10-K 1 bsbk-10k_20191231.htm 10-K bsbk-10k_20191231.htm

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the Fiscal Year Ended December 31, 2019

 

OR

 

TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the transition period from _____________ to _______________

 

Commission File Number: 001-39180

 

Bogota Financial Corp.

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

Maryland

 

84-3501231

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization

 

(I.R.S. Employer Identification Number)

 

819 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, New Jersey

 

07666

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

(Zip code)

 

 

 

(201) 862-0660

(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:  None

 

Common stock, par value $0.01 per share

 

BSBK 

 

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

Title of Each Class

 

Trading Symbol(s)

 

Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.   Yes      No  

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act.   Yes      No  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant: (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes     No  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).   Yes     No  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer   Accelerated filer   Non-accelerated filer   Smaller reporting company  

Emerging growth company  

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).   Yes      No  

 

As of June 30, 2019, the aggregate market value of the voting and non-voting common equity held by non-affiliates of the Registrant was $-0-.

 

As of March 30, 2020 there were 13,157,525 outstanding shares of the registrant’s common stock, of which 7,236,640 shares are owned by Bogota Financial, MHC.

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

1.

Portions of the Proxy Statement for the 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (Part III)

 

 

 


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

PAGE

 

 

 

PART I

 

2

ITEM 1.

Business

2

ITEM 1A.

Risk Factors

28

ITEM 1B.

Unresolved Staff Comments

36

ITEM 2.

Properties

36

ITEM 3.

Legal Proceedings

36

ITEM 4.

Mine Safety Disclosures

36

PART II

 

37

ITEM 5.

Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

37

ITEM 6.

Selected Financial Data

37

ITEM 7.

Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

39

ITEM 7A.

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk

49

ITEM 8.

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

50

ITEM 9.

Changes In and Disagreements With Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

84

ITEM 9A.

Controls and Procedures

84

ITEM 9B.

Other Information

84

PART III

 

84

ITEM 10.

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

84

ITEM 11.

Executive Compensation

84

ITEM 12.

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

85

ITEM 13.

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

85

ITEM 14.

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

85

PART IV

 

86

ITEM 15.

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

86

ITEM 16.

Form 10-K Summary

86

SIGNATURES

 

87

 

 

 


EXPLANATORY NOTE

Bogota Financial Corp. (the “Company,” “we” or “our”) was formed in September 2019 to serve as the mid-tier stock holding company for Bogota Savings Bank (the “Bank”) upon the reorganization of the Bank into the two-tier mutual holding company structure. As of December 31, 2019, the reorganization had not been completed and, therefore, the Company had no assets or liabilities and had not conducted any business activities other than organizational activities as of December 31, 2019. Accordingly, the audited financial statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K relate solely to Bogota Savings Bank.

Forward Looking Statements

 

This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements, which can be identified by the use of words such as “estimate,” “project,” “believe,” “intend,” “anticipate,” “assume,” “plan,” “seek,” “expect,” “will,” “may,” “should,” “indicate,” “would,” “contemplate,” “continue,” “potential,” “target” and words of similar meaning.  These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

 

 

statements of our goals, intentions and expectations;

 

statements regarding our business plans, prospects, growth and operating strategies;

 

statements regarding the quality of our loan and investment portfolios; and

 

estimates of our risks and future costs and benefits.

These forward-looking statements are based on current beliefs and expectations of our management and are inherently subject to significant business, economic and competitive uncertainties and contingencies, many of which are beyond our control. In addition, these forward-looking statements are subject to assumptions with respect to future business strategies and decisions that are subject to change.  Accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on such statements.  We are under no duty to and do not take any obligation to update any forward-looking statements after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

The following factors, among others, could cause actual results to differ materially from the anticipated results or other expectations expressed in the forward-looking statements:

 

 

general economic conditions, either nationally or in our market area, that are worse than expected;

 

changes in the level and direction of loan delinquencies and charge-offs and changes in estimates of the adequacy of the allowance for loan losses;

 

our ability to access cost-effective funding;

 

fluctuations in real estate values and both residential and commercial real estate market conditions;

 

demand for loans and deposits in our market area;

 

our ability to continue to implement our business strategies;

 

competition among depository and other financial institutions;

 

inflation and changes in market interest rates that reduce our margins and yields, reduce the fair value of financial instruments or reduce our volume of loan originations or increase the level of defaults, losses and prepayments on loans we have made and make whether held in portfolio or sold in the secondary market;

 

adverse changes in the securities markets;

 

changes in laws or government regulations or policies affecting financial institutions, including changes in regulatory fees and capital requirements;

 

our ability to manage market risk, credit risk and operational risk;

 

our ability to enter new markets successfully and capitalize on growth opportunities;

 

our ability to successfully integrate into our operations any assets, liabilities or systems we may acquire, as well as new management personnel or customers, and our ability to realize related revenue synergies and cost savings within expected time frames and any goodwill charges related thereto;

 

changes in consumer spending, borrowing and savings habits;

1


 

changes in accounting policies and practices, as may be adopted by the bank regulatory agencies, the Financial Accounting Standards Board, the Securities and Exchange Commission or the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board;

 

our ability to retain key employees;

 

our compensation expense associated with equity allocated or awarded to our employees; and

 

changes in the financial condition, results of operations or future prospects of issuers of securities that we own.

 

Because of these and a wide variety of other uncertainties, our actual future results may be materially different from the results indicated by these forward-looking statements.  Please also see “Item 1A. Risk Factors.”

 

PART I

 

 

ITEM 1.

Business

 

Bogota Financial Corp.

 

Bogota Financial Corp. is a Maryland corporation that was formed in September 2019 as part of the mutual holding company reorganization of Bogota Savings Bank to become the bank holding company of Bogota Savings Bank.  Since being incorporated, other than holding the common stock of Bogota Savings Bank, Bogota Financial Corp. retained approximately 50% of the net cash proceeds of the stock conversion offering, made a loan to the employee stock ownership plan of Bogota Savings Bank, and has not engaged in any other business activities to date.  Bogota Financial Corp.’s executive offices are located at 819 Teaneck Road, Teaneck, New Jersey 07666, and its telephone number is (201) 862-0660.

 

Bogota Financial Corp. completed its stock offering in connection with the mutual holding company reorganization of Bogota Savings Bank on January 15, 2020. The Company sold 5,657,735 shares of common stock at $10.00 per share in its subscription offering for gross proceeds of approximately $56.6 million. In connection with the reorganization, the Company also issued 263,150 shares of common stock and $250,000 in cash to Bogota Savings Bank Charitable Foundation, Inc., and 7,236,640 shares of common stock to Bogota Financial, MHC, the New Jersey-chartered mutual holding company. Shares of the Company’s common stock began trading on January 16, 2020 on the Nasdaq Capital Market under the trading symbol “BSBK.”

 

Bogota Financial Corp., as the holding company of Bogota Savings Bank, is authorized to pursue other business activities permitted by applicable laws and regulations, which may include the acquisition of banking and financial services companies.  We currently have no agreements to acquire other financial institutions or financial services companies, although we may determine to do so in the future.

Our cash flows will depend on earnings from the investment of the net offering proceeds and from any dividends we receive from Bogota Savings Bank.  Bogota Savings Bank is subject to regulatory limitations on the amount of dividends that it may pay.  Initially, Bogota Financial Corp. will not own or lease any property, but instead will pay a fee to Bogota Savings Bank for the use of its premises, furniture and equipment.  We intend to employ as officers of Bogota Financial Corp. only persons who are officers of Bogota Savings Bank.  However, we will use the support staff of Bogota Savings Bank from time to time.  We will pay a fee to Bogota Savings Bank for the time devoted to Bogota Financial Corp. by employees of Bogota Savings Bank; however, these individuals will not be separately compensated by Bogota Financial Corp.  Bogota Financial Corp. may hire additional employees, as appropriate, to the extent it expands its business in the future.

 

Bogota Financial, MHC

 

Bogota Financial, MHC was formed in January 2020 as a New Jersey-chartered mutual holding company in connection with the reorganization of Bogota Savings Bank into the “two-tier” mutual holding company form of organization.  Bogota Financial, MHC will, for as long as it is in existence, own a majority of the outstanding shares of Bogota Financial Corp.’s common stock. As a mutual holding company, Bogota Financial, MHC will be a non-stock company.

 

Bogota Financial, MHC’s principal assets are the common stock of Bogota Financial Corp. it received in the reorganization and offering and $50,000 cash in initial capitalization.  Presently, it is expected that the only business activity of Bogota Financial, MHC will be to own a majority of Bogota Financial Corp.’s common stock. Bogota Financial, MHC is authorized, however, to engage in any other business activities that are permissible for mutual holding companies under New Jersey law, including investing in loans and securities. Bogota Financial, MHC is subject to comprehensive regulation and examination by the New Jersey Department of Banking and Insurance (the “NJDBI”) and the Federal Reserve Board.

 

2


Bogota Savings Bank

 

Founded in 1893, Bogota Savings Bank is a New Jersey-chartered savings bank that operates two retail banking offices in Teaneck and Bogota, New Jersey.  Bergen County and the surrounding areas are our primary market area for our business operations.  We attract deposits from the general public and municipalities and use those funds along with advances from the Federal Home Loan Bank of New York and funds generated from operations to originate one- to four-family residential real estate loans and commercial real estate and multi-family loans and, to a lesser extent, consumer loans, commercial and industrial loans and construction loans. We also invest in securities, which have historically consisted primarily of U.S. Government and agency obligations, municipal obligations, corporate bonds and mortgage-backed securities.  We offer a variety of deposit accounts, including demand accounts, savings accounts, money market accounts and certificate of deposit accounts.  

 

At December 31, 2019, we had consolidated total assets of $766.6 million, total deposits of $497.7 million and total equity of $75.0 million.  Bogota Savings Bank is subject to comprehensive regulation and examination by the NJDBI and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation.  Our website address is www.bogotasavingsbank.com.  Information on this website is not and should not be considered a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

Market Area

 

Our branches, including our corporate office, are located in Bergen County, although we consider our lending area to generally encompass Bergen, Monmouth and Ocean Counties in New Jersey and the surrounding areas.  Bergen County ranks as the most populous county in New Jersey (out of 21 counties) with a population of approximately 950,000 compared to an estimated population of 630,000 for Monmouth County, 577,000 for Ocean County and 9.0 million for the entire state.   The economy in our primary market area has benefited from being varied and diverse, with a broad economic base.  Bergen County has a median household income of approximately $101,000, Monmouth County has a median household income of approximately $98,000 and Ocean County has a median household income of $68,000.  The median household income for New Jersey is approximately $83,000 and the median household income is approximately $63,000 for the United States. As of December 2019, the unemployment rate was 2.8% for Bergen County, 3.2% for Monmouth County and 3.9% for Ocean County, compared to 3.7% for New Jersey and a national rate of 3.5%.

We believe that we have developed products and services that will meet the financial needs of our current and future customer base; however, we plan, and believe it is necessary, to expand the range of products and services that we offer to be more competitive in our market area.  Our marketing strategies focus on the strength of our knowledge of local consumer and small business markets, as well as expanding relationships with current customers and reaching out to develop new, profitable business relationships.

Competition

We face significant competition for deposits and loans. Our most direct competition for deposits has come historically from the numerous financial institutions operating in our market area (including other community banks and credit unions), many of which are significantly larger than we are and have greater resources.  We also face competition for investors’ funds from other sources such as brokerage firms, money market funds and mutual funds, as well as from securities offered by the Federal Government, such as Treasury bills.  Based on FDIC data at June 30, 2019 (the latest date for which information is available), we had 0.89% of the FDIC-insured deposit market share in Bergen County, which was the 19th largest market share among the 51 institutions with offices in the county.  Money center banks, such as Bank of America, JP Morgan Chase, Wells Fargo and Citi, and large regional banks, such as TD Bank, M&T Bank and PNC Bank, have a significant presence in Bergen County.

Our competition for loans comes primarily from the competitors referenced above and from other financial service providers, such as mortgage companies and mortgage brokers. Competition for loans also comes from the increasing number of non-depository financial service companies participating in the mortgage market, such as insurance companies, securities firms, financial technology companies, specialty finance firms and technology companies.

We expect competition to remain intense in the future as a result of legislative, regulatory and technological changes and the continuing trend toward consolidation of the financial services industry. Technological advances, for example, have lowered barriers to entry, allowed banks to expand their geographic reach by providing services over the internet and made it possible for non-depository institutions, including financial technology companies, to offer products and services that traditionally have been provided by banks.  Competition for deposits and the origination of loans could limit our growth in the future.

3


Lending Activities

Historically, our lending activities have emphasized one- to four-family residential real estate loans, and such loans continue to comprise the largest portion of our loan portfolio.  Other areas of lending include commercial real estate and multi-family loans and, to a much lesser extent, consumer loans, consisting primarily of home equity loans and lines of credit, commercial and industrial loans and construction loans. Subject to market conditions and our asset-liability analysis, we expect to continue to focus on commercial real estate and multi-family lending as part of our effort to diversify the loan portfolio and increase the overall yield earned on our loans. We compete for loans by offering high quality personalized service, providing convenience and flexibility, providing timely responses on loan applications, and by offering competitive pricing.

 

 

4


 

Loan Portfolio Composition. The following table sets forth the composition of the loan portfolio at the dates indicated.

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

Amount

 

 

Percent

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

Real Estate Loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential

 

$

384,296

 

 

 

71.28

%

 

$

376,304

 

 

 

71.18

%

 

$

359,925

 

 

 

69.81

%

 

$

329,463

 

 

 

67.17

%

 

$

335,172

 

 

 

73.12

%

Commercial and multi-family

 

 

119,832

 

 

22.23

 

 

 

123,221

 

 

23.31

 

 

 

125,339

 

 

24.31

 

 

 

130,541

 

 

26.62

 

 

 

91,866

 

 

20.04

 

Construction(1)

 

 

5,943

 

 

1.1

 

 

 

2,339

 

 

0.44

 

 

 

3,204

 

 

0.62

 

 

 

1,963

 

 

0.4

 

 

 

1,080

 

 

0.24

 

Commercial and Industrial

 

 

2,264

 

 

0.42

 

 

 

1,267

 

 

0.24

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Home Equity and other

 

 

26,838

 

 

4.98

 

 

 

25,515

 

 

4.83

 

 

 

27,098

 

 

5.26

 

 

 

28,496

 

 

5.81

 

 

 

30,272

 

 

6.6

 

Total loans receivable

 

$

539,173

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

528,646

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

515,566

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

490,463

 

 

 

100.00

%

 

$

458,390

 

 

 

100.00

%

_____________________

(1)Represents amounts disbursed at December 31, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016 and 2015. The undrawn amounts of construction loans totaled $3.1 million, $3.6 million, $337,000, $387,000 and $837,000 at December 31, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016 and 2015, respectively.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5


 

Loan Portfolio Maturities. The following tables set forth the contractual maturities of our total loan portfolio at December 31, 2019.  Demand loans, loans having no stated repayment schedule or maturity, and overdraft loans are reported as being due in one year or less.  The table presents contractual maturities and does not reflect repricing or the effect of prepayments.  Actual maturities may differ.

 

 

At December 31, 2019

 

 

Residential Real Estate Loans

 

 

Commercial and Multi-Family Real Estate Loans

 

 

Commercial and Industrial Loans

 

 

Construction Loans

 

 

Consumer Loans

 

 

Total Loans

 

 

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amounts due in:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   One year or less

$

259

 

 

$

4,539

 

 

$

 

 

$

398

 

 

$

497

 

 

$

5,693

 

   More than one year through five years

 

5,334

 

 

 

5,266

 

 

 

1,702

 

 

 

 

 

 

622

 

 

 

12,923

 

   More than five years through ten years

 

63,833

 

 

 

27,912

 

 

 

562

 

 

 

 

 

 

894

 

 

 

93,201

 

   More than ten years through fifteen years

 

54,682

 

 

 

20,464

 

 

 

 

 

 

5,545

 

 

 

5,088

 

 

 

85,779

 

   More than fifteen years

 

260,188

 

 

 

61,651

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19,737

 

 

 

341,576

 

      Total

$

384,296

 

 

$

119,832

 

 

$

2,264

 

 

$

5,943

 

 

$

26,838

 

 

$

539,173

 

 

The following table sets forth our fixed and adjustable-rate loans at December 31, 2019 that are contractually due after December 31, 2020.

 

 

 

Fixed Rates

 

 

Floating or Adjustable Rates

 

 

Total

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate loans

 

$

315,131

 

 

$

69,165

 

 

$

384,296

 

Commercial and multi-family real estate loans

 

 

25,438

 

 

 

94,394

 

 

 

119,832

 

Construction loans

 

 

2,866

 

 

 

3,077

 

 

 

5,943

 

Commercial and industrial loans

 

 

2,154

 

 

 

110

 

 

 

2,264

 

Consumer loans

 

 

5,472

 

 

 

21,366

 

 

 

26,838

 

      Total

 

$

351,061

 

 

$

188,112

 

 

$

539,173

 

 

Residential Real Estate Loans.  Our one- to four-family residential loan portfolio consists of mortgage loans that enable borrowers to purchase or refinance existing homes, most of which serve as the primary residence of the borrower.  At December 31, 2019, one- to four-family residential real estate loans totaled $384.3 million, or 71.28% of our total loan portfolio, and consisted of $315.1 million of fixed-rate loans and $68.2 million of adjustable-rate loans.  Most of these one- to four-family residential properties are located in our primary market area.

 

We offer fixed-rate and adjustable-rate residential real estate loans with maturities up to 30 years.  The one- to four-family residential mortgage loans that we originate are generally underwritten according to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac guidelines, and we refer to loans that conform to such guidelines as “conforming loans.”  Loans to be sold to other approved investors or secondary market sources are underwritten to their specific requirements.  We generally originate both fixed- and adjustable-rate mortgage loans in amounts up to the maximum conforming loan limits.  We also originate loans above the conforming limits up to a maximum amount of $2.5 million, which are referred to as “jumbo loans.”  We generally underwrite jumbo loans, whether originated or purchased, in a manner similar to conforming loans.

 

Our adjustable-rate residential real estate loans have interest rates that are fixed for an initial period ranging from one to ten years.  After the initial fixed period, the interest rate on adjustable-rate residential real estate loans is generally reset every year based on a contractual spread or margin above the average yield on U.S. Treasury securities.  Our adjustable-rate residential real estate loans have initial and periodic caps of 2% on interest rate changes, with a current cap of 5% over the life of the loan.

 

We will originate one- to four-family residential mortgage loans with loan-to-value ratios of up to 70% to 80% of the appraised value, depending on the size of the loan.  Additionally, we will originate residential mortgage loans on townhouses or condominiums with loan-to-value ratios of up to 65% to 75% of the appraised value, depending on the size of the loan.  Our conforming residential real estate loans may be for up to 90% of the appraised value of the property provided the borrower obtains private mortgage insurance. Additionally, mortgage insurance is required for all mortgage loans that have a loan-to-value ratio greater than 80%. The required coverage amount varies based on the loan-to-value ratio and term of the loan. We only permit borrowers to purchase mortgage insurance from companies that have been approved by Bogota Savings Bank.

6


 

We generally do not offer “interest only” mortgage loans on one- to four-family residential properties or loans that provide for negative amortization of principal, such as “Option ARM” loans, where the borrower can pay less than the interest owed on the loan, resulting in an increased principal balance during the life of the loan. Additionally, we do not offer “subprime loans” (loans that are made with low down-payments to borrowers with weakened credit histories typically characterized by payment delinquencies, previous charge-offs, judgments, bankruptcies, or borrowers with questionable repayment capacity as evidenced by low credit scores or high debt-burden ratios) or Alt-A loans (defined as loans having less than full documentation).

 

Commercial and Multi-Family Real Estate Loans.  At December 31, 2019, we had $119.8 million in commercial and multi-family real estate loans, representing 22.23% of our total loan portfolio.  Our commercial real estate loans are secured primarily by office buildings, industrial facilities, retail facilities and other commercial properties, substantially all of which are located in our primary market area.  At December 31, 2019, commercial real estate loans totaled $62.9 million, of which $28.4 million was owner-occupied real estate and $34.5 million was secured by income producing, or non-owner-occupied real estate.  

 

We generally originate commercial real estate loans with maximum terms of ten years based on a 25-year amortization schedule, and loan-to-value ratios of up to 70% of the appraised value of the property for loans that are originated in-house and 60% of the appraised value of the property for loans received from brokers.  Our commercial real estate loans are offered with fixed interest rates or adjustable interest rates.  Interest rates on our adjustable rate loans generally adjust every three, five, seven and ten years and the interest rate is indexed to the Federal Home Loan Bank advance rate, plus a margin, subject to an interest rate floor.  All of our commercial real estate loans are subject to our underwriting procedures and guidelines, including requiring borrowers to generally have three months of operating expenses and loan payment reserves in a liquid account with us.  At December 31, 2019, our largest commercial real estate loan totaled $7.8 million and was secured by an office building located in our primary market area.  At December 31, 2019, this loan was performing in accordance with its original terms.  

 

We consider a number of factors in originating commercial real estate loans.  We evaluate the qualifications and financial condition of the borrower (including credit history), profitability and expertise, as well as the value and condition of the mortgaged property securing the loan.  When evaluating the qualifications of the borrower, we consider the financial resources of the borrower, the borrower’s experience in owning or managing similar property and the borrower’s payment history with us and other financial institutions.  In evaluating the property securing the loan, among other factors we consider the net operating income of the mortgaged property before debt service and depreciation, the debt service coverage ratio (the ratio of net operating income to debt service) to ensure that it is at least 1.25x of the monthly debt service, and the ratio of the loan amount to the appraised value of the mortgaged property.  Our commercial real estate loans are generally appraised by outside independent appraisers approved by the board of directors.  Personal guarantees are often obtained from commercial real estate borrowers.  Each borrower’s financial information on such loans is monitored on an ongoing basis by requiring periodic financial statement updates.    

At December 31, 2019, multi-family real estate loans totaled $55.4 million.  Our multi-family real estate loans are generally secured by properties consisting of five or more rental units within our New Jersey market area.  We originate multi-family residential real estate loans with fixed interest rates or with a variety of adjustable interest rates with terms and amortization periods generally of up to 25 years.  Interest rates on our adjustable-rate multi-family real estate loans adjust and the interest rate is generally indexed to the Federal Home Loan Bank advance rate, plus a margin.  At December 31, 2019, our largest multi-family residential real estate loan had an outstanding balance of $5.9 million and is secured by an apartment building located in our primary market area.  At December 31, 2019, this loan was performing according to its original terms.  

In underwriting multi-family residential real estate loans, we require a debt service coverage ratio of at least 1.20x and consider several factors, including the age and condition of the collateral, the financial resources and income level of the borrower and the borrower’s experience in owning or managing similar properties.  Multi-family residential real estate loans have loan-to-value ratios of up to 75% of the appraised value of the property securing the loans for loans that are originated in-house and 60% of the appraised value of the property for loans received from brokers.  All of our commercial real estate loans are subject to our underwriting procedures and guidelines, including requiring borrowers to generally have three months of operating expenses and loan payment reserves in a liquid account with us.  The borrower’s financial information on such loans is monitored on an ongoing basis by requiring periodic financial statement updates.  

Consumer Loans.  We offer consumer loans to customers residing in our primary market area.  Our consumer loans consist primarily of home equity loans and lines of credit.  At December 31, 2019, consumer loans totaled $26.8 million, or 4.98% of our total loan portfolio.

 

Home equity loans and lines of credit are multi-purpose loans used to finance various home or personal needs, where a one- to four-family primary or secondary residence serves as collateral.  We generally originate home equity loans and lines of credit of up to $500,000 with a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 70% (75% if Bogota Savings Bank holds the first lien position) and $300,000, with a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 80% and terms of up to 30 years.  Home equity lines of credit have adjustable rates of interest

7


that are based on the prime interest rate published in The Wall Street Journal, plus a margin, and reset monthly. Home equity lines of credit are secured by residential real estate in a first or second lien position.

The procedures for underwriting consumer loans include assessing the applicant’s payment history on other indebtedness, the applicant’s ability to meet existing obligations and payments on the proposed loan, and the loan-to-value ratio. Although the applicant’s creditworthiness is a primary consideration, the underwriting process also includes a comparison of the value of the collateral, if any, to the proposed loan amount.

Construction Loans.  We also originate loans to finance the construction of one- to four-family residential properties.  At December 31, 2019, residential construction loans totaled $5.9 million, or 1.10% of our total loan portfolio.  Most of these loans are secured by properties located in our primary market area.

 

Our residential land and acquisition loans are generally structured as two-year interest-only balloon loans.  The interest rate is generally a fixed rate based on an index rate, plus a margin.  Our construction-to-permanent loans are generally structured as interest-only, adjustable rate loans with a duration of six to twelve months for the construction phase.  The interest rate on these loans are based on the prime interest rate as published in The Wall Street Journal, plus a margin.  Construction loan-to-value ratios for one- to four-family residential properties generally will not exceed 80% of the appraised value of the property on a completed basis, while loan-to-value rations for land acquisition financing will not exceed 50% of the value of the land for an unimproved lot and 75% of the value of the land for an improved lot.  Once the construction project is satisfactorily completed, we look to provide permanent financing.  

 

We also offer loans primarily to established local developers to finance the construction of commercial and multi-family properties or to acquire land for development of commercial and multi-family properties.  We also provide construction loans primarily to local developers for the construction of one- to four-family residential developments.  At December 31, 2019, we had a single commercial construction loan that totaled $3.1 million, or 0.57% of our total loan portfolio.  This loan was secured by an office building located in our primary market area.  At December 31, 2019, this loan was performing according to its original terms.  We also had undrawn amounts on the commercial construction loan totaling $1.3 million at December 31, 2019.

Historically, our commercial construction loans are generally interest-only loans that provide for the payment of interest during the construction phase, which is usually between 12 to 24 months.  The interest rate is generally adjustable based on an index rate, typically the prime interest rate as published in The Wall Street Journal or LIBOR, plus a margin.  At the end of the construction phase, the loan generally converts to a permanent commercial real estate mortgage loan, but in some cases it may be payable in full.  However, our construction loans for the construction of one- to four-family residential properties do not convert to permanent residential real estate loans.  Loans can be made with a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 75% of the appraised market value upon completion of the project or a maximum loan-to-value ratio of 50% for raw land.  

Before making a commitment to fund a commercial construction loan, we require an appraisal of the property by an independent licensed appraiser.  The construction phase is carefully monitored to minimize our risk.  All construction projects must be completed in accordance with approved plans and approved by the municipality in which they are located.  Loan proceeds are disbursed periodically in increments as construction progresses and as inspections by our approved inspectors warrant.

Commercial and Industrial Loans.  We offer commercial loans and adjustable rate lines of credit in an amount of up to $500,000 to small and medium sized businesses in our market area.  These loans are generally secured by accounts receivable, inventory or other business assets, and we may support this collateral with liens on real property.  At December 31, 2019, we had seven commercial and industrial loans that totaled $2.3 million, or 0.42% of our total loan portfolio.  

Commercial lending products include revolving lines of credit and term loans.  Our commercial lines of credit are typically made with adjustable interest rates, indexed to the prime interest rate published in The Wall Street Journal, plus a margin, and we can demand repayment of the borrowed due at any time after it is due.  Term loans are generally made with fixed interest rates, indexed to the comparable Federal Home Loan Bank of New York amortizing advance indications, plus a margin, and are for terms up to seven years.  

When making commercial and industrial loans, we require a debt service coverage ratio of at least 125% and we review and consider the financial statements of the borrower, our lending history with the borrower, the borrower’s debt service capabilities, the projected cash flows of the business and the value of the collateral, accounts receivable, inventory and equipment. Depending on the collateral used to secure the loans, commercial and industrial loans are made in amounts of up to 70% of the value of the collateral securing the loan. We generally do not make unsecured commercial and industrial loans. Personal guarantees are obtained from commercial and industrial borrowers.

8


Loan Underwriting Risks

Adjustable-Rate Loans.  While we anticipate that adjustable-rate loans will better offset the adverse effects of an increase in interest rates as compared to fixed-rate loans, an increased monthly payment required of adjustable-rate loan borrowers in a rising interest rate environment could cause an increase in delinquencies and defaults.  The marketability of the underlying property also may be adversely affected in a high interest rate environment.  In addition, although adjustable-rate loans make our asset base more responsive to changes in interest rates, the extent of this interest sensitivity is somewhat limited by the annual and lifetime interest rate adjustment limits on adjustable-rate residential real estate loans.

Commercial and Multi-Family Real Estate Loans.  Loans secured by commercial and multi-family real estate generally have larger balances and involve a greater degree of risk than one- to four-family residential real estate loans.  Of primary concern in commercial real estate and multi-family lending is the borrower’s creditworthiness and the feasibility and cash flow potential of the project.  Payments on loans secured by income properties often depend on the successful operation and management of the properties.  As a result, repayment of such loans may be subject to adverse conditions in the real estate market or the economy to a greater extent than residential real estate loans.  To monitor cash flows on income properties, we require borrowers and loan guarantors, if any, to provide annual financial statements on commercial real estate and multi-family loans.  In reaching a decision whether to make a commercial real estate or multi-family loan, we consider and review a global cash flow analysis of the borrower and consider the net operating income of the property, the borrower’s expertise, credit history and profitability and the value of the underlying property.  We generally have required that the properties securing these real estate loans have debt service coverage ratios (the ratio of earnings before debt service to debt service) of at least 1.25x.  We require a Phase One environmental report when we believe there is a possibility exists that hazardous materials may have existed on the site, or the site may have been impacted by adjoining properties that handled hazardous materials.

Consumer Loans.  Consumer loans may entail greater risk than residential mortgage loans, particularly in the case of consumer loans that are unsecured or secured by assets that depreciate rapidly, such as motor vehicles. Repossessed collateral for a defaulted consumer loan may not provide an adequate source of repayment for the outstanding loan and a small remaining deficiency often does not warrant further substantial collection efforts against the borrower.  Consumer loan collections depend on the borrower’s continuing financial stability, and therefore are likely to be adversely affected by various factors, including job loss, divorce, illness or personal bankruptcy.  Furthermore, the application of various federal and state laws, including federal and state bankruptcy and insolvency laws, may limit the amount that can be recovered on such loans.

Construction Loans.  Our construction loans are based upon our estimates of costs to complete a project and the value of the completed project.  Underwriting is focused on the borrowers’ financial strength, credit history and demonstrated ability to produce a quality product and effectively market and manage its operations.  All construction loans for which the builder does not have a binding purchase agreement must be approved by the internal loan committee.

Construction lending involves additional risks when compared to permanent residential lending because funds are advanced upon the security of the project, which is of uncertain value before its completion.  Because of the uncertainties inherent in estimating construction costs, it is difficult to evaluate accurately the total funds required to complete a project and the related loan-to-value ratio.  This type of lending also typically involves higher loan principal amounts and is often concentrated with a small number of builders.  In addition, generally during the term of a construction loan, interest may be funded by the borrower or disbursed from an interest reserve set aside from the construction loan budget.  These loans often involve the disbursement of substantial funds with repayment substantially dependent on the success of the ultimate project and the ability of the borrower to sell or lease the property or obtain permanent take-out financing, rather than the ability of the borrower or guarantor to repay principal and interest.  If the appraised value of a completed project proves to be overstated, we may have inadequate security for the repayment of the loan upon completion of construction of the project and may incur a loss.  We use a discounted cash flow analysis to determine the value of any construction project of five or more units.  Our ability to continue to originate a significant amount of construction loans is dependent on the strength of the housing market in our market areas.

Commercial and Industrial Loans.  Unlike residential real estate loans, which generally are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from his or her employment or other income, and which are secured by real property whose value tends to be readily ascertainable, commercial business loans have higher risk and typically are made on the basis of the borrower’s ability to make repayment from the cash flow of the borrower’s business, and the collateral securing these loans may fluctuate in value.  Our commercial business loans are originated primarily based on the identified cash flow of the borrower and secondarily on the underlying collateral provided by the borrower.  Most often, this collateral consists of real estate, accounts receivable, inventory or equipment.  Credit support provided by the borrower for most of these loans and the probability of repayment is based on the liquidation value of the pledged collateral and enforcement of a personal guarantee, if any.  As a result, the availability of funds for the repayment of commercial business loans may depend substantially on the success of the business itself.  Further, any collateral securing such loans may depreciate over time, may be difficult to appraise and may fluctuate in value.

9


Originations, Purchases and Participations of Loans

Lending activities are conducted by our loan personnel operating at our main office and branch office location.  We also obtain referrals from existing or past customers and from accountants, real estate brokers, builders and attorneys. All loans that we originate or purchase are underwritten pursuant to our policies and procedures, which incorporate Fannie Mae underwriting guidelines to the extent applicable for residential loans.  We originate both adjustable-rate and fixed-rate loans.  Our ability to originate fixed or adjustable-rate loans depends upon the relative customer demand for such loans, which is affected by current market interest rates as well as anticipated future market interest rates.  Our loan origination and purchase activity may be adversely affected by a rising interest rate environment, which typically results in decreased loan demand.  

As a supplement to our in-house loan originations of one- to four-family residential real estate loans, beginning in 2013, we entered into agreements with unaffiliated mortgage brokers as a source for additional residential real estate loans.  We currently work with five different mortgage brokers, none of which we have an ownership interest in or any common employees or directors.  Three of the mortgage brokers are located in Morris County, New Jersey and one mortgage broker is located in each of Hudson and Ocean County, New Jersey.  These mortgage brokers fund the one- to four-family residential real estate loans and then sell them to Bogota Savings Bank following our underwriting analysis.  We use the same parameters in evaluating these loans as we do for our in-house loan originations of one- to four-family residential real estate loans.  

For each purchased loan, we generally pay a fixed fee based on the loan balance.  For the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, we purchased for our portfolio $29.1 million and $26.5 million, respectively, of loans from these mortgage brokers.  As part of purchasing the loans, we acquire the servicing rights to the loans.  The purchased loans are acquired from these mortgage brokers without recourse or any right to require the mortgage broker to repurchase the loans. The fixed aggregate fee we pay to acquire the loan and servicing rights are added to the loan balance and amortized over the contractual life of the loan under the interest method.  

We purchase for our portfolio both fixed and adjustable interest rate one- to four-family real estate loans, with maturities up to 30 years, with a per loan limit of $1.0 million.

We generally do not purchase whole loans from third parties other than the one- to four-family residential real estate loans described above.  However, we purchase participation interests primarily in commercial real estate and multi-family loans where we are not the lead lender.  We underwrite our participation interest in the loans that we purchase according to our own underwriting criteria and procedures.  At December 31, 2019, the outstanding balances of our loan participations where we are not the lead lender totaled $15.7 million, all of which were commercial or multi-family real estate loans.

 

Loan Approval Procedures and Authority  

Pursuant to New Jersey law, the aggregate amount of loans that Bogota Savings Bank is permitted to make to any one borrower or a group of related borrowers is generally limited to 15% of Bogota Savings Bank’s capital, surplus fund and undivided profits (25% if the amount in excess of 15% is secured by “readily marketable collateral”).  At December 31, 2019, based on the 15% limitation, Bogota Savings Bank’s loans-to-one-borrower limit was approximately $11.3 million. On the same date, Bogota Savings Bank had no borrowers with outstanding balances in excess of this amount.  Our regulatory loans-to-one borrower limit will increase following completion of the offering.  At December 31, 2019, our largest loan relationship with a single borrower was for $9.2 million, which consisted of six loans secured by various commercial real estate and multi-family properties in our primary market area, and the underlying loans were performing in accordance with their terms on that date.  

 

Our lending activities follow written, non-discriminatory, underwriting standards and loan origination procedures established by our board of directors and management.  The board of directors has granted loan approval authority to certain officers up to prescribed limits, depending on the officer’s title experience and the type of loan.  

Loans in excess of individual officers’ lending limits require approval of our Internal Loan Committee, which is comprised of our President and Chief Executive Officer, Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President and Compliance/BSA Officer. The Internal Loan Committee can approve individual loans of up to prescribed limits, depending on the type of loan.  Loans that involve policy exceptions also must be approved by the Internal Loan Committee and ratified by the board of directors.

Loans in excess of the Internal Loan Committee’s loan approval authority require the approval of the board of directors.  

 

Delinquencies and Asset Quality

Delinquency Procedures.  When a borrower fails to make a required loan payment, we take a number of steps to have the borrower cure the delinquency and restore the loan to current status, including contacting the borrower by letter and phone at regular intervals.  System-generated late notices are mailed to a borrower after the late payment “grace period,” which is 10 days in the case

10


of loans secured by commercial real estate and 15 days in the case of residential and consumer loans.  We attempt to contact the borrower and develop a plan of repayment no later than the 36th day of delinquency.  A second notice will be mailed to a borrower if the loan remains past due after 40 days for commercial real estate loans and 45 days for residential and consumer loans.  By the 120th day of delinquency, we will issue a pre-foreclosure notice that will require the borrower to bring the loan current within 30 days to avoid the beginning of foreclosure proceedings for loans secured by residential real estate.  A report of all loans 30 days or more past due is provided to the board of directors monthly.

Loans Past Due and Non-Performing Assets.  Loans are reviewed on a regular basis.  Management determines that a loan is impaired or non-performing when it is probable that at least a portion of the loan will not be collected in accordance with the original terms due to a deterioration in the financial condition of the borrower or the value of the underlying collateral if the loan is collateral dependent.  When a loan is determined to be impaired, the measurement of the loan in the allowance for loan losses is based on the present value of expected future cash flows, except that all collateral-dependent loans are measured for impairment based on the fair value of the collateral, less costs to sell. Non-accrual loans are loans for which collectability is questionable and, therefore, interest on such loans will no longer be recognized on an accrual basis.  All loans that become 90 days or more delinquent are placed on non-accrual status unless the loan is well secured and in the process of collection.  When loans are placed on non-accrual status, unpaid accrued interest is fully reversed, and further income is recognized only to the extent received on a cash basis or cost recovery method.  

 

When we acquire real estate as a result of foreclosure, the real estate is classified as real estate owned.  The real estate owned is recorded at the lower of carrying amount or fair market value, less estimated costs to sell.  Any excess of the recorded value of the loan over the fair market value of the property is charged against the allowance for loan losses, or, if the existing allowance is inadequate, charged to expense in the current period.  After acquisition, all costs incurred in maintaining the property are expensed.  Costs relating to the development and improvement of the property, however, are capitalized to the extent of estimated fair value less estimated costs to sell.

A loan is classified as a troubled debt restructuring if, for economic or legal reasons related to the borrower’s financial difficulties, we grant a concession to the borrower that we would not otherwise consider. This usually includes a modification of loan terms, such as a reduction of the interest rate to below market terms, capitalizing past due interest or extending the maturity date and possibly a partial forgiveness of the principal amount due. Interest income on restructured loans is accrued after the borrower demonstrates the ability to pay under the restructured terms through a sustained period of repayment performance, which is generally six consecutive months.

 

 

Delinquent Loans. The following table sets forth our loan delinquencies by type, by amount and by percentage of type at the dates indicated.

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

 

30-89 Days

 

 

90 Days or More

 

 

30-89 Days

 

 

90 Days or More

 

 

 

Number of Loans

 

 

Principal Balance

 

 

Number of Loans

 

 

Principal Balance

 

 

Number of Loans

 

 

Principal Balance

 

 

Number of Loans

 

 

Principal Balance

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate loans

 

 

2

 

 

$

371

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

2

 

 

$

389

 

 

 

2

 

 

$

637

 

Commercial and multi-family real estate loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

2

 

 

 

198

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

4

 

 

$

569

 

 

 

 

 

$

 

 

 

2

 

 

$

389

 

 

 

3

 

 

$

659

 

 

 

11


 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

 

30-89 Days

 

 

90 Days or More

 

 

30-89 Days

 

 

90 Days or More

 

 

 

Number of Loans

 

 

Principal Balance

 

 

Number of Loans

 

 

Principal Balance

 

 

Number of Loans

 

 

Principal Balance

 

 

Number of Loans

 

 

Principal Balance

 

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate loans

 

 

2

 

 

$

390

 

 

 

4

 

 

$

746

 

 

 

1

 

 

$

145

 

 

 

8

 

 

$

1,206

 

Commercial and multi-family real estate loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,329

 

 

 

 

 

Construction loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

2

 

 

 

40

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

4

 

 

$

430

 

 

 

5

 

 

$

771

 

 

 

3

 

 

$

2,474

 

 

 

8

 

 

$

1,206

 

 

 

Nonperforming Assets. The table below sets forth the amounts and categories of our non-performing assets at the dates indicated.  Non-accrual loans include non-accruing troubled debt restructurings of $347,000, $729,000, $3.2 million, $643,000 and $346,000 as of December 31, 2019, 2018, 2017, 2016 and 2015, respectively.  

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Non-accrual loans:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate loans

 

$

570

 

 

$

959

 

 

$

1,076

 

 

$

3,836

 

 

$

1,768

 

Commercial and multi-family real estate loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2,461

 

 

 

120

 

 

 

Construction loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

20

 

 

 

22

 

 

 

25

 

 

 

117

 

 

 

122

 

Total

 

 

590

 

 

 

981

 

 

 

3,562

 

 

 

4,073

 

 

 

1,890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Accruing loans past due 90 days or more:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and multi-family real estate loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total non-performing loans

 

 

590

 

 

 

981

 

 

 

3,562

 

 

 

4,073

 

 

 

1,890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Real estate owned

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total non-performing assets

 

 

590

 

 

 

981

 

 

 

3,562

 

 

 

4,073

 

 

 

1,890

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Troubled debt restructurings (accruing):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate loans

 

$

434

 

 

$

230

 

 

$

238

 

 

$

395

 

 

$

391

 

Commercial real estate loans

 

 

229

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total troubled debt restructurings (accruing)

 

$

663

 

 

$

230

 

 

$

238

 

 

$

395

 

 

$

391

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total troubled debt restructurings (accruing) and total non-performing assets

 

$

1,253

 

 

$

1,211

 

 

$

3,800

 

 

$

4,468

 

 

$

2,281

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total non-performing loans to total loans

 

 

0.11

%

 

 

0.19

%

 

 

0.69

%

 

 

0.83

%

 

 

0.41

%

Total non-performing loans to total assets

 

0.08

 

 

0.15

 

 

0.55

 

 

0.65

 

 

0.34

 

Total non-performing assets to total assets

 

0.08

 

 

0.15

 

 

0.55

 

 

0.65

 

 

0.34

 

Total non-performing assets and troubled debt restructurings (accruing) to total assets

 

0.16

 

 

0.18

 

 

0.59

 

 

0.72

 

 

 

0.40

 

 

For the year ended December 31, 2019, gross interest income that would have been recorded had our non-accruing loans been current in accordance with their original terms was approximately $12,760.  Interest income recognized on such loans for the year ended December 31, 2019 was approximately $18,662.

 

 

12


Classified Assets. Federal regulations provide for the classification of loans and other assets, such as debt and equity securities considered to be of lesser quality, as “substandard,” “doubtful” or “loss.”  An asset is considered “substandard” if it is inadequately protected by the current net worth and paying capacity of the obligor or of the collateral pledged, if any.  “Substandard” assets include those characterized by the “distinct possibility” that the insured institution will sustain “some loss” if the deficiencies are not corrected.  Assets classified as “doubtful” have all of the weaknesses inherent in those classified “substandard,” with the added characteristic that the weaknesses present make “collection or liquidation in full,” on the basis of currently existing facts, conditions, and values, “highly questionable and improbable.”  Assets classified as “loss” are those considered “uncollectible” and of such little value that their continuance as assets without the establishment of a specific loss allowance is not warranted.  Assets which do not currently expose the insured institution to sufficient risk to warrant classification in one of the aforementioned categories but possess weaknesses are designated as “special mention.”

When an insured institution classifies problem assets as either substandard or doubtful, it may establish general allowances in an amount deemed prudent by management to cover probable accrued losses.  General allowances represent loss allowances which have been established to cover probable accrued losses associated with lending activities, but which, unlike specific allowances, have not been allocated to particular problem assets.  When an insured institution classifies problem assets as “loss,” it is required either to establish a specific allowance for losses equal to 100% of that portion of the asset so classified or to charge-off such amount.  An institution’s determination as to the classification of its assets and the amount of its valuation allowances is subject to review by the regulatory authorities, which may require the establishment of additional general or specific loss allowances.

The following table sets forth our amounts of classified loans and loans designated as special mention as of December 31, 2019, 2018 and 2017.  

 

 

 

At December 31,

 

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

 

(In thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Special mention

 

$

326

 

 

$

1,800

 

 

$

2,160

 

Substandard

 

 

2,633

 

 

 

915

 

 

 

3,169

 

Doubtful

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Loss

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   Total

 

$

2,959

 

 

$

2,715

 

 

$

5,329

 

 

As of December 31, 2019, special mention loans included two residential real estate loans totaling $326,089.  As of December 31, 2019, substandard loans included five residential real estate loans totaling $1.1 million, one consumer loan totaling $19,533 and two commercial real estate loan totaling $1.5 million.

Allowance for Loan Losses The allowance for loan losses is maintained at a level which, in management’s judgment, is adequate to absorb probable credit losses inherent in the loan portfolio.  The amount of the allowance is based on management’s evaluation of the collectability of the loan portfolio, including the nature of the portfolio, credit concentrations, trends in historical loss experience, specific impaired loans, and economic conditions. Allowances for loans that are individually classified as impaired are generally determined based on collateral values or the present value of estimated cash flows.  The allowance is increased by a provision for loan losses, which is charged to expense and reduced by full and partial charge-offs, net of recoveries.  Changes in the allowance relating to impaired loans are charged or credited to the provision for loan losses.  Management’s periodic evaluation of the adequacy of the allowance is based on various factors, including historical loss experience, current economic conditions, delinquency statistics, geographic and industry concentrations, the adequacy of the underlying collateral, the financial strength of borrowers, results of internal loan reviews and other qualitative and quantitative factors which could affect potential credit losses.

 

In addition, the NJDBI and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation periodically review our allowance for loan losses and as a result of such reviews, they may require us to adjust our allowance for loan losses or recognize loan charge-offs.

 


13


Allowance for Loan Losses. The following table sets forth activity in our allowance for loan losses for the periods indicated.

 

 

At or for the Years Ended December 31,

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

 

2017

 

 

2016

 

 

2015

 

 

(Dollars in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allowance at beginning of year

$

1,976

 

 

$

1,976

 

 

$

1,876

 

 

$

1,776

 

 

$

1,691

 

Provision for loan losses

 

 

 

 

 

100

 

 

 

100

 

 

 

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charge offs:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Commercial and multi-family real estate loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total charge-offs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recoveries:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Residential real estate loans

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10

 

Commercial and multi-family real estate loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Construction loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consumer loans

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total recoveries

 

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10