese law prohibits direct foreign investment in companies located in the PRC, such companies may conduct operations through VIEs as a means of providing the economic benefits of foreign investment in such companies without investing directly. However, we will not conduct an initial business combination with any target company that conducts operations through VIEs. As a result, this may limit the pool of acquisition candidates we may acquire in the PRC, in particular, due to the relevant PRC laws and regulations against foreign ownership of and investment in certain assets and industries, known as restricted industries, including but not limited to value-added telecommunications services such as internet content providers. Furthermore, this may limit the pool of acquisition candidates we may acquire in the PRC relative to other special purpose acquisition companies that are not subject to such restrictions and may make it more difficult and costly for us to consummate a business combination with a target business operating in the PRC relative to such other companies. As a result, we may not be able to consummate a business combination with a favored target company.

 

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M&A Rules and other PRC regulations may make it more difficult for us to complete an acquisition of a target business.

 

The Regulations on Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors, or the “M&A Rules,” adopted by six PRC regulatory agencies in 2006 and amended in 2009, and other regulations and rules concerning mergers and acquisitions established a comprehensive set of regulations governing the approval process by which a Chinese company may participate in an acquisition of its assets or its equity interests and by which a Chinese company may obtain public trading of its securities on a securities exchange outside the PRC. The M&A Rules have largely centralized and expanded the approval process to the Ministry of Commerce, the State Administration of Industry and Commerce (SAIC), the State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE) or its branch offices, the State Asset Supervision and Administration Commission (SASAC), and the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC).

 

Depending on the structure of the transaction, these M&A Rules may require the Chinese parties to make a series of applications and supplemental applications to one or more of the aforementioned agencies, some of which must be made within strict time limits and depending on approvals from one or the other of the aforementioned agencies. The application process has been supplemented to require the presentation of economic data concerning a transaction, including appraisals of the business to be acquired and evaluations of the acquirer which will permit the government to assess the economics of a transaction in addition to the compliance with legal requirements. If obtained, approvals will have expiration dates by which a transaction must be completed. Also, completed transactions must be reported to the Ministry of Commerce and some of the other agencies within a short period after closing or be subject to an unwinding of the transaction. Therefore, acquisitions in China may not be able to be completed because the terms of the transaction may not satisfy aspects of the approval process and may not be completed, even if approved, if they are not consummated within the time permitted by the approvals granted.

 

Moreover, according to the Anti-Monopoly Law and other relevant PRC regulations, transactions which are deemed concentrations and involve parties with specified turnover thresholds must be cleared by the State Administration for Market Regulation before they can be completed. On July 1, 2015, the National Security Law of China took effect, which provides that China would establish rules and mechanisms to conduct national security review of foreign investments in China that may impact national security. The Foreign Investment Law of China, or the Foreign Investment Law, came into effect on January 1, 2020 and reiterates that China will establish a security review system for foreign investments. On December 19, 2020, the National Development and Reform Commission, or the NDRC, and MOFCOM jointly issued the Measures for the Security Review of Foreign Investments, or the FISR Measures, which were made according to the National Security Law and the Foreign Investment Law and became effective on January 18, 2021. Under the FISR Measures, foreign investments in military-related industries and certain other industries that affect or may affect national security are subject to the security review conducted through the NDRC and MOFCOM. The FISR Measures further expand the scope of national security review on foreign investment compared to the existing rules, while leaving substantial room for interpretation and speculation.

 

Pursuant to the Foreign Investment Law, the PRC State Council shall promulgate or approve a list of special administrative measures for foreign investments. The Special Administrative Measures (Negative List) for the Access of Foreign Investment (Edition 2020) that was promulgated by the NDRC and MOFCOM and took effect in July 2020 is the currently effective negative list and may be amended from time to time. The Foreign Investment Law provides that foreign investors shall not invest in the “prohibited” industries on the negative list, and shall meet such requirements as stipulated under the negative list for making investment in the “restricted” industries. Depending on the specific industry in which the target for our initial business combination operates, our initial business combination may be subject to requirements of the negative list.

 

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If we pursue an initial business combination with a target based in China, or if the combined company after our initial business combination pursues additional strategic acquisitions in China, complying with the requirements of the above-mentioned regulations and other relevant rules to complete such transactions could be time-consuming, and any required approval processes, including obtaining approval from MOFCOM, any other relevant PRC governmental authorities or their respective local counterparts may hinder our ability to complete such transaction on a timely basis or at all. As a result, we may not be able to complete our initial business combination within the prescribed timeframe described in this prospectus, and the combined company’s ability to expand its business or maintain its market share by strategic acquisitions may be limited.

 

In addition, the Circular of the General Office of the State Council on the Establishment of Security Review System for the Merger and Acquisition of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors that became effective in March 2011, and the Rules on Implementation of Security Review System for the Merger and Acquisition of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors issued by MOFCOM that became effective in September 2011 specify that mergers and acquisitions by foreign investors that raise “national defense and security” concerns and mergers and acquisitions through which foreign investors may acquire de facto control over domestic enterprises that raise “national security” concerns are subject to strict review by MOFCOM. The rules prohibit any activities attempting to bypass a security review, including by structuring the transaction through a proxy or contractual control arrangement. In the event we acquire a target in China, we may be subject to such regulatory reviews, which may impact our ability to complete a business combination within the prescribed time period.

 

The scope of the review we may be subject to includes, but is not limited to, whether the acquisition will impact national security or economic and social stability, and research and development capabilities on key national security related technologies. Foreign investors must submit a security review application to MOFCOM for its review of a contemplated acquisition. If the acquisition is considered within the scope of the security review regulations, MOFCOM will transfer the application to a joint security review committee consisting of members from various PRC government agencies, for further review.

 

Complying with the requirements of the above-mentioned regulations and other relevant rules to complete acquisitions could be time consuming. Any required approval processes may delay or inhibit our ability to complete such transactions, including but not limited to our ability to complete an initial business combination within the prescribed timeframe described in this prospectus. We may also be prevented from pursuing certain investment opportunities if the PRC government considers the potential investments a national security concern.

 

If the approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission is required in connection with this offering, we cannot predict whether we will be able to obtain such approval.

 

The M&A Rules, adopted by six PRC regulatory agencies requires an overseas special purpose vehicle formed for listing purposes through acquisitions of PRC domestic companies and controlled by PRC companies or individuals to obtain the approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC) prior to the listing and trading of such special purpose vehicle’s securities on an overseas stock exchange. On September 21, 2006, the CSRC published on its official website procedures specifying documents and materials required to be submitted to it by any such special purpose vehicle seeking CSRC’s approval of overseas listings. However, substantial uncertainty remains regarding the scope and applicability of the M&A Rules and the CSRC approval requirement to offshore special purpose vehicles.

 

In addition, the Opinions jointly issued by the General Office of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the General Office of the State Council (the “Opinions”), which were made available to the public on July 6, 2021, call for strengthened regulation over illegal securities activities and supervision of overseas listings by China-based companies and propose to take effective measures, such as promoting the development of relevant regulatory systems to deal with the risks and incidents faced by China-based overseas-listed companies. The Opinions also provide that the State Council will revise provisions regarding the overseas issuance and listing of shares by companies limited by shares and will clarify the duties of domestic regulatory authorities. As of the date of this prospectus, no official guidance and related implementation rules have been issued in relation to the recently issued Opinions and the interpretation and implementation of the Opinions remain unclear at this stage.

 

On February 17, 2023, the CSRC promulgated the Trial Measures, which took effect on March 31, 2023. The Trial Measures supersede the prior M&A Rules and clarified and emphasized several aspects, which include but are not limited to: (1) comprehensive determination of the “indirect overseas offering and listing by PRC domestic companies” in compliance with the principle of “substance over form” and particularly, an issuer will be required to go through the filing procedures under the Trial Measures if the following criteria are met at the same time: (a) 50% or more of the issuer’s operating revenue, total profit, total assets or net assets as documented in its audited consolidated financial statements for the most recent accounting year comes from PRC domestic companies, and (b) the main parts of the issuer’s business activities are conducted in mainland China, or its main places of business are located in mainland China, or the senior managers in charge of its business operation and management are mostly Chinese citizens or domiciled in mainland China; (2) exemptions from immediate filing requirements for issuers that (a) have already been listed or registered but not yet listed in foreign securities markets, including U.S. markets, prior to the effective date of the Trial Measures, (b) are not required to re-perform the regulatory procedures with the relevant overseas regulatory authority or the overseas stock exchange, and (c) whose such overseas securities offering or listing shall be completed before September 30, 2023, provided however that such issuers shall carry out filing procedures as required if they conduct refinancing or are involved in other circumstances that require filing with the CSRC; (3) a negative list of types of issuers banned from listing or offering overseas, such as (a) issuers whose listing or offering overseas has been recognized by the State Council of the PRC as a possible threat to national security, (b) issuers whose affiliates have been recently convicted of bribery and corruption, (c) issuers under ongoing criminal investigations, and (d) issuers under major disputes regarding equity ownership; (4) issuers’ compliance with web security, data security, and other national security laws and regulations; (5) issuers’ filing and reporting obligations, such as the obligation to file with the CSRC after it submits an application for initial public offering to overseas regulators, and the obligation after offering or listing overseas to report to the CSRC material events including a change of control or voluntary or forced delisting of the issuer; and (6) the CSRC’s authority to fine both issuers and their shareholders between 1 and 10 million RMB for failure to comply with the Trial Measures, including failure to comply with filing obligations or committing fraud and misrepresentation.

 

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Based on our understanding of the current PRC laws and regulations, we believe that our company is not required to obtain any prior permission from any PRC governmental authorities (including the CSRC) for consummating this offering, given that our company is a blank check company newly incorporated in the Cayman Islands rather than in China and currently we do not own or control any equity interest in any PRC company or operate any business in China. Likewise, while our Sponsor is controlled by persons residing in the PRC, it is a British Virgin Islands company and has no operations in the PRC.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, sanctions or regulatory objection to this offering from the CSRC or any other PRC governmental authorities. However, there remains some uncertainty and no assurance as to how our interpretations to the M&A Rules, the Opinions and the Trial Measures will be interpreted or implemented by the relevant PRC governmental authorities, including the CSRC, or that the CSRC or any other PRC governmental authorities would not promulgate new rules or adopt new interpretation of existing rules that would require us to obtain CSRC or other PRC governmental approvals for this offering or, in the context of an overseas offering or if we decide to consummate the business combination with a target business based in and primarily operating in China.

 

If the CSRC or another PRC governmental authority subsequently determines that its approval is needed for this offering, or for our business combination with a target business based in and primarily operating in China, or approval obtained for the business combination is subsequently rescinded, we may face adverse actions or sanctions by the CSRC or other PRC governmental authorities. For example, we may be required to register with the CSRC following the Offering as a result of the Trial Measures. These governmental authorities may delay this offering or a potential business combination, impose fines and penalties, limit our operations in China, or take other actions that could result in our inability to consummate an initial business combination with a China-based business, or materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, reputation and prospects, as well as the trading price of our securities or the continued listing on a U.S. exchange. Any changes in PRC law, regulations, or interpretations may severely affect our operations after this offering. The use of the term “operate” and “operations” includes the process of searching for a target business and conducting related activities. To that extent, we may not be able to conduct the process of searching of a potential target company in China.

 

If we decide to consummate our business combination with a target business based in and primarily operating in China, the combined company’s business operations in China through its subsidiaries, are subject to relevant requirements to obtain applicable licenses from PRC governmental authorities under relevant PRC laws and regulations.

 

You may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments, or bringing actions in China against us or our management and directors named in the prospectus based on foreign laws. It may also be difficult for you or overseas regulators to conduct investigations or collect evidence within China.

 

Our officers and directors do and may continue to reside within China and Hong Kong, are and may continue to be physically there for a significant portion of each year, and are and may continue to be PRC nationals. In addition, following completion of a business combination, we may remain a company incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands, conduct most of our operations in China and most of our assets may be located in China and some of the post-combined company’s officers and directors may reside in China. As a result, it may be difficult for you to effect service of process upon us or those persons residing in China. Even with service of process, it may also be difficult to enforce judgments obtained in U.S. courts based on the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws against these officers and directors in China. The members of our Board of Directors that reside in mainland China are Yongjin Chen and Yun Wu, while the remaining members of our Board of Directors, Wong Ping Kuen, Ka Cheong Leung and Dick Wai Mak, also reside outside of the United States in Hong Kong.

 

In addition, there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the PRC would recognize or enforce judgments of U.S. courts against us or such persons predicated upon the civil liability provisions of U.S. securities laws or those of any U.S. state. The recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are provided for under the PRC Civil Procedures Law. PRC courts may recognize and enforce foreign judgments in accordance with the requirements of the PRC Civil Procedures Law based either on treaties between China and the country where the judgment is made or on principles of reciprocity between jurisdictions. China does not have any treaties or other forms of written arrangement with the U.S. that provide for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments. In addition, according to the PRC Civil Procedures Law, the PRC courts will not enforce a foreign judgment against us or our directors and officers if they decide that the judgment violates the basic principles of PRC laws or national sovereignty, security, or public interest. As a result, it is uncertain whether and on what basis a PRC court would enforce a judgment rendered by a court in the U.S.

 

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It may also be difficult for you or overseas regulators to conduct investigations or collect evidence within China. For example, in China, there are significant legal and other obstacles to obtaining information needed for shareholder investigations or litigation outside China or otherwise with respect to foreign entities. Although the authorities in China may establish a regulatory cooperation mechanism with its counterparts of another country or region to monitor and oversee cross-border securities activities, such regulatory cooperation with the securities regulatory authorities in the U.S. may not be efficient in the absence of a practical cooperation mechanism. Furthermore, according to Article 177 of the PRC Securities Law, or “Article 177,” which became effective in March 2020, no overseas securities regulator is allowed to directly conduct investigations or evidence collection activities within the territory of the PRC. Article 177 further provides that Chinese entities and individuals are not allowed to provide documents or materials related to securities business activities to foreign agencies without prior consent from the securities regulatory authority of the PRC State Council and the competent departments of the PRC State Council. While detailed interpretation of or implementing rules under Article 177 have yet to be promulgated, the inability for an overseas securities regulator to directly conduct investigation or evidence collection activities within China may further increase difficulties faced by you in protecting your interests.

 

Any actions by the Chinese government, including any decision to intervene or influence the operations of any future PRC subsidiary or to exert control over any offering of securities conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, may cause us to make material changes to the operations of any future PRC subsidiary, may limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors, and may cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

The Chinese government has exercised and continues to exercise substantial control over virtually every sector of the Chinese economy through regulation and state ownership. The ability of our subsidiary to operate in China may be impaired by changes in its laws and regulations, including those relating to taxation, environmental regulations, land use rights, foreign investment limitations, and other matters. The central or local governments of China may impose new, stricter regulations or interpretations of existing regulations that would require additional expenditures and efforts on our part to ensure our PRC subsidiary compliance with such regulations or interpretations. As such, any future PRC subsidiary may be subject to various government and regulatory interference in the provinces in which they operate. They could be subject to regulation by various political and regulatory entities, including various local and municipal agencies and government sub-divisions. They may incur increased costs necessary to comply with existing and newly adopted laws and regulations or penalties for any failure to comply.

 

Furthermore, it is uncertain when and whether we will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to list on U.S. exchanges in the future, and even when such permission is obtained, whether it will be denied or rescinded. Our operations following a business combination with a PRC entity could be adversely affected, directly or indirectly, by existing or future laws and regulations relating to our business or industry, particularly in the event permission to list on U.S. exchanges may be later required, or withheld or rescinded once given.

 

Accordingly, government actions in the future, including any decision to intervene or influence the operations of any future PRC subsidiary at any time or to exert control over an offering of securities conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, may cause us to make material changes to the operations of any future PRC subsidiary, may limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors, and/or may cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

Cash-Flow Structure of a Post-Acquisition Company Based in China.

 

The PRC government also has significant authority to exert restrictions on foreign exchange and our ability to transfer cash between entities, across borders, and to U.S. investors that may apply if we acquire a company that is based in China in an initial business combination. If we consummate an initial business combination with a company based in China, we may rely on dividends and other distributions from our future operating company in China to provide us with cash flow and to meet our other obligations. Such payments would be subject to restrictions on dividends as current regulations in China would permit our PRC operating company to pay dividends to us only out of its accumulated distributable profits, if any, determined in accordance with Chinese accounting standards and regulations. In addition, our operating company in China will be required to set aside at least 10% (up to an aggregate amount equal to half of its registered capital) of its accumulated profits each year. Such cash reserve may not be distributed as cash dividends. Each such entity in China is also required to further set aside a portion of its after-tax profits to fund the employee welfare fund, although the amount to be set aside, if any, is determined at the discretion of its board of directors. Although the statutory reserves can be used, among other ways, to increase the registered capital and eliminate future losses in excess of retained earnings of the respective companies, the reserve funds are not distributable as cash dividends except in the event of liquidation. In addition, if our operating company in China incurs debt on its own behalf in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other payments to us.

 

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In addition, we may be subject to restrictions on currency exchange as the PRC government may limit or eliminate our ability to utilize cash generated in Renminbi, or RMB to fund our business activities outside of the PRC or pay dividends in foreign currencies to our shareholders, including holders of our securities, and may limit our ability to obtain foreign currency through debt or equity financing. Should we choose to acquire a company in China, exchange controls that exist in the PRC may restrict or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to acquire a target company in PRC and limit our ability to utilize our cash flow effectively following our initial business combination. If we were to acquire a PRC company, the PRC regulation on loans to, and direct investment in, our PRC subsidiary by offshore holding companies and governmental control in currency conversion may restrict our ability to make loans to or capital contributions to our PRC subsidiary, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

 

These restrictions will restrict our ability to distribute earnings from our businesses, including subsidiaries, to the parent company and U.S. investors as well as the ability to settle amounts owed under contractual agreements. In addition, fluctuations in exchange rates could result in foreign currency exchange losses to us and may reduce the value of, and amount in U.S. Dollars of dividends payable on, our shares in foreign currency terms.

 

To date, we have not pursued an initial business combination and there have not been any capital contributions or shareholder loans by us to any PRC entities, we do not yet have any subsidiaries, and we have not received, declared or made any dividends or distributions.

 

If we become directly subject to the recent scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity involving U.S.-listed Chinese companies, we may have to expend significant resources to investigate and resolve the matter which could harm our business operations, this offering and our reputation and could result in a loss of your investment in our ordinary shares, especially if such matter cannot be addressed and resolved favorably.

 

Recently, U.S. public companies that have substantially all of their operations in China, have been subjected to intense scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity by investors, financial commentators and regulatory agencies, such as the SEC. Much of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity has centered around financial and accounting irregularities, a lack of effective internal controls over financial accounting, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud. As a result of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity, the publicly traded stock of many U.S. listed Chinese companies has sharply decreased in value and, in some cases, has become virtually worthless. Many of these companies are now subject to shareholder lawsuits and SEC enforcement actions and are conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations. It is not clear what effect this sector-wide scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity will have on us if we target a PRC company with respect to the initial business combination. If we become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we will have to expend significant resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend the company. This situation may be a major distraction to our management. If such allegations are not proven to be groundless, we will be severely hampered including in our efforts to close a business combination and your investment in our securities could be rendered worthless.

 

Because our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC, we will face certain legal and operational risks following our initial public offering, which could cause a significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares may occur including rendering them worthless.

 

Because our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC, we will face certain legal and operational risks following our initial public offering. These risks could result in a material change in the value of our securities that we are registering for sale. In addition, these legal and operational risks could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors. Further, these legal and operational risks cause result in a material adverse change in our operations which could also cause the value of our securities to decline significantly or even be worthless.

 

We are subject to complex and evolving laws and regulations in China. The PRC government has indicated an intent to exert more oversight and control over offerings that are conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, and initiated various regulatory actions and made various public statements, some of which are published with little advance notice, including cracking down on illegal activities in the securities market, enhancing supervision over China-based companies listed overseas, adopting new measures to extend the scope of cybersecurity reviews, and expanding efforts in anti-monopoly enforcement. Moreover, PRC laws and regulations governing the PRC based business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain.

 

Because our Sponsor and members of our Board of Directors and management have significant business ties to and are based in the PRC, and due the various legal uncertainties arising in the PRC, we will face certain legal and operational risks following our initial public offering. As a result of these risks, a significant depreciation of the value of our ordinary shares may occur. Further, these risks could result in a material change in the value of our securities that we are registering for sale. In addition, these legal and operational risks could significantly limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors. Further, these legal and operational risks cause result in a material adverse change in our operations which could cause the value of our securities to decline significantly or even be worthless.

 

Given that a majority of our directors and officers have significant ties to China, the Chinese government may exercise oversight and discretion over their conduct including their search for a target company, the Chinese government may intervene or influence our operations at any time, which could result in a material change in our search for a target business and/or the value of the securities we are registering.

 

Since a majority of our directors and officers have significant ties to China, the Chinese government may have potential oversight and discretion over the conduct of our directors and officers including over our directors’ and officers’ search for a target company. The Chinese government may intervene or influence our operations at any time through the directors and officers who have significant ties in China, which could result in a material change in our search for a target business and/or the value of the securities we are offering. Changes in the policies, regulations, rules, and the enforcement of laws of the PRC government may be adopted quickly with little advance notice and could have a significant impact upon our ability to operate. The realization of any these risks could adversely impact our initial business combination, future business and any future offering of securities.

 

Exchange controls that exist in the PRC may restrict or prevent us from using the proceeds of this offering to acquire a target company in the PRC and limit our ability to utilize our cash flow effectively following our initial business combination.

 

China’s State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, promulgated the Notice of the State Administration of Foreign Exchange on Reforming the Administration of Foreign Exchange Settlement of Capital of Foreign-invested Enterprises, or Circular 19, effective on June 1, 2015, in replacement of the Circular on the Relevant Operating Issues Concerning the Improvement of the Administration of the Payment and Settlement of Foreign Currency Capital of Foreign-Invested Enterprises, or SAFE Circular 142, the Notice from the State Administration of Foreign Exchange on Relevant Issues Concerning Strengthening the Administration of Foreign Exchange Businesses, or Circular 59, and the Circular on Further Clarification and Regulation of the Issues Concerning the Administration of Certain Capital Account Foreign Exchange Businesses, or Circular 45. According to Circular 19, the flow and use of the RMB capital converted from foreign currency-denominated registered capital of a foreign-invested company is regulated such that RMB capital may not be used for the issuance of RMB entrusted loans, the repayment of inter-enterprise loans or the repayment of banks loans that have been transferred to a third party. Although Circular 19 allows RMB capital converted from foreign currency-denominated registered capital of a foreign-invested enterprise to be used for equity investments within the PRC, it also reiterates the principle that RMB converted from the foreign currency-denominated capital of a foreign-invested company may not be directly or indirectly used for purposes beyond its business scope. Thus, it is unclear whether SAFE will permit such capital to be used for equity investments in the PRC in actual practice. SAFE promulgated the Notice of the State Administration of Foreign Exchange on Reforming and Standardizing the Foreign Exchange Settlement Management Policy of Capital Account, or Circular 16, effective on June 9, 2016, which reiterates some of the rules set forth in Circular 19, but changes the prohibition against using RMB capital converted from foreign currency-denominated registered capital of a foreign-invested company to issue RMB entrusted loans to a prohibition against using such capital to issue loans to non-associated enterprises. Violations of SAFE Circular 19 and Circular 16 could result in administrative penalties.

 

As such, Circular 19 and Circular 16 may significantly limit our ability to transfer the proceeds of this offering to a PRC target company and the use of such proceeds by the PRC target company.

 

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In addition, following our initial business combination with a PRC target company, we will be subject to the PRC’s rules and regulations on currency conversion. In the PRC, the SAFE regulates the conversion of the Renminbi into foreign currencies. Currently, foreign invested enterprises (“FIE”) are required to apply to the SAFE for “Foreign Exchange Registration Certificates for FIEs.” Following our initial business combination, we will likely be an FIE as a result of our ownership structure. With such registration certificates, which need to be renewed annually, FIEs are allowed to open foreign currency accounts including a “basic account” and “capital account.” Currency conversion within the scope of the “basic account,” such as remittance of foreign currencies for payment of dividends, can be effected without requiring the approval of the SAFE. However, conversion of currency in the “capital account,” including capital items such as direct investment, loans and securities, still require approval of the SAFE.

 

We cannot assure you the PRC regulatory authorities will not impose further restrictions on the convertibility of the Renminbi. Any future restrictions on currency exchanges may limit our ability to use the proceeds of this offering in an initial business combination with a PRC target company and the use our cash flow for the distribution of dividends to our shareholders or to fund operations we may have outside of the PRC.

 

Recent greater oversight by the PRC government and Cyberspace Administration of China over cybersecurity and data security, particularly for companies seeking to list on a foreign exchange, could adversely impact our initial business combination, future business and any future offering of securities.

 

On July 6, 2021, the General Office of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued the Opinions on Severe and Lawful Crackdown on Illegal Securities Activities and made them available to the public. These Opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and supervision of overseas listings by China-based companies. These Opinions proposed to take measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems, to deal with the risks and incidents facing China-based overseas-listed companies including greater cybersecurity and data privacy protection.

 

On July 10, 2021, the Cyberspace Administration of China or CAC published the Circular on Seeking Comments on Cybersecurity Review Measures (Revised Draft for Comments) (the “Review Measures Draft”), which provides that, in addition to critical information infrastructure operators (“CIIOs”) that intend to purchase Internet products and services, data processing operators engaging in data processing activities that affect or may affect national security must be subject to cybersecurity review by the Cybersecurity Review Office of the PRC. According to the Review Measures Draft, a cybersecurity review assesses potential national security risks that may be brought about by any procurement, data processing, or overseas listing. The Review Measures Draft further requires that CIIOs and data processing operators that possess personal data of at least one million users must apply for a review by the Cybersecurity Review Office of the PRC before conducting listings in foreign countries. On December 28, 2021, CAC published the Measures for Cybersecurity Review (“CRM”), which further restates and expands the applicable scope of the cybersecurity review. The revised CRM became effective on February 15, 2022. Pursuant to the revised CRM, if a network platform operator holding personal information of over one million users seeks for foreign listing, it must apply for the cybersecurity review, and operators of critical information infrastructure purchasing network products and services are also obligated to apply for the cybersecurity review for such purchasing activities. In addition, the revised CRM empowers the cybersecurity review office to initiate cybersecurity review when they believe any particular data processing activities affect or may affect national security. Compliance or failure to comply with such laws could increase the costs of our products and services, could limit their use or adoption, and could otherwise negatively affect our operating results and business.

 

As these regulations were newly issued and the governmental authorities may further enact detailed rules or guidance with respect to the interpretation and implementation of such regulations, it remains unclear whether we will be identified as a CIIO. Our business is subject to complex and evolving Chinese and international laws and regulations, including those regarding data privacy and cybersecurity. Many of these laws and regulations are subject to change and uncertain interpretation. Failure to comply with existing or future laws and regulations related to cybersecurity, information security, privacy and data protection could lead to government enforcement actions, which could include civil or criminal fines or penalties, investigation or sanction by regulatory authorities, private litigation, other liabilities, and/or adverse publicity. Compliance or failure to comply with such laws could increase the costs of our products and services, could limit their use or adoption, and could otherwise negatively affect our operating results and business. There remains uncertainty as to how the above-mentioned initiatives will be interpreted or implemented and whether the PRC regulatory agencies, including the CAC, may adopt new laws, regulations, rules, or further detailed implementation and interpretation related thereto. As we do not have any assets or operations at this time in PRC, we may become subject to such processes, procedures and reviews following a business combination with a PRC entity. We will take all reasonable measures and actions to comply with any such laws, regulations or rules that are or come into effect, and to minimize the adverse effect of such laws on us. We cannot guarantee, however, that we will not be subject to cybersecurity review in the future. During such review, we may be required to suspend our operation or experience other disruptions to our operations. Cybersecurity review could also result in negative publicity with respect to our Company and diversion of our managerial and financial resources, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial conditions, and results of operations. Furthermore, if any such new laws, regulations, rules, or implementation and interpretation require cybersecurity review and clearance or other specific actions to be completed by a potential acquisition target based in the PRC, we may face delays and uncertainties as to whether such clearance can be obtained within the timeframe described in this prospectus for our initial business combination, and we may be prevented from pursuing certain investment opportunities as a result thereof. In anticipation of the strengthened implementation of cybersecurity laws and regulations and the continued expansion of our business, we face potential risks if we provide or are deemed to provide network products and services to CIIOs, or we are deemed as a CIIO under the PRC cybersecurity laws and regulations. In such case, we would be required to follow the relevant cybersecurity review procedures and could be subject to cybersecurity review by the CAC and other relevant PRC regulatory authorities. As of the date of this offering memorandum, we have not been involved in any investigations on cybersecurity review made by the CAC on such basis, and we have not received any inquiry, notice, warning, or sanctions in such respect.

 

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For the further purposes of regulating data processing activities, safeguarding data security, promoting data development and utilization, protecting the lawful rights and interests of individuals and organizations, and maintaining national sovereignty, security, and development interests, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of China, or the SCNPC, published the Data Security Law, which took effect on September 1, 2021. The Data Security Law introduces a data classification and hierarchical protection system based on the importance of data in economic and social development, and the degree of harm it may cause to national security, public interests, or legitimate rights and interests of individuals or organizations if such data are tampered with, destr