253G2 1 fundrebel_253g2.htm OFFERING CIRCULAR

Table of Contents

 

Filed Pursuant to Rule 253(g)(2)

File No. 024-11985

 

OFFERING CIRCULAR DATED DECEMBER 1, 2022

 

FundRebel Dean, LLC

 

Sponsored by FundRebel

 

Up to $75,000,000 in Common Shares, consisting of:

$15,000,000 in Class A Common Shares

$60,000,000 in Class B Common Shares

 

FundRebel Dean, LLC (the “Company”) is a newly organized Delaware limited liability company formed to identify, underwrite, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects.

 

We are externally managed by FundRebel, LLC, which also serves as our sponsor (“FundRebel”, the “Manager”, or the “Sponsor”). We intend to elect to be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes from the date of our formation and to qualify as a real estate investment trust, or REIT, beginning with our taxable year ending December 31, 2022. This election to be treated as a REIT may be deferred by our board of directors until the taxable year ending December 31, 2023. In the event of such deferral of the REIT election, we would be taxed as a corporation for the taxable year ending December 31, 2022.

 

 

 

   

 

 

We are offering up to $75,000,000 worth of our common shares, which represent limited liability company interests in the Company, to the public at $10.00 per share, an amount that was arbitrarily determined by the Manager. We are offering two classes of our common shares – Class A and Class B (collectively, the “common shares”). We are offering up to 1,500,000 Class A common shares, and 6,000,000 Class B common shares. The minimum investment in our Class B common shares for initial purchases is 100 shares, or $1,000, and the minimum investment for our Class A common shares is 100,000 shares, or $1,000,000. We expect to offer common shares in this offering until we raise the maximum amount being offered, unless terminated by our Sponsor at an earlier time or extended in accordance with the terms of this offering circular. We have not adopted a redemption plan for our shareholders. Rather, we intend to have our shares quoted on PPEX, an alternative trading system (ATS) operated by North Capital Investment Technology, Inc. (“PPEX”) with a view to providing our shareholders with potential liquidity in the form of a secondary market for their investment in our shares.

 

The Company has engaged Dalmore Group, LLC, member FINRA/SIPC (“Dalmore”), to act as the broker-dealer of record in connection with this Offering, but not for underwriting or placement agent services. To the extent that the Company’s officers and directors make any communications in connection with this offering they intend to conduct such efforts in accordance with an exemption from registration contained in Rule 3a4-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and, therefore, none of them is required to register as a broker-dealer.

 

Investing in the Company’s common shares is speculative and involves substantial risks. You should purchase these securities only if you can afford a complete loss of your investment. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 19 to read about the more significant risks you should consider before buying our common shares. These risks include the following:

 

  · We depend on the Manager to select our investments and conduct our operations. We will pay fees and expenses to the Manager and its affiliates that were not determined on an arm’s length basis, and therefore we do not have the benefit of arm’s length negotiations of the type normally conducted between unrelated parties. These fees increase your risk of loss.
     
  · We have no operating history. The prior performance of our Sponsor and its affiliates may not predict our future results. Therefore, we cannot assure you that we will achieve our investment objectives.
     
  · This is a “blind pool” offering because we have not identified any investments to acquire with the net proceeds of this offering. You will not be able to evaluate our investments prior to purchasing our common shares.
     
  · FundRebel is our Manager and Sponsor. As such, our Manager’s executive officers are also officers, directors, managers and/or key professionals of our Sponsor and its affiliates. As a result, they will face conflicts of interest, including time constraints, allocation of investment opportunities and significant conflicts created by the Manager’s compensation arrangements with us and other affiliates of our Sponsor.
     
  · Our Sponsor and its affiliates may sponsor and/or contract with other companies that compete with the Company, and our Sponsor does not have an exclusive management arrangement with the Company.
     
  · We may change our investment guidelines without shareholder consent, which could result in investments that are different from those described in this offering circular.

 

 

 

   

 

 

  · Although our distribution policy is to use our cash flow from our operations to make distributions, our organizational documents permit us to pay distributions from any source, including offering proceeds, financing proceeds or proceeds from the sale of assets. We have not established a limit on the amount of proceeds we may use to fund distributions. If we pay distributions from sources other than our cash flow from operations, we will have less funds available for investments and your overall investment return is likely to be reduced. In any event, we intend to make annual distributions as required to maintain eligibility as a REIT and to avoid U.S. federal income and excise taxes on retained income.
     
  · Our operating agreement does not require the Manager to seek shareholder approval to liquidate our assets by a specified date, nor does our operating agreement require the Manager to list the Company’s common shares for trading by a specified date. No public market currently exists for our common shares, no public market is expected to develop, and the Manager does not expect to pursue any public market listing in the foreseeable future. Until the Company’s shares are listed, if ever, you may not be able to sell your common shares except on the secondary market on PPEX described in this offering circular of which there is no guarantee. If you are able to sell your common shares, you may have to sell them at a substantial loss.
     
  · If we fail to qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes and no relief provisions apply, we would be subject to entity-level U.S. federal income tax and, as a result, our cash available for distribution to our shareholders and the value of the Company’s shares could materially decrease.

 

The United States Securities and Exchange Commission does not pass upon the merits of or give its approval to any securities offered or the terms of the offering, nor does it pass upon the accuracy or completeness of any offering circular or other solicitation materials. These securities are offered pursuant to an exemption from registration with the SEC; however, the SEC has not made an independent determination that the securities offered are exempt from registration.

 

The use of projections or forecasts in this offering is prohibited. No one is permitted to make any oral or written predictions about the cash benefits or tax consequences you will receive from your investment in our common shares.

 

   Per Share   Total Minimum   Total Maximum 
Public Offering Price (1)  $10.00   $500,000.00 (2)  $75,000,000.00 
Underwriting Discounts and Commissions (3)  $0.10   $5,000.00   $750,000.00 
Proceeds to Us from this Offering to the Public (Before Expenses)  $9.90   $495,000.00   $74,250,000.00 

 

  (1) The initial price per share shown was arbitrarily determined by the Manager.

 

  (2) This is a “best efforts” offering. We will draw down on investors’ funds and issue common shares until we raise at least $500,000 in this offering, and we will not start operations until we raise $500,000 from investors in this offering, and $500,000 from a private placement to our Sponsor and its officers and directors, which we expect will occur immediately after raising the minimum offering amount in this offering. Until the minimum threshold is met, investors’ funds will remain in a subscription escrow account established for the offering (the “Subscription Escrow Account”). The Company has engaged North Capital Private Securities Corporation as an escrow agent (the “Escrow Agent”) to hold funds tendered by investors, and assuming we raise at least $500,000 in this offering, may hold a series of closings at which we receive the funds from the escrow agent and issue the shares to investors. In the event we have not raised the minimum offering amount by the date that is one year from the qualification of this offering with the Securities and Exchange Commission, any money tendered by potential investors will be promptly returned by the Escrow Agent. The Company may undertake one or more closings on a rolling basis once the minimum offering amount is sold. After each closing, funds tendered by investors will be available to the Company. See “Plan of Distribution

 

 

 

   

 

 

  (3) The Company has engaged Dalmore Group, LLC, member FINRA/SIPC (“Dalmore”), to act as the broker-dealer of record in connection with this offering, but not for underwriting or placement agent services. This includes the 1% commission, but it does not include the one-time set-up fee and consulting fee payable by the Company to Dalmore. Dalmore will also be providing certain administrative and compliance related functions in connection with this Offering. See “Plan of Distribution and Selling Security Holders” for details. To the extent that the Company’s officers and directors make any communications in connection with the Offering they intend to conduct such efforts in accordance with an exemption from registration contained in Rule 3a4-1 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and, therefore, none of them is required to register as a broker-dealer.

 

We will offer our common shares on a best efforts basis through online through our website at www.fundrebel.com. The approximate date of the commencement of the proposed sales to the public of our common shares will be within two calendar days from the date on which the offering is qualified by the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) and on a continuous basis thereafter until the maximum number of common shares offered hereby is sold. The termination of the offering will occur on the earlier of (i) the date that subscriptions for our common shares offered hereby equal $75,000,000 or (ii) an earlier date determined by the Company in its sole discretion.

 

Generally, no sale may be made to you in this offering if the aggregate purchase price you pay is more than 10% of the greater of your annual income or net worth. Different rules apply to non-natural persons and we are entitled to apply different rules to accredited investors as defined under Rule 501(a) of Regulation D. Before making any representation that your investment does not exceed applicable thresholds, we encourage you to review Rule 251(d)(2)(i)(C) of Regulation A. For general information on investing, we encourage you to refer to www.investor.gov.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

This Offering Circular follows the Form S-11 disclosure format.

 

The date of this offering circular is December 1, 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THIS OFFERING CIRCULAR

 

Please carefully read the information in this offering circular and any accompanying offering circular supplements, which we refer to collectively as the offering circular. You should rely only on the information contained in this offering circular. We have not authorized anyone to provide you with different information. This offering circular may only be used where it is legal to sell these securities. You should not assume that the information contained in this offering circular is accurate as of any date later than the date of this offering circular or such other dates as are stated in this offering circular or as of the respective dates of any documents or other information incorporated by reference into this offering circular.

 

This offering circular is part of an offering statement that we filed with the SEC using a continuous offering process.

 

Periodically, as we make material investments or have other material developments, we will provide an offering circular supplement that may add, update or change information contained in this offering circular. Any statement that we make in this offering circular will be modified or superseded by any inconsistent statement made by us in a subsequent offering circular supplement. The offering statement we filed with the SEC includes exhibits that provide more detailed descriptions of the matters discussed in this offering circular. You should read this offering circular and the related exhibits filed with the SEC and any offering circular supplement, together with additional information contained in our annual reports, semi-annual reports and other reports and information statements that we will file periodically with the SEC. See the section entitled “Additional Information” below for more details.

 

The offering statement and all supplements and reports that we have filed or will file in the future can be read at the SEC website, www.sec.gov, or on our Sponsor and Manager’s website www.fundrebel.com. The contents of www.fundrebel.com (other than the offering statement, this offering circular and the appendices and exhibits thereto) are not incorporated by reference in or otherwise a part of this offering circular.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

IMPORTANT INFORMATION ABOUT THIS OFFERING CIRCULAR i
STATE LAW EXEMPTION AND PURCHASE RESTRICTIONS 1
QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THIS OFFERING 2
OFFERING SUMMARY 9
RISK FACTORS 19
STATEMENTS REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION 52
ESTIMATED USE OF PROCEEDS 55
MANAGEMENT 58
MANAGEMENT COMPENSATION 66
PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS 68
CONFLICTS OF INTEREST 69
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGY 73
PLAN OF OPERATION 81
PRIOR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY 88
DESCRIPTION OF OUR COMMON SHARES 89
U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS 100
ERISA CONSIDERATIONS 120
PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION 123
HOW TO SUBSCRIBE 126
ADDITIONAL INFORMATION 127
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF FUNDREBEL DEAN, LLC F-1
APPENDIX A: FORM OF SUBSCRIPTION AGREEMENT A-1
APPENDIX B: PRIOR PERFORMANCE TABLES B-1

 

 

 

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STATE LAW EXEMPTION AND PURCHASE RESTRICTIONS

 

The Company’s common shares are being offered and sold only to “qualified purchasers” (as defined in Regulation A under the Securities Act). As a Tier 2 offering pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act, this offering will be exempt from state law “Blue Sky” review, subject to meeting certain state filing requirements and complying with certain anti-fraud provisions, to the extent that our common shares are offered and sold only to “qualified purchasers” or at a time when our common shares are listed on a national securities exchange. “Qualified purchasers” include: (i) “accredited investors” under Rule 501(a) of Regulation D and (ii) all other investors so long as their investment in our common shares does not represent more than 10% of the greater of their annual income or net worth (for natural persons), or 10% of the greater of annual revenue or net assets at fiscal year-end (for non-natural persons). However, our common shares are being offered and sold only to those investors that are within the latter category (i.e., investors whose investment in our common shares does not represent more than 10% of the applicable amount), regardless of an investor’s status as an “accredited investor.” Accordingly, we reserve the right to reject any investor’s subscription in whole or in part for any reason, including if we determine in our sole and absolute discretion that such investor is not a “qualified purchaser” for purposes of Regulation A.

 

To determine whether a potential investor is an “accredited investor” for purposes of satisfying one of the tests in the “qualified purchaser” definition, the investor must be a natural person:

 

  1. who has an individual net worth, or joint net worth with the person’s spouse, that exceeds $1,000,000 at the time of the purchase, excluding the value of the primary residence of such person;

 

  2. who has earned income exceeding $200,000 in each of the two most recent years or joint income with a spouse exceeding $300,000 for those years and a reasonable expectation of the same income level in the current year;

 

  3. who has certain professional certifications, designations or credentials or other credentials issued by an accredited educational institution, as designated by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”); or

 

  4. who, with respect to investments in a private fund, are “knowledgeable employees” of the fund, as defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940.

 

The list above is non-exhaustive; prospective investors should review Rule 501 of Regulation D for more details on whether they are an “accredited investor.” If the investor is not a natural person, different standards apply. See Rule 501 of Regulation D for more details.

 

For purposes of determining whether a potential investor is a “qualified purchaser”, annual income and net worth should be calculated as provided in the “accredited investor” definition under Rule 501 of Regulation D. In particular, net worth in all cases should be calculated excluding the value of an investor’s home, home furnishings and automobiles.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS ABOUT THIS OFFERING

 

The following questions and answers about this offering highlight material information regarding us and this offering that is not otherwise addressed in the “Offering Summary” section of this offering circular. You should read this entire offering circular, including the section entitled “Risk Factors,” before deciding to purchase our common shares.

 

  Q: What is FundRebel Dean, LLC?

 

  A: The Company has been formed as a Delaware limited liability company to identify, underwrite, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects. The use of the terms “Dean,” the “Company,” “we,” “us” or “our” in this offering circular refer to FundRebel Dean, LLC unless the context indicates otherwise.

 

  Q: What is a real estate investment trust, or REIT?

 

  A: In general, a REIT is an entity treated as a corporation for U.S federal income tax purposes that:

 

  · combines the capital of at least 100 investors to acquire or provide financing for a diversified portfolio of real estate investments or real estate loans under professional management;
     
  · is able to qualify as a “real estate investment trust” under the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, which we also refer to in this offering circular as the “Code,” for U.S. federal income tax purposes and is therefore generally entitled to a deduction for the dividends it pays and not subject to U.S. federal corporate income taxes on its net income distributed to its shareholders; and
     
  · generally pays distributions to investors of at least 90% of its annual ordinary taxable income.

 

In this offering circular, we refer to an entity that qualifies to be taxed as a real estate investment trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes as a REIT. We intend to elect to be treated as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes commencing with our taxable year ending December 31, 2022, although the election to be treated as a REIT may be deferred by our board of directors until the taxable year ending December 31, 2023.

 

  Q: Who will choose which investments you make?

 

  A: We are externally managed by FundRebel, which we also refer to as the Manager. Our Manager will be responsible for all of our investment decisions. FundRebel is also our Sponsor.

 

  Q: Who is FundRebel?

 

  A: FundRebel, is our Sponsor, as well as our Manager. It maintains a website, www.fundrebel.com, where the Company will seek investment in the securities described in this offering.

 

 

 

 

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  Q: Why should I invest in commercial real estate?

 

  A: The Company intends to offer a professionally managed, diversified portfolio of multi-family, and other commercial real estate assets to investors who generally have had limited or no access to such investments in the past. Allocating some portion of your investment portfolio to a direct investment in commercial real estate may offer:

 

  · a reasonably predictable level of current income from the investment;
     
  · diversification of your portfolio, by investing in an asset class designed to produce current income; and
     
  · the opportunity for capital appreciation if the particular investments made by the Company perform well and the market expands and matures over time.

 

  Q: Why should I invest specifically in a company that is focused primarily on commercial real estate?

 

  A: We believe that there is a dearth of capital in the commercial real estate industry below the radar of traditional institutional real estate investors, which market inefficiency can result in attractive risk-adjusted returns. Conventional commercial real estate capital sources use little-to-no technology and therefore generally apply outmoded and more costly human resources to originate, process, and service real estate deals. The consequence is that established real estate funds prefer to focus on larger real estate properties, equity investments of at least $10 million, which allow them to amortize their overhead across a larger investment denominator and generate more substantial fees. Particularly since the 2008 financial crisis, this bias has been exacerbated by the tendency for institutional investors to prefer to invest with fund managers with the longest track record, which tends to be the largest funds. As such, the largest real estate investors have grown even larger and target transactions usually requiring at least $50 million of equity, if not more. Our operating experience has shown us that there is a significant segment of smaller commercial real estate transactions that, by and large, have been neglected by the major real estate capital players.  

 

  Q: What kind of offering is Dean securities offering?

 

  A: We are offering securities pursuant to Regulation A of the Securities Act. We are offering a maximum of $75,000,000 worth of our common shares (consisting of a maximum of 6,000,000 Class B common shares and 1,500,000 Class A common shares) to the public on a “best efforts” basis at $10.00 per share. We have established a minimum offering amount of $500,000 and will not issue any common shares until we have received subscriptions equaling the minimum offering amount.

 

  Q: How is an investment in your common shares different from investing in shares of a listed real estate investment trust?

 

  A: The fundamental difference between our common shares and the shares of a listed REIT is the continuous liquidity available with a listed REIT. For investors with a short-term investment horizon, a listed REIT is a more appropriate investment than our common shares. Additionally, listed REITs are subject to more demanding public disclosure and corporate governance requirements than we will be subject to. While we are subject to the scaled reporting requirements of Regulation A, such periodic reports are substantially less than what would be required for a listed REIT that files reports pursuant to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).

 

  Q: How is an investment in your common shares different from investing in shares of a traditional, non-traded REIT?

 

  A: Investors do not pay any up-front broker-dealer distribution fees, saving investors approximately 70% to 90% in upfront expenses as compared to a traditional, non-traded REIT. Traditional non-traded REITs use a highly labor-intensive method with hundreds to thousands of commissioned-based sales brokers calling on investors to sell their offerings.

 

 

 

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  Q: What is the purchase price for your common shares?

 

  A: Our Manager set our offering price at $10.00 per share, with a minimum purchase of 100,000 shares for investors seeking to purchase Class A common shares, and 100 shares for investors seeking to purchase Class B common shares. We do not intend to adjust our offering price during the duration of our offering.

 

  Q: Will I have the opportunity to redeem my common shares?

 

A: No. While our Manager has the right to establish a redemption plan to redeem common shares of the Company, our Manager does not intend to establish such a plan. Instead, the Company intends to apply for quotation on the PPEX, an ATS, with a view to providing liquidity for investors in this offering. Nonetheless, you should view this investment as long-term, with poor liquidity. There can be no assurance as to the volume of trading that might occur on the PPEX, or the prices at which such trading occurs.

 

  Q: Will I be charged upfront selling commissions?

 

  A: No. Investors will not pay upfront selling commissions as part of the price per common share purchased in this offering. Additionally, there is no dealer manager fee or other service-related fee in connection with the offering and sale of our common shares.

 

  Q: Who will pay the Company’s organization and offering costs?

 

  A: Our Manager or its affiliates will pay on our behalf all costs incurred in connection with our organization and the offering of our shares. See “Estimated Use of Proceeds” for more information about the types of costs that may be incurred. Following the completion of the offering, we will start to reimburse the Manager, without interest, for these organization and offering costs incurred both before and after that date. Reimbursement payments will be made in quarterly installments, but the aggregate amount reimbursed cannot exceed 0.50% per annum of the aggregate gross offering proceeds from this offering. If the sum of the total unreimbursed amount of such organization and offering costs, plus new costs incurred since the last reimbursement payment, exceeds the reimbursement limit described above for the applicable quarterly installment, the excess will be eligible for reimbursement in subsequent quarters (subject to the 0.50% annual limit), calculated on an accumulated basis, until the Manager has been reimbursed in full. As of the date of this offering circular, the Manager has not begun to require reimbursement of offering expenses.

 

  Q: What fees and expenses will you pay to the Manager or any of its affiliates?

 

  A: When we purchase a property, the Manager will be entitled to an acquisition fee equal to 2.00% of the purchase price of the property, payable by the Company to the Manager at the time of acquisition of the property. Additionally, whether and when we seek to sell the Company’s assets, including to companies affiliated or sponsored or managed by Manager and Sponsor and its affiliates, our Manager would be entitled to an exit fee of 1.00% of the gross purchase price of the asset(s) sold by the Company. Our Manager will not be entitled to a quarterly asset management fee.

 

Following the completion of the offering, we will reimburse the Manager for the organization and offering expenses that the Manager has paid or will pay on our behalf. Additionally, we will reimburse the Manager for out-of-pocket expenses paid to third parties in connection with providing services to us, including license fees, auditing fees, fees associated with SEC reporting requirements, increases in insurance costs, Delaware taxes and filing fees, administration fees, fees for the services of an independent representative, and third-party costs associated with these expenses. This does not include overhead, employee costs, utilities or technology costs of FundRebel or their affiliates. The expense reimbursements that we will pay to the Manager include expenses incurred by our Manager in the performance of services under the Management Services Agreement to be entered into between the Manager and us. See “Management—Management Services Agreement.” 

 

The payment by us of fees and expenses will reduce the cash available for investment and distribution. See Management Compensation” for more details regarding the fees that will be paid to the Manager and its affiliates.

 

 

 

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  Q: Will you use leverage?

 

  A: Yes. The Company will use leverage through mortgage financing of some or all of the properties acquired by the Company. During the period when we are acquiring our initial portfolio, we may employ greater leverage on individual assets (that will also result in greater leverage of the initial portfolio) in order to quickly build a diversified portfolio of assets. Please see “Investment Objectives and Strategy” for more details.

 

  Q: How often will I receive distributions?

 

  A: We expect that the Manager will declare and pay distributions quarterly in arrears commencing in the second full quarter after the quarter in which we make our first real estate-related investment; however, the Manager may declare other periodic distributions as circumstances dictate. Any distributions we make will be at the discretion of the Manager and will be based on, among other factors, our present and reasonably projected future cash flow. The Manager’s discretion as to the payment of distributions will be limited by the REIT distribution requirements, which generally require that we make aggregate annual distributions to our shareholders of at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, computed without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding net capital gain. Moreover, even if we make the required minimum distributions under the REIT rules, we will be subject to U.S. federal income and excise taxes on our undistributed taxable income and gains. As a result, the Manager intends to make such additional distributions, beyond the minimum REIT distribution, to avoid such taxes. See “Description of Our Common Shares — Distributions” and “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

 

Any distributions that we make will directly reduce the amount of our assets. Our goal is to provide a reasonably predictable and stable level of current income, through quarterly distributions, while at the same time maintaining a fair level of consistency in our total assets.

 

  Q: What will be the source of your distributions?

 

  A: We may pay distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations, including from the proceeds of this offering and the private placements to our Sponsor and its officers and directors, interest or dividend income received from our investments, financing proceeds from recapitalization of our properties, and the sale of investments, among others, and we have no limit on the amounts we may pay from such sources. We expect that our cash flow from operations available for distribution will be lower in the initial stages of this offering until we have raised significant capital and made substantial investments. As a result, we expect that during the early stages of our operations, and from time to time thereafter, we may pay distributions from sources other than cash flows from operations.

 

  Q: Will the distributions I receive be taxable as ordinary income?

 

  A: Unless your investment is held in a qualified tax-deferred or tax-exempt account or we designate certain distributions as capital gain dividends, distributions that you receive generally will be taxed as ordinary income to the extent they are from current or accumulated earnings and profits. The portion of your distribution in excess of current and accumulated earnings and profits is considered a return of capital for U.S. federal income tax purposes and will reduce the tax basis of your investment, rather than result in current tax, until your basis is reduced to zero. Return of capital distributions made to you in excess of your tax basis in our common shares will be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as proceeds from the sale of our common shares. Distributions we designate as capital gain dividends will generally be taxable at long-term capital gains rates for U.S. federal income tax purposes. However, because each investor’s tax considerations are different, we recommend that you consult with your tax advisor. You also should review the section of this offering circular entitled “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations,” including for a discussion of the special rules applicable to distributions in redemption of shares and liquidating distributions.

 

  Q: May I reinvest my cash distributions in additional shares?

 

  A: No.  We have not adopted a distribution reinvestment plan whereby investors may elect to have their cash distributions automatically reinvested in additional common shares.

 

 

 

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  Q: Who might benefit from an investment in our shares?

 

  A: An investment in the Company’s shares may be beneficial for you if you seek to diversify your portfolio with a commercial real estate investment vehicle focused primarily on commercial real estate multi-family development projects, seek current income, seek to grow your capital over a long-term horizon, and are able to hold your investment for a time period consistent with our liquidity strategy. On the other hand, we caution persons who require immediate liquidity or guaranteed income, or who seek a short-term investment, that an investment in the Company’s shares will not meet those needs.

 

  Q: Are there any risks involved in buying our shares?

 

  A: Investing in our common shares involves a high degree of risk. If we are unable to effectively manage the impact of these risks, we may not meet our investment objectives, and therefore, you should purchase these securities only if you can afford a complete loss of your investment. See “Risk Factors” for a description of the risks relating to this offering and an investment in our shares.

 

  Q: How does a “best efforts” offering work?

 

  A: When common shares are offered to the public on a “best efforts” basis, we are only required to use our best efforts to sell our common shares. None of our Sponsor, Manager or any other party has a firm commitment or obligation to purchase any of our common shares.

 

  Q: Who can buy shares?

 

  A: Generally, you may purchase shares if you are a “qualified purchaser” (as defined in Regulation A under the Securities Act). “Qualified purchasers” include:

 

  · “accredited investors” under Rule 501(a) of Regulation D; and
     
  · all other investors so long as their investment in our common shares does not represent more than 10% of the greater of their annual income or net worth (for natural persons), or 10% of the greater of annual revenue or net assets at fiscal year-end (for non-natural persons).

 

However, our common shares are being offered and sold only to those investors that are within the latter category (i.e., investors whose investment in our common shares does not represent more than 10% of the applicable amount), regardless of an investor’s status as an “accredited investor.”

  

Net worth in all cases should be calculated excluding the value of an investor’s home, home furnishings and automobiles. We reserve the right to reject any investor’s subscription in whole or in part for any reason, including if we determine in our sole and absolute discretion that such investor is not a “qualified purchaser” for purposes of Regulation A. Please refer to the section above entitled “State Law Exemption and Purchase Restrictions” for more information.

 

  Q: How do I buy shares?

 

  A: You may purchase our common shares in this offering by creating a new account, or logging into your existing account at www.fundrebel.com. You will need to fill out a subscription agreement like the one attached to this offering circular as Appendix A for a certain investment amount and pay for the shares at the time you subscribe.

 

 

 

 6 

 

 

  Q: Is there any minimum investment required?

 

  A: Yes. If you desire to purchase our Class B common shares, you must initially purchase at least 100 Class B common shares in this offering, or $1,000. If you desire to purchase our Class A common shares, you must initially purchase at least 100,000 Class A common shares, or $1,000,000.

 

  Q: May I make an investment through my IRA or other tax-deferred retirement account?

 

  A: Yes. You may make an investment through your IRA or other tax-deferred retirement account. In making these investment decisions, you should consider, at a minimum, (1) whether the investment is in accordance with the documents and instruments governing your IRA, plan or other retirement account, (2) whether the investment would constitute a prohibited transaction under applicable law, (3) whether the investment satisfies the fiduciary requirements associated with your IRA, plan or other retirement account, (4) whether the investment will generate unrelated business taxable income (“UBTI”) to your IRA, plan or other retirement account, and (5) whether there is sufficient liquidity for such investment under your IRA, plan or other retirement account. You should note that an investment in our common shares will not, in itself, create a retirement plan and that, in order to create a retirement plan, you must comply with all applicable provisions of the Code

 

  Q: Is there any minimum initial offering amount required to be sold?

 

  A: Yes. We will not draw down on investors’ funds and issue common shares until we have raised at least $500,000 in subscriptions from investors in this offering. Until such time, investors’ funds will remain in the Escrow Agent’s non-interest bearing account. The funds will be drawn by us using an ACH electronic fund transfer through the Automated Clearing House network or wire transfer only after the Company has received $500,000 in subscriptions from investors. Until such time, investors may revoke their subscriptions. Additionally, we will not start operations until we raise an additional $500,000 from a private placement to our Sponsor and its officers and directors, which we expect will occur immediately after raising the minimum offering amount in this offering.

 

  Q: What happens to my subscription if you don’t raise at least $500,000?

 

  A: We will not accept subscription payments associated with subscription agreements until we have raised $500,000. Once we have received investments for this amount, we will accept subscription payments, common shares will be issued, and investors will become shareholders. If we do not meet the minimum threshold after qualification of the offering, we will cancel the offering and release all investors from their commitments.

 

  Q: What will you do with the proceeds from your offering?

 

  A:

We expect to use substantially all of the net proceeds from this offering (after paying or reimbursing organization and offering expenses) to invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate properties and/or development projects. We expect that any expenses or fees payable to the Manager for its services in connection with managing our daily affairs, including but not limited to, the selection and acquisition of our investments, will be paid from cash flow from operations. If such fees and expenses are not paid from cash flow (or waived) they will reduce the cash available for investment and distribution. See “Management Compensation” for more details regarding the fees that will be paid to the Manager and its affiliates.

 

We may not be able to promptly invest the net proceeds of this offering in multi-family and/or commercial real estate properties. In the interim, we may invest in short-term, highly liquid or other authorized investments. Such short-term investments will not earn as high of a return as we expect to earn on our real estate-related investments.

  

 

 

 7 

 

 

  Q: How long will this offering last?

 

  A: We currently expect that this offering will remain open for investors until we raise the maximum amount being offered, unless terminated by us at an earlier time. We reserve the right to terminate this offering for any reason at any time.

 

  Q: Will I be notified of how my investment is doing?

 

  A: Yes, we will provide you with periodic updates on the performance of your investment in us, including:

 

  · an annual report;
     
  · a semi-annual report;
     
  · current event reports for specified material events within four business days of their occurrence;
     
  · supplements to the offering circular, if we have material information to disclose to you; and
     
  · other reports that we may file or furnish to the SEC from time to time.

 

We will provide this information to you by posting such information on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov, on  www.fundrebel.com, via e-mail, or, upon your consent, via U.S. mail.

 

  Q: When will I get my detailed tax information?

 

  A: Your IRS Form 1099-DIV tax information, if required, will be provided by March 31 of the year following each taxable year.

 

  Q: Who can help answer my questions about the offering?

 

  A: If you have more questions about the offering, or if you would like additional copies of this offering circular, you should contact us by email at info@fundrebel.com or by mail at:

 

FundRebel Dean, LLC

c/o FundRebel

104 W. 40th Street, Suite 1030

New York, NY 10018

info@fundrebel.com

 

 

 

 8 

 

 

OFFERING SUMMARY

 

This offering summary highlights material information regarding our business and this offering that is not otherwise addressed in the “Questions and Answers About this Offering” section of this offering circular. Because it is a summary, it may not contain all of the information that is important to you. To understand this offering fully, you should read the entire offering circular carefully, including the “Risk Factors” section before making a decision to invest in our common shares.

 

FundRebel Dean, LLC

 

FundRebel Dean, LLC is a newly organized Delaware limited liability company formed to identify, underwrite, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects.

 

We intend to operate in a manner that will allow us to qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Among other requirements, REITs are required to distribute to shareholders at least 90% of their annual REIT taxable income (computed without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding net capital gain).

 

Our office is located at 104 W. 40th Street, Suite 1030, New York, NY 10018. Our telephone number is (212) 203-7672. Information regarding the Company, the Sponsor and the Manager is available at www.fundrebel.com.

 

Investment Strategy

 

We intend to use substantially all of the proceeds of this offering to identify, underwrite, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects, and to invest in other estate-related assets.

 

We will seek to create and maintain a diversified portfolio of investments that generate cashflow through the periodic payment of rents or other means, allowing us to make regular dividend distributions to our shareholders.

 

The principals of our Manager have extensive experience investing in numerous types of properties. Thus, we may acquire a wide variety of commercial properties, including office, industrial, retail, hospitality, and other real properties. These properties may be existing, income-producing properties, newly constructed properties or properties under development or construction and may include properties purchased for renovation and conversion into condominiums, for example. We intend to focus on acquiring properties with significant possibilities for capital appreciation, such as those requiring development, those located in markets with high growth potential and those available from sellers who are distressed or face time-sensitive deadlines.

 

Our Manager intends to directly structure, underwrite and manage most of the investments we make. Our underwriting process will involve comprehensive and systematic financial, structural, operational and legal due diligence of our partners and the underlying projects, in order to identify and structure investments that meet our investment requirements. We feel the market environment offers a broad range of opportunities to source compelling investments with attractive risk-return profiles.

 

We will seek, directly or through subsidiaries wholly or majority controlled by us, be the sole owner of any acquisition, development or improvement investment we enter into, or the majority owner and controlling party of any joint venture or other entity through which we make an acquisition. We do not intend to invest in bridge and/or mezzanine loans that may lead to an opportunity to purchase a real estate interest, nor do we intend to make or invest in commercial mortgage-backed securities, mortgage loans and Code Section 1031 tenant-in-common interests.

  

 

 

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Investment Objectives

 

Our primary investment objectives are:

 

  · to realize growth in the value of our investments within approximately three to five years from the one year anniversary of the qualification of our initial offering;
     
  · to preserve, protect and return investors’ capital contributions;
     
  · to pay competitive cash distributions from rents and preferred returns earned on the Company’s investments; and
     
  · to create a repeatable investment process that allows the Company to continue to redeploy capital to achieve our investment objectives.

  

Market Opportunities

 

We believe that the near-and medium-term market for investment in commercial and multi-family real estate is compelling from a risk-return perspective. We believe that our investment strategy, combined with the investment expertise of the Manager’s management team will provide opportunities to originate investments with attractive expected returns and strong structural features, in order to seek an attractive risk-return profile for the Company and our shareholders.

 

Our Manager and Sponsor

 

FundRebel, the Manager, manages our day-to-day operations. FundRebel is also our Sponsor. A team of investment professionals, acting through the Manager, will make all the decisions regarding the selection, negotiation, financing and disposition of our investments, subject to the limitations in our operating agreement. Our Manager will also be responsible for asset management, marketing, investor relations and other administrative services on our behalf with the goal of maximizing our operating cash flow and preserving our invested capital. FundRebel, as our Sponsor, is also able to exercise significant control over our business.

 

The Company is an affiliate of FundRebel, which maintains a website, www.fundrebel.com where investors may subscribe to the offering of the Company’s securities.

 

Mark Drachman and Allen Konstam are the co-founders and managing principals of FundRebel, and together are primarily responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the Sponsor, the Manager, and their affiliates.

 

 

 

 10 

 

 

Our Structure

 

The chart below shows the relationship between the Manager, Sponsor, and the Company as of the date of this offering circular.

 

 

 

Management Compensation

 

Our Manager and its affiliates will receive fees and expense reimbursements for services relating to this offering and the investment and management of our assets. The items of compensation are summarized in the following table. Neither the Manager nor its affiliates will receive any selling commissions or dealer manager fees in connection with the offer and sale of our common shares.

 

No portion of the fees detailed below will be allocated to any individual in his or her capacity as an executive officer of our Sponsor or Manager.

 

 

 

 11 

 

 

See “Management Compensation” for a more detailed explanation of the fees and expenses payable to the Manager and its affiliates.

  

Form of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount
         
   

Organization and Offering Stage

 

   
Organization and Offering Expenses — Manager   To date, the Manager has paid $105,960 in organization and offering expenses on our behalf. We will reimburse the Manager for these costs and future organization and offering costs it may incur on our behalf. We expect organization and offering expenses to not exceed $250,000 or, if we raise the maximum offering amount, approximately 0.33% of gross offering proceeds.   $250,000
         
Distribution Sales and Marketing Allowance — Broker Sales Commission   Investors will not pay upfront selling commissions as part of the price per share of our common shares purchased in this offering. The Manager will pay Dalmore selling commissions equal to 1.00% of the proceeds raised in this offering.  

Actual amounts are dependent upon the offering proceeds we raise. Assuming the maximum offering amount is raised, commissions payable to Dalmore would be $750,000.

  

The amounts will be paid by the Manager and will not be directly charged to either the Company or its investors.

         
   

Acquisition and Development Stage

 

 

 

Acquisition Fee — Manager

 

The Company or any entity solely-owned or controlled by the Company that acquires a property will pay the Manager a fee of 2.0% of the amount of the purchase price of any property payable upon the acquisition of the property.

 

Paid directly by the Company to the Manager. Actual amounts are dependent upon the purchase price of an we cannot determine these amounts at the present time.
         
Reimbursement of Acquisition Expenses — Manager (1)   We will reimburse the Manager for actual expenses incurred in connection with the selection, acquisition, or due diligence of a prospective investment, subject to a 1% limit on the amount of the prospective investment, whether or not we ultimately acquire the investment.   Actual amounts are dependent upon the offering proceeds we raise (and any leverage we employ) and the number of investment opportunities considered by the Company. The maximum reimbursement in a year, assuming the maximum amount of this offering is raised and we utilize leverage of 75% (the high end of the Company’s disclosed target leverage range),  would be $875,000.

 

 

 

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Operational Stage

 

   
Asset Management Fee — Manager   None.  

None.

         
Other Operating Expenses — Manager  

We will reimburse the Manager for out of pocket expenses paid to third parties in connection with providing services to us, including license fees, auditing fees, fees associated with SEC reporting requirements, increases in insurance costs, Delaware taxes and filing fees, administration fees, fees for the services of an independent representative, and third-party costs associated with these expenses. This does not include overhead, employee costs, utilities or technology costs of the Manager, the Sponsor or their affiliates.

 

The expense reimbursements that we will pay to the Manager also include expenses incurred by our Manager in the performance of services under the Management Services Agreement to be entered into between the Manager and us.

  Actual amounts are dependent upon the results of our operations; we cannot determine these amounts at the present time
       
 

Liquidation – Listing Stage

 

   
Disposition Fee   None.   None.
         
Exit Fee   1.00% of the gross proceeds from the sale of an asset held by the Company will be paid as a fee to the Manager, and 99.00% will go to the Company.   Actual amounts are dependent upon the results of a sale; we cannot determine these amounts at the present time

 

  (1) After we raise an aggregate of $1,000,000, consisting of $500,000 from investors in this offering (the minimum offering amount) and $500,000 from the private placements to our Sponsor and its officers and directors (at which time we will begin our operations), we will start to reimburse the Manager, without interest, for these organization and offering costs incurred both before and after that date. Reimbursement payments will be made in quarterly installments, but the aggregate quarterly amount reimbursed can never exceed 0.125% of the aggregate gross offering proceeds from this offering, or 0.50% per annum. If the sum of the total unreimbursed amount of such organization and offering costs, plus new costs incurred since the last reimbursement payment, exceeds the reimbursement limit described above for the applicable quarterly installment, the excess will be eligible for reimbursement in subsequent quarters (subject to the 0.125% quarterly limit), calculated on an accumulated basis, until the Manager has been reimbursed in full.

 

Our Manager in its sole discretion may defer or waive any fee payable to it under the operating agreement. All or any portion of any deferred fees will be deferred without interest and paid when the Manager determines.

 

 

 

 13 

 

 

Summary of Risk Factors

 

Investing in our common shares involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully review the “Risk Factors” section of this offering circular, beginning on page 19, which contains a detailed discussion of the material risks that you should consider before you invest in our common shares.

 

Conflicts of Interest

 

Our Manager and its affiliates will experience conflicts of interest in connection with the management of our business. Some of the material conflicts that the Manager and its affiliates will face include the following:

 

  · Our Sponsor’s investment professionals, acting on behalf of the Manager, must determine which investment opportunities to recommend for the Company and for other investors whose accounts may be managed by the Sponsor or its affiliates.
     
  · Our Sponsor’s investment professionals, acting on behalf of the Manager will have to allocate their time among us, our Sponsor’s business and other programs and activities in which they are involved.
     
  · The terms of our operating agreement (including the Manager’s rights and obligations and the compensation payable to our Manager and its affiliates) were not negotiated at arm’s length and may be less attractive than an agreement negotiated with an independent third party.
     
  · The terms of our operating agreement limit the ability of our shareholders to remove the Manager. Our shareholders may only remove the Manager for “cause” following the affirmative vote of shareholders holding two-thirds of the outstanding common shares. Unsatisfactory financial performance does not constitute “cause” under the operating agreement.
     
  · At some future date after we have acquired a substantial investment portfolio that the Manager determines would be most effectively managed by our own personnel, we may seek shareholder approval to internalize the management of the Company by directly acquiring assets and employing the key investment and real estate professionals performing services to us for consideration that would be negotiated at that time. The payment of such consideration could result in dilution to your interest in us and could reduce the net income per share and funds from operations per share attributable to your investment. Additionally, in an internalization transaction, the investment and real estate professionals who become our employees may receive more compensation than they previously received from our Sponsor or its affiliates. These possibilities may provide incentives to these individuals to pursue an internalization transaction, even if an alternative strategy might otherwise be in our shareholders’ best interest.
     
  · Our Manager may, without shareholder consent (unless otherwise required by law), determine that we should merge or consolidate through a roll-up or other similar transaction involving other entities, into or with such other entities, including entities affiliated with the Manager.
     
  · As a non-traded company conducting an exempt offering pursuant to Regulation A, we are not subject to a number of corporate governance requirements, including the requirements for a board of directors or independent board committees.

 

 

 

 14 

 

 

Distributions

 

We expect the Manager to declare and pay distributions quarterly in arrears commencing in the second full quarter after the quarter in which we make our first real estate-related investment; however, the Manager may declare other periodic distributions as circumstances dictate. In order that investors may generally begin receiving distributions immediately upon our acceptance of their subscription, we expect to authorize and declare distributions based on daily record dates.

 

Any distributions we make will be at the discretion of the Manager, and will be based on, among other factors, our present and reasonably projected future cash flow. Distributions will be paid to shareholders as of the record dates selected by the Manager. In addition, the Manager’s discretion as to the payment of distributions will be limited by the REIT distribution requirements, which generally require that we make aggregate annual distributions to our shareholders of at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, computed without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding net capital gain. Moreover, even if we make the required minimum distributions under the REIT rules, we will be subject to U.S. federal income and excise taxes on our undistributed taxable income and gains. As a result, the Manager intends to make such additional distributions, beyond the minimum REIT distribution, to avoid such taxes. See “Description of Our Common Shares — Distributions” and “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

 

Any distributions that we make will directly impact our NAV, by reducing the amount of our assets. Our goal is to provide a reasonably predictable and stable level of current income, through quarterly or other periodic distributions, while at the same time maintaining a fair level of consistency in our NAV. Over the course of your investment, your distributions plus the change in NAV per share (either positive or negative) will produce your total return.

 

Our distributions will generally constitute a return of capital to the extent that they exceed our current and accumulated earnings and profits as determined for U.S. federal income tax purposes. To the extent that a distribution is treated as a return of capital for U.S. federal income tax purposes, it will reduce a holder’s adjusted tax basis in the holder’s shares, and to the extent that it exceeds the holder’s adjusted tax basis will be treated as gain resulting from a sale or exchange of such shares.

 

Borrowing Policy

 

We intend to employ conservative levels of borrowing in order to provide additional funds to support our investment activities. Our target portfolio-wide leverage after we have acquired an initial substantial portfolio of diversified investments is between zero and 75% of the greater of cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) or fair market value of our assets. During the initial acquisition of portfolio properties, , we may employ greater leverage on individual assets (that will also result in greater leverage of the initial portfolio) in order to quickly build a diversified portfolio of assets. Our Manager may from time to time modify our leverage policy in its discretion in light of then-current economic conditions, relative costs of debt and equity capital, market values of our properties, general conditions in the market for debt and equity securities, growth and acquisition opportunities or other factors. However, other than during the initial acquisition of portfolio properties, it is our policy to not borrow more than 75% of the greater of cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) or fair market value of our assets. We cannot exceed the leverage limit of our leverage policy unless any excess in borrowing over such level is approved by the Manager’s Research Committee. See “Investment Objectives and Strategy” for more details regarding our leverage policies.

 

Valuation Policies

 

We expect to engage an independent valuation agent with expertise in appraising commercial real estate and other real estate-related financial assets to provide annual valuations of the investments of the Company, including related liabilities, to be set forth in reports of the underlying investments, and to adjust those valuations for events known to the independent valuation agent that it believes are likely to have a material impact on previously provided estimates of the value of the affected investments and related liabilities. Our Manager will inform the independent valuation expert if a material event occurs between scheduled annual valuations that the Manager believes may materially affect the value of our assets.

 

 

 

 15 

 

 

At the end of each fiscal quarter, beginning with the first fiscal quarter following the commencement of this offering, our internal accountants will calculate our NAV per share using a process that reflects (1) estimated values of each of our investments, including related liabilities provided periodically by our independent valuation expert in reports of the underlying real estate, as they may be updated upon certain material events described below, (2) quarterly updates in the price of liquid assets for which third party market quotes are available, (3) accruals of our quarterly or other periodic distributions, and (4) estimates of quarterly accruals, on a net basis, of our operating revenues, expenses and fees.

 

The independent valuation expert will not be responsible for, and will not prepare, our quarterly aggregate NAV or NAV per share.

 

Our goal is to provide a reasonable estimate of the market value of the Company’s shares on a quarterly basis. However, the majority of our assets will consist of multi-family and other commercial real estate and other real estate-related assets. As with any non-traded investment valuation protocol, the conclusions reached by our independent valuation expert will be based on a number of judgments, assumptions and opinions about future events that may or may not prove to be correct. The use of different judgments, assumptions or opinions would likely result in different estimates of the value of our commercial real estate assets and investments. In addition, for any given quarter, our published NAV per share may not fully reflect certain material events, to the extent that the financial impact of such events on our portfolio is not immediately quantifiable. As a result, the quarterly calculation of our NAV per share is unlikely to reflect the precise amount that might be paid for the Company’s shares in a market transaction, and any potential disparity in our NAV per share may be in favor of either shareholders who shareholders who buy new shares, or existing shareholders.

 

We note that the price per share of our common shares being offered in this offering will not change based on any NAV per share calculations published by the Company as set forth above.

 

Liquidity Event

 

Subject to then existing market conditions, we expect to consider options for providing liquidity to our shareholders beginning five years from the completion of this offering. While we expect to seek a liquidity transaction during this time frame, we cannot assure you that a suitable opportunity to obtain liquidity on acceptable terms will be available or that market conditions for a transaction will be favorable during this time frame. Our Manager has the discretion to consider a liquidity transaction at any time if it determines such event to be in the best interests of the Company’s shareholders. A liquidity transaction could consist of a sale or a roll-off to scheduled maturity of our assets, a sale or merger of the Company, a consolidation transaction with other companies managed by the Manager or its affiliates, a listing of our common shares on a national securities exchange or a similar transaction. The Company does not have a stated term, as we believe setting a finite date for a possible, but uncertain, future liquidity transaction may result in actions that are not necessarily in the best interest or within the expectations of our shareholders.

 

Voting Rights

 

Our common shareholders will have voting rights only with respect to certain matters, primarily relating to amendments to our operating agreement that would, if adopted, adversely change the rights of the common shares, and removal of the Manager for “cause.” Each outstanding common share entitles the holder to one vote on all matters submitted to a vote of common shareholders. Our shareholders do not elect or vote on retention of the Manager, and, unlike the holders of common shares in a corporation, have only limited voting rights on other key matters affecting our business, and therefore limited ability to influence decisions regarding our business. For additional information, see “Description of Our Common Shares—Voting Rights.”

 

Other Governance Matters

 

Other than the limited shareholder voting rights described above, our operating agreement vests most other decisions relating to our assets and to the business of the Company, including decisions relating to acquisitions, dispositions, the engagement of asset managers, the issuance and redemption of securities in the Company, including additional common shares, mergers, dispositions, roll-up transactions, and other decisions relating to our business, in the Manager. See “Management” for more information about the rights and responsibilities of the Manager.

 

 

 

 16 

 

 

Investment Company Act Considerations

 

We intend to, directly or through subsidiaries that we may establish, originate, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of commercial and multi-family development projects and other real estate-related assets. We expect to use substantially all of the net proceeds from this offering to identify, structure and invest in commercial and multi-family commercial real estate projects and other real estate related investments.

 

We intend to conduct our operations so that neither we, nor any the subsidiaries we may establish, will be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Company Act”). Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act defines an investment company as any issuer that is or holds itself out as being engaged primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Investment Company Act defines an investment company as any issuer that is engaged or proposes to engage in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns or proposes to acquire investment securities having a value exceeding 40% of the value of the issuer’s total assets (exclusive of U.S. Government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis, which we refer to as “the 40% test.” Excluded from the term “investment securities,” among other things, are securities issued by majority-owned subsidiaries that are not themselves investment companies and are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company set forth in Section 3(c)(1) or Section 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act.

 

We believe that neither we nor subsidiaries we may establish will be considered investment companies for purposes of Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act because we and they will not engage primarily or hold themselves out as being primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Rather, we and such subsidiaries will be primarily engaged in non-investment company businesses related to real estate. Consequently, we and our subsidiaries expect to be able to conduct our operations such that none will be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act.

 

We will monitor our compliance with the 40% test, including the holdings of the securities of our subsidiaries (if any) to determine whether each of our subsidiaries constitutes an “investment security,” or does not fall within, or is excepted from, the definition of an investment company under the Investment Company Act. The securities issued by any wholly owned or majority-owned subsidiary that we may form and that are excepted from the definition of “investment company” based on Section 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act, together with any other investment securities we may own, may not have a value in excess of 40% of the value of our total assets (exclusive of U.S. Government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis.

 

The Investment Company Act defines a majority-owned subsidiary of a person as a company 50% or more of the outstanding voting securities of which are owned by such person, or by another company which is a majority-owned subsidiary of such person. We intend to treat companies in which we own at least a majority of the outstanding voting securities as majority-owned subsidiaries. The determination of whether an entity is a majority-owned subsidiary of the Company is made by us. We also intend to treat subsidiaries of which we or our wholly owned or majority-owned subsidiary is the manager (in a manager-managed entity) or managing member (in a member-managed entity) or in which our agreement or the agreement of our wholly owned or majority-owned subsidiary is required for all major decisions affecting the subsidiaries (which we refer to as “Controlled Subsidiaries”), as majority-owned subsidiaries even though none of the interests issued by such Controlled Subsidiaries meets the definition of voting securities under the Investment Company Act. We reached our conclusion on the basis that the interests issued by the Controlled Subsidiaries are the functional equivalent of voting securities. We have not asked the SEC staff for concurrence of our analysis, and it is possible that the SEC staff could disagree with any of our determinations. If the SEC staff were to disagree with our treatment of one or more companies as majority-owned subsidiaries, we would need to adjust our strategy and our assets. Any such adjustment in our strategy could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

 

 

 17 

 

 

We and certain of our subsidiaries may also rely upon the exception from the definition of investment company under Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act. Section 3(c)(5)(C), as interpreted by the staff of the SEC, requires an entity to invest at least 55% of its assets in “mortgages and other liens on and interests in real estate,” which we refer to as “qualifying real estate interests”, and at least 80% of its assets in qualifying real estate interests plus “real estate-related assets”.  To classify assets as qualifying real estate assets or real estate-related assets, we will rely on no-action letters and other guidance published by the SEC staff regarding those kinds of assets, as well as upon our analyses (in consultation with outside counsel) of guidance published with respect to other types of assets. There can be no assurance that the laws and regulations governing the Investment Company Act status of companies similar to ours, or the guidance from the SEC or its staff regarding the treatment of assets as qualifying real estate assets or real estate-related assets, will not change in a manner that adversely affects our operations. In fact, in August 2011, the SEC published a concept release in which it asked for comments on this exclusion from regulation. To the extent that the SEC staff provides more specific guidance regarding any of the matters bearing upon our Investment Company Act status, or our exception from being defined as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, we may be required to adjust our strategy accordingly. Any additional guidance from the SEC staff could further inhibit our ability to pursue the strategies that we have chosen. 

 

The loss of our exclusion from regulation pursuant to the Investment Company Act could require us to restructure our operations, sell certain of our assets or abstain from the purchase of certain assets, which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations. See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Organizational Structure—Maintenance of our Investment Company Act exemption imposes limits on our operations, which may adversely affect our operations.”

 

Financial Condition

 

The Company’s auditor included a “going concern” note in its audit report related to the financial statements of the Company as of January 7, 2022. The Company has not commenced planned principal operations, plans to incur significant costs in pursuit of its capital financing plans, and has not generated any revenues or profits since January 7, 2022 (its inception) through the date of this offering circular. These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern for a reasonable period of time. The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern in the next twelve months is dependent upon its ability to obtain capital financing from investors sufficient to meet current and future obligations. No assurance can be given that the Company will be successful in these efforts.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 18 

 

 

RISK FACTORS

 

An investment in our common shares involves substantial risks. You should carefully consider the following risk factors in addition to the other information contained in this offering circular before purchasing shares. The occurrence of any of the following risks might cause you to lose all or a significant part of your investment. The risks and uncertainties discussed below are not the only ones we face, but do represent those risks and uncertainties that we believe are most significant to our business, operating results, prospects and financial condition. Some statements in this offering circular, including statements in the following risk factors, constitute forward-looking statements. Please refer to the section entitled “Statements Regarding Forward-Looking Information.”

 

Risks Related to an Investment in Dean

 

We have no prior operating history, and the prior performance of our Sponsor or other real estate investment opportunities sponsored by our Sponsor may not predict our future results.

 

We are a recently formed company and have no operating history. As of the date of this offering circular, we have not made any investments, and have no cash on hand. You should not assume that our performance will be similar to the past performance of our Sponsor or other real estate investment opportunities sponsored by our Sponsor. Our limited operating history significantly increases the risk and uncertainty you face in making an investment in our shares.

 

Our auditor included a “going concern” note in its audit report.

 

The Company’s auditor included a “going concern” note in its audit report related to the financial statements of the Company as of January 7, 2022. The Company has not commenced planned principal operations, plans to incur significant costs in pursuit of its capital financing plans, and has not generated any revenues or profits since January 7, 2022 (its inception) through the date of this offering circular. These factors, among others, raise substantial doubt about the ability of the Company to continue as a going concern for a reasonable period of time. The Company’s ability to continue as a going concern in the next twelve months is dependent upon its ability to obtain capital financing from investors sufficient to meet current and future obligations. No assurance can be given that the Company will be successful in these efforts.

 

The Company does not have a public trading market for its shares. While it intends to seek a quotation on PPEX, there can be no guarantee as to the volume or pricing with respect to any secondary trading that might develop, Liquidity may be limited in comparison to the liquidity of other REITs.

 

Our operating agreement does not require the Manager to seek shareholder approval to liquidate our assets by a specified date, nor does our operating agreement require the Manager to list the Company’s shares for trading on a national securities exchange by a specified date. There is currently no public market for the Company’s shares and we have no plans to list the Company’s shares on a national stock exchange, unlike some other REITs. We plan to seek a quotation for the Company's common shares on PPEX. Even assuming our application for quotation is accepted, there can be no assurance as to the volume or level of any trading that will develop. The PPEX does not employ market makers to provide liquidity, unlike national securities exchanges. Until the Company’s shares are listed, if ever, you may not sell the Company’s shares unless the buyer meets the applicable suitability and minimum purchase standards. In addition, our operating agreement prohibits the ownership of more than 9.8% in value or number of our shares, whichever is more restrictive, or more than 9.8% in value or number of our common shares, whichever is more restrictive, unless exempted by the Manager, which may inhibit large investors from purchasing your shares. This restriction will be enforced by the Company in accordance with its operating agreement, pursuant to which the Company has the right to void transfers of its shares that would result in ownership of more than 9.8% in value or number of shares. Therefore, it may be difficult for you to sell the Company’s shares at the time you wish to do so, if you are able to sell them at all. If you are able to sell your shares, you may have to sell them at a substantial discount to their public offering price. It is also likely that the Company’s shares would not be accepted by any lender as the primary collateral for a loan. Because of the illiquid nature of our shares, you should purchase the Company’s shares only as a long-term investment and be prepared to hold them for an indefinite period of time.

 

 

 

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If we are unable to find suitable investments for the Company, we may not be able to achieve our investment objectives or pay distributions to shareholders.

 

Our ability to achieve our investment objectives and to pay distributions to shareholders depends upon the performance of the Manager in identifying, structuring, and/or acquiring our investments in commercial real estate assets. The more money we raise through the sale of shares in this offering, the greater the challenge is for us to invest all of the net proceeds on suitable terms. Except for investments that may be described in supplements to this offering circular prior to the date you subscribe for our shares, you will have no opportunity to evaluate the economic merits or the terms of our investments before making a decision to invest in the Company. You must rely entirely on the abilities of the Manager and the partners and vendors with which Manager chooses to work.

 

To the extent that our Manager’s real estate professionals face competing demands upon their time in instances when we have capital ready for investment, we may face delays in execution. Further, because we are raising a “blind pool” whereby we are not committed to investing in any particular assets, it may be difficult for us to invest the net offering proceeds promptly, on attractive terms, or in a way that meets our social impact goals.

  

We cannot assure you that the Manager will be successful in obtaining suitable investments on financially attractive terms or that, if the Manager makes investments on our behalf, our objectives will be achieved. If we, through the Manager, are unable to find suitable investments to deploy our capital, we will hold the proceeds from this offering in an interest-bearing account or will invest the proceeds in liquid investments in a manner that is consistent with our classification as a REIT. If, over an extended period, we continue to be unsuccessful in sourcing suitable investments, we may decide to liquidate the Company. In the event we are unable to locate suitable investments on a timely basis after receiving subscriptions for our shares, we may be unable or limited in our ability to pay distributions, and we may not be able to meet our investment objectives. Further, the failure of our management to apply the net proceeds of this offering effectively or to find investments that meet our investment criteria, including our social impact criteria, in sufficient time or on acceptable terms could cause the value of our common shares to decline.

 

We may invest the net proceeds from this offering in investments with which you do not agree and would not make directly.

 

We will have a high degree of autonomy in investing the net proceeds of this offering. You will be unable to evaluate the manner in which the net proceeds of this offering are invested and will have no opportunity to assess our prospective investments. As a result, we may use the net proceeds from this offering to invest in investments with which you may not agree and would not support if you were evaluating the investment directly. This may be true for financial or social reasons. Our determination that an investment has the potential to produce a positive social or environmental impact may differ from your assessment, or our perspective on the entire landscape of “impact investments” may be different than yours.

 

If we pay distributions from sources other than cash flow from operations, we will have less capital available for investments and your overall return is likely to be reduced.

 

Although our distribution policy is to use our cash flow from operations to make distributions to shareholders, our operating agreement permits us to pay distributions from any source, including offering proceeds, borrowings, or sales of assets. We have not placed a cap on the use of proceeds to fund distributions. Until the proceeds from this offering are fully invested and from time to time during the operational stage, we may not generate sufficient cash flow from operations to fund distributions. If we pay distributions from sources other than our cash flow from operations, we will have less capital available to make investments, and your overall return is likely be reduced.

 

 

 

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There is a risk that you may not receive distributions at all, or that distributions may not grow over time.

 

We intend to make distributions on a quarterly basis from assets legally available therefor to our shareholders in amounts such that all or substantially all of our REIT taxable income in each year, subject to certain adjustments, is distributed. We have not established a minimum distribution payment level and the amount of our distributions will vary over time. Our ability to pay distributions may be adversely affected by a number of factors, including the risk factors described in this offering circular. All distributions will be made at the discretion of our Manager and will depend on our earnings, our financial condition, maintenance of our REIT status and other factors that our Manager may deem to be relevant from time to time. Among the factors that could adversely affect our results of operations and impair our ability to pay distributions to our shareholders are:

 

  · the profitability of the investment of the net proceeds of this offering;
     
  · our ability to make profitable reinvestments;
     
  · interest charges or other expenses that reduce our cash flow;
     
  · defaults in our asset portfolio or other decreases in the aggregate NAV of our portfolio; and
     
  · the fact that anticipated operating expense levels may not be accurate and actual expense results are higher than estimates.

 

A change in any one of these factors could affect our ability to make distributions. We cannot assure you that we will achieve investment results that will allow us to make a specified level of cash distributions or year-to-year increases in cash distributions.

 

We may not be able to make distributions in the future or our Manager may change our distribution policy in the future. In addition, some of our distributions may include a return of capital. To the extent that we decide to pay distributions in excess of our current and accumulated tax earnings and profits, such distributions would generally be considered a return of capital for U.S. federal income tax purposes. A return of capital reduces the basis of a shareholder’s investment in our common shares to the extent of such basis and is treated as capital gain thereafter.

 

Future disruptions in the financial markets or deteriorating economic conditions could adversely impact the commercial real estate market, which could hinder our ability to implement our business strategy and generate returns to you.

 

We intend to identify, underwrite, invest in, manage, and acquire a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects, and to invest in other real estate-related assets. Economic conditions greatly increase the risks of these investments, including the risk of price declines and vacancy rates that are greater than anticipated (see “— Risks Related to Our Investments”). If the value of individual projects or the portfolio as a whole were to decline, the Company could face pressure from lenders to repay its borrowings or increase the equity investment in the projects to reduce the leverage ratio. Depending on the Company’s liquidity position at the time, the Company might be forced to liquidate investments, which could reduce the value of your investment in our common shares.

 

In addition, revenues from the properties and other assets supporting any investments made by the Company could decrease, making it more difficult for the Company to cover its expenses and make distributions. Each of these factors would likely have a negative impact on the value of our common shares.

 

 

 

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More generally, the risks arising from the financial market and economic conditions are applicable to all of the investments we may make. The risks apply variously to commercial and multi-family real estate investments. They also apply to the debt and equity securities of companies that have investment objectives similar to ours, which could adversely affect the liquidity and value of our investments.

 

Future disruptions in the financial markets or deteriorating economic conditions may also impact the market for our investments and the volatility of our investments. The returns available to investors are determined, in part, by: (i) the supply and demand for such investments and (ii) the existence of a market for such investments, which includes the ability to sell or finance such investments. During periods of volatility, the number of investors participating in the market and amount of risk capital deployed may quickly change. If demand for these investments increases, the cost of our targeted investments may increase and the expected returns may decline. If demand for these investments decreases, or liquidity declines, expected returns on new investments will increase but the value of the Company’s existing portfolio is likely to fall, adversely affecting the NAV of current shareholders.

 

All of the factors described above could adversely impact our ability to implement our business strategy and make distributions to our investors and could decrease the value of an investment in common shares of the Company.

 

We may suffer from delays in locating suitable investments, which could limit our ability to make distributions and lower the overall return on your investment.

 

We rely upon the Manager’s real estate professionals to identify and structure suitable investments for the Company. Our Sponsor and its affiliates also rely on these professionals to vet and conduct due diligence on investment opportunities. To the extent that the Manager’s and the Sponsor’s investment professionals face competing demands upon their time in instances when we have capital ready for investment, we may face delays in execution. Delays we encounter in the selection of suitable projects would likely limit our ability to pay distributions to our shareholders and lower their overall returns.

 

Additionally, the current market for commercial and multi-family investment properties that meet our objectives is highly competitive. The more shares we sell in this offering, the greater our challenge will be to invest all of the net proceeds on favorable terms. Except for investments that may be described in supplements to this offering circular prior to the date you subscribe for our shares, you will have no opportunity to evaluate the terms of transactions or other economic or financial data concerning our investments. You must rely entirely on the management and oversight of our Manager, and the performance of any property manager hired by the Manager. We cannot be sure that our Manager will be successful in obtaining investments for the Company on suitable terms.

 

Furthermore, where we acquire properties prior to the start of construction or during the early stages of construction, it will typically take several months to complete construction and rent the completed property. Therefore, you could suffer delays in the receipt of distributions attributable to those particular properties.

 

Because this is a blind pool offering, you will not have the opportunity to evaluate our investments before we make them, which makes your investment more speculative.

 

Because we have not yet acquired or identified any investments that we may make, we are not able to provide you with any information to assist you in evaluating the merits of any specific investments that we may make, except for investments that may be described in supplements to this offering circular. We will seek to invest substantially all of the offering proceeds available for investment, after the payment of fees and expenses, multi-family, and other commercial real estate development projects, and other real estate-related assets. However, because you will be unable to evaluate the economic merit of assets before we invest in them, you will have to rely entirely on the ability of our Manager to select suitable and successful investment opportunities. Furthermore, our Manager will have broad discretion in implementing policies regarding the criteria used to evaluate particular investment projects, and you will not have the opportunity to review or evaluate the criteria. These factors increase the risk that your investment may not generate returns comparable to our competitors.

 

 

 

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Investment in the Company may involve more risk than investment in a fund in which the sponsor makes a substantial equity investment as our Sponsor may have less economic incentive to avoid a loss on an investment than a sponsor who has made a substantial equity contribution. 

 

Upon the commencement of operations, our Sponsor, its directors and officers, will have invested $500,000 into the Company. Therefore, our Sponsor will have comparatively limited exposure to loss in the value of our shares compared to sponsors of other investment funds that have invested significantly more into those funds. Without this exposure, our investors may be at a greater risk of loss because our Sponsor does not have as much to lose from a decrease in the value of the Company’s shares as do those sponsors who make more significant equity investments in their companies.

 

Because we are limited in the amount of funds we can raise, we will be limited in the number and type of investments we make and the value of your investment in us will fluctuate with the performance of the specific assets we acquire.

 

This offering is being made on a “best efforts” basis and we may begin to invest net proceeds from this offering immediately after the commencement of this offering. Further, under Regulation A, we are only allowed to raise up to $75 million in any 12-month period (although we may raise capital in other ways). We expect the size of the investments that we will make will average about $5 million to $100 million per asset. As a result, the amount of proceeds we raise in this offering may be substantially less than the amount we would need to achieve a well-diversified portfolio of investments, even if we are successful in raising the maximum offering amount. If we are unable to raise substantial funds, we will make fewer investments resulting in less diversification in terms of the type, number and size of investments that we make. In that case, the likelihood that any single asset’s performance would adversely affect our profitability will increase. Your investment in the Company’s shares will be subject to greater risk to the extent that we lack a diversified portfolio of investments. Further, we will have certain fixed operating expenses, including certain expenses in connection with certain SEC filings, regardless of whether we are able to raise substantial funds in this offering. Our inability to raise substantial funds would increase our fixed operating expenses as a percentage of gross income, reducing our net income and limiting our ability to make distributions.

 

Any adverse changes in our Sponsor’s financial position or our relationship with our Sponsor or its affiliates could hinder our operating performance and could adversely affect the return on your investment.

 

At this early stage in its development, FundRebel has funded substantially all of its operations with proceeds from private financings. To meet its financing requirements in the future, it may raise funds through equity offerings, debt financings or strategic alliances. Raising additional funds may involve agreements or covenants that restrict FundRebel’s business activities and options. Additional funding may not be available to it on favorable terms, or at all. If FundRebel is unable to obtain additional funds, it may be forced to reduce or terminate its operations. Any inability for our Sponsor to fund its operations could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

 

We have engaged the Manager to manage our operations and our portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate investments. Our Manager has a limited number of employees and relies upon our Sponsor’s personnel to perform certain services on its behalf for us. Our ability to achieve our investment objectives and to pay distributions is dependent upon the performance of our Manager, our Sponsor and their affiliates as well as our Sponsor’s and our Manager’s investment professionals to identify, structure, and acquire investments, to manage our assets and to ensure the regular operation of our day-to-day activities. Any adverse changes in our Sponsor’s financial condition or our relationship with our Sponsor could hinder the Manager’s ability to successfully manage our operations and our portfolio of investments.

 

 

 

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If we do not successfully implement a liquidity transaction, you may have to hold your investment for an indefinite period.

 

Our operating agreement does not require the Manager to pursue a transaction providing liquidity to shareholders. Even if our Manager decides to pursue such a liquidity transaction, market conditions and other factors could cause us to delay the listing of the Company’s shares on a national securities exchange, delay developing a secondary market, or delay the commencement of a liquidation or other type of liquidity transaction, such as a merger or sale of assets, beyond five years from the termination of this offering. If the Manager does decide to pursue a liquidity transaction, we would be under no obligation to conclude the process within a set time. If we adopt a plan of liquidation, the timing of the sale of assets will depend on real estate and financial markets, economic conditions in areas in which properties are located, and U.S. federal income tax effects on shareholders, that may prevail in the future. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to liquidate all assets. After we adopt a plan of liquidation, we would likely remain in existence until all of our investments are liquidated. If we do not pursue a liquidity transaction, or if we delay such a transaction due to market conditions, the Company’s shares may continue to be illiquid and you may, for an indefinite period of time, be unable to convert your investment to cash easily and could suffer losses on your investment.

 

We may change our targeted investments and investment guidelines without shareholder consent.

 

Our Manager may change our targeted investments and investment guidelines at any time without the consent of our shareholders, which could result in our making investments that are different from, and possibly more risky than, the investments described in this offering circular. A change in our targeted investments or investment guidelines may increase our exposure to interest rate risk, default risk and real estate market volatility, all of which could adversely affect the value of our common shares and our ability to make distributions to you.

 

We have minimal capital, no significant assets and no revenue from operations.

 

We have minimal capital and for the foreseeable future will be wholly dependent upon our ability to finance our operations from the sale of equity or other financing alternatives. We cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully raise capital. The failure to successfully raise capital could result in our bankruptcy or other event that would have a material adverse effect on us and on the value of your shares. We have no significant assets or financial resources, so such adverse event could put your investment at significant risk.

 

The market in which we participate is competitive and, if we do not compete effectively, our results could be adversely affected.

 

The commercial and multi-family commercial real estate market is competitive and rapidly changing. We expect competition to persist and intensify in the future, which could harm our ability to compete effectively in the marketplace.

 

Our principal competitors include major banking institutions, private equity funds, real estate investment trusts, insurance companies, private lending funds, hedge funds, private investors, and specialty finance companies. Competition could result in fewer investment opportunities available to the Company, reduced margins, and/or overpaying for assets, any of which could harm our business. In addition, in the future we may experience new competition from sources we cannot yet predict, which may diminish our ability to compete effectively and our operating results could be harmed, adversely affecting your investment in the Company.

 

Many of our current or potential competitors listed above have significantly more financial, technical, marketing and other resources than we do. We may not be able to compete successfully with our competitors for investments. In addition, the number of entities and the amount of funds competing for suitable investments may increase. If we pay higher prices for investments, our returns will be lower and the value of our assets may not increase or may decrease significantly below the amount we paid for such assets. If such events occur, you may experience a lower return on your investment.

 

 

 

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We rely on third-party banks and on third-party computer hardware and software, in addition to software developed by the Sponsor and its affiliates. If we are unable to continue utilizing these services, our business and our ability to service the corresponding projects may be adversely affected.

 

We, the Sponsor, and the Manager all rely on third-party technology vendors and FDIC-insured depository institutions to process our transactions, including payments related to the development, leasing, and maintenance of projects in which the Company invests, processing of subscriptions under this offering and distributions to our shareholders. Under the Automated Clearing House (ACH) rules, if we experience a high rate of reversed transactions (known as “chargebacks”), we may be subject to sanctions and potentially disqualified from using the system to process payments. We also rely on leased computer services and software licensed from third parties. Hardware and software may be physically located off-site, as is often the case with “cloud services.” This leased or licensed hardware and software may not continue to be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all. If we cannot continue to obtain such services elsewhere, or if we are not able to transition to another payment processor quickly, your ability to receive distributions will be delayed or impaired.

 

We are dependent on the key personnel, including all investment personnel, of FundRebel (our Manager and Sponsor) for our success.

 

Our future depends, in part, on FundRebel’s ability to attract and retain key personnel. Our future also depends on the continued contributions of the executive officers and other key personnel of FundRebel, each of whom would be difficult to replace. In particular, Mark Drachman and Allen Konstam, the co-founders and managing principals of FundRebel, are critical to the management of our business and operations and the development of our strategic direction. The loss of the services of Mr. Drachman or Mr. Konstam or of other executive officers or key personnel of FundRebel and the process to replace any of FundRebel’s key personnel would involve significant time and expense and may significantly delay or prevent the achievement of our business objectives.

 

If our techniques for managing risk are ineffective, we may be exposed to unanticipated losses.

 

In order to manage the significant risks inherent in our business, we must maintain effective policies, procedures and systems that enable us to identify, monitor and control our exposure to market, operational, legal and reputational risks. Our risk management methods may prove to be ineffective due to their design or implementation or as a result of the lack of adequate, accurate or timely information. If our risk management efforts are ineffective, we could suffer losses or face litigation, particularly from our clients, and sanctions or fines from regulators.

 

Our techniques for managing risks may not fully mitigate the risk exposure in all economic or market environments, or against all types of risk, including risks that we might fail to identify or anticipate. Any failures in our risk management techniques and strategies to accurately quantify such risk exposure could limit our ability to manage risks or to seek positive, risk-adjusted returns. In addition, any risk management failures could cause fund losses to be significantly greater than historical measures predict. Our more qualitative approach to managing those risks could prove insufficient, exposing us to unanticipated losses in our Net Asset Value and therefore a reduction in our revenues.

 

This offering is focused on attracting a large number of investors who plan to make relatively small investments. An inability to attract such investors may have an adverse effect on the success of our offering, and we may not raise adequate capital to implement our business strategy.

 

Our common shares are being offered and sold only to “qualified purchasers” (as defined in Regulation A). “Qualified purchasers” include: (i) “accredited investors” under Rule 501(a) of Regulation D (which, in the case of natural persons, (A) have an individual net worth, or joint net worth with the person’s spouse, that exceeds $1,000,000 at the time of the purchase, excluding the value of the primary residence of such person, or (B) earned income exceeding $200,000 in each of the two most recent years or joint income with a spouse exceeding $300,000 for those years and a reasonable expectation of the same income level in the current year) and (ii) all other investors so long as their investment in the particular issuer does not represent more than 10% of the greater of their annual income or net worth (for natural persons), or 10% of the greater of annual revenue or net assets at fiscal year-end (for non-natural persons). However, our common shares are currently being offered and sold only to those investors that are within the latter category (i.e., investors whose investment in our common shares does not represent more than 10% of the applicable amount), regardless of an investor’s status as an “accredited investor.” Therefore, our target investor base inherently consists of persons that may not have the high net worth or income that investors in a traditional initial public offering have, where the investor base is typically composed of “accredited investors.”

 

 

 

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Our reliance on attracting investors that may not meet the net worth or income requirements of “accredited investors” carries certain risks that may not be present in traditional initial public offerings. For example, certain economic, geopolitical and social conditions may influence the investing habits and risk tolerance of these smaller investors to a greater extent than “accredited investors,” which may have an adverse effect on our ability to raise adequate capital to implement our business strategy. Additionally, our focus on investors that plan on making, or are able to make, relatively small investments requires a larger investor base in order to meet our annual goal of raising $75,000,000 in our offering. We may have difficulties in attracting a large investor base, which may have an adverse effect on the success of this offering, and a larger investor base involves increased transaction costs, which will increase our expenses.

 

We may be subject to liability for security breaches of our computer systems.

 

It is possible that our systems would be “hacked,” leading to the theft or disclosure of confidential information you have provided to us. Because techniques used to obtain unauthorized access or to sabotage systems change frequently and generally are not recognized until they are launched, we and our vendors may be unable to anticipate these techniques or to implement adequate defensive measures.

 

Using a credit card to purchase common shares may impact the return on your investment as well as subject you to other risks inherent in this form of payment.

 

Investors in this offering have the option of paying for their investment with a credit card, which is not usual in the traditional investment markets. Transaction fees charged by your credit card company (which can reach 5% of transaction value if considered a cash advance) and interest charged on unpaid card balances (which can reach almost 25% in some states) add to the effective purchase price of the common shares you buy. See “Plan of Distribution and Selling Securityholders.” The cost of using a credit card may also increase if you do not make the minimum monthly card payments and incur late fees. Using a credit card is a relatively new form of payment for securities and will subject you to other risks inherent in this form of payment, including that, if you fail to make credit card payments (e.g. minimum monthly payments), you risk damaging your credit score and payment by credit card may be more susceptible to abuse than other forms of payment. Moreover, where a third-party payment processor is used, as in this offering, your recovery options in the case of disputes may be limited. The increased costs due to transaction fees and interest may reduce the return on your investment.

 

The SEC’s Office of Investor Education and Advocacy issued an Investor Alert dated February 14, 2018 entitled: Credit Cards and Investments – A Risky Combination, which explains these and other risks you may want to consider before using a credit card to pay for your investment.

 

Risks Related to our Sponsor and our Manager

 

FundRebel, our Sponsor and Manager, has a limited operating history and no profits to date. As a result, our Manager and Sponsor face increased risks, uncertainties, expenses and difficulties.

 

FundRebel, our Manager and Sponsor, has a limited operating history – and specifically, it has limited experience operating a REIT, which could negatively affect our ability to execute our business strategy, qualify as a REIT, and maintain that status.

 

Our Manager’s due diligence of potential investments may not reveal all of the risks associated with such investments and may not reveal other weaknesses in such investments, , which could lead to investment losses.

 

Before making an investment, our Manager assesses the strengths and weaknesses of a particular project. In making the assessment and otherwise conducting customary due diligence, our Manager relies on resources available to it and, in some cases, an investigation by third parties. This process is particularly important with respect to newly formed originators, because there may be little or no information publicly available about these entities and their investment experience. We cannot assure you that our Manager’s due diligence process will uncover all relevant facts or that any investment will be successful.

 

 

 

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Future offerings of debt securities, which would rank senior to our common shares upon our liquidation, and future offerings of equity securities, which would dilute our existing shareholders and may be senior to our common shares for the purposes of dividend and liquidating distributions, may cause the value of our common shares to decline.

 

In the future, we may raise capital through the issuance of debt or additional equity securities. Upon liquidation, holders of our debt securities and preferred stock, if any, and lenders with respect to other borrowings will be entitled to our available assets prior to the holders of our common shares. Additional equity offerings may dilute the holdings of our existing shareholders or cause the value of our common shares to decline, or both. Our preferred stock, if issued, could have a preference on liquidating distributions or a preference on dividend payments that could limit our ability to pay dividends to the holders of our common shares. Sales of substantial amounts of our common shares, or the perception that these sales could occur, could have a material adverse effect on the price of our common shares, even if there is no effect on the NAV, and even though there is no liquid market for our shares. Because our decision to issue debt or equity securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings, if any. Thus, holders of our common shares will bear the risk of our future offerings reducing the value of our common shares and diluting the value of their shareholdings in us.

 

We have the authority to enter into unsecured related party loans that, in the aggregate, do not exceed $5 million and do not carry an interest rate that exceed prevailing interest rates without the approval of an Independent Representative. If we choose to raise debt capital and there is an economic slowdown or recession that would force us to liquidate, this debt would be paid back prior to distributions on our equity.

 

We are relying on the exemption for insignificant participation by benefit plan investors under ERISA.

 

The Plan Assets Regulation (as defined in “ERISA Considerations”) provides that the assets of an entity will not be deemed to be the assets of a benefits plan if equity participation in the entity by benefit plan investors, including benefit plans, is not significant. The Plan Assets Regulation provides that equity participation in the entity by benefit plan investors is “significant” if at any time 25% or more of the value of any class of equity interest is held by benefit plan investors. Because we are relying on this exemption, we will not accept investments from benefit plan investments over 25% of the value of any class of equity interest. If repurchases of shares cause us to go over 25%, we may repurchase shares of benefit plan investors without their consent until we are under the 25% limit. See “ERISA Considerations for additional information regarding the Plan Assets Regulation.

 

Risks Related to Compliance and Regulation

 

We are offering our common shares pursuant to amendments to Regulation A promulgated pursuant to the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act, and we cannot be certain if the reduced ongoing disclosure requirements applicable to Tier 2 issuers will make our common shares less attractive to investors as compared to a traditional initial public offering.

 

As a Tier 2 issuer, we will be subject to scaled disclosure and reporting requirements, which may make an investment in our common shares less attractive to investors who are accustomed to enhanced disclosure and more frequent financial reporting. In addition, given the relative lack of regulatory precedence regarding the amendments to Regulation A, there are ongoing compliance issues that we may be subject to. If our scaled disclosure and reporting requirements, or regulatory uncertainty regarding Regulation A, reduces the attractiveness of our common shares, we may be unable to develop a diversified portfolio of real estate investments, which could severely affect the value of our common shares.

 

Under Section 107 of the JOBS Act, we are permitted to use the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. This permits us to delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have elected to use the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standard that have different effective dates for public and private companies until the earlier of the date that we (i) are no longer an emerging growth company or (ii) affirmatively and irrevocably opt out of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B). By electing to extend the transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards, our financial statements may not be comparable to companies that comply with all public accounting standards.

 

 

 

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Our use of Form 1-A and our reliance on Regulation A for this offering may make it more difficult to raise capital as and when we need it, as compared to if we were conducting a traditional initial public offering on Form S-11.

 

Because of the exemptions from various reporting requirements provided to us under Regulation A and because we are only permitted to raise up to $75 million in any 12-month period under Regulation A (although we may raise capital in other ways), we may be less attractive to investors, and it may be difficult for us to raise additional capital as and when we need it. Investors may be unable to compare our business with other companies in our industry if they believe that our financial accounting is not as transparent as other companies in our industry. If we are unable to raise additional capital as and when we need it, our financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

 

There may be deficiencies with our internal controls that require improvements, and if we are unable to adequately evaluate internal controls, we may be subject to sanctions.

 

As a Tier 2 issuer, we will not need to provide a report on the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting, and we will be exempt from the auditor attestation requirements concerning any such report so long as we are a Tier 2 issuer. We are in the process of evaluating whether our internal control procedures are effective and therefore there is a greater likelihood of undiscovered errors in our internal controls or reported financial statements as compared to issuers that have completed such evaluations.  

 

Maintenance of our Investment Company Act exemption imposes significant limits on our operations, which may adversely affect our operations.

 

We intend to conduct our operations so that neither we nor any subsidiaries we may establish will be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act. We may own real estate and/or other real estate-related assets described below (i) directly; (ii); through wholly-owned subsidiaries; and/or (iii) through majority-owned subsidiaries controlled by the Company.

 

We intend, directly or through subsidiaries and affiliated partnerships, to identify, underwrite, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects, together with other real estate-related assets.

 

In connection with the Section 3(a)(1)(C) analysis, the determination of whether an entity is a majority-owned subsidiary of the Company is made by us. The Investment Company Act defines a majority-owned subsidiary of a person as a company 50% or more of the outstanding voting securities of which are owned by such person, or by another company which is a majority-owned subsidiary of such person. The Investment Company Act further defines voting security as any security presently entitling the owner or holder thereof to vote for the election of directors of a company. We intend to treat companies in which we own at least a majority of the outstanding voting securities as majority-owned subsidiaries. We also intend to treat subsidiaries of which we or our wholly-owned or majority-owned subsidiary is the manager (in a manager-managed entity) or managing member (in a member-managed entity) or in which our agreement or the agreement of our wholly-owned or majority-owned subsidiary is required for all major decisions affecting the subsidiaries (which we refer to as “Controlled Subsidiaries”), as majority-owned subsidiaries even though none of the interests issued by such Controlled Subsidiaries meets the definition of voting securities under the Investment Company Act. We reached our conclusion on the basis that the interests issued by the Controlled Subsidiaries are the functional equivalent of voting securities. We have not asked the SEC staff for concurrence of our analysis, our treatment of such interests as voting securities, or whether the Controlled Subsidiaries, or any other of our subsidiaries, may be treated in the manner in which we intend, and it is possible that the SEC staff could disagree with any of our determinations. If the SEC staff were to disagree with our treatment of one or more companies as majority-owned subsidiaries, we would need to adjust our strategy and our assets. Any such adjustment in our strategy could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

 

 

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Certain of our subsidiaries may also rely on the exclusion from the definition of investment company provided by Section 3(c)(5)(C) under the Investment Company Act. Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act is designed for entities “primarily engaged in the business of purchasing or otherwise acquiring mortgages and other liens on and interests in real estate.” This exclusion generally requires that at least 55% of the entity’s assets on an unconsolidated basis consist of qualifying real estate interests and at least 80% of the entity’s assets consist of qualifying real estate interests or real estate-related assets. These requirements limit the assets those subsidiaries can own and the timing of sales and purchases of those assets.

 

To classify the assets held by our subsidiaries as qualifying real estate interests or real estate-related assets, we will rely on no- action letters and other guidance published by the SEC staff regarding those kinds of assets, as well as upon our analyses (in consultation with outside counsel) of guidance published with respect to other types of assets. We cannot assure you that the laws and regulations governing the Investment Company Act status of companies similar to ours, or the guidance from the SEC or its staff regarding the treatment of assets as qualifying real estate interests or real estate-related assets, will not change in a manner that adversely affects our operations. In fact, in August 2011, the SEC published a concept release in which it asked for comments on this exclusion from regulation. To the extent that the SEC staff provides more specific guidance regarding any of the matters bearing upon our exemption from the need to register or exclusion under the Investment Company Act, we may be required to adjust our strategy accordingly. Any additional guidance from the SEC staff could further inhibit our ability to pursue the strategies that we have chosen.

 

Furthermore, although we intend to monitor the assets of our subsidiaries regularly, we cannot assure you that our subsidiaries will be able to maintain their exclusion from registration. Any of the foregoing could require us to adjust our strategy, which could limit our ability to make certain investments or require us to sell assets in a manner, at a price or at a time that we otherwise would not have chosen. This could negatively affect the value of our common shares, the sustainability of our business model and our ability to make distributions.

 

Registration under the Investment Company Act would require us to comply with a variety of substantive requirements that impose, among other things:

 

  · limitations on capital structure;
     
  · restrictions on specified investments;
     
  · restrictions on leverage or senior securities;
     
  · restrictions on unsecured borrowings;
     
  · prohibitions on transactions with affiliates; and
     
  · compliance with reporting, record keeping, voting, proxy disclosure and other rules and regulations that would significantly increase our operating expenses.

 

If we were required to register as an investment company but failed to do so, we could be prohibited from engaging in our business, and criminal and civil actions could be brought against us.

 

Registration with the SEC as an investment company would be costly, would subject us to a host of complex regulations and would divert attention from the conduct of our business, which could materially and adversely affect us. In addition, if we purchase or sell any real estate assets to avoid becoming an investment company under the Investment Company Act, our NAV, the amount of funds available for investment and our ability to pay distributions to our shareholders could be materially adversely affected.

 

 

 

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We are not subject to the banking regulations of any state or federal regulatory agency.

 

We are not subject to the periodic examinations to which commercial banks and other thrift institutions are subject. Consequently, our financing decisions are not subject to periodic review by any governmental agency. Moreover, we are not subject to regulatory oversight relating to our capital, asset quality, management or compliance with laws. As such, we are solely reliant on the judgment of the Manager to determine and manage the risk profile, exposure, liquidity, and leverage of the Company.

 

Recent legislative and regulatory initiatives have imposed restrictions and requirements on financial institutions that could have an adverse effect on our business.

 

The financial industry has recently become more highly regulated. There has been, and may continue to be, a related increase in regulatory investigations of the trading and other investment activities of alternative investment funds and companies. Such investigations may impose additional regulatory burdens and expenses on us, may require the attention of senior management of the Manager and may result in fines if we are deemed to have violated any regulations. In addition, the cost to maintain regulatory compliance has risen in the past few years and is likely to continue to rise.

 

As internet commerce in regulated financial services continues to develop, federal and state governments may adopt new laws to regulate internet such commerce and services, which may negatively affect our business.

 

As internet commerce related to regulated financial services — the sale of securities and the offering of specialized investment management through pooled investment vehicles—continues to evolve, increasing regulation by federal and state governments becomes more likely. Our business could be negatively affected by the application of existing laws and regulations or the enactment of new laws applicable to lending and securities markets. The cost to comply with such laws or regulations could be significant and would increase our operating expenses, and we may be required to pass along those costs in the form of increased fees, which could negatively impact our ability to make other real estate investments. In addition, federal and state governmental or regulatory agencies may decide to impose taxes on services provided over the internet. These taxes could discourage the use of the internet as a means of commercial financing, which would adversely affect the viability of our offering and our Company.

 

Laws intended to prohibit money laundering may require us to disclose investor information to regulatory authorities.

 

The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (the “PATRIOT Act”) requires that financial institutions establish and maintain compliance programs to guard against money laundering activities, and requires the Secretary of the U.S. Treasury (“Treasury”) to prescribe regulations in connection with anti-money laundering policies of financial institutions. The Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (“FinCEN”), an agency of the Treasury, has announced that it is likely that such regulations would subject certain pooled investment vehicles to enact anti-money laundering policies. It is possible that there could be promulgated legislation or regulations that would require the Company or our service providers to share information with governmental authorities with respect to prospective investors in connection with the establishment of anti-money laundering procedures. Such legislation and/or regulations could require us to implement additional restrictions on the transfer of our common shares to comply with such legislation and/or regulations. We reserve the right to request such information as is necessary to verify the identity of prospective shareholders and the source of the payment of subscription monies, or as is necessary to comply with any customer identification programs required by FinCEN and/or the SEC. In the event of delay or failure by a prospective shareholder to produce any information required for verification purposes, an application for, or transfer of, our common shares may be refused. We will not have the ability to reject a transfer of our common shares where all necessary information is provided and any other applicable transfer requirements, including those imposed under the transfer provisions of our operating agreement, are satisfied.

 

 

 

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Risks Related to Conflicts of Interest

 

There are conflicts of interest between us, the Manager, the Sponsor and their affiliates.

 

The principals of our Manager and Sponsor (FundRebel) also provide (or intend to provide) asset management and other services to individuals, families, businesses, non-profit organizations, qualified plans and us. Prevailing market rates for contracts between affiliates are determined by management based on industry standards and expectations of what management would be able to negotiate with a third party on an arm’s length basis. All of the agreements and arrangements between such parties, including those relating to compensation, are not the result of arm’s length negotiations. Some of the conflicts inherent in the Company’s transactions with the Manager, the Sponsor and their affiliates, and the limitations on such parties adopted to address these conflicts, are described below. The Company, the Manager, the Sponsor and their affiliates will try to balance our interests with their own. However, to the extent that such parties take actions that are more favorable to them than to us, these actions could have negative impact on our financial performance and, consequently, on distributions to shareholders and the value of our common shares. We have adopted a conflicts of interest policy. See “Conflicts of Interest—Certain Conflict Resolution Measures—Independent Representative” and “—Our Policies Relating to Conflicts of Interest.”

 

The interests of the Manager, the Sponsor, their principals, and their other affiliates may conflict with your interests.

 

The operating agreement provides the Manager with broad powers and authority, which may result in one or more conflicts of interest between your interests and those of the Manager, its principals and its other affiliates. This risk is increased by the Manager being controlled by Mark Drachman and Allen Konstam, each of whom are principals of our Sponsor and each of whom participates, or expects to participate, directly or indirectly in other offerings by our Sponsor and its affiliates. Potential conflicts of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

 

  · the Sponsor, its principals and/or its other affiliates may in the future originate and offer other real estate investment opportunities, including additional blind pool offerings similar to this offering, and may make investments in real estate assets for their own respective accounts, whether or not competitive with our business;
     
  · affiliates of the Manager may compete with us with respect to certain investments which we may want to acquire, and as a result we may either not be presented with the opportunity or have to compete with the affiliates to acquire these investments. The Manager and our officers may choose to allocate favorable investments to its affiliates instead of to us. The ability of the Manager, its officers and individuals providing services to the Manager to engage in other business activities may reduce the time the Manager spends managing us;
     
  · the Sponsor, the Manager, their principals and/or other affiliates are not required to devote all of their time and efforts to our affairs. During turbulent conditions in the mortgage industry, distress in the credit markets or other times when we will need focused support and assistance from the Manager, other entities for which the Manager may also acts as an investment manager will likewise require greater focus and attention, placing the Manager’s resources in high demand. In such situations, we may not receive the necessary support and assistance we require or would otherwise receive if we were internally managed or if the Manager did not act as a manager for other entities;
     
  · The Manager is entitled to certain fees (such as an acquisition fee and exit fee) regardless of the performance of our portfolio. The Manager’s entitlement to compensation that is not performance-based might reduce its incentive to devote its time and effort to seeking investments that provide attractive risk-adjusted returns for our portfolio. This in turn could hurt both our ability to make distributions to our shareholders and the value of our common shares;
     
  · we pay the Manager a 2% fee on the value of acquisitions of investments. This may incentivize our Manger to purchase real estate at higher purchase prices, which entitle our Manager to higher acquisition fees regardless of the quality or performance of the investment. Additionally, we pay the Manager an exit fee of 1% of the purchase price from the sale of any asset of our Company. As such, the Manager may be incentivized to sell an asset acquired by the Company at a time that is not ideal for the Company and its investors;
     
  · the Manager, its principals and its other affiliates will not be required to disgorge any profits or fees or other compensation they may receive from any other business they own separately from us, and you will not be entitled to receive or share in any of the profits return fees or compensation from any other business owned and operated by the Manager, its principals and/or its other affiliates for their own benefit; and
     
  · we may engage the Manager or affiliates of the Manager to perform services at prevailing market rates. Prevailing market rates are determined by the Manager based on industry standards and expectations of what the Manager would be able to negotiate with third parties on an arm’s length basis.

 

 

 

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We have agreed to limit remedies available to us and our shareholders for actions by the Manager.

 

Our operating agreement limits the fiduciary duties that the Manager has towards the Company. We and our shareholders will only have recourse and be able to seek remedies against the Manager to the extent it breaches its obligations pursuant to our operating agreement. Furthermore, we have agreed to limit the liability of the Manager and to indemnify the Manager against certain liabilities. These provisions are detrimental to shareholders because they restrict the remedies available to them for actions that without those limitations might constitute breaches of duty, including fiduciary duties, and could reduce shareholder returns. By purchasing our common shares, you will be treated as having consented to the provisions set forth in the operating agreement. In addition, we may choose not to enforce, or to enforce less vigorously, our rights under the operating agreement because of our desire to maintain our ongoing relationship with the Manager.

 

Risks Related to Our Investments

 

Our investments in commercial and multi-family real estate projects other real estate-related assets will be subject to the risks typically associated with real estate.

 

Our commercial real estate investments will generally be financed by one or more loans that are directly or indirectly secured by a lien on the real property that, upon the occurrence of a default on the loan, could result in our loss of ownership of the property through a foreclosure process. We will not know whether the values of the properties securing such loans will remain at the levels existing on the dates of origination of those loans. If the values of the mortgaged properties drop, our risk will increase because of the lower value of the security associated with such loans. In this manner, a decline in real estate values could adversely impact the leverage of our portfolio and substantially increase the risk of loss. Therefore, our investments will be subject to the risks typically associated with real estate.

 

The value of real estate may be adversely affected by a number of risks, including:

 

  · natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes and floods;
     
  · acts of war or terrorism, including the consequences of terrorist attacks, such as those that occurred on September 11, 2001;
     
  · adverse changes in national and local economic and real estate conditions;
     
  · an oversupply of (or a reduction in demand for) space in the areas where particular properties are located and the attractiveness of particular properties to prospective tenants;
     
  · changes in governmental laws and regulations, fiscal policies and zoning ordinances and the related costs of compliance therewith and the potential for liability under applicable laws;
     
  · costs of remediation and liabilities associated with environmental conditions affecting properties; and
     
  · the potential for uninsured or underinsured property losses.

 

The value of each property is affected significantly by its ability to generate cash flow and net income, which in turn depends on the amount of rental or other income that can be generated net of expenses required to be incurred with respect to the property. Many expenditures associated with properties (such as operating expenses and capital expenditures) cannot be reduced when there is a reduction in income from the properties. These factors may have a material adverse effect on the value that we can realize from assets we originate, own or acquire.

 

 

 

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The actual rents we receive for properties in which we invest may be less than estimated market rents, and we may experience a decline in realized rental rates from time to time, which could adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and operating cash flow.

 

A wide array of factors, including competitive pricing pressure in our markets, a general or regional economic downturn and the lack of desirability of our properties compared to other properties in our markets, may limit our ability to realize our target rents across our portfolio. In addition, depending on market rental rates at any point in time, compared to rates on existing leases in our portfolio, from time to time rental rates for expiring leases may be higher than starting rental rates for new leases. If we are unable to obtain sufficient rents across our entire portfolio, or if our rents are consistently below market, then our ability to generate cash flow in line with our objectives will be negatively impacted.

 

Properties that have significant vacancies could be difficult to sell, which could reduce the return on these properties.

 

A property may realize vacancies either by the expiration of tenant leases or the continued default of tenants under their leases. If vacancies persist for a long period of time, we may suffer reduced revenues resulting in less cash available for distribution to our shareholders. In addition, the resale value of such properties could be diminished because the market value depends principally on the value of the cash flow generated by the leases on that property. Such a reduction in resale values could also reduce the value of your investment.

 

Further, a decline in general economic conditions in the markets in which our investments are located or in the U.S. generally could lead to an increase in tenant defaults, lower rents, higher vacancies, and less demand for commercial real estate in those markets. In such a scenario, we may be inclined to provide leasing incentives to our tenants in order to compete in a more competitive leasing environment, which could result in reduced revenue and lower resale value of properties, reducing the value of your shares in the Company.

 

We may enter into long-term leases with tenants in certain properties, which may become below-market rentals over time.

 

We may enter into long-term leases with tenants of certain of our properties, or we may include renewal options that specify a maximum rental rate increase. These leases generally provide for rent to increase over time; however, if we do not accurately judge the potential for increases in market rental rates, we may set terms at levels that are below the then-prevailing market, even after contractual rent increases. Moreover, we may have no ability to terminate those leases or to adjust the rent to then-prevailing market rates. As a result, our cash available for distribution could be lower than if we had not entered into such long-term leases.

 

Potential development and construction delays and resultant increased costs and risks may hinder our operating results and decrease our net income.

 

Because we may substantially improve any properties that we acquire in order to increase the value of such properties, we may acquire unimproved real property or properties that are under development or construction in order to be habitable. Investments in such properties will be subject to the inherent risks and uncertainties associated with the development and construction of real property, including those related to re-zoning land for development, environmental concerns of governmental entities and/or community groups and our builders’ ability to complete projects in conformance with plans, specifications, budgeted costs and timetables. If a builder fails to perform according to the terms of a contract, we may resort to legal action to rescind the purchase or the construction contract or to compel performance. A builder’s performance may also be affected or delayed by conditions beyond the builder’s control. Delays in completing construction could also give tenants the right to terminate preconstruction leases. We may incur additional risks when we make periodic progress payments or other advances to builders before they complete construction. These and other factors can result in increased costs of a project or loss of our investment. In addition, we will be subject to normal lease-up risks relating to newly-constructed projects. We also must rely on projected rental income, expense projections and estimates of the fair market value of property upon completion of construction when agreeing upon a purchase price at the time we acquire the property. If our forecasts are inaccurate, we may pay too much for a property, and the return on our investment could suffer. In addition, to the extent we acquire loans to finance construction or renovation projects, the risk of cost overruns and non-completion of the construction or renovation of the properties underlying such loans may materially adversely affect our investment. The foregoing risks apply to projects we undertake directly, or in partnership with others, or to any projects in which we invest that are managed by others.

 

 

 

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Costs imposed by regulators or incurred by the Company in order to comply with governmental laws and regulations may reduce our net income and the cash available for distributions to our shareholders.

 

Real property and the operations conducted on real property are subject to federal, state and local laws and regulations related to protection of the environment and human health. We could be subject to liabilities in the form of fines, penalties or damages for noncompliance with these laws and regulations. These laws and regulations generally govern wastewater discharges, air emissions, the operation and removal of underground and above-ground storage tanks, the use, storage, treatment, transportation and disposal of solid and hazardous materials, the remediation of contamination associated with the release or disposal of solid and hazardous materials, the presence of toxic building materials and other health and safety-related concerns.

 

Some of these laws and regulations may impose joint and several liability on the tenants, owners or operators of real property for the costs to investigate or remediate contaminated properties, regardless of fault, whether the contamination occurred prior to purchase, or whether the acts causing the contamination were legal. Activities of our tenants, the condition of properties at the time we buy them, operations in the vicinity of our properties, such as the presence of underground storage tanks, or activities of unrelated third parties may affect our properties.

 

The presence of hazardous substances, or the failure to properly manage or remediate these substances, may hinder our ability to sell, rent or pledge such property as collateral for future borrowings. Any material expenditures, fines, penalties or damages we must pay will reduce our ability to make distributions and may reduce the value of your investment in the Company.

 

Uninsured losses relating to real property or excessive premiums for insurance coverage could reduce our cash flows and the value of our shareholders’ investment.

 

There are types of losses, generally catastrophic in nature, such as losses due to wars, acts of terrorism, earthquakes, floods, hurricanes, pollution or environmental matters, that are uninsurable or not economically insurable, or may be insured subject to significant limitations, such as large deductibles or co-payments. Insurance risks associated with potential acts of terrorism could sharply increase the premiums we pay for coverage against property and casualty claims. Additionally, mortgage lenders in some cases insist that commercial property owners purchase coverage against terrorism as a condition for providing mortgage loans. Such insurance policies may not be available at reasonable costs, if at all, which could inhibit our ability to finance or refinance our properties. In such instances, we may be required to provide other financial support, either through financial assurances or self-insurance, to cover potential losses. We may not have adequate coverage for such losses. If any of our properties incurs a casualty loss that is not fully insured, the value of our assets will be reduced by any such uninsured loss, which may reduce the value of your investment. In addition, other than any working capital reserve or other reserves that we may establish and maintain, we have no source of funding to repair or reconstruct any uninsured property. Also, to the extent we must pay unexpectedly large amounts for insurance, we could suffer reduced earnings that would result in lower distributions to you.

 

Risks of cost overruns and non-completion of the construction or renovation of the investment properties may materially adversely affect our investment.

 

The renovation, refurbishment or expansion of an investment property involves risks of cost overruns and non-completion. Costs of construction or improvements to bring a property up to standards established for the market position intended for that property may exceed original estimates, possibly making a project uneconomical. Other risks may include environmental risks and construction, rehabilitation and subsequent leasing of the property not being completed on schedule. If such construction or renovation is not completed in a timely manner, or if it costs more than expected, the property may experience a prolonged impairment of net operating income and may not be meet the return requirements of the Manager.

 

 

 

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We have no contractual limits on the geographic concentration of our investments in commercial real estate and other real estate-related debt assets. If our investments are concentrated in an area that experiences adverse economic conditions, our investments may lose value and we may experience losses.

 

Certain investments in commercial real estate and other real estate-related assets in which we invest may be in or secured by a single property or properties in one geographic location. These investments may carry the risks associated with significant geographical concentration. We have not established any investment limits to our exposure to these risks for future investments. As a result, properties underlying our investments may be overly concentrated in certain geographic areas, and we may experience losses as a result. A worsening of economic conditions in the geographic area in which our investments may be concentrated could have an adverse effect on our business, including reducing the demand for real estate and depressed rental values. 

 

Hedging against interest rate exposure may adversely affect our earnings, limit our gains or result in losses, which could adversely affect cash available for distribution to our shareholders.

 

We may enter into interest rate swap agreements or pursue other interest rate hedging strategies. Our hedging activity will vary in scope based on the level of interest rates, the type of portfolio investments held, and other changing market conditions. Interest rate hedging may fail to protect or could adversely affect us because, among other things: 

 

  · interest rate hedging can be expensive, particularly during periods of rising and volatile interest rates;
     
  · available interest rate hedging may not correspond directly with the interest rate risk for which protection is sought;
     
  · the duration of the hedge may not match the duration of the related liability or asset;
     
  · our hedging opportunities may be limited by the treatment of income from hedging transactions under the rules determining REIT qualification;
     
  · the credit quality of the party owing money on the hedge may be downgraded to such an extent that it impairs our ability to sell or assign our side of the hedging transaction;
     
  · the party owing money in the hedging transaction may default on its obligation to pay; and
     
  · we may purchase a hedge that turns out not to be necessary, i.e., a hedge that is out of the money.

 

Any hedging activity we engage in may adversely affect our earnings, which could adversely affect cash available for distribution to our shareholders. Therefore, while we may enter into such transactions to seek to reduce interest rate risks, unanticipated changes in interest rates may result in poorer overall investment performance than if we had not engaged in any such hedging transactions. In addition, the degree of correlation between price movements of the instruments used in a hedging strategy and price movements in the portfolio positions being hedged or liabilities being hedged may vary materially. Moreover, for a variety of reasons, we may not seek to establish a perfect correlation between such hedging instruments and the portfolio holdings being hedged. Any such imperfect correlation may prevent us from achieving the intended hedge and expose us to risk of loss.

 

 

 

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Many of our investments are illiquid and we may not be able to vary our portfolio in response to changes in economic and other conditions.

 

The illiquidity of our target investments may make it difficult for us to sell such investments if the need or desire arises. As a result, we expect many of our investments will be illiquid, and if we are required to liquidate all or a portion of our portfolio quickly, we may realize significantly less than the value at which we have previously recorded our investments and our ability to vary our portfolio in response to changes in economic and other conditions may be relatively limited, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Declines in the market values of our investments may adversely affect periodic reported results of operations and credit availability, which may reduce earnings and, in turn, cash available for distribution to our shareholders.

 

Some of our assets will be classified for accounting purposes as “available-for-sale.” These investments are carried at estimated fair value and temporary changes in the market values of those assets will be directly charged or credited to shareholders’ equity without impacting net income on the income statement. Moreover, if we determine that a decline in the estimated fair value of an available-for-sale security falls below its amortized value and is not temporary, we will recognize a loss on that security on the income statement, which will reduce our earnings in the period recognized.

 

A decline in the market value of our assets may adversely affect us particularly in instances where we have borrowed money based on the market value of those assets. If the market value of those assets declines, the lender may require us to post additional collateral to support the loan. If we were unable to post the additional collateral, we may have to sell assets at a time when we might not otherwise choose to do so. A reduction in credit available may reduce our earnings and, in turn, cash available for distribution to shareholders.

 

Further, credit facility providers may require us to maintain a certain amount of cash reserves or to set aside unlevered assets sufficient to maintain a specified liquidity position, which would allow us to satisfy our collateral obligations. As a result, we may not be able to leverage our assets as fully as we would choose, which could reduce our return on equity. In the event that we are unable to meet these contractual obligations, our financial condition could deteriorate rapidly.

 

Market values of our investments may decline for a number of reasons, such as changes in prevailing market rates, increases in defaults, increases in voluntary prepayments for those investments that we have that are subject to prepayment risk, widening of credit spreads and downgrades of ratings of the securities by ratings agencies.

 

Some of our portfolio investments will be carried at estimated fair value as determined by us and, as a result, there may be uncertainty as to the value of these investments.

 

Some of our portfolio investments will be in the form of securities that are recorded at fair value but that have limited liquidity or are not publicly traded. The fair value of securities and other investments that have limited liquidity or are not publicly traded may not be readily determinable. We estimate the fair value of these investments on a quarterly basis. Because such valuations are inherently uncertain, may fluctuate over short periods of time and may be based on numerous estimates, our determinations of fair value may differ materially from the values that would have been used if a ready market for these securities existed. The value of our common shares could be adversely affected if our determinations regarding the fair value of these investments are materially higher than the values that we ultimately realize upon their disposal.

 

Competition with third parties in sourcing and acquiring investments may reduce our profitability and the return on your investment.

 

We have significant competition with respect to our acquisition of assets with many other companies, including other REITs, insurance companies, commercial banks, private investment funds, hedge funds, specialty finance companies and other private investors, many of which have greater resources than us. We may not be able to compete successfully for investments. In addition, the number of entities and the amount of funds competing for suitable investments may increase. If we pay higher prices for investments, our returns will be lower and the value of our assets may not increase or may decrease significantly below the amount we paid for such assets. If such events occur, you may experience a lower return on your investment.

  

 

 

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Insurance may not cover all potential losses on our properties, which may harm the value of our assets.

 

We will obtain comprehensive insurance covering each of our properties, including liability, fire and extended coverage. However, there are certain types of losses, generally of a catastrophic nature, such as earthquakes, floods and hurricanes that may be uninsurable or not economically insurable. Inflation, changes in building codes and ordinances, environmental considerations, and other factors also might make it infeasible to use insurance proceeds to replace a property if it is damaged or destroyed. Under such circumstances, the insurance proceeds, if any, might not be adequate to restore the economic value of a property, which might impair our security and decrease the value of the property.

  

The leases on the properties underlying our investments may not be renewed on favorable terms.

 

The Company’s properties could be negatively impacted by the deteriorating economic conditions and weaker rental markets. Upon expiration or earlier termination of leases on these properties, the space may not be relet or, if relet, the terms of the renewal or reletting (including the cost of required renovations or concessions to tenants) may be less favorable than current lease terms. In addition, the poor economic conditions may reduce a tenants’ ability to make rent payments under their leases. Any of these situations may result in extended periods where there is a significant decline in revenues or no revenues generated by these properties. Additionally, if market rental rates are reduced, property-level cash flows would likely be negatively affected as existing leases renew at lower rates. If the leases for these properties cannot be renewed for all or substantially all of the space at these properties, or if the rental rates upon such renewal or reletting are significantly lower than expected, our ability to repay principal and interest on a loan backed by such properties may be impaired, and value of our investments may be adversely effected.

 

A sponsor’s form of entity may cause special risks or hinder our recovery.

 

The bankruptcy of a sponsor, or a general partner or managing member of a sponsor of a project in which the Company invests, may impair out ability to enforce our rights and remedies under the operating agreement of the project. Projects that are not single-purpose entities structured to limit the possibility of becoming insolvent or bankrupt, may be more likely to become insolvent or the subject of a voluntary or involuntary bankruptcy proceeding because the sponsor may be (i) operating entities with a business distinct from the operation of the property with the associated liabilities and risks of operating an ongoing business or (ii) individuals that have personal liabilities unrelated to the property.

 

We may be exposed to environmental liabilities with respect to properties in our investment portfolio.

 

In the course of our business, we will take title to real estate, and, if we do take title, we could be subject to environmental liabilities with respect to these properties. In such a circumstance, we may be held liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage, personal injury, and investigation and clean-up costs incurred by these parties in connection with environmental contamination, or may be required to investigate or clean up hazardous or toxic substances, or chemical releases, at a property. The costs associated with investigation or remediation activities could be substantial. If we ever become subject to significant environmental liabilities, our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Risks Relating to Economic Conditions

 

Economic recessions or downturns may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Economic recessions or downturns may result in a prolonged period of market illiquidity, which could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. Unfavorable economic conditions also could reduce investments in our Company by investors and engagement by real estate operators. Periods of economic slowdown or recession, significantly rising interest rates, declining employment levels, decreasing demand for real estate, or the public perception that any of these events may occur, have resulted in and could continue to result in a general decline in acquisition, disposition and leasing activity, as well as a general decline in the value of real estate and in rents. These events could adversely affect our demand among investors, which will impact our results of operations.

 

 

 

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During an economic downturn, it may also take longer for us to dispose of real estate investments, or the disposition prices may be lower than originally anticipated. As a result, the carrying value of such investments may become impaired and we could record losses as a result of such impairment or could experience reduced profitability related to declines in investment values. These events could adversely affect our performance and, in turn, our business, and negatively impact our results of operations.

 

Negative general economic conditions could continue to reduce the overall amount of sale, leasing, and financing activity in the commercial real estate industry, and could also reduce the demand for our securities, which may in turn adversely affect our ability to manage the Company profitably. We are unable to predict the likely duration or severity of any disruption in financial markets and the resultant adverse economic conditions in the United States and other countries that would likely ensue.

 

Further downgrades of the U.S. credit rating, impending automatic spending cuts or a government shutdown could negatively impact our liquidity, financial condition and earnings.

 

Over the past few years, U.S. debt ceiling and budget deficit concerns have increased the possibility of additional credit rating downgrades and economic slowdowns, or a recession in the United States. Although U.S. lawmakers have passed legislation to raise the federal debt ceiling on multiple occasions, ratings agencies have lowered or threatened to lower the long-term sovereign credit rating on the United States. The impact of this or any further downgrades to the U.S. government’s sovereign credit rating or its perceived creditworthiness could adversely affect the United States and global financial markets and economic conditions. With the improvement of the U.S. economy, the Federal Reserve may continue to raise interest rates, which would increase borrowing costs and may negatively impact our ability to access the debt markets on favorable terms. In addition, disagreement over the federal budget has, in the past, caused the U.S. federal government to essentially shut down for periods of time. Continued adverse political and economic conditions could have an adverse effect on our business and financial condition.

 

Global economic, political and market conditions and economic uncertainty caused by the recent outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19) may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

The current worldwide financial market situation, various social and political tensions in the United States and around the world, and the recent public health crisis caused by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), may continue to contribute to increased market volatility, may have long-term effects on the United States and worldwide financial markets, and may cause further economic uncertainties or deterioration in the United States and worldwide. Economic uncertainty can have a negative impact on our business through changing spreads, structures and purchase multiples, as well as the overall supply of investment capital. Since 2010, several European Union, or EU, countries, including Greece, Ireland, Italy, Spain, and Portugal, have faced budget issues, some of which may have negative long-term effects for the economies of those countries and other EU countries. Additionally, the precise details and the resulting impact of the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the EU, commonly referred to as “Brexit”, are impossible to ascertain at this point. The effect on the United Kingdom’s economy will likely depend on the nature of trade relations with the EU following its exit, a matter to be negotiated. The decision may cause increased volatility and have a significant adverse impact on world financial markets, other international trade agreements, and the United Kingdom and European economies, as well as the broader global economy for some time. Further, there is continued concern about national-level support for the Euro and the accompanying coordination of fiscal and wage policy among European Economic and Monetary Union member countries. In addition, the fiscal policy of foreign nations, such as China, may have a severe impact on the worldwide and United States financial markets.  Finally, public health crises, pandemics and epidemics, such as those caused by new strains of viruses such as H5N1 (avian flu), severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and, most recently, the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), are expected to increase as international travel continues to rise and could adversely impact our business by interrupting business, supply chains and transactional activities, disrupting travel, and negatively impacting local, national or global economies.  We do not know how long the financial markets will continue to be affected by these events and cannot predict the effects of these or similar events in the future on the United States economy and securities markets or on our investments. As a result of these factors, there can be no assurance that we will be able to successfully monitor developments and manage our investments in a manner consistent with achieving our investment objectives.

 

 

 

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The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and measures intended to prevent its spread could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, cash flows and financial condition.

 

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused, and is likely to continue to cause, severe economic, market and other disruptions worldwide. We cannot assure you that conditions in the bank lending, capital and other financial markets will not continue to deteriorate as a result of the pandemic, or that our access to capital and other sources of funding will not become constrained, which could adversely affect the availability and terms of future borrowings, renewals or refinancings. In addition, the deterioration of global economic conditions as a result of the pandemic may ultimately decrease occupancy levels and pricing across our portfolio and may cause one or more of our tenants to be unable to meet their rent obligations to us in full, or at all, or to otherwise seek modifications of such obligations.  In addition, governmental authorities may enact laws that will prevent us from taking action against tenants who do not pay rent.

 

The extent of the COVID-19 pandemic’s effect on our operational and financial performance will depend on future developments, including the duration, spread and intensity of the outbreak, all of which are uncertain and difficult to predict. Due to the speed with which the situation is developing, we are not able at this time to estimate the effect of these factors on our business, but the adverse impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows could be material.

 

Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure

 

We do not have a board of directors and are managed by the Manager. Our shareholders do not elect or vote on the Manager and have limited ability to influence decisions regarding our business.

 

Our operating agreement provides that the assets, affairs and business of the Company will be managed under the direction of the Manager. Our shareholders do not elect or vote on the Manager, and, unlike the holders of common shares in a corporation, have only limited voting rights on matters affecting our business, and therefore limited ability to influence decisions regarding our business. In addition, our operating agreement provides that the Manager will generally operate in a manner that is appropriate to maintain our REIT status, which may further limit decisions regarding our business. 

 

If our shareholders are dissatisfied with the performance of the Manager, they have little ability to remove the Manager. Our shareholders may only remove the Manager with 30 days prior written notice for “cause,” following the affirmative vote of two-thirds of our shareholders. Unsatisfactory financial performance of the Company does not constitute “cause” under our operating agreement.

 

Our common shareholders will have limited voting rights and may be bound by either a majority or supermajority vote.

 

Our common shareholders will have voting rights only with respect to certain matters, primarily relating to amendments to our operating agreement that would adversely change the rights of the common shares and removal of the Manager for “cause.” Each outstanding common share entitles the holder to one vote on all matters submitted to a vote of common shareholders. Generally, matters to be voted on by our shareholders must be approved by a majority of the votes cast by all common shares present in person or represented by proxy, although the vote to remove the Manager for “cause” requires a two-thirds vote. If any vote occurs, you will be bound by the majority or supermajority vote, as applicable, even if you did not vote with the majority or supermajority.

 

 

 

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Because we are not a reporting company under the Exchange Act, there is less public information about us available as compared to Exchange Act reporting companies.

 

We are not a reporting company under the Exchange Act, and therefore we will not be required to comply with the ongoing reporting requirements of the Exchange Act. We will have continuous disclosure obligations, including annual reports, semiannual reports and current reports. However, we will not be required to comply with all of the requirements of disclosure with which an Exchange Act reporting company would have to comply. For instance, our officers and 10% shareholders will not be required to comply with Section 16 of the Exchange Act and will not be required to make Form 3 and Form 4 filings. Since we and our shareholders are not required to make these filings, there will be less information available to the public about the Company.

 

As a non-listed company conducting an exempt offering pursuant to Regulation A, we are not subject to a number of corporate governance requirements, including the requirements for a board of directors or independent board committees.

 

As a non-listed company conducting an exempt offering pursuant to Regulation A, we are not subject to a number of corporate governance requirements that an issuer conducting an offering on Form S-11 or listing on a national stock exchange would be. Accordingly, while we have retained the Independent Representative to review certain conflicts of interest, we do not have a board of directors, nor are we required to have (i) a board of directors of which a majority consists of “independent” directors under the listing standards of a national stock exchange, (ii) an audit committee composed entirely of independent directors and a written audit committee charter meeting a national stock exchange’s requirements, (iii) a nominating/corporate governance committee composed entirely of independent directors and a written nominating/corporate governance committee charter meeting a national stock exchange’s requirements, (iv) a compensation committee composed entirely of independent directors and a written compensation committee charter meeting the requirements of a national stock exchange, and (v) independent audits of our internal controls. Accordingly, you may not have the same protections afforded to shareholders of companies that are subject to all of the corporate governance requirements of a national stock exchange.

 

If our Sponsor establishes additional REIT offerings and the Manager is engaged in managing portfolios for other customers in the future, there may be conflicts of interests among the various REIT offerings, which may result in opportunities that would benefit the Company being allocated disproportionately or entirely to the other offerings.

 

Our Sponsor has not sponsored any investment vehicles or funds other than our Company to date. Nonetheless, our Sponsor expects to establish and sponsor additional REIT offerings in the future, including offerings that may manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects. In addition, the Manager may manage client portfolios or separately managed account portfolios for other advisors, for which investments such as the debt investments made by the Company would be appropriate. Our Sponsor’s real estate professionals acting on behalf of the Manager must determine which investment opportunities to recommend to us and other FundRebel entities.

 

These additional REITs may have investment criteria that compete with us. If a sale, financing, investment or other business opportunity would be suitable for more than one of these investment vehicles or investors, the Manager will allocate it using its business judgment. Any allocation of this type may involve the consideration of a number of factors that our Sponsor and its officers and directors determine to be relevant. Except under any policies that may be adopted by the Manager or Sponsor, no REIT (including us) will have any duty, responsibility or obligation to refrain from:

 

  · engaging in the same or similar activities or lines of business as any other REIT;
     
  · doing business with any potential or actual tenant, lender, purchaser, supplier, customer or competitor of any REIT;
     
  · engaging in, or refraining from, any other activities whatsoever relating to any of the potential or actual tenants, lenders, purchasers, suppliers or customers of any REIT;
     
  · establishing material commercial relationships with another REIT; or
     
  · making operational and financial decisions that could be considered to be detrimental to another REIT managed by the Manager.

 

 

 

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In addition, any decisions by our Sponsor or Manager to renew, extend, modify or terminate an agreement or arrangement, or enter into similar agreements or arrangements in the future, may benefit one REIT more than another REIT or limit or impair the ability of any REIT to pursue business opportunities. In addition, third parties may require as a condition to their arrangements or agreements with or related to any one particular REIT that such arrangements or agreements include or not include another REIT, as the case may be. Any of these decisions may benefit one REIT more than another REIT.

 

The conflicts of interest policies we have adopted may not adequately address all of the conflicts of interest that may arise with respect to our activities and are subject to change or suspension.

 

In order to avoid any actual or perceived conflicts of interest among the REITs and with the Manager’s and Sponsor’s directors, officers and affiliates, we have adopted a conflicts of interest policy to specifically address some of the conflicts relating to our activities. We cannot assure you that these policies will be adequate to address all of the conflicts that may arise or will address such conflicts in a manner that is favorable to the Company. Our Manager may modify, suspend or rescind the policies set forth in the conflicts policy, including any resolution implementing the provisions of the conflicts policy, in each case, without a vote of our shareholders.

 

Certain provisions of our operating agreement and Delaware law could hinder, delay or prevent a change of control of the Company.

 

Certain provisions of our operating agreement and Delaware law could have the effect of discouraging, delaying or preventing transactions that involve an actual or threatened change of control of the Company. These provisions include the following:

 

  · Authorization of additional shares, issuances of authorized shares and classification of shares without shareholder approval. Our operating agreement authorizes us to issue additional shares or other securities of the Company for the consideration and on the terms and conditions established by the Manager without the approval of our shareholders. In particular, the Manager is authorized to provide for the issuance of an unlimited amount of one or more classes or series of our shares, including preferred shares, and to fix the number of shares, the relative powers, preferences and rights, and the qualifications, limitations or restrictions applicable to each class or series thereof by resolution authorizing the issuance of such class or series. Our ability to issue additional shares and other securities could render more difficult or discourage an attempt to obtain control over the Company by means of a tender offer, merger or otherwise.
     
  · Delaware Business Combination Statute—Section 203. Section 203 of the DGCL, which restricts certain business combinations with interested shareholders in certain situations, does not apply to limited liability companies unless they elect to utilize it. Our operating agreement does not currently elect to have Section 203 of the DGCL apply to us. In general, this statute prohibits a publicly held Delaware corporation from engaging in a business combination with an interested shareholder for a period of three years after the date of the transaction by which that person became an interested shareholder, unless the business combination is approved in a prescribed manner. For purposes of Section 203, a business combination includes a merger, asset sale or other transaction resulting in a financial benefit to the interested shareholder, and an interested shareholder is a person who, together with affiliates and associates, owns, or within three years prior did own, 15% or more of voting shares. Our Manager may elect to amend our operating agreement at any time to have Section 203 apply to us.
     
  · Ownership limitations. To assist us in qualifying as a REIT, our operating agreement, subject to certain exceptions, provides that generally no person may own, or be deemed to own by virtue of the attribution provisions of the Code, either more than 9.8% in value or in number of our common shares, whichever is more restrictive, or more than 9.8% in value or in number of our shares, whichever is more restrictive. Accordingly, no person may own, or be deemed to own, more than 9.8% in value or in number of our shares, whichever is more restrictive. The ownership limits could have the effect of discouraging a takeover or other transaction in which shareholders might receive a premium for their shares or which holders might believe to be otherwise in their best interests. Furthermore, we will reject any investor’s subscription in whole or in part if we determine that such subscription would violate such ownership limits.
     
  · Exclusive authority of the Manager to amend our operating agreement. Our operating agreement provides that the Manager has the exclusive power to adopt, alter or repeal any provision of the operating agreement, unless such amendment would adversely change the rights of the common shares. Thus, our shareholders generally may not effect changes to our operating agreement.

 

 

 

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The offering price of the Company’s shares was not established on an independent basis; the actual value of your investment may be substantially less than what you pay.

 

We established the offering price of the Company’s shares on an arbitrary basis. The selling price of the Company’s shares bears no relationship to our book or asset values or to any other established criteria for valuing shares. Because the offering price is not based upon any independent valuation, the offering price may not be indicative of the proceeds that you would receive upon liquidation. Further, the offering price may be significantly more than the price at which the shares would trade if they were to be listed on an exchange or actively traded by broker-dealers.

 

In addition, the price you pay for the Company’s shares in this offering may be more or less than shareholders who acquire their shares in the future, such as via PPEX. There is no guarantee that the value of shares you purchase in this offering will increase in the future, should you seek to sell your shares.

 

Your interest in us will be diluted if we issue additional shares, which could reduce the overall value of your investment.

 

Potential investors in this offering do not have preemptive rights with respect to any shares we may issue in the future. Under our operating agreement, we have authority to issue an unlimited number of additional common shares or other securities, although, under Regulation A, we are only allowed to sell up to $75 million of the Company’s shares in any 12-month period (although we may raise capital in other ways). In particular, the Manager is authorized, subject to the restrictions of Regulation A and other applicable securities laws, to provide for the issuance of an unlimited amount of one or more classes or series of shares in the Company, including preferred shares, and to fix the number of shares, the relative powers, preferences and rights, and the qualifications, limitations or restrictions applicable to each class or series thereof by resolution authorizing the issuance of such class or series, without shareholder approval. After your purchase in this offering, the Manager may elect to (i) sell additional shares in this or future public offerings, (ii) issue equity interests in private offerings, or (iii) issue shares to the Manager, or its successors or assigns, in payment of an outstanding fee obligation. To the extent we issue additional equity interests after your purchase in this offering, your percentage ownership interest in us will be diluted. In addition, depending upon the terms and pricing of any additional offerings and the value of our investments, you may also experience dilution in the book value and fair value of your shares.

 

The subscription agreement has a forum selection provision that requires disputes be resolved in state or federal courts in the State of New York, regardless of convenience or cost to you, the investor. 

 

In order to invest in this offering, investors agree to resolve disputes arising under the subscription agreement in state or federal courts located in the State of New York for the purpose of any suit, action or other proceeding arising out of or based upon the agreement. Section 22 of the Securities Act creates concurrent jurisdiction for federal and state courts over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. We believe that the exclusive forum provision applies to claims arising under the Securities Act, but there is uncertainty as to whether a court would enforce such a provision in this context. Section 27 of the Exchange Act creates exclusive federal jurisdiction over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. As a result, the exclusive forum provision will not apply to suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or any other claim for which the federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction. You will not be deemed to have waived the Company’s compliance with the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder. This forum selection provision may limit your ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us. Although we believe the provision benefits us by providing increased consistency in the application of New York law in the types of lawsuits to which it applies and in limiting our litigation costs, to the extent it is enforceable, the forum selection provision may limit investors’ ability to bring claims in judicial forums that they find favorable to such disputes, may increase investors’ costs of bringing suit and may discourage lawsuits with respect to such claims. Alternatively, if a court were to find the provision inapplicable to, or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such matters in other jurisdictions, which could adversely affect our business, financial condition or results of operations.

 

 

 

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Risks Related to Our Status as a REIT

 

Failure to qualify as a REIT would cause us to be taxed as a regular corporation, which would substantially reduce funds available for distributions to our shareholders.

 

We believe that our organization, prior and proposed ownership and method of operation have enabled and will continue to enable us to meet the requirements for qualification and taxation as a REIT. However, we cannot assure you that we will qualify as such. This is because qualification as a REIT involves the application of highly technical and complex provisions of the Code as to which there are only limited judicial and administrative interpretations and involves the determination of facts and circumstances not entirely within our control. Future legislation, new regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions may significantly change the tax laws or the application of the tax laws with respect to qualification as a REIT or the U.S. federal income tax consequences of such qualification.

 

If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year, we will face serious tax consequences that will substantially reduce the funds available for distributions to our shareholders because:

 

  · we would not be allowed a deduction for dividends paid to shareholders in computing our taxable income and would be subject to U.S. federal income tax at regular corporate rates;
     
  · we could be subject to increased state and local taxes; and
     
  · unless we are entitled to relief under certain U.S. federal income tax laws, we could not re-elect REIT status until the fifth calendar year after the year in which we failed to qualify as a REIT.

 

In addition, if we fail to qualify as a REIT, we will no longer be required to make distributions. As a result of all these factors, our failure to qualify as a REIT could impair our ability to expand our business and raise capital, and it would adversely affect the value of our common shares. See “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations” for a discussion of certain U.S. federal income tax considerations relating to us and our common shares.

 

Even if we qualify as a REIT, we may owe other taxes that will reduce our cash flows.

 

Even if we qualify for taxation as a REIT, we may be subject to certain U.S. federal, state and local taxes on our income and assets, on taxable income that we do not distribute to our shareholders, on net income from certain “prohibited transactions,” and on income from some activities conducted as a result of a foreclosure, and state or local income, property and transfer taxes. For example, to the extent we satisfy the 90% distribution requirement but distribute less than 100% of our REIT taxable income, we will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax on our undistributed taxable income. We also will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax if the actual amount that we distribute to our shareholders in a calendar year is less than a minimum amount specified under the Code. As another example, we are subject to a 100% “prohibited transaction” tax on any gain from a sale of property that is characterized for U.S. federal income tax purposes as held for sale rather than investment, unless we comply with a statutory safe harbor or realize the gain through a taxable REIT subsidiary (“TRS”). Further, any TRS that we establish will be subject to regular corporate U.S. federal, state and local taxes. Any of these taxes would decrease cash available for distribution to shareholders.

 

 

 

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REIT distribution requirements could adversely affect our liquidity and may force us to borrow funds during unfavorable market conditions.

 

In order to maintain our REIT status and to meet the REIT distribution requirements, we may need to borrow funds on a short-term basis or sell assets, even if the then-prevailing market conditions are not favorable for these borrowings or sales. In addition, we may need to reserve cash (including proceeds from this offering) to satisfy our REIT distribution requirements, even though there are attractive investment opportunities that may be available. To qualify as a REIT, we generally must distribute to our shareholders at least 90% of our net taxable income each year, excluding capital gains. In addition, we will be subject to corporate income tax to the extent we distribute less than 100% of our taxable income including any net capital gain. We intend to make distributions to our shareholders to comply with the requirements of the Code for REITs and to minimize or eliminate our corporate income tax obligation to the extent consistent with our business objectives. Our cash flows from operations may be insufficient to fund required distributions, for example as a result of differences in timing between the actual receipt of income and the recognition of income for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the effect of non-deductible capital expenditures, the creation of reserves or required debt service or amortization payments. The insufficiency of our cash flows to cover our distribution requirements could have an adverse impact on our ability to raise short- and long-term debt or sell equity securities in order to fund distributions required to maintain our REIT status. In addition, we will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax on the amount, if any, by which distributions paid by us in any calendar year are less than the sum of 85% of our ordinary income, 95% of our capital gain net income and 100% of our undistributed income from prior years. To address and/or mitigate some of these issues, we may make taxable distributions that are in part paid in cash and in part paid in our common shares. In such cases our shareholders may have tax liabilities from such distributions in excess of the cash they receive. The treatment of such taxable share distributions is not clear, and it is possible the taxable share distribution will not count towards our distribution requirement, in which case adverse consequences could apply.

 

We intend to distribute our REIT taxable income to our shareholders in a manner intended to satisfy the 90% distribution requirement and to avoid both corporate income tax and the 4% nondeductible excise tax. However, there is no requirement that TRSs distribute their after-tax net income to their shareholders. Our taxable income may substantially exceed our net income as determined in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP, because, for example, realized capital losses will be deducted in determining our GAAP net income, but may not be deductible in computing our taxable income. In addition, we may invest in assets that generate taxable income in excess of economic income or in advance of the corresponding cash flow from the assets. To the extent that we generate such non-cash taxable income in a taxable year, we may incur corporate income tax and the 4% nondeductible excise tax on that income if we do not distribute such income to our shareholders in that year. As a result of the foregoing, we may generate less cash flow than taxable income in a particular year. In that event, we may be required to use cash reserves, incur debt, or liquidate non-cash assets at rates or at times that we regard as unfavorable to satisfy the distribution requirement and to avoid corporate income tax and the 4% nondeductible excise tax in that year.

 

If we fail to invest a sufficient amount of the net proceeds from selling our common shares in real estate assets within one year from the receipt of the proceeds, we could fail to qualify as a REIT.

 

Temporary investment of the net proceeds from sales of our common shares in short-term securities and income from such investment generally will allow us to satisfy various REIT income and asset requirements, but only during the one-year period beginning on the date we receive the net proceeds. If we are unable to invest a sufficient amount of the net proceeds from sales of our common shares in qualifying real estate assets within such one-year period, we could fail to satisfy one or more of the gross income or asset tests and/or we could be limited to investing all or a portion of any remaining funds in cash or cash equivalents. If we fail to satisfy any such income or asset test, unless we are entitled to relief under certain provisions of the Code, we could fail to qualify as a REIT. See “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

 

If we form a taxable REIT subsidiary (TRS), our overall tax liability could increase.

 

Any TRS we form will be subject to U.S. federal, state and local income tax on its taxable income. Accordingly, although our ownership of any TRSs may allow us to participate in the operating income from certain activities that we could not participate in without violating the REIT income tests requirements of the Code or incurring the 100% tax on gains from prohibited transactions, the TRS through which we earn such operating income or gain will be fully subject to corporate income tax. The after-tax net income of any TRS would be available for distribution to us; however, any dividends received by us from our domestic TRSs will only be qualifying income for the 95% REIT income test, not the 75% REIT income test. If we have any non-U.S. TRSs, then they may be subject to tax in jurisdictions where they operate and under special rules dealing with foreign subsidiaries, and they may generate income that is non-qualifying for either of the REIT income tests.

 

 

 

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Although our use of TRSs may partially mitigate the impact of meeting certain requirements necessary to maintain our qualification as a REIT, there are limits on our ability to own and engage in transactions with TRSs, and a failure to comply with the limits would jeopardize our REIT qualification and may result in the application of a 100% excise tax.

 

A REIT may own up to 100% of the stock or securities of one or more TRSs. A TRS may hold assets and earn income that would not be qualifying assets or income if held or earned directly by a REIT. A TRS also may sell assets without incurring the 100% tax on prohibited transactions. Both the subsidiary and the REIT must jointly elect to treat the subsidiary as a TRS. A corporation of which a TRS directly or indirectly owns more than 35% of the voting power or value of the stock will automatically be treated as a TRS. Overall, no more than 20% of the value of a REIT’s assets may consist of stock or securities of one or more TRSs. In addition, the rules limit the deductibility of interest paid or accrued by a TRS to its parent REIT to assure that the TRS is subject to an appropriate level of corporate taxation. The rules also impose a 100% excise tax on certain transactions between a TRS and its parent REIT that are not conducted on an arm’s-length basis (for example if we charged our TRS interest in excess of an arm’s length rate). We may jointly elect with one or more subsidiaries for those subsidiaries to be treated as TRSs for U.S. federal income tax purposes. These TRSs will pay U.S. federal, state and local income tax on their taxable income, and their after-tax net income will be available for distribution to us but is not required to be distributed to us. We will monitor the value of our respective investments in any TRSs we may form for the purpose of ensuring compliance with TRS ownership limitations and intend to structure our transactions with any such TRSs on terms that we believe are arm’s-length to avoid incurring the 100% excise tax described above. We cannot assure you, however, that we will be able to comply with the 20% TRS limitation or to avoid application of the 100% excise tax.

 

Complying with REIT requirements may cause us to forego otherwise attractive opportunities or to liquidate otherwise attractive investments.

 

To qualify as a REIT, we must continually satisfy tests concerning, among other things, the sources of our income, the nature and diversification of our assets, the amounts we distribute to our shareholders and the ownership of our shares. We may be required to make distributions to our shareholders at disadvantageous times or when we do not have funds readily available for distribution. Thus, compliance with the REIT requirements may, for instance, hinder our ability to make certain otherwise attractive investments or undertake other activities that might otherwise be beneficial to us and our shareholders, or may require us to borrow or liquidate investments in unfavorable market conditions and, therefore, may hinder our investment performance. As a REIT, at the end of each calendar quarter, at least 75% of the value of our assets must consist of cash, cash items, U.S. Government securities and qualified “real estate assets.” The remainder of our investments in securities (other than cash, cash items, U.S. Government securities, securities issued by a TRS and qualified real estate assets) generally cannot include more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of any one issuer or more than 10% of the total value of the outstanding securities of any one issuer. In addition, in general, no more than 5% of the value of our total assets (other than cash, cash items, U.S. Government securities, securities issued by a TRS and qualified real estate assets) can consist of the securities of any one issuer, and no more 20% of the value of our total securities can be represented by securities of one or more TRSs, and no more than 25% of the value of our total assets may be represented by debt instruments of publicly offered REITs that are not secured by mortgages on real property or real property interests. After meeting these requirements at the close of a calendar quarter, if we fail to comply with these requirements at the end of any subsequent calendar quarter, we must correct the failure within 30 days after the end of the calendar quarter or qualify for certain statutory relief provisions to avoid losing our REIT qualification. As a result, we may be required to liquidate from our portfolio or forego otherwise attractive investments. These actions could have the effect of reducing our income and amounts available for distribution to our shareholders.

 

 

 

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You may be restricted from acquiring, transferring or redeeming certain amounts of our common shares.

 

In order to maintain our REIT qualification, among other requirements, no more than 50% in value of our outstanding shares may be owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer individuals, as defined in the Code to include certain kinds of entities, during the last half of any taxable year, other than the first year for which a REIT election is made. To assist us in qualifying as a REIT, our operating agreement contains an aggregate share ownership limit and a common shares ownership limit. Generally, any of the Company’s shares owned by affiliated owners will be added together for purposes of the aggregate share ownership limit, and any common shares owned by affiliated owners will be added together for purposes of the common shares ownership limit.

 

If anyone attempts to transfer or own shares in a way that would violate the aggregate share ownership limit or the common shares ownership limit (or would prevent us from continuing to qualify as a REIT), unless such ownership limits have been waived by the Manager, those shares instead will be deemed transferred to a trust for the benefit of a charitable beneficiary and will be either redeemed by us or sold to a person whose ownership of the shares will not violate the aggregate share ownership limit or the common shares ownership limit and will not prevent us from qualifying as a REIT. If this transfer to a trust fails to prevent such a violation or our disqualification as a REIT, then the initial intended transfer or ownership will be null and void from the outset. Shares falls between the date of purchase and the date of redemption or sale.

 

Our limits on ownership of the Company’s shares also may require us to decline redemption requests that would cause other shareholders to exceed such ownership limits. In addition, in order to comply with certain of the distribution requirements applicable to REITs we will decline to honor any redemption request that we believe is a “dividend equivalent” redemption as discussed in “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations—Taxation of Taxable U.S. shareholders—Redemptions of Common Shares.”

 

Complying with REIT requirements may limit our ability to hedge effectively and may cause us to incur tax liabilities.

 

The REIT provisions of the Code substantially limit our ability to hedge our assets and liabilities. Generally, income from a hedging transaction we enter into to manage risk of interest rate changes with respect to borrowings made or to be made to acquire or carry real estate assets or to offset certain other positions does not constitute “gross income” for purposes of the 75% or 95% gross income tests, provided certain circumstances are satisfied. To the extent that we enter into other types of hedging transactions, the income from those transactions is likely to be treated as non-qualifying income for purposes of both of the gross income tests. As a result of these rules, we may need to limit our use of advantageous hedging techniques or implement those hedges through a TRS. This could increase the cost of our hedging activities because our TRS would be subject to tax on income or gains resulting from hedges entered into by it or expose us to greater risks associated with changes in interest rates than we would otherwise want to bear. In addition, losses in our TRSs will generally not provide any tax benefit, except for being carried forward for use against future taxable income in the TRSs.

 

The ability of the Manager to revoke our REIT qualification without shareholder approval may cause adverse consequences to our shareholders.

 

Our operating agreement provides that the Manager may revoke or otherwise terminate our REIT election, without the approval of our shareholders, if it determines that it is no longer in our best interest to continue to qualify as a REIT. If we cease to be a REIT, we will not be allowed a deduction for dividends paid to shareholders in computing our taxable income and will be subject to U.S. federal income tax at regular corporate rates, as well as state and local taxes, which may have adverse consequences on our total return to our shareholders.

 

 

 

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Investments outside the U.S. could present additional complications to our ability to satisfy the REIT qualification requirements and may subject us to additional taxes.

 

Although we do not expect to invest in non-U.S. real estate or other non-U.S. real estate-related assets, if we were to make such investments, operating in functional currencies other than the U.S. dollar and in environments in which real estate transactions are customarily structured differently than they are in the U.S. or are subject to different legal rules may complicate our ability to structure non-U.S. investments in a manner that enables us to satisfy the REIT qualification requirements. In addition, non-U.S. investments may subject us to various non-U.S. tax liabilities, including withholding taxes.

 

The IRS may take the position that gains from sales of property and other assets are subject to a 100% prohibited transaction tax.

 

We may have to sell assets from time to time to fund redemptions, to satisfy our REIT distribution requirements, to satisfy other REIT requirements, or for other purposes. It is possible that the IRS may take the position that one or more sales of our properties may be a prohibited transaction, which is a sale of property held by us primarily for sale in the ordinary course of our trade or business. If we are deemed to have engaged in a prohibited transaction, our gain from such sale would be subject to a 100% tax. The Code sets forth a safe harbor under which a REIT may, under certain circumstances, sell property without risking the imposition of the 100% tax, but there is no assurance that we will be able to qualify for the safe harbor. We do not intend to hold property for sale in the ordinary course of business, but there is no assurance that the IRS will not challenge our position, especially if we make frequent sales or sales of property in which we have short holding periods.

 

Possible legislative, regulatory or other actions affecting REITs could adversely affect our shareholders and us.

 

The rules dealing with U.S. federal, state and local income taxation are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process and by the IRS and the U.S. Treasury Department. Changes to tax laws (which changes may have retroactive application) could adversely affect our shareholders or us. We cannot predict whether, when, in what forms, or with what effective dates, tax laws, regulations and rulings may be enacted, promulgated or decided, which could result in an increase in our, or our shareholders’, tax liability or require changes in the manner in which we operate in order to minimize increases in our tax liability. A shortfall in tax revenues for states and municipalities in which we operate may lead to an increase in the frequency and size of such changes. If such changes occur, we may be required to pay additional taxes on our assets or income or be subject to additional restrictions. These increased tax costs could, among other things, adversely affect our financial condition, the results of operations and the amount of cash available for the payment of dividends.

 

Shareholders are urged to consult with their own tax advisors with respect to the impact that legislation may have on their investment and the status of legislative, regulatory or administrative developments and proposals and their potential effect on their investment in our shares.

 

A portion of our distributions may be treated as a return of capital for U.S. federal income tax purposes, which could reduce the basis of a shareholder’s investment in our common shares and may trigger taxable gain.

 

A portion of our distributions may be treated as a return of capital for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a general matter, a portion of our distributions will be treated as a return of capital for U.S. federal income tax purposes if the aggregate amount of our distributions for a year exceeds our current and accumulated earnings and profits for that year. To the extent that a distribution is treated as a return of capital for U.S. federal income tax purposes, it will reduce a holder’s adjusted tax basis in the holder’s shares, and to the extent that it exceeds the holder’s adjusted tax basis will be treated as gain resulting from a sale or exchange of such shares. See “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

 

 

 

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Our Manager and its affiliates have limited prior experience managing a portfolio of assets owned by a REIT.

 

REITs are subject to numerous complex requirements in order to maintain their REIT status, including income and asset composition tests. The Manager and its affiliates have limited prior experience managing a portfolio in the manner intended to comply with such requirements. To the extent the Manager and its affiliates manage us in a manner that causes us to fail to be a REIT, it could adversely affect the value of our common shares.

 

Potential characterization of distributions or gain on sale may be treated as unrelated business taxable income to tax-exempt investors.

 

If (1) all or a portion of our assets are subject to the rules relating to taxable mortgage pools, (2) a tax-exempt shareholder has incurred debt to purchase or hold our common shares, or (3) the residual Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduit interests, or REMIC residual interests, we buy generate “excess inclusion income,” then a portion of the distributions to and, in the case of a shareholder described in clause (2), gains realized on the sale of common shares by such tax-exempt shareholder may be subject to U.S. federal income tax as unrelated business taxable income, or UBTI, under the Code.

 

We could fail to qualify as a REIT or we could become subject to a penalty tax if income we recognize from certain investments that are treated or could be treated as equity interests in a foreign corporation exceeds 5% of our gross income in a taxable year.

 

We may invest in securities that are treated or could be treated for U.S. federal (and applicable state and local) corporate income tax purposes as equity interests in foreign corporations. Categories of income that qualify for the 95% gross income test include dividends, interest and certain other enumerated classes of passive income. Under certain circumstances, the U.S. federal income tax rules concerning controlled foreign corporations and passive foreign investment companies require that the owner of an equity interest in a foreign corporation include amounts in income without regard to the owner’s receipt of any distributions from the foreign corporation. Amounts required to be included in income under those rules are technically neither actual dividends nor any of the other enumerated categories of passive income specified in the 95% gross income test. Furthermore, there is no clear precedent with respect to the qualification of such income under the 95% gross income test. Due to this uncertainty, we intend to limit our direct investment in securities that are or could be treated as equity interests in a foreign corporation such that the sum of the amounts we are required to include in income with respect to such securities and other amounts of non-qualifying income do not exceed 5% of our gross income. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in this regard. To avoid any risk of failing the 95% gross income test, we may be required to invest only indirectly, through a domestic TRS, in any securities that are or could be considered to be equity interests in a foreign corporation. This, of course, will result in any income recognized from any such investment becoming subject to U.S. federal income tax in the hands of the TRS, which may, in turn, reduce our yield on the investment. For further information, see “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.”

 

If we were considered to actually or constructively pay a “preferential dividend” to certain of our shareholders, our status as a REIT could be adversely affected. 

 

As stated above, in order to qualify as a REIT, we must distribute as dividends to our shareholders at least 90% of our annual REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends-paid deduction and excluding net capital gains.  Historically, in order for dividends to be counted as satisfying the annual distribution requirements for REITs, and to provide us with a REIT-level tax deduction, the dividends could not be “preferential dividends.” A dividend is not a preferential dividend if the distribution is pro rata among all outstanding shares of stock within a particular class and in accordance with the preferences among different classes of stock as set forth in a REIT’s organizational documents.  We intend to make dividends pro rata by class as disclosed under “Description of Our Common Shares — Distributions” and “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations.” Nevertheless, if the IRS were to take the position that we paid a preferential dividend while we were subject to the preferential dividend rule, such dividends would not qualify for the dividends paid deduction, we may be deemed to have failed the 90% distribution test, and our status as a REIT could be terminated for the year in which such determination is made.

 

 

 

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Risks Related to Retirement Plans

 

If you fail to meet the fiduciary and other standards under ERISA or the Code as a result of an investment in our common shares, you could be subject to criminal and civil penalties. 

 

If the fiduciary of an employee pension benefit plan subject to the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (“ERISA”), such as a profit sharing, Section 401(k), or pension plan, or any other retirement plan or account fails to meet the fiduciary and other standards under ERISA or Code Section 4975, such as an IRA or Keogh plan, as a result of an investment in our common shares, the fiduciary could be subject to civil (and criminal, if the failure is willful) penalties.  

 

There are special considerations that apply to such plans and accounts subject to ERISA and Code Section 4975 whose assets are being invested in our common shares. If you are investing the assets of such a plan or account (including assets of an insurance company general account or entity whose assets are considered plan assets under ERISA) in our common shares, in addition to meeting the fiduciary obligations noted in the preceding paragraph, you should satisfy yourself that: 

 

  · your investment is made in accordance with the documents and instruments governing your plan or IRA, including your plan or account’s investment policy;
     
  · your investment satisfies the prudence and diversification requirements of Section 404(a)(1)(B) and 404(a)(1)(C) of ERISA and other applicable provisions of ERISA and/or the Code; 
     
  · your investment in our shares, for which no trading market exists or is expected to develop, is consistent with, and will not impair the liquidity of the plan or IRA, including liquidity needed to satisfy minimum and other distribution requirements and tax withholding requirements that may be applicable;  
     
  · your investment will not produce unacceptable unrelated business taxable income, referred to as UBTI, for the plan or IRA;
     
  · you will be able to value the assets of the plan annually in accordance with ERISA requirements and applicable provisions of the plan or IRA;
     
  · your investment will not constitute a prohibited transaction under Section 406 of ERISA or Code Section 4975; and
     
  · our assets will not be treated as “plan assets” of the plan or IRA.  

 

With respect to the annual valuation requirements under ERISA and the Code, we expect to provide an estimated NAV for our common shares quarterly commencing on the date that is thirty (30) days from the date Dean completes an initial acquisition of portfolio properties. SeeDescription of our Common Shares—Valuation Policies.” You should ensure that this frequency and approach to valuation is acceptable to the trustee or custodian of any plan or account before any investment in our shares is made by such plan or account.  The estimated value we report is not likely to reflect the proceeds you would receive upon our liquidation or upon the sale of your common shares. Accordingly, we can make no assurances that such estimated value will satisfy the applicable annual valuation requirements under ERISA and the Code. The Department of Labor or the Internal Revenue Service may determine that a plan fiduciary or an IRA custodian is required to take further steps to determine the value of our common shares. In the absence of an appropriate determination of value, a plan fiduciary or an IRA custodian may be subject to damages, penalties, or other sanctions.

 

Failure to satisfy the fiduciary standards of conduct and other applicable requirements of ERISA and the Code may result in the imposition of civil and criminal penalties and could subject the fiduciary to equitable remedies. In addition, if an investment in our common shares constitutes a prohibited transaction under ERISA or the Code, the fiduciary that authorized or directed the investment may be subject to the imposition of excise taxes with respect to the amount invested, and for IRAs, the tax-exempt status of the IRA may be lost and all of the assets of the IRA may be deemed distributed and subject to tax. For a discussion of the considerations associated with an investment in our shares by a qualified employee benefit plan or IRA, see “ERISA Considerations.” ERISA plan fiduciaries and IRA owners and custodians should consult with counsel before making an investment in our common shares.

 

 

 

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Significant investment by benefit plan investors (as defined by ERISA) could result in treatment of our assets as benefit plan assets.

 

The Department of Labor has promulgated regulations (the “Plan Assets Regulation) describing what constitutes the assets of an entity whose underlying assets are considered to include “plan assets” of such plans, accounts, and arrangements (each of which we refer to as a “benefit plan”) with respect to the benefit plan’s investment in an entity for purposes of the fiduciary responsibility provisions of Title I of ERISA and Code Section 4975. Under the Plan Assets Regulation, if a benefit plan invests in an “equity interest” of an entity that is neither a “publicly offered security” nor a security issued by an investment company registered under the Investment Company Act, the benefit plan’s assets are deemed to include both the equity interest itself and an undivided interest in each of the entity’s underlying assets, unless it is established that the entity is an “operating company” or the equity participation by “benefit plan investors” (as defined in Section 3(42) of ERISA) is not “significant.”

 

Under the Plan Assets Regulation and Section 3(42) of ERISA, equity participation in an entity by benefit plan investors is “significant” on any date if, immediately after the most recent acquisition of any equity interest in the entity, 25% or more of the value of any class of equity interest in the entity is held by benefit plan investors. We refer to this as the 25% limitation. For purposes of making determinations under the 25% limitation, (i) the value of any equity interests held by a person (other than a benefit plan investor) that has discretionary authority or control with respect to the assets, or any affiliate of such a person, is disregarded, and (ii) an entity that holds plan assets shall be considered to be a benefit plan investor only to the extent of its equity interests held by other benefit plan investors. The definition of a “benefit plan investor” effectively excludes governmental, church, and foreign benefit plans, but for purposes of calculating the 25% limitation includes IRAs.

 

We do not expect our common shares to be considered a “publicly offered security” for purposes of ERISA. Additionally, we will not be registered under the Investment Company Act, and we may not qualify as an “operating company” for purposes of the Plan Assets Regulation. Therefore, if participation in us through the acquisition of any class of equity interest by benefit plan investors is “significant” within the meaning of the Plan Assets Regulation and Section 3(42) of ERISA, our assets could be deemed to be the assets of benefit plans investing in our securities unless we are otherwise able to meet one of the other exemptions under ERISA. See “ERISA Considerations.”

 

If our assets were deemed to be “plan assets” under ERISA, among other things:

 

  · the prudence and other fiduciary responsibility standards of ERISA would apply to investments we make;
     
  · certain transactions in which we might seek to engage could constitute “prohibited transactions” under ERISA and the Code, which, absent an exemption, could restrict us from acquiring an otherwise desirable investment or from entering into an otherwise favorable transaction;
     
  · our assets could be subject to ERISA’s reporting and disclosure requirements;
     
  · the fiduciary causing the benefit plan to make an investment in our securities could be deemed to have delegated its responsibility to manage the assets of the benefit plan; and 
     
  · the indicia of ownership of our assets would have to be maintained within the jurisdiction of the district courts of the United States unless certain regulatory exceptions were applicable.

 

We cannot guarantee that we will be able to limit equity participation in our securities by benefit plan investors to less than 25% of the total value of each class of our equity securities or that we could qualify under one of the “operating company” exemptions.   Accordingly, our assets may be deemed “plan assets” under ERISA, which could severely restrict our operations or subject us to fines if we fail to comply with the above-noted requirements. 

 

 

 

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If you invest in our common shares through an IRA or other retirement plan, you may be limited in your ability to withdraw required minimum dividends.

 

If you establish a plan or account through which you invest in our common shares, federal law may require you to withdraw required minimum dividends from such plan in the future. Our common shares will be highly illiquid, and even if our common shares are quoted on the PPEX, there may still be limited liquidity. If you require liquidity, you may generally sell your shares, but such sale may be at a price less than the price at which you initially purchased your common shares. If you fail to withdraw required minimum distributions from your plan or account, you may be subject to certain taxes and tax penalties.

 

Specific rules apply to foreign, governmental and church plans.

 

As a general rule, certain employee benefit plans, including foreign pension plans, governmental plans established or maintained in the United States (as defined in Section 3(32) of ERISA), and certain church plans (as defined in Section 3(33) of ERISA), are not subject to ERISA’s requirements and are not “benefit plan investors” within the meaning of the Plan Assets Regulation. Any such plan that is qualified and exempt from taxation under Code Sections 401(a) and 501(a) may nonetheless be subject to the prohibited transaction rules set forth in Section 503 and, under certain circumstances in the case of church plans, Code Section 4975. Also, some foreign plans and governmental plans may be subject to foreign, state, or local laws which are, to a material extent, similar to the provisions of ERISA or Code Section 4975. Each fiduciary of a plan subject to any such similar law should make its own determination as to the need for and the availability of any exemption relief.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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STATEMENTS REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

 

We make statements in this offering circular that are forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. The words “believe,” “estimate,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan,” “seek,” “may,” and similar expressions or statements regarding future periods are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other important factors that could cause our actual results, performance or achievements, or industry results, to differ materially from any predictions of future results, performance or achievements that we express or imply in this offering circular or in the information incorporated by reference into this offering circular.

 

The forward-looking statements included in this offering circular are based upon our current expectations, plans, estimates, assumptions and beliefs that involve numerous risks and uncertainties. Assumptions relating to the foregoing involve judgments with respect to, among other things, future economic, competitive and market conditions and future business decisions, all of which are difficult or impossible to predict accurately and many of which are beyond our control. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in such forward-looking statements are based on reasonable assumptions, our actual results and performance could differ materially from those set forth in the forward-looking statements. Factors that could have a material adverse effect on our operations and future prospects include, but are not limited to:

 

  · our ability to effectively deploy the proceeds raised in this offering;
     
  · risks associated with breaches of our data security;
     
  · changes in economic conditions generally and the real estate and securities markets specifically;
     
  · expected rates of return provided to investors;
     
  · the ability of our Sponsor and its affiliates to source, originate and service our assets, and the quality and performance of these assets;
     
  · our ability to retain and hire competent employees and appropriately staff our operations;
     
  · legislative or regulatory changes impacting our business or our assets (including changes to the laws governing the taxation of REITs and SEC guidance related to Regulation A or the JOBS Act);
     
  · changes in business conditions and the market value of our assets, including changes in interest rates, prepayment risk, operator or borrower defaults or bankruptcy, and generally the increased risk of loss if our investments fail to perform as expected;
     
  · our ability to implement effective conflicts of interest policies and procedures among the various real estate investment opportunities sponsored by our Sponsor;
     
  · our ability to access sources of liquidity when we have the need to fund redemptions of common shares in excess of the proceeds from the sales of our common shares in our continuous offering and the consequential risk that we may not have the resources to satisfy redemption requests;
     
  · our failure to maintain our status as a REIT;

 

 

 

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  · our ability to avail ourselves of certain regulatory exemptions and safe harbors;
     
  · our compliance with applicable local, state and federal laws, including the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended (the “Advisers Act”), the Investment Company Act and other laws; and
     
  · changes to generally accepted accounting principles, or GAAP.

 

Any of the assumptions underlying forward-looking statements could be inaccurate. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on any forward-looking statements included in this offering circular. All forward-looking statements are made as of the date of this offering circular and the risk that actual results will differ materially from the expectations expressed in this offering circular will increase with the passage of time. Except as otherwise required by the federal securities laws, we undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements after the date of this offering circular, whether as a result of new information, future events, changed circumstances or any other reason. In light of the significant uncertainties inherent in the forward-looking statements included in this offering circular, including, without limitation, the risks described under “Risk Factors,” the inclusion of such forward-looking statements should not be regarded as a representation by us or any other person that the objectives and plans set forth in this offering circular will be achieved.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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ESTIMATED USE OF PROCEEDS

 

The table below sets forth our estimated use of proceeds from this offering and the private placements described below, assuming we receive $75,000,000 from this offering, which is the maximum offering amount. Our common shares will be offered at $10.00 per share.

 

We expect to use substantially all of the net proceeds from this offering (after paying or reimbursing organization and offering expenses) to identify, underwrite, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects, and other real estate- related assets. We expect that any expenses or fees payable to the Manager for its services in connection with managing our daily affairs, including but not limited to, the selection and acquisition of our investments, will be paid from cash flow from operations. If such fees and expenses are not paid from cash flow (or not waived) they will reduce the cash available for investment. See “Management Compensation” for more details regarding the fees that will be paid to the Manager and its affiliates. Many of the amounts set forth in the table below represent the Manager’s best estimate since they cannot be precisely calculated at this time.

 

We may not be able to promptly invest the net proceeds of this offering in multi-family, and other commercial real estate projects. In the interim, we may invest in short-term, highly liquid or other authorized investments, subject to the requirements for qualification as a REIT. Such short-term investments will not earn as high of a return as we expect to earn on our real estate-related investments.

 

   Minimum Offering
Amount (1)
   Maximum Offering
Amount (1)
 
Gross Offering Proceeds  $500,000   $75,000,000 
Less:          
Organization and Offering Expenses (2) (3)   0    0 
Net Proceeds from this Offering   500,000    75,000,000 
Proceeds from Private Placements (2)   500,000    500,000 
Estimated Amount Available for Investments  $1,000,000   $75,500,000 

 

  (1) This is a “best efforts” offering. We will not draw down on investors’ funds and admit investors as shareholders until we have received subscriptions for at least $500,000 in this offering, and we will not start operations until we have closed upon at least $500,000 in investments in this offering and $500,000 from private placements so our Sponsor and its officers and directors.

 

  (2) Investors will not pay upfront selling commissions in connection with the purchase of our common shares. After we raise $500,000 in this offering and $500,000 in the private placements and have begun our operations, we will begin to reimburse the Manager for organization and offering costs, which are expected to be up to $250,000. Reimbursement payments will be made in quarterly installments, but the aggregate quarterly amount reimbursed can never exceed 0.50% of the aggregate gross offering proceeds from this offering. If the sum of the total unreimbursed amount of such organization and offering costs, plus new costs incurred since the last reimbursement payment, exceeds the reimbursement limit described above for the applicable quarterly installment, the excess will be eligible for reimbursement in subsequent quarters (subject to the 0.50% limit), calculated on an accumulated basis, until the Manager has been reimbursed in full. Please see “Management Compensation” for a description of additional fees and expenses that we will pay the Manager.

 

  (3) Amount reflected is an estimate. Includes all expenses to be paid by us in connection with the formation of the company and the qualification of the offering, and the marketing and distribution of shares, including, without limitation, expenses for printing, engraving and amending offering statements or supplementing offering circulars, mailing and distributing costs, telephones, internet and other telecommunications costs, all advertising and marketing expenses, charges of experts and fees, expenses and taxes related to the filing, registration and qualification of the sale of shares under federal and state laws, including taxes and fees and accountants’ and attorneys’ fees. See “Plan of Distribution.”

 

After we raise the minimum offering amount of $500,000 in this offering and have raised $500 in private placements to our Sponsor and its officers and directors, we will begin to reimburse the Manager, without interest, for these organization and offering costs incurred both before and after that date. Reimbursement payments will be made in quarterly installments, but the aggregate quarterly amount reimbursed can never exceed 0.50% of the aggregate gross offering proceeds from this offering. If the sum of the total unreimbursed amount of such organization and offering costs, plus new costs incurred since the last reimbursement payment, exceeds the reimbursement limit described above for the applicable quarterly installment, the excess will be eligible for reimbursement in subsequent quarters (subject to the 0.50% limit), calculated on an accumulated basis, until the Manager has been reimbursed in full.

 

 

 

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MANAGEMENT

 

Our Manager

 

We operate under the direction of the Manager, FundRebel, which is responsible for directing the management of our business and affairs, managing our day-to-day affairs, and implementing our investment strategy. Our Manager will establish a Research Committee to establish investment guidelines and maintain ultimate responsibility for making decisions with respect to all acquisitions and dispositions of investment assets. See “—Research Committee of the Manager” below. The Company does not have any employees. Instead, the Manager and the Sponsor will act for and on behalf of the Company through their officers and directors. The Manager, the Sponsor and their officers and directors are not required to devote all of their time to our business and are only required to devote such time to the Company’s affairs as their duties require.

 

We will follow investment guidelines adopted by the Manager and the investment and borrowing policies set forth in this offering circular, unless they are modified by the Manager. Our Manager may establish further written policies on investments and borrowings and will monitor our administrative procedures, investment operations and performance to ensure that the policies are fulfilled. Our Manager may change our investment objectives at any time without approval of our shareholders.

 

Our Manager performs its duties and responsibilities pursuant to our operating agreement. Our Manager maintains a contractual relationship with us and our shareholders, and we have agreed to limit fiduciary duties and the liability of the Manager and to indemnify the Manager against certain liabilities.

 

Responsibilities of the Manager

 

The responsibilities of the Manager include:

 

Investment Advisory and Acquisition Services

 

  · develop, approve and oversee our overall investment strategy, which will consist of elements such as investment selection criteria, diversification strategies and asset disposition strategies;
     
  · design and implement the structure of the Company, including form and ownership of subsidiaries, to give the Company maximum investment flexibility while qualifying as a REIT;
     
  · serve as our investment and financial manager with respect to originating, investing in and managing a diversified portfolio of  multi-family real estate investment together with select commercial real estate investments and real estate-related assets;
     
  · adopt and periodically review our investment guidelines and limits;
     
  · approve and oversee our debt financing strategies;
     
  · approve joint ventures, limited partnerships and other such relationships with third parties;
     
  · approve any potential liquidity transaction;

 

 

 

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  · obtain market research and economic and statistical data in connection with our investments and investment objectives and policies;
     
  · oversee and conduct the due diligence process related to prospective investments;
     
  · prepare reports regarding prospective investments that include recommendations and supporting documentation necessary for the Manager’s Research Committee to evaluate the Company’s overall investment portfolio, specific proposed investments, or any proposed changes to the Company’s investment guidelines; and
     
  · negotiate and execute approved investments and other transactions.

 

Offering Services

 

  · develop this offering, including determining its specific terms;
     
  · prepare and approve all marketing materials to be used by us relating to this offering;
     
  · negotiate and coordinate the receipt, collection, processing and acceptance of subscription agreements, commissions, and other administrative support functions;
     
  · create and implement various technology and electronic communications related to this offering; and
     
  · provide all other services related to this offering.

 

Asset Management Services

 

  · investigate, select, and, on our behalf, engage and conduct business with such persons as the Manager deems necessary to the proper performance of its obligations under our operating agreement, including but not limited to consultants, accountants, lenders, technical managers, attorneys, corporate fiduciaries, escrow agents, depositaries, custodians, agents for collection, insurers, insurance agents, developers, construction companies and any and all persons acting in any other capacity deemed by the Manager necessary or desirable for the performance of any of the services under our operating agreement;
     
  · monitor applicable markets and obtain reports (which may be prepared by the Manager or its affiliates) where appropriate, concerning the value of our investments;
     
  · monitor and evaluate the performance of our investments, and provide daily management services to us and perform and supervise the various management and operational functions related to our investments;
     
  · formulate and oversee the implementation of strategies for the administration, promotion, management, operation, maintenance, improvement, financing and refinancing, marketing, leasing and disposition of investments on an overall portfolio basis; and
     
  · coordinate and manage relationships between us and any joint venture partners.

 

 

 

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Accounting and Other Administrative Services

 

  · manage and perform the various administrative functions necessary for our day-to-day operations;
     
  · provide or arrange for administrative services, legal services, office space, office furnishings, personnel and other overhead items necessary and incidental to our business and operations;
     
  · provide financial and operational planning services and portfolio management functions;
     
  · maintain accounting data and any other information concerning our activities as will be required to prepare and to file all periodic financial reports and returns required to be filed with the SEC and any other regulatory agency, including annual financial statements;
     
  · maintain all appropriate company books and records;
     
  · oversee tax and compliance services and risk management services and coordinate with appropriate third parties, including independent accountants and other consultants, on related tax matters;
     
  · make, change, and revoke such tax elections on behalf of the Company as the Manager deems appropriate, including, without limitation, (i) making an election be treated as a REIT or to revoke such status, (ii) making an election to be classified as an association taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes;
     
  · supervise the performance of such ministerial and administrative functions as may be necessary in connection with our daily operations;
     
  · provide us with all necessary cash management services, whether effected through FundRebel or a non-affiliate;
     
  · manage and coordinate with the transfer agent, if any, the process of making distributions and payments to shareholders;
     
  · evaluate and obtain adequate insurance coverage based upon risk management determinations;
     
  · provide timely updates related to the overall regulatory environment affecting us, as well as manage compliance with regulatory matters;
     
  · evaluate our corporate governance structure and appropriate policies and procedures related thereto; and
     
  · oversee all reporting, record keeping, internal controls and similar matters in a manner to allow us to comply with applicable law.

 

 

 

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Shareholder Services

 

  · determine our distribution policy and authorize distributions from time to time;
     
  · approve amounts available for redemptions of our common shares;
     
  · manage communications with our shareholders, including answering phone calls, preparing and sending written and electronic reports and other communications; and
     
  · establish technology infrastructure to assist in providing shareholder support and services.

 

Financing Services

 

  · identify and evaluate potential financing and refinancing sources, engaging a third party broker if necessary;
     
  · negotiate terms of, arrange and execute financing agreements;
     
  · manage relationships between us and our lenders, if any; and
     
  · monitor and oversee the service of our debt facilities and other financings, if any.

 

Disposition Services

 

  · evaluate and approve potential asset dispositions, sales or liquidity transactions; and
     
  · structure and negotiate the terms and conditions of transactions pursuant to which our assets may be sold.

 

Our Manager may hire affiliates (provided the services are provided on an arms-length basis on such terms as would be obtained from a third party) or third parties to assist with the performance of the aforementioned services.

 

 

 

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Allocation of Investment Opportunities

 

As of the date of this offering circular, our Sponsor has not organized any investment vehicles except for our Company. Nonetheless, our Sponsor expects to establish and sponsor additional REIT offerings in the future, and to offer such investment opportunities through its website at www.fundrebel.com, and these additional investment vehicles may have investment criteria that compete with us. In addition, the Manager may manage client portfolios or separately managed account portfolios for other advisors, for which investments such as the debt investments made by the Company would be appropriate. If a sale, financing, investment or other business opportunity would be suitable for more than one of these investment vehicles or investors, the Manager will allocate it using its business judgment. Any allocation of this type may involve the consideration of a number of factors that the Manager determines to be relevant, including:

 

  · the investment objectives and criteria of the Company and the other entities;
     
  · the cash requirements of the Company and the other entities;
     
  · the effect of the investment on the diversification of the Company’s or the other entities’ portfolios by type and risk of investment;
     
  · the policy of the Company or the other entities relating to leverage;
     
  · the anticipated cash flow of the asset proposed to be acquired;
     
  · the income tax effects of the purchase on the Company or the other entities;
     
  · the size of the investment; and
     
  · the amount of funds available to the Company or the other entities.

 

See also “Conflicts of Interest– Allocation of Investment Opportunities.”

 

Management Services Agreement

 

The Company and the Manager intend to enter into a Management Services Agreement upon qualification of this offering circular, which we refer to as the “Management Services Agreement.” The Management Services Agreement describes at length and in detail many of the duties of the Manager. However, the list of the Manager’s duties and authority in the Management Services Agreement is not exclusive. Under the broad grant of authority in our operating agreement, the Manager could have duties and authority not listed in the Management Services Agreement.

 

The form of the Management Services Agreement to be entered into is included as Exhibit 6.1 to this offering statement, of which this offering circular forms a part.

 

 

 

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The duties of the Manager include managing our investments, raising money, accounting and administrative services, and managing investor relations. Some of the specific duties of the Manager are:

 

  · Conducting this Offering
     
  · Establishing investment guidelines, policies, and procedures
     
  · Overseeing and conducting due diligence
     
  · Arranging for financing from banks and other financial institutions
     
  · Reviewing joint venture opportunities
     
  · Keeping and maintaining the books and records of the Company
     
  · Managing the Company’s portfolio of assets
     
  · Managing the administrative and back-office functions of the Company
     
  · Collecting, maintaining, and distributing information
     
  · Determining the improvements to be made to properties owned by the Company
     
  · Maintaining appropriate technology systems
     
  · Making, changing, and revoking tax elections including making an election be treated as a REIT and to be treated as a corporation for tax purposes
     
  · Complying with SEC requirements
     
  · Managing distributions and payments to Investors;
     
  · Handling redemption requests from Investors
     
  · Engaging property managers, contractors, attorneys, accountants, and other third parties
     
  · Entering into contracts and other agreement

  

The Management Services Agreement will remain in effect for as long as the Manager is the manager of the Company under our operating agreement

 

 

 

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Executive Officers and Directors FundRebel LLC, our Sponsor and Manager

 

As of the date of this offering circular, the executive officers and directors of FundRebel LLC, our Sponsor and Manager, are as follows:

 

Name Age Position

Term of Office

(Date of Appointment)

Executive Officers     June 2021
Mark Drachman 39 Chief Executive Officer June 2021
Allen Konstam 39 Chief Operating Officer June 2021
Husein Sonara 40 Chief Strategy Officer June 2021
Al Spahn 56 Chief Technology Officer June 2021
Daniel Briggs 36 Chief Marketing Officer June 2021
Managers      
Mark Drachman 39 Manager June 2021
Allen Konstam 39 Manager June 2021

 

Mark Drachman, Managing Principal and Co-Founder

 

Mark Drachman has cemented himself as one of the top real estate producers in the Tri-State area with over a half billion dollars of commercial and residential transactional volume on the east coast. With close to 20 years in the business, his experience brings great value to all aspects of the deal from its inception through completion. Mark founded Kings Highway Development LLC in 2012 which focuses on acquiring distressed multi-family and single family residential properties and maximizing the value-add opportunity through his market knowledge and development expertise, where he worked until 2019. In 2005 Mark founded Delmark Realty LLC, a commercial and residential brokerage firm focused on New York real estate, where he still serves as President today. As President, Mark oversees a team of agents at Delmark Realty LLC that work under him. Prior to founding Delmark Realty, he began as a commercial real estate broker at GFI Capital Resources. Mark is also a Co-Founder & Managing Partner at Condra Property Group, another company focused on investments in real estate. Mark’s vast range of experience includes development, construction, acquisition, and dispositions and together with his many years of experience he is able to identify opportunities in the marketplace and capitalize on them.

 

Allen Konstam, Managing Principal and Co-Founder

 

Allen has a 20-year history as a professional in the commercial real estate industry. His professional responsibilities encompass more than 1 million sq ft of active development real estate. He possesses a deep knowledge of zoning and building codes and has worked on prominent buildings such as Madison Square Garden, The International Gem Tower, and 56 Leonard. Prior to co-founding FundRebel in June 2021, Allen was a Managing Director at Madison Realty Capital, a real estate investment company, from September 2017 to March 2021. Prior to that, Allen Konstam was a Director of Development at Heritage Equity Partners from 2013 until 2017, where he was directly responsible for development projects with more than one-million buildable square-feet. Prior to that, Allen was a Lead Development Coordinator for Construction Consulting Associates (CCA) for ten years and specialized in New York City Zoning and Building codes. He worked on prominent buildings such as Madison Square Garden, The International Gem Tower and 56 Leonard. Allen was the Director of Development and head of construction for the Williamsburg Hotel from inception through completion. Allen has the ability to facilitate highly efficient value-add solutions within complicated opportunities. Allen is a proud father of five.

 

Husein Sonara, Chief Strategic Officer

 

Husein I. Sonara is a 20 year veteran of the real estate industry. His experience in the business has encompassed acquisition, development, finance, construction, management, and governmental interface within multiple US jurisdictions in the service of project execution. During his career he has structured joint ventures and partnerships and anchored initiatives into the ongoing development and improvement of large scale urban assets nearing $1B in transaction volume. These have included commercial office, luxury condominium and rental residential, hospitality and retail projects. Most recently he served as Chief Operating Officer of The Sapir Organization, a renown commercial landlord and developer based in New York City and Miami. During his career he has been responsible for numerous aspects of the business and the delivery of more than 1.5M square feet of commercial and residential development and construction. He is a hands-on operator who immerses himself into projects and the pursuit of a successful outcome for all stakeholders.

 

 

 

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Al Spahn, Chief Technology Officer

 

As Chief Technology Officer of FundRebel, Al is responsible for driving the vision around the FundRebel technology roadmap. Partnering closely with other members of FundRebel’s leadership and broader technology communities, Al is setting the foundation for long-term investments and helping to align FundRebel’s technology approach with its overall corporate development priorities and strategy.

 

Al has 25 years’ experience in business and technology and has led groups for companies in staffing, real estate, lodging, travel, wireless/mobile and security. His longevity in the technology space coincides with his passion for expanding his knowledge. Since 2006, Al has worked at Solomon Page, which was recently ranked as one of America’s Best Professional Recruiting Firms of 2022. He currently serves as CTO of Solomon Page, where he matches new technology capabilities with business needs of the company.

 

Daniel Briggs, Chief Marketing Officer

 

Daniel serves as the Chief Marketing Officer of FundRebel, a position he has held since joining FundRebel in 2021. Daniel is responsible for the design and rollout of the FundRebel brand, marketing, and the front-end digital user interface(s). Dan also collaborates closely with other leadership members to facilitate investor reporting, product & offering formation, in addition to broader operational strategy and company performance. Dan has over 15 years of design, marketing, and operational strategy experience including the formation and leadership of multidisciplinary teams across many business and company verticals. Dan possesses diverse industry experience spanning finance, real estate, professional sports, retail, agriculture, non-profit, technology, and consumer packaged goods. From 2019 to 2021, Daniel served as Creative Director of The Sapir Organization, a multidisciplinary real estate investor, operator and developer, founded by the late Tamir Sapir. From 2016 to 2019, Daniel served as Creative Director at Merit Marketing, a full-service marketing and advertising agency.

 

Research Committee of the Manager

 

The Research Committee of the Manager is a standing committee, established to assist the Manager in fulfilling its oversight responsibilities by (1) considering and approving of investments made by us or on our behalf, (2) establishing our investment guidelines and overseeing our investment portfolio, and the investment activity of other accounts and funds held for our benefit and (3) overseeing the investment activities of our subsidiaries (if any). The Research Committee will consist of at least three members, each of whom will be appointed by the Manager, who will serve until such time as such Research Committee member resigns or is replaced by the Manager, in its sole and absolute discretion. The initial Research Committee will be comprised of Mr. Drachman, Mr. Konstam, and Mr. Sonara. In the event that two or more members of the Research Committee are interested parties in a transaction, the Independent Representative (defined below) will be required to approve the transaction. See “Conflicts of Interest— Certain Conflict Resolution Measures—Our Policies Relating to Conflicts of Interest.”

 

Underwriting Standards

 

The evaluation of a particular investment generally commences with a development opportunity that is identified directly by the Company or referred by a broker. The amount of a particular investment financed is generally no less than $1 million and no more than $300 million. Opportunities should typically have the following elements in order to be eligible for consideration: development project in multi-family housing; located in a geographic region with strong demographics (including but not limited to population growth, job growth, wage growth, increasing home values, stable or growing rental cap rates), favorable regulatory environment, solid infrastructure, and reliable services (contractors and skilled trades, property management).

 

The Research Committee reviews each investment opportunity after an analysis of underlying values (acquisition, cost plus basis, after repair value), cash flows, budgets, capital structure, partnership qualifications (if any), vendors, rent rolls, and any other factors that the Research Committee determines to be relevant to its evaluation.

 

 

 

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Underwriting Parameters

 

The Research Committee will sometimes require a licensed independent appraiser or broker to assist with its confirmation of a property’s fair market value under different assumptions. In other cases, the Research Committee may rely on opinions of value from other sources, such as the price of a recent sale of that particular property or comparable properties and an opinion of value from the Company itself, the opinion of value provided by a lender that offered to provide financing to a project in which the Company invested, or a real estate broker knowledgeable in the area where the property is located. In some cases, however, the Research Committee will determine that the cost or time to obtain an independent certified appraisal or price opinion is not warranted.

 

The appraisal or evaluation for construction loans, rehabilitation loans and entitlement loans will be prepared on either an “after-completed” basis, i.e., assuming that the entitlements or the improvements for which the loan is obtained will be completed, or on an “as-is” basis. The appraiser may also assume that all public improvements to be funded by special assessment district bonds will be completed as proposed and that the property will be marketed and sold in the manner planned by the borrower. In the case of a construction loan, rehabilitation loan or entitlement loan, the loan-to-value ratio as estimated in the appraisal or evaluation and the budget for the project may exceed the loan-to-value ratios listed above at times during the term of the loan. This may occur because the appraisal or evaluation may be based upon the value of the property when the construction or improvements are completed or the entitlements obtained; however, before the construction, improvements or entitlements are completed, the value of the property will generally be less than the “as completed” appraised or evaluated value.

 

The Research Committee performs its own underwriting analysis, in its sole discretion, with respect to all underlying investment opportunities. However, Investors should perform their own respective due diligence and should not rely on any evaluation or analysis performed by the Company. Investors should independently assess the prospects of risks associated with any investment, including, without limitation, all of the risks detailed in this offering circular.

 

Each project must carry appropriate property casualty insurance, and the Company may (but will not always) be named as loss payee on any such. Any payment made on such policies may be used to repair the property or to reduce the outstanding balance on any underlying financing. The Company does not generally require property damage coverage for landslides, earthquakes, floods, or similar natural disaster events. Any hazard losses not then covered by a policy would result in losses which would not be reimbursed, and investors could sustain a significant reduction, or complete elimination of, the return and a total loss of their investment.

 

Compensation of Executive Officers

 

We do not currently have any employees nor do we currently intend to hire any employees who will be compensated directly by us. Each of the executive officers of our Manager & Sponsor, FundRebel, receives compensation for his or her services from FundRebel. As executive officers of FundRebel, these individuals will perform the duties of the Manager to manage our day-to-day affairs, oversee the review, selection and recommendation of investment opportunities, service acquired investments and monitor the performance of these investments to ensure that they are consistent with our investment objectives. Although we will indirectly bear some of the costs of the compensation paid to these individuals, through fees we pay to FundRebel, we do not intend to pay any compensation directly to these individuals.

 

 

 

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Limited Liability and Indemnification of the Manager and Others

 

Subject to certain limitations, our operating agreement limits the liability of the Manager, its officers and directors, our Sponsor and our Sponsor’s officers, directors, shareholders and affiliates, for monetary damages and provides that we will indemnify and pay or reimburse reasonable expenses in advance of final disposition of a proceeding to the Manager, its officers and directors, our Sponsor and our Sponsor’s officers, directors, shareholder and affiliates.

 

Our operating agreement provides that to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law the Manager, its officers and directors, our Sponsor, its officers and directors, and our Sponsor’s shareholders and affiliates will not be liable to us. In addition, pursuant to our operating agreement, we have agreed to indemnify the Manager, its officers and directors, our Sponsor and our Sponsor’s officers, directors, shareholders and affiliates, to the fullest extent permitted by law, against all expenses and liabilities (including judgments, fines, penalties, interest, amounts paid in settlement with the approval of the company and attorney’s fees and disbursements) arising from the performance of any of their obligations or duties in connection with their service to us or the operating agreement, including in connection with any civil, criminal, administrative, investigative or other action, suit or proceeding to which any such person may hereafter be made party by reason of being or having been the Manager, one of the Manager’s directors or officers or one of the Sponsor’s directors or officers.

 

Insofar as the foregoing provisions permit indemnification of directors, officers or persons controlling us for liability arising under the Securities Act, we have been informed that, in the opinion of the SEC, this indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable.

 

Term and Removal of the Manager

 

Our operating agreement provides that the Manager will serve as our manager for an indefinite term, but that the Manager may be removed by us, or may choose to withdraw as the Company’s manager, under certain circumstances.

 

Our shareholders may only remove the Manager at any time with 30 days prior written notice for “cause,” following the affirmative vote of two-thirds of our shareholders. If the Manager is removed for “cause,” the members will have the power to elect a replacement Manager upon the affirmative vote or consent of the holders of a majority of our common shares. “Cause” is defined as:

 

  · the Manager’s continued breach of any material provision of the operating agreement following a period of 30 days after written notice thereof (or 45 days after written notice of such breach if the Manager, under certain circumstances, has taken steps to cure such breach within 30 days of the written notice);
     
  · the commencement of any proceeding relating to the bankruptcy or insolvency of the Manager, including an order for relief in an involuntary bankruptcy case or the Manager authorizing or filing a voluntary bankruptcy petition;
     
  · the Manager committing fraud against us, misappropriating or embezzling our funds, or acting, or failing to act, in a manner constituting bad faith, willful misconduct, gross negligence or reckless disregard in the performance of its duties under the operating agreement; provided, however, that if any of these actions is caused by an employee, personnel and/or officer of the Manager or one of its affiliates and the Manager (or such affiliate) takes all necessary and appropriate action against such person and cures the damage caused by such actions within 30 days of the Manager’s actual knowledge of its commission or omission, then the Manager may not be removed; or
     
  · the dissolution of the Manager.

 

Unsatisfactory financial performance of the Company does not constitute “cause” under the operating agreement.

 

 

 

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In the event that shareholders vote to remove the Manager, the Company may incur additional costs associated with installing a new third party as manager, including, among other costs, paying asset management, servicing, property management or other operating expenses that would be negotiated at arms’ length, which could be higher than the rates currently agreed to with the Manager.

 

Our Manager may assign its rights under our operating agreement in its entirety or delegate certain of its duties under the operating agreement to any of its affiliates, including pursuant to the Management Services Agreement described above under “—Management Services Agreement” without the approval of our shareholders so long as the Manager obtains consent of our Company and if such assignment or delegation does not require our approval under the Advisers Act. Our Manager may withdraw as the Manager if we become required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, with such withdrawal deemed to occur immediately before such event. Our Manager will determine whether any succeeding manager possesses sufficient qualifications to perform the management function. In the event of the removal or withdrawal of the Manager, the Manager will cooperate with us and take all reasonable steps to assist in making an orderly transition of the management function.

 

Holdings of our Common Shares

 

As of the date of this offering circular, there are no common shares of our Company outstanding.

 

Our Sponsor’s Website

 

We will conduct this offering primarily via www.fundrebel.com, which will host this offering in connection with the distribution of the common shares offered pursuant to this offering circular. This site is owned and operated by FundRebel, our Sponsor and Manager. We will not pay the Sponsor any sales commissions or other remuneration for hosting this offering on its website, other than reimbursable expenses under the Management Services Agreement.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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MANAGEMENT COMPENSATION

 

The Manager and its affiliates will receive fees and expense reimbursements for services relating to this offering and the investment and management of our assets. The items of compensation are summarized in the following table.

 

No portion of the fees detailed below will be allocated to any individual in his or her capacity as an executive officer of our Sponsor or Manager.

 

See “Management Compensation” for a more detailed explanation of the fees and expenses payable to the Manager and its affiliates.

  

Form of Compensation and Recipient   Determination of Amount   Estimated Amount
         
   

Organization and Offering Stage

 

   
Organization and Offering Expenses — Manager   To date, the Manager has paid $105,960 in organization and offering expenses on our behalf. We will reimburse the Manager for these costs and future organization and offering costs it may incur on our behalf. We expect organization and offering expenses to not exceed $250,000 or, if we raise the maximum offering amount, approximately 0.33% of gross offering proceeds.   $250,000
         
Distribution Sales and Marketing Allowance — Broker Sales Commission   Investors will not pay upfront selling commissions as part of the price per share of our common shares purchased in this offering. The Manager will pay Dalmore selling commissions equal to 1.00% of the proceeds raised in this offering.  

Actual amounts are dependent upon the offering proceeds we raise. Assuming the maximum offering amount is raised, commissions payable to Dalmore would be $750,000.

  

The amounts will be paid by the Manager and will not be directly charged to either the Company or its investors.

         
   

Acquisition and Development Stage

 

 

 

Acquisition Fee — Manager

 

The Company or any entity solely-owned or controlled by the Company that acquires a property will pay the Manager a fee of 2.0% of the amount of the purchase price of any property payable upon the acquisition of the property.

 

Paid directly by the Company to the Manager. Actual amounts are dependent upon the purchase price of an we cannot determine these amounts at the present time.
     
Reimbursement of Acquisition Expenses — Manager (1)   We will reimburse the Manager for actual expenses incurred in connection with the selection, acquisition or due diligence of a prospective investment, subject to a 1% limit on the amount of the prospective investment, whether or not we ultimately acquire the investment.   Actual amounts are dependent upon the offering proceeds we raise (and any leverage we employ) and the number of investment opportunities considered by the Company. The maximum reimbursement in a year, assuming the maximum amount of this offering is raised and we utilize leverage of 75% (the high end of the Company’s disclosed target leverage range), would be $875,000.

 

 

 

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Operational Stage

 

   
Asset Management Fee — Manager   None.  

None.

         
Other Operating Expenses — Manager  

We will reimburse the Manager for out of pocket expenses paid to third parties in connection with providing services to us, including license fees, auditing fees, fees associated with SEC reporting requirements, increases in insurance costs, Delaware taxes and filing fees, administration fees, fees for the services of an independent representative, and third-party costs associated with these expenses. This does not include overhead, employee costs, utilities or technology costs of the Manager, the Sponsor or their affiliates.

 

The expense reimbursements that we will pay to the Manager also include expenses incurred by our Manager in the performance of services under the Management Services Agreement to be entered into between the Manager and us.

  Actual amounts are dependent upon the results of our operations; we cannot determine these amounts at the present time
       
 

Liquidation – Listing Stage

 

   
Disposition Fee   None.   None.
         
Exit Fee   1.00% of the gross proceeds from the sale of an asset held by the Company will be paid as a fee to the Manager, and 99.00% will go to the Company.   Actual amounts are dependent upon the results of a sale; we cannot determine these amounts at the present time

 

  (1) After we raise an aggregate of $1,000,000, consisting of $500,000 from investors in this offering (the minimum offering amount) and $500,000 from the private placements to our Sponsor and its officers and directors (at which time we will begin our operations), we will start to reimburse the Manager, without interest, for these organization and offering costs incurred both before and after that date. Reimbursement payments will be made in quarterly installments, but the aggregate quarterly amount reimbursed can never exceed 0.125% of the aggregate gross offering proceeds from this offering, or 0.50% per annum. If the sum of the total unreimbursed amount of such organization and offering costs, plus new costs incurred since the last reimbursement payment, exceeds the reimbursement limit described above for the applicable quarterly installment, the excess will be eligible for reimbursement in subsequent quarters (subject to the 0.125% quarterly limit), calculated on an accumulated basis, until the Manager has been reimbursed in full.

 

Our Manager in its sole discretion may defer or waive any fee payable to it under the operating agreement. All or any portion of any deferred fees will be deferred without interest and paid when the Manager determines.

 

 

 

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PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS

 

The following table sets forth the beneficial ownership of our common shares as of the date of this Offering Circular, for each person or group that holds more than 5% of our common shares, for each director and executive officer of FundRebel, our Sponsor and Manager and for the directors and executive officers of FundRebel as a group. To our knowledge, each person that will beneficially own our common shares will have sole voting and disposition power with regard to such shares.

 

Unless otherwise indicated below, each person or entity has an address in care of our principal executive offices at 104 W. 40th Street, Suite 1030, New York, NY 10018.

 

Name of Beneficial Owner (1)  Class of Shares   Number of Shares
Beneficially Owned
   Percent of
All Shares
   
Allen Konstam     0(2)    0% 
Mark Drachman     0(2)    0% 
Husein Sonara          0% 
Al Spahn          0% 
Daniel Briggs          0% 
All directors and executive officers of FundRebel
as a group (5 persons)
          0% (2)

 

  (1) Under SEC rules, a person is deemed to be a “beneficial owner” of a security if that person has or shares “voting power,” which includes the power to dispose of or to direct the disposition of such security. A person also is deemed to be a beneficial owner of any securities that person has a right to acquire within 60 days. Under these rules, more than one person may be deemed to be a beneficial owner of the same securities and a person may be deemed to be a beneficial owner of securities as to which he or she has no economic or pecuniary interest.
  (2) Concurrently with the Company receiving subscriptions for the minimum offering amount of $500,000 and closing on those investments, the Company intends to close the private placements to our Sponsor and its officers and directors for $500,000 in gross proceeds. The Company expects that each of Mr. Konstam and Mr. Drachman will purchase 25,000 Class B shares of the Company for $250,000 each, for a total of $500,000 for 50,000 Class B shares of the Company. In such event, Mr. Konstam and Mr. Drachman would be the sole members of FundRebel LLC (our Sponsor and Manager) that own shares in our Company.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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CONFLICTS OF INTEREST

 

We are subject to various conflicts of interest arising out of our relationship with FundRebel and its affiliates. We discuss these conflicts below and conclude this section with a discussion of the corporate governance measures we have adopted to mitigate some of the risks posed by these conflicts.

 

Our Affiliates’ Interests in Other Entities

 

General

 

The officers and directors and the key investment professionals of our Sponsor who perform services for us on behalf of the Manager are also officers, directors, managers, and/or key professionals of other entities involved in real estate investment. These persons have legal obligations with respect to the Sponsor and those entities that are similar to their obligations to us. In the future, these persons and other affiliates of our Sponsor may organize other real estate-related investment programs and acquire for their own account real estate-related investments that may be suitable for us. In addition, our Sponsor may grant equity interests in the Manager to certain of its management personnel performing services for the Manager. At the date of this offering circular, the Sponsor has not directly established any investment vehicles other than our Company – but the principals of the Sponsor have established three Prior Programs, which have not yet concluded.

 

Allocation of Investment Opportunities

 

Our Sponsor’s real estate professionals acting on behalf of our Manager must determine which investment opportunities to recommend to us and other FundRebel entities. Our Manager and its affiliates may allocate investments between us and other real estate ventures established by our Sponsor. As of the date of this offering circular, our Sponsor has not directly established or sponsored any other investment vehicles. However, our Sponsor is expected to establish and sponsor additional REITs and continue to offer investment opportunities. These additional investment vehicles may have investment criteria that compete with us.

 

If a subsequent event or development causes any investment, in the opinion of our Sponsor’s real estate professionals, to be more appropriate for another FundRebel entity, they may offer the investment to such entity.

 

Except under any policies that may be adopted by our Manager, which policies will be designed to minimize conflicts among the programs and other investment opportunities provided by FundRebel, no FundRebel investment opportunity (including us) will have any duty, responsibility or obligation to refrain from:

 

  · engaging in the same or similar activities or lines of business as any other REIT or FundRebel investment opportunity;
     
  · doing business with any potential or actual tenant, lender, purchaser, supplier, customer or competitor of any REIT or FundRebel investment opportunity;
     
  · engaging in, or refraining from, any other activities whatsoever relating to any of the potential or actual tenants, lenders, purchasers, suppliers or customers of any REIT or FundRebel investment opportunity;
     
  · establishing material commercial relationships with another REIT or FundRebel investment opportunity; or
     
  · making operational and financial decisions that could be considered to be detrimental to another program or FundRebel investment opportunity.

 

 

 

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In addition, any decisions by our Manager to renew, extend, modify or terminate an agreement or arrangement, or enter into similar agreements or arrangements in the future, may benefit one REIT more than another REIT or limit or impair the ability of any REIT to pursue business opportunities. In addition, third parties may require as a condition to their arrangements or agreements with or related to any one particular program that such arrangements or agreements include or not include another REIT, as the case may be. Any of these decisions may benefit one REIT more than another REIT.

 

Allocation of Our Affiliates’ Time

 

We rely on FundRebel’s executive officers and key real estate and investment professionals who act on behalf of the FundRebel in its role as our Manager and Sponsor for the day-to-day operation of our business. Each of FundRebel’s officers and directors have competing responsibilities, obligations to other investors and engage other business activities on behalf of entities other than the Company. As such, each of them will face conflicts of interest in allocating time among us, the FundRebel, and other entities and other business activities in which they are involved. However, we believe that the Manager and its affiliates have sufficient depth of investment professionals to fully discharge their responsibilities to the Company and the other entities for which they work.

 

Receipt of Fees and Other Compensation by the Manager and its Affiliates

 

Our Manager and its affiliates will receive substantial fees from us, which fees will not be negotiated at arm’s length. These fees could influence the Manager’s advice to us as well as the judgment of affiliates of the Manager, some of whom also serve as the Manager’s officers and directors and as the key real estate and investment professionals of our Sponsor. Among other matters, these compensation arrangements could affect their judgment with respect to:

 

  · the continuation, renewal or enforcement of provisions in our operating agreement involving the Manager and its affiliates, or the Management Services Agreement between the Manager and our Company;
     
  · public offerings of equity by us, which will likely entitle the Manager to certain increased fees;
     
  · whether and when we seek to list our common shares on a stock exchange or other trading market;
     
  · whether we seek shareholder approval to internalize our management, which may entail acquiring assets (such as office space, furnishings and technology costs) and the key real estate, debt finance, and investment professionals of our Sponsor who are performing services for us on behalf of the Manager for consideration that would be negotiated at that time and may result in these real estate professionals receiving more compensation from us than they currently receive from our Sponsor;
     
  · whether and when we seek to sell the company or its assets; and
     
  · whether and when we merge or consolidate our assets with other companies, including companies affiliated with the Manager.

 

Duties Owed by Some of Our Affiliates to Our Manager and the Manager’s Affiliates

 

The officers and directors and the key real estate and investment professionals of FundRebel, our Sponsor and Manager, performing services on behalf our Company are also officers, directors, managers and/or key professionals of other entities involved in real estate investment. As a result, they owe duties to each of these entities, their shareholders, members and limited partners. These duties may from time to time conflict with the duties that they owe to us.

 

 

 

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License Agreement

 

Upon the commencement of this offering, our Sponsor has verbally agreed to grant us a non-exclusive, royalty free license to use the name “FundRebel” and certain marketplace technology owned by the Sponsor. See “Management—License Agreement.”

 

Certain Conflict Resolution Measures

 

Independent Representative

 

If our Sponsor, Manager or their affiliates have a conflict of interest with us that is not otherwise covered by an existing policy we have adopted or a transaction is deemed to be a “principal transaction,” the Manager will appoint an independent representative (the “Independent Representative”) to protect the interests of the shareholders and review and approve such transactions. Any compensation payable to the Independent Representative for serving in such capacity on our behalf will be payable by us. Principal transactions are defined as transactions between our Sponsor, Manager or their affiliates, on the one hand, and us or one of our subsidiaries, on the other hand. Our Manager is only authorized to execute principal transactions with the prior approval of the Independent Representative and in accordance with applicable law. Such prior approval may include but not be limited to pricing methodology for the acquisition of assets and/or liabilities for which there are no readily observable market prices.

 

Our Policies Relating to Conflicts of Interest

 

In addition to the provisions in our operating agreement described below and the Manager’s investment allocation policies described above, we have adopted the following policies prohibiting us from entering into certain types of transactions with the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates in order to further reduce the potential for conflicts inherent in transactions with affiliates.

 

Pursuant to these conflicts of interest policies, we may not engage in the following types of transactions unless such transaction is approved by the Independent Representative:

 

  · sell or lease any investments to the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates;
     
  · acquire or lease any investments from the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates; and
     
  · invest in or make mortgage loans in which the transaction is with the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates, including any mortgage loans that are subordinate to any mortgage or equity interest of the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates.

 

In addition, pursuant to these conflicts of interest policies, we will neither make any loans to the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates but we may borrow money from the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates to fund short-term liquidity needs. These restrictions on loans will only apply to advances of cash that are commonly viewed as loans, as determined by the Manager. By way of example only, the prohibition on loans would not restrict advances of cash for legal expenses or other costs incurred as a result of any legal action for which indemnification is being sought nor would the prohibition limit our ability to advance reimbursable expenses incurred by the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates.

 

These conflicts of interest policies may be amended at any time in the Manager’s discretion.

 

 

 

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Other Operating Agreement Provisions Relating to Conflicts of Interest

 

Our operating agreement contains many other restrictions relating to conflicts of interest including the following:

 

Term of the Manager. Our operating agreement provides that the Manager will serve as our manager for an indefinite term, but that the Manager may be removed by us, or may choose to withdraw as manager, under certain circumstances. Our shareholders may remove the Manager at any time with 30 days prior written notice for “cause,” following the affirmative vote of two-thirds of our shareholders. Unsatisfactory financial performance does not constitute “cause” under the operating agreement. Our Manager may withdraw as manager if we become required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, with such withdrawal deemed to occur immediately before such event. In the event of the removal of the Manager, the Manager will cooperate with us and take all reasonable steps to assist in making an orderly transition of the management function. Our Manager will determine whether any succeeding manager possesses sufficient qualifications to perform the management function. See “Management—Term and Removal of the Manager.”

 

Other Transactions Involving Affiliates. Before engaging in a transaction involving an affiliate, the Manager must conclude that all other transactions between us and our Sponsor, the Manager, any of their officers or directors, or any of their affiliates are fair and reasonable to us and on terms and conditions not less favorable to us than those available from unaffiliated third parties. See “Management—Research Committee of the Manager.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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INVESTMENT OBJECTIVES AND STRATEGY

 

Investment Objectives

 

Our investment objectives are:

 

  · to realize growth in the value of our investments within approximately three to five years from the one year anniversary of the qualification of our initial offering;
     
  · to preserve, protect and return investors’ capital contributions;
     
  · to pay competitive cash distributions from rents and preferred returns earned on the Company’s investments;
     
  · to create a repeatable investment process that allows the Company to continue to redeploy capital to achieve our investment objectives.

 

We cannot assure you that we will realize these objectives or that the value of our assets will not decrease. Furthermore, within our investment objectives and policies, the Manager will have broad discretion with respect to the selection of specific investments and the purchase and sale of our assets. Our Manager’s Research Committee will review our investment guidelines at least annually to determine whether our investment guidelines continue to be in the best interests of our shareholders. See “Management—Research Committee of the Manager.”

 

Investment Strategy

 

We intend to use substantially all of the proceeds of this offering to identify, underwrite, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects, and to invest in other estate-related assets.

 

We will seek to create and maintain a diversified portfolio of investments that generate cashflow through the periodic payment of rents and/or preferred dividends, allowing us to make regular dividend distributions to our shareholders.

 

The principals of our Manager have extensive experience investing in numerous types of properties. Thus, we may acquire a wide variety of commercial properties, including office, industrial, retail, hospitality, and other real properties. These properties may be existing, income-producing properties, newly constructed properties or properties under development or construction and may include properties purchased for renovation and conversion into condominiums, for example. We focus on acquiring properties with significant possibilities for capital appreciation, such as those requiring development, those located in markets with high growth potential and those available from sellers who are distressed or face time-sensitive deadlines. commercial and

 

Our Manager intends to directly structure, underwrite and manage most of the investments we make. Our underwriting process will involve comprehensive and systematic financial, structural, operational and legal due diligence of our partners and the underlying projects, in order to identify and structure investments that meet our investment requirements. We feel the market environment offers a broad range of opportunities to source compelling investments with attractive risk-return profiles.

 

We will seek to be, either directly or through a subsidiary wholly or majority-owned and controlled by us, the sole owner of any acquisition, development or improvement investment we enter into, or the majority owner and controlling party of any joint venture or other entity through which we make an acquisition. We do not intend to invest in bridge and/or mezzanine loans that may lead to an opportunity to purchase a real estate interest, nor do we intend to make or invest in commercial mortgage-backed securities, mortgage loans and Code Section 1031 tenant-in-common interests.

 

 

 

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We plan to employ leverage to enhance the total return to our shareholders through loans from banks or other lenders, or by issuing short-term debt, equity or other capital markets transactions backed by the Company’s portfolio of assets. Our target leverage ratio after we have acquired an initial substantial portfolio of diversified investments is between 0% - 75% of the greater of cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) or fair market value of our assets. During the period when we are acquiring our initial portfolio, we may employ greater leverage if the Manager determines that it is in our best interest. We will seek to secure leverage that is non-recourse, non-mark-to-market financing to the extent obtainable on a cost effective basis. Our Manager may from time to time modify our leverage policy in its discretion. However, other than during our initial period of operations, it is our policy not to borrow more than 75% of the greater of cost (before deducting depreciation or other non-cash reserves) or fair market value of our assets. We cannot exceed the leverage limit of leverage policy unless any excess in borrowing over such level is approved by the Manager’s Research Committee.

 

In executing our investment strategy, we believe that we will benefit from the principals of our Manager and Sponsor’s extensive experience in real estate. These competitive advantages include:

 

·The principals of our Sponsor’s relationships with lenders that originate and distribute commercial real estate debt and real-estate related debt securities;
   
·The principals of our Sponsor’s relationship with commercial and multi-family developers and redevelopers, which the Company intends to work with, as opportunities arise, to carry out its investment objectives; and
   
·Our Sponsor’s experienced research team, which analyzes, underwrites, and monitors each prospective investment through an established due diligence process.

 

Market Overview and Opportunity

 

Opportunistic real estate investments remain a coveted and time proven arena to deploy capital into, and as the world evolves due to macroeconomic and global geopolitical shifts the consolidation of this space and competition only increases as the decades pass. More global entrants continue to create an increasingly competitive market landscape in the most desirable geographies, and we have witnessed the broadscale elimination of ability for newcomers to achieve aspirational participations within the real estate industry. Every market cycle creates free market opportunity to acquire, reposition, develop and capitalize on trends, or dislocations. Every market however typically does not provide available opportunity to those who are outside of the immediate professional investment spectrum or who do not possess the standard expected net worth to benefit.

 

Our strategy for our investors will combine the identification of investment targets originated by the industry relationships and experience of the managers combined with the utilization of a proprietary and purpose built technology assisted underwriting apparatus.

 

Targeted Investments

 

We intend to invest in a wide variety of commercial properties, including, without limitation, multifamily, office, industrial, retail, hospitality and other real properties. These properties may be existing or properties under development or construction, properties not yet developed, land for development or resale and may include properties purchased for conversion into condominiums. In each case, the properties are identified by the Manager as opportunistic investments. These properties are identified as such because of the economic opportunity presented and the executability of a property-specific business plan as determined by the Manager. Transactions which contemplate the deploying of capital into the active restructuring of distressed opportunities and projects will also be actively evaluated.

 

 

 

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We intend to hold the assets we invest in for approximately five years from the termination of this offering     . We believe that this period of time is generally sufficient to enable us to capitalize on the potential for increased income, capital appreciation and capital realization of such assets while also providing for a level of liquidity consistent with our investment strategy and fund life. Though we evaluate each of our assets for capital appreciation generally within a targeted holding period of approximately five years from the termination of this offering, we may consider investing in properties and other assets with a different holding period in the event such investments provide an opportunity for an attractive return in a period that is consistent with the life of our Company. Further, economic or market conditions, or the tax rules applicable to REITs, may influence us to hold our investments for different periods of time.

 

As a result of our flexibility to invest in a multitude of real estate types rather than in specific limited asset types and our intent to target larger assets with significant management, reposition or development prospects for near-term capital appreciation, higher income, recapitalization or exit we believe that our investments will have the potential to provide a rate of return superior to real estate programs that invest in a limited range of asset types and are less opportunistic in their approach versus the traditional fund style model. Additionally we will provide a level of engagement to our investors not typically offered with the intent of establishing a measure of participation in the process through our investor interface and experience.

 

Investments in Real Property

 

In executing our investment strategy with respect to investments in real property, we seek to invest in assets that we believe may be managed, repositioned or redeveloped so that they will reach an optimum value within approximately three to five years from the from the one year anniversary of the qualification of our initial offering. We may acquire properties with lower tenant quality or low occupancy rates and reposition them by seeking to improve the property, tenant quality and occupancy rates and thereby increase asset revenues and overall property value. Further, we may invest in properties that we believe are an attractive value because all or a portion of the tenant leases expire within a short period after the date of acquisition, and we intend to renew leases or replace existing tenants at the properties for improved returns. We may acquire properties in markets that are depressed or overbuilt with the anticipation that, within our targeted holding period, the markets will recover and favorably impact the value of these properties. We may also acquire properties from sellers who are distressed or face time-sensitive deadlines with the expectation that we can achieve better success with the properties. Many of the markets where we acquire properties may have high growth potential in real estate lease rates and sale prices. To the extent feasible, we invest in a diversified portfolio of properties in terms of geography, type of property and industry of our tenants that satisfies our investment objectives of preserving our capital and realizing capital appreciation upon the ultimate sale of our properties. In making investment decisions for us, our Manager’s Research Committee considers relevant real estate property and financial factors, including the location of the property, its suitability for any development contemplated or in progress, its income-producing capacity, the prospects for long-range appreciation and its liquidity and income and REIT tax considerations.

 

We are not limited in the number or size of properties we may acquire or the percentage of net proceeds of this offering that we may invest in a single property. The number and mix of properties we acquire depends upon real estate and market conditions and other circumstances existing at the time we acquire our properties and the amount of proceeds we raise in this offering.

 

Our investment in real estate is expected to generally take the form of holding fee title of real estate assets directly or through wholly and/or majority owned and controlled subsidiaries. In addition, we may purchase properties and lease them back to the sellers of such properties. Although we use our best efforts to structure any such sale-leaseback transaction such that the lease will be characterized as a “true lease” so that we will be treated as the owner of the property for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the Internal Revenue Service could challenge such characterization. In the event that any such sale-leaseback transaction is recharacterized as a financing transaction for U.S. federal income tax purposes, deductions for depreciation and cost recovery relating to such property would be disallowed. See “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations—Gross Income Tests—Sale-Leaseback Transactions”.

 

 

 

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Though we intend to diversify our portfolio by geographic location, we expect to continue to focus on markets with high growth potential. As a result, our actual investments may result in concentrations in a limited number of geographic regions. We expect to make our investments in or in respect of real estate assets located in the United States.

 

Our obligation to purchase any property generally is conditioned upon the delivery and verification of certain documents from the seller or developer, including, where appropriate:

 

  · plans and specifications;
     
  · environmental reports;
     
  · surveys;
     
  · evidence of marketable and insurable title subject to such liens and encumbrances as are acceptable to our Manager;
     
  · auditable financial statements covering recent operations of properties having operating histories; and
     
  · title and liability insurance policies.

 

We do not purchase any property unless and until we obtain what is generally referred to as a “Phase I” environmental site assessment and are generally satisfied with the environmental status of the property. A Phase I environmental site assessment basically consists of a visual survey of the building and the property in an attempt to identify areas of potential environmental concerns, visually observing neighboring properties to assess surface conditions or activities that may have an adverse environmental impact on the property, and contacting local governmental agency personnel and performing a regulatory agency file search in an attempt to determine any known environmental concerns in the immediate vicinity of the property. A Phase I environmental site assessment does not generally include any sampling or testing of soil, groundwater or building materials from the property.

 

Multifamily and Mixed-Use Properties.  We may acquire and develop multifamily and mixed-use properties for rental operations as apartment buildings and/or for conversion into condominiums. In each case, these multifamily and mixed-use communities must meet our investment objectives and may include conventional multifamily properties, such as mid-rise, high-rise, and garden-style properties, as well as student housing and age-restricted properties (typically requiring at least one resident of each unit to be 55 or older). Specifically, we may acquire multifamily assets that may benefit from enhancement or repositioning and development assets. We may purchase any type of residential property, including properties that require capital improvement or lease-up to enhance shareholder returns. Location, condition, design and amenities are key characteristics for apartment communities and condominiums. We focus on major metropolitan areas and other markets and submarkets that are deemed likely to benefit from ongoing population shifts, possess more favorable attitudes toward business and taxation from the local and state municipalities, offer subsidy or PPP opportunities and that are poised for high growth potential based on the analytics generated by and determination of the manager.

 

The terms and conditions of any apartment lease that we enter into with our residents may vary substantially; however, we expect that a majority of our leases will continue to be standardized leases customarily used between landlords and residents for the specific type and use of the property in the geographic area where the property is located. In the case of apartment communities, such standardized leases generally have terms of one year or less. All prospective residents for our apartment communities are required to submit a credit application.

 

 

 

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Office Properties. We may acquire and develop office properties for rental operations. In each case, these office properties must meet our investment objectives and may include low-rise, mid-rise and high-rise office buildings and office parks in urban and suburban locations, especially those that are in or near central business districts or have access to transportation. Specifically, we may acquire office properties that may benefit from enhancement or repositioning and development assets. We may purchase any type of office property, including properties that require capital improvement or lease-up to enhance shareholder returns. Location, condition, design and amenities are key characteristics for office properties. We focus on major metropolitan areas and other markets and submarkets that are poised for high growth potential.

 

The terms and conditions of any office lease that we enter into with our tenants may vary substantially; however, we expect that a majority of our leases will continue to be standardized leases customarily used between landlords and tenants for the specific type and use of the property in the geographic area where the property is located. All prospective tenants for our office properties are required to submit a credit application.

 

Retail Properties. We may acquire and develop retail properties for rental operations. In each case, these retail properties must meet our investment objectives and may include malls, power centers, strip centers, urban retail, and single tenant properties with credit or non-credit tenants. Specifically, we may acquire retail properties that may benefit from enhancement or repositioning and development assets. We may purchase any type of retail property, including properties that require capital improvement or lease-up to enhance shareholder returns. Location, condition, design and amenities are key characteristics for retail properties. We focus on major metropolitan areas and other markets and submarkets that are poised for high growth potential.

  

The terms and conditions of any retail lease that we enter into with our tenants may vary substantially; however, we expect that a majority of our leases will continue to be standardized leases customarily used between landlords and tenants for the specific type and use of the property in the geographic area where the property is located. All prospective tenants for our retail properties are required to submit a credit application.

 

Industrial Properties. We may acquire and develop industrial properties for rental operations. In each case, these industrial properties meet our investment objectives and may include warehouse and distribution facilities, office/warehouse flex properties, research and development properties and light industrial properties. Specifically, we may acquire industrial properties that may benefit from enhancement or repositioning and development assets. We may purchase any type of industrial property, including properties that require capital improvement or lease-up to enhance shareholder returns. Location and condition are key characteristics for industrial properties. We focus on major metropolitan areas and other markets and submarkets that are poised for high growth potential.

 

The terms and conditions of any industrial lease that we enter into with our tenants may vary substantially; however, we expect that a majority of our leases will be standardized leases customarily used between landlords and tenants for the specific type and use of the property in the geographic area where the property is located. All prospective tenants for our industrial properties are required to submit a credit application.

 

Other Possible Investments

 

We may invest in whatever types of interests in real estate-related assets or other investments that we believe are in our shareholders’ best interests, consistent with the guidelines and disclosures contained in this offering circular. Our conflicts of interest policy and operating agreement do limit certain types of investments involving the Manager, our Sponsor, their officers or any of their affiliates. See “Conflicts of Interest—Certain Conflict Resolution Measures.”

 

 

 

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Investment Process

 

Our Manager has the authority to make all the decisions regarding our investments consistent with the investment guidelines and borrowing policies approved by the Manager’s Research Committee and subject to the limitations in our operating agreement and the direction and oversight of the Manager’s Research Committee. Our Manager’s Research Committee must approve all investments. We will not purchase or lease assets in which the Manager, any of our officers or any of their affiliates has an interest without a determination by the Independent Representative that such transaction is fair and reasonable to us and at a price to us that is not materially greater than the cost of the asset to the affiliated seller or lessor. In the event that two or more members of the Research Committee are interested parties in a transaction, the Independent Representative will consider and vote upon the approval of the transaction. Our Manager’s Research Committee will formally review at a duly called meeting our investment guidelines on an annual basis and our investment portfolio on a quarterly basis or, in each case, more often as they deem appropriate. Changes to our investment guidelines must be approved by the Manager’s Research Committee.

  

In selecting investments for us, the Manager will utilize an established underwriting and investment process that focuses on ensuring that each prospective investment is being evaluated using a consistent process and with regard to all relevant, available information. The criteria that the Manager will consider when evaluating prospective investment opportunities include:

 

  · compliance with the general guidelines described in this offering circular and the specific guidelines established by the Manager;
  · macroeconomic conditions that may influence operating performance;
  · real estate market conditions that could influence real estate and/or the economic performance, value, and market price of the real estate;
  · fundamental analysis of the underlying real estate, including tenant rosters, lease terms, zoning, operating costs and the asset’s overall competitive position in its market;
  · micro and macro real estate and leasing market conditions that could affect the underlying real estate;
  · the cash flow in place and projected to accrue over the term of the investment;
  · the reasonableness of estimated costs and timing associated with capital improvements of the underlying real estate;
  · a valuation of the investment cost relative to its projected long-term value and the ability to create liquidity through a sale or refinancing;
  · review of third-party reports, including appraisals, engineering and environmental reports;
  · physical inspections of underlying real estate;
  · the overall structure of the investment and rights in the documentation; and
  · other unique, material factors that could affect the relative value or market price of the investments or the collateral backing them.

 

If a potential investment meets the Manager’s underwriting criteria, the Manager will review the proposed transaction structure, including related collateral, guarantees, other security, reserve requirements, cash flow sweeps, and call protection. Our Manager will evaluate the asset’s position within the overall capital structure of the issuer, and the rights accruing to the asset in relation to other parts of the capital stack. Our Manager will evaluate each potential investment’s risk-return profile in comparison to other investments available, and will consider alternative financing sources, if applicable, to ensure that the investment fits within the parameters of the Company’s financing facilities (if any) and to ensure performance of the underlying real estate collateral.

 

Borrowing Policy

 

We believe that the Company’s ability to obtain competitive financing, through the Sponsor’s relationship with top-tier financial institutions and other lenders, should allow the Company to successfully employ moderate levels of borrowing in order to enhance the Company’s investment returns to shareholders. Although our investment strategy is not contingent on financing our assets in whole or in part through the capital markets, our Sponsor’s and its principals’ ability and experience in securing and structuring flexible financing should provide the Company with an advantage in potentially obtaining attractive term financing to support our investment strategy.

 

 

 

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We intend to employ leverage in order to execute and scale opportunities. We believe that careful use of leverage will help us to achieve our investment goals. We expect that once we have fully invested the proceeds of this offering, our debt financing, on a portfolio-wide basis, will be between 0% and 75% of the fair market value of our assets, although it may exceed this level during our offering stage. Our Manager may from time to time modify our leverage policy in its discretion, with the approval of the Research Committee. However, other than during our initial acquisition of portfolio properties, it is our policy to not borrow more than 75% of the fair market value of our assets with traditional debt instruments such as senior, bridge or mezzanine. We cannot exceed the leverage limit of our leverage policy unless any excess in borrowing over such level is approved by the Manager’s Research Committee.

 

Operating Policies

 

Credit Risk Management. We may be exposed to various types and levels of credit and special hazard risk depending on the nature of our underlying assets and the nature and level of credit enhancements supporting our assets. Our Manager and its executive officers will review and monitor credit risk and other risks of loss associated with each investment. In addition, we will seek to diversify our portfolio to avoid undue geographic, issuer, industry and certain other types of concentrations. Our Manager’s Research Committee will monitor the overall portfolio risk, including concentration risk, and levels of provision for loss.

 

Interest Rate Risk Management. To the extent consistent with maintaining our qualification as a REIT, we will follow an interest rate risk management policy intended to mitigate the negative effects of major interest rate fluctuations. We intend to manage our interest rate risk from borrowings by managing the overall duration risk in the Company’s portfolio, thereby limiting the Company’s overall exposure to interest rate moves. The interest rate risk of the portfolio will be monitored by the Research Committee, which will establish interest rate risk guidelines for the Manager.

 

Hedging Activities. We may engage in hedging transactions to protect our investment portfolio from interest rate fluctuations and other changes in market conditions. These transactions may include the purchase or sale of listed interest rate futures or options, interest rate swaps, the purchase or sale of over-the-counter interest rate collars, caps or floors, options, mortgage derivatives and other hedging instruments. These instruments may be used to hedge as much of the interest rate risk as we determine is in the best interest of our shareholders, given the cost of such hedges and the need to maintain our qualification as a REIT. We may from time to time enter into interest rate swap agreements to offset the potential adverse effects of rising interest rates under certain short-term repurchase agreements. We may elect to bear a level of interest rate risk that could otherwise be hedged when the Manager believes, based on all relevant facts, that bearing such risk is either advisable or economically unavoidable. The Research Committee will review the hedging activity of the Company in the context of its overall monitoring of the Company’s investments.

 

Equity Capital Policies. Under our operating agreement, we have authority to issue an unlimited number of additional common shares or other securities. In particular, the Manager is authorized to provide for the issuance of an unlimited amount of one or more classes or series of shares in the Company, including preferred shares, and to fix the number of shares, the relative powers, preferences and rights, and the qualifications, limitations or restrictions applicable to each class or series thereof by resolution authorizing the issuance of such class or series, without shareholder approval. After your purchase in this offering, the Manager may elect to: (i) sell additional shares in this or future public offerings (whether on Form S-11, Form 1-A or otherwise), (ii) issue equity interests in private offerings or (iii) issue shares to the Manager, or its successors or assigns, in payment of an outstanding fee obligation. To the extent we issue additional equity interests after your purchase in this offering, your percentage ownership interest in us will be diluted. In addition, depending upon the terms and pricing of any additional offerings and the value of our investments, you could also experience dilution in the book value and fair value of your shares.

 

 

 

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Disposition Policies

 

The period that we will hold our investments in commercial real estate projects and other real estate-related assets will vary depending on the type of asset, interest rates and other factors. Our Manager will develop a well-defined exit strategy for each investment we make. Our Manager will continually perform a hold vs. sell analysis on each asset in order to determine the optimal time to hold the asset. Macro- and microeconomic and market conditions may lead us to hold different investments for different periods of time. We may sell an asset before the end of the expected holding period if we believe that a sale of the asset would be in our best interests.

 

Liquidity Event

 

Subject to then-prevailing market conditions, we expect to consider options for providing liquidity to our shareholders beginning approximately five years from the completion of this offering. While we expect to seek a liquidity transaction during this time frame, we cannot assure you that a suitable opportunity to obtain liquidity on acceptable terms will be available or that market conditions for a transaction will be favorable during that time frame. Our Manager has broad discretion to consider a liquidity transaction at any time if it determines such event to be in the best interests of the Company’s shareholders. A liquidity transaction could consist of a sale or roll-off to scheduled maturity of our assets, a sale or merger of the Company, a consolidation transaction with other companies managed by the Manager or its affiliates, a listing of the Company’s shares on a national securities exchange or a similar transaction. We do not have a stated term for the Company, as we believe setting a finite date for a possible, but uncertain, future liquidity transaction may result in actions that are not necessarily in the best interest or within the expectations of our shareholders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PLAN OF OPERATION

 

General

 

We are a newly organized Delaware limited liability company formed to identify, underwrite, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of multi-family and other commercial real estate development projects.

 

We plan to diversify our portfolio by investment type, investment size and investment risk with the goal of constructing a portfolio of real estate assets that provides stable, attractive risk-adjusted returns to our investors. We may make our investments through the acquisition of individual assets. As of the date of this offering circular, we have not commenced operations nor have we identified any specific investments in which there is a reasonable probability that we will invest.

 

FundRebel is the Manager of the Company. The Manager is responsible for managing our day-to-day operations and our portfolio of commercial real estate and other real estate-related assets. Our Manager also has the authority to make all of the decisions regarding our investments, subject to the limitation in our operating agreement and the direction and oversight of the Manager’s Research Committee. The Manager, the Sponsor, and/or other affiliates of our Sponsor will provide marketing, investor relations and other administrative services on our behalf.

 

We intend to make an election to be taxed as a REIT under the Code, commencing with our taxable year ending December 31, 2022, although this election may be deferred by our board of directors until the taxable year ending December 31, 2023. If we qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax to the extent we distribute qualifying dividends to our shareholders. If we fail to qualify as a REIT in any taxable year after electing REIT status, we will be subject to U.S. federal income tax on our taxable income at regular corporate income tax rates and generally will not be permitted to qualify for treatment as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes for four years following the year in which our qualification is denied. Such an event could materially and adversely affect our net income and cash available for distribution. However, we believe that we will be organized and will be able to operate in a manner that will allow us to qualify for treatment as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes commencing with our taxable year ending December 31, 2022, and we intend to continue to operate so as to remain qualified as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes thereafter.

 

Competition

 

Our net income and overall investment success depend, in large part, on our ability to source investments with attractive risk-adjusted returns. In originating these investments, we compete with other REITs, specialty finance companies, savings and loan associations, banks, mortgage bankers, insurance companies, mutual funds, institutional investors, investment banking firms, private funds, private lenders, governmental bodies, private investors and other entities, many of which have greater financial resources and a lower cost of capital than we have. In addition, there are numerous REITs and funds with asset acquisition objectives similar to ours, and others may be organized in the future, which may increase competition for the investments suitable for us. Competitive variables include market presence and visibility, size of investment and underwriting standards. To the extent that a competitor is willing to risk larger amounts of capital in a particular transaction or to employ more liberal underwriting standards when evaluating potential investments than we are, our investment volume and profit margins for our investment portfolio could be impacted. Our competitors may also be willing to accept lower returns on their investments and may succeed in buying the assets that we have targeted for acquisition. Although we believe that we are well positioned to compete effectively in each facet of our business, there is enormous competition in our market sector, and we cannot assure you that we will compete effectively or that we will not encounter increased competition in the future that could limit our ability to conduct our business effectively.

 

 

 

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Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

We are dependent upon the net proceeds from this offering to conduct our proposed operations. We will obtain the capital required to purchase and originate real estate-related investments and conduct our operations from the proceeds of this offering and any future offerings we may conduct, from secured or unsecured financing obtained from banks or other lenders, and from any undistributed funds from our operations. For information regarding the anticipated use of proceeds from this offering, see “Estimated Use of Proceeds.”

 

We will not commence operations unless we raise $500,000 in this offering and $500,000 from private placements to our Sponsor and its officers and directors. If we raise substantially less than $75,000,000 in gross offering proceeds, we will make fewer investments resulting in less diversification in terms of the type, number and size of investments we make, and the value of an investment in our equity will fluctuate with the performance of the specific assets we acquire. Further, we will have certain fixed operating expenses, including certain expenses related to operating as a publicly-offered REIT, regardless of whether we are able to raise substantial funds in this offering. Our inability to raise substantial funds would increase our fixed operating expenses as a percentage of gross income, reducing our net income and limiting our ability to make distributions.

 

Our Manager has paid $105,960 in organization and offering expenses on our behalf as of June 30, 2022, which we must reimburse. From January 7, 2022 (inception) through June 30, 2022, the Manager has paid $71,750 and $34,210 for offering costs and legal and professional expenses related to this offering, respectively, on behalf of the Company, of which all remain payable as of the date of this offering circular. Apart from this, we have no other outstanding debt and we have received no commitment from any lender to provide us with financing. Our targeted portfolio-wide leverage after we have acquired an initial substantial portfolio of diversified investments is between 0% and 75% of the fair market value of our assets. During the period when we are acquiring our initial portfolio, we may employ greater leverage on individual assets (that will also result in greater leverage of the initial portfolio) in order to quickly build a diversified portfolio of assets. Our Manager may from time to time modify our leverage policy in its discretion, with approval of the Research Committee, in light of then-prevailing economic conditions, the relative cost of debt and equity capital, the market values of our assets, general conditions in the market for debt and equity securities, the Company’s growth and acquisition opportunities, or other factors. However, other than during our initial period of operations, it is our policy to not borrow more than 75% of the fair market value of the cost of our assets. We cannot exceed the leverage limit of our leverage policy unless any excess in borrowing over such level is approved by the Manager’s Research Committee.

 

In addition to making investments in accordance with our investment objectives, we expect to use our capital resources to make certain payments to the Manager. During our organization and offering stage, these payments will include reimbursements of certain organization and offering expenses advanced by the Manager on behalf of the Company. During our acquisition and development stage, we expect to make payments to the Manager in connection with the selection and purchase of investments, the management of our assets and costs incurred by the Manager in providing services to us. For a discussion of the compensation to be paid to the Manager, see “Management Compensation.”

 

We intend to elect to be taxed as a REIT and to operate as a REIT commencing with our taxable year ending December 31, 2022, although this election may be deferred by our board of directors until the taxable year ending December 31, 2023. To maintain our qualification as a REIT, we will be required to make aggregate annual distributions to our shareholders of at least 90% of our REIT taxable income (computed without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding net capital gain). Our Manager may authorize distributions in excess of those required for us to maintain REIT status depending on our financial condition and such other factors as the Manager deems appropriate. Provided we have sufficient available cash flow, we intend to authorize and declare distributions based on weekly record dates and pay distributions on a quarterly or other periodic basis. We have not established a minimum distribution level, and we do not expect to establish a minimum distribution level until after the Company commences operations.

 

 

 

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Related Party Loans and Warehousing of Assets

 

If we do not have sufficient funds to acquire an investment that the Manager would otherwise wish to make, then we may obtain a related party loan from, or issue a participation interest to, the Sponsor or an affiliate of the Sponsor. Our operating agreement expressly authorizes us to enter into such related party loans and to issue such participation interests. Each related party loan and participation interest will be an unsecured obligation of ours, that is payable solely to the extent that such related party loan or participation interest remains outstanding. Unsecured related party loans that, in the aggregate, do not exceed $5 million and do not carry an interest rate that exceeds the then prevailing interest rates, can be entered into without the approval of an Independent Representative. As we sell additional common shares in this offering, generate income from operations, or secure third party financing from unrelated parties, we will use the proceeds of such activities to pay down the principal and interest of the related party loan or the principal of the outstanding participation interests, as appropriate, reducing the payment obligation of the related party loan or participation interest, and our obligation to the holder of the related party loan or participation interest.

 

In instances where a participation interest is outstanding, payments of the participation interest will be pari passu (i.e., of equal seniority) to our right to payment from the underlying asset, and any payments received from the underlying asset will be subsequently distributed pro rata (i.e., in equal proportion to their proportionate interest) among us and the participation interest holder. In the event that we generate funds from operations or from financing activities to fully extinguish the principal of an outstanding participation interest, we will repay the participation interest, and, other than any accrued but unpaid return due to it from the underlying asset, the holder of the participation interest will no longer hold any obligation of ours with regard to payment. It is anticipated that each participation interest will have a varying return that is dependent upon, and will generally be identical to, the projected return on the underlying asset.

 

As an alternative means of investments for which we do not yet have sufficient funds, the Sponsor or an affiliate of the Sponsor and Company may close and fund each investment prior to it being acquired by us. This ability to warehouse investments allows us the flexibility to deploy our offering proceeds as funds are raised. We may then acquire such investment at a price equal to the fair market value of such investment, which will generally equal the cost of the investment (including reimbursements for servicing fees and accrued interest, if any), so there is no mark-up (or mark-down) at the time of our acquisition.

 

Results of Operations

 

FundRebel Dean LLC was formed on January 7, 2022 and, as of the date of this offering circular, we have not commenced our principal operations. We also incurred $19,326 in general and administrative operating expenses related to legal and professional fees, resulting in a net loss of $19,326.

 

Market Outlook — Real Estate Capital Markets

 

We are encouraged by the improvements in commercial real estate capital and credit markets, as well as the positive macroeconomic factors supporting the commercial real estate industry. As we look ahead over the next five years, we believe strong economic fundamentals, higher transaction volume, and a healthier commercial real estate lending market will continue to support core United States metro markets.

 

If the markets for risk assets continue to strengthen, the competition for yield will become increasingly competitive. We believe the Sponsor’s network of commercial real estate partners, together with its own experience in real estate transactions, provides us with a competitive advantage in identifying and originating attractive investment opportunities across commercial sub-markets during this period of heightened competition.

 

 

 

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On the other hand, risks related to rising interest rates and regulatory uncertainty could adversely affect our ability to originate new investments or adversely impact the values of our existing investment portfolio. In the event that real estate market fundamentals deteriorate, our investments may be impaired as a result of lower rental rates, reduced occupancy levels, and/or declining collateral values. Furthermore, such an adverse market environment could materially impact the cost and availability of long-term credit, hampering our ability to initiate and complete the types of development projects contemplated herein. Similarly, a decline in real estate values reflecting an imbalance in supply and demand could lead to a reduction in marginal development efforts, adversely affecting the Company.

 

Investment Company Act Considerations  

 

We intend to, directly or through subsidiaries that we may establish, originate, invest in and manage a diversified portfolio of commercial and multi-family development projects and other real estate-related assets. We expect to use substantially all of the net proceeds from this offering to identify, structure and invest in commercial and multi-family commercial real estate projects and other real estate related investments.

 

We intend to conduct our operations so that neither we, nor any the subsidiaries we may establish, will be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “Investment Company Act”). Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act defines an investment company as any issuer that is or holds itself out as being engaged primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Section 3(a)(1)(C) of the Investment Company Act defines an investment company as any issuer that is engaged or proposes to engage in the business of investing, reinvesting, owning, holding or trading in securities and owns or proposes to acquire investment securities having a value exceeding 40% of the value of the issuer’s total assets (exclusive of U.S. Government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis, which we refer to as “the 40% test.” Excluded from the term “investment securities,” among other things, are securities issued by majority-owned subsidiaries that are not themselves investment companies and are not relying on the exception from the definition of investment company set forth in Section 3(c)(1) or Section 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act.

 

We believe that neither we nor subsidiaries we may establish will be considered investment companies for purposes of Section 3(a)(1)(A) of the Investment Company Act because we and they will not engage primarily or hold themselves out as being primarily in the business of investing, reinvesting or trading in securities. Rather, we and such subsidiaries will be primarily engaged in non-investment company businesses related to real estate. Consequently, we and our subsidiaries expect to be able to conduct our operations such that none will be required to register as an investment company under the Investment Company Act.

 

We will monitor our compliance with the 40% test, including the holdings of the securities of our subsidiaries (if any) to determine whether each of our subsidiaries constitutes an “investment security,” or does not fall within, or is excepted from, the definition of an investment company under the Investment Company Act. The securities issued by any wholly owned or majority-owned subsidiary that we may form and that are excepted from the definition of “investment company” based on Section 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the Investment Company Act, together with any other investment securities we may own, may not have a value in excess of 40% of the value of our total assets (exclusive of U.S. Government securities and cash items) on an unconsolidated basis.

 

The Investment Company Act defines a majority-owned subsidiary of a person as a company 50% or more of the outstanding voting securities of which are owned by such person, or by another company which is a majority-owned subsidiary of such person. We intend to treat companies in which we own at least a majority of the outstanding voting securities as majority-owned subsidiaries. The determination of whether an entity is a majority-owned subsidiary of the Company is made by us. We also intend to treat subsidiaries of which we or our wholly owned or majority-owned subsidiary is the manager (in a manager-managed entity) or managing member (in a member-managed entity) or in which our agreement or the agreement of our wholly owned or majority-owned subsidiary is required for all major decisions affecting the subsidiaries (which we refer to as “Controlled Subsidiaries”), as majority-owned subsidiaries even though none of the interests issued by such Controlled Subsidiaries meets the definition of voting securities under the Investment Company Act. We reached our conclusion on the basis that the interests issued by the Controlled Subsidiaries are the functional equivalent of voting securities. We have not asked the SEC staff for concurrence of our analysis and it is possible that the SEC staff could disagree with any of our determinations. If the SEC staff were to disagree with our treatment of one or more companies as majority-owned subsidiaries, we would need to adjust our strategy and our assets. Any such adjustment in our strategy could have a material adverse effect on us.

 

 

 

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We and certain of our subsidiaries may also rely upon the exception from the definition of investment company under Section 3(c)(5)(C) of the Investment Company Act. Section 3(c)(5)(C), as interpreted by the Staff of the SEC, requires an entity to invest at least 55% of its assets in “mortgages and other liens on and interests in real estate,” which we refer to as “qualifying real estate interests”, and at least 80% of its assets in qualifying real estate interests plus “real estate-related assets”. To classify assets as qualifying real estate assets or real estate-related assets, we will rely on no-action letters and other guidance published by the SEC Staff regarding those kinds of assets, as well as upon our analyses (in consultation with outside counsel) of guidance published with respect to other types of assets. There can be no assurance that the laws and regulations governing the Investment Company Act status of companies similar to ours, or the guidance from the SEC or its staff regarding the treatment of assets as qualifying real estate assets or real estate-related assets, will not change in a manner that adversely affects our operations. In fact, in August 2011, the SEC published a concept release in which it asked for comments on this exclusion from regulation. To the extent that the SEC Staff provides more specific guidance regarding any of the matters bearing upon our Investment Company Act status, or our exception from being defined as an investment company under the Investment Company Act, we may be required to adjust our strategy accordingly. Any additional guidance from the SEC Staff could further inhibit our ability to pursue the strategies that we have chosen. 

 

The loss of our exclusion from regulation pursuant to the Investment Company Act could require us to restructure our operations, sell certain of our assets or abstain from the purchase of certain assets, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition, results of operations, or ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation

 

The accounting and reporting policies of the Company conform to accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America ("GAAP"). The Company’s fiscal year is December 31.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the Company’s financial statement in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statement, and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

Risks and Uncertainties

 

The Company has a limited operating history. The Company's business and operations are sensitive to general business and economic conditions in the United States. A host of factors beyond the Company's control could cause fluctuations in these conditions. These adverse conditions could affect the Company's financial condition and the results of its operations.

 

Deferred Offering Costs

 

The Company complies with the requirements of FASB ASC 340-10-S99-1 with regards to offering costs. Prior to the completion of an offering, offering costs are capitalized. The deferred offering costs are charged to member’s equity/(deficit) upon the completion of an offering or to expense if the offering is not completed.

 

The Company will reimburse the Manager for any offering costs incurred by the Manager from the proceeds from the offering. As of January 7, 2022 (inception), the Manager has incurred $35,000 in offering expenses.

 

 

 

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Fair Value Measurements

 

Certain assets and liabilities of the Company are carried at fair value under GAAP. Fair value is defined as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. Valuation techniques used to measure fair value must maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs. Financial assets and liabilities carried at fair value are to be classified and disclosed in one of the following three levels of the fair value hierarchy, of which the first two are considered observable and the last is considered unobservable:

 

·Level 1—Quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.
   
·Level 2—Observable inputs (other than Level 1 quoted prices), such as quoted prices in active markets for similar assets or liabilities, quoted prices in markets that are not active for identical or similar assets or liabilities, or other inputs that are observable or can be corroborated by observable market data.
   
·Level 3—Unobservable inputs that are supported by little or no market activity that are significant to determining the fair value of the assets or liabilities, including pricing models, discounted cash flow methodologies and similar techniques.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” establishes principles for reporting information about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from the entity’s contracts to provide goods or services to customers.

 

Revenues will be recognized when control of the promised goods or services are transferred to a customer, in an amount that reflects the consideration that the Company expects to receive in exchange for those goods or services. The Company applies the following five steps in order to determine the appropriate amount of revenue to be recognized as it fulfills its obligations under each of its agreements: 1) identify the contract with a customer; 2) identify the performance obligations in the contract; 3) determine the transaction price; 4) allocate the transaction price to performance obligations in the contract; and 5) recognize revenue as the performance obligation is satisfied.

 

No revenue has been earned or recognized as of January 7, 2022 (inception).

 

Organizational Costs

 

In accordance with Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) ASC 720, “Other Expenses”, organizational costs, including accounting fees, legal fee, and costs of organization, are expensed as incurred. The Manager has incurred $14,884 of pre-inception expenses in connection with forming the Company, which, are recorded to this financial statement as accumulated deficit and due to related party.

 

 

 

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Income Taxes

 

The Company is a limited liability company. Accordingly, under the Internal Revenue Code, all taxable income or loss flows through to its members. Therefore, no provision for income tax has been recorded in the statement. Income from the Company is reported and taxed to the members on their individual tax returns. The Company intended to elect to be treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes from the date of its formation and to qualify as a real estate investment trust, or REIT, beginning with its taxable year ending December 31, 2022. This election to be treated as a REIT may be deferred by its board of directors until the taxable year ending December 31, 2023. In the event of such deferral of the REIT election, it would be taxed as a corporation for the taxable year ending December 31, 2022.

 

The Company complies with FASB ASC 740 for accounting for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in a company’s financial statement, which prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement process for financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. For those benefits to be recognized, a tax position must be more-likely-than-not to be sustained upon examination by taxing authorities. FASB ASC 740 also provides guidance on derecognition, classification, interest and penalties, accounting in interim periods, disclosure and transition. Based on the Company’s evaluation, it has been concluded that there are no significant uncertain tax positions requiring recognition in the Company’s financial statement. The Company believes that its income tax positions would be sustained on audit and does not anticipate any adjustments that would result in a material change to its financial position.

 

The Company may in the future become subject to federal, state and local income taxation though it has not been since its inception. The Company is not presently subject to any income tax audit in any taxing jurisdiction.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

Management does not believe that any recently issued, but not yet effective, accounting standards could have a material effect on the accompanying financial statement. As new accounting pronouncements are issued, the Company will adopt those that are applicable under the circumstances.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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PRIOR PERFORMANCE SUMMARY

 

Narrative Summary

 

The Sponsor of the Company is FundRebel, LLC. The Sponsor was formed in June 2021. The owners of the Sponsor are Mark Drachman and Allen Konstam.

 

Since its inception, the Sponsor has been involved primarily in organizational activities. Over the last 10 years, the owners and principals of the Sponsor, Mark Drachman and Allen Konstam (including other entities of which either Mr. Drachman or Mr. Konstam was a principal) have acted as the sponsor of three real estate investment opportunities, each of which we refer to as a “Prior Program.” In the aggregate, the Prior Programs have raised $29 million from 24 investors, and purchased, developed and/or built a total of 3 individual properties, consisting of 1 property located in Wilmington, Delaware (redevelopment of a 16-building garden low rise community consisting of 192 units), 2 properties in Hollywood, Florida (a property consisting of 36 luxury beachfront condominiums and a 50% ownership in the purchase and assemblage of 25 economy-style hotels on a property) with an aggregate value of approximately $94,000,000. Of this $94,0000,000, approximately 23% of this value is represented by residential properties, with 77% represented by commercial properties; and approximately 89% being represented by construction properties, with 11% represented by used properties.

 

No properties in any of the Prior Programs have been sold to date.

 

All of the Prior Programs are similar to the projects in which the Company intends to invest, in the sense that all involved the purchase, redevelopment, and/or construction of commercial and/or multi-family residential properties.

 

All of the Prior Programs involved private offerings under SEC Regulation D. None of the Prior Programs:

 

  · Has been registered under the Securities Act of 1933;
     
  · Has been required to report under section 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934;
     
  · Has had a class of equity securities registered under section 12(g) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; or
     
  · Has, or has had, 300 or more security holders.

 

There have been no major adverse business developments or conditions experienced by any of these Prior Programs that would be material to purchasers of our common shares in this offering.

 

During the last three years, the owners and principals of the Sponsor have acquired an ownership in, built, or started to build three individual properties, as follows:

 

    Property Type   Location   Method of Financing
             
Property #1   Multi-Family (Apartments)   Wilmington, DE   Debt and Equity
Property #2   Multi-Family (Condominiums)   Hollywood Beach, FL   Debt and Equity
Property #3   Commercial (Hotel)   Hollywood Beach, FL   Debt and Equity

 

The Sponsor has not participated as a Manager or a Sponsor in any previous direct participation programs as defined in FINRA Rule 2310(a)(18) and 2310(b)(3)(D).

 

Additional Information

 

Please see the tables under “Prior Performance Tables” in Appendix B to this offering circular for more information regarding our Sponsor’s prior performance.

 

 

 

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DESCRIPTION OF OUR COMMON SHARES

 

The following descriptions of our common shares, certain provisions of Delaware law and certain provisions of our certificate of formation and operating agreement are summaries and are qualified by reference to Delaware law, our certificate of formation and our operating agreement, copies of which are filed as exhibits to the offering statement of which this offering circular is a part.

 

General

 

The Company is a Delaware limited liability company organized on January 7, 2022 under the Delaware Limited Liability Company Act, or Delaware LLC Act, issuing limited liability company interests. The limited liability company interests in the Company will be denominated in common shares of limited liability company interests, and designated in two classes – Class A common shares and Class B common shares (collectively, the “common shares”) and, if created in the future, preferred shares of limited liability company interests (“preferred shares”). Our operating agreement provides that we may issue an unlimited number of Class A common shares and Class B common shares with the approval of the Manager and without shareholder approval.

 

We are offering up to 1,500,000 of our Class A common shares and up to 6,000,000 of our Class B common shares, each at price of $10.00 per share. Class A common shares will only be available to investors that invest a minimum of $1,000,000 in this offering.

 

The Class A and Class B investor shares have no par value, with the rights, preferences, powers, privileges and restrictions, qualifications and limitations set forth in this Share Designation for Class A common shares and Class B common shares, filed as Exhibit 2.3 to the Offering Statement of which this Offering Circular forms a part.

 

All of the common shares offered by this offering circular will be duly authorized and validly issued. Upon payment in full of the consideration payable with respect to the common shares, as determined by the Manager, the holders of such shares will not be liable to us to make any additional capital contributions with respect to such shares (except for the return of distributions under certain circumstances as required by Sections 18-215, 18-607 and 18-804 of the Delaware LLC Act). Holders of common shares have no conversion, exchange, sinking fund or appraisal rights, no pre-emptive rights to subscribe for any securities of the Company and no preferential rights to distributions.

 

We intend to elect and qualify to be taxed as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes commencing with our taxable year ending December 31, 2022, although this election may be deferred by our board of directors until the taxable year ending December 31, 2023. In the event of such deferral of the REIT election, we would be taxed as a corporation for the taxable year ending December 31, 2022.

 

Distributions

 

We intend to make distributions periodically, as conditions permit. The order of distributions will be governed by the Company’s operating and by the Share Designation for the Class A and Class B common shares.

 

We divide distributions into two categories:

 

  · Distributions of ordinary operating cash flow (for example, net income from the rental of a property, after expenses); and
     
  · Distributions of the net proceeds from “capital transactions” like sales or refinancing of properties (“net proceeds” means the gross proceeds of the capital transaction, reduced by the expenses of the transaction, including repayment of debt).

 

Distribution rights of Class A common shares and Class B common shares differ. The rights of each are summarized below.

 

 

 

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Class A Common Shares Distributions

 

Distributions of ordinary operating cash flow. Distributions of ordinary operating cash flow will be in the following order of priority:

 

  · Step One: First, Class A common shareholders will receive all the operating cash flow until they have received a 8% cumulative, non-compounded annual return on their invested capital. We refer to this as the “Class A Preferred Return
     
  · Step Two: Second, any remaining operating cash flow will be distributed to the Sponsor in an amount that equals 3.4% of the Preferred Return paid to date. We refer to this as the “Class A Catchup Return.”
     
  · Step Three: Third, any remaining operating cash flow will be distributed 70% to the Class A common shareholders on a pro rata basis, and 30% to the Sponsor.

 

Distributions of the net proceeds from capital transactions. Distributions of the net proceeds from capital transactions will be made from time to time as determined by the Manager to the holders of the Class A common shares. Holders of Class A common shares will be distributed on a pro rata basis an amount equal to 70% of the “Class A Investor Net Capital Proceeds”, with 30% of the Class A Investor Net Capital Proceeds going to the to the Sponsor.

 

The “Class A Investor Net Capital Proceeds” will be calculated by multiplying the total net proceeds from capital transactions in a particular distribution to all common shareholders of the Company (i.e. Class A and Class B shareholders combined) by a fraction, the numerator of which is the amount of Class A common shares outstanding as of the date of the distribution, and the denominator of which is the total number of outstanding common shares of the Company as of such date.

 

Class B common shares Distributions

 

Distributions of ordinary operating cash flow. Distributions of ordinary operating cash flow will be in the following order of priority:

 

  · Step One: First, Class B common shareholders will receive all the operating cash flow until they have received a 6% cumulative, non-compounded annual return on their invested capital. We refer to this as the “Class B Preferred Return
     
  · Step Two: Second, any remaining operating cash flow will be distributed to the Sponsor in an amount that equals 2.5% of the Preferred Return paid to date. We refer to this as the “Class B Catchup Return.”
     
  · Step Three: Third, any remaining operating cash flow will be distributed 70% to the Class B common shareholders on a pro rata basis, and 30% to the Sponsor.

 

Distributions of the net proceeds from capital transactions. Distributions of the net proceeds from capital transactions will be made from time to time as determined by the Manager to the holders of the Class B common shares. Holders of Class B common shares will be distributed on a pro rata basis an amount equal to 70% of the “Class B Investor Net Capital Proceeds”, with 30% of the Class B Investor Net Capital Proceeds going to the to the Sponsor.

 

 

 

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The “Class B Investor Net Capital Proceeds” will be calculated by multiplying the total net proceeds from capital transactions in a particular distribution to all common shareholders of the Company (i.e. Class A and Class B shareholders combined) by a fraction, the numerator of which is the amount of Class B common shares outstanding as of the date of the distribution, and the denominator of which is the total number of outstanding common shares of the Company as of such date.

 

We expect to make distributions of ordinary operating cash flow on at least an annual basis, i.e., once per year. Distributions of the net proceeds from capital transactions will be made, if at all, upon the occurrence of a capital transaction.

 

NOTE CONCERNING CALCULATION OF RETURNS: In general, we will calculate the returns of Investors beginning on the last day of the fiscal quarter in which an investor purchases his, her, or its Class A common shares or Class B common shares.

 

Voting Rights

 

Class A common shares and Class B common shares have identical voting rights. Our common shareholders will have voting rights only with respect to certain matters, as described below. Each outstanding common share entitles the holder to one vote on all matters submitted to a vote of common shareholders. Generally, matters to be voted on by our shareholders must be approved by either a majority or supermajority, as the case may be, of the votes cast by all common shares present in person or represented by proxy. If any such vote occurs, you will be bound by the majority or supermajority vote, as applicable, even if you did not vote with the majority or supermajority.

 

The following circumstances will require the approval of holders representing a majority or supermajority, as the case may be, of the common shares:

 

  · any amendment to our operating agreement that would adversely change the rights of the common shares (majority of affected class/series
  · removal of the Manager as the manager of the Company for “cause” as described under “Management—Term and Removal of the Manager” (two-thirds); and
  · all such other matters as the Manager, in its sole discretion, determines will require the approval of shareholders, or as otherwise required by law.

 

General Procedures

 

Public Announcements; Notices. In the case of specified dispositions or a redemption, we will publicly announce or otherwise provide specified information to holders of common shares.

 

Meetings. Our operating agreement provides that special meetings of shareholders may only be called by the Manager. There will be no annual or regular periodic meetings of the members.

 

Fractional Shares. Our Manager will not have to issue or deliver any fractional shares to any holder of common shares upon any redemption or distribution under the provisions described under “—Redemptions.” Instead of issuing fractional shares, we will pay cash for the fractional share in an amount equal to the fair market value of the fractional share, without interest.

 

Adjustments for Distributions. Upon the redemption of any common shares, the redemption price will be reduced by the aggregate sum of distributions, if any, declared on the shares subject to the redemption request with record dates during the period between the quarter-end redemption request date and the date of redemption. If a redemption date with respect to common shares comes after the record date for the payment of a distribution to be paid on those shares but before the payment or distribution, the registered holders of those shares at the close of business on such record date will be entitled to receive the distribution on the payment date, notwithstanding the redemption of those shares or our default in payment of the distribution.

 

 

 

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Payment of Taxes. If any person exchanging a certificate representing common shares wants us to issue a certificate in a different name than the registered name on the old certificate, that person must pay any transfer or other taxes required by reason of the issuance of the certificate in another name or establish, to the satisfaction of us or our agent, that the tax has been paid or is not applicable.

 

Liquidation Rights

 

In the event of a liquidation, termination or winding up of the Company, whether voluntary or involuntary, we will first pay or provide for payment of our debts and other liabilities, including the liquidation preferences of any class of preferred shares. Thereafter, holders of our common shares will share in our funds remaining for distribution pro rata in accordance with their respective interests in the Company.

 

Preferred Shares

 

Section 215(e) of the Delaware LLC Act also specifically authorizes the creation of ownership interests of different classes of limited liability company interests, having such relative rights, powers and duties as the limited liability company agreement may provide, and may make provision for the future creation in the manner provided in the limited liability company agreement of additional classes of membership interests. In accordance with this provision, our operating agreement provides that the Manager is authorized to provide for the issuance from time to time of an unlimited amount of one or more classes or series of preferred shares of limited liability company interests (“preferred shares”). Unless otherwise required by law or by any stock exchange, if applicable, any such authorized preferred shares will be available for issuance without further action by our common shareholders. Our Manager is authorized to fix the number of preferred shares, the relative powers, preferences and rights, and the qualifications, limitations or restrictions applicable to each class or series thereof by resolution authorizing the issuance of such class or series and without shareholder approval. As of the date of this offering circular, no preferred shares are outstanding and we have no current plans to issue any preferred shares.

 

We could issue a class or series of preferred shares that could, depending on the terms of the class or series, impede or discourage an acquisition attempt or other transaction that some, or a majority, of holders of common shares might believe to be in their best interests or in which holders of common shares might receive a premium for their common shares.

 

Transfer Agent and Registrar

 

The Manager has engaged Issuer Direct to act as our transfer agent.

 

Operating Agreement

 

Non-Member Manager

 

Our operating agreement designates FundRebel, as our non-member manager. Our Manager will generally not be entitled to vote on matters submitted to our shareholders, although its approval will be required with respect to certain amendments to the operating agreement that would adversely affect its rights. Our Manager will not have any distribution, redemption, conversion or liquidation rights by virtue of its status as the Manager.

 

 

 

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Organization and Duration

 

We were formed on January 7, 2022, as FundRebel Dean, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, and will remain in existence until dissolved in accordance with our operating agreement.

 

Purpose

 

Under our operating agreement, we are permitted to engage in any business activity that lawfully may be conducted by a limited liability company organized under Delaware law and, in connection therewith, to exercise all of the rights and powers conferred upon us pursuant to the agreement relating to such business activity; provided, however, that, the Manager may only revoke or otherwise terminate our REIT election, without approval of our shareholders, if it determines that it is no longer in our best interests to continue to qualify as a REIT.

 

Agreement to be Bound by our Operating Agreement; Power of Attorney

 

By purchasing a common share, you will be admitted as a member of the Company and will be bound by the provisions of, and deemed to be a party to, our operating agreement. Pursuant to this agreement, each shareholder and each person who acquires a common share from a shareholder grants to the Manager a power of attorney to, among other things, execute and file documents required for our qualification, continuance or dissolution. The power of attorney also grants the Manager the authority to make certain amendments to, and to execute and deliver such other documents as may be necessary or appropriate to carry out the provisions or purposes of, our operating agreement.

 

Limited Liability and Indemnification of the Manager and Others

 

Subject to certain limitations, our operating agreement limits the liability of the Manager, its officers and directors, our Sponsor and our Sponsor’s shareholders and affiliates, for monetary damages and provides that we will indemnify and pay or reimburse reasonable expenses in advance of final disposition of a proceeding to the Manager, its officers and directors, our Sponsor and our Sponsor’s shareholders and affiliates.

 

Our operating agreement provides that to the fullest extent permitted by applicable law the Manager, its officers and directors, our Sponsor and our Sponsor’s shareholders and affiliates will not be liable to us. In addition, pursuant to our operating agreement, we have agreed to indemnify the Manager, its officers and directors, our Sponsor and our Sponsor’s shareholders and affiliates, to the fullest extent permitted by law, against all expenses and liabilities (including judgments, fines, penalties, interest, amounts paid in settlement with the approval of the company and attorney’s fees and disbursements) arising from the performance of any of their obligations or duties in connection with their service to us or the operating agreement, including in connection with any civil, criminal, administrative, investigative or other action, suit or proceeding to which any such person may hereafter be made party by reason of being or having been the manager or one of the Manager’s directors or officers.

 

Insofar as the foregoing provisions permit indemnification of directors, officers or persons controlling us for liability arising under the Securities Act, we have been informed that, in the opinion of the SEC, this indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is therefore unenforceable.

 

 

 

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Amendment of Our Operating Agreement; Exclusive Authority of the Manager to Amend our Operating Agreement

 

Amendments to our operating agreement may be proposed only by or with the consent of the Manager. Our Manager will not be required to seek approval of the shareholders to adopt or approve any amendment to our operating agreement, except to the extent that such amendment would limit the rights of the holders of any class or series of shares or would otherwise have an adverse effect on such holders. In such a case, the proposed amendment must be approved in writing by holders representing a majority of the class or series of shares so affected.

 

Termination and Dissolution

 

We will continue as a limited liability company until terminated under our operating agreement. We will dissolve upon: (1) the election of the Manager to dissolve us; (2) the sale, exchange or other disposition of all or substantially all of our assets; (3) the entry of a decree of judicial dissolution of the Company; or (4) at any time that we no longer have any shareholders, unless our business is continued in accordance with the Delaware LLC Act.

 

Books and Reports

 

We are required to keep appropriate books of our business at our principal offices. The books will be maintained for both tax and financial reporting purposes on a basis that permits the preparation of financial statements in accordance with GAAP. For financial reporting purposes and U.S. federal income tax purposes, our fiscal year and our tax year are the calendar year.

 

We will provide audited financial statements to investors within 120 days of our fiscal year end.

 

Determinations by the Manager

 

Any determinations made by the Manager under any provision described in our operating agreement will be final and binding on our shareholders, except as may otherwise be required by law.

 

Restrictions on Ownership and Transfer

 

In order for us to qualify as a REIT under the Code, shares of the Company must be owned by 100 or more persons during at least 335 days of a taxable year of 12 months (other than the first year for which an election to be a REIT has been made) or during a proportionate part of a shorter taxable year. Also, not more than 50% of the value of our outstanding shares may be owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer individuals (as defined in the Code to include certain entities) during the last half of a taxable year (other than the first year for which an election to be a REIT has been made). To qualify as a REIT, we must satisfy other requirements as well. See “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations—Requirements for Qualification as a REIT.”

 

 

 

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To assist us in qualifying as a REIT, our operating agreement, subject to certain exceptions, contains restrictions on the number and value of our common shares and the number and value of shares of the Company that a person may own. Our operating agreement provides that generally no person may own, or be deemed to own by virtue of certain attribution provisions of the Code, either more than 9.8% in value or in number of our common shares, whichever is more restrictive, or more than 9.8% in value or in number of our shares, whichever is more restrictive. Accordingly, no person may own, or be deemed to own, more than 9.8% in value or in number of our shares, whichever is more restrictive. We refer to these limits collectively as the “ownership limit.” An individual or entity that becomes subject to the ownership limit or any of the other restrictions on ownership and transfer of the shares of the Company described below is referred to as a “prohibited owner” if, had the violative transfer or other event been effective, the individual or entity would have been a beneficial owner or, if appropriate, a record owner of shares.

 

The applicable constructive ownership rules under the Code are complex and may cause the Company’s shares owned actually or constructively by a group of individuals and/or entities to be owned constructively by one individual or entity. As a result, the acquisition of less than 9.8% by value or number of our common shares, whichever is more restrictive, or 9.8% by value or number of our shares, whichever is more restrictive, (or the acquisition of an interest in an entity that owns, actually or constructively, the Company’s shares by an individual or entity), could, nevertheless, cause that individual or entity, or another individual or entity, to own constructively in excess of the ownership limit.

 

Our Manager may, in its sole discretion, subject to such conditions as it may determine and the receipt of certain representations and undertakings, prospectively or retroactively, waive the ownership limit or establish a different limit on ownership, or excepted holder limit, for a particular shareholder if the shareholder’s ownership in excess of the ownership limit would not result in the Company being “closely held” within the meaning of Code Section 856(h) (without regard to whether the ownership interest is held during the last half of a taxable year) or otherwise would result in the Company failing to qualify as a REIT. As a condition of its waiver or grant of excepted holder limit, the Manager may, but is not required to, require the recipient to obtain an opinion of counsel or IRS ruling satisfactory to the Manager in order to determine or ensure the Company’s qualification as a REIT. In addition, the Manager will reject any investor’s subscription in whole or in part if it determines that such subscription would violate such ownership limits.

 

In connection with granting a waiver of the ownership limit, creating an excepted holder limit or at any other time, the Manager may from time to time increase or decrease the ownership limit for all other individuals and entities unless, after giving effect to such increase, five or fewer individuals could beneficially or constructively own in the aggregate, more than 49.9% in value of the shares then outstanding of the Company or the Company would otherwise fail to qualify as a REIT. Prior to the modification of the ownership limit, the Manager may require such opinions of counsel, affidavits, undertakings or agreements as it may deem necessary or advisable in order to determine or ensure our qualification as a REIT. A reduced ownership limit will not apply to any person or entity whose percentage ownership of our common shares or shares of the Company, as applicable, is in excess of such decreased ownership limit until such time as such individual’s or entity’s percentage ownership of our common shares or shares of the Company, as applicable, equals or falls below the decreased ownership limit, but any further acquisition of our common shares or shares of the Company, as applicable, in excess of such percentage ownership of our common shares or shares of the Company will be in violation of the ownership limit.

 

Our operating agreement further prohibits:

 

  · any person from beneficially or constructively owning, applying certain attribution rules of the Code, shares of the Company that would result in the Company being “closely held” under Code Section 856(h) (without regard to whether the ownership interest is held during the last half of a taxable year) or otherwise cause us to fail to qualify as a REIT; and
  · any person from transferring the Company’s shares if such transfer would result in the Company’s shares being owned by fewer than 100 persons (determined without reference to any rules of attribution).

 

 

 

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Any person who acquires or attempts or intends to acquire beneficial or constructive ownership of the Company’s shares that will or may violate the ownership limit or any of the other foregoing restrictions on ownership and transfer of our shares, or who would have owned the Company’s shares transferred to a trust as described below, must immediately give us written notice of the event, or in the case of an attempted or proposed transaction, must give at least 15 days’ prior written notice to us and provide us with such other information as we may request in order to determine the effect of such transfer on our qualification as a REIT. The foregoing restrictions on ownership and transfer of the Company’s shares will not apply if the Manager determines that it is no longer in our best interests to attempt to qualify, or to continue to qualify, as a REIT or that compliance with the restrictions and limitations on ownership and transfer of the Company’s shares as described above is no longer required in order for us to qualify as a REIT.

 

If any transfer of the Company’s shares would result in the Company’s shares being beneficially owned by fewer than 100 persons, such transfer will be null and void and the intended transferee will acquire no rights in such shares. In addition, if any purported transfer of the Company’s shares or any other event would otherwise result in any person violating the ownership limit or an excepted holder limit established by the Manager or in the Company being “closely held” under Code Section 856(h) (without regard to whether the ownership interest is held during the last half of a taxable year) or otherwise failing to qualify as a REIT, then that number of shares (rounded up to the nearest whole share) that would cause us to violate such restrictions will be automatically transferred to, and held by, a trust for the exclusive benefit of one or more charitable organizations selected by us and the intended transferee will acquire no rights in such shares. The automatic transfer will be effective as of the close of business on the business day prior to the date of the violative transfer or other event that results in a transfer to the trust. Any dividend or other distribution paid to the prohibited owner, prior to our discovery that the shares had been automatically transferred to a trust as described above, must be repaid to the trustee upon demand for distribution to the beneficiary by the trust. If the transfer to the trust as described above is not automatically effective, for any reason, to prevent violation of the applicable ownership limit or the Company being “closely held” under Code Section 856(h) (without regard to whether the ownership interest is held during the last half of a taxable year) or otherwise failing to qualify as a REIT, then our operating agreement provides that the transfer of the shares will be null and void.

 

Shares of the Company transferred to the trustee are deemed offered for sale to us, or our designee, at a price per share equal to the lesser of (1) the price paid by the prohibited owner for the shares and (2) $10.00 per share. We may reduce the amount payable by the amount of any dividend or other distribution that we have paid to the prohibited owner before we discovered that the shares had been automatically transferred to the trust and that are then owed to the trustee as described above, and we may pay the amount of any such reduction to the trustee for the benefit of the charitable beneficiary. We have the right to accept such offer until the trustee has sold the shares held in the trust as discussed below. Upon a sale to us, the interest of the charitable beneficiary in the shares sold terminates, the trustee must distribute the net proceeds of the sale to the prohibited owner and any dividends or other distributions held by the trustee with respect to such shares will be paid to the charitable beneficiary.

 

If we do not buy the shares, the trustee must, as soon as practicable after receiving notice from us of the transfer of shares to the trust, sell the shares to a person or entity designated by the trustee who could own the shares without violating the ownership limit or the other restrictions on ownership and transfer of shares of the Company. After the sale of the shares, the interest of the charitable beneficiary in the shares transferred to the trust will terminate and the trustee must distribute to the prohibited owner an amount equal to the lesser of (1) the price paid by the prohibited owner for the shares and (2) the sales proceeds (net of commissions and other expenses of sale) received by the trust for the shares. The trustee may reduce the amount payable to the prohibited owner by the amount of any dividend or other distribution that we paid to the prohibited owner before we discovered that the shares had been automatically transferred to the trust and that are then owed to the trustee as described above. Any net sales proceeds in excess of the amount payable to the prohibited owner will be immediately paid to the beneficiary of the trust, together with any dividends or other distributions thereon. In addition, if, prior to discovery by us that the Company’s shares have been transferred to a trust, such shares are sold by a prohibited owner, then such shares will be deemed to have been sold on behalf of the trust and to the extent that the prohibited owner received an amount for or in respect of such shares that exceeds the amount that such prohibited owner was entitled to receive, such excess amount will be paid to the trustee upon demand. The prohibited owner has no rights in the shares held by the trustee.

 

The trustee will be designated by us and will be unaffiliated with us and with any prohibited owner. Prior to the sale of any shares by the trust, the trustee will receive, in trust for the beneficiary of the trust, all dividends and other distributions paid by us with respect to the shares held in trust and may also exercise all voting rights with respect to the shares held in trust. These rights will be exercised for the exclusive benefit of the beneficiary of the trust. Any dividend or other distribution paid prior to our discovery that the Company’s shares have been transferred to the trust will be paid by the recipient to the trustee upon demand.

 

 

 

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Subject to Delaware law, effective as of the date that the shares have been transferred to the trust, the trustee will have the authority, at the trustee’s sole discretion:

 

  · to rescind as void any vote cast by a prohibited owner prior to our discovery that the shares have been transferred to the trust; and
  · to recast the vote in accordance with the desires of the trustee acting for the benefit of the beneficiary of the trust.

 

However, if we have already taken irreversible company action, then the trustee may not rescind and recast the vote.

 

In addition, if the Manager determines in good faith that a proposed transfer or other event would violate the restrictions on ownership and transfer of our shares, the Manager may take such action as it deems advisable to refuse to give effect to or to prevent such transfer, including, but not limited to, causing us to redeem our shares, refusing to give effect to the transfer on our books or instituting proceedings to enjoin the transfer.

 

Every owner of 5% or more (or such lower percentage as required by the Code or the regulations promulgated thereunder) of our shares, within 30 days after the end of each taxable year, must give us written notice, stating the shareholder’s name and address, the number of shares of each class of the Company that the shareholder beneficially owns and a description of the manner in which the shares are held. Each such owner must provide to us in writing such additional information as we may request in order to determine the effect, if any, of the shareholder’s beneficial ownership on our qualification as a REIT and to ensure compliance with the ownership limit. In addition, each shareholder must provide to us in writing such information as we may request in good faith in order to determine our qualification as a REIT and to comply with the requirements of any taxing authority or governmental authority or to determine such compliance.

 

Any certificates representing the Company’s shares will bear a legend referring to the restrictions described above.

 

These restrictions on ownership and transfer could delay, defer or prevent a transaction or a change in control that might involve a premium price for the common shares or otherwise be in the best interest of the holders of the common shares.

 

Personal Conduct Repurchase Right

 

Our operating agreement provides that we may elect to repurchase, at a price equal to $10.00 per share all of the common shares held by an investor in the event that such investor fails to conform its personal conduct to common and accepted standards of good citizenship or conducts itself in a way that reflects poorly upon us, as determined by the Manager in its sole and absolute discretion. The purchase price will be payable to the investor in a single payment, with the payment becoming due fifteen (15) business days following the date on which we provide notice to the investor of our decision to repurchase the common shares.

 

Prospect of roll-up/Public Listing

 

The Manager may determine that it is in the best interest of the Company to (i) contribute to, or convert the company into, an alternative vehicle, through consolidation, merger or other similar transaction with other companies, some of which may be managed by the Manager or its affiliates (a “Roll-Up”) or (ii) list the Company’s shares (or shares of the Roll-Up vehicle) on a national securities exchange. In connection with a Roll-Up, shareholders may receive from the Roll-Up vehicle cash, stock, securities or other interests or assets of such vehicle, on such terms as the Manager deems fair and reasonable, provided, however, that the Manager will be required to obtain approval of shareholders holding a majority of the outstanding common shares if required by applicable laws or regulations.

 

 

 

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Anti-Takeover Effects of Our Operating Agreement and Delaware Law

 

The following is a summary of certain provisions of our operating agreement and Delaware law that may be deemed to have the effect of discouraging, delaying or preventing transactions that involve an actual or threatened change of control of the Company. These provisions include the following:

 

Authorized but Unissued Shares

 

Our operating agreement authorizes us to issue additional common shares or other securities of the Company for the consideration and on the terms and conditions established by the Manager without the approval of our shareholders. In particular, the Manager is authorized to provide for the issuance of an unlimited amount of one or more classes or series of shares of the Company, including preferred shares, and to fix the number of shares, the relative powers, preferences and rights, and the qualifications, limitations or restrictions applicable to each class or series thereof by resolution authorizing the issuance of such class or series. Our ability to issue additional shares and other securities could render more difficult or discourage an attempt to obtain control over us by means of a tender offer, merger or otherwise.

 

Delaware Business Combination Statute—Section 203

 

We are a limited liability company organized under Delaware law. Some provisions of Delaware law may delay or prevent a transaction that would cause a change in our control. Section 203 of the DGCL, which restricts certain business combinations with interested shareholders in certain situations, does not apply to limited liability companies unless they elect to utilize it. Our operating agreement does not currently elect to have Section 203 of the DGCL apply to us. In general, this statute prohibits a publicly held Delaware corporation from engaging in a business combination with an interested shareholder for a period of three years after the date of the transaction by which that person became an interested shareholder, unless the business combination is approved in a prescribed manner. For purposes of Section 203, a business combination includes a merger, asset sale or other transaction resulting in a financial benefit to the interested shareholder, and an interested shareholder is a person who, together with affiliates and associates, owns, or within three years prior did own, 15% or more of voting shares. Our Manager may elect to amend our operating agreement at any time to have Section 203 apply to us.

 

Valuation Policies

 

We expect to engage an independent valuation agent with expertise in appraising commercial real estate and other real estate-related financial assets to provide annual valuations of the investments of the Company, including related liabilities, to be set forth in reports of the underlying investments, and to adjust those valuations for events known to the independent valuation agent that it believes are likely to have a material impact on previously provided estimates of the value of the affected investments and related liabilities. Our Manager will inform the independent valuation expert if a material event occurs between scheduled annual valuations that the Manager believes may materially affect the value of our assets.

 

At the end of each fiscal quarter, beginning with the first fiscal quarter following the commencement of this offering, our internal accountants will calculate our NAV per share using a process that reflects (1) estimated values of each of our investments, including related liabilities provided periodically by our independent valuation expert in reports of the underlying real estate, as they may be updated upon certain material events described below, (2) quarterly updates in the price of liquid assets for which third party market quotes are available, (3) accruals of our quarterly or other periodic distributions, and (4) estimates of quarterly accruals, on a net basis, of our operating revenues, expenses and fees.

 

The independent valuation expert will not be responsible for, and will not prepare, our quarterly aggregate NAV or NAV per share.

 

 

 

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Our goal is to provide a reasonable estimate of the market value of the Company’s shares on a quarterly basis. However, the majority of our assets will consist of commercial real estate and other real estate-related assets. As with any non-traded investment valuation protocol, the conclusions reached by our independent valuation expert will be based on a number of judgments, assumptions and opinions about future events that may or may not prove to be correct. The use of different judgments, assumptions or opinions would likely result in different estimates of the value of our commercial real estate assets and investments. In addition, for any given quarter, our published NAV per share may not fully reflect certain material events, to the extent that the financial impact of such events on our portfolio is not immediately quantifiable. As a result, the quarterly calculation of our NAV per share is unlikely to reflect the precise amount that might be paid for the Company’s shares in a market transaction, and any potential disparity in our NAV per share may be in favor of shareholders who buy new shares, or existing shareholders.

 

We will not update our offering price per share for our common shares in this offering based on any NAV calculations described above.

 

Redemption Plan

 

Our Manager may establish a redemption plan pursuant to which a holder of the Company’s common shares may request that the Company may redeem all or any portion of their shares, subject to the terms of such plan. However, as of the date of this Offering Circular, the Manager has not adopted such a plan, and has no intention to adopt such a plan in the foreseeable future.

 

Trading on PPEX

 

We intend to seek a quotation on PPEX, the ATS operated by North Capital Investment Technology, Inc. (“North Capital”). In order to do so, we will enter into a listing agreement with North Capital, and a secondary market trading agreement with Dalmore. Assuming that our application is successful, sellers will be able to have shares that they wish to sell quoted on PPEX. Dalmore, as the secondary market trading broker, will be entitled to a commission on sales made on PPEX. There can be no assurance as to the volume of pricing of any trading on PPEX. Any sales on PPEX will be subject to the conditions of and restrictions on transfer set out above in “Risk Factors – Risks Related to an Investment in Dean -- The Company does not have a public trading market for its shares. While it intends to seek a quotation on PPEX, there can be no guarantee as to the volume or pricing with respect to any secondary trading that might develop, Liquidity may be limited in comparison to the liquidity of other REITs.”

 

Reports to Shareholders

 

Our operating agreement requires that we prepare an annual report and deliver it to our common shareholders within 120 days after the end of each fiscal year. Our Manager is required to take reasonable steps to ensure that the annual report complies with our operating agreement provisions and with applicable securities laws.

 

Under the Securities Act, we must update this offering circular upon the occurrence of certain events, such as asset acquisitions. We will file updated offering circulars and offering circular supplements with the SEC. We are also subject to the informational reporting requirements of the Securities Act that are applicable to Tier 2 companies whose securities are offered pursuant to Regulation A, and accordingly, we will file annual reports, semi-annual reports and other information with the SEC. In addition, we will provide you directly with periodic updates, including offering circulars, offering circular supplements, quarterly pricing supplements, quarterly information statements and other information.

 

We will provide such periodic updates electronically through our Sponsor’s website at www.fundrebel.com, and documents will be provided electronically. You may access and print all periodic updates provided through our website. As periodic updates become available, we will notify you of this by sending you an e-mail message that will include instructions on how to retrieve the periodic updates. If our e-mail notification is returned to us as “undeliverable,” we will contact you to obtain your updated e-mail address. We will provide you with paper copies at any time upon request. The contents of www.fundrebel.com are not incorporated by reference in or otherwise a part of this offering circular.

 

 

 

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U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

 

The following is a summary of certain U.S. federal income tax considerations relating to our qualification and taxation as a REIT and the acquisition, holding, and disposition of our common shares. For purposes of this section, references to “Dean”, “we,” “us” or “the Company” means only FundRebel Dean, LLC and not its subsidiaries or other lower-tier entities, except as otherwise indicated. This summary is based upon the Code, the regulations promulgated by the U.S. Treasury Department, current administrative interpretations and practices of the IRS (including administrative interpretations and practices expressed in private letter rulings which are binding on the IRS only with respect to the particular taxpayers who requested and received those rulings) and judicial decisions, all as currently in effect and all of which are subject to differing interpretations or to change, possibly with retroactive effect. No assurance can be given that the IRS would not assert, or that a court would not sustain, a position contrary to any of the tax considerations described below. No advance ruling has been or will be sought from the IRS regarding any matter discussed in this summary. The summary is also based upon the assumption that the operation of the Company, and of any subsidiaries and other lower-tier affiliated entities, will be in accordance with its applicable organizational documents and as described in this offering circular. This summary is for general information only, and does not purport to discuss all aspects of U.S. federal income taxation that may be important to a particular shareholder in light of its investment or tax circumstances or to shareholders subject to special tax rules, such as:

 

  · U.S. expatriates;
     
  · persons who mark-to-market our common shares;
     
  · subchapter S corporations;
     
  · U.S. shareholders who are U.S. persons (as defined below) whose functional currency is not the U.S. dollar;
     
  · financial institutions;
     
  · insurance companies;
     
  · broker-dealers;
     
  · REITs;
     
  · regulated investment companies;
     
  · trusts and estates;
     
  · holders who receive our common shares through the exercise of employee stock options or otherwise as compensation;
     
  · persons holding our common shares as part of a “straddle,” “hedge,” “short sale,” “conversion transaction,” “synthetic security” or other integrated investment;
     
  · persons subject to the alternative minimum tax provisions of the Code;
     
  · persons subject to special tax accounting rules under Code Section 451(b);

 

 

 

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  · persons holding our common shares through a partnership or similar pass-through entity;
     
  · persons holding a 10% or more (by vote or value) beneficial interest in the Company;
     
  · tax-exempt organizations, except to the extent discussed below in “—Taxation of the Company—Taxation of Tax-Exempt U.S. Shareholders;” and
     
  · non-U.S. persons (as defined below), except to the extent discussed below in “—Taxation of the Company— Taxation of Non-U.S. Shareholders.”

 

This summary assumes that shareholders will hold our common shares as capital assets, within the meaning of Code Section 1221, which generally means as property held for investment.

 

For the purposes of this summary, a U.S. person is a beneficial owner of our common shares who for U.S. federal income tax purposes is:

 

  · a citizen or resident of the United States;
     
  · a corporation (including an entity treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes) created or organized in or under the laws of the United States or of a political subdivision thereof (including the District of Columbia);
     
  · an estate whose income is subject to U.S. federal income taxation regardless of its source; or
     
  · any trust if (1) a U.S. court is able to exercise primary supervision over the administration of such trust and one or more U.S. persons have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust or (2) it has a valid election in place to be treated as a U.S. person.

 

For the purposes of this summary, a U.S. shareholder is a beneficial owner of our common shares who is a U.S. person. A tax-exempt organization is a U.S. person that is exempt from U.S. federal income tax under Code Sections 401(a) or 501(a). For the purposes of this summary, a non-U.S. person is a nonresident alien individual or an entity treated as a foreign corporation, estate or trust for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and a non-U.S. shareholder is a beneficial owner of our common shares who is a non-U.S. person. The term “corporation” includes any entity treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and the term “partnership” includes any entity treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes.

 

The information in this section is based on the current Code, current, temporary and proposed Treasury Regulations, the legislative history of the Code, current administrative interpretations and practices of the IRS, including its practices and policies as endorsed in private letter rulings, which are not binding on the IRS except in the case of the taxpayer to whom a private letter ruling is addressed, and existing court decisions. Future legislation, regulations, administrative interpretations and court decisions could change current law or adversely affect existing interpretations of current law, possibly with retroactive effect. Any change could apply retroactively. We have not obtained any rulings from the IRS concerning the tax treatment of the matters discussed below. Thus, it is possible that the IRS could challenge the statements in this discussion that do not bind the IRS or the courts and that a court could agree with the IRS.

 

THE U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX TREATMENT OF HOLDERS OF OUR COMMON SHARES DEPENDS IN SOME INSTANCES ON DETERMINATIONS OF FACT AND INTERPRETATIONS OF COMPLEX PROVISIONS OF U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX LAW FOR WHICH NO CLEAR PRECEDENT OR AUTHORITY MAY BE AVAILABLE. IN ADDITION, THE TAX CONSEQUENCES OF HOLDING OUR COMMON SHARES TO ANY PARTICULAR SHAREHOLDER WILL DEPEND ON THE SHAREHOLDER’S PARTICULAR TAX CIRCUMSTANCES. YOU ARE URGED TO CONSULT YOUR TAX ADVISOR REGARDING THE U.S. FEDERAL, STATE, LOCAL, AND NON-U.S. INCOME AND OTHER TAX CONSEQUENCES TO YOU, IN LIGHT OF YOUR PARTICULAR INVESTMENT OR TAX CIRCUMSTANCES, OF ACQUIRING, HOLDING, AND DISPOSING OF OUR COMMON SHARES.

 

 

 

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Taxation of the Company

 

We intend to elect to be taxed as a REIT under the Code, commencing with the taxable year ending December 31, 2022, although this election may be deferred by our board of directors until the taxable year ending December 31, 2023. In the event of such deferral of the REIT election, we would be taxed as a corporation for the taxable year ending December 31, 2022. A REIT generally is not subject to U.S. federal income tax on the income that it distributes to its shareholders if it meets the applicable REIT distribution and other requirements for qualification. We believe that we have been organized, owned and operated in conformance with the requirements for qualification and taxation as a REIT under the Code, and that our proposed ownership, organization and method of operation will enable us to continue to meet the requirements for qualification and taxation as a REIT under the Code. However, given the highly complex nature of the rules governing REITs, the ongoing importance of factual determinations and the possibility of future changes in our circumstances or applicable law, we cannot assure you that we will so qualify for any particular year or that the IRS will not challenge our conclusions with respect to our satisfaction of the REIT requirements.

 

Qualification and taxation as a REIT depends on our ability to meet, on a continuing basis, through actual results of operations, distribution levels, diversity of share ownership and various qualification requirements imposed upon REITs by the Code, discussed below. In addition, our ability to qualify as a REIT may depend in part upon the operating results, organizational structure and entity classification for U.S. federal income tax purposes of certain entities in which we invest, which we may not control. Our ability to qualify as a REIT also requires that we satisfy certain asset and income tests, some of which depend upon the fair market values of assets directly or indirectly owned by us. Such values may not be susceptible to a precise determination. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that the actual results of our operations for any taxable year will satisfy the requirements for qualification and taxation as a REIT.

 

Taxation of REITs in General

 

Provided that we qualify as a REIT, we will generally be entitled to a deduction for dividends that we pay and, therefore, will not be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax on our net taxable income that is currently distributed to our shareholders. This treatment substantially eliminates the “double taxation” at the corporate and shareholder levels that results generally from investment in a corporation. Rather, income generated by a REIT is generally taxed only at the shareholder level, upon a distribution of dividends by the REIT.

 

Even if we qualify for taxation as a REIT, we will be subject to U.S. federal income taxation as follows:

 

  · We will be taxed at regular U.S. federal corporate rates on any undistributed income, including undistributed cashless income such as accrued but unpaid interest.
     
  · If we have net income from “prohibited transactions,” which are, in general, sales or other dispositions of property held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business, other than foreclosure property, such income will be subject to a 100% tax. See “—Prohibited Transactions” and “—Foreclosure Property” below.
     
  · If we elect to treat property that we acquire in connection with a foreclosure of a mortgage loan or from certain leasehold terminations as “foreclosure property,” we may thereby avoid (1) the 100% tax on gain from a resale of that property (if the sale would otherwise constitute a prohibited transaction) and (2) treating any income from such property as non-qualifying for purposes of the REIT gross income tests discussed below, provided however, that the gain from the sale of the property or net income from the operation of the property that would not otherwise qualify for the 75% income test but for the foreclosure property election will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax at the highest applicable rate (currently 21%).
     
  · If we fail to satisfy the 75% gross income test or the 95% gross income test, as discussed below, but nonetheless maintain our qualification as a REIT because other requirements are met, we will be subject to a 100% tax on an amount equal to (1) the greater of (A) the amount by which we fail the 75% gross income test or (B) the amount by which we fail the 95% gross income test, as the case may be, multiplied by (2) a fraction intended to reflect profitability.

 

 

 

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  · If we fail to satisfy any of the REIT asset tests, as described below, other than a failure of the 5% or 10% REIT asset tests that do not exceed a statutory de minimis amount as described more fully below, but our failure is due to reasonable cause and not due to willful neglect and we nonetheless maintain our REIT qualification because of specified cure provisions, we will be required to pay a tax equal to the greater of $50,000 or the highest corporate tax rate (currently 21%) of the net income generated by the non-qualifying assets during the period in which we failed to satisfy the asset tests.
     
  · If we fail to satisfy any provision of the Code that would result in our failure to qualify as a REIT (other than a gross income or asset test requirement) and the violation is due to reasonable cause and not due to willful neglect, we may retain our REIT qualification but we will be required to pay a penalty of $50,000 for each such failure.
     
  · If we fail to distribute during each calendar year at least the sum of (1) 85% of our REIT ordinary income for such year, (2) 95% of our REIT capital gain net income for such year and (3) any undistributed taxable income from prior periods (or the required distribution), we will be subject to a 4% excise tax on the excess of the required distribution over the sum of (A) the amounts actually distributed (taking into account excess distributions from prior years), plus (B) retained amounts on which income tax is paid at the corporate level.
     
  · We may be required to pay monetary penalties to the IRS in certain circumstances, including if we fail to meet record-keeping requirements intended to monitor our compliance with rules relating to the composition of our shareholders, as described below in “—Requirements for Qualification as a REIT.”
     
  · A 100% excise tax may be imposed on some items of income and expense that are directly or constructively paid between us and any TRS, and any other TRSs we may own if and to the extent that the IRS successfully adjusts the reported amounts of these items because the reported amounts were not consistent with arm’s length amounts.
     
  · If we acquire appreciated assets from a corporation that is not a REIT in a transaction in which the adjusted tax basis of the assets in our hands is determined by reference to the adjusted tax basis of the assets in the hands of the non-REIT corporation, we may be subject to tax on such appreciation at the highest corporate income tax rate then applicable if we subsequently recognize gain on a disposition of any such assets during the 10-year period following their acquisition from the non-REIT corporation.
     
  · We may elect to retain and pay U.S. federal income tax on our net long-term capital gain. In that case, a shareholder would include its proportionate share of our undistributed long-term capital gain in its income (to the extent we make a timely designation of such gain to the shareholder), would be deemed to have paid the tax that it paid on such gain, and would be allowed a credit for its proportionate share of the tax deemed to have been paid, and an adjustment would be made to increase the shareholder’s basis in our common shares.
     
  · We may own subsidiaries that will elect to be treated as TRSs and we may hold equity interests in our borrowers or other investments through such TRSs, the earnings of which will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax.
     
  · We will generally be subject to tax on the portion of any excess inclusion income derived from an investment in residual interests in real estate mortgage investment conduits (“REMICs”) or “taxable mortgage pools” to the extent our stock is held in record name by specified tax-exempt organizations not subject to tax on unrelated business tax income (“UBTI”) or non-U.S. sovereign investors.

 

In addition, we may be subject to a variety of taxes other than U.S. federal income tax, including state, local, and non-U.S. income, franchise property and other taxes.

 

 

 

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Requirements for Qualification as a REIT

 

The Code defines a REIT as a corporation, trust or association:

 

  (1) that is managed by one or more trustees or directors;
     
  (2) the beneficial ownership of which is evidenced by transferable shares or by transferable certificates of beneficial interest;
     
  (3) that would be taxable as a domestic corporation but for its election to be subject to tax as a REIT under Code Sections 856 through 860;
     
  (4) that is neither a financial institution nor an insurance company subject to specific provisions of the Code;
     
  (5) commencing with its second REIT taxable year, the beneficial ownership of which is held by 100 or more persons during at least 335 days of a taxable year of 12 months, or during a proportionate part of a taxable year of less than 12 months;
     
  (6) in which, commencing with its second REIT taxable year, during the last half of each taxable year, not more than 50% in value of the outstanding stock is owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer “individuals” as defined in the Code to include specified entities (the “5/50 Test”);
     
  (7) that makes an election to be a REIT for the current taxable year or has made such an election for a previous taxable year that has not been terminated or revoked and satisfies all relevant filing and other administrative requirements established by the IRS that must be met to elect and maintain REIT status;
     
  (8) that has no earnings and profits from any non-REIT taxable year at the close of any taxable year;
     
  (9) that uses the calendar year for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and complies with the record-keeping requirements of the Code and the regulations promulgated thereunder; and
     
  (10) that meets other tests described below, including with respect to the nature of its income and assets and the amount of its distributions.

 

We intend to file a timely election on IRS Form 8832 to be treated as an association taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes with effect from our date of formation. Accordingly, we believe we will satisfy the threshold requirement that we be a corporation, trust or association. For purposes of condition (1), “directors” generally means persons treated as “directors” for purposes of the Investment Company Act, which we believe includes the Manager. Our shares are generally freely transferable, and we believe that the restrictions on ownership and transfers of the Company’s shares do not prevent us from satisfying condition (2). Although we are organized as a limited liability company, for U.S. federal income tax purposes we elected to be classified as a corporation in compliance with condition (3). Conditions (5) and (6) do not need to be satisfied for the first taxable year for which an election to become a REIT has been made. We believe that the shares sold in this offering will allow us to timely comply with condition (6). However, depending on the number of shareholders who subscribe for shares in this offering and the timing of subscriptions, we may need to conduct an additional offering of preferred shares to timely comply with (5). For purposes of determining stock ownership under condition (6) above, a supplemental unemployment compensation benefits plan, a private foundation and a portion of a trust permanently set aside or used exclusively for charitable purposes generally are each considered an individual. A trust that is a qualified trust under Code Section 401(a) generally is not considered an individual, and beneficiaries of a qualified trust are treated as holding shares of a REIT in proportion to their actuarial interests in the trust for purposes of condition (6) above. To monitor compliance with the share ownership requirements, we are generally required to maintain records regarding the actual ownership of our shares. Provided we comply with these recordkeeping requirements and that we would not otherwise have reason to believe we fail the 5/50 Test after exercising reasonable diligence, we will be deemed to have satisfied the 5/50 Test. In addition, our operating agreement provides restrictions regarding the ownership and transfer of our shares, which are intended to assist us in satisfying the share ownership requirements described above.

 

 

 

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For purposes of condition (7) above, we intend to elect to be treated as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes, in accordance with the applicable regulations, by figuring our income in accordance with the REIT provisions of U.S. federal income tax law on a timely filed IRS Form 1120-REIT for the year 2022.

 

For purposes of condition (9) above, we will have used and will continue to use a calendar year for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and we intend to continue to comply with the applicable recordkeeping requirements.

 

Effect of Subsidiary Entities

 

Ownership of Partnership Interests

 

In the case of a REIT that is a partner in an entity that is treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, the REIT is deemed to own its proportionate share of the partnership’s assets and to earn its proportionate share of the partnership’s gross income based on its pro rata share of capital interests in the partnership for purposes of the asset and gross income tests applicable to REITs, as described below. However, solely for purposes of the 10% value test, described below, the determination of a REIT’s interest in partnership assets will be based on the REIT’s proportionate interest in any securities issued by the partnership, excluding for these purposes, certain excluded securities as described in the Code. For purposes of determining the amount of the REIT’s taxable income that must be distributed, or is subject to tax, the REIT’s share of partnership income is determined under the partnership tax provisions of the Code and will reflect any special allocations of income or loss that are not in proportion to capital interests. Income earned through partnerships retains its character for U.S. federal income tax purposes when allocated among its partners. We intend to obtain covenants from any partnerships in which we invest but do not control to operate in compliance with the REIT requirements, but we may not control any particular partnership into which we invest, and thus no assurance can be given that any such partnerships will not operate in a manner that causes us to fail an income or asset test requirement. In general, partnerships are not subject to U.S. federal income tax. However, a partnership in which we invest may be required to pay the hypothetical increase in partner-level taxes resulting from an adjustment of partnership tax items on audit.

 

Disregarded Subsidiaries

 

If a REIT owns a corporate subsidiary that is a “qualified REIT subsidiary,” that subsidiary is disregarded for U.S. federal income tax purposes, and all assets, liabilities and items of income, deduction and credit of the subsidiary are treated as assets, liabilities and items of income, deduction and credit of the REIT itself, including for purposes of the gross income and asset tests applicable to REITs, as summarized below. A qualified REIT subsidiary is any corporation, other than a TRS, that is wholly owned by a REIT, by other disregarded subsidiaries of a REIT or by a combination of the two. Single member limited liability companies or other domestic unincorporated entities that are wholly owned by a REIT are also generally disregarded as separate entities for U.S. federal income tax purposes, including for purposes of the REIT gross income and asset tests unless they elect TRS status. Disregarded subsidiaries, along with partnerships in which we hold an equity interest, we sometimes refer to as “pass-through subsidiaries.”

 

In the event that a disregarded subsidiary ceases to be wholly owned by us (for example, if any equity interest in the subsidiary is acquired by a person other than us or another disregarded subsidiary of ours), the subsidiary’s separate existence would no longer be disregarded for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Instead, it would have multiple owners and would be treated as either a partnership or a taxable corporation. Such an event could, depending on the circumstances, adversely affect our ability to satisfy the various asset and gross income tests applicable to REITs, including the requirement that REITs generally may not own, directly or indirectly, more than 10% of the value or voting power of the outstanding securities of another corporation. See “—Asset Tests” and “—Gross Income Tests.”

 

 

 

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Taxable REIT Subsidiaries

 

A REIT, in general, may jointly elect with a subsidiary corporation, whether or not wholly owned, to treat the subsidiary corporation as a TRS. The separate existence of a TRS or other taxable corporation, unlike a disregarded subsidiary as discussed above, is not ignored for U.S. federal income tax purposes. Accordingly, such an entity would generally be subject to U.S. federal income tax on its taxable income, which may reduce the cash flow generated by us and our subsidiaries in the aggregate and our ability to make distributions to our shareholders.

 

A REIT is not treated as holding the assets of a TRS or other taxable subsidiary corporation or as receiving any income that the subsidiary earns. Rather, the stock issued by the subsidiary is an asset in the hands of the REIT, and the REIT generally recognizes dividend income when it receives distributions of earnings from the subsidiary. This treatment can affect the gross income and asset test calculations that apply to the REIT, as described below. Because a parent REIT does not include the assets and income of its TRSs in determining the parent REIT’s compliance with the REIT requirements, such entities may be used by the parent REIT to undertake indirectly activities that the REIT rules might otherwise preclude the parent REIT from doing directly or through pass-through subsidiaries. If dividends are paid to us by one or more domestic TRSs we may own, a portion of the dividends that we distribute to shareholders who are taxed at individual rates generally will be eligible for taxation at preferential qualified dividend income tax rates rather than at ordinary income rates. See “—Taxation of Taxable U.S. Shareholders” and “—Annual Distribution Requirements.”

 

We may hold any equity interests we receive in our borrowers or certain other investments through one or more TRSs. While we intend to manage the size of our TRSs and dividends from our TRSs in a manner that permits us to qualify as a REIT, it is possible that the equity investments appreciate to the point where our TRSs exceed the thresholds mandated by the REIT rules. In such cases, we could lose our REIT status if we are unable to satisfy certain exceptions for failing to satisfy the REIT income and asset tests. In any event, any earnings attributable to equity interests held in TRSs will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax.

 

To the extent we hold an interest in a non-U.S. TRS, potentially including a CDO investment, we may be required to include our portion of its earnings in our income irrespective of whether or not such non-U.S. TRS has made any distributions. Any such income will not be qualifying income for purposes of the 75% gross income test and may not be qualifying income for purposes of the 95% gross income test.

 

Certain Equity Investments and Kickers

 

We expect to hold certain equity investments (with rights to receive preferred economic returns) in entities treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes and may hold “kickers” in entities treated as partnerships for U.S. federal income tax purposes (and may hold such a kicker outside of a TRS). When we hold investments treated as equity in partnerships, as discussed above, for purposes of the REIT income and asset tests we are required to include our proportionate share of the assets and income of the partnership, based on our share of partnership capital, as if we owned such share of the issuer’s assets directly. As a result, any nonqualifying income generated, or nonqualifying assets held, by the partnerships in which we hold such equity could jeopardize our compliance with the REIT income and asset tests. We intend to obtain covenants from our equity issuers (including a kicker issuer if the kicker is held outside of a TRS) to operate in compliance with the REIT requirements, but we generally will not control such issuers, and thus no assurance can be given that any such issuers will not operate in a manner that causes us to fail an income or asset test requirement. Moreover, at least one IRS internal memorandum would treat the preferred return on certain equity investments as interest income for purposes of the REIT income tests, which treatment would cause such amounts to be nonqualifying income for purposes of the 75% gross income test. Although we do not believe that interest income treatment is appropriate, and that analysis was not followed in subsequent IRS private letter rulings, the IRS could re-assert that position.

 

The proper characterization of certain equity investments (with rights to receive preferred economic returns) as unsecured indebtedness or as equity for U.S. federal income tax purposes may be unclear. Characterization of such an equity investment as unsecured debt for U.S. federal income tax purposes would subject the investment to the various asset test limitations on investments in unsecured debt, and our preferred return would be treated as non-qualifying income for purposes of the 75% gross income test (but we would not have to include our share of the underlying assets and income of the issuer in our tests). Thus, if the IRS successfully challenged our characterization of an investment as equity for U.S. federal income tax purposes, or successfully treated a preferred return as interest income, we could fail an income or asset test. In that event, we could face substantial penalty taxes to cure the resulting violations, as described in “Failure to Qualify” below, or, if we were deemed to have acted unreasonably in making the investment, lose our REIT status.

 

 

 

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Gross Income Tests

 

In order to maintain our qualification as a REIT, we annually must satisfy two gross income tests. First, at least 75% of our gross income for each taxable year, excluding gross income from sales of inventory or dealer property in “prohibited transactions” and certain hedging and foreign currency transactions, must be derived from investments relating to real property or mortgages on real property, including “rents from real property,” dividends received from and gains from the disposition of other shares of REITs, interest income derived from mortgage loans secured by real property or interests in real property, and gains from the sale of real estate assets (other than certain debt instruments of publicly offered REITs), as well as income from certain kinds of temporary investments. Interest and gain on debt instruments issued by publicly offered REITs that are not secured by mortgages on real property or interests in real property are not qualifying income for purposes of the 75% income test. Second, at least 95% of our gross income in each taxable year, excluding gross income from prohibited transactions and certain hedging and foreign currency transactions, must be derived from some combination of income that qualifies under the 75% income test described above, as well as other dividends, interest, and gain from the sale or disposition of stock or securities, which need not have any relation to real property. 

 

Dividend Income

 

We may receive material distributions from our TRSs. These distributions are generally classified as dividend income to the extent of the earnings and profits of the distributing corporation. Such distributions generally constitute qualifying income for purposes of the 95% gross income test, but not the 75% gross income test.

 

If we invest in an entity treated as a “passive investment foreign company” or “controlled foreign corporation” for U.S. federal income tax purposes, which could include a CDO investment, we could be required to include our portion of its earnings in our income prior to the receipt of any distributions. Any such income inclusions would not be treated as qualifying income for purposes of the 75% gross income test and may not be qualifying income for purposes of the 95% gross income test.

 

Hedging Transactions

 

We may enter into hedging transactions with respect to one or more of our assets or liabilities. Hedging transactions could take a variety of forms, including interest rate swap agreements, interest rate cap agreements, options, forward rate agreements or similar financial instruments. Except to the extent provided by Treasury regulations (which have not been proposed or finalized), any income from a hedging transaction, including gain from the sale or disposition of such a transaction, will not constitute gross income for purposes of the 75% or 95% gross income test if (i) we enter into the hedging transaction in the normal course of business primarily to manage risk of interest rate or price changes or currency fluctuations with respect to borrowings made or to be made, or ordinary obligations incurred or to be incurred, to acquire or carry real estate assets, and the hedge is clearly identified as specified in Treasury regulations before the close of the day on which it was acquired, originated, or entered into, or (ii) we enter into the hedging transaction primarily to manage risk of currency fluctuations with respect to any item of income or gain that would be qualifying income under the 75% or 95% gross income tests and the hedge is clearly identified as such before the close of the day on which it was acquired, originated, or entered into or (iii) we enter into the hedging transaction that hedges against transactions described in clause (i) or (ii) and is entered into in connection with the extinguishment of debt or sale of property that are being hedged against by the transactions described in clauses (i) or (ii) and the hedge complies with certain identification requirements. To the extent that we enter into other types of hedging transactions, including hedges of interest rates on debt we acquire as assets, the income from those transactions is likely to be treated as non-qualifying income for purposes of both of the 75% and 95% gross income tests. We intend to structure any hedging transactions in a manner that does not jeopardize our qualification as a REIT, but we cannot assure you that we will be successful in this regard.

 

 

 

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Rents from Real Property

 

We expect to acquire interests in real property (through majority-owned subsidiaries with rights to receive preferred economic returns) and may acquire other interests in real property (including equity participations). However, to the extent that we own real property or interests therein, rents we receive qualify as “rents from real property” in satisfying the gross income tests described above, only if several conditions are met, including the following. If rent attributable to personal property leased in connection with a lease of real property is greater than 15% of the total rent received under any particular lease, then all of the rent attributable to such personal property will not qualify as rents from real property. The determination of whether an item of personal property constitutes real or personal property under the REIT provisions of the Code is subject to both legal and factual considerations and therefore can be subject to different interpretations.

 

In addition, in order for rents received by us to qualify as “rents from real property,” the rent must not be based in whole or in part on the income or profits of any person. However, an amount will not be excluded from rents from real property solely by reason of being based on a fixed percentage or percentages of sales or if it is based on the net income of a tenant which derives substantially all of its income with respect to such property from subleasing of substantially all of such property, to the extent that the rents paid by the subtenants would qualify as rents from real property, if earned directly by us. Moreover, for rents received to qualify as “rents from real property,” we generally must not furnish or render certain services to the tenants of such property, other than through an “independent contractor” who is adequately compensated and from which we derive no income or through a TRS. We are permitted, however, to perform services that are “usually or customarily rendered” in connection with the rental of space for occupancy only and are not otherwise considered rendered to the occupant of the property. In addition, we may directly or indirectly provide non-customary services to tenants of our properties without disqualifying all of the rent from the property if the payment for such services or, if greater, 150% of our cost of providing such services, does not exceed 1% of the total gross income from the property. In such a case, only the amounts for non-customary services are not treated as rents from real property and the provision of the services does not disqualify the related rent.

 

Rental income will qualify as rents from real property only to the extent that we do not directly or constructively own, (1) in the case of any tenant which is a corporation, stock possessing 10% or more of the total combined voting power of all classes of stock entitled to vote, or 10% or more of the total value of shares of all classes of stock of such tenant, or (2) in the case of any tenant which is not a corporation, an interest of 10% or more in the assets or net profits of such tenant.

 

Phantom Income

 

Due to the nature of the assets in which we may invest, we may be required to recognize taxable income from those assets in advance of our receipt of cash flow on or proceeds from disposition of such assets and may be required to report taxable income in early periods that exceeds the economic income ultimately realized on such assets.

 

Because of such potential timing differences between income recognition or expense deduction and cash receipts or disbursements, there is a significant risk that we may have substantial taxable income in excess of cash available for distribution. In that event, we may need to borrow funds or take other action to satisfy the REIT distribution requirements for the taxable year in which this “phantom income” is recognized. See “—Annual Distribution Requirements.”

 

Failure to Satisfy the Gross Income Tests

 

We intend to monitor our sources of income, including any non-qualifying income received by us, and manage our assets so as to ensure our compliance with the gross income tests. We cannot assure you, however, that we will be able to satisfy the gross income tests. If we fail to satisfy one or both of the 75% or 95% gross income tests for any taxable year, we may still qualify as a REIT for the year if we are entitled to relief under applicable provisions of the Code. These relief provisions will generally be available if our failure to meet these tests was due to reasonable cause and not due to willful neglect and, following the identification of such failure, we set forth a description of each item of our gross income that satisfies the gross income tests in a schedule for the taxable year filed in accordance with the Treasury Regulations. It is not possible to state whether we would be entitled to the benefit of these relief provisions in all circumstances. If these relief provisions are inapplicable to a particular set of circumstances involving us, we will not qualify as a REIT. As discussed above under “—Taxation of REITs in General,” even where these relief provisions apply, a tax would be imposed upon the profit attributable to the amount by which we fail to satisfy the particular gross income test.

 

 

 

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Asset Tests

 

At the close of each calendar quarter, we must also satisfy five tests relating to the nature of our assets. First, at least 75% of the value of our total assets must be represented by some combination of “real estate assets,” cash, cash items, and U.S. Government securities. For this purpose, real estate assets include loans secured by mortgages on real property to the extent described below, certain mezzanine loans and mortgage-backed securities as described below, interests in real property (such as land, buildings, leasehold interests in real property), shares in other qualifying REITs and stock or debt instruments held for less than one year purchased with the proceeds from an offering of shares of our stock or certain debt. Second, not more than 25% of our assets may be represented by securities other than those in the 75% asset test. Third, of the assets that do not qualify for purposes of the 75% test and that are not securities of our TRSs: (i) the value of any one issuer’s securities owned by us may not exceed 5% of the value of our gross assets, and (i) we generally may not own more than 10% of any one issuer’s outstanding securities, as measured by either voting power or value. Fourth, the aggregate value of all securities of TRSs held by us may not exceed 20% of the value of our gross assets. Fifth, not more than 25% of the value of our gross assets may be represented by nonqualified publicly offered REIT debt instruments (i.e., that are not secured by mortgages on real property or interests in real property).

 

Securities for purposes of the asset tests may include debt securities that are not fully secured by a mortgage on real property (or treated as such). However, the 10% value test does not apply to certain “straight debt” and other excluded securities, as described in the Code, including any loan to an individual or an estate, any obligation to pay rents from real property and any security issued by a REIT. In addition, (1) a REIT’s interest as a partner in a partnership is not considered a security for purposes of applying the 10% value test; (2) any debt instrument issued by a partnership (other than straight debt or other excluded security) will not be considered a security issued by the partnership if at least 75% of the partnership’s gross income is derived from sources that would qualify for the 75% REIT gross income test; and (3) any debt instrument issued by a partnership (other than straight debt or other excluded security) will not be considered a security issued by the partnership to the extent of the REIT’s interest as a partner in the partnership.

 

For purposes of the 10% value test, “straight debt” means a written unconditional promise to pay on demand on a specified date a sum certain in money if (1) the debt is not convertible, directly or indirectly, into stock and (2) the interest rate and interest payment dates are not contingent on profits, the borrower’s discretion, or similar factors other than certain contingencies relating to the timing and amount of principal and interest payments, as described in the Code. In the case of an issuer which is a corporation or a partnership, securities that otherwise would be considered straight debt will not be so considered if we, and any of our “controlled taxable REIT subsidiaries” as defined in the Code, hold any securities of the corporate or partnership issuer which (A) are not straight debt or other excluded securities (prior to the application of this rule), and (B) have an aggregate value greater than 1% of the issuer’s outstanding securities (including, for the purposes of a partnership issuer, our interest as a partner in the partnership). As a result, the straight debt exception would not be available to us with respect to a loan where we also hold an equity participation in the borrower through a TRS.

 

Except as provided below, a real estate mortgage loan that we own generally will be treated as a real estate asset for purposes of the 75% REIT asset test if, on the date that we acquire or originate the mortgage loan, the value of the real property securing the loan is equal to or greater than the principal amount of the loan. Existing IRS guidance provides that certain rules described above that are applicable to the gross income tests may apply to determine what portion of a mortgage loan will be treated as a real estate asset if the mortgage loan is secured both by real property and other assets. Under special guidance issued by the IRS, if the value of the mortgage loan exceeds the greater of the current value of the real property securing the loan and the value of the real property securing the loan at the time we committed to acquire the loan, such excess will not be a qualifying real estate asset. Furthermore, we may be required to retest modified loans to determine if the modified loan is adequately secured by real property as of the modification date if the modification results in a taxable exchange. However, under special guidance issued by the IRS, if a loan modification occurred as a result of default or we reasonably believed that there was a significant risk of default and the modification reduced such risk, we generally would not be required to retest such modified loan. Notwithstanding the foregoing, as discussed above under “ – Gross Income Tests – Interest Income,” a mortgage loan secured by both real property and personal property will be treated as a wholly qualifying real estate asset if the fair market value of such personal property does not exceed 15% of the total fair market value of all such property, even if the real property collateral is less than the outstanding principal balance on the loan.

 

 

 

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As discussed above under “—Gross Income Tests,” there may be circumstances in which our mezzanine loans do not comply with the safe harbor under Revenue Procedure 2003-65. To the extent that any of our mezzanine loans do not meet all of the requirements for reliance on the safe harbor set forth in the Revenue Procedure, such loans may not be real estate assets and could adversely affect our REIT status.

 

As discussed above under “—Gross Income Tests,” participation interests in investments that we acquire may not be treated as direct interests in the underlying asset, which may cause the participation interest to not qualify as a real estate asset. While we intend that any such participation interests will be structured in a manner so as to be treated for REIT purposes as equivalent to a direct interest in the loan, and therefore, as a real estate asset, there can be no guarantee that such treatment will be respected by the IRS.

 

We may enter into repurchase agreements under which we will nominally sell certain of our assets to a counterparty and simultaneously enter into an agreement to repurchase the sold assets. We generally believe that we will be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as the owner of the assets that are the subject of any such repurchase agreement and the repurchase agreement will be treated as a secured lending transaction notwithstanding that we may transfer record ownership of the assets to the counterparty during the term of the agreement. It is possible, however, that the IRS could successfully assert that we did not own the assets during the term of the repurchase agreement, which could impact our REIT status.

 

We believe that our assets will be structured in a manner that will comply with the foregoing REIT asset requirements and we intend to monitor compliance on an ongoing basis. We cannot assure you, however, that we will be successful in this effort. In this regard, to determine compliance with these requirements, we will need to estimate the value of our assets. We may not obtain independent appraisals to support our conclusions as to the values of our assets. In many cases, the values may not be susceptible to a precise determination and will be subject to change in the future. In some cases, we may rely on our own valuation that differs from the value determined by an appraiser. We cannot assure you that the IRS will not disagree with our determinations and assert that a different value is applicable, in which case we might not satisfy the 75% asset test and the other asset tests and could fail to qualify as a REIT.

 

Failure to Satisfy Asset Tests

 

After initially meeting the asset tests at the close of any quarter, we will not lose our qualification as a REIT for failure to satisfy the asset tests at the end of a later quarter solely by reason of changes in asset values. If we fail to satisfy the asset tests because we acquire assets during a quarter, we can cure this failure by disposing of sufficient non-qualifying assets within 30 days after the close of that quarter. If we fail the 5% asset test, or the 10% vote or value asset tests at the end of any quarter and such failure is not cured within 30 days thereafter, we may dispose of sufficient assets (generally within six months after the last day of the quarter in which the identification of the failure to satisfy these asset tests occurred) to cure such a violation that does not exceed the lesser of 1% of our assets at the end of the relevant quarter or $10,000,000. If we fail any of the other asset tests or our failure of the 5% and 10% asset tests is in excess of the de minimis amount described above, as long as such failure was due to reasonable cause and not willful neglect, we are permitted to avoid disqualification as a REIT, after the 30 day cure period, by taking steps, including the disposition of sufficient assets to meet the asset test (generally within six months after the last day of the quarter in which we identified the failure to satisfy the REIT asset test) and paying a tax equal to the greater of $50,000 or the highest corporate income tax rate (currently 21%) of the net income generated by the non-qualifying assets during the period in which we failed to satisfy the asset test.

 

Annual Distribution Requirements

 

In order to qualify as a REIT, we are required to distribute dividends, other than capital gain dividends, to our shareholders in an amount at least equal to:

 

  (a) the sum of:

 

  · 90% of our “REIT taxable income” (computed without regard to its deduction for dividends paid and its net capital gains); and
     
  · 90% of the net income (after tax), if any, from foreclosure property (as described below); minus

 

  (b) the sum of specified items of non-cash income that exceeds a percentage of our income.

 

 

 

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These distributions must be paid in the taxable year to which they relate or in the following taxable year if such distributions are declared in October, November or December of the taxable year, are payable to shareholders of record on a specified date in any such month and are actually paid before the end of January of the following year. Such distributions are treated as both paid by us and received by each shareholder on December 31 of the year in which they are declared. In addition, at our election, a distribution for a taxable year may be declared before we timely file our tax return for the year and be paid with or before the first regular dividend payment after such declaration, provided that such payment is made during the 12-month period following the close of such taxable year. These distributions are taxable to our shareholders in the year in which paid, even though the distributions relate to our prior taxable year for purposes of the 90% distribution requirement.

 

In order for distributions to be counted towards our distribution requirement and to give rise to a tax deduction by us, they must not be “preferential dividends.” A dividend is not a preferential dividend if it is pro rata among all outstanding shares of stock within a particular class and is in accordance with the preferences among different classes of stock as set forth in the organizational documents. To avoid paying preferential dividends, we must treat every shareholder of the class of shares with respect to which we make a distribution the same as every other shareholder of that class, and we must not treat any class of shares other than according to its dividend rights as a class. Under certain technical rules governing deficiency dividends, we could lose our ability to cure an under-distribution in a year with a subsequent year deficiency dividend if we pay preferential dividends. Preferential dividends potentially include “dividend equivalent redemptions.” Accordingly, we intend to pay dividends pro rata within each class, and to abide by the rights and preferences of each class of the Company’s shares if there is more than one and will seek to avoid dividend equivalent redemptions. (See “— Taxation of U.S. Shareholders — Redemptions of Common Shares” below for a discussion of when redemptions are dividend equivalent and measures we intend to take to avoid them.). If, however, we qualify as a “publicly offered REIT” (within the meaning of Code Section 562(c)) in the future, the preferential dividend rules will cease to apply to us. In addition, the IRS is authorized to provide alternative remedies to cure a failure to comply with the preferential dividend rules, but as of the date hereof has not proposed or issued any relevant guidance.

 

To the extent that we distribute at least 90%, but less than 100%, of our “REIT taxable income,” as adjusted, we will be subject to tax at ordinary U.S. federal corporate tax rates on the retained portion. In addition, we may elect to retain, rather than distribute, our net long-term capital gains and pay tax on such gains. In that case, we could elect to have our shareholders include their proportionate share of such undistributed long-term capital gains in income and receive a corresponding credit or refund, as the case may be, for their proportionate share of the tax paid by us. Our shareholders would then increase the adjusted basis of their stock in us by the difference between the designated amounts included in their long-term capital gains and the tax deemed paid with respect to their proportionate shares.

 

If we fail to distribute during each calendar year at least the sum of (1) 85% of our REIT ordinary income for such year, (2) 95% of our REIT capital gain net income for such year and (3) any undistributed taxable income from prior periods, we will be subject to a 4% excise tax on the excess of such required distribution over the sum of (x) the amounts actually distributed (taking into account excess distributions from prior periods) and (y) the amounts of income retained on which we have paid corporate income tax. We intend to make timely distributions so that we are not subject to the 4% excise tax.

 

It is possible that, from time to time, we may not have sufficient cash from operations to meet the distribution requirements. For example, timing differences may arise between the actual receipt of cash and the inclusion of the corresponding items in income by us for U.S. federal income tax purposes prior to receipt of such income in cash or non-deductible expenditures. See “—Gross Income Tests— Phantom Income” above. In the event that such shortfalls occur, to meet our distribution requirements it might be necessary to arrange for short-term, or possibly long-term, borrowings, use cash reserves, liquidate non-cash assets at rates or times that we regard as unfavorable or pay dividends in the form of taxable stock dividends. In the case of a taxable stock dividend, shareholders would be required to include the dividend as income and would be required to satisfy the tax liability associated with the distribution with cash from other sources.

 

We may be able to rectify a failure to meet the distribution requirements for a year by paying “deficiency dividends” to shareholders in a later year, which may be included in our deduction for dividends paid for the earlier year. In this case, we may be able to avoid losing our qualification as a REIT or being taxed on amounts distributed as deficiency dividends. However, we will be required to pay interest and a penalty based on the amount of any deduction taken for deficiency dividends.

 

 

 

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In the event that we undertake a transaction (such as a tax-free merger) in which we succeed to earnings and profits of a taxable corporation, in addition to the distribution requirements above we also must distribute such non-REIT earnings and profits to our shareholders by the close the taxable year of the transaction. Such additional dividends are not deductible against our REIT taxable income. We may be able to rectify a failure to distribute any such non-REIT earnings and profits by making distributions in a later year comparable to deficiency dividends noted above and paying an interest charge.

 

Liquidating distributions generally will be treated as dividends for purposes of the above rules to the extent of current earnings and profits in the year paid provided we complete our liquidation within 24 months following our adoption of a plan of liquidation. Compliance with this 24-month requirement could require us to sell assets at unattractive prices, distribute unsold assets to a “liquidating trust” for the benefit of our shareholders, or terminate our status as a REIT. The U.S. federal income tax treatment of a beneficial interest in a liquidating trust would vary significantly from the U.S. federal income treatment of ownership of our shares.

 

Excess Inclusion Income

 

If we directly or indirectly acquire a residual interest in a REMIC or equity interests in a taxable mortgage pool, a portion of our income from such arrangements may be treated as “excess inclusion income.” See “—Effect of Subsidiary Entities—Taxable Mortgage Pools.” We are required to allocate any excess inclusion income to our shareholders in proportion to their dividends. We would be subject to U.S. corporate tax to the extent of any excess inclusion income from the REMIC residual interest or taxable mortgage pool that is allocable to the percentage of our shares held in record name by “disqualified organizations,” which are generally certain cooperatives, governmental entities and tax-exempt organizations that are exempt from tax on unrelated business taxable income. Our operating agreement allows us to deduct such taxes from the distributions otherwise payable to the responsible disqualified organizations. Because this tax would be imposed on us, however, unless we can recover the tax out of distributions to the disqualified holders, all of our investors, including investors that are not disqualified organizations, would bear a portion of the tax cost associated with the classification of us or a portion of our assets as a taxable mortgage pool.

 

Shareholders who are not disqualified organizations will have to treat our dividends as excess inclusion income to the extent of their allocable shares of our excess inclusion income. This income cannot be offset by net operating losses of our shareholders. If the shareholder is a tax-exempt entity and not a disqualified organization, this income is fully taxable as unrelated business taxable income under Code Section 512. If the shareholder is a foreign person, it would be subject to U.S. federal income tax withholding on this income without reduction or exemption pursuant to any otherwise applicable income tax treaty. If the shareholder is a REIT, a regulated investment company, common trust fund or other pass-through entity, the shareholder’s allocable share of our excess inclusion income could be considered excess inclusion income of such entity.

 

Prohibited Transactions

 

Net income we derive from a prohibited transaction outside of a TRS is subject to a 100% tax unless the transaction qualifies for a statutory safe harbor discussed below. The term “prohibited transaction” generally includes a sale or other disposition of property (other than foreclosure property) that is held as inventory or primarily for sale to customers, in the ordinary course of a trade or business by a REIT. For purposes of this 100% tax, income earned from a shared appreciation provision in a mortgage loan (see below) is treated as if the REIT sold an interest in the underlying property (thus subjecting such income to 100% tax if we hold the shared appreciation mortgage outside of a TRS and the underlying property is inventory or held for sale). The 100% tax will not apply to gains from the sale of property held through a TRS or other taxable corporations (which are taxed at regular corporate rates). Thus, we intend to conduct our operations so that loans or other assets owned by us (or assets that are the subject of a shared appreciation provision that we own) that are inventory or held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business are held through a TRS. However, whether property is held as inventory or “primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business” depends on the particular facts and circumstances, and no assurance can be given that we will be successful in isolating all investments subject to the 100% tax in our TRSs or that we will not engage in prohibited transactions outside of our TRSs.

 

 

 

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Foreclosure Property

 

Foreclosure property is real property and any personal property incident to such real property (1) that is acquired by a REIT as a result of the REIT having bid on the property at foreclosure or having otherwise reduced the property to ownership or possession by agreement or process of law after there was a default (or default was imminent) on a lease of the property or a mortgage loan held by the REIT and secured by the property, (2) for which the related loan or lease was acquired by the REIT at a time when default was not imminent or anticipated and (3) for which such REIT makes a proper election to treat the property as foreclosure property. REITs generally are subject to tax at the maximum U.S. federal corporate rate (currently 21%) on any net income from foreclosure property, including any gain from the disposition of the foreclosure property, other than income that would otherwise be qualifying income for purposes of the 75% gross income test. Any gain from the sale of property for which a foreclosure property election is in effect will not be subject to the 100% tax on gains from prohibited transactions described above, even if the property would otherwise constitute inventory or property held for sale in the hands of the selling REIT.

 

Failure to Qualify

 

In the event that we violate a provision of the Code that would result in our failure to qualify as a REIT, we may nevertheless continue to qualify as a REIT under specified relief provisions available to us to avoid such disqualification if (i) the violation is due to reasonable cause and not due to willful neglect, (ii) we pay a penalty of $50,000 for each failure to satisfy a requirement for qualification as a REIT and (iii) the violation does not include a violation under the gross income or asset tests described above (for which other specified relief provisions are available). This cure provision reduces the instances that could lead to our disqualification as a REIT for violations due to reasonable cause. If we fail to qualify for taxation as a REIT in any taxable year and none of the relief provisions of the Code apply, we will be subject to tax on our taxable income at regular corporate rates. Distributions to our shareholders in any year in which we are not a REIT will not be deductible by us, nor will they be required to be made. In this situation, to the extent of current or accumulated earnings and profits, and, subject to limitations of the Code, distributions to our shareholders will generally be taxable in the case of U.S. shareholders (as defined above) who are individuals at a maximum rate of 20%, and dividends in the hands of our corporate U.S. shareholders may be eligible for the dividends received deduction. Unless we are entitled to relief under the specific statutory provisions, we will also be disqualified from re-electing to be taxed as a REIT for the four taxable years following a year during which qualification was lost. It is not possible to state whether, in all circumstances, we will be entitled to statutory relief.

 

Taxation of Taxable U.S. Shareholders

 

This section summarizes the taxation of U.S. shareholders that are not tax-exempt organizations.

 

Distributions

 

Provided that we qualify as a REIT, distributions made to our taxable U.S. shareholders out of our current or accumulated earnings and profits, and not designated as capital gain dividends, will generally be taken into account by them as ordinary dividend income. Such distributions will not be eligible for the dividends received deduction for corporations. However, prior to January 1, 2026, taxpayers who are individuals are entitled, subject to some limitations and exceptions, to an offsetting deduction equal to 20% of REIT dividends received. Dividends received from REITs are generally not eligible to be taxed at the preferential qualified dividend income rates applicable to individual U.S. shareholders who receive dividends from taxable subchapter C corporations. As discussed above, if we realize excess inclusion income from a residual interest in REMIC or a taxable mortgage pool and allocate such excess inclusion income to a taxable U.S. shareholder, that income cannot be offset by net operating losses of such shareholder. 

 

 

 

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Distributions from us that are designated as capital gain dividends will be taxed to U.S. shareholders as long-term capital gains, to the extent that they do not exceed our actual net capital gain for the taxable year, without regard to the period for which the U.S. shareholder has held our stock. To the extent that we elect under the applicable provisions of the Code to retain our net capital gains, U.S. shareholders will be treated as having received, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, our undistributed capital gains as well as a corresponding credit or refund, as the case may be, for taxes paid by us on such retained capital gains. U.S. shareholders will increase their adjusted tax basis in our common shares by the difference between their allocable share of such retained capital gain and their share of the tax paid by us. Corporate U.S. shareholders may be required to treat up to 20% of some capital gain dividends as ordinary income. Long-term capital gains are generally taxable at maximum U.S. federal rates of 20% in the case of U.S. shareholders who are individuals and 21% for corporations. Capital gains attributable to the sale of depreciable real property held for more than 12 months generally are subject to a 25% maximum U.S. federal income tax rate for U.S. shareholders who are individuals, to the extent of previously claimed depreciation deductions.

 

Distributions from us in excess of our current or accumulated earnings and profits will not be taxable to a U.S. shareholder to the extent that they do not exceed the adjusted tax basis of the U.S. shareholder’s common shares in respect of which the distributions were made, but rather will reduce the adjusted tax basis of these shares. To the extent that such distributions exceed the adjusted tax basis of a U.S. shareholder’s common shares, they will be treated as gain from the disposition of the shares and thus will be included in income as long-term capital gain, or short-term capital gain if the shares have been held for one year or less.

 

To the extent that we have available net operating losses and capital losses carried forward from prior tax years, such losses may reduce the amount of distributions that must be made in order to comply with the REIT distribution requirements. See “—Taxation of the Company” and “—Annual Distribution Requirements.” Such losses, however, are not passed through to U.S. shareholders and do not offset income of U.S. shareholders from other sources, nor do they affect the character of any distributions that are actually made by us. 

 

Dispositions of Our Common Shares

 

In general, capital gains recognized by individuals and other non-corporate U.S. shareholders upon the sale or disposition of shares of our common shares will be subject to a maximum U.S. federal income tax rate of 20%, if such shares were held for more than one year and will be taxed at ordinary income rates (of up to 37%) if such shares were held for one year or less. Capital gains recognized by U.S. shareholders that are corporations are subject to U.S. federal income tax at a maximum rate of 21%, regardless of the corporation’s holding period.

 

Capital losses recognized by individuals and other non-corporate U.S. shareholders upon the disposition of our common shares held for more than one year at the time of disposition will be considered long-term capital losses (or short-term capital losses if the shares have not been held for more than one year) and are generally available only to offset capital gain income of the U.S. shareholder but not ordinary income (except in the case of individuals, who may offset up to $3,000 of ordinary income each year). In addition, any loss upon a sale or exchange of shares of our common shares by an individual or non-corporate U.S. shareholder who has held the shares for six months or less, after applying holding period rules, will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of distributions received from us that were required to be treated by the U.S. shareholder as long-term capital gain. Capital losses recognized by corporations may only be deducted to the extent of recognized capital gains.

 

Redemptions of Common Shares

 

A redemption of shares will be treated under Code Section 302 as a taxable distribution unless the redemption satisfies one of the tests set forth in Code Section 302(b) enabling the redemption to be treated as a sale or exchange of the redeemed shares. A redemption that is not treated as a sale or exchange will be taxed in the same manner as regular distributions (e.g., as ordinary dividend income to the extent paid out of earnings and profits unless properly designated as a capital gain dividend), and a redemption treated as a sale or exchange will be taxed in the same manner as other taxable sales discussed above.

 

 

 

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The redemption will be treated as a sale or exchange if it (i) is “substantially disproportionate” with respect to the shareholder, (ii) results in a “complete termination” of the shareholder’s interest in us, or (iii) is “not essentially equivalent to a dividend” with respect to the shareholder, all within the meaning of Code Section 302(b). In determining whether any of these tests have been met, shares considered to be owned by the shareholder by reason of certain constructive ownership rules set forth in the Code, as well as shares actually owned, must generally be taken into account. Because the determination as to whether any of the alternative tests of Code Section 302(b) is satisfied with respect to any particular redemption will depend upon the facts and circumstances as of the time the determination is made, and the constructive ownership rules are complicated, prospective shareholders are advised to consult their own tax advisors to determine such tax treatment.

 

If a redemption of shares is treated as a distribution that is taxable as a dividend, the amount of the distribution is measured by the amount of cash and the fair market value of the property received by the redeeming shareholder. In addition, although guidance is sparse, the IRS could take the position that shareholders who do not participate in any redemption treated as a dividend should be treated as receiving a constructive stock distribution taxable as a dividend in the amount of the increased percentage ownership in us as a result of the redemption, even though such shareholder did not actually receive cash or other property as a result of such redemption. The amount of any such constructive dividend would be added to any non-redeeming shareholder’s basis in his shares. It also is possible that under certain technical rules relating to the deduction for dividends paid, the IRS could take the position that redemptions taxed as dividends impair our ability to satisfy our distribution requirements under the Code. To avoid certain issues related to our ability to comply with the REIT distribution requirements (see “— Qualification as a REIT — Annual Distribution Requirements”), we have implemented procedures designed to track our shareholders’ percentage interests in our common shares and identify any such dividend equivalent redemptions, and we will decline to effect a redemption to the extent that we believe that it would constitute a dividend equivalent redemption. However, we cannot assure you that we will be successful in preventing all dividend equivalent redemptions. In general, the U.S. federal income tax rules applicable to REITs likely will require us to complete our liquidation within 24 months following our adoption of a plan of liquidation. Compliance with this 24-month requirement could require us to distribute unsold assets to a “liquidating trust.” Each shareholder would be treated as receiving a liquidating distribution equal to the value of the liquidating trust interests received by the shareholder. The U.S. federal income tax treatment of ownership an interest in any such liquidating trust would differ materially from the U.S. federal income tax treatment of an investment in our shares.

 

Liquidating Distributions

 

Once we have adopted (or are deemed to have adopted) a plan of liquidation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, liquidating distributions received by a U.S. shareholder with respect to our common shares will be treated first as a recovery of the shareholder’s basis in the shares (computed separately for each block of shares) and thereafter as gain from the disposition of our common shares.

 

Medicare Tax on Unearned Income

 

U.S. shareholders that are individuals, estates or trusts may be required to pay an additional 3.8% tax on, among other things, dividends on and capital gains realized from the sale or other disposition of stock. U.S. shareholders should consult their tax advisors regarding the effect, if any, of this legislation on their ownership and disposition of our common shares.

 

Taxation of Tax-Exempt U.S. Shareholders

 

U.S. tax-exempt entities generally are exempt from U.S. federal income taxation. However, they are subject to taxation on their UBTI. While many investments in real estate may generate UBTI, the IRS has ruled that regular distributions from a REIT to a tax-exempt entity do not constitute UBTI. Based on that ruling, and provided that (1) a tax-exempt U.S. shareholder has not held our common shares as “debt-financed property” within the meaning of the Code (that is, where the acquisition or holding of the property is financed through a borrowing by the tax-exempt shareholder) and (2) we do not hold REMIC residual interests or interests in a taxable mortgage pool that gives rise to “excess inclusion income,” distributions from us and income from the sale of our common shares generally should not give rise to UBTI to a tax-exempt U.S. shareholder. Excess inclusion income from REMIC residual interests or interests in a taxable mortgage pool, if any, that we allocate to a tax-exempt U.S. shareholder will be treated as UBTI (or, in the case of a disqualified organization, taxable to us). See “—Excess Inclusion Income.”

 

 

 

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Tax-exempt U.S. shareholders that are social clubs, voluntary employee benefit associations, supplemental unemployment benefit trusts, and qualified group legal services plans exempt from U.S. federal income taxation under Code Sections 501(c)(7), (c)(9), (c)(17) and (c)(20), respectively, are subject to different UBTI rules, which generally will require them to characterize distributions from us as UBTI.

 

In general, the U.S. federal income tax rules applicable to REITs will require us to complete our liquidation within 24 months following our adoption of a plan of liquidation. Compliance with this 24-month requirement could require us to distribute unsold assets to a liquidating trust. The U.S. federal income tax treatment of ownership an interest in any such liquidating trust would differ materially from the U.S. federal income tax treatment of an investment in our stock, including the potential incurrence of income treated as UBTI.

 

Tax-exempt U.S. shareholders are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding the U.S. federal, state, local and non-U.S. tax consequences of owning our common shares.

 

Taxation of Non-U.S. Shareholders

 

General

 

In general, non-U.S. shareholders will not be considered to be engaged in the conduct of a U.S. trade or business solely as a result of their ownership of our common shares. In cases where a non-U.S. shareholder’s investment in our common shares is, or is treated as, effectively connected with the non-U.S. shareholder’s conduct of a U.S. trade or business, dividend income received in respect of our common shares and gain from the sale of our common shares generally will be “effectively connected income” (“ECI”) subject to U.S. federal income tax at graduated rates in the same manner as if the non-U.S. shareholder were a U.S. shareholder, and such dividend income may also be subject to the 30% branch profits tax (subject to possible reduction under a treaty) on the income after the application of the income tax in the case of a non-U.S. shareholder that is a corporation. Additionally, non-U.S. shareholders that are nonresident alien individuals who are present in the U.S. for 183 days or more during the taxable year are subject to a 30% withholding tax on their capital gains. The remaining discussion below assumes that dividends and gain generated in respect of our common shares are not effectively connected with the conduct of a U.S. trade or business of a non-U.S. shareholder and that the non-U.S. shareholder is not present in the U.S. for 183 days or more during any taxable year.

 

FIRPTA

 

Under the Foreign Investment in Real Property Tax Act (“FIRPTA”), gains from U.S. real property interests (“USRPIs”) are generally treated as ECI subject to U.S. federal income tax at graduated rates in the same manner as if the non-U.S. shareholder were a U.S. shareholder (and potentially branch profits tax to non-U.S. corporations) and will generate U.S. tax return filing obligations for such non-U.S. shareholders. USRPIs generally include interests in real property located in the United States and loans that provide the lender with a participation in the profits, gains, appreciation (or similar arrangements) of real property located in the United States. Loans secured by real property located in the United States that do not provide the lender with a participation in profits, gains, appreciation (or similar arrangements) of the real property are generally not treated as USRPIs.

 

In addition, stock of a domestic corporation (including a REIT) will be a USRPI if at least 50% of its real property assets and assets used in a trade or business are USRPIs at any time during a prescribed testing period. Notwithstanding the foregoing rule, (i) our common shares will not be a USRPI if we are “domestically controlled,” (ii) our common shares will not be a USRPI with respect to a selling non-U.S. shareholder if the shares sold are of a class that is regularly traded on an established securities market and the selling non-U.S. shareholder owned, actually or constructively, 10% or less of our outstanding stock of that class at all times during a specified testing period (generally the lesser of the five year period ending on the date of disposition or the period of our existence), or (iii) with respect to a selling non-U.S shareholder that is a “qualified shareholder” (as described below) or (iv) with respect to a selling non-U.S. shareholder that is a “qualified foreign pension fund” (as described below).

 

 

 

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A domestically controlled REIT is a REIT in which, at all times during a specified testing period (generally the lesser of the five-year period ending on the date of disposition of the REIT’s shares of common shares or the period of the REIT’s existence), less than 50% in value of its outstanding shares of common shares is held directly or indirectly by non-U.S. persons. For these purposes, a person holding less than 5% of our common shares for five years will be treated as a U.S. person unless we have actual knowledge that such person is not a U.S. person. We intend to ensure that we will be domestically controlled at all times in the future.

 

Our shares are not currently traded on an established securities market, and we have no current intent to list the Company’s shares for trading. We also cannot assure you that we will be domestically controlled at all times in the future. Thus, we cannot assure you that our stock will not become a USRPI in the future.

 

Ordinary Dividends

 

The portion of dividends received by non-U.S. shareholders payable out of our earnings and profits that are not attributable to gains from sales or exchanges of USRPIs will generally be subject to U.S. federal withholding tax at the rate of 30%, unless that rate is reduced or eliminated by an applicable income tax treaty. Under some treaties, however, lower rates generally applicable to dividends do not apply to dividends from REITs. In addition, any portion of the dividends paid to non-U.S. shareholders that are treated as excess inclusion income from REMIC residual interests or interests in a taxable mortgage pool will not be eligible for exemption from the 30% withholding tax or a reduced treaty rate. 

 

Non-Dividend Distributions

 

A non-U.S. shareholder should not incur tax on a distribution in excess of our current and accumulated earnings and profits if the excess portion of the distribution does not exceed the adjusted basis of its common shares. Instead, the excess portion of the distribution will reduce the adjusted basis of that shareholder’s common shares. A non-U.S. shareholder generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on a distribution that exceeds both our current and accumulated earnings and profits and the adjusted basis of its stock unless our common shares constitute a USRPI and no other exception applies to the selling non-U.S. shareholder. If our common shares do constitute a USRPI and no other exception applies to the selling non-U.S. shareholder, distributions in excess of both our earnings and the non-U.S. shareholder’s basis in our stock will be treated as ECI subject to U.S. federal income tax. Regardless of whether the distribution exceeds basis, we will be required to withhold 15% of any distributions to non-U.S. shareholders in excess of our current year and accumulated earnings (i.e., including distributions that represent a return of the non-U.S. shareholder’s tax basis in our common shares). The withheld amounts will be credited against any U.S. tax liability of the non-U.S. shareholder and may be refundable to the extent such withheld amounts exceed the shareholder’s actual U.S. federal income tax liability. Even in the event our common shares do not constitute a USRPI, we may choose to withhold on the entire amount of any distribution at the same rate as we would withhold on a dividend because we may not be able to determine at the time we make a distribution whether or not the distribution will exceed our current and accumulated earnings and profits. However, a non-U.S. shareholder may obtain a refund of amounts that we withhold if we later determine that a distribution in fact exceeded our current and accumulated earnings and profits, to the extent such withheld amounts exceed the shareholder’s actual U.S. federal income tax liability. Obtaining such a refund will require the non-U.S. shareholder to file a U.S. income tax return for the relevant year.

 

Capital Gain Dividends and Distributions of FIRPTA Gains

 

Subject to the exceptions that may apply if our common shares are regularly traded on an established securities market or if the selling non-U.S. shareholder is a “qualified shareholder” or a “qualified foreign pension fund,” each as described below, under a FIRPTA “look-through” rule, any of our distributions to non-U.S. shareholders of gain attributable to the sale of a USRPI will be treated as ECI and subject to 21% withholding regardless of whether our common shares constitute a USRPI. Amounts treated as ECI under the look-through rule may also be subject to the 30% branch profits tax (subject to possible reduction under a treaty), after the application of the income tax to such ECI, in the case of a non-U.S. shareholder that is a corporation. In addition, we will be required to withhold tax equal to 21% of the maximum amount that could have been designated as capital gains dividends. Capital gain dividends received by a non-U.S. shareholder that are attributable to dispositions of our assets other than USRPIs are not subject to U.S. federal income tax. This FIRPTA look-through rule also applies to distributions in redemption of shares and liquidating distributions, to the extent they represent distributions of gain attributable to the sale of a USRPI.

 

 

 

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A distribution that would otherwise have been treated as gain from the sale of a USRPI under the FIRPTA look-through rule will not be treated as ECI, and instead will be treated as otherwise described in this offering circular without regard to the FIRPTA look-through rule, if (1) the distribution is received with respect to a class of stock that is regularly traded on an established securities market located in the United States, and (2) the recipient non-U.S. shareholder does not own more than 10% of that class of stock at any time during the one-year period ending on the date on which the distribution is received. We currently are not publicly traded, and these rules will not apply unless and until our common shares become “regularly traded” on an established securities exchange.

 

Dispositions of Our Common Shares

 

A sale of our common shares by a non-U.S. shareholder generally will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax unless the shares constitute a USRPI. Subject to the exception that may apply if our common shares were regularly traded on an established securities market (as described above), if our shares do constitute a USRPI, gain from the sale of our shares would be ECI to a non-U.S. shareholder unless such non-U.S. shareholder were a qualified shareholder or qualified foreign pension fund, each as described below. If the Company’s shares did not constitute a USRPI, gain from the sale of the Company’s shares would not be subject to U.S. federal income tax.

 

To the extent our common shares are held directly (or indirectly through one or more partnerships) by a “qualified shareholder,” our common shares will not be treated as a USRPI. Further, to the extent such treatment applies, any distribution to such shareholder will not be treated as gain realized on the sale or exchange of a USRPI. For these purposes, a qualified shareholder is generally a non-U.S. shareholder that (i)(A) is eligible for treaty benefits under an income tax treaty with the United States that includes an exchange of information program, and the principal class of interests of which is listed and regularly traded on one or more stock exchanges or (B) is a foreign limited partnership organized in a jurisdiction with an exchange of information agreement with the United States and that has a class of regularly traded limited partnership shares (having a value greater than 50% of the value of all partnership shares) on the New York Stock Exchange or Nasdaq, (ii) is a “qualified collective investment vehicle” (within the meaning of Code Section 897(k)(3)(B)) and (iii) maintains records of persons holding 5% or more of the class of interests described in clauses (i)(A) or (i)(B) above, However, in the case of a qualified shareholder having one or more “applicable investors,” the exception described in the first sentence of this paragraph will not apply with respect to a portion of the qualified shareholder’s common shares (determined by applying the ratio of the value of the interests held by applicable investors in the qualified shareholder to the value of all interests in the qualified shareholder and applying certain constructive ownership rules). Such ratio applied to the amount realized by a qualified shareholder on the disposition of our shares or with respect to a distribution from us attributable to gain from the sale or exchange of a USRPI will be treated as amounts realized from the disposition of USRPIs. For these purposes, an “applicable investor” is a person who holds an interest in the qualified shareholder and holds more than 10% of our common shares after the application of certain constructive ownership rules.

 

FIRPTA will not apply to any USRPI held directly (or indirectly through one or more partnerships) by, or to any distribution received from a REIT by, a “qualified foreign pension fund” or any entity all of the interests of which are held by a qualified foreign pension fund. For these purposes, a “qualified foreign pension fund” is an organization or arrangement (i) created or organized in a foreign country, (ii) established to provide retirement or pension benefits to current or former employees (or their designees) of one or more employers for services rendered, (iii) which does not have a single participant or beneficiary that has a right to more than 5% of its assets or income, (iv) which is subject to government regulation and provides annual information reporting about its beneficiaries to relevant local tax authorities and (v) with respect to which, under its local laws, contributions that would otherwise be subject to tax are deductible or excluded from its gross income or taxed at a reduced rate, or taxation of its income is deferred or taxed at a reduced rate

 

Redemptions and Liquidating Distributions

 

A redemption of shares by a non-U.S. shareholder will be treated as a regular distribution or as a sale or exchange of the redeemed shares under the same rules of Code Section 302 that apply to U.S. shareholders and which are discussed above under “Taxation of Taxable U.S. shareholders—Redemptions of Common Shares.” Subject to the FIRPTA look-through rule, (i) if our shares constitute a USRPI, gain from a redemption treated as a sale or exchange of our shares would be ECI to any non-U.S. shareholder unless such non-U.S. shareholder is a qualified shareholder or a qualified foreign pension fund, as described above, and (ii) if the Company’s shares do not constitute a USRPI, gain from a redemption treated as a sale or exchange of our shares would not be subject to U.S. federal income tax.

 

 

 

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Once we have adopted (or are deemed to have adopted) a plan of liquidation for U.S. federal income tax purposes, liquidating distributions received by a non-U.S. shareholder with respect to our common shares would be treated first as a recovery of the shareholder’s basis in the shares (computed separately for each block of shares) and thereafter as gain from the disposition of those shares. Subject to the FIRPTA look-through rule, (i) if our shares constitute a USRPI, gain from a liquidating distribution would be ECI to a non-U.S. shareholder unless such non-U.S. shareholder is a qualified shareholder or a qualified foreign pension fund, as described above, and (ii) if our shares do not constitute a USRPI, gain from a liquidating distribution with respect to the Company’s shares would not be subject to U.S. federal income tax. In general, the U.S. federal income tax rules applicable to REITs would require us to complete our liquidation within 24 months after the adoption of a plan of liquidation. Compliance with this 24-month requirement could require us to distribute unsold assets to a “liquidating trust.” The U.S. federal income tax treatment of ownership an interest in any such liquidating trust would differ materially from the U.S. federal income tax treatment of an investment in our shares and would likely require the owner to recognize income treated as ECI and to file U.S. federal income tax returns.

 

The IRS takes the view that under the FIRPTA look-through rule, but subject to the exceptions described above that may apply to a holder of no more than 10% of our common shares if our common shares are regularly traded on an established securities market, to a qualified shareholder or to a qualified foreign pension fund, distributions in redemption of our common shares and liquidating distributions to non-U.S. shareholders will be treated as ECI and subject to 21% withholding, and also potentially subject to branch profits tax in the case of corporate non-U.S. shareholders, to the extent that the distributions are attributable to gain from the sale of a USRPI, regardless of whether our stock is a USRPI and regardless of whether the distribution is otherwise treated as a sale or exchange.

 

Backup Withholding and Information Reporting

 

We will report to our U.S. shareholders and the IRS the amount of dividends paid during each calendar year and the amount of any tax withheld. Under the backup withholding rules, a U.S. shareholder may be subject to backup withholding with respect to dividends paid unless the holder is a corporation or comes within other exempt categories and, when required, demonstrates this fact or provides a taxpayer identification number or social security number, certifies as to no loss of exemption from backup withholding and otherwise complies with applicable requirements of the backup withholding rules. A U.S. shareholder that does not provide his or her correct taxpayer identification number or social security number may also be subject to penalties imposed by the IRS. In addition, we may be required to withhold a portion of dividends or capital gain distribution to any U.S. shareholder who fails to certify his or her non-foreign status.

 

We must report annually to the IRS and to each non-U.S. shareholder the amount of dividends paid to such holder and the tax withheld with respect to such dividends, regardless of whether withholding was required. Copies of the information returns reporting such dividends and withholding may also be made available to the tax authorities in the country in which the non-U.S. shareholder resides under the provisions of an applicable income tax treaty. A non-U.S. shareholder may be subject to backup withholding unless applicable certification requirements are met.

 

Payment of the proceeds of a sale of our common shares within the United States is subject to both backup withholding and information reporting unless the selling beneficial owner certifies under penalties of perjury that it is a non-U.S. shareholder (and the payor does not have actual knowledge or reason to know that the selling beneficial owner is a U.S. person) or the holder otherwise establishes an exemption. Payment of the proceeds of a sale of our common shares conducted through certain U.S.-related financial intermediaries is subject to information reporting (but not backup withholding) unless the financial intermediary has documentary evidence in its records that the beneficial owner is a non-U.S. shareholder and specified conditions are met, or an exemption is otherwise established.

 

Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Any amounts withheld under the backup withholding rules may be allowed as a refund or a credit against such holder’s U.S. federal income tax liability provided the required information is timely furnished to the IRS.

 

 

 

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Foreign Accounts and FATCA

 

Federal legislation commonly referred to as “FATCA” currently imposes withholding taxes on certain U.S. source passive payments to “foreign financial institutions” and certain other non-U.S. entities. Under this legislation, the failure to comply with additional certification, information reporting and other specified requirements could result in withholding tax being imposed on payments of dividends and sales proceeds to U.S. shareholders who own any of our common shares through foreign accounts or foreign intermediaries and certain non-U.S. shareholders. The legislation imposes a 30% withholding tax on dividends paid to a foreign financial institution or to a foreign entity other than a financial institution, unless (i) the foreign financial institution undertakes certain diligence and reporting obligations or (ii) the foreign entity is not a financial institution and either certifies it does not have any substantial U.S. owners or furnishes identifying information regarding each substantial U.S. owner. If the payee is a foreign financial institution (that is not otherwise exempt), it must either (1) enter into an agreement with the U.S. Treasury requiring, among other things, that it undertake to identify accounts held by certain U.S. persons or U.S.-owned foreign entities, annually report certain information about such accounts, and withhold 30% on payments to account holders whose actions prevent it from complying with these reporting and other requirements or (2) in the case of a foreign financial institution that is resident in a jurisdiction that has entered into an intergovernmental agreement to implement FATCA, comply with the revised diligence and reporting obligations of such intergovernmental agreement. Prospective investors should consult their tax advisors regarding this legislation.

 

State, Local and Non-U.S. Taxes

 

We and our shareholders may be subject to state, local or non-U.S. taxation in various jurisdictions, including those in which it or they transact business, own property or reside. The state, local or non-U.S. tax treatment of us and our shareholders may not conform to the U.S. federal income tax treatment discussed above. Any non-U.S. taxes incurred by us would not pass through to shareholders as a credit against their U.S. federal income tax liability. Prospective shareholders should consult their tax advisors regarding the application and effect of state, local and non-U.S. income and other tax laws on an investment in our common shares.

 

Legislative or Other Actions Affecting REITs

 

The rules dealing with U.S. federal income taxation are constantly under review by persons involved in the legislative process and by the IRS and the U.S. Department of the Treasury. No assurance can be given as to whether, when, or in what form, U.S. federal income tax laws applicable to us and our shareholders may be enacted. Changes to the U.S. federal income tax laws and interpretations of U.S. federal income tax laws could adversely affect an investment in the Company’s shares.

 

ERISA CONSIDERATIONS

 

The Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974, as amended (“ERISA”), is a broad statutory framework that governs most U.S. retirement and other U.S. employee benefit plans. ERISA and the rules and regulations of the Department of Labor (the “DOL”) under ERISA contain provisions that should be considered by fiduciaries of employee benefit plans subject to the provisions of Title I of ERISA (“ERISA Plans”) and their legal advisors. In particular, a fiduciary of an ERISA Plan should consider whether an investment in our common shares (or, in the case of a participant-directed defined contribution plan (a “Participant-Directed Plan”), making our common shares available for investment under the Participant-Directed Plan) satisfies the requirements set forth in Part 4 of Title I of ERISA, including the requirements that (1) the investment satisfy the prudence and diversification standards of ERISA, (2) the investment be in the best interests of the participants and beneficiaries of the ERISA Plan, (3) the investment be permissible under the terms of the ERISA Plan’s investment policies and governing instruments and (4) the investment does not give rise to a non-exempt prohibited transaction under ERISA or Code Section 4975.

 

 

 

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In determining whether an investment in our common shares (or making the Company’s shares available as an investment option under a Participant-Directed Plan) is prudent for ERISA purposes, a fiduciary of an ERISA Plan should consider all relevant facts and circumstances including, without limitation, possible limitations on the transferability of our common shares, whether the investment provides sufficient liquidity in light of the foreseeable needs of the ERISA Plan (or the participant account in a Participant-Directed Plan), and whether the investment is reasonably designed, as part of the ERISA Plan’s portfolio, to further the ERISA Plan’s purposes, taking into consideration the risk of loss and the opportunity for gain (or other return) associated with the investment. It should be noted that we will invest our assets in accordance with the investment objectives and guidelines described in this offering circular, and that neither the Manager nor any of its affiliates has any responsibility for developing any overall investment strategy for any ERISA Plan (or the participant account in a Participant-Directed Plan) or for advising any ERISA Plan (or participant in a Participant-Directed Plan) as to the advisability or prudence of an investment in us. Rather, it is the obligation of the appropriate fiduciary for each ERISA Plan (or participant in a Participant-Directed Plan) to consider whether an investment in our common shares by the ERISA Plan (or making such shares available for investment under a Participant-Directed Plan in which event it is the obligation of the participant to consider whether an investment in our common shares is advisable), when judged in light of the overall portfolio of the ERISA Plan, will meet the prudence, diversification and other applicable requirements of ERISA.

 

Section 406 of ERISA and Code Section 4975 prohibit certain transactions involving the assets of an ERISA Plan, as well as those plans that are not subject to ERISA but that are subject to Code Section 4975, such as individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”) and non-ERISA Keogh plans (collectively with ERISA Plans, “Plans”), and certain persons (referred to as “parties in interest” for purposes of ERISA or “disqualified persons” for purposes of the Code) having certain relationships to Plans, unless a statutory or administrative exemption is applicable to the transaction. A party in interest or disqualified person who engages in a non-exempt prohibited transaction may be subject to non-deductible excise taxes and other penalties and liabilities under ERISA and the Code, and the transaction might have to be rescinded. In addition, a fiduciary who causes an ERISA Plan to engage in a non-exempt prohibited transaction may be personally liable for any resultant loss incurred by the ERISA Plan and may be subject to other potential remedies.

 

A Plan that proposes to invest in our common shares (or to make the Company’s shares available for investment under a Participant-Directed Plan) may already maintain a relationship with the Manager or one or more of its affiliates, as a result of which the Manager or such affiliate may be a “party in interest” under ERISA or a “disqualified person” under the Code, with respect to such Plan (e.g., if the Manager or such affiliate provides investment management, investment advisory or other services to that Plan). ERISA (and the Code) prohibits plan assets from being used for the benefit of a party in interest (or disqualified person). This prohibition is not triggered by “incidental” benefits to a party in interest (or disqualified person) that result from a transaction involving the Plan that is motivated solely by the interests of the Plan. ERISA (and the Code) also prohibits a fiduciary from using its position to cause the Plan to make an investment from which the fiduciary, its affiliates or certain parties in which it has an interest would receive a fee or other consideration or benefit. In this circumstance, Plans that propose to invest in our common shares should consult with their counsel to determine whether an investment in our common shares would result in a transaction that is prohibited by ERISA or Code Section 4975.

 

If our assets were considered to be assets of a Plan (referred to in this offering circular as “Plan Assets”), our management might be deemed to be fiduciaries of the investing Plan. In this event, the operation of the company could become subject to the restrictions of the fiduciary responsibility and prohibited transaction provisions of Title I of ERISA and/or the prohibited transaction rules of Code Section 4975.

 

The DOL has promulgated a final regulation under ERISA, 29 C.F.R. § 2510.3-101 (as modified by Section 3(42) of ERISA, the “Plan Assets Regulation”), that provides guidelines as to whether, and under what circumstances, the underlying assets of an entity will be deemed to constitute Plan Assets for purposes of applying the fiduciary requirements of Title I of ERISA (including the prohibited transaction rules of Section 406 of ERISA) and the prohibited transaction provisions of Code Section 4975.

 

 

 

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Under the Plan Assets Regulation, the assets of an entity in which a Plan or IRA makes an equity investment will generally be deemed to be assets of such Plan or IRA unless the entity satisfies one of the exceptions to this general rule. Generally, the exceptions require that the investment in the entity be one of the following:

 

  · in securities issued by an investment company registered under the Investment Company Act;
     
  · in “publicly offered securities,” defined generally as interests that are “freely transferable,” “widely held” and registered with the SEC;
     
  · in an “operating company” which includes “venture capital operating companies” and “real estate operating companies;” or
     
  · in which equity participation by “benefit plan investors” is not significant.

 

The shares will constitute an “equity interest” for purposes of the Plan Assets Regulation, and the shares may not constitute “publicly offered securities” for purposes of the Plan Assets Regulation. In addition, the shares will not be issued by a registered investment company.

 

The 25% Limit. Under the Plan Assets Regulation, and assuming no other exemption applies, an entity’s assets would be deemed to include “plan assets” subject to ERISA on any date if, immediately after the most recent acquisition of any equity interest in the entity, 25% or more of the value of any class of equity interests in the entity is held by “benefit plan investors” (the “25% Limit”). For purposes of this determination, the value of equity interests held by a person (other than a benefit plan investor) that has discretionary authority or control with respect to the assets of the entity or that provides investment advice for a fee with respect to such assets (or any affiliate of such a person) is disregarded. The term “benefit plan investor” is defined in the Plan Assets Regulation as (a) any employee benefit plan (as defined in Section 3(3) of ERISA) that is subject to the provisions of Title I of ERISA, (b) any plan that is subject to Code Section 4975 and (c) any entity whose underlying assets include plan assets by reason of a plan’s investment in the entity (to the extent of such plan’s investment in the entity). Thus, while our assets would not be considered to be “plan assets” for purposes of ERISA so long as the 25% Limit is not exceeded. Our operating agreement provides that if benefit plan investors exceed the 25% Limit, we may redeem their interests at a price equal to the purchase price per share paid by such investor. We intend to rely on this aspect of the Plan Assets Regulation.

 

Accordingly, we believe, on the basis of the Plan Assets Regulation, that our underlying assets should not constitute “plan assets” for purposes of ERISA. However, no assurance can be given that this will be the case.

 

If our assets are deemed to constitute “plan assets” under ERISA, certain of the transactions in which we might normally engage could constitute a non-exempt “prohibited transaction” under ERISA or Code Section 4975. In such circumstances, in our sole discretion, we may void or undo any such prohibited transaction, and we may require each investor that is a “benefit plan investor” to redeem their shares upon terms that we consider appropriate.

 

Prospective investors that are subject to the provisions of Title I of ERISA and/or Code Section 4975 should consult with their counsel and advisors as to the provisions of Title I of ERISA and/or Code Section 4975 relevant to an investment in our common shares.

 

As discussed above, although IRAs and non-ERISA Keogh plans are not subject to ERISA, they are subject to the provisions of Code Section 4975, prohibiting transactions with “disqualified persons” and investments and transactions involving fiduciary conflicts. A prohibited transaction or conflict of interest could arise if the fiduciary making the decision to invest has a personal interest in or affiliation with the Company or any of its respective affiliates. In the case of an IRA, a prohibited transaction or conflict of interest that involves the beneficiary of the IRA could result in disqualification of the IRA. A fiduciary for an IRA who has any personal interest in or affiliation with the Company or any of its respective affiliates, should consult with his or her tax and legal advisors regarding the impact such interest may have on an investment in the Company’s shares with assets of the IRA.

 

Shares sold by us may be purchased or owned by investors who are investing Plan assets. Our acceptance of an investment by a Plan should not be considered to be a determination or representation by us or any of our respective affiliates that such an investment is appropriate for a Plan. In consultation with its advisors, each prospective Plan investor should carefully consider whether an investment in the Company is appropriate for, and permissible under, the terms of the Plan’s governing documents.

 

Governmental plans, foreign plans and most church plans, while not subject to the fiduciary responsibility provisions of ERISA or the provisions of Code Section 4975, may nevertheless be subject to local, foreign, state or other federal laws that are substantially similar to the foregoing provisions of ERISA and the Code. Fiduciaries of any such plans should consult with their counsel and advisors before deciding to invest in our common shares.

 

 

 

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PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

 

The Company is offering up to $75,000,000 worth of our common shares pursuant to this offering circular. The Company has engaged Dalmore Group, LLC (“Dalmore”), a broker-dealer registered with the SEC and a member of FINRA, to act as the broker-dealer of record for this Offering, but not for underwriting or placement agent services. The Company has also engaged Dalmore to perform the following administrative and compliance related functions in connection with this Offering:

 

  · Review investor information, including KYC (“Know Your Customer”) data, AML (“Anti Money Laundering”) and other compliance background checks, and provide a recommendation to the Company whether or not to accept investor as a customer.
  · Review each investors subscription agreement to confirm such investors participation in the Offering and provide a determination to the Company whether or not to accept the use of the subscription agreement for the investor’s participation.
  · Contact and/or notify the Company, if needed, to gather additional information or clarification on an investor;
  · Not provide any investment advice nor any investment recommendations to any investor.
  · Keep investor details and data confidential and not disclose to any third-party except as required by regulators or pursuant to the terms of the agreement (e.g. as needed for AML and background checks).
  · Coordinate with third party providers to ensure adequate review and compliance.

 

As compensation for the services listed above, Dalmore will be entitled to a commission equal to 1% of the amount raised in the Offering to support the Offering on all newly invested funds after the issuance of a No Objection Letter by FINRA. In addition, Dalmore is entitled to a one-time advance set up fee of $5,000 to cover reasonable out-of-pocket accountable expenses actually anticipated to be incurred by Dalmore, such as, among other things, preparing the FINRA filing. Dalmore will refund any fee related to the advance to the extent it is not used, incurred or provided to the Company. In addition, Dalmore will be entitled to a $20,000 consulting fee that will be due after FINRA issues a No Objection Letter and the SEC qualifies the Offering. The Company estimates that total fees due to pay Dalmore would be $775,000 for a fully subscribed Offering. Investors will not pay upfront selling commissions as part of the price per share of our common shares purchased in this offering. The Manager will pay on behalf of the Company all selling commissions and fees payable to Dalmore in connection with this offering.

We intend to conduct this offering through our Sponsor’s website at www.fundrebel.com, which is not subject to the registration requirements of Section 304 of the JOBS Act because it does not offer and sell securities pursuant to Section 4(a)(6) of the Securities Act, and, therefore, does not meet the definition of a “funding portal.”

 

This offering circular and any supplements hereto will be furnished to prospective investors upon their request via electronic PDF format and will be available for viewing and download 24 hours per day, 7 days per week on www.fundrebel.com, as well as on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov.

 

In order to subscribe to purchase our common shares, a prospective investor must electronically complete, sign and deliver to us an executed subscription agreement like the one attached to this offering circular as Appendix A and transmit funds for its subscription amount in accordance with the instructions provided therein.

 

After we raise the minimum offering amount, settlement may occur up to 45 days after a prospective investor submits a subscription agreement, depending on the volume of subscriptions received. An investor will become a member of the Company, including for tax purposes, and the shares will be issued, as of the date of settlement. Settlement will not occur until an investor’s funds have cleared and the Manager accepts the investor as a member. The number of shares issued to an investor will be calculated based on the price per share in effect on the date we receive the subscription.

 

We reserve the right to reject any investor’s subscription in whole or in part for any reason or for no reason, including if we determine in our sole and absolute discretion that such investor is not a “qualified purchaser” for purposes of Section 18(b)(4)(D)(ii) of the Securities Act. If the offering terminates or if any prospective investor’s subscription is rejected, all funds received from such investors will be returned without interest or deduction.

 

 

 

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State Law Exemption and Offerings to “Qualified Purchasers”

 

Our common shares are being offered and sold only to “qualified purchasers” (as defined in Regulation A under the Securities Act). As a Tier 2 offering pursuant to Regulation A under the Securities Act, this offering will be exempt from state “Blue Sky” law review, subject to certain state filing requirements and anti-fraud provisions, to the extent that our common shares offered hereby are offered and sold only to “qualified purchasers” or at a time when our common shares are listed on a national securities exchange. “Qualified purchasers” include: (i) “accredited investors” under Rule 501(a) of Regulation D and (ii) all other investors so long as their investment in our common shares does not represent more than 10% of the greater of their annual income or net worth (for natural persons), or 10% of the greater of annual revenue or net assets at fiscal year-end (for non-natural persons). However, our common shares are being offered and sold only to those investors that are within the latter category (i.e., investors whose investment in our common shares does not represent more than 10% of the applicable amount), regardless of an investor’s status as an “accredited investor.” Accordingly, we reserve the right to reject any investor’s subscription in whole or in part for any reason, including if we determine in our sole and absolute discretion that such investor is not a “qualified purchaser” for purposes of Regulation A.

 

Certificates Will Not be Issued

 

We will not issue membership certificates or other physical securities. Instead, our common shares will be recorded and maintained on the Company’s electronic membership register.

 

Transferability of our Common Shares

 

Our common shares are generally freely transferable by our shareholders subject to any restrictions imposed by applicable securities laws or regulations, compliance with the transfer provisions of our operating agreement related to REIT compliance ownership limits and analogous regulatory compliance and receipt of appropriate documentation. The transfer of any our common shares in violation of the operating agreement will be deemed invalid, null and void, and of no force or effect. Any person to whom our common shares are attempted to be transferred in violation of the operating agreement will not be entitled to vote on matters coming before the shareholders, receive distributions from the Company or have any other rights in or with respect to our common shares. We will not have the ability to reject a transfer of our common shares where all applicable transfer requirements, including those imposed under the transfer provisions of our operating agreement, are satisfied.

 

Subscription Escrow Account

 

The proceeds of this offering will be placed into an escrow account (the “Subscription Escrow Account”) until such time as we receive subscriptions from investors in this offering of $500,000 (representing the minimum offering amount) and the private placements to our Sponsor and its officers and directors have closed, which we expect will occur immediately after we have raised the minimum offering amount in this offering. Upon satisfaction of this contingency, when we accept subscription payments, common shares will be issued, and investors will become shareholders.

 

North Capital Private Securities Corporation (the “Escrow Agent”) will serve as escrow agent in accordance with Rule 15c2-4 of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended. Investor funds will be held in a segregated bank account at an FDIC insured bank pending each closing or termination of the offering. All subscribers will be instructed by the Company or its agents to transfer funds by check, wire, credit card, debit card, or ACH transfer directly to the Subscription Escrow Account established for this offering. All checks will be made payable to the Escrow Agent. Investors who purchase shares via credit card may incur credit card processing fees. The Company does not intend to pay these processing fees on behalf of investors.

 

 

 

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Forum Selection Provision

 

Our subscription agreement includes a forum selection provision that requires any claims against the Company based on the Subscription Agreement be brought in a state or federal court of competent jurisdiction in the State of New York. This forum may limit investors’ ability to bring claims in judicial forums that they find favorable to such disputes and may discourage lawsuits with respect to such claims. The Company has adopted these provisions to limit the time and expense incurred by its management to challenge any such claims. As a company with a small management team, this provision allows its officers not to lose a significant amount of time traveling to any particular forum so they may continue to focus on operations of the Company.

 

Advertising, Sales and other Promotional Materials

 

In addition to this offering circular, subject to limitations imposed by applicable securities laws, we expect to use additional advertising, sales and other promotional materials in connection with this offering. These materials may include information relating to this offering, the past performance of our Sponsor and its affiliates, property brochures, articles and publications concerning real estate, or public advertisements and audio-visual materials, in each case only as authorized by us. In addition, the sales material may contain certain quotes from various publications without obtaining the consent of the author or the publication for use of the quoted material in the sales material. Although these materials will not contain information in conflict with the information provided by this offering circular and will be prepared with a view to presenting a balanced discussion of risk and reward with respect to our common shares, these materials will not give a complete understanding of this offering, us or our common shares and are not to be considered part of this offering circular. This offering is made only by means of this offering circular and prospective investors must read and rely on the information provided in this offering circular in connection with their decision to invest in our common shares.

 

Offering Circular Supplements and Post-Qualification Amendments

 

In accordance with the Securities Act Industry Guide 5, we undertake to:

 

  · file a sticker supplement pursuant to Rule 253(g) under the Securities Act during the distribution period describing each real estate-related asset not identified in the offering circular at such time as there arises a reasonable probability that such asset will be acquired and to consolidate all such stickers into a post-qualification amendment filed at least once every three months, with the information contained in such amendment provided simultaneously to the existing shareholders. Each sticker supplement shall disclose all compensation and fees received by the Manager and its affiliates in connection with any such acquisition. Where appropriate, the post-qualification amendment shall include or incorporate by reference audited financial statements meeting the requirements of Rule 3-14 of Regulation S-X for properties acquired during the distribution period; and
     
  · file, after the end of the distribution period, a current report on Form 1-U containing the financial statements and any additional information required by Rule 3-14 of Regulation S-X, where applicable, to reflect each subscription made after the end of the distribution period involving the use of 10% or more (on a cumulative basis) of the net proceeds of the offering and to provide the information contained in such report to the shareholders at least once each quarter after the distribution period of the offering has ended.

 

 

 

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HOW TO SUBSCRIBE

 

Subscription Procedures

 

Investors seeking to purchase our common shares who satisfy the “qualified purchaser” standards should proceed as follows:

 

  · Read this entire offering circular and any supplements accompanying this offering circular.
     
  · Electronically complete and execute a copy of the subscription agreement. A specimen copy of the subscription agreement, including instructions for completing it, is included in this offering circular as Appendix A.
     
  · Tender funds via check, wire, credit card, debit card, or ACH transfer to us for the full purchase price of our common shares being subscribed for.

 

By executing the subscription agreement and paying the total purchase price for our common shares subscribed for, each investor agrees to accept the terms of the subscription agreement and attests that the investor meets the minimum standards of a “qualified purchaser,” and that such subscription for common shares does not exceed 10% of the greater of such investor’s annual income or net worth (for natural persons), or 10% of the greater of annual revenue or net assets at fiscal year-end (for non-natural persons). Subscriptions will be effective only upon our acceptance and we reserve the right to reject any subscription in whole or in part.

 

We cannot accept subscriptions until such time as we have received $500,000 in proceeds from this offering. Prior to completing us receiving $500,000 in proceeds from investors in this offering, subscribers may revoke their subscription by providing us with a written notice requesting such rescission. In such cases the subscription amounts will be returned without deduction or interest by the Escrow Agent to the originating account in accordance with Rule 10b-9 under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. The Escrow Agent has not investigated the desirability or advisability of the investment in the shares nor approved, endorsed or passed upon the merits of purchasing the shares.

 

Following the date on which the minimum offering amount is reached, subscriptions will be accepted to the Subscription Escrow Account or rejected as soon as reasonably practicable, within 45 days of receipt. Once we reach the minimum offering amount, subscriptions will be irrevocable until we complete our due diligence process and notify a subscriber that a subscription has been accepted or rejected.

 

We will not draw funds from any subscriber that are accepted into the Subscription Escrow Account until the date we reach the minimum offering amount or the date your subscription is accepted, whichever is later. If we accept your subscription, we will email you a confirmation.

 

IRAs, Keough plans, 401(k) plans, and other qualified plans are not eligible to invest in the Company’s common shares.

 

Minimum Purchase Requirements

 

You must initially purchase at least 100 common shares in this offering, or $1,000 based on the current per share price. In order to satisfy this minimum purchase requirement, unless otherwise prohibited by state law, a husband and wife may jointly contribute funds from their separate individual accounts, provided that each such contribution is made in increments of $100. If you have satisfied the applicable minimum purchase requirement, any additional purchase must be in amounts of at least $10 (or the then NAV of our common shares). 

 

 

 

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ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

We have filed with the SEC an offering statement under the Securities Act on Form 1-A regarding this offering. This offering circular, which is part of the offering statement, does not contain all the information set forth in the offering statement and the related exhibits filed with the SEC, to which we refer you. Upon the qualification of the offering statement, we will be subject to the informational reporting requirements of the Securities Act that are applicable to Tier 2 companies whose securities are qualified pursuant to Regulation A, and accordingly, we will file annual reports, semi-annual reports and other information with the SEC. You may read and copy the offering statement, the related exhibits and the reports and other information we file with the SEC at the SEC’s public reference facilities maintained by the SEC at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, DC 20549. You can also request copies of those documents, upon payment of a duplicating fee, by writing to the SEC. Please call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330 for further information regarding the operation of the public reference rooms. The SEC also maintains a website at www.sec.gov that contains reports, information statements and other information regarding issuers that file with the SEC.

 

You may also request a copy of these filings at no cost, by emailing us at: info@fundrebel.com

 

Within 120 days after the end of each fiscal year we will provide to our shareholders of record an annual report (via the SEC’s EDGAR website). The annual report will contain audited financial statements and certain other financial and narrative information that we are required to provide to shareholders.

 

We also maintain a website at www.fundrebel.comwhere there may be additional information about our business, but the contents of that site are not incorporated by reference in or otherwise a part of this offering circular.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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FUNDREBEL DEAN, LLC

 

Financial Statements

 

 

 

  

FundRebel Dean LLC

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

  Page
   
BALANCE SHEET AS OF JUNE 30, 2022 (UNAUDITED) F-2
   
STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS FOR THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 7, 2022 (INCEPTION) TO JUNE 30, 2022 (UNAUDITED) F-3
   
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN MEMBERS’ EQUITY FOR THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 7, 2022 (INCEPTION) TO JUNE 30, 2022 (UNAUDITED) F-4
   

STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS FOR THE PERIOD FROM JANUARY 7, 2022 (INCEPTION) TO JUNE 30, 2022 (UNAUDITED)

F-5
   
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (UNAUDITED) F-6

 

 

 

 

  Page
   
REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM F-11
   
BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2021 and 2020 F-12
   
NOTES TO THE FINANCIAL STATEMENTS F-13

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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FundRebel Dean LLC

A Delaware Limited Liability Company

 

Financial Statements (unaudited)

June 30, 2022

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 F-1 

 

 

FundRebel Dean LLC

BALANCE SHEET (UNAUDITED)

As of June 30, 2022

 

   June 30, 2022 
     
ASSETS     
Current Assets:     
Cash and cash equivalents  $ 
Deferred offering costs   71,750 
Total Current Assets   71,750 
      
TOTAL ASSETS  $71,750 
      
LIABILITIES AND MEMBERS' EQUITY/(DEFICIT)     
Current Liabilities:     
Due to related party  $105,960 
Total Liabilities   105,960 
      
Members' Equity / (Deficit):     
Contributed capital    
Accumulated deficit   (34,210)
Total Members' Equity/(Deficit)   (34,210)
      
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND MEMBERS' EQUITY/(DEFICIT)  $71,750 

 

No assurance is provided

The accompanying notes are integral part of the financial statements.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 F-2 

 

 

 

FundRebel Dean LLC

STATEMENT OF OPERATIONS (UNAUDITED)

For the period from January 7, 2022 (Inception) to June 30, 2022

 

 

Net Revenue  $ 
      
Operating Expenses:     
General and administrative expense   19,326 
      
Loss from operations   (19,326)
      
Net loss before income taxes   (19,326)
      
Provision for income taxes    
      
Net Loss  $(19,326)

 

No assurance is provided.

The accompanying notes are integral part of the financial statements.

In the opinion of management all adjustments necessary in order to make the interim consolidated financial statements not misleading have been included.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 F-3 

 

 

FundRebel Dean LLC

STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN MEMBERS’ EQUITY/(DEFICIT) (UNAUDITED)

For the period from January 7, 2022 (Inception) to June 30, 2022

 

   Contributed Capital   Accumulated Deficit   Total Members' Equity/(Deficit) 
             
Balance as of January 7, 2022 (inception)  $   $(14,884)  $(14,884)
                
Capital contributions            
Net Loss       (19,326)   (19,326)
Balance as of June 30, 2022  $