424B3 1 f424b31021_tmcinc.htm PROSPECTUS

PROSPECTUS

 

Filed Pursuant to Rule 424(b)(3)
Registration No. 333-260126

TMC THE METALS COMPANY INC.

Up to 264,438,297 Common Shares
Up to 9,500,000 Warrants

________________

This prospectus relates to the issuance by us of up to an aggregate of 24,500,000 of our common shares, without par value (“Common Shares”), which consists of (i) up to 9,500,000 of Common Shares that are issuable upon the exercise of private placement warrants (the “Private Placement Warrants”) originally issued in a private placement in connection with the initial public offering of our predecessor company, Sustainable Opportunities Acquisition Corp. (“SOAC”), at an exercise price of $11.50 per Common Share, and (ii) up to 15,000,000 Common Shares that are issuable upon the exercise of 15,000,000 warrants issued in connection with the initial public offering of SOAC (the “Public Warrants,” and together with the Private Placement Warrants, the “Warrants”).

This prospectus also relates to the resale from time to time by the Selling Securityholders named in this prospectus (the “Selling Securityholders”) of up to (i) 9,500,000 Private Placement Warrants, (ii) 9,500,000 Common Shares that may be issued upon exercise of the Private Placement Warrants, (iii) 11,578,620 Common Shares that may be issued upon exercise of the Allseas Warrant (as defined below), (iv) 6,759,000 Common Shares held by SOAC’s sponsor, Sustainable Opportunities Holdings LLC (the “Sponsor”), SOAC’s former directors and certain of their transferees (collectively, the “Founder Shares”), (v) 11,030,000 Common Shares issued in the PIPE Financing (as defined below), (vi) 131,178,480 Common Shares issued to certain shareholders of DeepGreen (as defined below) pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement (as defined below), (vi) 77,277,244 Common Shares issuable to certain shareholders of DeepGreen upon the conversion of DeepGreen Earnout Shares (as defined below) pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, (vii) 1,241,000 Common Shares issuable to the Sponsor and its transferees upon the conversion of Sponsor Earnout Shares (as defined below) and (viii) 873,953 Common Shares issued to certain service providers to DeepGreen.

This prospectus provides you with a general description of such securities and the general manner in which we and the Selling Securityholders may offer or sell the securities. More specific terms of any securities that we and the Selling Securityholders may offer or sell may be provided in a prospectus supplement that describes, among other things, the specific amounts and prices of the securities being offered and the terms of the offering. The prospectus supplement may also add, update or change information contained in this prospectus.

We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of Common Shares or Private Placement Warrants by the Selling Securityholders or of Common Shares by us pursuant to this prospectus, except with respect to amounts received by us upon exercise of the Warrants.

However, we will pay the expenses, other than any underwriting discounts and commissions, associated with the sale of securities pursuant to this prospectus.

We are registering certain of the securities for resale pursuant to the Selling Securityholders’ registration rights under certain agreements between us and the Selling Securityholders. Our registration of the securities covered by this prospectus does not mean that either we or the Selling Securityholders will issue, offer or sell, as applicable, any of the securities. The Selling Securityholders may offer and sell the securities covered by this prospectus in a number of different ways and at varying prices. We provide more information about how the Selling Securityholders may sell the shares or Warrants in the section entitled “Plan of Distribution.”

You should read this prospectus and any prospectus supplement or amendment carefully before you invest in our securities.

Our Common Shares and Public Warrants are listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “TMC” and “TMCWW,” respectively. On October 6, 2021, the closing price of our Common Shares was $4.14 and the closing price for our Public Warrants was $1.01.

________________

Investing in our securities involves a high degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 13 of this prospectus and in the other documents that are incorporated by reference in this prospectus.

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

The date of this prospectus is October 22, 2021.

 

Table of Contents

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

Page

CERTAIN DEFINED TERMS

 

1

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

4

SUMMARY OF THE PROSPECTUS

 

6

THE OFFERING

 

11

RISK FACTORS

 

13

USE OF PROCEEDS

 

39

DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE

 

40

MARKET PRICE, TICKER SYMBOL AND DIVIDEND INFORMATION

 

41

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

42

BUSINESS OF TMC

 

51

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

104

DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES

 

117

SECURITIES ACT RESTRICTIONS ON RESALE OF COMMON SHARES

 

129

BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP OF SECURITIES

 

130

SELLING SECURITYHOLDERS

 

132

MANAGEMENT

 

138

EXECUTIVE AND DIRECTOR COMPENSATION

 

145

CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

 

154

U.S. FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

 

159

CANADIAN FEDERAL INCOME TAX CONSIDERATIONS

 

166

PLAN OF DISTRIBUTION

 

168

LEGAL MATTERS

 

171

EXPERTS

 

171

WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION

 

172

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

F-1

You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus. No one has been authorized to provide you with information that is different from that contained in this prospectus. This prospectus is dated as of the date set forth on the cover hereof. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus is accurate as of any date other than that date.

For investors outside the United States:    We have not done anything that would permit this offering or possession or distribution of this prospectus in any jurisdiction where action for that purpose is required, other than in the United States. You are required to inform yourselves about and to observe any restrictions relating to this offering and the distribution of this prospectus.

i

Table of Contents

CERTAIN DEFINED TERMS

In this document:

Allseas” means Allseas Group S.A.

Allseas Warrant” means the warrant held by Allseas to purchase up to 11,578,620 Common Shares, which shall vest upon certain milestones into such number of Common Shares that is based on the formula described therein, and which was assumed by TMC upon the consummation of the Business Combination, in accordance with its terms;

Arrangement” means the arrangement under Part 9, Division 5 of the BCBCA on the terms and subject to the conditions set forth in the Plan of Arrangement;

BCBCA” means the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia);

Business Combination” means the transactions contemplated by the Business Combination Agreement which were consummated on September 9, 2021, including the migration and continuance of SOAC from the Cayman Islands to British Columbia, Canada and the acquisition by SOAC of all of the issued and outstanding common shares in the capital of DeepGreen in exchange for Common Shares and Special Shares, whereby DeepGreen became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company; and DeepGreen and NewCo Sub amalgamated to continue as one unlimited liability company existing under the laws of British Columbia, Canada, pursuant to a court-approved plan of arrangement under the BCBCA.

Business Combination Agreement” means that Business Combination Agreement, dated as of March 4, 2021, by and among SOAC, NewCo Sub and DeepGreen.

Closing” means the closing of the Business Combination.

Closing Date” means the closing date of the Business Combination, which occurred on September 9, 2021.

Code” means the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended.

Common Shares” means the Common Shares, without par value, of TMC.

DeepGreen” means DeepGreen Metals Inc., a company existing under the laws of British Columbia, Canada, prior to the consummation of the Arrangement and the Business Combination.

DeepGreen capital stock” means the shares of DeepGreen capital stock outstanding prior to the Business Combination.

DeepGreen Earnout Shares” means the (a) 4,999,973 Class A Special Shares, (b) 9,999,853 Class B Special Shares, (c) 9,999,853 Class C Special Shares, (d) 19,999,855 Class D Special Shares, (e) 19,999,855 Class E Special Shares, (f) 19,999,855 Class F Special Shares, (g) 24,999,860 Class G Special Shares, and (h) 24,999,860 Class H Special Shares, in each case in the capital of TMC, each of which is automatically convertible into Common Shares on a one for one basis (unless adjusted as described herein) if certain price per Common Share thresholds are met as described in “Description of Securities — Special Shares.”

DeepGreen Option” means each option to purchase common shares of DeepGreen granted to a DeepGreen employee, director, or consultant.

DeepGreen shareholder” means each holder of DeepGreen capital stock as of any determination time prior to the Effective Time.

Effective Time” means, with respect to the Business Combination, the time on the Closing Date that the Arrangement became effective.

Exchange Act” means the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended.

FASB” means the Financial Accounting Standards Board.

Founder Shares” means the aggregate of 6,759,000 Common Shares held by the Sponsor, Rick Gaenzle, Isaac Barchas and Justin Kelly and their respective transferees.

1

Table of Contents

Initial Shareholders” means the Sponsor and SOAC’s independent directors.

Investment Company Act” means the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended.

Initial public offering” means SOAC’s initial public offering, consummated on May 8, 2020, through the sale of an aggregate of 30,000,000 units at $10.00 per unit.

JOBS Act” means the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012.

NewCo Sub” means 1291924 B.C. Unlimited Liability Company, an unlimited liability company existing under the laws of British Columbia, Canada and a wholly owned subsidiary of SOAC.

Nasdaq” means The Nasdaq Stock Market.

NORI-D” means the commercialization project of the estimated resources located in NORI Area D.

Notice and Articles” means the notice of articles and articles of TMC upon the Continuance.

PIPE Financing” means the issuance of an aggregate of 11,030,000 shares of Common Shares pursuant to the Subscription Agreements to the PIPE Investors immediately prior to the Closing, at a purchase price of $10.00 per share.

PIPE Investors” means the certain institutional and accredited investors who are party to the Subscription Agreements.

PIPE Investor Subscription Agreements” means the subscription agreements, each dated as of March 4, 2021, by and between TMC and the PIPE Investors, pursuant to which TMC issued an aggregate of 11,030,000 Common Shares to the PIPE Investors immediately prior to the Closing at a purchase price of $10.00 per share.

Private Placement Warrants” means the 9,500,000 warrants issued to the Sponsor concurrently with SOAC’s initial public offering, each of which is exercisable for one Common Share.

Public shares” means SOAC Common Shares included in the units issued in SOAC’s initial public offering.

Public shareholders” means holders of public shares.

Public Warrants” means the warrants included in the units issued in SOAC’s initial public offering, each of which is exercisable for one Common Share, in accordance with its terms.

SOAC” means Sustainable Opportunities Acquisition Corp., a Cayman Islands exempted company limited by shares (which, after the Closing is known as TMC the metals company Inc.).

SOAC Ordinary Shares” means the Class A ordinary shares of SOAC, which were redesignated as Common Shares as a result and upon the consummation of the Continuance;

SOAC Class B ordinary shares” means the shares of Class B ordinary shares of SOAC.

TMC” means TMC the metals company Inc., a British Columbia, Canada corporation (which, prior to consummation of the Business Combination, was known as Sustainable Opportunities Acquisition Corp. (“SOAC” herein)) and, where applicable, its direct and indirect wholly-owned subsidiaries.

TMC Incentive Equity Plan” means the TMC the metals company Inc. 2021 Incentive Equity Plan.

Registration Rights Agreement” means the amended and restated registration rights agreement entered into as of the Closing by and among TMC, the Sponsor, certain affiliates of the Sponsor, and certain securityholders of Legacy DeepGreen.

Sarbanes-Oxley Act” means the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002.

SEC” means the United States Securities and Exchange Commission.

Securities Act” means the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.

2

Table of Contents

Special Shares” means the DeepGreen Earnout Shares and the Sponsor Earnout Shares.

Sponsor” means Sustainable Opportunities Holdings LLC, a Delaware limited liability company.

Sponsor Earnout Shares” means the 500,000 Class I Special Shares and 741,000 Class J Special Shares in the capital of TMC, each of which is automatically convertible into Common Shares on a one for one basis (unless adjusted as described herein) if certain Common Share price thresholds are met as described in “Description of Securities — Special Shares.”

Transfer Agent” means Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company.

Trust Account” means the Trust Account of SOAC that held the proceeds from SOAC’s initial public offering and the private placement of the Private Placement Warrants.

Trustee” means Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company.

U.S. GAAP” means United States generally accepted accounting principles.

Units” means the units of SOAC, each consisting of one share of SOAC ordinary shares and one-half (1/2) of one Public Warrant of SOAC.

3

Table of Contents

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

This prospectus includes forward-looking statements regarding, among other things, our plans, strategies and prospects, both business and financial. These statements are based on the beliefs and assumptions of our management. Although we believe that our plans, intentions and expectations reflected in or suggested by these forward-looking statements are reasonable, we cannot assure you that we will achieve or realize these plans, intentions or expectations. Forward-looking statements are inherently subject to risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Generally, statements that are not historical facts, including statements concerning possible or assumed future actions, business strategies, events or results of operations, are forward-looking statements. These statements may be preceded by, followed by or include the words “believes”, “estimates”, “expects”, “projects”, “forecasts”, “may”, “will”, “should”, “seeks”, “plans”, “scheduled”, “anticipates” or “intends” or similar expressions. Forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus include, but are not limited to, statements about:

•        our ability to recognize the anticipated benefits of the Business Combination, which may be affected by, among other things, the commercial and technical feasibility of seafloor polymetallic nodule collection and processing;

•        the supply and demand for battery metals and manganese alloys;

•        the future prices of battery metal and manganese alloys;

•        the timing and content of International Seabed Authority’s exploitation regulations that will create the legal and technical framework for exploitation of polymetallic nodules in the Clarion Clipperton Zone of the Pacific Ocean;

•        government regulation of deep seabed mining operations and changes in mining laws and regulations;

•        the risks of developing and deploying equipment for operations to collect polymetallic nodules at sea and to process such nodules on land;

•        environmental risks;

•        the timing and amount of estimated future production, costs of production, capital expenditures and requirements for additional capital;

•        cash flow provided by operating activities;

•        maintaining and negotiating of key strategic relationships;

•        our ability to raise financing in the future;

•        unanticipated reclamation expenses;

•        claims and limitations on insurance coverage;

•        the uncertainty in mineral resource estimates;

•        financial risks posed by our material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting;

•        the uncertainty in geological, hydrological, metallurgical and geotechnical studies and opinions;

•        infrastructure risks;

•        dependence on key management personnel and executive officers;

•        our financial performance;

•        economic downturns and political and market conditions beyond our control could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations;

•        the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our business; and

•        other factors detailed under the section titled “Risk Factors.”

4

Table of Contents

These forward-looking statements are based on information available as of the date of this prospectus, and current expectations, forecasts and assumptions, and involve a number of judgments, risks and uncertainties. Important factors could cause actual results to differ materially from those indicated or implied by forward-looking statements such as those contained in documents we have filed with the SEC. Accordingly, forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing our views as of any subsequent date, and we do not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date they were made, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable securities laws.

As a result of a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties, our actual results or performance may be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. For a discussion of the risks involved in our business and investing in our Common Shares, see the section entitled “Risk Factors.”

Should one or more of these risks or uncertainties materialize, or should any of the underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary in material respects from those expressed or implied by these forward-looking statements. You should not place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements.

5

Table of Contents

SUMMARY OF THE PROSPECTUS

This summary highlights selected information included in this prospectus and does not contain all of the information that may be important to you in making an investment decision. This summary is qualified in its entirety by the more detailed information included in this prospectus. Before making your investment decision with respect to our securities, you should carefully read this entire prospectus, including the information under “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.

The Company

We are a deep-sea minerals exploration company focused on the collection, processing and refining of polymetallic nodules found on the seafloor of the Clarion Clipperton Zone of the Pacific Ocean (the “CCZ”). The CCZ is a zone of abyssal plains and other formations in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, with a length of around 4,500 miles (7,240 km) that spans approximately 4,500,000 square kilometers (1,700,000 sq mi). Polymetallic nodules sit unattached to the seafloor and are located in significant quantities on the seafloor of the CCZ, have high concentrations of nickel, manganese, cobalt and copper in a single rock. Our subsidiaries Nauru Ocean Resources Inc. (“NORI”) and Tonga Offshore Mining Limited (“TOML”) possess the exclusive exploration rights to regions within the CCZ and operate under the effective supervision, regulation and sponsorship of the Republic of Nauru (“Nauru”) and the Kingdom of Tonga (“Tonga”), respectively. These metals are the main raw material inputs into lithium NMC (nickel-manganese-cobalt) battery cathodes and electric wiring often used in electric vehicles (“EV”) and energy storage. We have identified the potential to recover metals from polymetallic nodules to support increasing demand from battery and electric vehicle production through the development of a process that produces metals from the polymetallic nodules with near-zero solid processing waste. We have a dual mission: (1) to supply metals for the clean energy transition with low environmental and social impact; and (2) to accelerate the transition to a circular metal economy. The primary application of our mission is to solve the primary metal supply problem required for the manufacture of EV batteries.

Background and Business Combination

The Company was originally known as Sustainable Opportunities Acquisition Corp. (“SOAC”). On September 9, 2021 (the “Closing Date”), we consummated a business combination (the “Business Combination”) pursuant to the terms of the business combination agreement dated as of March 4, 2021 (the “Business Combination Agreement”) by and among SOAC, 1291924 B.C. Unlimited Liability Company, an unlimited liability company existing under the laws of British Columbia, Canada (“NewCo Sub”), and DeepGreen Metals Inc., a company existing under the laws of British Columbia, Canada (“Legacy DeepGreen”). In connection with the Business Combination, SOAC changed its name to “TMC the metals company Inc.” (“TMC”).

Prior to the Effective Time (as defined below), SOAC migrated and was continued from the Cayman Islands to British Columbia, Canada and was domesticated as a company existing under the laws of British Columbia, pursuant to Part XII of the Cayman Islands Companies Act (as Revised) and Part 9, Division 8 of the Business Corporations Act (British Columbia) (the “BCBCA”) (such continuance, the “Continuance”). As a result and upon the consummation of the Continuance, (i) the identifying name of the Class A ordinary shares of SOAC, par value $0.0001 per share (the “Class A ordinary shares”), and Class B ordinary shares of SOAC, par value $0.0001 per share (the “Class B ordinary shares”), were changed to common shares of the Company (the “Common Shares”) and the Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares were changed from shares with par value to shares without par value; (ii) the rights and restrictions attached to the renamed Class A ordinary shares and Class B ordinary shares of SOAC were deleted and the shares have the rights and restrictions attached to the Common Shares, as described in the notice of articles and articles of the Company; (iii) the number of authorized Common Shares were unlimited; (iv) each issued and outstanding whole warrant to purchase one Class A ordinary share automatically represented the right to purchase one Common Share at an exercise price of $11.50 per share on the terms and conditions set forth in the SOAC warrant agreement; (v) the notice of articles and articles of TMC became the governing documents of the Company; and (vi) SOAC’s name changed to “TMC the metals company Inc.”

On the Closing Date, promptly following the Continuance, pursuant to a court-approved plan of arrangement (the “Plan of Arrangement,” and the arrangement pursuant to such Plan of Arrangement, the “Arrangement”) under the BCBCA, (i) SOAC acquired all of the issued and outstanding common shares in the capital of DeepGreen

6

Table of Contents

(the “DeepGreen Common Shares”); (ii) the shareholders and the optionholders of DeepGreen became entitled to receive at the Effective Time, in exchange for their DeepGreen Common Shares and options to purchase DeepGreen Common Shares, as applicable, an aggregate of (a) 229,162,651 Common Shares (which includes Common Shares underlying options) based on an Adjusted Equity Value (as defined in the Business Combination Agreement) immediately prior to the Effective Time of $2,291,628,539, (b) 4,999,973 Class A Special Shares (which includes Class A Special Shares underlying options), (c) 9,999,853 Class B Special Shares (which includes Class B Special Shares underlying options), (d) 9,999,853 Class C Special Shares (which includes Class C Special Shares underlying options ), (e) 19,999,855 Class D Special Shares (which includes Class D Special Shares underlying options), (f) 19,999,855 Class E Special Shares (which includes Class E Special Shares underlying options), (g) 19,999,855 Class F Special Shares (which includes Class F Special Shares underlying options), (h) 24,999,860 Class G Special Shares (which includes Class G Special Shares underlying options), and (i) 24,999,860 Class H Special Shares (which includes Class H Special Shares underlying options), in each case, in the capital of the Company, each of which Special Share is automatically convertible into Common Shares on a one-for-one basis (unless adjusted as described herein) if certain Common Share price thresholds are met as described herein (collectively, the “DeepGreen Earnout Shares”); (iii) DeepGreen became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company; and (iv) DeepGreen and NewCo Sub amalgamated to continue as one unlimited liability company existing under the laws of British Columbia, Canada. In addition, we assumed the Allseas Warrant which became a warrant to purchase our Common Shares upon the consummation of the Business Combination, in accordance with its terms. As a consequence of the Business Combination, each option to purchase DeepGreen Common Shares, whether vested or unvested, that was outstanding immediately prior to the Effective Time was assumed by the Company and became an option (vested or unvested, as applicable) to purchase a number of Common Shares equal to the number of DeepGreen Common Shares subject to such option immediately prior to the Effective Time multiplied by the Per Share Consideration (as defined in the Business Combination Agreement), rounded down to the nearest whole number of shares, at an exercise price per share equal to the exercise price per share of such option immediately prior to the Effective Time divided by the Per Share Consideration, rounded up to the nearest whole cent. The time that the Arrangement became effective is referred to as the “Effective Time.”

Immediately following the Continuance and prior to the Effective Time, Sustainable Opportunities Holdings LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (the “Sponsor”), exchanged 741,000 Common Shares (which consisted of the SOAC Class B ordinary shares prior to the Continuance) for 500,000 Class I Special Shares (the “Class I Special Shares”) and 741,000 Class J Special Shares, each of which is automatically convertible into Common Shares on a one-for-one basis if certain Common Share price thresholds are met as described herein (the “Class J Special Shares” and, together with the Class I Special Shares, the “Sponsor Earnout Shares” and, collectively with the DeepGreen Earnout Shares, the “Special Shares”).

In connection with the foregoing and concurrently with the execution of the Business Combination Agreement, SOAC entered into Subscription Agreements (the “Subscription Agreements”) with certain investors (the “PIPE Investors”), pursuant to which the PIPE Investors agreed to purchase an aggregate of 11,030,000 Common Shares at a purchase price of $10.00 per share, for aggregate gross proceeds of $110,300,000 (the “PIPE Financing”). The PIPE Financing closed concurrently with the Business Combination. SOAC also entered into Subscription Agreements for an aggregate of 22,000,000 Common Shares, for a purchase price of $10.00 per share and an aggregate purchase price of $220,000,000 with two investors who defaulted on the Closing Date under the Subscription Agreements. The Company is aggressively pursuing its available remedies with respect to both investors.

The total number of Common Shares outstanding immediately following the Closing was approximately 224,385,324 comprising (i) 203,874,981 Common Shares issued to DeepGreen shareholders, (ii) 11,030,000 Common Shares issued in connection with the Closing to the PIPE Investors pursuant to the PIPE Financing, (iii) 6,759,000 Common Shares held by the initial shareholders (which includes the Sponsor, Rick Gaenzle, Isaac Barchas and Justin Kelly, the “initial shareholders”) and (iv) 2,721,343 Common Shares held by public shareholders, reflecting redemptions of 27,278,657 Class A ordinary shares.

Stock Exchange Listing

Common Shares and Public Warrants are listed for trading on Nasdaq under the symbols “TMC” and “TMCWW”, respectively.

7

Table of Contents

Summary of Risk Factors

Investing in our securities involves risks. You should carefully consider the risks described in “Risk Factors” beginning on page 13 before making a decision to invest in our Common Shares. If any of these risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition and results of operations would likely be materially adversely affected. Some of the risks related our business and industry are summarized below.

References in the summary below to “we”, “us”, “our” and “the Company” refer to TMC and its subsidiaries.

•        Our key exploration activities are, and our development activities are expected to be, undertaken primarily by our subsidiaries NORI and TOML, which are sponsored by Nauru and Tonga, respectively, and which require the continued sponsorship of those countries for such subsidiaries’ business operations. If either country ceases such sponsorship, NORI or TOML would need to seek sponsorship elsewhere, which could impact our operations as a group. Furthermore, changes in government regulation and political instability within these areas could impact our mineral exploration and future prospects in the CCZ.

•        Our business relies on the ability of NORI and TOML, as applicable, to obtain approval for necessary contracts to collect polymetallic nodules granted by the International Seabed Authority (“ISA”), among other regulators. The failure to obtain such approvals could disrupt or prohibit our operations.

•        Our success will depend on our ability to attract skilled operators, maintenance technicians, engineers and other personnel required to operate our business. In the event that we are unable to hire, train and retain the necessary number of skilled technicians, engineers and other personnel, there could be an adverse impact on our labor costs and our ability to reach anticipated production levels in a timely manner, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations. Our exploration, collecting, and processing activities are subject to laws, rules, regulations, environmental requirements, taxation and other policies that are subject to change and that may significantly impact our business, financial condition, liquidity and viability of operations.

•        We may be subject to potential risks and liabilities associated with pollution of the environment that could occur as a result of exploration, development, production and processing activities. Such liabilities may impact the performance of our business or may require us to suspend our operations.

•        Seafloor polymetallic nodules have never been commercially exploited. Mineral resource exploration is highly speculative and characterized by a number of significant risks including suitable equipment and favorable sea and climate conditions. We cannot guarantee that minerals will be discovered in sufficient grade or quantities to be commercially viable.

•        Until mineral reserves and mineral resources are actually collected and processed, we must rely upon estimated calculations for the mineral resources and grades of mineralization in contract areas and estimated equipment production rates and collection efficiency, which might prove to be materially inaccurate and thus have an adverse impact on projections for our future revenues, cash flows, royalties, and development and operating expenditures.

•        Any polymetallic nodules that we recover will require specialized treatment and processing on high value equipment, which we may not be able to develop or which may not provide the projected metal recovery rates at the estimated project capital and operating costs, which could impact projections for our future revenues, cash flows, royalties, and development and operating expenditures.

•        Our exploring, project development and future collecting, processing and refining operations involve many hazards and uncertainties which could result in damage to, or destruction of, production facilities, personal injury or death, environmental damage, delays in processing, increased production costs, asset write downs, monetary losses and legal liability, all of which could have an adverse effect on our business.

•        We have a limited operating history and cannot provide assurance of profitability in the future. Our actual operating costs on a commercial scale may differ significantly from those that have been anticipated.

8

Table of Contents

•        We rely on existing and future strategic relationships to successfully explore, collect, process and refine polymetallic nodules. There can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to maintain and develop such relationships.

•        The profitability of our nodule collecting and processing will be significantly affected by changes to the market price, demand and taxation of battery metals and manganese as well as the cost of power, petroleum fuels, and oil.

•        We may become subject to legal proceedings as well as pressure and lobbying from non-governmental organizations, particularly with respect to environmental concerns, which may cause significant disruption to our business.

•        Offshore operations could be interrupted by non-governmental organizations or subject to piracy, which in the absence of strong enforcement by regulators, could negatively impact our ability to operate.

•        We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting which, if not corrected, could affect the reliability of our consolidated financial statements and have other adverse consequences.

•        Our business is subject to a variety of risks, some of which may not be covered by existing or future insurance policies, which may reduce or eliminate any future profitability and a decline in the value of our securities.

•        The COVID-19 pandemic has and could continue to materially impact aspects of our business, including increasing the cost of operations and reducing employee productivity, limiting travel of personnel, adversely affecting the health and welfare of personnel, or preventing or delaying important third-party service providers from performing normal and contracted activities crucial to the operation of our business.

•        Our ability to generate revenue will be diminished if we are unable to compete with substitutions for the minerals that we intend to process.

•        We rely on third parties to conduct independent analyses with respect to our business, and any inaccuracies in such analyses could have a material adverse effect on our collecting and development objectives.

•        The metals contained in the minerals that we intend to collect, process and refine are contemplated to be used in batteries for electric vehicles and energy storage; wiring, steel and manganese alloys. While we may identify other uses for the minerals we collect, the immediate growth of our business is correlated with the demand for electric vehicles, energy storage, wiring, steel and manganese alloys, which may not develop as expected.

•        Our continuing exploration is capital intensive and may depend on our ability to obtain necessary financing or cause the business to incur debt. There is no assurance that we will be successful in obtaining the required financing for our operations or be able to satisfy any resulting debt obligations.

•        There exist certain negative perceptions related to acquiring metals produced from deep-sea minerals. Some market proponents have recently expressed opposition to acquiring deep-sea derived metals, and if this position gains broad traction in the marketplace for EV and Battery metals, it could have a material impact on our business and operations.

•        Our business is capital intensive, and we may be required to raise additional funds in the future to accomplish our objectives.

Corporate Information

SOAC was incorporated on December 18, 2019 as a Cayman Islands exempted company limited by shares and formed for the purpose of effecting a merger, share exchange, asset acquisition, share purchase, reorganization or similar business combination with one or more businesses.

9

Table of Contents

On May 8, 2020, SOAC consummated an initial public offering of 30,000,000 units at an offering price of $10.00 per unit, and a private placement with Sponsor of 9,500,000 Private Placement Warrants at an offering price of $1.00 per warrant.

DeepGreen was incorporated under the laws of the Province of British Columbia, Canada in 2011.

On September 9, 2021, SOAC and DeepGreen completed the Business Combination, which included the migration and continuance of SOAC from the Cayman Islands to British Columbia, Canada and the acquisition by SOAC of all of the issued and outstanding common shares in the capital of DeepGreen in exchange for Common Shares and Special Shares, whereby DeepGreen became a wholly-owned subsidiary of the Company; and DeepGreen and NewCo Sub amalgamated to continue as one unlimited liability company existing under the laws of British Columbia, Canada, pursuant to a court-approved plan of arrangement under the BCBCA. As a result, DeepGreen became a wholly owned subsidiary of SOAC, SOAC’s corporate name was changed to TMC the metals company Inc. and the business of DeepGreen became the business of the Company.

TMC’s principal executive offices are located at 595 Howe Street, 10th Floor, Vancouver, British Columbia V6C 2T5, and its telephone number is (574) 252-9333. TMC does not have a physical office in Vancouver, British Columbia, its directors and executive officers work remotely in various countries around the world, and the Vancouver, British Columbia address disclosed as its principal executive office has been provided because it is TMC’s records office required under the BCBCA.

Emerging Growth Company

Section 102(b)(1) of the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012 (the “JOBS Act”) exempts emerging growth companies from being required to comply with new or revised financial accounting standards until private companies (that is, those that have not had a registration statement under the Securities Act declared effective or do not have a class of securities registered under the Exchange Act) are required to comply with the new or revised financial accounting standards. The JOBS Act provides that a company can elect to opt out of the extended transition period and comply with the requirements that apply to non-emerging growth companies but any such election to opt out is irrevocable. We have elected not to opt out of such extended transition period which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, we, as an emerging growth company, can adopt the new or revised standard at the time private companies adopt the new or revised standard. This may make comparison of our financial statements with those of another public company that is not an emerging growth company or is an emerging growth company that has opted out of using the extended transition period, difficult or impossible because of the potential differences in accounting standards used.

We will remain an emerging growth company until the earlier of: (1) the last day of the fiscal year (a) following the fifth anniversary of the closing of SOAC’s initial public offering, (b) in which we have total annual gross revenue of at least $1.07 billion, or (c) in which we are deemed to be a large accelerated filer, which means the market value of our common equity that is held by non-affiliates is $700 million or more as of the end of that fiscal year’s second fiscal quarter; and (2) the date on which we have issued more than $1.00 billion in non-convertible debt securities during the prior three-year period. References herein to “emerging growth company” have the meaning associated with it in the JOBS Act.

10

Table of Contents

THE OFFERING

Issuer

 

TMC the metals company Inc.

Issuance of Common Shares

   

Common Shares to be issued upon exercise of all Private Placement Warrants and Public Warrants

 


24,500,000 shares

Common Shares outstanding prior to exercise of all warrants

 


224,385,324 shares(1)

Use of proceeds

 

We will receive up to an aggregate of approximately $281,750,000 from the exercise of all 24,500,000 Warrants, assuming the exercise in full of such Warrants for cash.

Unless we inform you otherwise in a prospectus supplement or free writing prospectus, we intend to use the net proceeds from the exercise of such warrants for general corporate purposes.

Resale of Common Shares and warrants

   

Common Shares offered by the Selling Securityholders (representing the Founder Shares, Common Shares that may be issued upon exercise of the Private Placement Warrants, Common Shares issued in the PIPE Financing, Common Shares issued or issuable to certain shareholders of DeepGreen pursuant to the Business Combination Agreement, including Common Shares that may be issued upon the conversion of DeepGreen Earnout Shares, Common Shares issuable upon the conversion of Sponsor Earnout Shares and Common Shares issued to certain service providers to Legacy DeepGreen)

 












264,438,297 Common Shares

Warrants offered by the Selling Securityholders (representing the Private Placement Warrants)

 


9,500,000 Private Placement Warrants

Exercise price

 

$11.50 per share, subject to adjustment as described herein

Redemption

 

The Warrants are redeemable in certain circumstances. See “Description of Securities — Warrants” for further discussion.

Use of proceeds

 

We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of the Common Shares and Warrants to be offered by the Selling Securityholders. With respect to Common Shares underlying the Warrants, we will not receive any proceeds from such shares except with respect to amounts received by us upon exercise of such Warrants to the extent such Warrants are exercised for cash.

____________

(1)      Represents the number of Common Shares outstanding as of September 9, 2021. The number of issued and outstanding Common Shares does not include the Common Shares reserved for issuance under the TMC Incentive Equity Plan or reserved for issuance upon conversion of the Special Shares.

11

Table of Contents

Lock-up agreements

 

Certain of our stockholders are subject to certain restrictions on transfer until the termination of applicable lock-up periods. See “Plan of Distribution — Amended and Restated Registration Rights Agreement” for further discussion.

Ticker symbols

 

“TMC” and “TMCWW” for the Common Shares and Public Warrants, respectively.

12

Table of Contents

RISK FACTORS

An investment in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below before making an investment decision. Our business, prospects, financial condition, or operating results could be harmed by any of these risks, as well as other risks not known to us or that we consider immaterial as of the date of this prospectus. The trading price of our securities could decline due to any of these risks, and, as a result, you may lose all or part of your investment.

Unless the context otherwise requires, references in this section to “we,” “us,” “our” and the “Company” refer to TMC the metals company Inc. and its subsidiaries following the Business Combination, or to DeepGreen or SOAC prior to the Business Combination, as the case may be.

Risks Related to Laws, Rules, Regulations and Policies

Our business is subject to numerous regulatory uncertainties which, if not resolved in our favor, would have a material adverse impact on our business.

To date, no commercial-scale collection (also referred to as “mining,” “exploitation” or “harvesting”) of nodules has occurred in the area of the high seas beyond national jurisdiction (the “Area”), which includes the CCZ. Moreover, despite the release by the International Seabed Authority (the “ISA”) of the Draft Regulations on Exploitation of Mineral Resources (the “Draft Regulations”), finalization of such regulations remains subject to approval and adoption by the ISA. The ISA was intending to have these regulations finalized by July 2020, but the COVID-19 pandemic disrupted ISA meetings and discussions. Once adopted, these regulations will create the legal and technical framework for exploitation of the polymetallic nodules in the NORI, TOML and Marawa Contract Areas.

Section 1, paragraph 15 of the 1994 Agreement relating to the Implementation of Part XI of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (“UNCLOS”) allows a member state whose national intends to apply for approval of a plan of work for exploitation to notify the ISA of such intention. This notice obliges the ISA to complete the adoption of exploitation regulations within two years of the request made by the member state.

On June 25, 2021, the Republic of Nauru submitted its notice to the ISA requesting that it complete, by July 9, 2023, the adoption of regulations necessary to facilitate the approval of plans of work for the commercial exploitation of polymetallic nodules. The notice submitted by the Republic of Nauru to the ISA has increased the likelihood that regulations will be adopted that will govern and enable commercial scale polymetallic nodule collection. If the ISA has not completed the adoption of such regulations within the prescribed time and an application for approval of a plan of work for exploitation is pending before the ISA, the ISA shall nonetheless consider and provisionally approve such plan of work based on: (i) the provisions of the UNCLOS; (ii) any rules, regulations and procedures that the ISA may have adopted provisionally at the time, (iii) the basis of the norms contained in the UNCLOS and (iv) the principle of non-discrimination among contractors.

We expect the final regulations (“Final Regulations”) to be approved within the next two years, but there can be no assurance that such regulations will be approved then, or at all. The Draft Regulations and several supporting standards and guidelines are at an advanced stage, but there remains uncertainty regarding the final form that these will take, as well as the impact that such regulations, standards and guidelines will have on our ability to meet our objectives.

The collection of polymetallic nodules within the CCZ, where our exploration areas are located, will require approval of an ISA Exploitation Contract (which will authorize commercial collection activities). As part of the application for an ISA Exploitation Contract, all contractors will be required to complete baseline studies and an environmental and social impact assessment (“ESIA”), culminating in an Environmental Impact Statement (“EIS”), prior to collecting nodules. The EIS would be accompanied by an Environmental Management and Monitoring Plan (“EMMP). The EMMP is expected to specify the objectives and purpose of all monitoring requirements, the components to be monitored, frequency of monitoring, methods of monitoring, analysis required in each monitoring component, monitoring data management and reporting.

In order to collect the mineral resources and commercialize our projects, our wholly-owned subsidiaries Nauru Ocean Resources Inc. (“NORI”) and Tonga Offshore Mining Limited (“TOML”) will each need to obtain an ISA Exploitation Contract, as will our partner Marawa Research and Exploration Limited (“Marawa”), in addition

13

Table of Contents

to related permits that may be required by our commercial partners. There can be no assurance that the ISA will evaluate any exploration contract application by our subsidiaries in a timely manner. Even if the ISA timely evaluates such applications(s), our subsidiaries may be required to submit a supplementary EIS before obtaining approval. As such, there is a risk that an ISA Exploitation Contract may not be granted by the ISA, may not be granted on a timely basis, or may be granted on uneconomic terms.

Similarly, with respect to sponsor state regulation, no assurance can be given that new rules and regulations will not be enacted or that existing rules and regulations will not be applied in a manner that would limit or curtail production or development by our subsidiaries. Amendments to current laws and regulations governing the operations and activities of deep sea mineral resources companies, or changes in interpretation thereto, or the unwillingness of countries throughout the world to enforce such laws and regulations, could have a material adverse impact on our business, and could cause increases in exploration expenses, capital expenditures, production costs, or put the security of our equipment at risk to activism or piracy. Such amendments could also cause reductions in our future production, or the delay or abandonment in the development of our polymetallic mineral resource properties. There can be no certainty that actions by governmental and regulatory authorities, including changes in regulation, taxation and other fiscal regimes, will not adversely impact our projects or our business. Further, our operations depend on the continuation of the sponsorship arrangements between our subsidiaries NORI and TOML and each of their host sponsoring nations, the Kingdom of Tonga and the Republic of Nauru, respectively. Each subsidiary has been registered and incorporated within such host nation and each nation has maintained effective supervision, regulation, and sponsorship over the conduct of such subsidiary. While we have beneficial ownership over such subsidiaries, we operate under the regulation and sponsorship of the Republic of Nauru and the Kingdom of Tonga. If such arrangement is challenged, or sponsorship is terminated, we may have to restructure the ownership or operations of such subsidiary to ensure continued state sponsorship. Failure to maintain sponsorship, or secure new state sponsorship, will have a material impact on such subsidiary and on our overall business and operations.

While the rates of payments are yet to be set by the ISA, the 1994 Agreement relating to the Implementation of Part XI of the UNCLOS of 10 December 1982 (the “1994 Implementation Agreement”) prescribes a relevant framework that the rates of payments “shall be within the range of those prevailing in respect of land-based mining of the same or similar minerals in order to avoid giving deep seabed miners an artificial competitive advantage or imposing on them a competitive disadvantage.” The ISA has held workshops with stakeholders to discuss and seek comments on the potential financial regime for the collecting of polymetallic nodules in the Area. There can be no assurance that the ISA will put in place Final Regulations in a timely manner or at all. Such regulations may also impose burdensome obligations or restrictions on us, and/or may contain terms that do not enable us to develop our projects.

Our resource activities are subject to changes in government regulation and political instability.

Parties carrying out exploration and collection operations in the Area must be sponsored by a State that is a member of the ISA. The sponsoring States of our subsidiaries NORI and TOML are Nauru and Tonga, respectively. If either country ceases such sponsorship, NORI or TOML would need to seek sponsorship elsewhere, which could impact our operations as a group.

In addition, our subsidiary, DeepGreen Engineering Pte Ltd. (“DGE”), has an exclusive contract with Marawa, which is sponsored by the Republic of Kiribati that permits DGE to conduct activities in connection with the exploration contract held by Marawa with the ISA. There is a risk that a State sponsoring activities in a project area ceases to be a sponsor, or is not permitted to be a sponsor, or that NORI and TOML cease to remain as sponsored contractors by such State; and if an agreement cannot be reached with a substitute sponsoring State, or if we are unable to transfer our sponsorship to another State, such subsidiary could be forced to cease activities in the Area.

Additionally, there is little jurisprudence or interpretative guidance regarding the application of the sponsorship regulations that are applicable to our business. For example, with respect to the question over the regulation of which State can impact the activities of any contractor (such as NORI or TOML), we have taken the view that incorporation, registration and the grant of nationality are critical factors, amongst others, notwithstanding the beneficial ownership of a subsidiary by its parent (“beneficial ownership”). While this position has not been challenged by our sponsoring States or the ISA, certain organizations that oppose the deep-sea polymetallic nodule exploration and collecting industry have advocated for the use of a beneficial ownership test for state sponsorship, and there are no guarantees that our interpretation will be universally accepted in the future.

14

Table of Contents

The mineral exploration activities of our subsidiaries and their future project development prospects could be affected in varying degrees by political instability and changes in government regulation relating to foreign investment and the deep-sea polymetallic collecting business, including expropriation. Operations may also be affected in varying degrees by possible terrorism, military conflict, crime, piracy, fluctuations in currency rates, and high inflation. In addition, from time to time, governments may nationalize private businesses, including companies such as ours. There can be no assurance that the governments of countries where we or our affiliates or third-party contractors operate or the governments with which our subsidiaries work in the Area will not nationalize companies such as ours and our assets in the future, or impose burdensome obligations or restrictions. There can also be no assurance that the ISA will not impose burdensome obligations or restrictions on our business or our projects (or those of our affiliates and third-party contractors), or that they will not implement policies or regulations that would prevent us from accomplishing our objectives.

Changes to any of the laws, rules, regulations or policies to which we are subject could have a significant impact on our business.

Changes to any of the laws, rules, regulations, taxation or other policies to which we are subject could have a significant impact on our business. There can be no assurance that we will be able to comply with any future laws, rules, regulations and policies. Failure to comply with applicable laws, rules, regulations, and policies may subject us to civil or regulatory proceedings, including fines or injunctions, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity, and results of operations. In addition, compliance with any future laws, rules, regulations, and policies could negatively impact our profitability, and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, liquidity and results of operations.

Furthermore, we may seek to expand our production capabilities in the future, which would require additional regulatory approvals that may not be provided in a timely manner or at all. Furthermore, such additional approvals could require changes to environmental offset areas and related environmental protections which, if overly burdensome, could impact our operations.

Our exploration, collecting, processing and refining activities are subject to extensive and costly environmental requirements, and current and future laws, regulations, and permits may impose significant costs, liabilities, or obligations, or could limit or prevent our ability to continue our operations as currently contemplated or to undertake new operations.

All phases of exploring for and collecting and processing polymetallic nodules will be subject to environmental regulation in various jurisdictions and under national as well as international laws and conventions. No seafloor polymetallic nodule deposit has been harvested on a commercial scale, and it is not clear what environmental parameters may need to be measured to satisfy regulatory authorities for an ISA Exploitation Contract should be granted. A full ESIA for deep sea collecting operations has yet to be completed and approved by the ISA, and the full impact of any polymetallic nodule collecting operation on the environment has yet to be determined. Further, the required standards for an ESIA are currently unclear and have not been finalized by the ISA, which could require changes to any submissions made by our subsidiaries in connection with an ISA Exploitation Contract application. Environmental legislation is evolving in a manner which is likely to require strict standards and enforcement, increased fines and penalties for non-compliance, more stringent environmental assessments of proposed projects and a heightened degree of responsibility for companies and their officers, directors and employees. Additionally, while we intend to produce seafloor polymetallic nodules in a way that mitigates and reduces potential damage to the seafloor and marine environmental conditions, we do not know whether the ISA or any other regulatory body will seek to impose onerous methods for the restoration of the area or rehabilitation obligations on our collecting process. Any such obligations, to the extent they are overly burdensome, could result in material changes to our business as currently contemplated.

Although the environmental impact review process has not yet been finalized, all contractors have been made aware of the requirement to complete baseline studies and an ESIA, culminating in an Environmental Impact Statement (“EIS”), prior to collecting. The EIS would be accompanied by an Environmental Management and Monitoring Plan (“EMMP”), which will be required as part of the application for an ISA Exploitation Contract within the contract areas of NORI, TOML and Marawa. The EMMP is expected to specify the objectives and purpose of all monitoring requirements, the components to be monitored, frequency of monitoring, methods of monitoring, analysis required in each monitoring component, monitoring data management and reporting.

15

Table of Contents

The EMMP will also be submitted to the ISA for approval as part of the ISA Exploitation Contract application. There are no guarantees that the ISA will evaluate any exploration contract application by our subsidiaries in a timely manner, and even if the ISA does timely evaluate such applications(s), such subsidiary may be required to submit a supplementary EIS before being approved. This may result in delays that could impact our projected timeframe. Furthermore, in the event that the ISA timely evaluates and approves an application, any aspect of such application and approval theoretically could be subject to legal challenges which could result in further delays that could detrimentally impact our business. For example, certain conservation groups have sought to impose a ten-year moratorium on deep-sea polymetallic nodule collection. While this agenda does not appear to have directly impacted the current proposed Final Regulations and implementation of the policies of the ISA, any such moratorium would have a material adverse effect on our business.

The environmental permitting process is expected to involve a series of checks and balances with reviews being conducted by the ISA, including technical evaluations by the ISA secretariat and a constituent body of the ISA known as the Legal and Technical Commission (the “LTC”). The recommendations of the LTC will then go before the ISA Council (a core policy-making body of the ISA), which will then review and, if it deems appropriate, approve the contractor’s application. It would require a two-thirds majority of the Council to reject a development proposal that is recommended to it by the LTC. There are no assurances that the work our subsidiaries have done to date or their contemplated future operations will satisfy the final environmental rules and regulations adopted by the ISA, and any future changes could delay the timing of such submissions to the ISA or our subsidiaries operations more generally, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. Sponsoring State approvals and permits are currently and may in future be required in connection with our operations. To the extent such approvals are required and not obtained, our subsidiaries may be curtailed or prohibited from proceeding with planned exploration or development of mineral properties. Failure to comply with applicable laws, regulations, and permitting requirements may result in enforcement actions thereunder, including orders issued by regulatory or judicial authorities causing operations to cease or be curtailed and may include corrective measures requiring capital expenditures, installation of additional equipment, or remedial actions. Parties engaged in collection operations may be required to compensate those suffering loss or damage by reason of the collection activities and may have civil or criminal fines or penalties imposed for violations of applicable laws and regulations.

We may become subject to environmental liabilities as a result of noncompliance or newly imposed regulations.

All of the exploration and development operations of our subsidiaries will be subject to environmental permitting and regulations, which can make operations expensive or prohibit them altogether. We may also be subject to potential risks and liabilities associated with pollution of the environment that could occur as a result of our subsidiaries’ exploration, development, and production activities.

To the extent that a subsidiary becomes subject to environmental liabilities, the payment of such liabilities, or the costs incurred to remedy environmental pollution, would reduce funds otherwise available to us, which could have a material adverse effect on our business. If we or our subsidiaries are unable to fully remedy an environmental problem, they might be required to suspend operations or enter into interim compliance measures pending completion of the required remedy. The potential exposure could be material to our business.

All of our exploration, development, production and processing activities will be subject to regulation under certain environmental laws and regulations. Our subsidiaries may be required to obtain permits for their activities. They may be required to update and review permits from time to time, and may also be subject to environmental impact analyses and public review processes prior to the approval of any future activities. It is possible that future changes in applicable laws, regulations and permits, or changes in their enforcement or regulatory interpretation by local governments, sponsor states, and other regulatory bodies, could have a significant impact on our business.

There is significant uncertainty regarding the impact of polymetallic nodule collection on biodiversity in the CCZ and recovery rates of impacted ecosystems.

Potential future commercial-scale nodule collection operations in the CCZ are certain to disturb wildlife in the operating area. The nature and severity of these impacts on CCZ wildlife are expected to vary by species and are currently subject to significant uncertainty. Our studies cataloguing wildlife and ecosystem function, piloting the nodule collection system and assessing impacts arising from the use of this system are all currently in progress. Given the significant volume of deep water and the difficulty of sampling or retrieving biological specimens in

16

Table of Contents

the Area, a complete biological inventory might never be established. Accordingly, impacts on CCZ biodiversity may never be, completely and definitively known. For the same reasons, it may also not be possible to definitively say whether the impact of nodule collection on global biodiversity will be less significant than those estimated for land-based mining for a similar amount of produced metal.

It is also currently not definitively known how the risk of biodiversity loss in the CCZ could be eliminated or reduced through mitigation strategies or how long it will take for disturbed seabed areas to recover naturally. Prior research indicates that the density, diversity and function of fauna representing most of resident biomass (including mobile, pelagic and microbial life) are expected to recover naturally over years to decades. However, a high level of uncertainty exists around recovery of fauna that requires the hard substrate of nodules for critical life function. The extent to which planned measures, such as leaving behind 15% of nodule cover (by mass) and setting aside no-take zones, would aid recruitment and recovery of nodule-dependent species in impacted areas will depend on factors like habitat connectivity, which is an area that is still under study.

Risks Related to Exploration, Collecting, Processing, and Commercialization

Our business is subject to significant risks, and we may never develop minerals in sufficient grade or quantities to justify commercial operations.

Mineral resource exploration, development, and operations are highly speculative and are characterized by a number of significant risks, including, among other things, unprofitable efforts resulting not only from the failure to discover mineral resources, and from finding mineral resources which, though present, are insufficient in quantity and quality to return a profit from production. Once mineralization is discovered, it may take a number of years from the initial exploration phases before production is possible, during which time the potential feasibility of the project may change adversely. Substantial expenditures are required to establish mineral resources and reserves, to determine processes to collect and transport the minerals and, if required, to construct processing facilities.

No deep-sea polymetallic properties in the Area that have been identified have as of today been developed into production. Exploration risk exists in the discovery, location, definition and recovery of seafloor polymetallic nodule deposits. Many companies fail to ever locate an economic deposit, and given that no seafloor polymetallic nodule deposit has ever been commercially developed, such risks may have a material impact on our ability to accomplish our objectives. Operations may be affected by the availability of suitable vessels and equipment, prevailing sea conditions, changes in meteorological conditions and climate change, currents close to the seafloor and throughout the water column, recovery of materials sampled, lack of experience in delineating deposits, or unsuitability of equipment for recovering such material in prevailing conditions. Substantial expenditures are required to establish mineral reserves, to develop metallurgical processes, and to construct collection and transportation vessels, and we will be required to rely upon the expertise of consultants and others for exploration, development, construction and operational knowhow, and such consultants and third parties may not always be available to support our operations. If we are not able to obtain such expertise or identify alternative sources of expertise, our operations and financial results will be negatively impacted.

While we believe that seafloor polymetallic nodules in the contract areas of our subsidiaries account for some of the world’s largest aggregated estimated deposits of battery metals, no assurance can be given that minerals will be discovered in sufficient grade or quantities to justify commercial operations. Whether an exploration property will be commercially viable depends on a number of factors, including: the particular attributes of the deposit, such as size, grade and proximity to infrastructure; metal prices, which are highly cyclical; availability of and effectiveness of technology to recover, trans-ship, transport and process nodules; government regulations, including regulations relating to prices, taxes, royalties, land tenure, land use, and environmental protection; availability of required personnel, third-party partners and contractors, any required financing and commercial demand in the marketplace for such metals. The precise impact of these factors cannot accurately be predicted, but the combination of these factors may result in the inability of our subsidiaries to operate or generate an adequate return on invested capital.

While we and our subsidiaries will evaluate the political and economic factors in determining an exploration strategy, there can be no assurance that significant restrictions will not be placed on intended development areas. Such restrictions may have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operation.

17

Table of Contents

No seafloor polymetallic nodule deposit has ever been commercially developed, and our collection and development plans and processes may not be sufficient to accomplish our objectives.

Seafloor polymetallic nodules have never been commercially mined, and there is a risk that our collection and recovery methods and the equipment that we intend to utilize during this process may not be adequate for the economic development of seafloor polymetallic nodule deposits. The equipment and technology that we intend to utilize has not been fully proven in such sub-sea conditions and for this specific material and application, and failure to adapt existing equipment or to develop suitable equipment or recovery and development techniques for the prevailing material and seafloor conditions would have a material adverse effect on the business of our subsidiaries, and the results of their operations and financial condition. We have partnered with Allseas, a leading global offshore contractor, to undertake a pre-production pilot collection system test in which a collector vehicle, a riser and lift system (“RALS”) and other systems will be tested. Although we expect the pilot collection system test to be successful, there can be no assurance that it will be, or that their technology will eventually be adequate for full scale commercial production, or that our intention to partner with Allseas in the initial production activities in one or more of our contract areas will be agreed with Allseas, hence we may be delayed in obtaining offshore collection equipment in the event we do not reach agreement with Allseas and have to develop such equipment on our own or through new third-party contractual relationships.

Mineral resource calculations from the contract areas of NORI and TOML are only estimates.

Calculations of mineral resources from the contract areas of NORI and TOML described in this prospectus and reported in technical reports prepared by AMC are only estimates and depend on geological interpretation and statistical inferences or assumptions drawn from recovery and sampling analysis, which might prove to be materially inaccurate. While these reports have been provided by experts, there is a degree of uncertainty attributable to the calculation of mineral resources. Mineral Reserves have not been defined and will require completion of further studies. Until mineral resources are actually collected and processed, the quantity of metal and nodule abundance must be considered as estimates only and no assurance can be given that the indicated levels of metals will be produced. In making determinations about whether to advance any of our projects to further development, we must rely upon calculated estimates for the mineral resources and grades of mineralization in our contract areas and estimated equipment production rates and collection efficiency.

The estimation of mineral reserves and mineral resources is a subjective process that is partially dependent upon the judgment of the persons preparing the estimates. The process relies on the quantity and quality of available data and is based on knowledge, experience, statistical analysis of data and industry practices. Valid estimates made at a given time may significantly change when new information becomes available.

Estimated mineral reserves and mineral resources may have to be recalculated based on changes in metal prices, further exploration or development activity or actual production experience. This could materially and adversely affect estimates of the volume or grade of mineralization, estimated recovery rates or other important factors that influence mineral reserves and mineral resources estimates. The extent to which mineral resources may ultimately be reclassified as mineral reserves is dependent upon the demonstration of their profitable recovery. Any material changes in volume and grades of mineralization will affect the economic viability of placing a property into production and a property’s return on capital. We cannot provide assurance that polymetallic nodules can be collected or processed profitably.

The mineral resource estimates in this prospectus have been determined and valued based on assumed future metal prices, cut-off grades, production rates and operating costs that may prove to be inaccurate. Extended declines in the market price for nickel, manganese, copper and cobalt may render portions of our mineralization uneconomic and result in reduced reported volume and grades, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on our financial performance, financial position and results of operations.

In addition, inferred mineral resources have a great amount of uncertainty as to their existence and their economic and legal feasibility. You should not assume that any part of an inferred mineral resource will be upgraded to a higher category or that any of the mineral resources will be reclassified as mineral reserves.

18

Table of Contents

The grade and quality of the polymetallic nodule deposits that we intend to develop are estimates, and there are no guarantees that such deposits will be suitable for collecting or commercialization.

The grades of the seafloor polymetallic nodule deposits that we intend to develop and commercialize are estimates that may prove to be inaccurate. While limited samples have been collected and analyzed, there are no guarantees that our projections of quality will hold true with respect to the polymetallic nodule deposits that we are able to collect from the seafloor. Actual grades may vary from our estimates, which could have a material adverse impact on our projections for future revenues, cash flows, royalties, and development and operating expenditures.

In addition, the precise form of mineral occurrence, grade, and tonnage, which is projected based on the mapping and analysis of samples, are not yet known. There is a risk that the sampling and imaging that has been completed to date, and that which will need to be completed in the future, has not and/or will not allow us to accurately quantify the tonnage and grade of identified polymetallic nodule deposits. Moreover, the projections or classifications based on such sampling could result in inaccurate environmental, geological or metallurgical assumptions (including with respect to the size, grade and/or recoverability of minerals) or incorrect assumptions concerning economic recoverability.

Uncertainty in our estimates of polymetallic nodule deposits could result in lower than expected revenues and higher costs.

We base our estimates of polymetallic nodule deposits on engineering, economic, and geological data assembled and analyzed by outside firms, which are reviewed by third-party expert consultants including engineers and geologists. Such estimates, however, are necessarily imprecise and depend to some extent on professional interpretation, including statistical inferences drawn from available data, which may prove unreliable. There are numerous uncertainties inherent in estimating quantities and qualities of the polymetallic nodules that we intend to collect and the costs associated therewith, including many factors beyond our control. Estimates of economically recoverable minerals necessarily depend upon a number of variable factors and assumptions, all of which may vary considerably from actual results, such as:

•        environmental, geological, geotechnical, collecting and processing conditions that may not be fully identified by available data or that may differ from experience;

•        changes to the strategic approach to collecting and processing, which will depend in large part on market demand, corporate strategy and other prevailing economic and financial conditions;

•        assumptions concerning future prices of products (including, most notably, battery metals) foreign exchange rates, production rates, process recovery rates, transportation costs, operating costs, capital costs and reclamation costs; and

•        assumptions concerning future effects of regulation, including the issuance of required permits and taxes by governmental agencies and foreign government policies relating to our collecting of the mineral resources from our contract areas.

Uncertainty in estimates related to the availability of polymetallic nodules could result in lower than expected revenues and higher than expected costs or a shortened estimated life for our projects. Fluctuations in factors out of our control such as changes in future product pricing, foreign government policies and foreign exchange rates can have a significant impact on the estimates of mineral resources and reserves and can result in significant changes in the quantum of our resources and/or reserves period-to-period.

The polymetallic nodules that we may recover will require specialized treatment and processing, and there is no certainty that such processes will result in a recovery of metals that is consistent with our expectations, or that we will be able to develop or otherwise access processing plants that are suitable for our purposes.

The polymetallic nodules that our subsidiaries may recover will comprise a mixture of base metals in varying proportions, which will likely necessitate specialized treatment by mineral processing plants or smelters. To date, no polymetallic nodule deposits have been collected and treated for recovery of metal products on a commercial scale, and there is a risk that such treatment may not be economically viable and/or that the nodules being treated will contain elements or compounds that would render them unsuitable for treatment.

19

Table of Contents

To date, no commercial-scale plants have been built to process polymetallic nodules. While Hatch Ltd. (“Hatch”), a global engineering, project management, and professional services firm, has helped us to develop a processing flowsheet with zero solid waste and is working with us in the development of a pilot plant processing program, the actual percentage recovery of metals may vary significantly from that forecast, and we are in the process of conducting a pilot scale metallurgical test-work program to determine our ability to expand such program into a full operational system.

Should our nodule collection plans become successful, we intend to develop land-based processing plants or partner with existing land-based processing partners. Furthermore, our future needs with respect to such processing plants have yet to be fully determined, and as such, the capital costs, performance, reliability, and maintenance of such plants is currently uncertain. While we believe that we have identified specific sites for the potential construction of such plants (based on factors such as proximity to deep-water ports, cost and source of electric power and natural gas, and proximity to customers), there is a risk that we will be unable to secure one or more of these sites on suitable terms. In the event that we are unable to secure one or more of the sites we have identified, or if construction delays impact our ability to develop one or more of such sites, our ability to process polymetallic nodules would be detrimentally impacted. Additionally, there can be no guarantees that such plants can be developed, or if developed, that such plants will perform in an economically viable manner or provide the projected metal recovery rates at the estimated project capital and operating costs, which could impact projections for our future revenues, cash flows, royalties, and development and operating expenditures.

We have identified potential tolling facilities to process nodules to Cu-Ni-Co alloy and Mn silicate, and developed a marketing strategy to place these products into existing smelting and refining facilities. There is no guarantee that these facilities will be available at the required times or that we would be able to secure them at commercially attractive rates. Additionally, even if we are able to secure appropriate processing facilities (either through ground-up construction or tolling arrangements), there is no guarantee that we will be able to provide them with the required nodule feedstocks at the required times. Accordingly, the timing in which we expand our operations may vary depending on geological, operational and financial developments, in addition to regulatory approvals from the ISA, among other factors, and these may impact our revenue and financial performance.

Our exploration and polymetallic nodule collecting activities may be affected by natural hazards, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Deep-sea mineral exploration and collection activities are inherently difficult and dangerous and may be delayed or suspended by severe weather events and climate change, sea conditions or other natural hazards, including storms, hurricanes and unpredictable weather patterns. In addition, even though sea conditions in a particular location may be somewhat predictable, the possibility exists that unexpected conditions may occur that adversely affect our operations. Seafloor mineral collection activities may be subject to interruptions resulting from weather and related marine conditions that adversely affect our collection operations or the ports of delivery and any such delays could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Nodule Collection, development and processing operations pose inherent risks and costs that may negatively impact our business.

Collection, development and processing operations involve many hazards and uncertainties, including, among others:

•        metallurgical or other processing problems;

•        technical and operational challenges in the collection and expansion of maritime collection activities;

•        difficulties in transferring nodules to transport vessels and delivering nodules to port;

•        industrial accidents;

•        unusual and unexpected water conditions;

•        unexpected seafloor conditions

•        unexpected environmental conditions, including contamination or leakage;

20

Table of Contents

•        periodic interruptions due to inclement or hazardous weather conditions or other acts of nature;

•        fires;

•        piracy and disruptive action by non-governmental actors opposed to deep sea collection;

•        organized labor disputes or work slow-downs;

•        mechanical equipment failure and facility performance problems;

•        the availability of financing, market demand, critical technology and equipment, and skilled labor; and

•        the inability of suppliers to provide key process inputs like electricity, gas, coal and processing reagents on a timely basis at the prices that have been forecast.

These occurrences could result in damage to, or destruction of, production facilities, personal injury or death, environmental damage, delays in processing, increased production costs, asset write downs, monetary losses and legal liability, any of which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition and adversely affect our projected development and production estimates. In addition, our operations could be interrupted by or negatively influenced by non-governmental actors which could negatively impact our or our subsidiaries’ ability to operate in the CCZ and international markets, obtain capital, collect, transport, process or sell metals, or otherwise conduct business.

There exist certain negative perceptions related to acquiring metals produced from deep sea minerals. Some market proponents have recently expressed opposition to acquiring deep-see mineral derived metals, and if this position gains broad traction in the marketplace for EV and Battery metals, it could have a material impact on our business and operations.

Fluctuations in transportation costs or disruptions in transportation services or damage or loss during transport could decrease our competitiveness or impair our ability to supply polymetallic nodules, processed minerals or products to our customers, which could adversely affect our results of operations.

Once our subsidiaries have been able to successfully develop their properties, they will be required to transport minerals to facilities for processing. Furthermore, once they have reached a point of commercialization, we will need to transport our products to our future customers, wherever they may be located. Finding affordable and dependable transportation is important because it allows us to supply customers around the world. Labor disputes, embargos, government restrictions, work stoppages, pandemics, derailments, damage or loss events, adverse weather conditions, vessel groundings inhibiting access to key navigation routes, other environmental events, changes to rail or ocean freight systems or other events and activities beyond our control could interrupt or limit available transport services, which could result in customer dissatisfaction and loss of sales potential and could materially adversely affect our results of operations.

Some of the equipment that we will need to accomplish our objectives has not been manufactured and/or tested.

Our subsidiaries will need to rely on high value equipment for collection and transport of materials. Much of this equipment, particularly as it pertains to sub-sea engineering and recovery systems, has yet to have completion of engineering, and has not been constructed and fully tested, and may not be suitable or may prove unreliable, and may not be delivered to us on a timely basis, thereby delaying our contemplated timetable. Moreover, our future needs with respect to sub-sea engineering and recovery systems have yet to be fully determined, and as such, the capital costs, performance, reliability, and maintenance associated with the necessary equipment is currently unknown. There can be no guarantees that the necessary sub-sea engineering and recovery systems can be developed, or if developed, that such systems will be deployable in an economically viable manner. Any equipment downtime or delayed mobilization of equipment may impact operations. Additionally, as we launch exploration, collection, and development initiatives, our subsidiaries may need to compete for the availability of suitable vessels and equipment, even though we have a close commercial relationship with our partners, Allseas and Maersk, there is a risk that certain vessels and equipment will be under long-term charter and will thus not be available to them when needed, if at all.

21

Table of Contents

Risks Related to Our Operations and Industry

Actual capital costs, financing strategies, operating costs, production and economic returns may differ significantly from those we have anticipated and there can be no assurance that any future development activities will result in profitable collecting operations.

The actual operating costs of our subsidiaries to collect polymetallic nodules and transport and process such nodules on a commercial scale will depend upon changes in the availability of financing or partners who undertake capital developments in partnership with us, and prices of labor, equipment and infrastructure, shipping costs, variances in ore recovery from those currently assumed, operational risks, changes in governmental regulation, including taxation, environmental, permitting and other regulations and other factors, many of which are beyond our control. Due to any of these or other factors, our capital and operating costs may be significantly higher than those set forth in the NORI and TOML Technical Report Summaries prepared by AMC Consultants Ltd. (“AMC”) and filed with the registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part (the “NORI Technical Report Summary” and the “TOML Technical Report Summary”). As a result of higher capital and operating costs, our financing ability may be impacted, and this may be further affected by lower commodity prices in the international markets that could impact production or economic returns which may differ significantly from those set forth in the NORI and TOML Technical Report Summaries and there can be no assurance that any of our development activities will result in profitable operations.

We have a limited operating history, and there can be no assurance that we will be able to commercially develop our properties or achieve profitability in the future.

We have a limited operating history, and we expect that our losses will continue until we achieve profitable commercial production. NORI currently intends to explore and collect mineral resources in the NORI areas identified in the Exploration Contract executed by NORI with the ISA (the “NORI Areas”), and we hope to expand such operations if viable in certain other parts of the CCZ, including by TOML in the TOML areas identified in the Exploration Contract executed between TOML and the ISA (the “TOML Areas”) and DGE in the Marawa areas identified in the Exploration Contract executed by Marawa with the ISA (the “Marawa Areas”). Although NORI expects to achieve early stage commercial production for NORI-D on or around 2024, there can be no assurance that it will be able to commercially develop these properties or that it will be able to generate profits in the future.

Our operating expenses and capital expenditures will increase in the future as consultants and new employees are engaged, equipment associated with advancing exploration is leased or purchased, and properties are developed. There can be no assurance that we will generate any revenues or achieve profitability, or that the assumed levels of expense associated with our exploration, development, and commercialization processes will prove to be accurate.

Our business is contingent on our ability to successfully identify, collect and process polymetallic nodules, and in doing so, we will need to rely on certain existing and future strategic relationships, some of which we may be unable to maintain and/or develop.

In conducting our business, we will rely on continuing existing strategic relationships as well as new relationships in a variety of disciplines, including the offshore equipment and services industries (such as our partnerships with Maersk and Allseas), the onshore mineral processing industry, and others involved in the mineral exploration industry. We will also need to continue to develop new relationships with third-party contractors, as well as with certain regulatory and governmental departments.

For example, we have been working with Hatch, a global engineering, project management, and professional services firm, to develop onshore processing technology for the production of readily saleable copper and manganese products, as well as products such as high-grade nickel and cobalt sulphates for the electric vehicle battery markets. In connection therewith, Hatch has developed a zero solid waste flowsheet. We are also party to certain agreements with Maersk and Maersk UK, pursuant to which Maersk and Maersk UK agreed to supply us with vessels and offshore services with respect to vessel operations and supplier management to support environmental studies within the NORI, TOML and Marawa Areas, though these arrangements are scheduled to terminate in 2022 unless extended by mutual agreement. Additionally, we are party to certain agreements with Allseas, pursuant to which, among other things, Allseas has agreed to design, engineer and construct an integrated offshore collection system to collect nodules from NORI Areas, and to assist with shipping efforts thereafter. Allseas

22

Table of Contents

is contractually required to develop a test system to demonstrate this capability, but it is not certain that Allseas will convert, or will be able to convert such system into a full-scale commercial operation or that we will reach contractual terms with Allseas for such commercial arrangements.

There can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to maintain and develop our existing relationships, or that we will be able to form the new relationships that are required in order for our business to be successful. Additionally, one of our material agreements with a strategic partner includes performance-based metrics that will adjust depending on the success of our business and the trading activity in our shares. We issued the Allseas Warrant to Allseas, which shall vest upon certain milestones into such number of our Common Shares that is based on the formula described therein. As of June 1, 2022, the value of the Allseas Warrant will be determined by multiplying the total number of our Common Shares underlying the warrant by the price per Common Share (“Warrant Credit Value”). In the event that the Warrant Credit Value is greater than $150,000,000, then on the vesting date of the Allseas Warrant, we shall receive a “credit” for the amount by which such Warrant Credit Value exceeds $150,000,000. We will be able to exchange such credit value for future goods and services from Allseas. However, if our Common Shares do not perform well, there is a chance that we will receive little or no such credit, in which case we will be required to pay more than is currently anticipated to Allseas in connection with the services that it is expected to provide. In addition, there can be no assurance that services will be required from Allseas to utilize any such credit.

The prevailing market prices of nickel, manganese, copper, cobalt, and other commodities will have a material impact on our ability to achieve commercial success.

The profitability of our nodule collection operations is significantly affected by changes in the market price of battery metals (cobalt, nickel and copper) and manganese and the cost of power, petroleum fuels, and oil, among other commodities and supply requirements. Prices of such metals are affected by numerous factors beyond our control, including: prevailing interest rates and returns on other asset classes; expectations regarding inflation, monetary policy and currency values; speculation; governmental and exchange decisions regarding the disposal of metal stockpiles; political and economic conditions; available supplies of battery metals from mine production, inventories and recycled metal; sales by holders and producers of battery metals; and demand for products containing nickel, manganese, copper and cobalt. The price of nickel, manganese, copper, cobalt and other minerals and oil has fluctuated widely in recent years. Depending on the prevailing price of nickel, manganese, copper, and cobalt, and the cost of power, chemical reagents, petroleum fuels and oil, cash flow from our collection operations and commercialization may not be sufficient to cover our operating costs or the costs to servicing any outstanding debt. In addition, our proposed full scale production plans would involve placing a large percentage of global manganese production in the market, and we may be constrained in our ability to sell such large volumes, or such production may negatively impact the market price of manganese, which would, in either case, negatively impact our overall economic position.

We are not currently party to any commodity hedging contracts, as we do not yet have any production. Debt financing may not be available on commercially reasonable terms, or at all.

We may be adversely affected by fluctuations in demand for nickel, manganese, copper, cobalt, and other commodities.

Because our revenue is expected to be from the collection and processing of minerals, changes in demand for, and taxes and other tariffs and fees imposed upon, such minerals and derived mineral products (most notably, nickel, manganese, copper, and cobalt) could significantly affect our profitability. A prolonged or significant economic contraction in the United States or worldwide could put downward pressure on market prices of minerals. Protracted periods of low prices for minerals could significantly reduce revenues and the availability of required development funds in the future. This could cause substantial reductions to, or a suspension of, our exploration, collecting and production operations, and impair asset values.

Demand for our minerals may be impacted by changes in supply dynamics and sources, and changes in demand for downstream products, including batteries for electric vehicles and energy storage that consume high volumes of the metals we intend to produce, as well as demand for manganese alloys used in steel-making, the targeted market for most of our manganese production. Lack of growth or material increases in new sources of supply in this or in any other related markets may adversely affect the demand for our minerals and any related

23

Table of Contents

products, and if the market for these critical existing and emerging technologies does not grow as we expect, grows more slowly than we expect, or if the demand for our products in these markets decreases, then our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results could be harmed. Notably, our financial success will depend in part on the expansion of the global manganese market to consume the additional volume of manganese that we intend to produce.

In contrast, extended periods of high commodity prices may create economic dislocations that could be destabilizing to the supply and demand of minerals, and ultimately to the broader markets. Periods of high market prices for our minerals are generally beneficial to our financial performance. However, strong prices also create economic pressure to identify or create new sources of supply and alternate technologies requiring consumption of metals that ultimately could depress future long-term demand for nickel, cobalt, copper and related products, and at the same time may incentivize development of competing properties.

We may experience difficulty in creating market acceptance for a novel manganese product.

We will be producing a novel manganese silicate product which does not have recognition in the marketplace with customers. Metallurgical testwork, market studies by CRU International Limited (“CRU”) and initial engagement with customers indicate that this manganese silicate product will be a premium product as an input into silicomanagese alloy production that we believe will receive strong market acceptance. However mineral processing industries may be slow to change feed stocks and suppliers, even in the face of potential improvements.

Additionally, manganese silicate is not a conventional mineral product and may require additional approvals for export and import from our processing facilities to our future customers.

We operate in a highly competitive industry, and there are no assurances that our efforts will be successful.

The battery metals collection and processing industry is capital intensive and competitive. Production of battery metals and manganese alloys is largely dominated by Chinese competitors amongst other nation states and private contractors. These competitors may have greater financial resources, as well as other strategic advantages to operate, maintain, improve and possibly expand their facilities. Additionally, domestic Chinese resources firms have historically been able to produce minerals and/or process metals from land-based operations at relatively low costs due to domestic economic and regulatory factors, including less stringent environmental and governmental regulations and lower labor and benefit costs. Many contractors currently hold ISA exploration contracts to assess the value of polymetallic nodule fields for future collecting in the Area. Each of these various contractors are potential competitors with respect to the collection of polymetallic nodules and the production of nickel, manganese, copper and cobalt products. We will be competing with several other contractors that may possess greater financial and/or technical resources. There is increasing competition from new and existing players in the search for polymetallic nodule deposits, the availability of marine exploration and support vessels, related marine equipment and specialized personnel, desirable exploration leases, suitable processing equipment, and available funds. There is a risk that competitors may find more promising resources, identify or develop more economic technologies, enter into strategic partnerships that constrain our optionality, or may develop novel methods to process nodules into metals (either on the seafloor or on land) that are more economic than we currently contemplate.

We may become subject to pressure and lobbying from non-governmental organizations.

Like other businesses that operate in the resources industry, we may become subject to pressure and lobbying from non-governmental organizations, particularly with respect to environmental concerns, including potential damage to the deep-sea environment. There is a risk that the demands and actions of such non-governmental organizations may cause significant disruption to our business, which could have a material adverse effect on our operations and financial condition. It is possible that direct action from environmental groups could physically impact ongoing operation during exploration, project development and commercial operations.

Our profitability could be adversely affected if we fail to maintain satisfactory labor relations.

Our exploration and production initiatives will be dependent upon the efforts of our employees. Although none of our employees are currently subject to any collective bargaining arrangements, our employees could, in the future, choose to be represented as a collective unit, which may result in labor disputes, work stoppages or other disruptions in our production efforts that could adversely affect us.

24

Table of Contents

Our business is subject to a variety of risks, some of which may not be covered by our future or existing insurance policies.

In the course of the exploration, development, and production of our mineral resource properties, we may be subject to a variety of risks that could result in (i) damage to, or destruction of, transportation vessels and processing facilities, (ii) personal injury or death, (iii) environmental damage, (iv) delays in collecting, transporting or processing, (v) monetary losses, (vi) natural disasters, (vii) environmental matters, and (viii) legal liability, among others. It is not always possible to fully insure against such risks, and we may determine not to insure against all such risks as a result of high premiums or for other reasons. Should such liabilities arise, they could reduce or eliminate any future profitability and result in an increase in cost and a decline in the value of our securities. We cannot be certain that insurance for some or all of these risks will be available on acceptable terms or conditions, if at all, and in some cases, coverage may not be acceptable or may be considered too expensive relative to the perceived risk.

Work stoppages or similar difficulties could significantly disrupt our operations, reduce our revenues and materially adversely affect our results of operations.

A work stoppage by any of the third parties providing services in connection with our operations or those of our strategic partners (such as for on-shore or off-shore operations) could significantly disrupt our activities, reduce our future revenues and materially adversely affect our results of operations.

A shortage of skilled technicians and engineers may further increase operating costs, which could materially adversely affect our results of operations.

Efficient collection, transport and processing using modern techniques and equipment requires skilled technicians and engineers. In addition, our optimization and eventual downstream efforts will significantly increase the number of skilled operators, maintenance technicians, engineers and other personnel required to successfully operate our business. If we are unable to hire, train and retain the necessary number of skilled technicians, engineers and other personnel there could be an adverse impact on our labor costs and our ability to reach anticipated production levels in a timely manner, which could have a material adverse effect on our results of operations.

We depend on key personnel for the success of our business. The loss of key personnel or the hiring of ineffective personnel could negatively impact our operations and profitability.

We depend on the services of our senior management team, our board of directors, our strategic partners and other key personnel. The loss of the services of any member of senior management, our board of directors or a key employee, or similar personnel within our strategic partners could have an adverse effect on our business. We and our partners may not be able to locate, attract or employ on acceptable terms qualified replacements for senior management, board of directors or other key employees if their services are no longer available.

Our growth will depend on our ability, and on the ability of our management team, board of directors and other employees, to execute on our plans and expand our operations and controls while maintaining effective cost controls.

Deep-sea exploration, collection, and production is a burgeoning industry, and our ability to implement our strategy requires effective planning and management control systems. Our plans may place a significant strain on our management and on our operational, financial and personnel resources. As such, our future growth and prospects will depend on our ability to manage this growth and to continue to expand and improve operational, financial and management information and quality control systems on a timely basis, while at the same time maintaining effective cost controls. Any failure to expand and improve operational, financial and management information and quality control systems in line with our growth could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. There are also risks associated with establishing and maintaining systems of internal controls.

The COVID-19 pandemic could have an adverse effect on our business.

The current COVID-19 pandemic has materially impacted the national and global economy and commodity and financial markets. The full extent and impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is unknown and to date has included, among other things, extreme volatility in financial markets, a slowdown in economic activity, volatility in commodity prices, and an increased possibility of a global recession. The response to COVID-19 has led to

25

Table of Contents

significant restrictions on travel, temporary business closures, quarantines, global stock market volatility and a general reduction in consumer activity and sentiment, globally. The outbreak has affected our business and operations and may continue to do so by, among others, increasing the cost of operations and reducing employee productivity, limiting travel of our personnel, adversely affecting the health and welfare of our personnel, or preventing or delaying important third-party service providers from performing normal and contracted activities crucial to the operation of our business.

The outbreak has resulted in significant governmental measures being implemented to control the spread of the virus, including, among others, restrictions on manufacturing and the movement of employees in many regions of the U.S. and other countries. These disruptions could continue to impact the market for minerals, which in turn could impact our business or business prospects.

Decisions beyond our control, such as canceled events, restricted travel, barriers to entry, temporary closures or limited availability of county, state or federal government agencies, or other factors, may affect our ability to perform collecting operations, corporate activities, and other actions that would normally be accomplished without such limitations. For instance, the final exploitation regulations were expected to be adopted by the ISA during 2020 but were delayed due to COVID-19. The extent to which the COVID-19 outbreak will further impact our operations, our business and the economy is highly uncertain. We cannot predict the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, but it may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We are dependent upon information technology systems, which are subject to cyber threats, disruption, damage and failure.

We depend upon information technology systems in the conduct of operations. Such information technology systems are subject to disruption, damage or failure from a variety of sources, including, without limitation, computer viruses, security breaches, cyber-attacks, natural disasters and defects in design. Cybersecurity incidents, in particular, are evolving and include, but are not limited to, malicious software, attempts to gain unauthorized access to data and other electronic security breaches that could lead to disruptions in systems, unauthorized release of confidential or otherwise protected information or the corruption of data. Various measures have been implemented to manage our risks related to information technology systems and network disruptions. However, given the unpredictability of the timing, nature and scope of information technology disruptions, we could potentially be subject to downtimes, operational delays, the compromising of confidential or otherwise protected information, destruction or corruption of data, security breaches, other manipulation or improper use of our systems and networks or financial losses from remedial actions, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition.

Our ability to generate revenue will be diminished if we are unable to compete with substitutions for the minerals that we intend to process.

Technology changes rapidly in the industries and end markets that utilize our materials. If these industries introduce new technologies or products that no longer require the minerals that we intend to collect and process, or if suitable substitutes become available, it could result in a decline in demand for our materials. If the demand for our materials decreases, it will have a material adverse effect on our business and the results of our operations and financial condition.

We are reliant on third parties to conduct independent analyses with respect to our business, and any inaccuracies in such analyses could have a material adverse effect on our collection and development objectives.

We rely upon third-party consultants, engineers, analysts, scientists, and others to provide analyses, reviews, reports, advice, and opinions regarding our potential projects. For example, the NORI Technical Report Summary and TOML Technical Report Summary contain mineral resource estimates and other information with respect to our contract areas. There is a risk that such analyses, reviews, reports, advice, opinions, and projects are incorrect, in particular with respect to resource estimation, process development, and recommendations for products to be produced, as well as with respect to economic assessments, including estimating the capital and operating costs of our project and forecasting potential future revenue streams. Uncertainties are also inherent in such estimations.

26

Table of Contents

We may become involved in litigation that may adversely affect us, including litigation related to non-performing PIPE investors.

Due to the nature of our business, we may be subject to regulatory investigations, claims, lawsuits and other proceedings in the ordinary course of our business. The results of these legal proceedings cannot be predicted with certainty due to the uncertainty inherent in litigation, including the effects of discovery of new evidence or advancement of new legal theories, the difficulty of predicting decisions of judges and juries and the possibility that decisions may be reversed on appeal. We can provide no assurances that these matters will not have a material adverse effect on our business. In the past, following periods of volatility in the market, securities class-action litigation has often been instituted against companies. Such litigation, if instituted against us, could result in substantial costs and diversion of management’s attention and resources, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and growth prospects.

In connection with the Closing of the Business Combination, we expected to receive approximately $330 million of proceeds in the PIPE Financing but only received $110.3 million due to two investors that failed to fulfill their funding obligations under their PIPE Investor Subscription Agreements. We have initiated litigation against the two non-performing investors in order to enforce the funding obligations under their PIPE Investor Subscription Agreements, but there can be no assurances that we will be successful in those efforts.

Our future growth may be dependent upon consumers’ willingness to adopt electric vehicles.

Given that the minerals we intend to collect and process are contemplated to be significantly linked to growing metals demand in batteries for electric vehicles, our growth is highly dependent upon the adoption by consumers of, and we are subject to an elevated risk of any reduced demand for, alternative fuel vehicles in general and electric vehicles in particular. While it has been projected that demand for such electric vehicles will surge over time, if the market for electric vehicles does not develop as we expect, or develops more slowly than we expect, our business, prospects, financial condition and operating results may be harmed. The market for alternative fuel vehicles is relatively new, rapidly evolving, characterized by rapidly changing technologies, price competition, additional competitors, evolving government regulation and industry standards, frequent new vehicle announcements and changing consumer demands and behaviors. Factors that may influence the adoption of alternative fuel vehicles, and specifically electric vehicles, include:

•        perceptions about electric vehicle quality, safety, design, performance and cost, especially if adverse events or accidents occur that are linked to the quality or safety of electric vehicles;

•        the material composition necessary for electric vehicle batteries and the potential of change in chemistry and engineering requirements that may move away from expected demand for nickel and cobalt;

•        perceptions about vehicle safety in general, in particular safety issues that may be attributed to the use of advanced technology, including vehicle electronics and regenerative braking systems;

•        the limited range over which electric vehicles may be driven on a single battery charge;

•        the decline of an electric vehicle’s range resulting from deterioration over time in the battery’s ability to hold a charge;

•        concerns about electric grid capacity and reliability;

•        the availability of alternative fuel vehicles, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles;

•        improvements in the fuel economy of the internal combustion engine;

•        the availability of service for electric vehicles;

•        the environmental consciousness of consumers;

•        volatility in the cost of oil and gasoline;

•        consumers’ perceptions of the dependency of the United States on oil from unstable or hostile countries;

27

Table of Contents

•        government regulations and economic incentives promoting fuel efficiency and alternate forms of energy;

•        access to charging stations, standardization of electric vehicle charging systems and consumers’ perceptions about convenience and cost to charge an electric vehicle;

•        the availability of tax and other governmental incentives to purchase and operate electric vehicles or future regulation requiring increased use of nonpolluting vehicles;

•        perceptions about and the actual cost of alternative fuel; and

•        macroeconomic factors.

Developments in alternative technologies or improvements in the internal combustion engine may materially adversely affect the demand for electric vehicles, and thus for the minerals that we intend to collect and process.

Significant developments in alternative technologies, such as advanced diesel, ethanol, fuel cells or compressed natural gas, or improvements in the fuel economy of the internal combustion engine, may materially and adversely affect demand for the minerals that we intend to harvest and process in ways we do not currently anticipate. Any such reductions in demand could have a material adverse effect on our business and prospects.

We may be required to take write-downs or write-offs, restructurings and impairments or other charges that could have a significant negative effect on our financial condition, results of operations and the share price of our securities, which could cause you to lose some or all of your investment.

We may be forced to write-down or write-off assets, restructure our operations, or incur impairment or other charges that could result in our reporting losses. Unexpected risks may arise and previously known risks may materialize which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations and could contribute to negative market perceptions about our securities or our company. Accordingly, our shareholders could suffer a reduction in the value of our Common Shares and Warrants. Our shareholders are unlikely to have a remedy for such reduction in value unless they are able to successfully claim that the reduction was due to the breach by our officers or directors of a duty of care or other fiduciary duty owed to them, or if they are able to successfully bring a private claim under securities laws that the registration statement or proxy statement/prospectus relating to the Business Combination contained an actionable material misstatement or material omission.

Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property

We may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property rights. If we fail to adequately enforce or defend our intellectual property rights, our business may be harmed.

Much of the technology used in the markets in which we compete is or may become protected by patents and trade secrets, and our commercial success will depend in significant part on our ability to access, obtain and maintain patent and trade secret protection for future products and methods or those of any of our strategic partners such as Allseas or onshore processing partners. To compete in these markets, we rely or may need to rely on a combination of trade secret protection, nondisclosure and licensing agreements, patents and trademarks to establish and protect our proprietary intellectual property rights. Our intellectual property rights (or those of our partners) may be challenged or infringed upon by third parties, or we may be unable to maintain, renew or enter into new license agreements with third-party owners of intellectual property on reasonable terms. In addition, our intellectual property may be subject to infringement or other unauthorized use outside of the United States. In such case, our ability to protect our intellectual property rights by legal recourse or otherwise may be limited, particularly in countries where laws or enforcement practices are undeveloped or do not recognize or protect intellectual property rights to the same extent as the United States. Unauthorized use of our intellectual property rights (or those of our partners) or our inability (or the inability of our partners) to preserve our existing intellectual property rights (or those of our partners) could adversely impact our competitive position and results of operations. The loss of our patents could reduce the value of the related products. In addition, the cost to litigate infringements of our patents, or the cost to defend ourselves against patent infringement actions by others, could be substantial and, if incurred, could materially affect our business and financial condition.

28

Table of Contents

Proprietary trade secrets and unpatented know-how may become important to our business. We will likely rely on trade secrets to protect certain aspects of our business systems and designs, especially where we do not believe that patent protection is appropriate or obtainable. However, trade secrets are difficult to protect. Our employees, consultants, contractors, outside scientific collaborators and other advisors may unintentionally or willfully disclose our confidential information to competitors, and confidentiality agreements may not provide an adequate remedy in the event of unauthorized disclosure of confidential or proprietary information. Enforcing a claim that a third-party illegally obtained and is using our trade secrets is expensive and time consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. Moreover, our competitors may independently develop equivalent knowledge, methods and know-how. Failure to obtain or maintain trade secret protection could adversely affect our competitive business position.

We or our partners may not be able to obtain necessary patents and the legal protection afforded by any patents may not adequately protect our or our partners’ rights or permit us to gain or keep any competitive advantage.

Our ability (or that of our partners) to obtain necessary patents is uncertain, and the legal protection to be afforded by any patents we (or they) may be issued in the future may not adequately protect our (or their) rights or permit us (or them) to gain or keep any competitive advantage necessary for our operations or our partnerships. In addition, the specific content required of patents and patent applications that are necessary to support and interpret patent claims is highly uncertain due to the complex nature of the relevant legal, scientific and factual issues. Changes in either patent laws or interpretations of patent laws in the United States or elsewhere may diminish the value of our intellectual property or narrow the scope of our patent protection. Even if patents are issued regarding our products and processes, our competitors may challenge the validity of those patents. Patents also will not protect our products and processes if competitors devise ways of making products without infringing our patents.

If we infringe, or are accused of infringing, on the intellectual property rights of third parties, it may increase our costs or prevent us from being able to commercialize new products.

There is a risk that we (or our partners) may infringe, or may be accused of infringing, the proprietary rights of third parties under patents and pending patent applications belonging to third parties that may exist in the United States and elsewhere in the world that relate to our products and processes (or those of our strategic partners). Because the patent application process can take several years to complete, there may be currently pending applications that may later result in issued patents that cover our products and processes. In addition, our products and processes may infringe existing patents.

Defending ourselves against third-party claims, including litigation in particular, would be costly and time consuming and would divert management’s attention from our business, which could lead to delays in our exploration, collecting, processing, and commercialization efforts. If third parties are successful in their claims, we might have to pay substantial damages or take other actions that are adverse to our business. As a result of intellectual property infringement claims, or to avoid potential claims, we might:

•        be prohibited from, or delayed in, selling or licensing some of our products or using some of our processes unless the patent holder licenses the patent to us, which it is not required to do;

•        be required to pay substantial royalties or grant a cross license to our patents to another patent holder; or

•        be required to redesign a product or process so it does not infringe a third-party’s patent, which may not be possible or could require substantial funds and time.

In addition, we could be subject to claims that our employees, or we, have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed trade secrets or other proprietary information of third parties.

If we are unable to resolve claims that may be brought against us by third parties related to their intellectual property rights on terms acceptable to us, we may be precluded from offering some of our products or using some of our processes.

In addition, we have not obtained definitive global trademark protection for the name “The Metals Company” and we may not be able to secure such protection over time. If we are unable to secure such protection, we may need to rebrand or otherwise modify our name, which could result in costs, delays and loss of market recognition.

29

Table of Contents

Risks Related to Our Securities and to Being a Public Company

We may issue additional Common Shares or other equity securities without shareholder approval, which would dilute your ownership interests and may depress the market price of our Common Shares.

As of September 30, 2021, we had 224,385,324 Common Shares and 24,500,000 Warrants to acquire Common Shares issued and outstanding. In addition, the Allseas Warrant is exercisable for up to 11,578,620 Common Shares subject to the terms and conditions thereof. Subject to the requirements of the BCBCA, our Articles authorize us to issue Common Shares and rights relating to our Common Shares for the consideration and on the terms and conditions established by our board of directors in its sole discretion, whether in connection with acquisitions or otherwise. In addition, 24,682,385 Common Shares are reserved for issuance under the TMC Incentive Equity Plan, subject to adjustment in certain events. In addition, up to 77,277,244 Common Shares, subject to adjustment in certain events, may be issued to the holders upon conversion of the Special Shares if certain Common Share price thresholds are met as described herein. Any Common Shares issued, including in connection with the exercise of warrants, upon conversion of the Special Shares or under the TMC Incentive Equity Plan, or other equity incentive plans that we may adopt in the future, would dilute the percentage ownership held by you.

Our issuance of additional Common Shares or other equity securities of equal or senior rank would have the following effects:

•        our existing shareholders’ proportionate ownership interest in the Company will decrease;

•        the amount of cash available per share, including for payment of dividends in the future, may decrease;

•        the relative voting strength of each previously outstanding Common Share may be diminished; and

•        the market price of our Common Shares may decline.

Our outstanding warrants will become exercisable for our Common Shares beginning on October 9, 2021, which if exercised, will increase the number of shares eligible for future resale in the public market and result in dilution to our stockholders.

We have 15,000,000 outstanding Public Warrants to purchase 15,000,000 Common Shares at an exercise price of $11.50 per share, which warrants will become exercisable beginning on October 9, 2021. In addition, there are 9,500,000 Private Placement Warrants outstanding exercisable for 9,500,000 shares of our Common Shares at an exercise price of $11.50 per share. In certain circumstances, the Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants may be exercised on a cashless basis. To the extent such warrants are exercised, additional shares of our Common Shares will be issued, which will result in dilution to the holders of our Common Shares and increase the number of shares eligible for resale in the public market. Sales of substantial numbers of such shares in the public market could adversely affect the market price of our Common Shares, the impact of which is increased as the value of our stock price increases.

Our warrants are accounted for as liabilities and the changes in value of our warrants could have a material effect on our financial results.

On April 12, 2021, the Acting Director of the Division of Corporation Finance and Acting Chief Accountant of the SEC together issued a statement regarding the accounting and reporting considerations for warrants issued by special purpose acquisition companies entitled “Staff Statement on Accounting and Reporting Considerations for Warrants Issued by Special Purpose Acquisition Companies (“SPACs”) (the “SEC Statement”). Specifically, the SEC Statement focused on certain settlement terms and provisions related to certain tender offers following a business combination, which terms are similar to those contained in the warrant agreement governing our warrants. As a result of the SEC Statement, SOAC reevaluated the accounting treatment of its Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants, and determined to classify the warrants as derivative liabilities measured at fair value, with changes in fair value each period reported in earnings.

As a result, included on SOAC’s balance sheet as of December 31, 2020 are derivative liabilities related to SOAC’s warrants. Accounting Standards Codification 815, Derivatives and Hedging (“ASC 815”), provides for the remeasurement of the fair value of such derivatives at each balance sheet date, with a resulting non-cash gain or loss related to the change in the fair value being recognized in earnings in the statement of operations. As a result of the

30

Table of Contents

recurring fair value measurement, our financial statements and results of operations may fluctuate quarterly, based on factors that are outside of our control. Due to the recurring fair value measurement, it is expected that we will recognize non-cash gains or losses on the warrants each reporting period and that the amount of such gains or losses could be material.

We have identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting. If we are unable to develop and maintain an effective system of internal control over financial reporting, we may not be able to accurately report our financial results in a timely manner, which may adversely affect investor confidence in us and materially and adversely affect our business and operating results and the value of our Common Shares.

In the course of preparing our financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2020, we identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting which relates to a deficiency in the design and operation of our financial statement close and reporting controls, including maintaining sufficient written policies and procedures and the need to use appropriate technical expertise when accounting for complex or non-routine transactions. We concluded that this material weakness is due to the fact that we were recently a private company with limited resources. We did not have the necessary business processes and related internal controls, or the appropriate resources or level of experience and technical expertise, that would be required to oversee financial reporting processes or to address the accounting and financial reporting requirements. Our management is in the process of developing a remediation plan. The material weakness will not be considered remediated until management designs and implements effective controls that operate for a sufficient period of time and management has concluded, through testing, that these controls are effective. The material weakness remains unremediated as of September 30, 2021.

Shortly before the Business Combination, we appointed a chief financial officer and we recently appointed a chief accounting officer, have hired and are currently recruiting additional finance personnel and have engaged a reputable independent accounting group to undertake a review and gap analysis of current systems and processes in order to develop a remediation plan. If not remediated, this material weakness could result in material misstatements to our annual or interim financial statements that would not be prevented or detected on a timely basis, or in the delayed filing of required periodic reports. If we are unable to assert that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, or when required in the future, if our independent registered public accounting firm is unable to express an unqualified opinion as to the effectiveness of the internal control over financial reporting, investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports, the market price of our securities could be adversely affected and we could become subject to litigation or investigations by Nasdaq, the SEC, or other regulatory authorities, which could require additional financial and management resources.

In addition, following this issuance of the SEC Statement, on May 24, 2021, after consultation with SOAC’s independent registered public accounting firm, SOAC’s management and its audit committee concluded that, in light of the SEC Statement, it was appropriate to restate SOAC’s previously issued audited financial statements as of and for the period ended December 31, 2020 (the “Restatement”). See “— Our warrants are accounted for as liabilities and the changes in value of SOAC’s warrants could have a material effect on its financial results.” As part of such process, SOAC identified a material weakness in its internal controls over financial reporting.

A material weakness is a deficiency or combination of deficiencies in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of its financial statements would not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

Effective internal controls are necessary for the combined company to provide reliable financial reports and prevent fraud. We continue to evaluate steps to remediate the material weaknesses. These remediation measures may be time consuming and costly and there is no assurance that these initiatives will ultimately have the intended effects.

If we identify any new material weakness in the future, any such newly identified material weakness could limit our ability to prevent or detect a misstatement of our accounts or disclosures that could result in a material misstatement of our annual or interim financial statements. In such case, we may be unable to maintain compliance with securities law requirements regarding timely filing of periodic reports in addition to applicable stock exchange listing requirements, investors may lose confidence in our financial reporting and our stock price may decline as a result. We cannot assure you that the measures we have taken to date, or any measures that may be taken in the future, will be sufficient to avoid potential future material weaknesses.

31

Table of Contents

We may face litigation and other risks as a result of the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting.

Following the issuance of the SEC Statement, after consultation with its independent registered public accounting firm, SOAC’s management and its audit committee concluded that it was appropriate to restate its previously issued audited financial statements as of and for the period ended December 31, 2020. See “— Our warrants are accounted for as liabilities and the changes in value of SOAC’s warrants could have a material effect on its financial results.” As part of the Restatement, SOAC identified a material weakness in its internal controls over financial reporting.

As a result of such material weakness, the Restatement, the change in accounting for the warrants, and other matters raised or that may in the future be raised by the SEC, we face potential for litigation or other disputes which may include, among others, claims invoking the federal and state securities laws, contractual claims or other claims arising from the Restatement and material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and the preparation of our financial statements. We can provide no assurance that such litigation or dispute will not arise in the future. Any such litigation or dispute, whether successful or not, could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.

There can be no assurance that the Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants will be in the money at the time they become exercisable, and they may expire worthless.

The exercise price for the outstanding Public Warrants and Private Placement Warrants is $11.50 per Common Share. There can be no assurance that such warrants will be in the money following the time they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, and as such, such warrants may expire worthless.

There are currently outstanding an aggregate of 24,500,000 warrants to acquire our Common Shares (not including the Allseas Warrant), which comprise 9,500,000 Private Placement Warrants held by SOAC’s initial shareholders at the time of SOAC’s initial public offering and 15,000,000 Public Warrants. Each of our outstanding whole warrants is exercisable commencing on October 9, 2021, for one Common Share in accordance with its terms. Therefore, as of September 30, 2021, if we assume that each outstanding whole warrant is exercised and one Common Share is issued as a result of such exercise, with payment of the exercise price of $11.50 per share, our fully-diluted share capital would increase by a total of 24,500,000 shares, with approximately $281,750,000 paid to us to exercise the warrants.

We are an emerging growth company and a smaller reporting company within the meaning of the Securities Act, and if we take advantage of certain exemptions from disclosure requirements available to “emerging growth companies” or “smaller reporting companies,” this could make our securities less attractive to investors and may make it more difficult to compare our performance with other public companies.

We are an “emerging growth company” within the meaning of the Securities Act, as modified by the JOBS Act, and we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. As a result, our stockholders may not have access to certain information they may deem important. We could be an emerging growth company for up to five years, although circumstances could cause us to lose that status earlier, including if the market value of our Common Shares held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the end of any second quarter of a fiscal year, in which case we would no longer be an emerging growth company as of the last day of such fiscal year. We cannot predict whether investors will find our securities less attractive because we will rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our securities less attractive as a result of our reliance on these exemptions, the trading prices of our securities may be lower than they otherwise would be, there may be a less active trading market for our securities and the trading prices of our securities may be more volatile.

Further, Section 102(b)(1) of the JOBS Act exempts emerging growth companies from being required to comply with new or revised financial accounting standards until private companies (that is, those that have not had a registration statement under the Securities Act declared effective or do not have a class of securities registered

32

Table of Contents

under the Exchange Act) are required to comply with the new or revised financial accounting standards. The JOBS Act provides that a company can elect to opt out of the extended transition period and comply with the requirements that apply to non-emerging growth companies but any such election to opt out is irrevocable. We have elected not to opt out of such extended transition period, which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, we, as an emerging growth company, can adopt the new or revised standard at the time private companies adopt the new or revised standard. This may make comparison of our financial statements with another public company that is not an emerging growth company or is an emerging growth company which has opted out of using the extended transition period difficult or impossible because of the potential differences in accounting standards used.

Additionally, we are a “smaller reporting company” as defined in Item 10(f)(1) of Regulation S-K. Smaller reporting companies may take advantage of certain reduced disclosure obligations, including, among other things, providing only two years of audited financial statements. We will remain a smaller reporting company until the last day of the fiscal year in which (i) the market value of our Common Shares held by non-affiliates is greater than or equal to $250 million as of the end of that fiscal year’s second fiscal quarter, and (ii) our annual revenues are greater than or equal to $100 million during the last completed fiscal year and the market value of our Common Shares held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of the end of that fiscal year’s second fiscal quarter. To the extent we take advantage of such reduced disclosure obligations, it may also make comparison of our financial statements with other public companies difficult or impossible.

Our business is capital intensive, and we may be required to raise additional funds in the future in order to accomplish our objectives.

The continuing exploration and development of the contract areas in NORI, TOML and Marawa may depend upon our ability to obtain dilutive and/or non-dilutive financing through debt financing, equity financing, joint ventures, or other means. Additionally, the actual amount of capital raised for our projects may vary materially from our current estimates, which could require that we raise additional funds. There is no assurance that we will be successful in obtaining the required financing for these or other purposes, including for general working capital, or that any funds raised will be sufficient for the purposes contemplated. We will not initially have any producing properties and will have no source of significant operating cash flow until 2024 at the earliest. There is no precedent for projects like ours, and therefore, debt financing may not be available in commercially available terms, or at all. Failure to obtain additional financing on a timely basis could cause us to reduce or terminate our operations. There can be no certainty that capital will be available to us on acceptable terms.

If additional funds are raised through further issuances of equity or convertible debt securities, existing shareholders could suffer significant dilution, and any new equity securities issued could have rights, preferences and privileges superior to those they possess prior to such issuances. Any debt financing secured in the future could involve restrictive covenants relating to capital raising activities and other financial and operational matters, which may make it more difficult for us to obtain additional capital and to pursue business opportunities, including potential acquisitions.

We may incur debt in the future, and our ability to satisfy our obligations thereunder remains subject to a variety of factors, many of which are not within our control.

We may seek to incur debt in the future in order to fund our exploration and operational programs, which would reduce our financial flexibility and could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operation.

Should we incur debt, our ability to satisfy any resulting debt obligations and to reduce our level of indebtedness will depend on future performance. General economic conditions, mineral prices, and financial, business and other factors will have an impact on our operations and future performance, and many of these factors are beyond our control. As such, we cannot assure investors that we will be able to generate sufficient cash flow to pay the interest on any debt, or that future working capital, borrowings, or equity financing will be available to pay or refinance such debt or meet future debt covenants. Factors that will affect our ability to raise cash through an offering of securities or a refinancing of any debt include financial market conditions, the value of our assets, and our performance at the time we are seeking to raise capital. We cannot assure investors that we will have sufficient funds to make such payments. If we do not have sufficient funds and are otherwise unable to negotiate renewals of

33

Table of Contents

our current borrowings or to arrange for new financing, we might be required to take measures to generate liquidity, such as selling some or all of our assets. Any such sales could have a material adverse effect on our business, operations and financial results. Moreover, failure to obtain additional financing, if required, on a timely basis, could cause us to reduce or delay our proposed operations.

We may need to raise additional capital in order to complete our programs and commence commercial operations and there is no assurance that we will be able to obtain adequate financing in the future or that such financing will be available to us on advantageous terms.

An active trading market for our Common Shares and Warrants may never develop or be sustained, which would adversely affect the liquidity and price of our securities.

An active trading market for our securities may never develop or, if developed, may not be sustained. In addition, the price of our securities could fluctuate significantly for various reasons, many of which are outside our control, such as our performance, large purchases or sales of our common shares, legislative changes and general economic, political or regulatory conditions. The release of our financial results may also cause our share price to vary. If an active market for our securities does not develop, it may be difficult for you to sell our Common Shares and/or Warrants you own or purchase without depressing the market price for our securities or to sell the securities at all. The existence of an active trading market for our securities will depend to a significant extent on our ability to continue to meet Nasdaq’s listing requirements, which we may be unable to accomplish.

There can be no assurance that we will be able to comply with the continued listing standards of Nasdaq.

In connection with the closing of the Business Combination, on September 10, 2021, our Common Shares and Public Warrants began trading on Nasdaq under the symbols “TMC” and “TMCWW,” respectively. If in the future Nasdaq delists our Common Shares from trading on its exchange for failure to meet the listing standards, we and our securityholders could face significant material adverse consequences including:

•        a limited availability of market quotations for our securities;

•        reduced liquidity for our securities;

•        a determination that our common shares are “penny stock” which will require brokers trading in our common shares to adhere to more stringent rules and possibly result in a reduced level of trading activity in the secondary trading market for our securities;

•        a limited amount of news and analyst coverage; and

•        a decreased ability to issue additional securities or obtain additional financing in the future.

The market price of our securities may be volatile, which could cause the value of your investment to decline.

Even if a trading market develops, the market price of our securities may be highly volatile and could be subject to wide fluctuations. In addition, the trading volume in our Common Shares and Public Warrants may fluctuate and cause significant price variations to occur. Securities markets worldwide experience significant price and volume fluctuations. This market volatility, as well as general economic, market and political conditions (including as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic), could reduce the market price of our securities in spite of our operating performance. If we are unable to operate as profitably as investors expect, the market price of our common shares post-Business Combination will likely decline when it becomes apparent that the market expectations may not be realized. In addition, our results of operations could be below the expectations of public market analysts and investors due to a number of potential factors, including variations in our quarterly or annual results of operations, operating results of other companies in the same industry, additions or departures of key management personnel, changes in our earnings estimates (if provided) or failure to meet analysts’ earnings estimates, publication of research reports about our industry, litigation and government investigations, changes or proposed changes in laws or regulations or differing interpretations or enforcement thereof affecting our business, adverse market reaction to any indebtedness we may incur or securities it may issue in the future, changes in market valuations of similar companies or speculation in the press or the investment community with respect to us or our industry, negative media coverage, adverse announcements by us or others and developments affecting us, announcements by our competitors of significant contracts, acquisitions, dispositions, strategic partnerships, joint ventures or capital commitments, actions

34

Table of Contents

by institutional shareholders, the possible effects of war, terrorism and other hostilities, adverse weather conditions, changes in general conditions in the economy or the financial markets or other developments affecting the industry in which we operate, and increases in market interest rates that may lead investors in our common shares to demand a higher yield, and in response the market price of our common shares could decrease significantly.

These broad market and industry factors may decrease the market price of our common shares, regardless of our actual operating performance. The stock market in general has, from time to time, experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations. In addition, in the past, following periods of volatility in the overall market and the market price of a company’s securities, securities class action litigation has often been instituted against these companies. Such litigation, if instituted against us, could result in substantial costs, a material negative impact on our liquidity and a diversion of our management’s attention and resources.

There may be sales of a substantial amount of our Common Shares after the Business Combination by former SOAC shareholders and/or former DeepGreen shareholders, and these sales could cause the price of our securities to fall.

As of September 30, 2021, we had 224,385,324 Common Shares and 24,500,000 Warrants to acquire Common Shares issued and outstanding. In addition, the Allseas Warrant is exercisable for up to 11,578,620 Common Shares subject to the terms and conditions thereof. All of our public shares are freely transferable (subject to any contractual lock-up agreements), except for the PIPE Shares and any shares held by our and Legacy DeepGreen’s “affiliates,” as that term is defined in Rule 144 under the Securities Act. Our Common Shares issued to the Sponsor and the independent SOAC directors in exchange for their founder shares are subject to certain contractual lock-up agreements. In addition, an aggregate of 124,969,517 Common Shares held by DeepGreen shareholders (including 14,732,740 Common Shares held by DeepGreen management) are subject to certain lock-up arrangements ending on the earlier of (A) 180 days after the Closing (or 540 days after the Closing in the case of 1,943,963 Common Shares held by DeepGreen management) and (B) the date on which (x) the Common Shares have traded at a price that is greater than or equal to $12.00 per share (as adjusted for stock splits, stock dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) during any 20 trading days within any 30 consecutive trading days after the Closing, or (y) we complete a liquidation, merger, stock exchange, reorganization or other similar transaction that results in all of our public stockholders having the right to exchange their Common Shares for cash, securities or other property. Further, up to 77,277,244 Common Shares may be issued to the holders upon conversion of the Special Shares if certain price thresholds are met as described herein and such Common Shares could be sold in the public market. Sales of substantial amounts of our Common Shares in the public market, or the perception that such sales will occur, could adversely affect the market price of our Common Shares.

We may redeem your unexpired warrants prior to their exercise at a time that is disadvantageous to you, thereby making your warrants worthless.

We have the ability to redeem outstanding warrants at any time after they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, at a price of $0.01 per warrant, provided that the closing price of our Common Shares equals or exceeds $18.00 per share (as adjusted for share subdivisions, share capitalizations, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within a 30-trading day period ending on the third trading day prior to proper notice of such redemption and provided that certain other conditions are met. If and when the warrants become redeemable by us, we may exercise our redemption right even if we are unable to register or qualify the underlying securities for sale under all applicable state securities laws. Redemption of the outstanding warrants could force you to (i) exercise your warrants and pay the exercise price therefor at a time when it may be disadvantageous for you to do so, (ii) sell your warrants at the then-current market price when you might otherwise wish to hold your warrants or (iii) accept the nominal redemption price which, at the time the outstanding warrants are called for redemption, is likely to be substantially less than the market value of your warrants. None of the private placement warrants will be redeemable by us on such terms so long as they are held by Sponsor or its permitted transferees.

Reports published by analysts, including projections in those reports that differ from our actual results, could adversely affect the price and trading volume of our Common Shares.

Securities research analysts may establish and publish their own periodic projections for us. These projections may vary widely and may not accurately predict the results we actually achieve. Our Common Share price may decline if our actual results do not match the projections of these securities research analysts. Similarly, if one or

35

Table of Contents

more of the analysts who write reports on us downgrades our shares or publishes inaccurate or unfavorable research about our business, our share price could decline. If one or more of these analysts ceases coverage of us or fails to publish reports on us regularly, our share price or trading volume could decline. While we expect research analyst coverage, if no analysts commence coverage of us, the market price and volume for our Common Shares could be adversely affected.

As we are not a reporting issuer in Canada, our Common Shares and Special Shares may be subject to restrictions on resale in Canada.

Our Common Shares and Special Shares distributed pursuant to the Business Combination were distributed pursuant to an exemption from the prospectus requirements in Canada. As we are not a reporting issuer in Canada and we do not intend to become a reporting issuer in Canada in the future, any distributions of our securities following the completion of the Business Combination will be a distribution that is subject to the prospectus requirements in Canada unless an exemption therefrom is available. An exemption from the prospectus requirements would be available to holders of shares of a class (and any Underlying Shares of such class) in respect of a trade if residents of Canada (the “Canadian Owners”) own, directly or indirectly, not more than 10% of the outstanding shares of such class or any Underlying Shares of such class, and represent in number not more than 10% of the total number of owners, directly or indirectly, of shares of the applicable class or Underlying Shares, on any distribution date (collectively, the “Ownership Cap”) and the trade is made through an exchange or market outside of Canada or to a person or company outside of Canada. On September 7, 2021, we received exemptive relief from the prospectus requirements in Canada such that the Common Shares and Special Shares issued to Canadian Owners in connection with the Business Combination are not subject to resale restrictions in Canada, subject to the terms and conditions set forth in the exemptive relief order. There can be no assurance that any future securities offerings held by Canadian Owners will be freely transferable by the Canadian Owners.

Because there are no current plans to pay cash dividends on our Common Shares for the foreseeable future, you may not receive any return on investment unless you sell your Common Shares for a price greater than that which you paid for it.

We intend to retain future earnings, if any, for future operations, expansion and debt repayment, and there are no current plans to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future. The declaration, amount, and payment of any future dividends on our Common Shares will be at the sole discretion of our board of directors. Our board of directors may take into account general and economic conditions, our financial condition and results of operations, our available cash and current and anticipated cash needs, capital requirements, contractual, legal, tax, and regulatory restrictions, implications on the payment of dividends by us to our shareholders, and such other factors as our board of directors may deem relevant. In addition, our ability to pay dividends may be limited by covenants of any future indebtedness we may in the future incur. As a result, you may not receive any return on an investment in our Common Shares unless you sell your common shares for a price greater than that which you paid for it.

Our actual financial position and results of operations may differ materially from the unaudited pro forma financial information included in this prospectus.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information included in this prospectus is presented for illustrative purposes only and is not necessarily indicative of our future financial position or results of operations. See “Unaudited Pro Forma Condensed Combined Financial Statements” for more information.

We are exposed to risks in our international operations, which could adversely affect our business.

We are exposed to foreign currency risk in connection with the business we conduct in foreign currencies to the extent that the exchange rates of the foreign currencies are subject to adverse change over time. It has not been our practice to enter into foreign exchange contracts to protect against adverse foreign currency fluctuations, and we cannot predict whether exchange rate fluctuations will significantly harm our operations or financial results in the future. In addition to adverse fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, we are exposed to further risks inherent in doing business abroad, including limitations on asset transfers, changes in foreign regulations and political turmoil, all of which could adversely affect us.

36

Table of Contents

We are expected to be a PFIC, which could result in adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences to U.S. Holders.

We are expected to be a passive foreign investment company (“PFIC”) for the tax year ended December 31, 2021. As a result, U.S. Holders (defined below) of our public shares and public warrants may be subject to certain adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences and may be subject to additional reporting requirements. See “U.S. Federal Income Tax Considerations — Tax Consequences of Ownership and Disposition of Public Shares and Public Warrants — Passive Foreign Investment Company Rules” for a more detailed discussion with respect to our PFIC status and the application of the PFIC rules. U.S. Holders of our public shares and public warrants are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding the application of the PFIC rules to them.

Canadian law and our Notice and Articles contain certain provisions, including anti-takeover provisions, that limit the ability of shareholders to take certain actions and could delay or discourage takeover attempts that shareholders may consider favorable.

Provisions in our Notice and Articles, as well as certain provisions under the BCBCA and applicable Canadian laws, may discourage, delay or prevent a merger, acquisition or other change in control of TMC that shareholders may consider favorable, including transactions in which they might otherwise receive a premium for their Common Shares.

For instance, the Notice and Articles contain provisions that establish certain advance notice procedures for nomination of candidates for election as directors at shareholders’ meetings. See “Description of TMC Securities — Certain Important Provisions of TMC Notice and Articles and the BCBCA.

Limitations on the ability to acquire and hold Common Shares may also be imposed by the Competition Act (Canada). This legislation permits the Commissioner of Competition, or Commissioner, to review any acquisition or establishment, directly or indirectly, including through the acquisition of shares, of control over or of a significant interest in TMC. Moreover, a non-Canadian must file an application for review with the Minister responsible for the Investment Canada Act and obtain approval of the Minister prior to acquiring control of a “Canadian business” within the meaning of the Investment Canada Act, where prescribed financial thresholds are exceeded.

Further, changes to critical minerals policies and regulations in Canada and the United States and elsewhere may impact our ability to conduct our businesses internationally, including processing and sales of minerals and metals, and the ability to negotiate or agree any merger, acquisition or change of control.

Our Notice and Articles will provide that any derivative actions, actions relating to breach of fiduciary duties and other matters relating to our internal affairs will be required to be litigated in the Province of British Columbia, Canada, and will contain an exclusive federal forum provision for certain claims under the Securities Act, which could limit your ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us.

Our Notice and Articles include a forum selection provision that provides that, unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the Supreme Court of British Columbia, Canada and the appellate courts therefrom, will be the sole and exclusive forum for (i) any derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf; (ii) any action or proceeding asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any of our directors, officers, or other employees to us; (iii) any action or proceeding asserting a claim arising pursuant to any provision of the BCBCA or TMC Notice and Articles (as either may be amended from time to time); or (iv) any action or proceeding asserting a claim otherwise related to the relationships among us, our affiliates and their respective shareholders, directors and/or officers, but excluding claims related to our business or of such affiliates. The forum selection provision also provides that our securityholders are deemed to have consented to personal jurisdiction in the Province of British Columbia and to service of process on their counsel in any foreign action initiated in violation of the foregoing provisions. The forum selection provision may impose additional litigation costs on securityholders in pursuing any such claims. This provision will not apply to suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, or the rules and regulations thereunder.

Section 22 of the Securities Act creates concurrent jurisdiction for federal and state courts over all claim brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act or the rules and regulations thereunder and our Notice and Articles will provide that the federal district courts of the United States of America will, to the

37

Table of Contents

fullest extent permitted by law, be the sole and exclusive forum for resolving any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act (the “Federal Forum Provision”). Application of the Federal Forum Provision means that suits brought by our securityholders to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act must be brought in federal court and cannot be brought in any state court.

Section 27 of the Exchange Act creates exclusive federal jurisdiction over all claims brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. Accordingly, actions by our shareholders to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or the rules and regulations thereunder must be brought in federal court. Our shareholders will not be deemed to have waived our compliance with the federal securities laws and the regulations promulgated thereunder.

Any person or entity purchasing or otherwise acquiring or holding any interest in any of our securities shall be deemed to have notice of and consented to the aforementioned forum selection provisions, including the Federal Forum Provision. Additionally, our securityholders cannot waive compliance with the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder. These provisions may limit our securityholders’ ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum they find favorable for disputes with us or our directors, officers, or other employees, which may discourage lawsuits against us and our directors, officers, and other employees. Alternatively, if a court were to find the choice of forum provision contained in our Notice and Articles to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions, which could harm our business, operating results and financial condition. See “Description of TMC Securities — Certain Important Provisions of TMC Notice and Articles and the BCBCA — Forum Selection.”

Our Notice and Articles will permit us to issue an unlimited number of Common Shares and preferred shares without seeking approval of the holders of our Common Shares.

Our Notice and Articles will permit us to issue an unlimited number of Common Shares. Subject to the requirements of the BCBCA and applicable securities exchange, we will not be required to obtain the approval of shareholders for the issuance of additional Common Shares. Any further issuances of Common Shares will result in immediate dilution to existing shareholders and may have an adverse effect on the value of their shareholdings.

The TMC Notice and Articles will also permit us to issue an unlimited number of preferred shares, issuable in series and, subject to the requirements of the BCBCA, having such designations, rights, privileges, restrictions and conditions, including dividend and voting rights, as our board of directors may determine and which may be superior to those of the Common Shares. The issuance of preferred shares could, among other things, have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing a change in control and might adversely affect the market price of the Common Shares. Subject to the provisions of the BCBCA and the Nasdaq, we will not be required to obtain the approval of the holders of Common Shares for the issuance of preferred shares or to determine the maximum number of shares of each series of preferred shares, create an identifying name for each series and attach such special rights or restrictions as our board of directors may determine. See “Description of TMC Securities — Authorized Share Capital — Preferred Shares.

As a company incorporated in British Columbia with some of our directors and officers residing outside of the U.S., it may be difficult for investors in the United States to enforce civil liabilities against us based solely upon the federal securities laws of the United States.

We are incorporated under the laws of British Columbia with our registered office located in British Columbia, Canada. Many of our directors and officers reside outside of the United States and all or a substantial portion of our assets and those of such persons are located outside the United States. Consequently, it may be difficult for U.S. investors to effect service of process within the United States upon us or our directors or officers who are not residents of the United States, or to realize in the United States upon judgments of courts of the United States predicated upon civil liabilities under the Securities Act. Investors should not assume that Canadian courts: (i) would enforce judgments of U.S. courts obtained in actions against us or such persons predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the U.S. federal securities laws or the securities or blue sky laws of any state within the United States or (ii) would enforce, in original actions, liabilities against us or such persons predicated upon the U.S. federal securities laws or any such state securities or blue sky laws.

38

Table of Contents

USE OF PROCEEDS

All of the Common Shares and Warrants offered by the Selling Securityholders pursuant to this prospectus will be sold by the Selling Securityholders for their respective accounts. We will not receive any of the proceeds from these sales.

We will receive up to an aggregate of approximately $281,750,000 from the exercise of the Warrants, assuming the exercise in full of all of the Warrants for cash. We expect to use the net proceeds from the exercise of the Warrants for general corporate purposes. We will have broad discretion over the use of proceeds from the exercise of the Warrants. There is no assurance that the holders of the Warrants will elect to exercise any or all of such Warrants. To the extent that the Warrants are exercised on a “cashless basis,” the amount of cash we would receive from the exercise of the Warrants will decrease.

39

Table of Contents

DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE

The offering price of the Common Shares underlying the Warrants offered hereby is determined by reference to the exercise price of the Warrants of $11.50 per share. The Public Warrants are listed on Nasdaq under the symbol “TMCWW.”

We cannot currently determine the price or prices at which Common Shares or Warrants may be sold by the Selling Securityholders under this prospectus.

40

Table of Contents

MARKET PRICE, TICKER SYMBOL AND DIVIDEND INFORMATION

Market Price and Ticker Symbol

Our Common Shares and Public Warrants are currently listed on Nasdaq under the symbols “TMC,” and “TMCWW,” respectively.

The closing price of the Common Shares and Public Warrants on October 6, 2021, was $4.14 and $1.01, respectively.

Holders

As of September 30, 2021, there were approximately 224,385,324 Common Shares issued and outstanding held of record by 197 holders, approximately 15,000,000 Public Warrants held of record by one holder and 9,500,000 private placement warrants issued in connection with SOAC’s initial public offering held of record by one holder, each exercisable for one Common Share at a price of $11.50 per share beginning on October 9, 2021.

Such numbers do not include beneficial owners holding our securities through nominee names.

Dividend Policy

We have not paid any cash dividends on our capital stock to date. The payment of cash dividends in the future will be dependent upon our revenues and earnings, if any, capital requirements and general financial condition. The payment of any cash dividends will be within the discretion of the board of directors at such time.

41

Table of Contents

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED COMBINED FINANCIAL INFORMATION

Unless the context otherwise requires, “TMC” refers to TMC the metals company Inc. (f/k/a Sustainable Opportunities Acquisition Corp.) and its subsidiary after the Closing, “SOAC” refers to Sustainable Opportunities Acquisition Corp. prior to the Closing, and “Legacy DeepGreen” or “DeepGreen” refers to DeepGreen Metals Inc. prior to the Closing.

The following unaudited pro forma condensed combined balance sheet of TMC as of June 30, 2021 and the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of operations of TMC for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020 present the combination of the financial information of SOAC and DeepGreen after giving effect to the Business Combination, PIPE Financing and related adjustments described in the accompanying notes. SOAC and DeepGreen are collectively referred to herein as the “Companies,” and the Companies, subsequent to the Business Combination and the PIPE Financing, are referred to herein as “TMC.”

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined statement of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and for the year ended December 31, 2020 give pro forma effect to the Business Combination and PIPE Financing as if they had occurred on January 1, 2020. The unaudited pro forma condensed combined balance sheet as of June 30, 2021 gives pro forma effect to the Business Combination and PIPE Financing as if they were completed on June 30, 2021.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information is based on and should be read in conjunction with the audited historical financial statements of each of SOAC and DeepGreen and the notes thereto, as well as the disclosures contained in the sections titled “SOAC’s Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and “DeepGreen’s Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” contained elsewhere in this filing.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information has been presented for illustrative purposes only and does not necessarily reflect what TMC’s financial condition or results of operations would have been had the Business Combination and PIPE Financing occurred on the dates indicated. Further, the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information also may not be useful in predicting the future financial condition and results of operations of TMC. The actual financial position and results of operations may differ significantly from the pro forma amounts reflected herein due to a variety of factors. The unaudited pro forma adjustments represent management’s estimates based on information available as of the date of this filing and are subject to change as additional information becomes available and analyses are performed.

On March 4, 2021, SOAC entered into the Business Combination Agreement with DeepGreen. SOAC has changed its jurisdiction of incorporation by deregistering as an exempted company in the Cayman Islands and continuing as a company under the laws of British Columbia, Canada, upon which SOAC has changed its name to “TMC the metal company Inc.” On the Closing Date, promptly following the Continuance, pursuant to the Arrangement, (i) SOAC has acquired all of the issued and outstanding DeepGreen Common Shares, (ii) the shareholders and the optionholders of DeepGreen are entitled to receive, in exchange for their DeepGreen Common Shares or DeepGreen Options, as applicable, an aggregate of (a) 203,874,981 Common Shares, (b) the DeepGreen Earnout Shares, or, as applicable, options to purchase such Common Shares and DeepGreen Earnout Shares, (iii) DeepGreen has become a wholly-owned subsidiary of TMC and (iv) DeepGreen and NewCo Sub have amalgamated to continue as one unlimited liability company existing under the laws of British Columbia. In addition, the Allseas Warrant has been assumed by TMC and has become a warrant to purchase Common Shares upon the consummation of the Business Combination, in accordance with its terms.

The historical financial information of SOAC and DeepGreen has been adjusted in the unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information to give effect to events that are (1) directly attributable to the Business Combination and the PIPE Financing and (2) factually supportable. The pro forma adjustments are prepared to illustrate the effect of the Business Combination and the PIPE Financing and certain other adjustments.

42

Table of Contents

The Business Combination was accounted for as a reverse recapitalization because DeepGreen was determined to be the accounting acquirer under Financial Accounting Standards Board’s Accounting Standards Codification Topic 805, Business Combinations (“ASC 805”). The determination is primarily based on the evaluation of the following facts and circumstances:

•        the pre-combination equityholders of DeepGreen hold the majority of voting rights in TMC;

•        the pre-combination equityholders of DeepGreen have the right to appoint the majority of the directors on the board of directors of TMC;

•        the senior management of DeepGreen comprise the senior management of TMC; and

•        the operations of DeepGreen comprise the ongoing operations of TMC.

Under the reverse recapitalization model, the Business Combination is treated as DeepGreen issuing equity for the net assets of SOAC, with no goodwill or intangible assets recorded. Transaction costs that were direct and incremental to the Business Combination are recorded in equity in the balance sheet to offset against proceeds.

The unaudited pro forma condensed combined financial information does not reflect the income tax effects of the pro forma adjustments as any change in the deferred tax balance would be offset by an increase in the valuation allowance given that DeepGreen incurred significant losses during the historical periods presented.

The following summarizes the pro forma Common Shares outstanding based on actual redemptions of 27.3 million shares for $272.9 million:

 

Shares

 

%

SOAC Public Shareholders

 

2,721,343

 

1.2

%

SOAC Initial Shareholders

 

6,759,000

 

3.0

%

Total SOAC

 

9,480,343

 

4.2

%

         

 

DeepGreen Metals shareholders

 

203,874,981

 

90.9

%

PIPE Investor(s)

 

11,030,000

 

4.9

%

Total Shares at Closing*

 

224,385,324

 

100.0

%

____________

*        Excludes 873,953 Common Shares to be issued as equity consideration to settle certain transaction costs. These Common Shares were subsequently issued on October 7, 2021.

The following unaudited pro forma condensed combined balance sheet as of June 30, 2021 and the unaudited pro forma condensed combined statements of operations for the six months ended June 30, 2021 and the year ended December 31, 2020 are based on the historical financial statements of SOAC and DeepGreen.

43

Table of Contents

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
As of June 30, 2021
(Amounts in U.S. dollars, except per share data)

 

SOAC
(Historical)

 

DeepGreen
Metals
(Historical)

 

Pro Forma
Transaction
Adjustments

     

Combined
Pro Forma

ASSETS

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

Current

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

Cash and equivalents

 

$

293,323

 

$

16,880,031

 

$

27,217,744

 

 

2a

 

$

121,198,478

   

 

 

 

 

 

110,300,000

 

 

2b

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

(33,492,620

)

 

2g

 

 

Receivable and prepayments

 

 

133,778

 

 

55,116

 

 

 

     

 

188,894

Total Current

 

 

427,101

 

 

16,935,147

 

 

104,025,124

 

     

 

121,387,372

Non-Current

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

Exploration licenses

 

 

 

 

43,150,319

 

 

 

     

 

43,150,319

Equipment

 

 

 

 

1,515,101

 

 

 

     

 

1,515,101

Operating lease right-of-use assets

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

Investments and cash held in Trust Account

 

 

300,078,204

 

 

 

 

(300,078,204

)

 

2a

 

 

Total non-current

 

 

300,078,204

 

 

44,665,420

 

 

(300,078,204

)

     

 

44,665,420

TOTAL ASSETS

 

$

300,505,305

 

$

61,600,567

 

$

(196,053,080

)

     

$

166,052,792

   

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

LIABILITIES

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

Current

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

Accounts payable and accrued liabilities

 

$

7,289,022

 

$

9,033,765

 

$

(6,712,817

)

 

2g

 

$

9,609,970

Allseas milestone payments

 

 

 

 

 

 

9,359,223

 

 

2j

 

 

9,359,223

Warrant liability

 

 

35,755,000

 

 

 

 

(21,600,000

)

 

2k

 

 

14,155,000

Deferred underwriter compensation

 

 

10,500,000

 

 

 

 

(10,500,000

)

 

2g

 

 

Total current

 

 

53,544,022

 

 

9,033,765

 

 

(29,453,594

)

     

 

33,124,193

Non-Current

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

Convertible debentures

 

 

 

 

26,160,589

 

 

(26,160,589

)

 

2i

 

 

Deferred tax liability

 

 

 

 

10,675,366

 

 

 

     

 

10,675,366

Total Non-current liabilities

 

 

 

 

36,835,955

 

 

(26,160,589

)

     

 

10,675,366

Total liabilities

 

 

53,544,022

 

 

45,869,720

 

 

(55,614,183

 

     

 

43,799,559

COMMITMENTS

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

Class A ordinary shares, $0.0001 par value; 30,000,000 shares subject to possible redemption at $10.00 per share at June 30, 2021

 

 

300,078,204

 

 

 

 

(300,078,204

)

 

2c

 

 

EQUITY

 

 

   

 

   

 

 

 

     

 

 

Common shares (unlimited shares, no par value – issued: 170,827,222)

 

 

 

 

188,900,923

 

 

(188,900,923

)

 

2h

 

 

Preferred shares (unlimited share, no par value – issued: 550,000)

 

 

 

 

550,000

 

 

(550,000

)

 

2h

 

 

Common shares to be issued

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2h

 

 

Reserves – Other

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2h

 

 

Reserves – Options

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2h

 

 

Preference shares, $0.0001 par value; 1,000,000 shares authorized; none issued and outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

     

 

44

Table of Contents

UNAUDITED PRO FORMA CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
As of June 30, 2021 — (Continued)
(Amounts in U.S. dollars, except per share data)

 

SOAC
(Historical)

 

DeepGreen
Metals
(Historical)

 

Pro Forma
Transaction
Adjustments

     

Combined
Pro Forma

Common Shares without par value

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

110,300,000

 

 

2b

 

 

283,732,532

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27,217,744

 

 

2a, 2c

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

750

 

 

2e

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(53,117,671

)

 

2d

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(16,279,803

)

 

2g

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

189,450,923

 

 

2h

 

 

 

   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

26,160,589

 

 

2i

 

 

 

Class A ordinary shares, $0.0001 par value; 300,000,000 shares authorized; -0- shares issued and outstanding (excluding 30,000,000 shares subject to possible redemption) at June 30, 2021

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2c

 

 

 

Class B ordinary shares, $0.0001 par value; 30,000,000 shares authorized; 7,500,000 shares issued and outstanding at
June 30, 2021

 

 

750

 

 

 

 

 

 

(750

)

 

2e

 

 

 

Class A Special Shares, no par value; 4,448,259 issued and outstanding

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2f

 

 

 

Class B Special Shares, no par value; 8,896,399 issued and outstanding