10-K 1 ctl2017123110k.htm 10-K Document
 
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
 
FORM 10-K
 
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017
or
o
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from                                to                               
Commission File No. 001-7784
 
ctllogo1a01.jpg
CENTURYLINK, INC.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
 
Louisiana
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
 
72-0651161
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
100 CenturyLink Drive, Monroe, Louisiana
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
71203
(Zip Code)
(318) 388-9000
(Registrant's telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, par value $1.00 per share
 
New York Stock Exchange
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: Stock Options

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý        No o
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o        No ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports) and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý        No o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý        No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer", "smaller reporting company," and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer ý
Accelerated filer o
Non-accelerated filer o
 (Do not check if a smaller reporting company)
Smaller reporting company o
 
 
 
Emerging growth company o
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes o        No ý
On February 16, 2018, 1,069,861,684 shares of common stock were outstanding. The aggregate market value of the voting stock held by non-affiliates as of June 30, 2017 was $11.7 billion.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE:
Portions of the Registrant's Proxy Statement to be furnished in connection with the 2018 annual meeting of shareholders are incorporated by reference in Part III of this report.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
 
 
 
 
 

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Unless the context requires otherwise, (i) references in this report on Form 10-K, for all periods presented, to "CenturyLink," "we," "us" and "our" refer to CenturyLink, Inc. and its consolidated subsidiaries and (ii) references in this report to "Level 3" refer to Level 3 Communications, Inc., which we acquired and renamed Level 3 Parent, LLC, on November 1, 2017.

PART I
ITEM 1. BUSINESS
Overview
We are an international facilities-based communications company engaged primarily in providing an integrated array of services to our business and residential customers. Our communications services include local and long-distance voice, virtual private network ("VPN") data network, private line (including business data services), Ethernet, information technology, wavelength, broadband, colocation and data center services, managed services, professional and other services provided in connection with selling equipment, network security and various other ancillary services. We strive to maintain our customer relationships by, among other things, bundling our service offerings to provide our customers with a complete offering of integrated communications services.
With approximately 450,000 route miles of fiber optic cable globally, we believe we are among the largest providers of communications services to global enterprise customers. Our terrestrial and subsea fiber optic long-haul network throughout North America, Europe and Latin America connects to metropolitan fiber networks that we operate. We operate in over 60 countries, with the substantial majority of our revenues being derived in the United States.
Based on our approximately 10.3 million total access lines at December 31, 2017, we believe we are the third largest wireline telecommunications company in the United States. We operate nearly 75% of our total access lines in portions of Colorado, Arizona, Washington, Minnesota, Florida, North Carolina, Oregon, Iowa, Utah, New Mexico, Missouri, and Idaho, and we also provide local service in portions of 25 other states. In the portion of the 37 states where we have local access lines, which we refer to as our local service area, we are the incumbent local telephone company.
At December 31, 2017, we served approximately 5.7 million broadband subscribers.
We were incorporated under the laws of the State of Louisiana in 1968. Our principal executive offices are located at 100 CenturyLink Drive, Monroe, Louisiana 71203 and our telephone number is (318) 388-9000.
For a discussion of certain risks applicable to our business, see "Risk Factors" in Item 1A of Part I of this report. The summary financial information in this Item 1 should be read in conjunction with, and is qualified by reference to, our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto in Item 8 and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report.
Acquisition of Level 3
On November 1, 2017, CenturyLink acquired Level 3 through successive merger transactions, including a merger of Level 3 with and into a merger subsidiary, which survived such merger as our indirect wholly-owned subsidiary under the name of Level 3 Parent, LLC. As a result of the acquisition, Level 3 shareholders received $26.50 per share in cash and 1.4286 of CenturyLink common stock, with cash paid in lieu of fractional shares, for each outstanding share of Level 3 common stock they owned at closing, subject to certain limited exceptions. Upon closing, CenturyLink shareholders owned approximately 51% and former Level 3 shareholders owned approximately 49% of the combined company.
In addition, each outstanding Level 3 restricted stock unit award granted prior to April 1, 2014 or granted to an outside director of Level 3 was converted into $26.50 in cash and 1.4286 shares of CenturyLink common stock (and cash in lieu of fractional shares) with respect to each Level 3 share covered by such award (the "Converted RSU Awards"). Each outstanding Level 3 restricted stock unit award granted on or after April 1, 2014 (other than those granted to outside directors of Level 3) was converted into a CenturyLink restricted stock unit award using a conversion ratio of 2.8386 to 1 as determined in accordance with a formula set forth in the merger agreement (“the Continuing RSU Awards”).
Our preliminary estimate of the amount of aggregate consideration of $19.617 billion is based on:
the 517.3 million shares of CenturyLink’s common stock (including those issued in connection with the Converted RSU Awards) issued to consummate the acquisition and the closing stock price of CenturyLink common stock at October 31, 2017 of $18.99;

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the cash consideration of $26.50 per share on the 362.1 common shares of Level 3 issued and outstanding as of October 31, 2017, and the cash consideration of $1 million paid on the Converted RSUs awards;
the estimated value of $136 million of the Continuing RSU Awards, which represents the pre-combination portion of Level 3’s share-based compensation awards assumed by CenturyLink; and
the estimated liability of $60 million for the dissenting common shares issued and outstanding as of October 31, 2017.
For additional information about our acquisition of Level 3, see (i) Note 2—Acquisition of Level 3 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report, (ii) our current report on Form 8-K/A filed by us with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") on January 16, 2018, (iii) our current report on Form 8-K filed by us with the SEC on November 1, 2017 and (iv) the definitive joint proxy statement/prospectus filed by us with the SEC on February 13, 2017.
Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business
On May 1, 2017, we sold our data centers and colocation business to a consortium led by BC Partners, Inc. and Medina Capital ("the Purchaser") in exchange for pre-tax cash proceeds of $1.8 billion and a minority stake in the limited partnership that owns the consortium's newly-formed global secure infrastructure company, Cyxtera Technologies ("Cyxtera"). As part of the transaction, the Purchaser acquired 57 of our data centers and assumed $294 million (as of May 1, 2017) of our capital lease obligations related to the divested properties.
Our colocation business generated revenues (excluding revenue from affiliates) of $210 million from January 1, 2017 through May 1, 2017, and $622 million and $626 million for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively (a small portion of which has been retained by us).
See Note 3—Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of
this report for additional information.
Financial and Operational Highlights
Our consolidated operating results, financial position and operational metrics include the operating results, financial position and operational metrics of Level 3 as of November 1, 2017. For additional information, see Note 2—Acquisition of Level 3 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report.
The following table summarizes the results of our consolidated operations.
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
2017(1)(2)
 
2016(2)(3)(4)
 
2015(3)
 
(Dollars in millions)
Consolidated statements of operations summary results:
 
 
 
 
 
Operating revenues
$
17,656

 
17,470

 
17,900

Operating expenses
15,647

 
15,137

 
15,321

Operating income
$
2,009

 
2,333

 
2,579

Net income
$
1,389

 
626

 
878

_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
The enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act legislation in December 2017 resulted in a re-measurement of our deferred tax assets and liabilities at the new federal corporate tax rate of 21%. The re-measurement resulted in a tax benefit of approximately $1.1 billion.
(2) 
During 2017 and 2016, we incurred Level 3 acquisition-related expenses of $271 million and $52 million, respectively. For additional information, see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Acquisition of Level 3" and Note 2—Acquisition of Level 3 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report.
(3) 
In 2017, we adopted ASU 2017-07, "Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost" by retrospectively applying the requirements of the ASU to our previously issued consolidated financial statements. The adoption of ASU 2017-07 increased operating income and increased total other expense, net by $2 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 and reduced operating income and decreased total other expense, net by $26 million for the year ended December 31, 2015.
(4) 
During 2016, we recognized $189 million of severance expenses and other one-time termination benefits associated with our workforce reductions.

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The following table summarizes certain selected financial information from our consolidated balance sheets:
 
As of December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
(Dollars in millions)
Consolidated balance sheets summary information:
 
 
 
Total assets
$
75,611

 
47,017

Total long-term debt(1)
37,726

 
19,993

Total stockholders' equity
23,491

 
13,399

_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
Total long-term debt for the year ended December 31, 2016 includes current maturities of long-term debt and capital lease obligations of $305 million associated with colocation assets sold in 2017. For additional information on our total long-term debt, see Note 5—Long-Term Debt and Credit Facilities to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report. For information on our total obligations, see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Future Contractual Obligations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report.
The following table summarizes certain of our operational metrics:
 
As of December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
(in thousands)
Operational metrics:
 
 
 
 
 
Total access lines(1)
10,282

 
11,090

 
11,748

Total broadband subscribers(1)
5,662

 
5,945

 
6,048

_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
Access lines are lines reaching from the customers' premises to a connection with the public network and broadband subscribers are customers that purchase broadband connection service through their existing telephone lines, stand-alone telephone lines, or fiber-optic cables. Our methodology for counting our access lines and broadband subscribers includes only those lines that we use to provide services to external customers and excludes lines used solely by us and our affiliates. It also excludes unbundled loops and includes stand-alone broadband subscribers. We count lines when we install the service.
Our methodology for counting access lines and broadband subscribers may not be comparable to those of other companies.
We estimate that during 2017 approximately 2% of our consolidated revenues was derived from providing telecommunications, colocation and hosting services outside the United States.
Operations
Segments
In January 2017, we implemented a new organization structure designed to further strengthen our ability to attain our operational, strategic and financial goals. Prior to this reorganization, we operated and reported as two segments, business and consumer. As a result of this reorganization, we changed the name of the predecessor business segment to "enterprise" segment. Additionally, we also reassigned our information technology, managed hosting, cloud hosting and hosting area network services from our business segment to a new non-reportable operating segment. We reported two segments, enterprise and consumer, from January 2017 through October 2017.
In connection with our acquisition of Level 3 (discussed further in Note 2—Acquisition of Level 3), effective November 1, 2017, we implemented a new organization structure and began managing our operations in two segments: business and consumer. Our consumer segment remains substantially unchanged under this reorganization, and our newly reorganized business segment includes the legacy CenturyLink enterprise segment operations and the legacy Level 3 operations. In addition, we reassigned our information technology, managed hosting, cloud hosting and hosting area network operations back into the business segment from the former non-reportable operating segment. At December 31, 2017, we had the following two segments:

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Business Segment. This segment consists generally of providing products and services to small, medium and enterprise business, wholesale and government customers, including other communication providers. Our products and services offered to these customers include our local and long-distance voice, VPN data network, private line (including business data services), Ethernet, information technology, wavelength, broadband, colocation and data center services, managed services, professional and other services provided in connection with selling equipment, network security and various other ancillary services, all of which are described further under "Products and Services"; and
Consumer Segment. This segment consists generally of providing products and services to residential customers. Our products and services offered to these customers include our broadband, local and long-distance voice, video and other ancillary services.
The following table shows the composition of our operating revenues by segment under our current segment categorization for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Percent Change
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2017 vs 2016
 
2016 vs 2015
Percentage of revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business segment
64
%
 
61
%
 
61
%
 
3
 %
 
%
Consumer segment
32
%
 
35
%
 
35
%
 
(3
)%
 
%
Non-segment revenues*
4
%
 
4
%
 
4
%
 
 %
 
%
Total operating revenues
100
%
 
100
%
 
100
%
 
 
 
 

_______________________________________________________________________________
* Consists of all revenues not attributable to our segment revenues. Certain revenues previously included in non-segment revenues have now been assigned to our business and consumer segments based on our new products and services categorization as further described below.
For additional information on our segment data, including information on certain centrally-managed assets and expenses not reflected in our segment results, see Note 14—Segment Information to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report.
Products and Services
In connection with our acquisition of Level 3 on November 1, 2017, we have revised the way we categorize our products and services and report our related revenues under the following categories: IP and data services, transport and infrastructure, voice and collaboration, IT and managed services and regulatory revenues, each of which is described in further detail below. From time to time, we change the categorization of our products and services, and we may make similar changes in the future.
We offer our customers the ability to bundle together several products and services. For example, our customers can bundle two or more services such as broadband, video (including DIRECTV through our strategic partnership) and voice services. We believe our customers value the convenience and price discounts associated with receiving multiple services through a single company.
Described in greater detail below are our primary products, services and revenue sources.
IP and Data Services
VPN Data Network. Built on our optical transport network, we offer customers the ability to create private point-to-point, point-to-multipoint, and full-mesh networks. These services allow service providers, enterprises and government entities to replace multiple networks with a single, cost-effective solution that simplifies the transmission of voice, video, and data over a single or converged network, while delivering high quality of service and security;
Ethernet. Ethernet services include point-to-point and multi-point equipment configurations that facilitate data transmissions across metropolitan areas and wide area networks. Ethernet services are also used to provide transmission services to wireless service providers that use our fiber-optic cables connected to their towers;
Internet Protocol ("IP"). Our IP services deliver a broad range of IP transit and network interconnection solutions for high bandwidth users; and

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Video. Our video services include our facilities-based video, marketed as CenturyLink Prism TV, which is a premium entertainment service that allows our customers to watch hundreds of television or cable channels and record up to four shows on one home digital video recorder. In addition, we offer various broadcast services, marketed as Vyvx, to provide audio and video feeds over fiber or satellite for broadcast and production customers. These services vary in capacity provided, frequency of use (that is, may be provided on an occasional or dedicated basis) and price. We also offer satellite digital television under an arrangement with DIRECTV that allows us to market, sell and bill for its services under its brand name.
Transport and Infrastructure
Broadband. Our broadband services allow customers to connect at high speeds to the Internet through their existing telephone lines or fiber-optic cables. A substantial portion of our broadband subscribers are located within the local service area of our wireline telephone operations;
Private Line. A private line (including business data services) is a direct circuit or channel specifically dedicated for the purpose of directly connecting two or more sites. Private line service offers a high-speed, secure solution for frequent transmission of large amounts of data between sites, including wireless backhaul transmissions;
Colocation and Data Center Services. Our colocation and data center services include data center facilities that we acquired from Level 3 and services including cloud, hosting, and application management solutions. Our data center services range from dedicated hosting and cloud services to more complex managed solutions, including disaster recovery, business continuity, applications management support and security services to manage mission critical applications;
Wavelength. Our wavelength services provide our customers that require significant amounts of bandwidth with an end-to-end transport solution of a fixed amount of bandwidth with Ethernet solutions;
Equipment Sales and Professional Services. Our equipment sales and professional services include the sale of telecommunications equipment located on customers' premises and related products and professional services, such as network management, installation and maintenance of data equipment, the building of proprietary fiber-optic broadband networks for our government and business customers and the reselling of software; and
Network Security Services. Our network security solutions are designed to address the escalating risk of cyber-attacks by assisting customers in establishing a secure network to safeguard brand value, to enable business continuity, and to avoid complexity and cost. Our network security services include adaptive network security, adaptive threat intelligence, network-based distributed denial of service (DDoS) mitigation and professional security services for governance, risk management, and compliance. Our network security services are sold stand-alone or in conjunction with IP and data services.
Voice and Collaboration
Local Voice Services. We offer local calling services for our residential and business customers within the local service area of our wireline markets, generally for a fixed monthly charge. These services include a number of enhanced calling features and other services, such as call forwarding, caller identification, conference calling, voice mail, selective call ringing and call waiting, for which we generally charge an additional monthly fee. We also generate revenues from non-recurring services, such as inside wire installation, maintenance services, service activation and reactivation;
Long-distance Voice Services. We offer our residential and business customers domestic and international long-distance services and toll-free services. Our international long-distance services include voice calls that either terminate or originate with our customers in the United States; and
Wholesale Voice Services. For our wholesale customers, our local calling service offerings include primarily the resale of our voice services and the sale of unbundled network elements ("UNEs") and toll free service. These services share many of the same features as the local voice services described above and frequently permit other carriers to terminate voice services transmitted in part on other carriers' networks. We offer wholesale long distance services, which include domestic and international voice termination services targeted to interexchange carriers, wireless providers, local phone companies, cable companies, resellers and voice over IP providers. Our wholesale toll free service terminates toll free calls that are originated on the traditional telephone network. Customers for these services include call centers, conferencing providers, and voice over IP providers.

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IT and Managed Services
Information Technology ("IT") Services. Our IT-based services focus primarily on the transport and delivery of enterprise data and applications; and
Managed Services. Managed services represents a blend of network, hosting, cloud, and IT services that typically require ongoing support from our staff. These services frequently involve equipment or networks owned, acquired or controlled by the customer and often include consulting or software development.
Regulatory Revenues
Universal Service Fund ("USF") support payments. We receive federal and state USF support payment subsidies designed to reimburse us for various costs related to certain telecommunications services, including the costs of deploying, maintaining and operating voice and broadband infrastructure in high-cost rural areas where we are not able to fully recover our costs from our customers;
Connect America Fund ("CAF"). We receive federal support payments from both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of the CAF program. The funding from the CAF Phase 2 support program has substantially replaced the funding from the interstate USF program that we previously utilized to support voice services in high-cost rural markets in 33 states; and
Other. We generate other operating revenues from the leasing and subleasing of space in our office buildings, warehouses and other properties and from rental income associated with our failed-sale-leaseback. For additional information on our failed-leaseback transaction, see "Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business—Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report.
Because we centrally manage the activities that generate these regulatory revenues, these revenues are not included in our segment revenues.
Additional Information
From time to time, we also make investments in other communications or technology companies.
For further information on regulatory, technological and competitive changes that could impact our revenues, see "Regulation" and "Competition" under this Item 1 below and "Risk Factors" under Item 1A below. For more information on the financial contributions of our various services, see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report.
Network
Most of our products and services are provided using our telecommunications network, which consists of voice switches, data switches and routers, high-speed transport equipment, fiber-optic and copper cables and other equipment. Our local exchange carrier networks also include central offices and remote site assets, and form a portion of the public switched telephone network. A substantial portion of our equipment operates with licensed software.
At December 31, 2017, our network included:
Approximately 450,000 route miles of fiber optic plant;
Approximately 900,000 miles of copper plant;
More than 360 colocation facilities and data centers globally;
Approximately 37,500 route miles of subsea fiber optic cable systems; and
Multiple gateway and transmission facilities used in connection with operating our network throughout North America, Europe and Latin America.

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We continue to enhance and expand our network by deploying various technologies to provide additional capacity to our customers. Rapid and significant changes in technology are expected to continue in the telecommunications industry. Our future success will depend, in part, on our ability to anticipate and adapt to changes in technology and customer demands, including demands for enhanced digitization, automation and customer self-service capabilities. In addition, we anticipate that continued increases in internet usage by our customers will require us to make significant capital expenditures to increase network capacity or to implement network management practices to alleviate network capacity shortages. The FCC's definition of broadband service could create additional requirements for higher capital spending to address marketing and competitive issues. Any such additional expenditure could adversely impact our results of operations and financial condition.
Similarly, we continue to take steps to simplify and modernize our network, much of which we have assembled through acquisitions. To attain our objectives, we plan to continue to undertake several complex projects that we expect will be costly and may take several years to complete. The costs of these projects could materially increase if we conclude that we need to replace any or all of our legacy systems.
Like other large communications companies, we are a constant target of cyber-attacks of varying degrees, which has caused us to spend increasingly more time and money to deal with increasingly sophisticated attacks. Some of the attacks result in security breaches, and we periodically notify our customers, our employees or the public of these breaches when necessary or appropriate. None of these resulting security breaches to date have materially adversely affected our business, results of operations or financial condition.
We rely on several other communications companies to provide our offerings. We lease a significant portion of our core fiber network from our competitors and other third parties. Many of these leases will lapse in future years. All of our satellite television and wireless voice services are provided by other carriers under agency agreements, and some of our other services are reliant upon reselling arrangements with other carriers. Our future ability to provide services on the terms of our current offerings will depend in part upon our ability to renew or replace these leases, agreements and arrangements on terms substantially similar to those currently in effect.
For additional information regarding our systems, network, cyber risks, capital expenditure requirements and reliance upon third parties, see "Risk Factors," generally, in Item 1A of Part I of this report, and, in particular, "Risk Factors—Risks Affecting Our Business" and "Risk Factors—Risks Affecting Our Liquidity and Capital Resources." For more information on our properties, see "Properties" in Item 2 of Part I of this report.
Patents, Trade Names, Trademarks and Copyrights
Either directly or through our subsidiaries, we have rights in various patents, trade names, trademarks, copyrights and other intellectual property necessary to conduct our business, such as our CenturyLink® and Prism® brand names. Our services often use the intellectual property of others, including licensed software. We also occasionally license our intellectual property to others as we deem appropriate.
Our patent portfolio includes patents covering technologies ranging from data and voice services to content distribution to transmission and networking equipment. Patents give us the right to prevent others, particularly competitors, from using our proprietary technologies. Patent licenses give us the freedom to operate our business without the risk of interruption from the holder of the patent that has been licensed to us. We plan to continue to file new patent applications as we enhance and develop products and services, and we plan to continue to seek opportunities to expand our patent portfolio through strategic acquisitions and licensing.
We periodically receive offers from third parties to purchase or obtain licenses for patents and other intellectual property rights in exchange for royalties or other payments. We also periodically receive notices, or are named in lawsuits, alleging that our products or services infringe on patents or other intellectual property rights of third parties. In certain instances, these matters can potentially adversely impact our operations, operating results or financial position. For additional information, see “Risk Factors—Risks Affecting Our Business” in Item 1A of Part I of this report, and Note 16—Commitments and Contingencies to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report.

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Sales and Marketing
We maintain local offices in most major and secondary markets within the U.S. and in most of the larger population centers within our local service area. In addition, we maintain offices within the primary markets of the more than 60 countries in which we operate. These offices provide sales and customer support services to the communities in our local markets. We also rely on our call center personnel and a variety of channel partners to promote sales of services that meet the needs of our customers. Our sales and marketing strategy is to enhance our sales by offering solutions tailored to the needs of our various customers and promoting our brands. Our offerings include both stand-alone services and bundled services designed to meet the needs of different customer segments.
We conduct most of our operations under the brand name "CenturyLink." Our satellite television service is offered on a co-branded basis under the "DIRECTV" name. Our switched digital television service offering is branded under the name "Prism TV."
Our sales and marketing approach to our residential customers emphasizes customer-oriented sales, marketing and service with a local presence. Our marketing plans include marketing our products and services primarily through direct sales representatives, inbound call centers, local retail stores, telemarketing and third parties, including retailers, satellite television providers, door to door sales agents and digital marketing firms. We support our distribution with digital marketing, direct mail, bill inserts, newspaper and television advertising, website promotions, public relations activities and sponsorship of community events and sports venues.
Similarly, our sales and marketing approach to our business customers includes a commitment to provide comprehensive communications and IT solutions for business, wholesale and government customers of all sizes, ranging from small business offices to the world's largest global enterprise customers. We strive to offer our business customers stable, reliable, secure and trusted solutions. Our marketing plans include marketing our products and services primarily through direct sales representatives, inbound call centers, telemarketing and third parties, including telecommunications agents, system integrators, value-added resellers and other telecommunications firms. We support our distribution through digital advertising, events, television advertising, website promotions and public relations.
Regulation
Overview
Our domestic operations are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (the “FCC”), various state utility commissions and occasionally by local agencies. Our non-domestic operations are regulated by supranational groups (such as the European Union), national agencies and, often, state, provincial or local bodies.
Our domestic operations are subject to significant regulation by the FCC, which regulates interstate communications, and state utility commissions, which regulate intrastate communications. These agencies (i) issue rules to protect consumers and promote competition, (ii) set the rates that telecommunication companies charge each other for exchanging traffic, and (iii) have traditionally developed and administered support programs designed to subsidize the provision of services to high-cost rural areas. In most states, local voice service, switched and business data services and interconnection services are subject to price regulation, although the extent of regulation varies by type of service and geographic region. In addition, we are required to maintain licenses with the FCC and with state utility commissions. Laws and regulations in many states restrict the manner in which a licensed entity can interact with affiliates, transfer assets, issue debt and engage in other business activities. Many acquisitions and divestitures require approval by the FCC and some state commissions. These agencies typically have the authority to withhold their approval, or to request or impose substantial conditions upon the transacting parties in connection with granting their approvals.
The following description discusses some of the major industry regulations that affect our operations, but numerous other regulations not discussed below could also impact us. Some legislation and regulations are currently the subject of judicial, legislative and administrative proceedings which could substantially change the manner in which the domestic and international communications industry operates and the amount of revenues we receive for our services. Neither the outcome of these proceedings, nor their potential impact on us, can be predicted at this time. For additional information, see "Risk Factors" in Item 1A of Part I of this report.
The laws and regulations governing our affairs are quite complex and occasionally in conflict with each other. From time to time, we are fined for failing to meet applicable regulations or service requirements.

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Federal Regulation of Domestic Operations
General
The 2016 U.S. Presidential election ushered in a new Administration with a more deregulatory agenda. The industry is undergoing rapid change, driven mostly by evolving technology and the emergence of a variety of new competitors. Cybersecurity and consumer privacy now dominate policy discussions. Much of our domestic operations are still required to comply with the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which materially amended the Communications Act of 1934, primarily to promote competition. Among other things, those laws regulate the terms and conditions under which we provide interstate communications services and require our incumbent local exchange carriers ("ILECs") to offer various of our traditional wireline services at just and reasonable rates and on non-discriminatory terms.
The FCC regulates interstate services we provide, including the business data service charges we bill for wholesale network transmission and the interstate access charges that we bill to long-distance companies and other communications companies in connection with the origination and termination of interstate phone calls. Additionally, the FCC regulates a number of aspects of our business related to privacy, homeland security and network infrastructure, including our access to and use of local telephone numbers and our provision of emergency 911 services. The FCC has responsibility for maintaining and administering support programs designed to expand nationwide access to communications services (which are described further below), as well as other programs supporting service to low-income households, schools and libraries, and rural health care providers. Changes in the composition of the five members of the FCC or its Chairman can have significant impacts on the regulation of our business.
In recent years, our operations and those of other telecommunications carriers have been further impacted by legislation, merger-related conditions and regulation imposing additional obligations on us, particularly with regards to providing voice and broadband service, bolstering homeland security, increasing disaster recovery requirements, minimizing environmental impacts and enhancing privacy. These laws include the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, and laws governing local telephone number portability and customer proprietary network information requirements. In addition, the FCC has heightened its focus on the reliability of emergency 911 services. The FCC has imposed fines on us and other companies for 911 outages and has adopted new compliance requirements for providing 911 services. We are incurring capital and operating expenses designed to comply with the FCC's 911 requirements and minimize future outages. All of these laws and regulations may cause us to incur additional costs and could impact our ability to compete effectively against companies not subject to the same regulations.
Over the past several years, the FCC has taken various actions and initiated certain proceedings designed to comprehensively evaluate the proper regulation of the provisions of data services to businesses. As part of its evaluation, the FCC has reviewed the rates, terms and conditions under which these services are provided. The FCC's proceedings remain pending, and their ultimate impact on us is currently unknown.
In 2015, the FCC issued an order regulating the manner in which ILECs can discontinue or reduce certain copper-based services. This order is under review by the current FCC but still requires ILECs to provide prior notice to certain customers of their proposed change in services, and in certain cases to provide replacement offerings on reasonably comparable terms and conditions. We expect that this order may limit our flexibility to react to changing conditions in the communications industry and introduce services such as Voice over Internet Protocol ("VoIP") services.
Intercarrier Compensation and Universal Service
For decades, the FCC has regularly considered various intercarrier compensation reforms, generally with a goal to create a uniform mechanism to be used by the entire telecommunications industry for payments between carriers originating, terminating, or carrying telecommunications traffic. The FCC has also traditionally administered support programs designed to promote the deployment of voice and broadband services in high-cost rural areas of the country.
In October 2011, the FCC adopted the Connect America and Intercarrier Compensation Reform order ("the 2011 order"), intended to reform the existing regulatory regime to recognize ongoing shifts to new technologies, including VoIP, and to re-direct universal service funding to foster nationwide broadband coverage. The 2011 order provides for a multi-year transition as terminating intercarrier compensation charges are reduced, universal service funding is explicitly targeted to broadband deployment, and line charges paid by end user customers are increased. These changes have increased the pace of reductions in the amount of switched access revenues related to our wholesale services, while creating opportunities for increased federal USF support and retail revenue.

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In late 2011, numerous parties filed a petition for reconsideration with the FCC seeking numerous revisions to the 2011 order. Future judicial challenges to the 2011 order are also possible, which could alter or delay the FCC's proposed changes. In addition, based on the outcome of the FCC proceedings, various state commissions may consider changes to their universal service funds or intrastate access rates. Rulemakings designed to implement the order are not complete, and several FCC proceedings relating to the 2011 order remain pending. For these and other reasons, we cannot predict the ultimate impact of these proceedings at this time.
As a result of the 2011 order, a new Universal Service program was created to deploy broadband to unserved and underserved rural areas utilizing the Connect America Fund or "CAF". The CAF substantially replaces interstate USF funding, that we previously utilized to support voice services in high-cost rural markets. There are two phases to the CAF program, CAF Phase 1, a one-time broadband grant program, and CAF Phase 2, which is a multi-year recurring subsidy program for more extensive broadband deployment in price-cap ILEC territories.
In 2015, we accepted CAF funding from the FCC of approximately $500 million per year for six years to fund the deployment of voice and broadband capable infrastructure for approximately 1.2 million rural households and businesses in 33 states of the 37 states in which we are an ILEC under the CAF Phase 2 high-cost support program. The funding from the CAF Phase 2 support program in these 33 states has substantially replaced the funding from the interstate USF high-cost program that we previously utilized to support voice services in high-cost rural markets in these 33 states.
As a result of accepting CAF Phase 2 support payments for 33 states, as well as existing merger-related commitments, we will be obligated to make substantial capital expenditures to build infrastructure by certain specified milestone deadlines. Future funding is contingent upon our compliance with these infrastructure buildout commitments and certain other service requirements, including certain minimum upload and download transmission speed requirements. In addition, if we are not in compliance with FCC measures at the end of the six-year CAF Phase 2 period, we will have 12 months to attain full compliance. If we are not in full compliance after the additional 12 months, we would incur a penalty equal to 1.89 times the average amount of support per location received in the state over the six-year term, plus a potential penalty of 10% of the state's total CAF Phase 2 support over the six-year term. For information on the risks associated with participating in this program, see "Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Legal and Regulatory Matters" in Item 1A of Part I of this report.
For additional information about the potential financial impact of the CAF Phase 2 program, see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report.
Broadband Regulation
In February 2015, the FCC adopted new regulations to regulate Internet services as a public utility under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934. A newly-constituted FCC voted to repeal most of those regulations in December 2017. Opponents of that change have judicially challenged this action and will likely advocate in favor of re-instituting regulation of Internet services under Title II of the Communications Act. Several states have also opposed the change and have initiated state executive orders or introduced legislation focused on state-specific Internet service regulation.
In 2015, the FCC adopted a broadband standard of 25 megabits per second download speed and 3 megabits per second of upload speed. At this time, we are not aware of any regulatory mandates requiring us to deploy this target speed. The new target is simply a benchmark by which the FCC will evaluate broadband deployment progress in the future. However, the FCC could attempt to utilize this broadband speed target in future regulatory proceedings, and our failure to attain these speeds in certain markets could place us at a marketing or financial disadvantage.
State Regulation of Domestic Operations
In recent years, most states have reduced their regulation of ILECs. Nonetheless, state regulatory commissions generally continue to regulate local service rates, intrastate access charges, state universal service funds and in some cases service quality. Our ILEC operations are generally regulated under various forms of alternative regulation that typically limit our ability to increase rates for basic local voice service, but relieve us from the requirement to meet certain earnings tests. In a number of states, our ILEC operations have gained pricing freedom for the majority of retail services other than basic voice service. In most of the states in which we operate as an ILEC, we have gained pricing flexibility for certain enhanced calling services, such as caller identification and for bundled services that also include local voice service.
Under state law, our telephone operating subsidiaries are typically governed by laws and regulations that (i) regulate the purchase and sale of ILECs, (ii) prescribe certain reporting requirements, (iii) require ILECs to provide service under publicly-filed tariffs setting forth the terms, conditions and prices of regulated services, (iv) limit ILECs' ability to borrow and pledge their assets, (v) regulate transactions between ILECs and their affiliates and (vi) impose various other service standards.

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Unlike many of our competitors which provide no ILEC services, our ILEC affiliates generally face "carrier of last resort" obligations which include an ongoing requirement to provide service to all prospective and current customers in their ILEC service area who request service and are willing to pay rates prescribed in our tariffs. In certain situations, this may constitute a competitive disadvantage to our ILEC affiliates if competitors can choose to focus on low-cost profitable customers and withhold service from high-cost unprofitable customers. On the other hand, our non-ILEC affiliates have substantial flexibility to compete against unaffiliated ILECs in other markets.
We operate in states where traditional cost recovery mechanisms, including rate structures and state USF, are under evaluation or have been modified. Recent changes to the federal tax code have prompted several states to review regulated rates. As laws and regulations change, there can be no assurance that these mechanisms will continue to provide us with any cost recovery.
For several years, we have faced various carrier complaints, legislation or other investigations regarding our intrastate switched access rates in several of our states. The outcomes of these disputes cannot be determined at this time. If we are required to reduce our intrastate switched access rates as a result of any of these disputes or state initiatives, we will seek to recover displaced switched access revenues from state universal service funds or other services. However, the amount of such recovery, particularly from retail customers, is not assured.
International Regulations
Our subsidiaries operating outside of the United States are subject to various regulations in the markets where service is provided. Although the scope of regulation varies from country to country, a substantial portion of our foreign operations are located in Europe and Brazil, both of which are governed by detailed telecommunication regulation.
All of the countries in which we currently operate are members of the World Trade Organization, and most have committed to some deregulatory measures fostering market competition and permitting foreign ownership. Some countries now permit competition for all telecommunications facilities and services, while others allow less competition for some facilities and services, but restrict competition for other services. The telecommunications regulatory regimes of many Latin American countries are in the process of development. Many issues, such as regulation of incumbent providers, interconnection, unbundling of local loops, resale of telecommunications services, and pricing have not been addressed fully, or even at all. We cannot accurately predict whether and how these issues will be resolved, or their effect on our operations. Further, some of the legal requirements governing our foreign operations are more restrictive than or conflict with those governing our domestic operations, which raises our compliance costs and regulatory risks.
European Union
The European Union, or EU, has adopted a more systematic approach to the convergence of networks and the regulation of telecommunications services. The European Commission oversees the implementation by its Member States of various directives developed to regulate electronic communications. These directives address, among other things, (i) interconnection and access, (ii) authorization and licensing, (iii) universal service, and (iv) privacy. In November 2009, the European Parliament and Council of Ministers agreed to implement a number of changes to the existing regulation regime including, among other things, more clearly define user rights.
In November 2015, the EU adopted Regulation EU 2015/2120 which, among other things set out new legislation in relation to open internet. The net neutrality provisions of this Regulation became effective at the beginning of the second quarter 2016. In 2015, the EU Commission also began a review of the entire suite of Directives and Regulations relating to the communications sector and proposals are currently under consideration with a view to making any changes in sufficient time to have these transposed into Member State law by 2019.
In June 2016, following a national referendum, the UK decided to cease its membership in the EU. The European Treaty sets out the legal process that must be followed to accomplish this departure. It is generally expected that the UK will remain a member of the EU until at least 2019. While there is likely to be little immediate effect for the Company or its customers, the longer term implications are presently unclear.
Brazil
Law No. 9,472, known as the General Telecommunications Law (“LGT”), provides for the organization of telecommunications services in Brazil (which includes the regulation of the performance, provision and use of services, and the implementation and operation of telecommunications networks). LGT establishes that the telecommunications policy must have as its main objectives universalization and competition in public telecommunications services. A legislative proposal currently in the Brazilian Senate may result in significant changes in the LGT, unifying private and public regimes under which the services are provided and promote a certain level of deregulation.

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Brazil’s communications regulatory agency has generally pursued a policy of market liberalization and supported a competitive telecommunications environment. In order to foster effective competition and prohibit economic concentration in the market, the agency may establish restrictions, limits or conditions for companies, or groups of companies, regarding obtaining and transferring concessions, permits and authorizations to render telecommunications services. The agency is reviewing the regulation applied to sharing of infrastructure between sectors and inside the telecommunication sector, especially in connection with price and rules access.
A 2014 law provides for network neutrality and prohibits all those responsible for routing traffic, including broadband providers, from impairing or degrading (also known as throttling) Internet traffic to different Internet applications; prioritizing traffic or some content; or unreasonably interfering with or hindering the ability of users to access lawful content.
Other Regulations
Our networks are subject to numerous local regulations, including codes that regulate our trenching and construction operations or that require us to obtain permits, licenses or franchises to operate. Such regulations vary on a city-by-city, country-by-country and state-by-state basis, and may require us to pay substantial fees. To install our own fiber optic transmission facilities, we typically need to obtain rights-of-way over privately and publicly owned land. Rights-of-way that are not already secured, or which may expire and not be renewed, may not be available to us on economically reasonable or advantageous terms in the future.
We are subject to federal and state regulations of customer service standards related to Prism TV. The FCC adopted customer service standards that we must meet in all of our Prism TV markets. The FCC has largely delegated its enforcement powers to local franchise authorities, who have the ability to adopt more stringent standards. We are subject to penalties in many of our local franchise agreements if we fail to meet applicable customer service standards.
Various foreign, federal and state laws govern our storage, maintenance and use of customer data, including a wide range of consumer protection, data protection, privacy, intellectual property and similar laws. The application, interpretation and enforcement of these laws are often uncertain, and may be interpreted and applied inconsistently from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Various foreign, federal and state legislative or regulatory bodies have recently adopted increasingly restrictive laws or regulations governing the protection or retention of data, and others are contemplating similar actions.
For additional information about these matters, see “Risk Factors—Risks Affecting Our Business” and “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Legal and Regulatory Matters” in item 1A of Part I of this report.
Competition
General
We compete in a rapidly evolving and highly competitive market, and we expect intense competition from a wide variety of sources under evolving market conditions to continue. In addition to competition from larger telecommunication service providers, we are facing increasing competition from several other sources, including cable and satellite companies, wireless providers, technology companies, cloud companies, broadband providers, device providers, resellers, sales agents and facilities-based providers using their own networks as well as those leasing parts of our network. Technological advances and regulatory and legislative changes have increased opportunities for a wide range of alternative communications service providers, which in turn have increased competitive pressures on our business. These alternate providers often face fewer regulations and have lower cost structures than we do. In addition, the communications industry has, in recent years, experienced substantial consolidation, and some of our competitors in one or more lines of our business are generally larger, have stronger brand names, have more financial and business resources and have broader service offerings than we currently do. In certain overseas markets, we compete against national incumbent telecommunications providers and other regional or international companies that may have a longer history of providing service in the market.
We compete to provide services to business customers based on a variety of factors, including the comprehensiveness and reliability of our network, our data transmission speeds, price, the latency of our available intercity and metro routes, the scope of our integrated offerings, the reach and peering capacity of our IP network, and customer service. Depending on the applicable market and requested services, competition can be intense, especially if one or more competitors in the market have network assets better suited to the customer’s needs or are offering faster transmission speeds or lower prices.

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Wireless telephone services are a significant source of competition with our traditional ILEC services particularly with regard to our small and medium size business customers as well as our wholesale business customers. It is increasingly common for customers to completely forego use of traditional wireline phone service and instead rely solely on wireless service for voice services. We anticipate this trend will continue, particularly with younger customers who are less accustomed to using traditional wireline voice services. Technological and regulatory developments in wireless services, Wi-Fi, and other wired and wireless technologies have contributed to the development of alternatives to traditional landline voice services. Moreover, the growing prevalence of electronic mail, text messaging, social networking and similar digital non-voice communications services continues to reduce the demand for traditional landline voice services. These factors have led to a long-term systemic decline in the number of our wireline voice service customers.
The Telecommunications Act of 1996, which obligates ILECs to permit competitors to interconnect their facilities to the ILEC's network and to take various other steps that are designed to promote competition, imposes several duties on an ILEC if it receives a specific request from another entity which seeks to connect with or provide services using the ILEC's network. In addition, each ILEC is obligated to (i) negotiate interconnection agreements in good faith, (ii) provide nondiscriminatory "unbundled" access to all aspects of the ILEC's network, (iii) offer resale of its telecommunications services at wholesale rates and (iv) permit competitors, on terms and conditions (including rates) that are just, reasonable and nondiscriminatory, to colocate their physical plant on the ILEC's property, or provide virtual colocation if physical colocation is not practicable. Current FCC rules require ILECs to lease a network element only in those situations where competing carriers genuinely would be impaired without access to such network elements, and where the unbundling would not interfere with the development of facilities-based competition.
As a result of these regulatory, consumer and technological developments, ILECs also face competition from competitive local exchange carriers, or CLECs, particularly in densely populated areas. CLECs provide competing services through reselling an ILEC's local services, through use of an ILEC's unbundled network elements or through their own facilities.
Technological developments have led to the development of new products and services that have reduced the demand for our traditional services, as noted above, or that compete with traditional ILEC services. Technological improvements have enabled cable television companies to provide traditional circuit-switched telephone service over their cable networks, and several national cable companies continue to aggressively market these services. Similarly, companies providing VoIP services provide voice communication services over the Internet which compete with our traditional telephone service and our own VoIP services. In addition, demand for our broadband services could be adversely affected by advanced wireless data transmission technologies being deployed by wireless providers and by certain technologies permitting cable companies and other competitors to deliver faster average broadband transmission speeds than ours.
Similar to us, many cable, technology or other communications companies that previously offered a limited range of services are now offering diversified bundles of services, either through their own networks, reselling arrangements or joint ventures. As such, a growing number of companies are competing to serve the communications needs of the same customer base. Such activities will continue to place downward pressure on the demand for and pricing of our services.
As both residential and business customers increasingly demand high-speed connections for entertainment, communications and productivity, we expect the demands on our network will continue to increase over the next several years. To succeed, we must continue to invest in our networks to ensure that they can deliver competitive services that meet these increasing bandwidth and speed requirements. In addition, network reliability and security are increasingly important competitive factors in our business.
In addition to facing direct competition from those providers described above, ILECs increasingly face competition from alternate communication systems constructed by long distance carriers, large customers, municipalities or alternative access vendors. These systems are capable of originating or terminating calls without use of an ILEC's networks or switching services. Other potential sources of competition include non-carrier systems that are capable of bypassing ILECs' local networks, either partially or completely, through various means, including the provision of business data services or independent switching services and the concentration of telecommunications traffic on a few of an ILEC's access lines. We anticipate that all these trends will continue and lead to decreased billable use of our networks.
Additional information about competitive pressures is located (i) under the heading "Risk Factors—Risks Affecting Our Business" in Item 1A of Part I of this report and (ii) in the discussion immediately below, which contains more specific information on how these trends in competition have impacted our segments.

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Business Segment
In connection with providing services to our business customers, which includes our small, medium and enterprise business, wholesale and government customers, we compete against other telecommunication providers, as well as other regional, national and international carriers, other data transport providers, cable companies, CLECs and other enterprises, some of whom are substantially larger than us. Competition is based on price, bandwidth, quality and speed of service, promotions and bundled offerings. In providing broadband services, we compete primarily with cable companies, wireless providers, technology companies and other broadband service providers. We face competition in Ethernet based services in the wholesale market from cable companies and fiber based providers.
Our competitors for providing integrated data, broadband, voice services and other IT services to our business customers range from mid-sized businesses to large enterprises. Due to the size and capacity of some of these companies, our competitors may be able to offer more inexpensive solutions to our customers. To compete, we focus on providing sophisticated, secure and performance-driven services to our business customers through our global infrastructure.
The number of companies providing business services has grown and increased competition for these services, particularly with respect to smaller business customers. Many of our competitors for services we offer to our business customers are not subject to the same regulatory requirements as we are and therefore they are able to avoid significant regulatory costs and obligations.
Our competitors for cloud, hosting, colocation and other IT services include telecommunications companies, technology companies, cloud companies, colocation companies, hardware manufacturers and system integrators that support the in-house IT operations for a business or offer outsourcing solutions. Due to the size, capacity and strategically low pricing tactics of some of these companies, our competitors may be able to offer more inexpensive solutions to our customers. The increase in recent years in the number of companies providing these services has placed substantial downward pressure on pricing for a wide range of cloud, hosting, colocation and other IT services. We believe, however, that our hybrid IT services capabilities, which offer multiple products and services (including network services), and our ability to create end-to-end integrated customer solutions, could help differentiate our products and services from those offered by competitors with a narrower range of products and services. We have remained focused on expanding our hybrid cloud capabilities through internal product development and strategic acquisitions of select startup businesses.
In addition, our voice and private line services revenues have been, and we expect they will continue to be, adversely affected by product substitution, technological migration and price competition. For our wholesale customers, we will continue to be adversely affected by product substitution, technological migration, industry consolidation and mandated rate reductions. Competition for private line services is based on price, network reach and reliability, service, promotions and bundled offerings. We face significant competition for access services from CLECs, cable companies, resellers and wireless service providers as well as some of our own wholesale markets customers, many of which are deploying their own networks to provide customers with local services. By doing so, these competitors reduce revenue producing traffic on our network.
In providing equipment sales and professional services to our business customers, we compete primarily with large integrators, equipment providers and national telecommunication providers. Competition is based on package offerings, and as such our strategy is to provide these customers individualized and customizable packages that include other services. As such, in providing data integration we often face many of the same competitive pressures as we face in providing other services, as discussed above.
We expect equipment sales and professional services revenues to continue to fluctuate from quarter to quarter as these offerings tend to be more sensitive than others to changes in the economy and in spending trends of our governmental customers. We further expect the profit margins on our equipment sales and professional services offerings to continue to be lower than those of our other services.
Consumer Segment
With respect to providing our services to residential customers, competition is based on price, bandwidth, quality and speed of service, promotions and bundled offerings. Wireless carriers' latest generation technologies are allowing them to more directly compete with our services. The manner in which we compete for broadband customers in this segment is substantially similar to the manner in which we compete for business customers, as described in the above section. In reselling DIRECTV video services, we compete primarily with cable and other satellite companies as well as other sales agents and resellers. Our Prism TV residential video service faces substantial competition from a variety of competitors, including well-established cable companies, satellite companies and several national companies that deliver content over the Internet and on mobile devices. Many of our competitors for these types of services are not subject to the same regulatory requirements as we are, and therefore are able to avoid significant regulatory costs and obligations.

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Our strategy for maintaining and increasing our base of broadband customers is based on pricing, packaging of services and features and quality of service. In order to remain competitive, we believe continually increasing connection speeds is important. As a result, we continue to invest in our network, which allows for the delivery of higher speed broadband services. We also continue to expand our marketing and product bundling efforts by offering a variety of bundled products and services with various pricing discounts, as we compete in a maturing market in which a significant portion of consumers already have broadband services. We offer these bundled products and services through various sales and marketing opportunities as further described above under the heading "Sales and Marketing."
Although our status as an ILEC in our local service areas continues to provide us advantages in providing local services in those territories, as noted above, we increasingly face significant competition as an increasing number of consumers are willing to substitute cable, wireless and electronic communications for traditional voice telecommunications services. This has led to an increase in the number and type of competitors within our industry, price compression and a decrease in our market share. As a result of this product substitution, we face greater competition in providing local and long-distance voice services from wireless providers, resellers and sales agents (including ourselves), social media hosts and broadband service providers, including cable companies. We also continue to compete with traditional telecommunications providers, such as national carriers, smaller regional providers, CLECs and independent telephone companies.
Our strategy to manage customer loss is based primarily on our pricing, packaging of services and features and quality of service. While bundle price discounts have resulted in lower average revenues for our individual services, we believe service bundles continue to positively impact our customer retention.
Acquisitions and Dispositions
We regularly evaluate the possibility of acquiring additional assets or disposing of assets in exchange for cash, securities or other properties, and at any given time may be engaged in discussions or negotiations regarding additional acquisitions or dispositions. We generally do not announce our acquisitions or dispositions until we have entered into a preliminary or definitive agreement.
See above under "Acquisition of Level 3", for additional information about our November 1, 2017 acquisition of Level 3, and the "Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business", for additional information about our May 1, 2017 disposition.
During 2016, we acquired all of the outstanding stock of three companies for total consideration of $53 million, including future deferred or contingent cash payments of $14 million, of which $49 million has been attributed to goodwill. These acquisitions were consummated to expand the product offerings of our business segment, and therefore, the goodwill was assigned to that segment. The majority of the goodwill was attributed primarily to expected future increases in revenue from the sale of new products. The majority of the goodwill from these acquisitions is expected to be deductible for tax purposes. See Note 4—Goodwill, Customer Relationships and Other Intangible Assets for additional information on these acquisitions.
Environmental Compliance
From time to time we may incur environmental compliance and remediation expenses, mainly resulting from owning or operating prior industrial sites or operating vehicle fleets or power supplies for our communications equipment. Although we cannot assess with certainty the impact of any future compliance and remediation obligations or provide you with any assurances regarding the ultimate impact thereof, we do not currently believe that future environmental compliance and remediation expenditures will have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or results of operations. For additional information, see "Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Legal and Regulatory Matters—Risks posed by other regulation" in Item 1A of Part I of this report and Note 16—Commitments and Contingencies included in Item 8 of Part II of this report.
Seasonality
Overall, our business is not materially impacted by seasonality. Our network-related operating expenses are, however, generally higher in the second and third quarters of the year. From time to time, weather related problems have resulted in increased costs to repair our network and respond to service calls in some of our markets. The amount and timing of these costs are subject to the weather patterns of any given year, but have generally been highest during the third quarter and have been related to damage from severe storms, including hurricanes, tropical storms and tornadoes in our markets along the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico coastlines.

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Employees
At December 31, 2017, we had approximately 51,000 employees, of which approximately 14,000 are members of either the Communications Workers of America ("CWA") or the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers ("IBEW"). See the discussion of risks relating to our labor relations in "Risk Factors—Risks Affecting Our Business" in Item 1A of Part I of this report and see Note 18—Labor Union Contracts to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report for additional information on the timing of certain contract expirations.
From time to time, we have reduced our workforce primarily due to (i) increased competitive pressures, (ii) the loss of customers and related revenues, (iii) cost reduction initiatives, (iv) process improvements through automation and (v) integration efforts from our acquisitions.
Website Access and Important Investor Information
Our website is www.centurylink.com. We routinely post important investor information in the "Investor Relations" section of our website at ir.centurylink.com. The information contained on, or that may be accessed through, our website is not part of this report. You may obtain free electronic copies of our annual reports on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports in the "Investor Relations" section of our website (ir.centurylink.com) under the heading "SEC Filings." These reports are available on our website as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file them with the SEC. From time to time we also use our website to webcast our earnings calls and certain of our meetings with investors or other members of the investment community.
We have adopted a written code of conduct that serves as the code of ethics applicable to our directors, officers and employees, in accordance with applicable laws and rules promulgated by the SEC and the New York Stock Exchange. In the event that we make any changes (other than by a technical, administrative or non-substantive amendment) to, or provide any waivers from, the provisions of our code of conduct applicable to our directors or executive officers, we intend to disclose these events on our website or in a report on Form 8-K filed with the SEC. The code of conduct, as well as copies of our guidelines on significant governance issues and the charters of our key board committees, are also available in the "Corporate Governance" section of our website at www.centurylink.com/Pages/AboutUs/Governance/ or in print to any shareholder who requests them by sending a written request to our Corporate Secretary at CenturyLink, Inc., 100 CenturyLink Drive, Monroe, Louisiana, 71203.
Investors may also read and copy any materials filed with the SEC at the SEC's Public Reference Room at 100 F Street, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20549. For information on the operation of the Public Reference Room, you are encouraged to call the SEC at 1-800-SEC-0330. For all of our electronic filings, the SEC maintains a website at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy statements and other information regarding issuers that file electronically with the SEC.
In connection with filing this report, our chief executive officer and chief financial officer made the certifications regarding our financial disclosures required under the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, and its related regulations. In addition, during 2017, our chief executive officer certified to the New York Stock Exchange that he was unaware of any violations by us of the New York Stock Exchange's corporate governance listing standards.
We typically disclose material non-public information by disseminating press releases, making public filings with the SEC, or disclosing information during publicly accessible meetings or conference calls. Nonetheless, from time to time we have used, and intend to continue to use, our website and social media accounts to augment our disclosures.
Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements and Related Matters
This report and other documents filed by us under the federal securities law include, and future oral or written statements or press releases by us and our management may include, forward-looking statements about our business, financial condition, operating results and prospects. These "forward-looking" statements are defined by, and are subject to the "safe harbor" protections under, the federal securities laws. These statements include, among others:
forecasts of our anticipated future results of operations, cash flows or financial position;
statements concerning the anticipated impact of our transactions, investments, product development and other initiatives, including synergies or costs associated with our recently-completed combination with Level 3, the impact of our other acquisitions or dispositions, and the impact our participation in government programs;
statements concerning the anticipated impact of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act enacted in late 2017;

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statements about our liquidity, profit margins, tax position, tax rates, asset values, contingent liabilities, growth opportunities and growth rates, acquisition and divestiture opportunities, business prospects, regulatory and competitive outlook, investment and expenditure plans, business strategies, dividend and stock repurchase plans, capital allocation plans, financing alternatives and sources, and pricing plans; and
other similar statements of our expectations, beliefs, future plans and strategies, anticipated developments and other matters that are not historical facts, many of which are highlighted by words such as “may,” “would,” “could,” “should,” “plan,” “believes,” “expects,” “anticipates,” “estimates,” “projects,” “intends,” “likely,” “seeks,” “hopes,” or variations or similar expressions with respect to the future.
These forward-looking statements are based upon our judgment and assumptions as of the date such statements are made concerning future developments and events, many of which are beyond our control. These forward-looking statements, and the assumptions upon which they are based, (i) are not guarantees of future results, (ii) are inherently speculative and (iii) are subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. Actual events and results may differ materially from those anticipated, estimated, projected or implied by us in those statements if one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or if our underlying assumptions prove incorrect. All of our forward-looking statements are qualified in their entirety by reference to our discussion of certain important factors that could cause our actual results to differ materially from those anticipated, estimated, projected or implied by us in those forward looking statements. Factors that could affect actual results include but are not limited to:
the effects of competition from a wide variety of competitive providers, including decreased demand for our traditional wireline service offerings and increased pricing pressures;
the effects of new, emerging or competing technologies, including those that could make our products less desirable or obsolete;
the effects of ongoing changes in the regulation of the communications industry, including the outcome of regulatory or judicial proceedings relating to intercarrier compensation, interconnection obligations, universal service, broadband deployment, data protection and net neutrality;
our ability to timely realize the anticipated benefits of our recently-completed combination with Level 3, including our ability to attain anticipated cost savings, to use Level 3's net operating loss carryforwards in the amounts projected, to retain key personnel and to avoid unanticipated integration disruptions;
our ability to safeguard our network, and to avoid the adverse impact on our business from possible security breaches, service outages, system failures, equipment breakage, or similar events impacting our network or the availability and quality of our services;
our ability to effectively adjust to changes in the communications industry, and changes in the composition of our markets and product mix;
possible changes in the demand for our products and services, including our ability to effectively respond to increased demand for high-speed broadband service;
our ability to successfully maintain the quality and profitability of our existing product and service offerings, to provision them successfully to our customers and to introduce profitable new offerings on a timely and cost-effective basis;
our ability to generate cash flows sufficient to fund our financial commitments and objectives, including our capital expenditures, operating costs, debt repayments, periodic share repurchases, dividends, pension contributions and other benefits payments;
changes in our operating plans, corporate strategies, dividend payment plans or other capital allocation plans, whether based upon changes in our cash flows, cash requirements, financial performance, financial position, market conditions or otherwise;
our ability to effectively retain and hire key personnel and to successfully negotiate collective bargaining agreements on reasonable terms without work stoppages;
increases in the costs of our pension, health, post-employment or other benefits, including those caused by changes in markets, interest rates, mortality rates, demographics or regulations;
adverse changes in our access to credit markets on favorable terms, whether caused by changes in our financial position, lower debt credit ratings, unstable markets or otherwise;

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our ability to meet the terms and conditions of our debt obligations;
our ability to maintain favorable relations with our key business partners, suppliers, vendors, landlords and financial institutions;
our ability to effectively manage our network buildout project and our other expansion opportunities;
our ability to collect our receivables from financially troubled customers;
any adverse developments in legal or regulatory proceedings involving us;
changes in tax, communications, pension, healthcare or other laws or regulations, in governmental support programs, or in general government funding levels;
the effects of changes in accounting policies or practices, including potential future impairment charges;
the effects of adverse weather, terrorism or other natural or man-made disasters;
the effects of more general factors such as changes in interest rates, in exchange rates, in operating costs, in general market, labor, economic or geo-political conditions, or in public policy; and
other risks referenced in "Risk Factors" in Item 1A or elsewhere in this report or other of our filings with the SEC.
Additional factors or risks that we currently deem immaterial, that are not presently known to us or that arise in the future could also cause our actual results to differ materially from our expected results. Given these uncertainties, investors are cautioned not to unduly rely upon our forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date made. We undertake no obligation to publicly update or revise any forward-looking statements for any reason, whether as a result of new information, future events or developments, changed circumstances, or otherwise. Furthermore, any information about our intentions contained in any of our forward-looking statements reflects our intentions as of the date of such forward-looking statement, and is based upon, among other things, existing regulatory, technological, industry, competitive, economic and market conditions, and our assumptions as of such date. We may change our intentions, strategies or plans (including our dividend or other capital allocation plans) at any time and without notice, based upon any changes in such factors, in our assumptions or otherwise.
Investors should also be aware that while we do, at various times, answer questions raised by securities analysts, it is against our policy to disclose to them selectively any material non-public information or other confidential information. Accordingly, investors should not assume that we agree with any statement or report issued by an analyst with respect to our past or projected performance. To the extent that reports issued by securities analysts contain any projections, forecasts or opinions, such reports are not our responsibility.
Unless otherwise indicated, information contained in this report and other documents filed by us under the federal securities laws concerning our views and expectations regarding the communications industry are based on estimates made by us using data from industry sources, and on assumptions made by us based on our management’s knowledge and experience in the markets in which we operate and the communications industry generally. You should be aware that we have not independently verified data from industry or other third-party sources and cannot guarantee its accuracy or completeness.
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS
The following discussion identifies the most significant risks or uncertainties that could (i) materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity or prospects or (ii) cause our actual results to differ materially from our anticipated results or other expectations. The following information should be read in conjunction with the other portions of this report, including “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in Item 7 and our consolidated financial statements and related notes in Item 8. Please note that the following discussion is not intended to comprehensively list all risks or uncertainties faced by us. Our operations or actual results could also be similarly impacted by additional risks and uncertainties that are not currently known to us, that we currently deem to be immaterial, that arise in the future or that are not specific to us, such as general economic conditions. In addition, certain of the risks described below apply only to a part or segment of our business.

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Risks Affecting Our Business
We may not be able to compete successfully against current or future competitors.
Each of our offerings to our business and consumer customers face increasingly intense competition from a wide variety of sources under evolving market conditions. In particular, (i) aggressive competition from a wide range of communications and technology companies has limited the prospects for several of our offerings to business customers, (ii) intense competition from wireless and other communications providers has led to a long-term systemic decline in the number of our wireline voice customers and (iii) strong competition from cable companies has impacted our business and consumer segments. We expect these trends will continue. For more detailed information, see "Business—Competition" in Item 1 of this report.
In addition to competition from a wide range of technology companies and communications providers (including those described above), we are facing increasing competition from several other sources, including satellite companies, cloud companies, broadband providers, device providers, resellers, sales agents and facilities-based providers using their own networks as well as those leasing parts of our network. Further competition could arise through industry consolidation, technological innovation, or changes in regulation, including changes allowing foreign carriers to more extensively compete in the U.S. market.
Some of our current and potential competitors (i) offer products or services that are substitutes for our traditional wireline voice services, including wireless voice and non-voice communication services, (ii) offer a more comprehensive range of communications products and services, (iii) offer products or services with features that we cannot readily match in some or all of our markets, (iv) install their services more quickly than we do, (v) have greater marketing, engineering, research, development, technical, provisioning, customer relations, financial and other resources, (vi) have larger or more diverse networks with greater transmission capacity, (vii) conduct operations or raise capital at a lower cost than us, (viii) are subject to less regulation, which we believe enables such competitors to operate more flexibly than us with respect to certain offerings, (ix) offer services nationally or internationally to a larger geographic area or larger base of customers, (x) have substantially stronger brand names, which may provide them with greater pricing power than ours, or (xi) have larger operations than ours, which may enable them to compete more successfully in recruiting top talent, entering into operational or strategic partnerships or acquiring companies. Consequently, these competitors may be better equipped to provide more attractive offerings, to charge lower prices for their products and services, to develop and expand their communications and network infrastructure more quickly, to adapt more swiftly to changes in technologies or customer requirements, to devote greater resources to the marketing and sale of their products and services, to provide more comprehensive customer service, to provide greater resources to research and development initiatives and to take advantage of business or other opportunities more readily.
Competition could adversely impact us in several ways, including (i) the loss of customers and market share, (ii) the possibility of customers terminating or reducing their usage of our services or shifting to less profitable services, (iii) reduced traffic on our networks, (iv) our need to expend substantial time or money on new capital improvement projects, (v) our need to lower prices or increase marketing expenses to remain competitive and (vi) our inability to diversify by successfully offering new products or services.
We are continually taking steps to respond to these competitive pressures, but these efforts may not be successful. Our operating results and financial condition would be adversely affected if these initiatives are unsuccessful or insufficient.
Rapid technological changes could significantly impact our competitive and financial position.
The communications industry has been and continues to be impacted by significant technological changes, which in general are enhancing wireless services and enabling a broader array of companies to compete with us. Many of these technological changes are (i) enabling customers to reduce or bypass use of our networks, (ii) displacing or reducing demand for our services, or (iii) enabling the development of competitive products or services. For years, improvements in wireless and Internet-based voice communications technologies have reduced demand for our traditional voice services, and these trends continue. More recently, continuous improvements in wireless data technologies have enabled wireless carriers to offer competing products, and we expect this trend to continue as technological advances enable these carriers to carry greater amounts of data faster and with less latency. Technological advancements have also permitted cable companies and other of our competitors to deliver faster average broadband transmission speeds than ours. Developments in software have permitted new competitors to offer affordable products that historically required more expensive hardware investment. Rapid changes in technology have also placed competitive pressures on our video, cloud and hosting businesses, and enabled new competitors to enter our markets. To enhance the competitiveness of certain of our services, we will likely be required to spend additional capital to install more fiber optic cable or to augment the capabilities of our copper-based services.

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We may not be able to accurately predict or respond to changes in technology or industry standards, or to the introduction of newly-offered services. Any of these developments could make some or all of our offerings less desirable or even obsolete, which would place downward pressure on our market share and revenues. These developments could also require us to (i) expend capital or other resources in excess of currently contemplated levels, (ii) forego the development or provision of products or services that others can provide more efficiently, or (iii) make other changes to our operating plans, corporate strategies or capital allocation plans, any of which could be contrary to the expectations of our security holders or could adversely impact our business operating results.
Even if we succeed in adapting to changes in technology or industry standards by developing new products or services, there is no assurance that the new products or services would have a positive impact on our profit margins or financial performance.
In addition to introducing new technologies and offerings, we may need, from time to time, to phase out outdated and unprofitable technologies and services. If we are unable to do so on a cost-effective basis, we could experience reduced profits. Similarly, if new market entrants are not burdened by an installed base of outdated equipment or obsolete technology, they may have a competitive advantage over us.
For additional information on the risks of increased expenditures, see “Risk Factors—Risks Affecting our Liquidity and Capital Resources—Our business requires us to incur substantial capital and operating expenses, which reduces our available free cash flow.”
Our local voice, long-distance voice, network access and private line (including business data services) services continue to experience declining revenues, and our efforts to offset these declines may not be successful.
Primarily as a result of the competitive and technological changes discussed above, we have experienced a prolonged systemic decline in our local voice, long-distance voice, network access and private line (including business data services) revenues. Consequently, we have experienced declining consolidated revenues (excluding acquisitions) for a prolonged period.
We have taken a variety of steps to counter these declines in local voice, long-distance voice, network access, private line (including business data services) revenues, including an increased focus on selling services in greater demand. However, for the reasons described elsewhere in this report, most of our more recent product and service offerings generate lower profit margins than our traditional services, and some can be expected to experience slowing or no growth in the future. Moreover, we cannot assure you that the revenues generated from our new offerings will offset revenue losses associated with our traditional services. In addition, our reliance on third parties to provide certain of our more recent product and service offerings could constrain our flexibility, as described further below.
Our failure to meet the evolving needs of our customers could adversely impact our competitive position.
In order to compete effectively and respond to changing market conditions, we must continuously offer products and services on terms and conditions that allow us to retain and attract customers and to meet their evolving needs. To do so, we continuously invest in our network and develop, test and introduce new products and services. Our ability to maintain attractive products and services and to successfully introduce new product or service offerings on a timely and cost-effective basis could be constrained by a range of factors, including network limitations, support system limitations, limited capital, an inability to attract key personnel with the necessary skills, intellectual property constraints, inadequate digitization or automation, testing delays, technological limits or an inability to act as quickly or efficiently as other competitors. In addition, new product or service offerings may not be widely accepted by our customers. Our business could be materially adversely affected if we are unable to maintain competitive products and services and to timely and successfully develop and introduce new products or services.
Our failure to continuously develop effective service support systems could adversely impact our competitive position.
For many of our services, we can effectively compete only if we can quickly and efficiently (i) quote and accept customer orders, (ii) provision and initiate ordered services, (iii) provide customers with adequate means to manage their services and (iv) accurately bill for our services. Development of systems designed to support these tasks is a significant undertaking that continuously requires our personnel and third-party vendors to adjust to changes in our offerings and customers' preferences, to eliminate inconsistencies between the practices of our legacy operations and newly-acquired operations, to eliminate older support systems that are costly or obsolete, to develop uniform practices and procedures, and to automate them as much as possible. Our failure to continuously develop service support systems that are satisfactory to our current and potential customers and capable of being utilized by our workforce could adversely impact our competitive position.

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In mid-2017, our Board of Directors formed a special committee of independent directors to review our policies, procedures and practices relating to consumer sales, service and billing following a former employee’s allegations of sales-related misconduct. In late 2017, the special committee concluded its review and issued its key findings. Among other things, the committee found that (i) our investment in consumer sales monitoring was insufficient, (ii) our ordering and billing software contributed to customer confusion and (iii) systems and human errors contributed to inaccurate billing. We are committed to improving our customers’ experience and believe that we have already made progress in addressing these concerns. Nonetheless, we cannot assure you that we will timely and effectively implement changes that will adequately address all of these issues to the full satisfaction of our customers.
We may not be able to successfully adjust to changes in our industry, our markets and our product mix.
Ongoing changes in the communications industry have fundamentally changed consumers’ communications expectations and requirements. In response to these changes, we have substantially altered our product and service offerings through acquisitions and internal product development. Many of these changes have placed a higher premium on sales, marketing and product development functions, and necessitated ongoing changes in our processes and operating protocols, as well as periodic reorganizations of our sales and leadership teams. In addition, we now offer a much more complex range of products and services, operate larger and more complex networks and serve a much larger and more diverse set of customers. Consequently, we now face greater challenges in effectively managing and administering our operations and allocating capital and other resources to our various offerings. For all these reasons, we cannot assure you that our efforts to adjust to these changes will be timely or successful.
Our revenues and cash flows from operating activities may not be adequate to fund all of our cash requirements.
As noted in greater detail below, our business is capital intensive, and we expect it to remain so for the foreseeable future. We will also continue to need substantial amounts of cash to meet our fixed commitments and other business objectives, including without limitation funding our operating costs, debt repayments, periodic pension contributions and other benefits payments. We further expect to continue to require significant cash to fund our quarterly dividend payments, subject to the discretionary right of our Board of Directors to change or terminate our current dividend practices at any time. We rely upon our consolidated revenues and cash flows from operating activities to fund our cash needs.
As noted in the risk factor disclosures appearing above and below, changes in competition, technology, regulation and demand for our traditional wireline services continue to place downward pressure on our consolidated revenues and cash flows from operating activities. During each of the past five years, we experienced declines in revenues and net cash provided by operating activities (excluding acquisitions) as compared to prior periods. Over the next several years, we expect that our future cash flows from operating activities will remain under pressure due to the factors discussed herein.
For these reasons, we cannot assure you that our future cash flows from operating activities will be sufficient to fund all of our cash requirements in the manner currently contemplated. Our inability to fund certain of these payments could have an adverse impact on our business, operations, competitive position, prospects or on the value of our securities.
We could be harmed by security breaches, damages or other significant disruptions or failures of our networks, information technology infrastructure or related systems, or of those we operate for certain of our customers.
We are materially reliant upon our networks, information technology infrastructure and related technology systems (including our billing and provisioning systems) to provide products and services to our customers and to manage our operations and affairs. We face the risk, as does any company, of a security breach or significant disruption of our information technology infrastructure and related systems. As a communications company that transmits large amounts of information over communications networks, we face an added risk that a security breach or other significant disruption of our network, infrastructure or systems, or those that we operate or maintain for certain of our business customers, could lead to material interruptions or curtailments of service. Moreover, in connection with processing and storing sensitive and confidential customer data, we face a heightened risk that a security breach or disruption could result in unauthorized access to our customers’ proprietary information.

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We strive to maintain the security and integrity of information and systems under our control, and maintain contingency plans in the event of security breaches or other system disruptions. Nonetheless, we cannot assure you that our security efforts and measures will prevent unauthorized access to our systems, loss or destruction of data (including confidential customer information), account takeovers, unavailability of service, computer viruses, malware, ransomware, distributed denial-of-service attacks, or other forms of cyber-attacks or similar events. These threats may derive from human error, hardware or software vulnerabilities, aging equipment or accidental technological failure. These threats may also stem from fraud, malice or sabotage on the part of employees, third parties or foreign nations, including attempts by outside parties to fraudulently induce our employees or customers to disclose or grant access to our data or our customers’ data, potentially including information subject to stringent domestic and foreign data protection laws governing personally identifiable information, protected health information or other similar types of sensitive data. These threats may also arise from failure or breaches of systems owned, operated or controlled by other unaffiliated operators to the extent we rely on such other systems to deliver services to our customers. Each of these risks could further intensify to the extent we maintain information in digital form stored on servers connected to the Internet.
Similar to other large telecommunications companies, we are a constant target of cyber-attacks of varying degrees. Although some of these attacks have resulted in security breaches, to date, none of these breaches have resulted in a material adverse effect on our operating results or financial condition. You should be aware, however, that the risk of breaches is likely to increase due to the greater use of open and software-defined networks, our increased operation of offshore systems and the increasing sophistication of cyber-attacks. You should be further aware that defenses against cyber-attacks currently available to U.S. companies are unlikely to prevent intrusions by a highly-determined, highly-sophisticated hacker. Consequently, you should assume that we will be unable to implement security barriers or other preventative measures that repel all future cyber-attacks. Any such future security breaches or disruptions could materially adversely affect our business, results of operations or financial condition, especially in light of the growing frequency, scope and well-documented sophistication of cyber-attacks and intrusions.
Although we maintain insurance coverage that may, subject to policy terms and conditions (including self-insured deductibles, coverage restrictions and monetary coverage caps), cover certain aspects of our cyber risks, such insurance coverage may be unavailable or insufficient to cover our losses.
Additional risks to our network, infrastructure and related systems include:
power losses or physical damage, whether caused by fire, flood, adverse weather conditions, terrorism, sabotage, vandalism or otherwise;
capacity or system configuration limitations, including those resulting from changes in our customer's usage patterns, the introduction of new technologies or products, or incompatibilities between our newer and older systems;
theft or failure of our equipment;
software or hardware obsolescence, defects or malfunctions;
deficiencies in our processes or controls;
our inability to hire and retain personnel with the requisite skills to adequately maintain or improve our systems;
programming, processing and other human error; and
service failures of our third-party vendors and other disruptions that are beyond our control.
Due to these factors, from time to time in the ordinary course of our business we experience disruptions in our service, and could experience more significant disruptions in the future.
Disruptions, security breaches and other significant failures of the above-described networks and systems could:
disrupt the proper functioning of these networks and systems, which could in turn disrupt (i) our operational, billing or other administrative functions or (ii) the operations of certain of our customers who rely upon us to provide services critical to their operations;
result in the unauthorized access to, and destruction, loss, theft, misappropriation or release of proprietary, confidential, sensitive, classified or otherwise valuable information of ours, our customers or our customers’ end users, including trade secrets, which others could use for competitive, disruptive, destructive or otherwise harmful purposes and outcomes;
require us to notify customers, regulatory agencies or the public of data breaches;

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require us to provide credits for future service under certain service level commitments we have provided contractually to our customers or to offer expensive incentives to retain customers;
subject us to claims for damages, fines, penalties, termination or other remedies under our customer contracts or service standards set by state regulatory commissions, which in certain cases could exceed our insurance coverage;
result in a loss of business, damage our reputation among our customers and the public generally, subject us to additional regulatory scrutiny or expose us to prolonged litigation; or
require significant management attention or financial resources to remedy the resulting damages or to change our systems, including expenses to repair systems, add new personnel or develop additional protective systems.
Any or all of the foregoing developments could have a negative impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
We could experience difficulties in expanding and updating our technical infrastructure.
Our ability to expand and update our systems and information technology infrastructure in response to our growth and changing business needs is important to our ability to maintain and develop attractive product and service offerings. As discussed further under “Business—Network Architecture” in Item 1 of this report, we are currently undertaking several complex, costly and time-consuming projects to simplify and modernize our network, which combines our legacy network and the networks of companies we have acquired in the past. Unanticipated delays in the completion of these projects may lead to increased project costs or operational inefficiencies. In addition, there may be issues related to our expanded or updated infrastructure that are not identified by our testing processes, and which may only become evident after we have started to fully utilize the redesigned systems. Our failure to modernize and upgrade our technology infrastructure could have adverse consequences, including the delayed implementation of new service offerings, decreased competitiveness of existing service offerings, network instabilities, increased operating or acquisition integration costs, service or billing interruptions or delays, service offering inconsistencies and the diversion of development resources. Any or all of the foregoing developments could have a negative impact on our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
Negative publicity may adversely impact us.
Our ability to attract and retain customers depends in part upon external perceptions of our products, services and management integrity. Customer complaints, governmental investigations, outages, or other service failures of networks operated by us could cause substantial adverse publicity affecting us. Similar events impacting other operators could indirectly harm us by causing substantial adverse publicity affecting our industry in general. In either case, press coverage, social media messaging or other public statements that insinuate improper actions by us or other operators, regardless of their factual accuracy or truthfulness, may result in negative publicity, litigation, governmental investigations or additional regulations. Addressing negative publicity and any resulting litigation or investigations may distract management, increase costs and divert resources. Negative publicity may have an adverse impact on our reputation and the morale of our employees, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.

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Market prices for many of our services have decreased in the past, and any similar price decreases in the future will adversely affect our revenues and margins.
Over the past several years, a range of competitive and technological factors, including robust network construction and intense competition, have lowered market prices for many of our products and services. If these market conditions persist, we may need to continue to reduce prices to retain customers and revenue. If future price reductions are necessary, our operating results will suffer unless we are able to offset these reductions by reducing our operating expenses or increasing our sales volumes.
Our future growth potential will depend in part on the continued development and expansion of the Internet.
Our future growth potential will depend in part upon the continued development and expansion of the Internet as a communication medium and marketplace for the distribution of data, video and other products by businesses, consumers, and governments. The use of the Internet for these purposes may not grow and expand at the rate anticipated by us or others, or may be restricted by factors outside of our control, including (i) actions by other carriers or governmental authorities that restrict us from delivering traffic over other parties' networks, (ii) changes in regulations, (iii) technological stagnation or (iv) increased concerns regarding cyber threats or (v) changes in consumers' preferences or data usage.
If we fail to hire and retain qualified executives, managers and employees, our operating results could be harmed.
Our future success depends on our ability to identify, hire, train and retain executives, managers and employees with technological, engineering, product development, operational, provisioning, marketing, sales, customer service, administrative, managerial and other key skills. There is a shortage of qualified personnel in several of these fields. We compete with several other companies for this limited pool of potential employees. As our industry increasingly becomes more competitive, it could become especially difficult to attract and retain top personnel with skills in high demand. Our workforce reduction initiatives over the past couple of years have further increased the challenges of attracting and retaining talented individuals. In addition, subject to limited exceptions, none of our executives or domestic employees have long-term employment agreements. For all these reasons, there is no assurance that our efforts to recruit and retain qualified personnel will be successful.
Increases in broadband usage may cause network capacity limitations, resulting in service disruptions, reduced capacity or slower transmission speeds for our customers.
Video streaming services, gaming and peer-to-peer file sharing applications use significantly more bandwidth than other Internet activity such as web browsing and email. As use of these newer services continues to grow, our broadband customers will likely use much more bandwidth than in the past. If this occurs, we could be required to make significant capital expenditures to increase network capacity in order to avoid service disruptions, service degradation or slower transmission speeds for our customers. Alternatively, we could choose to implement network management practices to reduce the network capacity available to bandwidth-intensive activities during certain times in market areas experiencing congestion, which could negatively affect our ability to retain and attract customers in affected markets. Competitive or regulatory constraints may preclude us from recovering the costs of network investments designed to address these issues, which could adversely impact our operating margins, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
We have been accused of infringing the intellectual property rights of others and will likely face similar accusations in the future, which could subject us to costly and time-consuming litigation or require us to seek third-party licenses.
Like other communications companies, we have increasingly in recent years received a number of notices from third parties or have been named in lawsuits filed by third parties claiming we have infringed or are infringing upon their intellectual property rights. We are currently responding to several of these notices and claims and expect this industry-wide trend will continue. Responding to these claims may require us to expend significant time and money defending our use of the applicable technology, and divert management’s time and resources away from other business. In certain instances, we may be required to enter into licensing agreements requiring royalty payments. In the case of litigation, we could be required to pay significant monetary damages or cease using the applicable technology. If we are required to take one or more of these actions, our profit margins may decline or our operations could be impaired. In addition, in responding to these claims, we may be required to stop selling or redesign one or more of our products or services, which could significantly and adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and cash flows.
Similarly, from time to time, we may need to obtain the right to use certain patents or other intellectual property from third parties to be able to offer new products and services. If we cannot license or otherwise obtain rights to use any required technology from a third party on reasonable terms, our ability to offer new products and services may be prohibited, restricted, made more costly or delayed.

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We may not be successful in protecting and enforcing our intellectual property rights.
We rely on various patents, copyrights, trade names, trademarks, service marks, trade secrets and other similar intellectual property rights, as well as confidentiality agreements and procedures, to establish and protect our proprietary rights. The steps we have taken, however, may not prevent unauthorized use or the reverse engineering of our technology. Others may independently develop technologies that are substantially equivalent, superior to, or otherwise competitive to the technologies we employ in our services or that infringe on our intellectual property. We may be unable to prevent competitors from acquiring proprietary rights that are similar to or infringe upon our proprietary rights, or to prevent our current or former employees from using or disclosing to others our proprietary information. Enforcement of our intellectual property rights may depend on initiating legal actions against parties who infringe or misappropriate our proprietary information, but these actions may not be successful, even when our rights have been infringed. If we are unsuccessful in protecting or enforcing our intellectual property rights, our business, competitive position, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.
Our operations, financial performance and liquidity are materially reliant on various third parties.
Reliance on other communications providers. To offer certain services in certain of our markets, we must either purchase services or lease network capacity from, or interconnect our network with the infrastructure of, other communications carriers or cloud companies who typically compete against us in those markets. Our reliance on these supply or interconnection arrangements exposes us to multiple risks. Typically these arrangements limit our control over the quality of our services and expose us to the risk that our ability to market our services could be adversely impacted by changes in the plans or properties of the carriers upon which we are reliant. In addition, we are exposed to the risk that the other carriers may be unwilling or unable to continue or renew these arrangements in the future on terms favorable to us, or at all. This risk is heightened when the other carrier is a competitor who may benefit from terminating the agreement or imposing price increases, or a carrier who suffers financial distress or bankruptcy. If we lose these arrangements and cannot timely replace them, our ability to provide services to our customers and conduct our business could be materially adversely affected. Moreover, many of our arrangements with other carriers are regulated by domestic or foreign agencies, which subject us to the additional risk that changes in regulation could increase our costs or otherwise adversely affect our ability to provide services. Finally, even when another carrier agrees or is obligated to provide services to us to permit us to obtain new customers, it is frequently expensive, difficult and time-consuming to switch the new customers to our network, especially if the other carrier fails to provide timely and efficient cooperation.
Conversely, certain of our operations carry a significant amount of voice or data traffic for other communications providers. Their reliance on our services exposes us to the risk that they may transfer all or a portion of this traffic from our network to networks built, owned or leased by them, thereby reducing our revenues. For additional information, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Business Trends” included in Item 7 of this report.
We also rely on reseller and sales agency arrangements with other communications companies to provide some of the services that we offer to our customers, including video services and wireless products and services. As a reseller or sales agent, we do not control the availability, retail price, design, function, quality, reliability, customer service or branding of these products and services, nor do we directly control all of the marketing and promotion of these products and services. Similar to the risks described above regarding our reliance upon other carriers, we could be adversely affected if these communication companies fail to maintain competitive products or services, or fail to continue to make them available to us on attractive terms, or at all.
Our operations and financial performance could be adversely affected if our relationships with any of these other communications companies are disrupted or terminated for any other reason, including if such other companies:
become bankrupt or experience substantial financial difficulties;
suffer work stoppages or other labor strife;
challenge our right to receive payments or services under applicable regulations or the terms of our existing contractual arrangements; or
are otherwise unable or unwilling to make payments or provide services to us.

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Reliance on other key suppliers and vendors. We depend on a limited number of suppliers and vendors for equipment and services relating to our network infrastructure, including fiber optic cable, software, optronics, transmission electronics, digital switches and related components. If any of these suppliers experience interruptions or other problems delivering or servicing these network components on a timely basis, our operations could suffer significantly. To the extent that proprietary technology of a supplier is an integral component of our network, we may have limited flexibility to purchase key network components from alternative suppliers and may be adversely affected if third parties assert patent infringement claims against our suppliers or us. We also rely on a limited number of (i) software vendors to support our business management systems, (ii) content suppliers to provide programming to our video operations, and (iii) contractors to assist us in connection with our network construction and maintenance activities. In the event it becomes necessary to seek alternative suppliers and vendors, we may be unable to obtain satisfactory replacement supplies, services, utilities or programming on economically attractive terms, on a timely basis, or at all, which could increase costs or cause disruptions in our services.
Reliance on utility providers and landlords. Our energy costs can fluctuate significantly or increase for a variety of reasons, including changes in legislation and regulation. Several pending proposals designed to reduce greenhouse emissions could substantially increase our energy costs, which we may not be able to pass on to our customers.
We lease many of our office facilities. Although the majority of these leases provide us with the opportunity to renew the lease, many of these renewal options provide that rent for the renewal period will be equal to the fair market rental rate at the time of renewal. Any resulting increases in our rent costs could have a negative impact on our financial results.
Reliance on governmental payments. We receive a material amount of revenue or government subsidies under various government programs, which are further described under the heading “Risk Factors—Risks Relating to Legal and Regulatory Matters." We also provide products or services to various federal, state and local agencies. Our failure to comply with complex governmental regulations and laws applicable to these programs, or the terms of our governmental contracts, could result in us being suspended or disbarred from future governmental programs or contracts for a significant period of time. Moreover, certain governmental agencies frequently reserve the right to terminate their contracts for convenience. If our governmental contracts are terminated for any reason, or if we are suspended or debarred from governmental programs or contracts, our results of operations and financial condition could be materially adversely affected.
Violating our government contracts could have other serious consequences.
We provide services to various governmental agencies with responsibility for national security or law enforcement. These governmental contracts impose significant requirements on us relating to network security, information storage and other matters, and in certain instances impose on us additional heightened responsibilities, including requirements related to the composition of our Board of Directors. While we expect to continue to comply fully with all of our obligations under these contracts, we cannot assure you of this. The consequences of violating these contracts could be severe, potentially including the revocation of our FCC licenses in the U.S. (in addition to being suspended or debarred from government contracting, as noted above.)
Rising costs, changes in consumer behaviors and other industry changes may adversely impact our video business.
The costs of purchasing video programming have risen significantly in recent years and continue to rise. Moreover, an increasing number of consumers are receiving access to video content through video streaming or other services pursuant to new technologies for a nominal or no fee, which will likely reduce demand for our more traditional video products. New technologies are also affecting consumer behavior in ways that are changing how content is delivered and viewed. Increased access to various media through wireless devices has the potential to reduce the viewing of our content through traditional distribution outlets. These new technologies have increased the number of entertainment choices available to consumers and intensified the challenges posed by audience fragmentation. Some of these newer technologies also give consumers greater flexibility to watch programming on a time-delayed or on-demand basis. All of these changes, coupled with changing consumer preferences and other related developments, could reduce demand for our video products and services.

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If we fail to extend or renegotiate our collective bargaining agreements with our labor unions as they expire from time to time, or if our unionized employees were to engage in a strike or other work stoppage, our business and operating results could be materially harmed.
As of December 31, 2017, approximately 28% of our employees were members of various bargaining units represented by the Communications Workers of America or the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. From time to time, our labor agreements with unions expire. Although we typically are able to negotiate new bargaining agreements, we cannot predict the outcome of our future negotiations of these agreements. We may be unable to reach new agreements, and union employees may engage in strikes, work slowdowns or other labor actions, which could materially disrupt our ability to provide services and result in increased cost to us. In addition, new labor agreements may impose significant new costs on us, which could impair our financial condition or results of operations in the future. To the extent they contain benefit provisions, these agreements may also limit our flexibility to change benefits in response to industry or competitive changes. In particular, retirement benefits provided under these agreements could cause us to incur costs not faced by many of our competitors, which could ultimately hinder our competitive position.
Portions of our property, plant and equipment are located on property owned by third parties.
We rely on rights-of-way, colocation agreements and other authorizations granted by governmental bodies, railway companies, carriers and other third parties to locate our cable, conduit and other network equipment on or under their respective properties. A significant number of these authorizations are scheduled to lapse over the next five to ten years, unless we are able to extend or renew them. Our operations could be adversely affected if any of these authorizations terminate or lapse, or if the landowner requests price increases.
Over the past few years, certain utilities, cooperatives and municipalities in certain of the states in which we operate have requested significant rate increases for attaching our plant to their facilities. To the extent that these entities are successful in increasing the amount we pay for these attachments, our future operating costs will increase.
Our subsidiaries currently are, and in the past have been, subject to lawsuits challenging the subsidiaries’ use of rights-of-way. Similar suits are possible in the future. Plaintiffs in these suits typically seek to have them certified as class action suits. These suits are typically complex, lengthy and costly to defend, and expose us to each of the other general litigation risks described elsewhere herein.
Our business customers may seek to shift risk to us.
We furnish to and receive from our business customers indemnities relating to damages caused or sustained by us in connection with certain of our operations. Our customers’ changing views on risk allocation could cause us to accept greater risk to win new business or could result in us losing business if we are not prepared to take such risks. To the extent that we accept such additional risk, and seek to insure against it, our insurance premiums could rise.
Our international operations expose us to various regulatory, currency, tax, legal and other risks.
Our international operations are subject to U.S. and non-U.S. laws and regulations regarding operations in international jurisdictions in which we provide services. These numerous and sometimes conflicting laws and regulations include anti-corruption laws, anti-competition laws, trade restrictions, tax laws, immigration laws, privacy laws and accounting requirements. Many of these laws are complex and change frequently. Regulations that require the awarding of contracts to local contractors or the employment of local citizens may adversely affect our flexibility or competitiveness in these jurisdictions. Local laws and regulations, and their interpretation and enforcement, differ significantly among those jurisdictions. There is a risk that these laws or regulations may materially restrict our ability to deliver services in various international jurisdictions or could be breached through inadvertence or mistake, fraudulent or negligent behavior of our employees or agents, failure to comply with certain formal documentation or technical requirements, or otherwise. Violations of these laws and regulations could result in fines and penalties, criminal sanctions against us or our personnel, or prohibitions on the conduct of our business or our ability to operate in one or more countries, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, results of operations, financial condition or prospects.

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Many non-U.S. laws and regulations relating to communications services are more restrictive than U.S. laws and regulations, particularly those relating to privacy rights and data retention. For example, all 28 member states of the European Union have adopted new European data protection laws that we believe could impact our operations in Europe and could potentially expose us to an increased risk of litigation or significant regulatory fines. Moreover, national regulatory frameworks that are consistent with the policies and requirements of the World Trade Organization have only recently been, or are still being, enacted in many countries. Accordingly, many countries are still in the early stages of providing for and adapting to a liberalized telecommunications market. As a result, in these markets we may encounter more protracted and difficult procedures to obtain licenses necessary to provide the full set of products and services we seek to offer.
In addition to these international regulatory risks, some of the other risks inherent in conducting business internationally include:
tax, licensing, political or other business restrictions or requirements, which may render it more difficult to obtain licenses or interconnection agreements on acceptable terms, if at all;
uncertainty concerning import and export restrictions, including the risk of fines or penalties assessed for violations;
longer payment cycles and problems collecting accounts receivable;
U.S. and non-U.S. regulation of overseas operations, including regulation under the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (the “FCPA”) and other applicable anti-corruption laws, including the U.K. Bribery Act of 2010 and the Brazilian Anti-corruption Law, (collectively with the FCPA, the "Anti-Corruption Laws");
economic, social and political instability, with the attendant risks of terrorism, kidnapping, extortion, civic unrest and potential seizure or nationalization of assets;
currency and exchange controls, repatriation restrictions and fluctuations in currency exchange rates;
challenges in securing and maintaining the necessary physical and telecommunications infrastructure;
the inability in certain jurisdictions to enforce contract rights either due to underdeveloped legal systems or government actions that result in a deprivation of contract rights;
increased risk of cyber-attacks or similar events to our network as we expand our network or interconnect our network with other networks internationally;
the inability in certain jurisdictions to adequately protect intellectual property rights;
laws, policies or practices that restrict with whom we can contract or otherwise limit the scope of operations that can legally or practicably be conducted within any particular country;
potential submission of disputes to the jurisdiction of a non-U.S. court or arbitration panel;
reliance on third parties, including those with which we have limited experience;
limitations in the availability, amount or terms of insurance coverage;
the imposition of unanticipated or increased taxes, increased communications or privacy regulations or other forms of public or governmental regulation that increase our operating expenses; and
challenges in staffing and managing overseas operations.
Many of these risks are beyond our control, and we cannot predict the nature or the likelihood of the occurrence or corresponding effect of any such events, each of which could have an adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

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Certain of our international operations are conducted in countries or regions experiencing corruption or instability, which subjects us to heightened legal and economic risks.
We do business and may in the future do additional business in certain countries or regions in which corruption is a serious problem. Moreover, in order to effectively compete in certain non-U.S. jurisdictions, it is frequently necessary or required to establish joint ventures, strategic alliances or marketing arrangements with local operators, partners or agents. In certain instances, these local operators, partners or agents may have interests that are not always aligned with ours. Reliance on local operators, partners or agents could expose us to the risk of being unable to control the scope or quality of our overseas services or products, or being held liable under any Anti-Corruption Laws for actions taken by our strategic or local partners or agents even though these partners or agents may not themselves be subject to such anti-corruption laws. Any determination that we have violated the Anti-Corruption Laws could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations, reputation or prospects.
We conduct significant operations in regions that have historically experienced high levels of political, economic and social instability, including the Latin American region. Various events in recent years have placed pressures on the stability of the currencies of several Latin American countries in which we operate, including Argentina, Brazil and Colombia. Pressures or volatility in local or regional currencies may adversely affect our customers in this region, which could diminish their ability or willingness to order products or services from us. Several Latin American countries have historically experienced high rates of inflation. Governmental actions taken to curb inflation, coupled with speculation about possible future actions, have in the past contributed to periodic economic uncertainty in many Latin American countries. Similar actions in the future, together with abrupt shifts in governmental administrations, could impede our ability to develop or implement effective business plans in the region. In addition, if high rates of inflation persist, we may not be able to adjust the price of our services sufficiently to offset the effects of inflation on our cost structures in those locations. A high inflation environment would also have negative effects on the level of economic activity and employment and adversely affect our business.
We are exposed to currency exchange rate risks and currency transfer restrictions and our results may suffer due to currency translations and re-measurements.
Certain of our current and prospective customers derive their revenue in currencies other than U.S. dollars but are invoiced by us in U.S. dollars. The obligations of customers with substantial revenue in non-U.S. currencies may be subject to unpredictable and indeterminate increases if such currencies depreciate relative to the U.S. dollar. Furthermore, these customers may become subject to exchange control regulations restricting the conversion of their revenue currencies into U.S. dollars. In either event, the affected customers may not be able to pay us in U.S. dollars. Similarly, declines in the value of non-U.S. currencies relative to the U.S. dollar could adversely affect us in several respects, including hampering our ability to market our services to customers whose revenue is denominated in depreciated currencies. In addition, where we issue invoices for our services in currencies other than U.S. dollars, our results of operations may suffer due to currency translations if such currencies depreciate relative to the U.S. dollar and we cannot or do not elect to enter into currency hedging arrangements regarding those payment obligations.
Certain Latin American economies have experienced shortages in non-U.S. currency reserves and have adopted restrictions on the use of certain mechanisms to expatriate local earnings and convert local currencies into U.S. dollars. Any of these shortages or restrictions may limit or impede our ability to transfer or to convert those currencies into U.S. dollars and to expatriate those funds.
We may not be able in the future to acquire new businesses on attractive terms.
Historically, much of our growth has been attributable to acquisitions. Our future ability to grow through additional acquisitions could be limited by several factors, including our leverage, debt covenants and inability to identify attractively-priced target companies. Moreover, we generally must devote significant management attention and resources to evaluate acquisition opportunities, which could preclude us from evaluating acquisition opportunities during periods when management is committed to other opportunities, tasks or activities. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that we will be able to attain future growth through acquisitions. See "Risks Relating to Our Recently-Completed Combination with Level 3" for a discussion of certain specific risks raised by our combination with Level 3 on November 1, 2017 and see the next risk factor immediately below for a discussion of certain general risks raised by acquisitions.

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Any additional future acquisitions or strategic investments by us would subject us to additional business, operating and financial risks, the impact of which cannot presently be evaluated, and could adversely impact our capital structure or financial position.
In an effort to implement our business strategies, we may from time to time in the future pursue other acquisition or expansion opportunities, including strategic investments. These transactions could involve acquisitions of entire businesses or investments in start-up or established companies, and could take several forms, including mergers, joint ventures, investments in new lines of business, or the purchase of equity interests or assets. These types of transactions may present significant risks and uncertainties, including the difficulty of identifying appropriate companies to acquire or invest in on acceptable terms, distraction of management from current operations, insufficient revenue acquired to offset liabilities assumed, unexpected expenses, inadequate return of capital, regulatory or compliance issues, potential infringements, potential violations of covenants in our debt instruments and other unidentified issues not discovered in due diligence. To the extent we acquire part or all of a business that is financially unstable or is otherwise subject to a high level of risk, we may be affected by currently unascertainable risks of that business. Accordingly, there is no current basis to evaluate the possible merits or risks of the particular business or assets that we may acquire. Moreover, we cannot guarantee that any such transaction will ultimately result in the realization of the benefits of the transaction originally anticipated by us or that any such transaction will not have a material adverse impact on our financial condition or results of operations. In particular, we can provide no assurances that we will be able to successfully integrate the technology systems, billing systems, accounting processes, sales force, cost structure, product development and service delivery processes, standards, controls, policies, strategies and culture of the acquired company with ours. In addition, the financing of any future acquisition completed by us could adversely impact our capital structure as any such financing would likely include the issuance of additional securities or the borrowing of additional funds. Except as required by law or applicable securities exchange listing standards, we do not expect to ask our shareholders to vote on any proposed acquisition. Moreover, we generally do not announce our acquisitions until we have entered into a preliminary or definitive agreement.
Unfavorable general economic conditions could negatively impact our operating results and financial condition.
Unfavorable general economic conditions, including unstable economic and credit markets, could negatively affect our business. While it is difficult to predict the ultimate impact of these general economic conditions, they could adversely affect demand for some of our products and services and could cause customers to shift to lower priced products and services or to delay or forego purchases of our products and services. These conditions impact, in particular, our ability to sell discretionary products or services to business customers that are under pressure to reduce costs or to governmental customers that have suffered substantial budget cuts in recent years. Any one or more of these circumstances could continue to depress our revenues. Also, our customers may encounter financial hardships or may not be able to obtain adequate access to credit, which could negatively impact their ability to make timely payments to us. In addition, as discussed further below, unstable economic and credit markets may preclude us from refinancing maturing debt at terms that are as favorable as those from which we previously benefited, at terms that are acceptable to us, or at all. For these reasons, among others, weak economic conditions could adversely affect our operating results, financial condition, and liquidity.
For additional information about our business and operations, see "Business" in Item 1 of this report.
Risks Relating to Our Recently-Completed Combination with Level 3
We expect to continue to incur substantial expenses related to the Level 3 combination.
 As noted elsewhere herein, we have incurred substantial expenses in connection with completing our business combination with Level 3 on November 1, 2017, and we expect to continue to incur substantial expenses in connection with integrating our business, operations, networks, systems, technologies, policies and procedures with those of Level 3. There are a large number of systems that will likely be integrated, including management information, purchasing, accounting and finance, sales, payroll and benefits, fixed asset, lease administration and regulatory compliance systems. While we have assumed that a certain level of transaction and integration expenses would be incurred, there are a number of factors beyond our control that could affect the total amount or the timing of our integration expenses. Many of the expenses that will be incurred, by their nature, are difficult to estimate accurately at the present time and may ultimately be greater than envisioned. Due to these factors, the transaction and integration expenses associated with the acquisition are likely in the near term to exceed the savings that we expect to achieve from the elimination of duplicative expenses and the realization of economies of scale and cost savings related to the integration of the businesses. As a result of these expenses, we have taken, and expect to continue to take, charges against our earnings. Our future charges are expected to be significant, although the timing of such charges is uncertain at present.

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We may be unable to integrate successfully our incumbent business and Level 3’s business and realize the anticipated benefits of the combination.
The transaction combined two companies which previously operated as independent public companies. The combined company will be required to devote significant management attention and resources to integrating the business practices and operations of CenturyLink and Level 3. Potential difficulties we may encounter in the integration process include the following:
the inability to successfully combine our incumbent business and Level 3’s business in a manner that permits us to achieve the cost savings and operating synergies anticipated to result from the acquisition, which would result in the anticipated benefits of the acquisition not being realized in the time frame currently anticipated or at all;
lost sales and customers as a result of certain customers of either of the two companies deciding to terminate or reduce their business with the combined company;
the complexities associated with managing the combined businesses out of several different locations and integrating personnel from the two companies, while at the same time attempting to provide consistent, high quality products and services under a unified culture;
the additional complexities of combining two companies with different histories, regulatory restrictions, operating structures and markets;
the failure to retain key employees of either of the two companies;
unanticipated impediments in integrating departments, systems (including accounting systems), technologies, books and records, procedures and policies, and in maintaining uniform standards and controls, including internal control over financial reporting;
potential unknown liabilities and unforeseen increased expenses, delays or regulatory conditions associated with the acquisition; and
performance shortfalls as a result of the diversion of management’s attention caused by completing the acquisition and integrating the companies’ operations.
For all these reasons, you should be aware that it is possible that the integration process could result in the distraction of management, the disruption of our ongoing business or inconsistencies in our products, services, standards, controls, procedures and policies, any of which could adversely affect the ability of the combined company to maintain relationships with customers, vendors and employees or to achieve the anticipated benefits of the acquisition, or could otherwise adversely affect our business and financial results.
We may be unable to retain key employees. 
Our success following the combination will depend in part upon our ability to retain key Level 3 and CenturyLink employees. Key employees may depart because of issues relating to uncertainty, changes in workplace responsibilities or demands, or difficulty of integration. Accordingly, we cannot assure you that we will be able to retain key employees to the same extent as in the past.
We plan to conduct rebranding initiatives which may not be favorably received by customers.
Prior to the Level 3 acquisition, CenturyLink and Level 3 marketed their respective products and services using the “CenturyLink” and “Level 3” brand names and logos. Following the acquisition, “CenturyLink” will be the brand name of the combined company. We cannot assure you that customers will be receptive to our proposed rebranding efforts.
Counterparties to certain significant agreements with Level 3 may exercise contractual rights to terminate such agreements following the Level 3 combination.
Level 3 is a party to certain agreements that may give the counterparty a right under certain conditions to terminate the agreement following a "change in control" of Level 3. In addition, certain Level 3 customer contracts, including those with state or federal government agencies, allow the customer to terminate the contract at any time for convenience. Any such counterparty may request modifications of their respective agreements as a condition to foregoing exercise of their termination rights. There is no assurance that such agreements will not be terminated as materially modified after the acquisition.

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We may be unable to obtain security clearances necessary to perform certain Level 3 government contracts.
Certain Level 3 legal entities and officers have security clearances required for Level 3's performance of customer contracts with various government entities. We have discussed and continue to discuss with appropriate governmental representatives arrangements that will permit us or our officers to continue to perform these Level 3 contracts. Although we expect these efforts will be successful, we cannot assure you of this.
We cannot assure you whether, when or in what amounts we will be able to use Level 3’s net operating loss carryforwards. 
As of December 31, 2017, CenturyLink had approximately $9.1 billion of net operating loss carryforwards, ("NOLs"), which for U.S. federal income tax purposes can be used to offset future taxable income. These NOLs are primarily related to federal NOLs we acquired through the Level 3 acquisition and are subject to prior limitations under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code ("Code") and related Treasury regulations. Additionally, these NOLs are subject to a current Section 382 limitation as a result of our acquisition of Level 3. It should be noted that issuances or sales of our stock following the combination (including certain transactions outside of our control) could result in an ownership change of CenturyLink under Section 382, which may further limit its use of the NOLs. For these and other reasons, we cannot assure you that we will be able to use Level 3's NOLs in the amounts we project.
Risks Relating to Legal and Regulatory Matters
We operate in a highly regulated industry and are therefore exposed to restrictions on our operations and a variety of risks relating to such regulation.
General. Our domestic operations are regulated by the Federal Communications Commission (the “FCC”), various state utility commissions and occasionally by local agencies. Our non-domestic operations are regulated by supranational groups (such as the European Union), national agencies and, often, state, provincial or local bodies.
Generally, we must obtain and maintain certificates of authority or licenses from these bodies in most territories where we offer regulated services. We cannot assure you that we will be successful in obtaining or retaining all licenses necessary to carry out our business plan, and, even if we are, the prescribed service standards and conditions imposed on us in connection with obtaining or acquiring control of these licenses may impose on us substantial costs and limitations. We also operate in some areas of the world without licenses, as permitted through relationships with locally-licensed partners.
We are subject to numerous requirements and interpretations under various international, federal, state and local laws, rules and regulations, which are often quite detailed and occasionally in conflict with each other. The regulation of telecommunications networks and services around the world varies widely. In some countries, the range of services we are legally permitted to provide may be limited or may change. As noted above, in other countries existing telecommunications legislation is in development, is subject to currently ongoing proceedings, is unclear or inconsistent, or is applied in an unequal or discriminatory fashion, often in the absence of adjudicative forums that are adequate to address disputes. Accordingly, we cannot ensure that we are always considered to be in compliance with all these requirements at any single point in time (as discussed further elsewhere herein). Our inability or failure to comply with the telecommunications and other laws of one or more countries in which we operate could prevent us from commencing or continuing to provide service therein.
The agencies responsible for the enforcement of these laws, rules and regulations may initiate inquiries or actions based on customer complaints or on their own initiative. Even if we are ultimately found to have complied with applicable regulations, such actions or inquiries could create adverse publicity that negatively impacts our business.
Domestic regulation of the telecommunications industry continues to change, and the regulatory environment varies substantially from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. A substantial portion of our local voice services revenue remains subject to FCC and state utility commission pricing regulation, which periodically exposes us to pricing or earnings disputes and could expose us to unanticipated price declines. In addition, from time to time carriers or other third parties refuse to pay for certain of our services or challenge our rights to receive certain service payments. Our future revenues, costs, and capital investment could be adversely affected by material changes to or decisions regarding the applicability of government requirements, and we cannot assure you that future regulatory, judicial or legislative activities will not have a material adverse effect on our operations.
Changes in the composition and leadership of the FCC, state commissions and other agencies that regulate our business could have significant impacts on our revenues, expenses, competitive position and prospects. Changes in the composition and leadership of these agencies are often difficult to predict, and make future planning more difficult.

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Risks associated with recent changes in regulation. Changes in regulation can have a material impact on our business, revenues or financial performance. Changes over the past couple of decades in federal regulations have substantially impacted our operations. In 2011, the FCC adopted an order providing for a multi-year transition to a regulatory structure that reduces intercarrier compensation charges, redeploys universal service funding to newer technologies, and increases certain end-user charges. These changes, coupled with our participation in the new FCC support programs, have significantly impacted various aspects of our operations, financial results and capital expenditures, including the amount of revenues we collect from our wholesale customers and from federal support programs. We expect these impacts will continue in the future. For more information, see "Business—Regulation" in Item 1 of this report, and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 of this report.
Many of the FCC’s regulations adopted in recent years remain subject to judicial review and additional rulemakings, thus increasing the difficulty of determining the ultimate impact of these changes on us and our competitors.
Federal and state agencies that dispense universal service or other support program payments can, and from time to time do, reduce the amount of those payments to us and other carriers.
Risks of higher costs. Regulations continue to create significant operating and capital costs for us. Challenges to our tariffs by regulators or third parties or delays in obtaining certifications and regulatory approvals could cause us to incur substantial legal and administrative expenses, and, if successful, such challenges could adversely affect the rates that we are able to charge our customers.
Our business also may be impacted by legislation and regulation imposing new or greater obligations related to regulations or laws related to regulating broadband services, storing records, bolstering homeland security or cyber security, increasing disaster recovery requirements, minimizing environmental impacts, enhancing privacy, restricting data collection, protecting intellectual property rights of third parties, or addressing other issues that impact our business, including (i) the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act, which requires communications carriers to ensure that their equipment, facilities, and services are able to facilitate authorized electronic surveillance, (ii) the USA Freedom Act, which requires communication companies to store records of communications of their customers, and (iii) laws that have significantly enhanced our responsibilities relating to data security in certain jurisdictions. We expect our compliance costs to increase if future laws or regulations continue to increase our obligations.
Increased risks of fines. We have recently paid certain regulatory fines associated with network or service outages, particularly with respect to outages impacting the availability of emergency - 911 services. Over the past couple of years, we believe that regulators have assessed substantially higher fines than in the past for these types of incidents, and it is possible this trend will continue.
Risks of reduced flexibility. As a diversified full service incumbent local exchange carrier in many of our operating markets, we have traditionally been subject to significant regulation that does not apply to many of our competitors. This regulation in many instances restricts our ability to change rates, to compete and to respond rapidly to changing industry conditions. In particular, cable television companies in recent years have been able to exploit differences in regulatory oversight, which we believe has helped them to develop service offerings competitive with ours. As our business becomes increasingly competitive, regulatory disparities between us and our competitors could increasingly impede our ability to compete.
Risks posed by other regulations. All of our operations are also subject to a variety of environmental, safety, health and other governmental regulations. In connection with our current operations, we use, handle and dispose of various hazardous and non-hazardous substances and wastes. In prior decades, certain of our current or former subsidiaries owned or operated, or are alleged to have owned or operated, manufacturing businesses, for which we have been notified of certain potential environmental liabilities regarding those past operations. We monitor our compliance with applicable regulations or commitments governing these current and past activities. Although we believe that we are in compliance with these regulations in all material respects, our use, handling and disposal of environmentally sensitive materials, or the prior operations of our predecessors, could expose us to claims or actions that could potentially have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.
For a discussion of regulatory risks associated with our international operations, see “Risk Factors—Risks Affecting Our Business—Our international operations expose us to various regulatory, currency, tax, legal and other risks."

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Our participation in the FCC's Connect America Fund ("CAF") Phase 2 support program poses certain risks.
Our participation in the FCC's CAF Phase 2 support program subjects us to certain financial risks. If we fail to attain certain specified infrastructure buildout requirements, the FCC could withhold future CAF support payments until these shortcomings are rectified. In addition, if we are not in compliance with FCC measures by the end of the CAF Phase 2 program, we would incur substantial penalties. To comply with the FCC's buildout requirements, we believe we will need to dedicate a substantial portion of our future capital expenditure budget to the construction of new infrastructure. The CAF-related expenditures could reduce the amount of funds we are willing or able to allocate to other initiatives or projects. In addition, if the FCC decides not to renew or extend the current CAF Phase 2 program, or initiate a replacement program, these support payments could end at the termination of the program.
Regulation of the Internet could limit our ability to operate our broadband business profitably and to manage our broadband facilities efficiently.
Since the creation of the Internet, there has been extensive debate about whether and how to regulate Internet service providers. A significant number of congressional leaders, state elected officials and various consumer interest groups have long advocated in favor of extensive regulation. In 2015, the FCC adopted new regulations that regulated broadband services as a public utility under Title II of the Communications Act of 1934. Although the FCC voted to repeal most of those regulations in December, 2017, opponents of the rescission have judicially challenged this action and will likely continue to advocate in favor of re-instituting extensive regulation. Depending on the content and scope of any such future federal or state regulations, the imposition of heightened regulation of our Internet operations could hamper our ability to operate our data networks efficiently, restrict our ability to implement network management practices necessary to ensure quality service, increase the cost of network extensions and upgrades, and otherwise negatively impact our current operations. As the significance of the Internet expands, state, local or foreign governments may adopt new laws or regulations, or apply existing laws and regulations to the Internet. We cannot predict the outcome of any such changes.
We may be liable for the material that content providers or distributors distribute over our network.
The liability of private network operators for information asserted on or disseminated through their networks is impacted both by changing technology and evolving legal principles that remain unsettled in many jurisdictions. While we disclaim any liability for third-party content in our service contracts, as a private network provider we could be exposed to legal claims relating to third party content stored or transmitted on our networks. Such claims could involve, among others, allegations of defamation, invasion of privacy, copyright infringement, or aiding and abetting restricted activities such as online gambling or pornography. Although we believe our liability for these types of claims is limited, suits against other carriers have been successful and we cannot assure you that our defenses will prevail. If we decide to implement additional measures to reduce our exposure to these risks, or if we are required to defend ourselves against these kinds of claims, our operations and financial results could be negatively affected.
Our pending legal proceedings could have a material adverse impact on our financial condition and operating results, the trading price of our securities and our ability to access the capital markets.
There are several material proceedings pending against us, as described in Note 16—Commitments and Contingencies to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this report. Results of these legal proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty. Irrespective of its merits, litigation may be both lengthy and disruptive to our operations and could cause significant expenditure and diversion of management attention. We review our litigation accrual liabilities on a quarterly basis, but in accordance with applicable accounting guidelines only establish accrual liabilities when losses are deemed probable and reasonably estimable and only revise previously-established accrual liabilities when warranted by changes in circumstances, in each case based on then-available information. As such, as of any given date we could have exposure to losses under proceedings as to which no liability has been accrued or as to which the accrued liability is inadequate. For each of these reasons, any of the proceedings described in Note 16—Commitments and Contingencies, as well as current litigation not described therein or future litigation, could have a material adverse effect on our business, reputation, financial position, operating results, the trading price of our securities and our ability to access the capital markets. We can give you no assurances as to the ultimate impact of these matters on us.
We are subject to franchising requirements that could impede our expansion opportunities or result in potential fines or penalties.
We may be required to obtain from municipal authorities operating franchises to install or expand certain facilities related to our fiber transport operations and certain of our other services. Some of these franchises may require us to pay franchise fees, and may require us to pay fines or penalties if we violate or exit our related contractual commitments. In some cases, certain franchise requirements could delay us in expanding our operations or increase the costs of providing these services.

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We are exposed to risks arising out of recent legislation affecting U.S. public companies.
Changing laws, regulations and standards relating to corporate governance and public disclosure, including the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, and related regulations implemented thereunder, have increased our legal and financial compliance costs and made some activities more time consuming. Any failure to successfully or timely complete annual assessments of our internal controls required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could subject us to sanctions or investigation by regulatory authorities. Any such action could adversely affect our financial results or our reputation with investors, lenders or others.
Changes in any of the above-described laws or regulations may limit our ability to plan, and could subject us to further costs or constraints.
From time to time, the laws or regulations governing us or our customers, or the government’s policy of enforcing those laws or regulations, have changed frequently and materially. The variability of these laws could hamper the ability of us and our customers to plan for the future or establish long-term strategies. Moreover, future changes in these laws or regulations could further increase our operating or compliance costs, or further restrict our operational flexibility, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations, competitive position, financial condition or prospects.
For a more thorough discussion of the regulatory issues that may affect our business, see "Business—Regulation" in Item 1 of this report.
Risks Affecting Our Liquidity and Capital Resources
Our high debt levels expose us to a broad range of risks.
We continue to carry significant debt. As of December 31, 2017, the aggregate principal amount of our consolidated long-term debt was $37.162 billion, excluding unamortized discounts, net, unamortized debt issuance costs and capital lease and other obligations. As of such date, $1.588 billion aggregate principal amount of this long-term debt was scheduled to mature prior to December 31, 2020. While we currently believe we will have the financial resources to meet or refinance our obligations when they come due, we cannot fully anticipate our future performance or financial condition, the future condition of the credit markets or the economy generally.
Our significant levels of debt can adversely affect us in several other respects, including:
limiting our ability to obtain additional financing for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions, refinancings or other general corporate purposes, particularly if, as discussed further in the risk factor disclosure below, (i) the ratings assigned to our debt securities by nationally recognized credit rating organizations are revised downward or (ii) we seek capital during periods of turbulent or unsettled market conditions;
requiring us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow from operations to the payment of interest and principal on our debt, thereby reducing the funds available to us for other purposes, including acquisitions, capital expenditures, strategic initiatives, dividends, stock repurchases, marketing and other potential growth initiatives;
hindering our ability to capitalize on business opportunities and to plan for or react to changing market, industry, competitive or economic conditions;
increasing our future borrowing costs;
increasing the risk that third parties will be unwilling or unable to engage in hedging or other financial or commercial arrangements with us;
making us more vulnerable to economic or industry downturns, including interest rate increases;
placing us at a competitive disadvantage compared to less leveraged competitors;
increasing the risk that we will need to sell securities or assets, possibly on unfavorable terms, or take other unfavorable actions to meet payment obligations; or
increasing the risk that we may not meet the financial covenants contained in our debt agreements or timely make all required debt payments, either of which could result in the acceleration of some or all of our outstanding indebtedness.
The effects of each of these factors could be intensified if we increase our borrowings.
A substantial portion of our indebtedness bears interest at variable rates. If market interest rates increase, our variable-rate debt will have higher debt service requirements, which could adversely impact our cash flows and financial condition.

38


Any failure to make required debt payments could, among other things, adversely affect our ability to conduct operations or raise capital.
Subject to certain limitations, our current debt agreements and the debt agreements of our subsidiaries allow us to incur additional debt, which could exacerbate the other risks described in this report.
Subject to certain limitations and restrictions, the current terms of our debt instruments and the debt instruments of our subsidiaries permit us or them to incur additional indebtedness. Incremental borrowings that impose additional financial risks could exacerbate the other risks described in this report.
We expect to periodically require financing, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain such financing on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all.
We have a significant amount of indebtedness that we intend to refinance over the next several years, principally through the issuance of debt by CenturyLink, Inc., Qwest Corporation or Level 3 Financing, Inc. We may also need to obtain additional financing under a variety of other circumstances, including if:
revenues and cash provided by operations decline;
economic conditions weaken, competitive pressures increase or regulatory requirements change;
we engage in additional acquisitions or undertake substantial capital projects or other initiatives that increase our cash requirements;
we are required to make pension or other benefits payments earlier or in greater amounts than currently anticipated;
our payments of federal income taxes increase faster or in greater amounts than currently anticipated; or
we become subject to significant judgments or settlements, including in connection with one or more of the matters discussed in Note 16—Commitments and Contingencies to our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report.
Our ability to arrange additional financing will depend on, among other factors, our financial position, performance, and credit ratings, as well as prevailing market conditions and other factors beyond our control. Global financial markets continue to be unpredictable and volatile. Prevailing market conditions could be adversely affected by (i) general market conditions, such as disruptions in domestic or overseas sovereign or corporate debt markets, geo-political instabilities, contractions or limited growth in the economy or other similar adverse economic developments in the U.S. or abroad and (ii) specific conditions in the communications industry. Volatility in the global markets could limit our access to the credit markets, leading to higher borrowing costs or, in some cases, the inability to obtain financing on terms that are as favorable as those from which we previously benefited, on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all.
In addition, our ability to borrow funds in the future will depend in part on the satisfaction of the covenants in our credit facilities and other debt instruments, which are discussed further below.
Our access to funds under our revolving credit facility is further dependent upon the ability of the facility’s lenders to meet their funding commitments. If one or more of the lenders fails to fund, the remaining lenders will not be legally obligated to rectify the funding shortfall.
For all the reasons mentioned above, we can give no assurance that additional financing for any of these purposes will be available on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all.
If we are unable to make required debt payments or refinance our debt, we would likely have to consider other options, such as selling assets, issuing additional securities, reducing or terminating our dividend payments, cutting costs or otherwise reducing our cash requirements, or negotiating with our lenders to restructure our applicable debt. Our current and future debt instruments may restrict, or market or business conditions may limit, our ability to do some of these things on favorable terms, or at all. For these and other reasons, we cannot assure you that we could implement these steps in a sufficient or timely manner, or at all. Moreover, any steps taken to strengthen our liquidity, such as cutting costs, could adversely impact our business or operations.

39


We have a complex debt structure, and our various debt agreements include restrictions and covenants that could (i) limit our ability to conduct operations or borrow additional funds, (ii) restrict our ability to engage in inter-company transactions and (iii) lead to the acceleration of our repayment obligations in certain instances.
CenturyLink, Inc. and various of its subsidiaries (including Embarq Corporation, Qwest Corporation, Qwest Capital Funding, Inc., Level 3 Financing, Inc. and Level 3 Parent, LLC) have borrowed substantial amounts of money from financial institutions or investors. Under the associated debt and financing arrangements, CenturyLink, Inc. and these subsidiaries are subject to various covenants and restrictions, the most restrictive of which pertain to the debt of CenturyLink, Inc. and the Level 3 entities.
CenturyLink, Inc.'s revolving and term loan debt arrangements contain several significant limitations restricting CenturyLink, Inc.’s ability to, among other things:
borrow additional money or issue guarantees;
pay dividends or other distributions to shareholders;
make loans, advances or other investments;
create liens on assets;
sell assets;
enter into sale-leaseback transactions;
enter into transactions with affiliates; and
engage in mergers or consolidations.
These above-listed restrictive covenants could materially adversely affect our ability to operate or expand our business, to pursue strategic transactions, or to otherwise pursue our plans and strategies.
The debt and financing arrangements of Level 3 Parent, LLC and its subsidiary Level 3 Financing, Inc. contain substantially similar limitations that restrict their operations on a standalone basis as a separate restricted group. Consequently, certain of these covenants may significantly restrict our ability to receive cash from Level 3, to distribute cash from Level 3 to other of our affiliated entities, or to enter into other transactions among our wholly-owned entities.
CenturyLink, Inc.'s above-referenced debt arrangements also contain financial covenants that require us to maintain certain financial ratios, and the term loan debt of Qwest Corporation includes a similar financial covenant. The ability of CenturyLink, Inc. and Qwest Corporation to comply with these provisions may be affected by events beyond their control.
The failure of CenturyLink, Inc. or any of its subsidiaries to comply with the above-described restrictive or financial covenants could result in an event of default, which, if not cured or waived, could accelerate our debt repayment obligations. Certain of our debt instruments have cross-default or cross-acceleration provisions. When present, these provisions could have a wider impact on liquidity than might otherwise arise from a default or acceleration of a single debt instrument. As noted elsewhere herein, we cannot assure you that we could adequately address any such defaults, cross-defaults or acceleration of our debt payment obligations in a sufficient or timely manner, or at all. For additional information, see “We expect to periodically require financing, and we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain such financing on terms that are acceptable to us, or at all” and Note 5—Long-Term Debt and Credit Facilities.
Any downgrade in the credit ratings of us or our affiliates could limit our ability to obtain future financing, increase our borrowing costs and adversely affect the market price of our existing debt securities or otherwise impair our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Nationally recognized credit rating organizations have issued credit ratings relating to CenturyLink, Inc.'s long-term debt and the long-term debt of several of its subsidiaries. Most of these ratings are below “investment grade”, which results in higher borrowing costs than "investment grade" debt as well as reduced marketability of our debt securities. There can be no assurance that any rating assigned to any of these debt securities will remain in effect for any given period of time or that any such ratings will not be lowered, suspended or withdrawn entirely by a rating agency if, in that rating agency’s judgment, circumstances so warrant.

40


A downgrade of any of these credit ratings could:
adversely affect the market price of some or all of our outstanding debt or equity securities;
limit our access to the capital markets or otherwise adversely affect the availability of other new financing on favorable terms, if at all;
trigger the application of restrictive covenants in certain of our debt agreements or result in new or more restrictive covenants in agreements governing the terms of any future indebtedness that we may incur;
increase our cost of borrowing; and
impair our business, financial condition and results of operations.
For more information on the credit ratings of our secured and unsecured debt, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations - Liquidity and Capital Resources - Debt and Other Financing Arrangements” in Item 7 of this report.
Under certain circumstances upon a change of control, we will be obligated to offer to repurchase certain of our outstanding debt securities, which could have certain adverse ramifications.
Under our June 19, 2017 credit agreement, a “change of control” of CenturyLink, Inc. constitutes an event of default. Moreover, if the credit ratings relating to certain of our currently outstanding long-term debt securities are downgraded in the manner specified thereunder in connection with a “change of control” of CenturyLink, Inc., then we will be required to offer to repurchase such debt securities. The long-term debt securities of several of our subsidiaries include similar covenants that could, under similar circumstances in connection with a “change of control” of one of the subsidiaries, require us to offer to repurchase such securities. If, due to lack of cash, legal or contractual impediments, or otherwise, we fail to offer to repurchase such debt securities, such failure could constitute an event of default under such debt securities. Any default under our credit facility or these debt securities could in turn constitute a default under other of our agreements relating to our indebtedness outstanding at that time. Moreover, the existence of these repurchase covenants may in certain circumstances render it more difficult or discourage a sale or takeover of us, or the removal of our incumbent directors.
Our business requires us to incur substantial capital and operating expenses, which reduces our available free cash flow.
Our business is capital intensive. We expect to continue to require significant cash to maintain and expand our network to remain competitive.
We expect to invest additional capital to expand and enhance our network infrastructure as a result of several factors, including:
changes in customers' service requirements, including increased demands by customers to transmit larger amounts of data at faster speeds;
technological advances of our competitors;
the development and launch of new services; or
our regulatory commitments, including infrastructure construction requirements arising out of our participation in the FCC's CAF Phase 2 program, which are discussed further herein.
We may be unable to expand or adapt our network infrastructure to respond to these developments in a timely manner, at a commercially reasonable cost or on terms producing satisfactory returns on our investment.
In addition to investing in expanded networks, new products or new technologies, we must from time to time invest capital to (i) replace some of our aging equipment that supports many of our traditional services that are experiencing revenue declines or (ii) convert older systems to simplify and modernize our network. While we believe that our currently planned level of capital expenditures will meet both our maintenance and core growth requirements, this may not be the case if demands on our network continue to accelerate or other circumstances underlying our expectations change. Increased spending could, among other things, adversely affect our operating margins, cash flows, results of operations and financial position.
Similarly, we continue to anticipate incurring substantial operating expenses to support our incumbent services and growth initiatives. We may be unable to sufficiently manage or reduce these costs, even if revenues in some of our lines of business are decreasing. If so, our operating margins will be adversely impacted.


41


As a holding company, we rely on payments from our operating companies to meet our obligations.
As a holding company, substantially all of our income and operating cash flow is dependent upon the earnings of our subsidiaries and their distribution of those earnings to us in the form of dividends, loans or other payments. As a result, we rely upon our subsidiaries to generate the funds necessary to meet our obligations, including the payment of amounts owed under our long-term debt. Our subsidiaries are separate and distinct legal entities and have no obligation to pay any amounts owed by us or, subject to limited exceptions for tax-sharing or cash management purposes, to make any funds available to us to repay our obligations, whether by dividends, loans or other payments. State law applicable to our subsidiaries restricts the amount of dividends that they may pay. Restrictions that have been or may be imposed by state regulators (either in connection with obtaining necessary approvals for our acquisitions or in connection with our regulated operations), and restrictions imposed by credit instruments or other agreements applicable to certain of our subsidiaries may limit the amount of funds that our subsidiaries are permitted to transfer to us, including the amount of dividends that may be paid to us. Moreover, our rights to receive assets of any subsidiary upon its liquidation or reorganization will be effectively subordinated to the claims of creditors of that subsidiary, including trade creditors. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources” included elsewhere in this report for further discussion of these matters.
We cannot assure you that we will continue paying dividends at the current rates, or at all.
For the reasons noted below, we cannot assure you that we will continue periodic dividends on our capital stock at the current rates, or at all.
As noted in the immediately preceding risk factor, because we are a holding company with no material assets other than the stock of our subsidiaries, our ability to pay dividends will depend on our subsidiaries generating a sufficient amount of earnings and cash flow and their ability to furnish funds to us in the form of dividends, loans or other payments.
Any quarterly dividends on our common stock and our outstanding shares of preferred stock will be paid from funds legally available for such purpose when, as and if declared by our Board of Directors. Decisions on whether, when and in which amounts to continue making any future dividend distributions will remain at all times entirely at the discretion of our Board of Directors, which reserves the right to change or terminate our dividend practices at any time and for any reason without prior notice, including without limitation any of the following:
our supply of cash or other liquid assets is anticipated to remain under pressure for the various reasons described in this report;
our cash requirements or plans might change for a wide variety of reasons, including changes in our financial position, capital allocation plans (including a desire to retain or accumulate cash), capital spending plans, stock purchase plans, acquisition strategies, strategic initiatives, debt payment plans (including a desire to maintain or improve credit ratings on our debt securities), pension funding or other benefits payments;
our ability to service and refinance our current and future indebtedness and our ability to borrow or raise additional capital to satisfy our capital needs;
the amount of dividends that we may distribute to our shareholders is subject to restrictions under Louisiana law and restrictions imposed by our existing or future credit facilities, debt securities, outstanding preferred stock securities, leases and other agreements, including restricted payment and leverage covenants; and
the amount of cash that our subsidiaries may make available to us, whether by dividends, loans or other payments, may be subject to the legal, regulatory and contractual restrictions described in the immediately preceding risk factor.
Based on its evaluation of these and other relevant factors, our Board of Directors may, in its sole discretion, decide not to declare a dividend on our common stock or our outstanding shares of preferred stock for any period for any reason without prior notice, regardless of whether we have funds legally available for such purposes. Holders of our equity securities should be aware that they have no contractual or other legal right to receive dividends.
Similarly, holders of our common stock should be aware that repurchases of our common stock under any repurchase plan then in effect are completely discretionary, and may be suspended or discontinued at any time for any reason regardless of our financial position.

42


Our current dividend practices could limit our ability to deploy cash for other beneficial purposes.
The current practice of our Board of Directors to pay common share dividends reflects a current intention to distribute to our shareholders a substantial portion of our cash flow. As a result, we may not retain a sufficient amount of cash to apply to other transactions that could be beneficial to our shareholders or debtholders, including stock buybacks, debt prepayments or capital expenditures that strengthen our business. In addition, our ability to pursue any material expansion of our business through acquisitions or increased capital spending may depend more than it otherwise would on our ability to obtain third party financing.
We cannot assure you whether, when or in what amounts we will be able to use our foreign or state net operating loss carryforwards, or when they will be depleted.
At December 31, 2017, we had state NOL carryforwards of approximately $21 billion. These NOLs are comprised of $11 billion from CenturyLink and $10 billion from Level 3. A significant portion of the state NOL carryforwards are generated in states where separate company income tax returns are filed and our subsidiaries that generated the losses may not have the ability to generate income in sufficient amounts to realize these losses. In addition, certain of these state NOL carryforwards will be limited by state laws related to ownership changes. As a result, we expect to utilize only a small portion of the state NOL carryforwards, and consequently have determined that as of December 31, 2017, these state NOL carryforwards, net of federal benefit, had a net tax benefit (after giving effect to our valuation allowance) of $481 million.
Additionally, we have foreign NOL carryforwards of $5.8 billion as a result of the Level 3 acquisition. A significant portion of the foreign NOL carryforwards are generated in subsidiaries that do not have a history of earnings and may not have the ability to generate income in sufficient amounts to realize the losses. As of December 31, 2017, we have determined that these foreign NOL carryforwards had net benefit of $293 million.
Increases in costs for pension and healthcare benefits for our active and retired employees may reduce our profitability and increase our funding commitments.
As of December 31, 2017, we had approximately 34,000 active employees participating in our company sponsored benefit plans, approximately 72,000 active and retired employees and surviving spouses eligible for post-retirement benefits, approximately 67,000 pension retirees and approximately 15,000 former employees with vested pension benefits participating in our benefit plans. The cost to fund the pension and healthcare benefit plans for our active and retired employees has a significant impact on our profitability. Our costs of maintaining our pension and healthcare plans, and the future funding requirements for these plans, are affected by several factors, most of which are outside our control, including:
decreases in investment returns on funds held by our pension and other benefit plan trusts;
changes in prevailing interest rates and discount rates or other factors used to calculate the funding status of our pension and other post-retirement plans;
increases in healthcare costs generally or claims submitted under our healthcare plans specifically;
increasing longevity of our employees and retirees;
the impact of the continuing implementation, modification or potential repeal of current federal healthcare legislation and regulations promulgated thereunder;
increases in the number of retirees who elect to receive lump sum benefit payments;
increases in insurance premiums we are required to pay to the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation, an independent agency of the United States government that must cover its own underfunded status by collecting premiums from a declining population of pension plans that are qualified under the U.S. tax code;
changes in plan benefits; and
changes in funding laws or regulations.
Increased costs under these plans could reduce our profitability and increase our funding commitments to our pension plans. Any future material cash contributions could have a negative impact on our liquidity by reducing our cash flows available for other purposes. Similarly, depletion of assets placed in trust by us to fund these benefits, such as those discussed elsewhere herein, will similarly reduce our liquidity by reducing our cash flows available for other purposes.

43


As of December 31, 2017, our pension plans and our other post-retirement benefit plans were substantially underfunded from an accounting standpoint. See Note 9—Employee Benefits to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of this report. For more information on our obligations under our defined benefit pension plans and other post-retirement benefit plans, please see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Pension and Post-retirement Benefit Obligations” included in Item 7 of this report.
For additional information concerning our liquidity and capital resources, see Item 7 of this report. For a discussion of certain currency and liquidity risks associated with our international operations, see "Risk Factors—Risks Affecting Our Business—Our international operations expose us to various regulatory, currency, tax, legal and other risks."
Other Risks
We face risks from natural disasters, which can disrupt our operations and cause us to incur substantial additional capital and operating costs.
A substantial number of our facilities are located in Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Texas, North Carolina, South Carolina and other coastal states, which subjects them to the risks associated with severe tropical storms, hurricanes and tornadoes, including downed telephone lines, flooded facilities, power outages, fuel shortages, damaged or destroyed property and equipment, and work interruptions. Although we maintain property and casualty insurance on our property (excluding our above ground outside plant) and may, under certain circumstances, be able to seek recovery of some additional costs through increased rates, only a portion of our additional costs directly related to such natural disasters have historically been recoverable. We cannot predict whether we will continue to be able to obtain insurance for catastrophic hazard-related damages or, if obtainable and carried, whether this insurance will be adequate to cover our losses. In addition, we expect any insurance of this nature to be subject to substantial deductibles, retentions and coverage exclusions, and the premiums to be based on our loss experience. For all these reasons, any future hazard-related costs and work interruptions could adversely affect our operations and our financial condition.
Terrorist attacks and other acts of violence or war may adversely affect the financial markets and our business.
Future terrorist attacks or armed conflicts may directly affect our physical facilities or those of our customers. These events could cause consumer confidence and spending to decrease or result in increased volatility in the U.S. and world financial markets and economy. Any of these occurrences could materially adversely affect our business.
If conditions or assumptions differ from the judgments, assumptions or estimates used in our critical accounting policies or forward-looking statements, our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures could be materially affected.
The preparation of financial statements and related disclosures in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make judgments, assumptions and estimates that affect the amounts reported in our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes. Our critical accounting policies, which are described in “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates” in Item 7 of this report, describe those significant accounting policies and methods used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements that are considered “critical” because they require judgments, assumptions and estimates that materially impact our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures. As a result, if future events or assumptions differ significantly from the judgments, assumptions and estimates in our critical accounting policies, these events or assumptions could have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.
While frequently presented with numeric specificity, the guidance and other forward-looking statements that we disseminate from time to time is based on numerous variables and assumptions (including, but not limited to, those related to industry performance and competition and general business, economic, market and financial conditions and additional matters specific to our business, as applicable) that are inherently subjective and speculative and are largely beyond our control. As a result, actual results may differ materially from our guidance or other forward-looking statements. Similarly, to adjust to evolving market conditions, we may change our intentions, strategies or plans at any time, which could materially alter our actual results from those previously anticipated. For additional information, see "Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements and Related Matters" in Item 1 of this report.

44


Lapses in disclosure controls and procedures or internal control over financial reporting could materially and adversely affect our operations, profitability or reputation.
There can be no assurance that our disclosure controls and procedures will be effective in the future or that we will not experience a material weakness or significant deficiency in internal control over financial reporting. Any such lapses or deficiencies may materially and adversely affect our business, operating results or financial condition, restrict our ability to access the capital markets, require us to expend significant resources to correct the lapses or deficiencies, expose us to regulatory or legal proceedings, including litigation brought by private individuals, subject us to fines, penalties or judgments, harm our reputation, or otherwise cause a decline in investor confidence and our stock price.
If our goodwill or other intangible assets become impaired, we may be required to record a significant charge to earnings and reduce our stockholders' equity.
As of December 31, 2017, approximately 57% of our total consolidated assets reflected on the consolidated balance sheet included in this report consisted of goodwill, customer relationships and other intangible assets. Under U.S. generally accepted accounting principles, most of these intangible assets must be tested for impairment on an annual basis or more frequently whenever events or circumstances indicate that their carrying value may not be recoverable. From time to time, we have recorded large non-cash charges to earnings in connection with required reductions of the value of our intangible assets. If our intangible assets are determined to be impaired in the future, we may be required to record additional significant, non-cash charges to earnings during the period in which the impairment is determined to have occurred. Any such charges could, in turn, have a material adverse effect on our results of operation, financial condition or ability to comply with financial covenants in our debt instruments.
The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act will have a substantial impact on us.
On December 22, 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the "Act") was signed into law. The Act significantly changes U.S. tax law by reducing the U.S. corporate income tax rate and making certain changes to U.S. taxation of income earned by foreign subsidiaries, capital expenditures, interest expense and various other items. Although we generally believe the net impact of this Act will be favorable to us, the Act is quite complex and certain of its features are expected to adversely impact us. Our views on the Act’s ultimate impact on us are subject to change as we complete additional analysis, review regulations that will need to be adopted to implement the Act and monitor other future developments related to the Act’s adoption.    
Additional changes in tax laws or tax audits could adversely affect us.
Like all large businesses, we are subject to frequent and regular audits by the Internal Revenue Service as well as state and local tax authorities. These audits could subject us to tax liabilities if adverse positions are taken by these tax authorities.
We believe that we have adequately provided for tax contingencies. However, our tax audits and examinations may result in tax liabilities that differ materially from those that we have recognized in our consolidated financial statements. Because the ultimate outcomes of all of these matters are uncertain, we can give no assurance as to whether an adverse result from one or more of them will have a material effect on our financial results.
Legislators and regulators at all levels of government may from time to time change existing tax laws or regulations or enact new laws or regulations that could negatively impact our operating results or financial condition.
The trading price of our common stock could be reduced if a large number of shares of our common stock are sold in the public market.
Our articles of incorporation currently authorize us to issue additional shares of our common stock, frequently without shareholder approval. Such additional issuances may dilute the beneficial ownership and voting power of our shareholders, and could reduce the trading price of our common stock. Similarly, the market price of our common stock could drop significantly if certain large holders of our common stock sell all or a substantial portion of their holdings in the public markets, or indicate their intent to do so. Similarly, the market price of our stock could be adversely affected if analysts or other market participants issue reports or make other statements that recommend the sale of our shares.
Our agreements and organizational documents and applicable law could limit another party’s ability to acquire us.
A number of provisions in our agreements and organizational documents and various provisions of applicable law may delay, defer or prevent a future takeover of CenturyLink unless the takeover is approved by our Board of Directors. These provisions could deprive our shareholders of any related takeover premium. For additional information, please see our Registration Statement on Form 8-A/A filed with the SEC on March 2, 2015.

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ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.

46


ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
Our property, plant and equipment consists principally of telephone lines, cable, cable landing stations, central office equipment, land and buildings related to our operations. Our gross property, plant and equipment consisted of the following components:
 
As of December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
Land
2
%
 
2
%
Fiber, conduit and other outside plant(1)
45
%
 
43
%
Central office and other network electronics(2)
36
%
 
35
%
Support assets(3)
15
%
 
17
%
Construction in progress(4)
2
%
 
3
%
Gross property, plant and equipment
100
%
 
100
%
_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
Fiber, conduit and other outside plant consists of fiber and metallic cable, conduit, poles and other supporting structures.
(2) 
Central office and other network electronics consists of circuit and packet switches, routers, transmission electronics and electronics providing service to customers.
(3) 
Support assets consist of buildings, cable landing stations, data centers, computers and other administrative and support equipment.
(4) 
Construction in progress includes inventory held for construction and property of the aforementioned categories that has not been placed in service as it is still under construction.
We own substantially all of our telecommunications equipment required for our business. However, we lease from third parties certain facilities, plant, equipment and software under various capital and operating lease arrangements when the leasing arrangements are more favorable to us than purchasing the assets. We also own and lease administrative offices in major metropolitan locations both in the United States and internationally. Substantially all of our network electronics equipment is located in buildings or on land that we own or lease, typically within our local service area. Outside of our local service area, our assets are generally located on real property pursuant to an agreement with the property owner or another person with rights to the property. It is possible that we may lose our rights under one or more of these agreements, due to their termination or expiration or in connection with legal challenges to our rights under such agreements. With the acquisition of Level 3 on November 1, 2017, we acquired, among other things, title or leasehold rights to various cable landing stations and data centers throughout the world related to undersea and terrestrial cable systems.
Our net property, plant and equipment was approximately $26.9 billion and $17.0 billion at December 31, 2017 and 2016, respectively. Some of our property, plant and equipment is pledged to secure the long-term debt of subsidiaries. For additional information, see Note 7—Property, Plant and Equipment to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report.
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
The information contained under the subheadings "Pending Matters" and "Other Proceedings and Disputes" in Note 16—Commitments and Contingencies to our consolidated financial statements included in Item 8 of Part II of this report is incorporated herein by reference.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.

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PART II
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Our common stock is listed on the New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") and the Berlin Stock Exchange and is traded under the symbol CTL and CYT, respectively. The following table sets forth the high and low reported sales prices on the NYSE along with the quarterly dividends, for each of the quarters indicated.
 
Sales Price
 
Cash Dividend per
Common Share
 
High
 
Low
 
2017
 
 
 
 
 
First quarter
$
26.29

 
22.33

 
0.540

Second quarter
27.61

 
23.05

 
0.540

Third quarter
24.14

 
18.17

 
0.540

Fourth quarter
20.55

 
13.16

 
0.540

2016
 
 
 
 
 
First quarter
$
32.49

 
21.94

 
0.540

Second quarter
32.94

 
26.35

 
0.540

Third quarter
31.56

 
26.51

 
0.540

Fourth quarter
33.45

 
22.86

 
0.540

Dividends on common stock during 2017 and 2016 were paid each quarter. On February 21, 2018, our Board of Directors declared a common stock dividend of $0.54 per share.
As described in greater detail in "Risk Factors" in Item 1A of Part I of this report, the declaration and payment of dividends is at the discretion of our Board of Directors, and will depend upon our financial results, cash requirements, future prospects and other factors deemed relevant by our Board of Directors.
At February 16, 2018, there were approximately 121,000 stockholders of record, although there were significantly more beneficial holders of our common stock. At February 16, 2018, the closing stock price of our common stock was $18.93.
Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities
The following table contains information about shares of our previously-issued common stock that we withheld from employees upon vesting of their stock-based awards during the fourth quarter of 2017 to satisfy the related minimum tax withholding obligations:
 
Total Number of
Shares Withheld
for Taxes
 
Average Price Paid
Per Share
Period
 
 
 
October 2017
4,554

 
$
20.00

November 2017
186,767

 
17.48

December 2017
140,448

 
15.57

Total
331,769

 
 


48


ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
The following tables of selected consolidated financial data should be read in conjunction with, and are qualified by reference to, our consolidated financial statements and notes thereto in Item 8 of Part II and "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report.
The tables of selected financial data shown below are derived from our audited consolidated financial statements, which include the operating results, cash flows and operational metrics of Level 3 for the 2 months ended December 31, 2017, and the assets and liabilities of Level 3 as of December 31, 2017. These historical results are not necessarily indicative of results that you can expect for any future period.
The following table summarizes selected financial information from our consolidated statements of operations.
 
Years Ended December 31,(1)
 
2017(2)(3)(5)
 
2016(3)(4)(5)(6)
 
2015(4)(5)
 
2014(4)(7)
 
2013(4)(8)
 
(Dollars in millions, except per share amounts
and shares in thousands)
Operating revenues
$
17,656

 
17,470

 
17,900

 
18,031

 
18,095

Operating expenses
15,647

 
15,137

 
15,321

 
15,674

 
16,800

Operating income
$
2,009

 
2,333

 
2,579

 
2,357

 
1,295

Income before income tax expense
540

 
1,020

 
1,316

 
1,110

 
224

Net income (loss)
1,389

 
626

 
878

 
772

 
(239
)
Basic earnings (loss) per common share
2.21

 
1.16

 
1.58

 
1.36

 
(0.40
)
Diluted earnings (loss) per common share
2.21

 
1.16

 
1.58

 
1.36

 
(0.40
)
Dividends declared per common share
2.16

 
2.16

 
2.16

 
2.16

 
2.16

Weighted average basic common shares outstanding
627,808

 
539,549

 
554,278

 
568,435

 
600,892

Weighted average diluted common shares outstanding
628,693

 
540,679

 
555,093

 
569,739

 
600,892

_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
See "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Results of Operations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report and in our preceding annual reports on Form 10-K for a discussion of unusual items affecting the results for each of the years presented.
(2) 
The enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act legislation in December 2017 resulted in a re-measurement of our deferred tax assets and liabilities at the new federal corporate tax rate of 21%. The re-measurement resulted in a tax benefit of approximately $1.1 billion.
(3) 
During 2017 and 2016, we incurred Level 3 acquisition-related expenses of $271 million and $52 million, respectively. For additional information, see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Acquisition of Level 3" and Note 2—Acquisition of Level 3 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report.
(4) 
In 2017, we adopted ASU 2017-07, "Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost" by retrospectively applying the requirements of the ASU to our previously issued consolidated financial statements. The adoption of ASU 2017-07 increased operating income and increased total other expense, net by $2 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 and reduced operating income and decreased total other expense, net by $26 million, $53 million and $158 million for the years ended December 31, 2015, 2014 and 2013, respectively.
(5) 
During 2017, 2016 and 2015, we recognized an incremental $186 million, $201 million and $215 million, respectively, of revenue associated with the Federal Communications Commission ("FCC") Connect America Fund Phase 2 support program, as compared to revenues received under the interstate USF program.
(6) 
During 2016, we recognized $189 million of severance expenses and other one-time termination benefits associated with our workforce reductions.
(7) 
During 2014, we recognized a $60 million tax benefit associated with a deduction for the tax basis for worthless stock in a wholly-owned foreign subsidiary and a $63 million pension settlement charge.
(8) 
During 2013, we recorded a non-cash, non-tax-deductible goodwill impairment charge of $1.092 billion for goodwill attributed to one of our previous operating segments and a litigation settlement charge of $235 million.

49


Selected financial information from our consolidated balance sheets is as follows:
 
As of December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
(Dollars in millions)
Net property, plant and equipment(1)
$
26,852

 
17,039

 
18,069

 
18,433

 
18,646

Goodwill(1)
30,475

 
19,650

 
20,742

 
20,755

 
20,674

Total assets(2)
75,611

 
47,017

 
47,604

 
49,103

 
50,471

Total long-term debt(2)(3)
37,726

 
19,993

 
20,225

 
20,503

 
20,809

Total stockholders' equity
23,491

 
13,399

 
14,060

 
15,023

 
17,191

_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
During 2016, as a result of our then pending sale of our colocation business and data centers, we reclassified $1.071 billion in net property, plant and equipment and $1.141 billion of goodwill to assets held for sale which is included in other current assets on our consolidated balance sheet. See Note 3—Sale of Colocation Business and Data Centers to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report, for additional information.
(2) 
In 2015, we adopted both ASU 2015-03 "Simplifying the Presentation of Debt Issuance Costs" and ASU 2015-17 "Balance Sheet Classification of Deferred Taxes" by retrospectively applying the requirements of the ASUs to our previously issued consolidated financial statements. The adoption of both ASU 2015-03 and ASU 2015-17 reduced total assets by $1.044 billion and $1.316 billion in each year for the two years ended December 31, 2014, respectively, and ASU 2015-03 reduced total long-term debt by $168 million and $157 million in each year for the two years ended December 31, 2014, respectively.
(3) 
Total long-term debt includes current maturities of long-term debt and capital lease obligations of $305 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 associated with assets held for sale. For additional information on our total long-term debt, see Note 5—Long-Term Debt and Credit Facilities to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report. For total contractual obligations, see "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Future Contractual Obligations" in Item 7 of Part II of this report.
Selected financial information from our consolidated statements of cash flows is as follows:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
(Dollars in millions)
Net cash provided by operating activities
$
3,878

 
4,608

 
5,153

 
5,188

 
5,559

Net cash used in investing activities
(8,871
)
 
(2,994
)
 
(2,853
)
 
(3,077
)
 
(3,148
)
Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities
5,358

 
(1,518
)
 
(2,301
)
 
(2,151
)
 
(2,454
)
Payments for property, plant and equipment and capitalized software
(3,106
)
 
(2,981
)
 
(2,872
)
 
(3,047
)
 
(3,048
)
The following table presents certain of our selected operational metrics:
 
As of December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
(in thousands)
Operational metrics:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total access lines(1)
10,282

 
11,090

 
11,748

 
12,394

 
13,002

Total broadband subscribers(1)
5,662

 
5,945

 
6,048

 
6,082

 
5,991

_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
Access lines are lines reaching from the customers' premises to a connection with the public network and broadband subscribers are customers that purchase broadband connection service through their existing telephone lines, stand-alone telephone lines, or fiber-optic cables. Our methodology for counting our access lines and broadband subscribers includes only those lines that we use to provide services to external customers and excludes lines used solely by us and our affiliates. It also excludes unbundled loops and includes stand-alone broadband subscribers. We count lines when we install the service.


50


ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
All references to "Notes" in this Item 7 of Part II refer to the Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements included in Item 8 of Part II of this report. Certain statements in this report constitute forward-looking statements. See "Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking Statements and Related Matters" in Item 1 of Part I of this report for factors relating to these statements and "Risk Factors" in Item 1A of Part I of this report for a discussion of certain risk factors applicable to our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity or prospects.
Overview
We are an international facilities-based communications company engaged primarily in providing an integrated array of services to our residential and business customers. Our communications services include local and long-distance voice, virtual private network ("VPN") data network, private line (including business data services), Ethernet, information technology, wavelength, broadband, colocation and data center services, managed services, professional and other services provided in connection with selling equipment, network security and various other ancillary services. We strive to maintain our customer relationships by, among other things, bundling our service offerings to provide our customers with a complete offering of integrated communications services.
With approximately 450,000 route miles of fiber optic cable globally, we believe we are among the largest providers of communications services to global enterprise customers. Our terrestrial and subsea fiber optic long-haul network throughout North America, Europe and Latin America connects to metropolitan fiber networks that we operate. We operate in over 60 countries, with the substantial majority of our revenues being derived in the United States.
Based on our approximately 10.3 million total access lines at December 31, 2017, we believe we are the third largest wireline telecommunications company in the United States.
Acquisition of Level 3
On November 1, 2017, CenturyLink, Inc. ("CenturyLink") acquired Level 3 Communications, Inc. ("Level 3") through successive merger transactions, including a merger of Level 3 with and into a merger subsidiary, which survived such merger as our indirect wholly-owned subsidiary under the name of Level 3 Parent, LLC. We entered into this transaction, among other things, to realize certain strategic benefits, including enhanced financial and operational scale, market diversification and leveraged combined networks.
During the year ended December 31, 2017, we recognized $97 million of integration-related expenses associated with our activities related to the Level 3 acquisition. During 2017, we also recognized $174 million in merger-related transaction costs, including investment banker and legal fees in connection with consummating the transaction.
Our consolidated financial statements include the accounts of CenturyLink and its majority owned subsidiaries, including Level 3 beginning on November 1, 2017. Due to the significant size of the acquisition, direct comparison of our results of operations for the periods ending on or after December 31, 2017 to prior periods are less meaningful than usual.
As a result of the acquisition, Level 3's assets and liabilities have been revalued and recorded at their preliminary estimated fair value. The assignment of estimated fair value requires a significant amount of judgment. The use of fair value measures affects the comparability of our post-acquisition financial information and may make it more difficult to predict earnings in future periods. We expect to complete our final fair value determinations prior to the first anniversary of the acquisition. Our final fair value determinations may be significantly different than those preliminary values reflected in our consolidated financial statements at December 31, 2017.
In the discussion that follows, we refer to the business that we operated prior to the Level 3 acquisition as "Legacy CenturyLink", and we refer to the incremental business activities that we now operate as a result of the Level 3 acquisition as "Legacy Level 3."
For additional information about our acquisition of Level 3, see (i) Note 2—Acquisition of Level 3 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report, (ii) our current report on Form 8-K/A filed by us with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the "SEC") on January 16, 2018, (iii) our current report on Form 8-K filed by us with the SEC on November 1, 2017 and (iv) the definitive joint proxy statement/prospectus filed by us with the SEC on February 13, 2017.

51


Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business
On May 1, 2017, we sold our data centers and colocation business to a consortium led by BC Partners, Inc. and Medina Capital ("the Purchaser") in exchange for pre-tax cash proceeds of $1.8 billion and a minority stake in the limited partnership that owns the consortium's newly-formed global secure infrastructure company, Cyxtera Technologies. As part of the transaction, the Purchaser acquired 57 of our data centers and assumed our capital lease obligations, which amounted to $294 million on May 1, 2017, related to the divested properties.
Our colocation business generated revenues (excluding revenue from affiliates) of $210 million from January 1, 2017 through May 1, 2017, and $622 million and $626 million for the years ended December 31, 2016 and 2015, respectively (a small portion of which has been retained by us).
This transaction did not meet the accounting requirements for a sale-leaseback transaction as described in ASC 840-40, Leases - Sale-Leaseback Transaction. Under the failed-sale-leaseback accounting model, we are deemed under GAAP to still own certain real estate assets sold to Cyxtera. The failed-sale-leaseback accounting treatment decreased net income by $103 million on our consolidated results of operations for the year ended December 31, 2017.
After factoring in the costs to sell the data centers and colocation business, excluding the impacts from the failed-sale-leaseback accounting treatment, the sale resulted in a $20 million gain as a result of the aggregate value of the consideration we received exceeding the carrying value of the assets sold and liabilities assumed. Based on the fair market values of the failed-sale-leaseback assets, the failed-sale-leaseback accounting treatment resulted in a loss of $102 million as a result of the requirement to treat a certain amount of the pre-tax cash proceeds from the sale of the assets as though it were the result of a financing obligation. The combined net loss of $82 million is included in selling, general and administrative expenses in our consolidated statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2017. The sale also resulted in a significant capital loss carryforward, which was entirely offset by a valuation allowance due to our determination that we are not likely to be able to utilize this carryforward prior to its expiration.
For all of 2018, we will be required by GAAP to record similar non-cash adjustments to our net income. Upon the January 1, 2019 implementation of the new accounting standard for Leases (ASU 2016-02), which was issued by the FASB in early 2016, this particular accounting treatment will no longer be applicable for this transaction, and the above-described real estate assets and corresponding financing obligation will be derecognized from our consolidated balance sheet.
See Note 3—Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report for additional information on the sale.
New Organizational Structure
In January 2017, we implemented a new organization structure designed to further strengthen our ability to attain our operational, strategic and financial goals. Prior to this reorganization, we operated and reported as two segments, business and consumer. As a result of this reorganization, we changed the name of the predecessor business segment to "enterprise" segment. Additionally, we also reassigned our information technology, managed hosting, cloud hosting and hosting area network services from our business segment to a new non-reportable operating segment. We reported two segments, enterprise and consumer, from January 2017 through October 2017.
In connection with our acquisition of Level 3 (discussed further in Note 2—Acquisition of Level 3 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report), effective November 1, 2017, we implemented a new organization structure and began managing our operations in two segments: business and consumer. Our consumer segment remains substantially unchanged under this reorganization, and our newly reorganized business segment includes the legacy CenturyLink enterprise segment operations and the legacy Level 3 operations. In addition, we reassigned our information technology, managed hosting, cloud hosting and hosting area network operations back into the business segment from the former non-reportable operating segment. At December 31, 2017, we had the following two segments:
Business Segment. This segment consists generally of providing products and services to small, medium and enterprise business, wholesale and government customers, including other communication providers. Our products and services offered to these customers include our local and long-distance voice, VPN data network, private line (including business data services), Ethernet, information technology, wavelength, broadband, colocation and data center services, managed services, professional and other services provided in connection with selling equipment, network security and various other ancillary services, all of which are described further under "Operating Revenues"; and
Consumer Segment. This segment consists generally of providing products and services to residential customers. Our products and services offered to these customers include our broadband, local and long-distance voice, video and other ancillary services.

52


Results of Operations
The following table summarizes the results of our consolidated operations for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
2017(1)(2)
 
2016(2)(3)(4)
 
2015(3)
 
(Dollars in millions except
per share amounts)
Operating revenues
$
17,656

 
17,470

 
17,900

Operating expenses
15,647

 
15,137

 
15,321

Operating income
2,009

 
2,333

 
2,579

Other expense, net
1,469

 
1,313

 
1,263

Income tax (benefit) expense
(849
)
 
394

 
438

Net income
$
1,389

 
626

 
878

Basic earnings per common share
$
2.21

 
1.16

 
1.58

Diluted earnings per common share
$
2.21

 
1.16

 
1.58

_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
The enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act legislation in December 2017 resulted in a re-measurement of our deferred tax assets and liabilities at the new federal corporate tax rate of 21%. The re-measurement resulted in a tax benefit of approximately $1.1 billion.
(2) 
During 2017 and 2016, we incurred Level 3 acquisition-related expenses of $271 million and $52 million, respectively. For additional information, see "Acquisition of Level 3" above and Note 2—Acquisition of Level 3 to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report.
(3) 
In 2017, we adopted ASU 2017-07, "Improving the Presentation of Net Periodic Pension Cost and Net Periodic Postretirement Benefit Cost" by retrospectively applying the requirements of the ASU to our previously issued consolidated financial statements. The adoption of ASU 2017-07 increased operating income and increased total other expense, net by $2 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 and reduced operating income and decreased total other expense, net by $26 million for the year ended December 31, 2015.
(4) 
During 2016, we recognized $189 million of severance expenses and other one-time termination benefits associated with our workforce reductions.
The following table summarizes our access lines, broadband subscribers and number of employees as of December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015:
 
As of December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
(in thousands)
Operational metrics:
 
 
 
 
 
Total access lines(1)
10,282

 
11,090

 
11,748

Total broadband subscribers(1)
5,662

 
5,945

 
6,048

Total employees
51

 
40

 
43

_______________________________________________________________________________
(1) 
Access lines are lines reaching from the customers' premises to a connection with the public network and broadband subscribers are customers that purchase broadband connection service through their existing telephone lines, stand-alone telephone lines, or fiber-optic cables. Our methodology for counting our access lines and broadband subscribers includes only those lines that we use to provide services to external customers and excludes lines used solely by us and our affiliates. It also excludes unbundled loops and includes stand-alone broadband subscribers. We count lines when we install the service.
During the last decade, we have experienced revenue declines primarily due to declines in access lines, private line customers, switched access rates and minutes of use. To mitigate these revenue declines, we remain focused on efforts to, among other things:
promote long-term relationships with our customers through bundling of integrated services;
increase the capacity, speed and usage of our networks;
provide a wide array of diverse services, including enhanced or additional services that may become available in the future due to, among other things, advances in technology or improvements in our infrastructure;

53


provide our premium services to a higher percentage of our customers;
pursue acquisitions of additional assets if available at attractive prices;
increase prices on our products and services if and when practicable; and
market our products and services to new customers.
Operating Revenues
We categorize our products, services and revenues among the following five categories:
IP and data services, which include primarily VPN data networks, Ethernet, IP, video (including our facilities-based video services and Vyvx broadcast services) and other ancillary services;
Transport and infrastructure, which include broadband, private line (including business data services), data center facilities and services, including cloud, hosting and application management solutions, wavelength, equipment sales and professional services, network security services and other ancillary services;
Voice and collaboration, which includes primarily local and long-distance voice, including wholesale voice, and other ancillary service;
IT and managed services, which include information technology services and managed services, which may be purchased in conjunction with our other network services; and
Regulatory revenues, which consist of Universal Service Fund ("USF") and Connect America Fund ("CAF") support payments and other operating revenues. We receive federal support payments from both federal and state USF programs and from the federal CAF program. The USF and CAF support payments are government subsidies designed to reimburse us for various costs related to certain telecommunications services. We generate other operating revenues from the leasing and subleasing of space in our office buildings, warehouses and other properties and from rental income associated with the failed-sale-leaseback. Because we centrally manage the activities that generate these regulatory revenues, these revenues are not included in our segment revenues.
For more information, see "Products and Services" in Item I of this report.
The following tables summarize our consolidated operating revenues recorded under our five revenue categories:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
IP & Data Services (1)
$
4,043

 
3,357

 
686

 
20
 %
Transport & Infrastructure (2)
6,551

 
6,826

 
(275
)
 
(4
)%
Voice & Collaboration (3)
5,679

 
5,943

 
(264
)
 
(4
)%
IT & Managed Services (4)
651

 
640

 
11

 
2
 %
Regulatory revenues (5)
732

 
704

 
28

 
4
 %
Total operating revenues
$
17,656

 
17,470

 
186

 
1
 %
_________________________________________________________________ 
(1
)
Includes primarily VPN data network, Ethernet, IP, video and ancillary revenues.
(2
)
Includes primarily broadband, private line (including business data services), colocation and data centers, wavelength and ancillary revenues.
(3
)
Includes local, long-distance and other ancillary revenues.
(4
)
Includes IT services and managed services revenues.
(5
)
Includes CAF Phase I, CAF Phase 2, federal and state USF support revenue, sublease rental income and failed-sale leaseback income.

54


 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2016
 
2015
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
IP & Data Services (1)
$
3,357

 
3,172

 
185

 
6
 %
Transport & Infrastructure (2)
6,826

 
6,986

 
(160
)
 
(2
)%
Voice & Collaboration (3)
5,943

 
6,326

 
(383
)
 
(6
)%
IT & Managed Services (4)
640

 
687

 
(47
)
 
(7
)%
Regulatory revenues (5)
704

 
729

 
(25
)
 
(3
)%
Total operating revenues
$
17,470

 
17,900

 
(430
)
 
(2
)%
____________________________________________________________________ 
(1
)
Includes primarily VPN data network, Ethernet, IP, video and ancillary revenues.
(2
)
Includes primarily broadband, private line (including business data services), colocation and data centers, wavelength and ancillary revenues.
(3
)
Includes local, long-distance and other ancillary revenues.
(4
)
Includes IT services and managed services revenues.
(5
)
Includes CAF Phase I, CAF Phase 2, federal and state USF support revenue, sublease rental income and failed-sale leaseback income.
Our total operating revenues increased by $186 million, or 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016 due to the inclusion of $1.39 billion in post-acquisition Legacy Level 3 operating revenues in our 2017 consolidated operating revenues. Total operating revenues for Legacy CenturyLink decreased by $1.204 billion for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016 and by $430 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The decline in total operating revenues for both periods reflects the continuing loss of access lines, loss of long-distance revenues primarily due to the displacement of traditional wireline telephone services by other competitive products and services, including data and wireless communication services, and reductions in the volume of our private line (including business data services) services. Our total operating revenues for the year ended December 31, 2017 were also impacted by the May 1, 2017 sale of our data centers and colocation business, which resulted in a reduction of colocation revenues of $396 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the prior year period.
Further analysis of our segment operating revenues and trends impacting our performance are provided below in "Segment Results."
Operating Expenses
Our current definitions of operating expenses are as follows:
Cost of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) are expenses incurred in providing products and services to our customers. These expenses include: employee-related expenses directly attributable to operating and maintaining our network (such as salaries, wages, benefits and professional fees); facilities expenses (which include third-party telecommunications expenses we incur for using other carriers' networks to provide services to our customers); rents and utilities expenses; equipment sales expenses (such as data integration and modem expenses); payments to universal service funds (which are federal and state funds that are established to promote the availability of telecommunications services to all consumers at reasonable and affordable rates, among other things, and to which we are often required to contribute); certain litigation expenses associated with our operations; and other expenses directly related to our operations; and
Selling, general and administrative expenses are corporate overhead and other operating expenses. These expenses include: employee-related expenses (such as salaries, wages, internal commissions, benefits and professional fees) directly attributable to selling products or services and employee-related expenses for administrative functions; marketing and advertising; property and other operating taxes and fees; external commissions; litigation expenses associated with general matters; bad debt expense; and other selling, general and administrative expenses.

55


These expense classifications may not be comparable to those of other companies.
The following tables summarize our operating expenses:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Cost of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)
$
8,203

 
7,774

 
429

 
6
%
Selling, general and administrative
3,508

 
3,447

 
61

 
2
%
Depreciation and amortization
3,936

 
3,916

 
20

 
1
%
Total operating expenses
$
15,647

 
15,137

 
510

 
3
%
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2016
 
2015
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Cost of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)
$
7,774

 
7,778

 
(4
)
 
 %
Selling, general and administrative
3,447

 
3,354

 
93

 
3
 %
Depreciation and amortization
3,916

 
4,189

 
(273
)
 
(7
)%
Total operating expenses
$
15,137

 
15,321

 
(184
)
 
(1
)%
Cost of Services and Products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization)
Cost of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) increased by $429 million, or 6%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016. The increase in costs of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) was attributable to the inclusion of $690 million in post-acquisition Legacy Level 3 costs (net of intercompany eliminations) in our consolidated costs of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization). Costs of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) for Legacy CenturyLink decreased by $261 million, or 3%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016. The decrease in cost of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) was primarily due to reductions in salaries and wages and employee benefits from lower headcount and healthcare costs, lower real estate and power expenses from the sale of the data centers and colocation business, and reduced customer premises equipment costs due to a decrease in sales of customer premises equipment and USF rates, which were partially offset by increases in facility costs. Cost of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) decreased by $4 million, or less than 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The decrease in cost of services and products (exclusive of depreciation and amortization) was primarily due to reductions in salaries and wages from lower headcount, professional fees, payment processing fees and customer premises equipment costs, which were substantially offset by increases in content costs for Prism TV (resulting from higher content volume and rates), network expense and USF rates.
Selling, General and Administrative
Selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $61 million, or 2%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016. The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses was primarily attributable to the inclusion of $253 million in post-acquisition Legacy Level 3 expenses (net of intercompany eliminations) in our consolidated selling, general and administrative expenses. Legacy CenturyLink's selling, general and administrative expenses decreased by $192 million, or 6%, primarily due to reductions in salaries and wages and employee benefits from lower headcount and healthcare costs, external commissions and bad debt expenses. These decreases were substantially offset by losses recognized from the sale of our data centers and colocation business and the related failed-sale-leaseback as further described in Note 3—Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report and increases in transaction and integration costs associated with the Level 3 acquisition. Selling, general and administrative expenses increased by $93 million, or 3%, for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The increase in selling, general and administrative expenses was primarily due to increases in severance expenses associated with workforce reductions, higher payments of employee health care claims, bad debt and other expenses (including fees related to the Level 3 acquisition), which were partially offset by reductions in professional fees and property and other taxes.

56


Depreciation and Amortization
The following tables provide detail of our depreciation and amortization expense:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Depreciation
$
2,710

 
2,691

 
19

 
1
%
Amortization
1,226

 
1,225

 
1

 
%
Total depreciation and amortization
$
3,936

 
3,916

 
20

 
1
%
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2016
 
2015
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Depreciation
$
2,691

 
2,836

 
(145
)
 
(5
)%
Amortization
1,225

 
1,353

 
(128
)
 
(9
)%
Total depreciation and amortization
$
3,916

 
4,189

 
(273
)
 
(7
)%
Annual depreciation expense is impacted by several factors, including changes in our depreciable cost basis, changes in our estimates of the remaining economic life of certain network assets, the addition of new plant (including from the acquisition of Level 3) and the sale of our data centers and colocation business. Depreciation expense increased by $19 million, or 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016 and decreased by $145 million, or 5%, for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The increase in depreciation expense for the year ended December 31, 2017 was primarily attributable to the inclusion of $143 million in post-acquisition Legacy Level 3 depreciation expense in our consolidated depreciation expense. Legacy CenturyLink's depreciation expense was lower for both periods due to full depreciation and retirement of certain plant placed in service prior to 2017 and 2016. Additionally, we ceased depreciating property, plant and equipment assets of our colocation business when we entered into the agreement to sell that business in late 2016. Absent the sale, we estimate that we would have recorded additional depreciation expense of $54 million from January 1, 2017 through May 1, 2017 related to the conveyed property. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in depreciation expense attributable to new plant placed in service since January1, 2016 and 2015, respectively. As a result of not meeting sale-leaseback accounting requirements, we are deemed under GAAP to still own certain real estate assets sold to Cyxtera; therefore, we are required to reflect a portion of the real estate assets on our consolidated balance sheet and depreciate these assets over their useful lives. As further described in Note 3—Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business, of the $91 million increase in depreciation expense on these real estate assets, $44 million is not expected to recur in future periods.
Amortization expense increased by $1 million, or less than 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016 and decreased by $128 million, or 9%, for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The increase in amortization expense for the year ended December 31, 2017 was primarily attributable to the inclusion of $139 million in post-acquisition Legacy Level 3 amortization expense in our consolidated amortization expense. Legacy CenturyLink's amortization expense was lower for both periods primarily due to the use of accelerated amortization for a portion of our customer relationship assets and our entry into an agreement to sell our data centers and colocation business. The effect of using an accelerated amortization method results in an incremental decline in expense each period as the intangible assets amortize. We ceased amortizing the intangible assets of our colocation business when we entered into the agreement to sell that business. Absent the sale, we estimate that we would have recorded additional amortization expense of $13 million from January 1, 2017 through May 1, 2017, related to the conveyed intangible assets. In addition, amortization of capitalized software was lower in both periods due to software becoming fully amortized faster than new software was acquired or developed.

57


Other Consolidated Results
The following tables summarize our total other expense, net and income tax (benefit) expense:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Interest expense
$
(1,481
)
 
(1,318
)
 
163

 
12
%
Other income, net
12

 
5

 
7

 
140
%
Total other expense, net
$
(1,469
)
 
(1,313
)
 
156

 
12
%
Income tax (benefit) expense
$
(849
)
 
394

 
(1,243
)
 
nm

 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2016
 
2015
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Interest expense
$
(1,318
)
 
(1,312
)
 
6

 
 %
Other income, net
5

 
49

 
(44
)
 
(90
)%
Total other expense, net
$
(1,313
)
 
(1,263
)
 
50

 
4
 %
Income tax expense
$
394

 
438

 
(44
)
 
(10
)%
_______________________________________________________________________________
nm-Percentages greater than 200% and comparisons between positive and negative values or to/from zero values are considered not meaningful.
Interest Expense
Interest expense increased by $163 million, or 12%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016. The increase in interest expense was primarily due to (i) the issuance of $7.945 billion of term loans in 2017 for the purpose of providing funding for the Level 3 acquisition, (ii) the assumption of Level 3's debt upon the consummation of the acquisition of Level 3, which accounted for $80 million in post-acquisition interest expense and (iii) the recognition of imputed interest expense resulting from the failed-sale-leaseback as further described in Note 3—Sale of Data Centers and Colocation Business. Interest expense increased by $6 million, or less than 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The increase in interest expense was substantially due to a reduction in the amount of net premium amortization recorded at acquisition due to the early retirement of several issuances of debt during the period, which has the effect of increasing interest expense, and an increase in interest expense on unsecured notes related to the issuance of $1.0 billion of new debt in April, 2016 in advance of a debt maturity in June, 2016.
Other Income, Net
Other income, net reflects certain items not directly related to our core operations, including our share of income from partnerships we do not control, interest income, gains and losses from non-operating asset dispositions, foreign currency gains and losses and components of net periodic pension and postretirement benefit costs. Other income (expense), net increased by $7 million, or 140%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016. This increase in other income, net was primarily due to a reduction in the loss on early retirement of debt, an increase in interest income from the $6 billion Term Loan B funds held in escrow and income generated from our services agreements with Cyxtera, which was substantially offset by a lower expected return on assets in 2017 for our pension and post-retirement plans. The expected return on assets for our pension and post-retirement plans was lower in 2017 as compared to 2016, which resulted in us recording pension and post-retirement expense in 2017 as compared to recording pension and post-retirement income in 2016. Other income, net decreased by $44 million, or 90%, for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. This decrease in other income, net was primarily due to losses on early retirement of debt, which was partially offset by the impact of nonrecurring funding from a state economic development program.

58


Income Tax (Benefits) Expense
The enactment of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act legislation in December 2017 resulted in a re-measurement of our deferred tax assets and liabilities at the new federal corporate tax rate of 21%. The re-measurement resulted in a tax benefit of approximately $1.1 billion recorded in the fourth quarter of 2017, which was the predominant factor contributing to our recognition of an $849 million income tax benefit for 2017, versus income tax expense of $394 million in the prior year. Income tax expense decreased by $44 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. For the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015, our effective income tax rate was (157.2)%, 38.6% and 33.3%, respectively. The effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2017 reflects the benefit from the re-measurement of deferred taxes as noted above, a $27 million tax expense related to the sale of our data centers and colocation business and a $32 million tax impact of non-deductible transaction costs related to the Level 3 acquisition. The effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2016 reflects a tax impact of $18 million from an intercompany dividend payment from one of our foreign subsidiaries to its domestic parent company that was made as part of our corporate restructuring in preparation for the sale of our colocation business. The effective tax rate for the year ended December 31, 2015 reflects a tax benefit of approximately $34 million related to affiliate debt rationalization, research and development tax credits of $28 million for 2011 through 2015, and a $16 million tax decrease due to changes in state taxes caused by apportionment changes, state tax rate changes and the changes in the expected utilization of net operating loss carryforwards ("NOLs"). See Note 13—Income Taxes to our consolidated financial statements in Item 8 of Part II of this report and "Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates—Income Taxes" below for additional information.
Segment Results
The results for our business and consumer segments are summarized below for the years ended December 31, 2017, 2016 and 2015:
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
(Dollars in millions)
Total segment revenues
$
16,924

 
16,766

 
17,171

Total segment expenses
9,390

 
9,081

 
9,025

Total segment income
$
7,534

 
7,685

 
8,146

Total margin percentage
45
%
 
46
%
 
47
%
Business segment:
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
$
11,220

 
10,704

 
10,977

Expenses
6,847

 
6,391

 
6,395

Income
$
4,373

 
4,313

 
4,582

Margin percentage
39
%
 
40
%
 
42
%
Consumer segment:
 
 
 
 
 
Revenues
$
5,704

 
6,062

 
6,194

Expenses
2,543

 
2,690

 
2,630

Income
$
3,161

 
3,372

 
3,564

Margin percentage
55
%
 
56
%
 
58
%

59


The following table reconciles our total segment revenues and total segment income presented above to consolidated operating revenues and consolidated operating income reported in our consolidated statements of operations.
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
(Dollars in millions)
Total segment revenues
$
16,924

 
16,766

 
17,171

Regulatory revenues
732

 
704

 
729

Operating revenues reported in our consolidated statements of operations
$
17,656

 
17,470

 
17,900

 
 
 
 
 
 
Total segment income
$
7,534

 
7,685

 
8,146

Regulatory revenues
732

 
704

 
729

Depreciation and amortization
(3,936
)
 
(3,916
)
 
(4,189
)
Non-segment expenses
(2,321
)
 
(2,140
)
 
(2,107
)
Operating income reported in our consolidated statements of operations
$
2,009

 
2,333

 
2,579

Products and Services
In connection with our acquisition of Level 3 on November 1, 2017, we revised the way we categorize our products and services and now report our related revenues under the following categories: IP and data services, transport and infrastructure, voice and collaboration, IT and managed services and regulatory revenues. From time to time, we change the categorization of our products and services, and we may make similar changes in the future.
We offer our customers the ability to bundle together several products and services. We believe our customers value the convenience and price discounts associated with receiving multiple services through a single company.

60


Business Segment
The operations of our business segment have been impacted by several significant trends, including those described below:
Our mix of total business segment revenues continues to migrate from traditional wireline voice services to newer, lower cost more technologically advanced products and services as our small, medium and enterprise business, wholesale and government customers increasingly demand integrated data, broadband, hosting and voice services. Our Ethernet-based services in the wholesale market face competition from cable companies and competitive fiber-based telecommunications providers. We anticipate continued pricing pressure for our colocation services as our competitors continue to expand their enterprise colocation operations. In recent years, our competitors, as well as several large, diversified technology companies, have made substantial investments in cloud computing. This expansion in competitive cloud computing offerings has led to increased pricing pressure, a migration towards lower-priced cloud-based services and enhanced competition for contracts, and we expect these trends to continue. Customers' demand for new technology has also increased the number of competitors offering services similar to ours. Price compression from each of these above-mentioned competitive pressures has negatively impacted the operating margins of certain business product and service offerings, and we expect this trend to continue. Our traditional wireline products and services revenues have been, and we expect they will continue to be, adversely affected by access line losses and price compression. In particular, our access, local services and long-distance revenues have been, and we expect will continue to be, adversely affected by customer migration to more technologically advanced services, a substantial increase in the use of non-voice communications, industry consolidation and price compression caused by regulation and rate reductions. For example, many of our business segment customers are substituting cable, wireless and Voice over Internet Protocol ("VoIP") services for traditional voice telecommunications services, resulting in continued access revenue loss. Demand for our private line services (including business data services) continues to decline due to our customers' optimization of their networks, industry consolidation and technological migration to higher-speed services. Although our traditional wireline services generally face fewer direct competitors than certain of our newer, lower cost more advanced products and services, customer migration and, to a lesser degree, price compression from competitive pressures have negatively impacted our traditional wireline revenues and the operating margins of these services. We expect this trend to continue. We expect both equipment sales and professional services revenue and the related costs will fluctuate from year to year as this offering tends to be more sensitive than others to changes in the economy and in spending trends of our federal, state and local government customers, many of whom have experienced substantial budget cuts over the past several years, with the possibility of additional future budget cuts.
Our operating costs also impact the operating margins of all of our above-mentioned services, but to a lesser extent than price compression and customer disconnects. These operating costs include employee costs, sales commissions, software costs on selected services, installation costs and third-party facility costs. We believe increases in operating costs have generally had a greater impact on the operating margins of some of our newer, more technologically advanced services as compared to our traditional wireline services, principally because those newer services rely more heavily upon the above-listed support functions. Operating costs, such as installation costs and third-party facility costs, have also negatively impacted the operating margins of our traditional wireline products and services, but to a lesser extent than customer loss, customer migration and price compression.
We continue to evaluate our segment operating structure and focus. This involves balancing our workforce in response to our workload requirements, productivity improvements and changes in industry, competitive, technological and regulatory conditions, while achieving operational efficiencies and improving our processes through automation. However, our ongoing efforts to increase revenue will continue to require that we incur higher costs in some areas. We also expect our business segment to benefit indirectly from enhanced efficiencies in our company-wide network operations.

61


The following tables summarize the results of operations from our business segment:
 
Business Segment
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Segment revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IP & Data Services (1)
$
3,595

 
2,851

 
744

 
26
 %
Transport & Infrastructure (2)
3,680

 
3,929

 
(249
)
 
(6
)%
Voice & Collaboration (3)
3,294

 
3,284

 
10

 
 %
IT & Managed Services (4)
651

 
640

 
11

 
2
 %
Total segment revenues
11,220

 
10,704

 
516

 
5
 %
Segment expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total expenses
6,847

 
6,391

 
456

 
7
 %
Segment income
$
4,373

 
4,313

 
60

 
1
 %
Segment margin percentage
39
%
 
40
%
 
 
 
 
__________________________________________________________________
(1)
Includes primarily VPN data network, Ethernet, IP and ancillary revenues.
(2)
Includes primarily broadband, private line (including business data services), colocation and data centers, wavelength and ancillary revenues.
(3)
Includes local, long-distance and other ancillary revenues.
(4)
Includes IT services and managed services revenues.
 
Business Segment
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2016
 
2015
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Segment revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IP & Data Services (1)
$
2,851

 
2,704

 
147

 
5
 %
Transport & Infrastructure (2)
3,929

 
4,157

 
(228
)
 
(5
)%
Voice & Collaboration (3)
3,284

 
3,429

 
(145
)
 
(4
)%
IT & Managed Services (4)
640

 
687

 
(47
)
 
(7
)%
Total segment revenues
10,704

 
10,977

 
(273
)
 
(2
)%
Segment expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total expenses
6,391

 
6,395

 
(4
)
 
 %
Segment income
$
4,313

 
4,582

 
(269
)
 
(6
)%
Segment margin percentage
40
%
 
42
%
 
 
 
 
______________________________________________________________________ 
(1)
Includes primarily VPN data network, Ethernet, IP and ancillary revenues.
(2)
Includes primarily broadband, private line (including business data services), colocation and data centers, wavelength and ancillary revenues.
(3)
Includes local, long-distance and other ancillary revenues.
(4)
Includes IT services and managed services revenues.

62


Segment Revenues
Business segment revenues increased by $516 million, or 5%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016 due to the inclusion of $1.39 billion in post-acquisition Legacy Level 3 business segment revenues in our consolidated business segment revenues. Business segment revenues for Legacy CenturyLink decreased by $874 billion for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016 and by $273 million for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The decline in business segment revenues for both periods is attributable to a reduction in access lines and lower volumes of long-distance and access services resulting from the competitive and technological factors noted above and to reductions in the volume of private line (including business data services) services. Our business segment revenues for the year ended December 31, 2017 were also impacted by the May 1, 2017 sale of our data centers and colocation business, which resulted in a reduction of colocation revenues of $396 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the prior year period.
Segment Expenses
Business segment expenses increased by $456 million, or 7%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016, primarily due to the inclusion of $749 million in post-acquisition Legacy Level 3 business segment expenses in our consolidated business segment expenses. Business segment expenses for Legacy CenturyLink decreased by $293 million for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016 primarily due to decreases in salaries and wages and employee benefits from lower headcount, real estate and power costs due to the sale of the data centers and colocation business, marketing and advertising expenses and network expense. These decreases were partially offset by an increase in facility costs. Business segment expenses for Legacy CenturyLink decreased by $4 million, or less than 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The decrease in our business segment expenses was primarily due to decreases in salaries and wages, professional fees and payment processing fees, which were substantially offset by increases in facility costs, network expense and real estate and power costs.
Segment Income
Business segment income increased by $60 million, or 1%, for the year ended December 31, 2017 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2016 primarily due to the inclusion of $641 million in post-acquisition Legacy Level 3 business segment net income and decreased by $269 million, or 6%, for the year ended December 31, 2016 as compared to the year ended December 31, 2015. The decrease of $581 million in Legacy CenturyLink business segment income for the year ended December 31, 2017 was due to the loss of customers, lower service volumes and the loss of income generated by our colocation business. The decrease in business segment income for the year ended December 31, 2016 was due predominantly to the loss of customers and lower service volumes.

63


Consumer Segment
The operations of our consumer segment have been impacted by several significant trends, including those described below:
In order to remain competitive and attract additional residential broadband subscribers, we believe it is important to continually increase our broadband network's scope and connection speeds. As a result, we continue to invest in our broadband network, which allows for the delivery of higher-speed broadband services to a greater number of customers. We compete in a maturing broadband market in which most consumers already have broadband services and growth rates in new subscribers have slowed or declined. Moreover, as described further in Item 1A of Part I of this report, certain of our competitors continue to provide broadband services at higher average transmission speeds than ours or through advanced wireless data service offerings, both of which we believe have impacted the competitiveness of certain of our broadband offerings. The offering of our facilities-based video services in our markets has required us to incur substantial start-up expenses in advance of marketing and selling the service. Also, our associated content costs continue to increase and the video business has become more competitive as more options become available to customers to access video services through new technologies. The demand for new technology has increased the number of competitors offering services similar to ours. Price compression and new technology from our competitors have negatively impacted the operating margins of our newer, more technologically advanced products and services and we expect this trend to continue. Our voice revenues have been, and we expect they will continue to be, adversely affected by access line losses and lower long-distance voice service volumes. Intense competition and product substitution continue to drive our access line losses. For example, many consumers are substituting cable and wireless voice services and electronic mail, texting and social networking non-voice services for traditional voice telecommunications services. We expect that these factors will continue to negatively impact our business. As a result of the expected loss of higher margin services associated with access lines, we continue to offer our customers service bundling and other product promotions to help mitigate this trend, as described below. Customer migration and price compression from competitive pressures have not only negatively impacted our traditional wireline services revenues, but they have also negatively impacted the operating margins of these services and we expect this trend to continue.
Operating costs also impact the operating margins of these services. These operating costs include employee costs, marketing and advertising expenses, sales commissions, TV content costs and installation costs. We believe increases in operating costs have generally had a greater impact on our operating margins of our newer, more technologically advanced products and services as compared to our traditional wireline services, principally because our newer, more technologically advanced products and services rely more heavily upon the above-listed operating expenses. Operating costs, such as installation costs and facility costs, have also negatively impacted the operating margins of our traditional wireline products and services, but to a lesser extent than customer migration and price compression. Operating costs also tend to impact our traditional wireline products and services margins to a lesser extent than our newer, more technologically advanced products and services as noted above.
Service bundling and product promotions. We offer our customers the ability to bundle multiple products and services. These customers can bundle broadband services with other services such as local voice, video and long-distance. While we believe our bundled service offerings can help retain customers, they also tend to lower our profit margins in the consumer segment due to the related discounts; and
Operating efficiencies. We continue to evaluate our segment operating structure and focus. This involves balancing our workforce in response to our workload requirements, productivity improvements and changes in industry, competitive, technological and regulatory conditions. We also expect our consumer segment to benefit indirectly from enhanced efficiencies in our company-wide network operations.

64


The following tables summarize the results of operations from our consumer segment:
 
Consumer Segment
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2017
 
2016
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Segment revenues:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IP & Data Services (1)
$
448

 
506

 
(58
)
 
(11
)%
Transport & Infrastructure (2)
2,871

 
2,897

 
(26
)
 
(1
)%
Voice & Collaboration (3)
2,385

 
2,659

 
(274
)
 
(10
)%
Total segment revenues
5,704

 
6,062

 
(358
)
 
(6
)%
Segment expenses:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total expenses
2,543

 
2,690

 
(147
)
 
(5
)%
Segment income
$
3,161

 
3,372

 
(211
)
 
(6
)%
Segment income margin percentage
55
%
 
56
%
 
 
 
 
______________________________________________________________________ 
(1)
Includes retail video revenues (including our facilities-based video revenues).
(2)
Includes primarily broadband and equipment sales and professional services revenues.
(3)
Includes local, long-distance and other ancillary revenues.
 
Consumer Segment
 
Years Ended December 31,
 
Increase / (Decrease)
 
% Change
 
2016
 
2015
 
 
 
(Dollars in millions)
 
 
Segment revenues: