F-1 1 ff12019_chinaliberal.htm REGISTRATION STATEMENT

As filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on August 5, 2019

 

Registration No. 333-[●]

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

Washington, D.C. 20549

 

FORM F-1

REGISTRATION STATEMENT

UNDER

THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933

 

China Liberal Education Holdings Limited

(Exact Name of Registrant as Specified in Its Charter)

 

Cayman Islands   8200   N/A
(State or Other Jurisdiction of
Incorporation or Organization)
  (Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification Number)

 

Jianxin Zhang, Chief Executive Officer

China Liberal Education Holdings Limited

Huateng Century Park Headquarters,

Building A, Level 2

Beijing, PRC

+86-10-6597-8118

(Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Registrant’s Principal Executive Offices)

 

Hunter Taubman Fischer & Li LLC

1450 Broadway, 26th Floor

New York, NY 10018

(212) 530-2206

(Name, Address, Including Zip Code, and Telephone Number, Including Area Code, of Agent for Service)

 

Copies to:

 

Ying Li, Esq.

Guillaume de Sampigny, Esq.

Hunter Taubman Fischer & Li LLC

1450 Broadway, 26th Floor

New York, NY 10018

(212) 530-2206

 

Elizabeth F. Chen, Esq.

Pryor Cashman LLP

7 Times Square

New York, NY 10036

(212) 326-0199

 

Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date hereof.

 

If any of the securities being registered on this form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box. ☒

  

If this form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, please check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

If this form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an emerging growth company as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act of 1933.

 

Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act. ☐

 

 

 

 

CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE

 

Class of Securities to be Registered   Amount
to be
Registered
    Proposed
Maximum
Offering
Price per
Share
    Proposed
Maximum
Aggregate
Offering
Price
    Amount of
Registration
Fee
 
Ordinary Shares, par value $0.001 per share (1)(2)     1,166,667     $ 6.00     $ 7,000,000     $ 848.40  
Ordinary Shares, par value $0.001 per share (4)     66,666     $ 6.00     $ 399,996     $ 48.48  
Underwriter Warrants (2)(3)     81,667       -       -       -  
Ordinary Shares underlying Underwriter Warrants (3)     81,667     $ 6.00     $ 490,000     $ 59.39  
Total     1,315,001             $ 7,889,996     $ 956.27  

  

(1)Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the amount of the registration fee in accordance with Rule 457(a) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the “Securities Act”). There is no current market for the securities or price at which the shares are being offered.

 

(2)Pursuant to Rule 416 under the Securities Act, there is also being registered hereby such indeterminate number of additional Ordinary Shares of the Registrant as may be issued or issuable because of stock splits, stock dividends, stock distributions, and similar transactions.

 

(3)We have agreed to issue to Boustead Securities, LLC (the “Underwriter”) warrants to purchase the number of ordinary shares (the “Underwriter Warrants”) in the aggregate equal to seven percent (7%) of the shares sold at closing of the offering. The Underwriter Warrants will be exercisable at any time, and from time to time within five (5) years from the effective date of this registration statement, in whole or in part, but may not be transferred nor may the shares underlying the warrants be sold until 180 days from the effective date of the offering. The exercise price of the Underwriter Warrants is equal to the public offering price per share in the offering. The Underwriter Warrants are with a cashless provision and shall be non-callable and non-cancelable with immediate piggy-back registration rights.

 

(4)This Registration Statement also covers the resale under a separate resale prospectus (the “Resale Prospectus”) by selling shareholder of the Registrant of up to 66,666 Ordinary Shares issued to the selling shareholder as named in the Resale Prospectus.

 

The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

 

 

 

 

 

 

EXPLANATORY NOTE

 

This Registration Statement contains two prospectuses, as set forth below.

 

  Public Offering Prospectus. A prospectus to be used for the public offering of 1,166,667 shares of ordinary shares of the Registrant (the “Public Offering Prospectus”) through the underwriter named on the cover page of the Public Offering Prospectus.
     
  Resale Prospectus. A prospectus to be used for the resale by the selling shareholder set forth therein of 66,666 shares of ordinary shares of the Registrant (the “Resale Prospectus”).

 

The Resale Prospectus is substantively identical to the Public Offering Prospectus, except for the following principal points:

 

  they contain different outside and inside front covers and back covers;
     
  they contain different Offering sections in the Prospectus Summary section beginning on page 1;
     
  they contain different Use of Proceeds sections on page 33;
     
  a Selling Shareholder section is included in the Resale Prospectus;
     
  a Selling Shareholder Plan of Distribution is included in the Resale Prospectus; and
     
  the Legal Matters section in the Resale Prospectus deletes the reference to counsel for the underwriter.

 

The Registrant has included in this Registration Statement a set of alternate pages after the back cover page of the Public Offering Prospectus (the “Alternate Pages”) to reflect the foregoing differences in the Resale Prospectus as compared to the Public Offering Prospectus. The Public Offering Prospectus will exclude the Alternate Pages and will be used for the public offering by the Registrant. The Resale Prospectus will be substantively identical to the Public Offering Prospectus except for the addition or substitution of the Alternate Pages and will be used for the resale offering by the selling shareholder.

 

 

 

 

The information in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

  

SUBJECT TO COMPLETION,

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS DATED AUGUST 5, 2019

 

1,166,667 Ordinary Shares

 

China Liberal Education Holdings Limited

 

 

This is an initial public offering of our ordinary shares. We are offering our ordinary shares, US$0.001 par value per share (“Ordinary Shares”). Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our Ordinary Shares. We expect the initial public offering price will be $6.00 per Ordinary Share. We have reserved the symbol “CLEU” for purposes of listing our Ordinary Shares on the Nasdaq Capital Market (“NASDAQ”) and plan to apply to list our Ordinary Shares on NASDAQ. There is no guarantee or assurance that our Ordinary Shares will be approved for listing on NASDAQ.

 

Investing in our Ordinary Shares involves a high degree of risk, including the risk of losing your entire investment. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 8 to read about factors you should consider before buying our Ordinary Shares.

 

We are an “emerging growth company” as defined under the federal securities laws and will be subject to reduced public company reporting requirements. Please read the disclosures beginning on page 3 of this prospectus for more information.

 

   PER SHARE   TOTAL 
Initial public offering price  $6.00   $7,000,000 
Underwriting discounts and commissions(1)  $0.42   $490,000 
Proceeds, before expenses, to us  $5.58   $6,510,000 

 

(1) We have agreed to issue, on the closing date of this offering, underwriter’s warrants to the Underwriter in an amount equal to 7% of the aggregate number of ordinary shares sold by us in this offering. For a description of other terms of the Underwriter’s warrants and a description of the other compensation to be received by the Underwriter, see “Underwriting” beginning on page 114.

 

Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any state securities commission nor any other regulatory body has approved or disapproved of these securities or determined if this prospectus is truthful or complete. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.

 

You should not assume that the information contained in the registration statement to which this prospectus is a part is accurate as of any date other than the date hereof, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or of any sale of the Ordinary Shares being registered in that registration statement of which this prospectus forms a part.

 

No dealer, salesperson or any other person is authorized to give any information or make any representations in connection with this Offering other than those contained in this prospectus and, if given or made, the information or representations must not be relied upon as having been authorized by us. This prospectus does not constitute an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any security other than the securities offered by this prospectus, or an offer to sell or a solicitation of an offer to buy any securities by anyone in any jurisdiction in which the offer or solicitation is not authorized or is unlawful.

 

This offering is being conducted on a firm commitment basis. The underwriter, Boustead Securities, LLC, is obligated to take and pay for all of the shares if any such shares are taken. We have granted the Underwriter an option for a period of 45 days after the closing of this offering to purchase up to 15% of the total number of our ordinary shares to be offered by us pursuant to this offering (excluding shares subject to this option), solely for the purpose of covering over-allotments, at the initial public offering price less the underwriting discount. If the underwriter exercises the option in full, the total underwriting discounts and commissions payable will be $0.42 based on an assumed offering price of $6.00 per ordinary share, and the total gross proceeds to us, before underwriting discounts and commissions and expenses, will be $7,000,000. If we complete this offering, net proceeds will be delivered to us on the closing date. We will not be able to use such proceeds in China, however, until we complete capital contribution procedures which require prior approvals, registration or filings, i.e., making a filing with the local branch of China’s Ministry of Commerce, and registering with the local branch of the State Administration for Market Regulation, and the approval of and registration with a local bank authorized by the State Administration of Foreign Exchange. See remittance procedures in the section titled “Use of Proceeds” beginning on page 33.

 

The underwriter expects to deliver the Ordinary Shares against payment as set forth under “Underwriting”, on or about [●], 2019.

 

 

The date of this prospectus is [           ], 2019. 

 

 

 

About this Prospectus

 

This prospectus is part of a registration statement we filed with the SEC. We and the Underwriter have not authorized anyone to provide any information or to make any representations other than those contained in this prospectus or in any free writing prospectuses prepared by us or on our behalf or to which we have referred you. We take no responsibility for, and can provide no assurance as to the reliability of, any other information that others may give you. This prospectus is an offer to sell only the shares offered hereby, but only under circumstances and in jurisdictions where it is lawful to do so. We are not making an offer to sell these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted or where the person making the offer or sale is not qualified to do so or to any person to whom it is not permitted to make such offer or sale. The information contained in this prospectus is current only as of the date on the front cover of the prospectus. You should not assume that the information contained in this prospectus, any prospectus supplement or the documents incorporated by reference are accurate as of any date other than their respective dates, regardless of the time of delivery of this prospectus or of any sale of the Ordinary Shares. Our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may have changed since that date.

 

Unless otherwise indicated or the context requires otherwise, references in this prospectus to:

 

“Affiliated Entities” are to our subsidiaries;
“Boya Hong Kong” are to China Boya Education Group Co., Limited, a Hong Kong limited liability company;
“China” or the “PRC” are to the People’s Republic of China, excluding Taiwan and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau for the purposes of this prospectus only;
“China Liberal Beijing” or “PRC Subsidiary” are to China Liberal (Beijing) Education Technology Co., Ltd., a PRC limited liability company and our operating subsidiary;
“China Liberal” are to China Liberal Education Holdings Limited, a Cayman Islands exempted company;
“Company,” “we” and “us” are to one or more of China Liberal Education Holdings Limited, and its Affiliated Entities, as the case may be;
“EAP” are to Australia English for Academic Purposes, which prepares international students for vocational or tertiary-level study in Australia and other contexts where English is the language of instruction, and it aims to develop student awareness, knowledge and skills in the use of English as the language of teaching and learning in a vocational and/or university environment;
 

“FMP” are to Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic;

 

“FUT” are to Fujian University of Technology;

 

“FPEC” are to Fujian Preschool Education College;

“IELTS” are to International English Language Testing System, an international standardized test of English language proficiency for non-native English language speakers, and accepted by most Australian, British, Canadian and New Zealand academic institutions;
“IGEC” are to International General Education Courses, a Sino-foreign joint education program developed and introduced by the Chinese Service Center for Scholarly Exchange, a public organization under the Ministry of Education of the PRC, in order to improve the overall reform and internationalization of PRC’s higher education;
“ISEC” are to International Scholarly Exchange Curriculum, a PRC government sponsored and highly profiled program affiliated with the China Scholarship Council directly under the Ministry of Education in the PRC;
 

“NZTC” are to New Zealand Tertiary College;

“shares,” “Shares,” or “Ordinary Shares” are to the Ordinary Shares of the Company, par value US$0.001 per share;
“Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs” are to education programs offered by joint ventures of the PRC and foreign institutions;
“TOEFL” are to Test of English as Foreign Language, an international standardized test of English language proficiency for non-native English language speakers, and commonly accepted by American academic institutions; and
“Yi Xin BVI” are to Yi Xin International Investment Limited, a company incorporated in the British Virgin Islands.

 

Our business is conducted by China Liberal Beijing in the PRC, using Renminbi, or RMB, the currency of China. Our consolidated financial statements are presented in United States dollars. In this prospectus, we refer to assets, obligations, commitments and liabilities in our consolidated financial statements in United States dollars. These dollar references are based on the exchange rate of RMB to United States dollars, determined as of a specific date or for a specific period. Changes in the exchange rate will affect the amount of our obligations and the value of our assets in terms of United States dollars which may result in an increase or decrease in the amount of our obligations (expressed in dollars) and the value of our assets, including accounts receivable (expressed in dollars).

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

  Page
PROSPECTUS SUMMARY 1
SUMMARY FINANCIAL DATA 5
CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS 7
RISK FACTORS 8

ENFORCEABILITY OF CIVIL LIABILITies

32
USE OF PROCEEDS 33
DIVIDEND POLICY 35
CAPITALIZATION 36
DILUTION 37
MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 38
INDUSTRY 57
BUSINESS 68
REGULATIONS 83
MANAGEMENT 88
EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 91
PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS 92
RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS 93
DESCRIPTION OF SHARE CAPITAL 94
SHARES ELIGIBLE FOR FUTURE SALE 106
TAXATION 107
UNDERWRITING 114
EXPENSES RELATING TO THIS OFFERING 117
LEGAL MATTERS 118
CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 118
EXPERTS 118
INTEREST OF NAMED EXPERTS AND COUNSEL 118
DISCLOSURE OF COMMISSION POSITION ON INDEMNIFICATION 118
WHERE YOU CAN FIND MORE INFORMATION 118
INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS F-1

  

i

 

 

PROSPECTUS SUMMARY

 

The following summary is qualified in its entirety by, and should be read in conjunction with, the more detailed information and financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. In addition to this summary, we urge you to read the entire prospectus carefully, especially the risks of investing in our Ordinary Shares, discussed under “Risk Factors,” before deciding whether to buy our Ordinary Shares.

 

Unless otherwise indicated, all dollar amounts included herein are recorded in United States dollars.

 

Unless otherwise indicated, all share amounts and per share amounts in this prospectus have been presented giving effect to a stock split of our Ordinary Shares at a ratio of 1,000-for-1, which occurred on July 8, 2019, and an issuance of 3,999,000 Ordinary Shares on July 15, 2019.

 

Our Business

 

Overview 

 

We are an exempted company incorporated in the Cayman Islands on February 25, 2019. Through our operating company, China Liberal (Beijing) Education Technology Co., Ltd., or China Liberal Beijing, incorporated in the PRC on August 10, 2011, we are an educational service provider operating under the “China Liberal” brand in the PRC. Our mission is to provide China’s students with the tools to excel in a global environment. We strive to meet the needs of the ever growing number of young talents in China.

 

We provide a wide variety of educational services and products intended to address the needs of our partnering schools and our students:

 

  Services provided under Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs (“Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs”), which services represent the core of our business;

Overseas study consulting services (“Overseas Study Consulting Services”);

Technological consulting services provided to targeted Chinese universities to improve their campus information and data management system and to optimize their teaching, operating and management environment, creating a “smart campus”; these consulting services include campus intranet solution buildout, school management software customization, smart devices (mainly Internet of things, or IoT devices, extending the Internet connectivity to physical devices) installation and testing, and school management data collection and analysis, all of which can be specifically tailored to meet a client’s particular needs (“Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions”); and

Tailored job readiness training to graduating students (“Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education”), acting as the key bridge between our partner schools and employers. However, we did not start generating revenue from this line of business until January 2019.

 

We also develop and provide textbooks and other course materials to students enrolled under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs to ensure the quality of students’ learning outcomes.

 

We started generating revenue in the year ended December 31, 2012 through our services provided under certain Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs. We continued to maintain and expand this core business throughout the years, giving us revenues stream of $2,821,602 and $2,410,781 for the years ended December 31, 2017, and 2018, respectively, representing 72.6% and 50.11% of our net revenues for those respective years. A vast majority of these revenues derives from our two major partners, Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic, or FMP and Minjiang University. Additionally, since we started our Overseas Study Consulting Services in 2017, this line of business has been a source of growing revenue. We generated $60,947 and $547,521 in revenues from our Overseas Study Consulting Services for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018, respectively, representing a sharp increase from 2% to 11% of our total revenue of that respective year. We also started generating revenues from our Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions business in 2017, with revenues of $950,992 and $1,820,974, representing 25% and 38% for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018, respectively. We did not generate any revenue from our Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education business because this line of business was newly added in December 2018.

 

We started our operations in Beijing where our headquarters are located. We established our first branch in Fujian Province in 2011 and subsequently expanded to various locations in the PRC, covering the cities of Hangzhou, Fuzhou and Ji’nan on the east coast of China.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, there is no public trading market for our Ordinary Shares and there is no assurance that a trading market for our Ordinary Shares will ever develop.

 

Competitive Strengths

 

We believe that the following competitive strengths enhance our position in the PRC market:

 

  Innovative and visionary management team with a proven track record;
  Innovative, flexible and cost-effective smart campus solutions; and
  Strong and experienced sales team with a focus on art students.

  

1

 

 

Business Strategy

 

We intend to continue to generate revenue from our core businesses, while expanding to related territories maximizing our existing resources, as well as striving to meet the needs of our clients. We intend to diversify our income model in the coming years by growing our four lines of business simultaneously. We are dedicated to enabling our students to capture life-changing opportunities by delivering transformative education services and by working with our partners. Our goal is to become a nationally recognized education services company that offers modernized and internationalized higher education solutions to students, with a focus on academic areas of art and computer science. We intend to achieve our goal by pursuing the following strategies:

 

  Continue to invest in technology and leverage our intellectual property;
  Offer our smart campus solutions to a growing number of partnering schools;
  Expand our focus to include computer science major;
  Continue to invest in sales and marketing activities to recruit art students for our one-on-one consulting services;
  Expand classroom-based pre-session training services based on our current proven one-on-one consulting model; and
  Establish our own-branded schools.

 

Our History and Corporate Structure

 

China Liberal Education Holdings Limited, or China Liberal, was incorporated in the Cayman Islands on February 25, 2019.

 

On July 8, 2019, our shareholders approved a stock split of our outstanding Ordinary Shares at a ratio of 1,000-for-1, which will be effective immediately. All references to Ordinary Shares, options to purchase Ordinary Shares, share data, per share data, and related information have been retroactively adjusted, where applicable, in this prospectus to reflect the split of our Ordinary Shares as if it had occurred at the beginning of the earlier period presented.

 

On July 15, 2019, our sole director approved a stock issuance increasing our Ordinary Shares by 3,999,000 to 5,000,000, effective immediate. All references to Ordinary Shares, options to purchase Ordinary Shares, share data, per share data, and related information have been retroactively adjusted, where applicable, in this prospectus to reflect the split of our Ordinary Shares as if it had occurred at the beginning of the earlier period presented.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, our authorized share capital is $50,000 divided into 50,000,000 ordinary shares. We directly hold 100% of the equity interests of Yi Xin International Investment Limited, a company incorporated in the British Virgin Islands (“Yi Xin BVI”), which in turn holds 100% of China Boya Education Group Co., Limited, a Hong Kong limited liability company (“Boya Hong Kong”). Boya Hong Kong originally holds 91.1772% equity interests of China Liberal Beijing, our PRC operating entity. On February 1, 2019, Boya Hong Kong entered into share transfer agreements with each of the non-controlling shareholders of China Liberal Beijing and completed the acquisition of the 8.8228% non-controlling interest in China Liberal Beijing. After these transactions, Boya Hong Kong owns 100% interest of China Liberal Beijing.

 

We commenced our operations in August 2011 through China Liberal Beijing.

 

The following diagram illustrates our corporate structure as of the date of this prospectus and upon completion of the Offering based on 1,166,667 Ordinary Shares being offered:

 

 

2

 

 

Corporate Information

 

Our principal executive office is located at Huateng Century Park Headquarters, Building A, Level 2, Beijing, PRC, and our phone number is +86-10-6597-8118. We maintain a corporate website at http://www.chinaliberal.com. The information contained in, or accessible from, our website or any other website does not constitute a part of this prospectus.

 

Implications of Being an “Emerging Growth Company”

 

As a company with less than $1.07 billion in revenue during our last fiscal year, we qualify as an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act. An “emerging growth company” may take advantage of reduced reporting requirements that are otherwise generally applicable to public companies. In particular, as an emerging growth company, we:

 

may present only two years of audited financial statements and only two years of related Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations, or MD&A;
are not required to provide a detailed narrative disclosure discussing our compensation principles, objectives and elements and analyzing how those elements fit with our principles and objectives, which is commonly referred to as “compensation discussion and analysis”;
are not required to obtain an attestation and report from our auditors on our management’s assessment of our internal control over financial reporting pursuant to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002;
are not required to obtain a non-binding advisory vote from our shareholders on executive compensation or golden parachute arrangements (commonly referred to as the “say-on-pay,” “say-on frequency” and “say-on-golden-parachute” votes);
are exempt from certain executive compensation disclosure provisions requiring a pay-for-performance graph and CEO pay ratio disclosure;
are eligible to claim longer phase-in periods for the adoption of new or revised financial accounting standards under §107 of the JOBS Act; and
will not be required to conduct an evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting until our second annual report on Form 20-F following the effectiveness of our initial public offering.

 

We intend to take advantage of all of these reduced reporting requirements and exemptions, including the longer phase-in periods for the adoption of new or revised financial accounting standards under §107 of the JOBS Act. Our election to use the phase-in periods may make it difficult to compare our financial statements to those of non-emerging growth companies and other emerging growth companies that have opted out of the phase-in periods under §107 of the JOBS Act.

 

Under the JOBS Act, we may take advantage of the above-described reduced reporting requirements and exemptions for up to five years after our initial sale of common equity pursuant to a registration statement declared effective under the Securities Act, or such earlier time that we no longer meet the definition of an emerging growth company. The JOBS Act provides that we would cease to be an “emerging growth company” if we have more than $1.07 billion in annual revenues, have more than $700 million in market value of our Ordinary Share held by non-affiliates, or issue more than $1 billion in principal amount of non-convertible debt over a three-year period.

 

3

 

 

THE OFFERING

 

Following is a brief summary of this Offering.

 

Ordinary Shares outstanding prior to the completion of this Offering   5,000,000 Ordinary Shares
     
Ordinary Shares offered by us   1,166,667 Ordinary Shares
     
Ordinary Shares Outstanding Immediately After the Offering  

6,166,667 Ordinary Shares assuming no exercise of the underwriters’ over-allotment option and excluding 81,667 ordinary shares underlying the underwriters’ warrants.

     
Price per Ordinary Shares  

We currently estimate that the initial public offering price will be $6.00 per ordinary share.

     
Use of proceeds   We intend to use the proceeds from this offering for working capital and general corporate purposes, including investment in smart campus solutions, research and development, integration of enterprises and vocation education and establishment of big data calculation training school. See “Use of Proceeds” for more information.
     
Proposed Nasdaq Symbol   “CLEU”
     
Transfer Agent   Transhare Corporation
     
Risk Factors   An investment in the Ordinary Shares is subject to a number of risks. You should carefully consider the information set forth in the “Risk Factors” section below and the other sections of this Prospectus, in addition to the documents included in and/or incorporated by reference in the registration statement to which this Prospectus forms a part.

 

4

 

 

SUMMARY FINANCIAL DATA

 

The following table sets forth selected historical statements of operations for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, and balance sheet data as of December 31, 2018 and 2017, which have been derived from our consolidated audited financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected in the future. You should read this data together with our consolidated financial statements and related notes appearing elsewhere in this prospectus as well as “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” appearing elsewhere in the prospectus.

 

Selected Statements of Operations Information:

 

   For the years ended
December 31,
 
   2018   2017 
         
REVENUE, NET  $4,808,993   $3,885,886 
COST OF REVENUE   2,702,297    2,161,322 
GROSS PROFIT   2,106,696    1,724,564 
           
OPERATING EXPENSES          
Selling expenses   704,060    541,424 
General and administrative expenses   579,500    408,762 
Total operating expenses   1,283,560    950,186 
           
INCOME FROM OPERATIONS   823,136    774,378 
           
OTHER INCOME          
Interest income   88,926    70,743 
Other income, net   180,191    187,794 
Total other income, net   269,117    258,537 
           
INCOME BEFORE INCOME TAXES   1,092,253    1,032,915 
           
INCOME TAX PROVISION   167,813    158,109 
           
NET INCOME   924,440    874,806 
Less: net income attributable to non-controlling interest   81,779    5,800 
NET INCOME ATTRIBUTABLE TO THE COMPANY  $842,661   $869,006 

 

5

 

 

Selected Balance Sheet Information:

  

   As of December 31, 
   2018   2017 
ASSETS        
CURRENT ASSETS        
Cash  $2,077,166   $7,970 
Accounts receivable, net   833,174    632,724 
Contract receivable, net   960,237    160,270 
Advance to suppliers   19,885    1,529,865 
Loan receivable   -    1,997,726 
Due from a related party   72,700    - 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   286,052    169,864 
TOTAL CURRENT ASSETS   4,249,214    4,498,419 
           
Property and equipment, net   101,205    68,155 
Contract receivable, net   1,617,186    684,780 
TOTAL NONCURRENT ASSETS   1,718,391    752,935 
           
TOTAL ASSETS  $5,967,605   $5,251,354 
           
LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
CURRENT LIABILITIES          
Accounts payable  $121,558   $171,976 
Deferred revenue   149,560    104,181 
Taxes payable   244,142    177,722 
Due to related parties   22,591    14,956 
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities   178,175    171,526 
TOTAL CURRENT LIABILITIES   716,026    640,361 
           
COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES          
           
SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY          
Ordinary shares, $0.001 par value, 50,000,000 shares authorized; 5,000,000 shares issued and outstanding*   5,000    5,000 
Additional paid in capital   4,579,116    1,643,527 
Statutory reserve   294,158    201,468 
Retained earnings   88,967    2,274,585 
Accumulated other comprehensive income (loss)   (234,237)   26,746 
Total China Liberal’s equity   4,733,004    4,151,326 
Non-controlling interest   518,575    459,667 
Total shareholders’ equity   5,251,579    4,610,993 
           
TOTAL LIABILITIES AND SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY  $5,967,605   $5,251,354 

  

* The Company issued 5,000,000 ordinary shares in the aggregate in July 2019. These shares are presented on a retroactive basis to reflect the nominal share issuance.

6

 

 

CAUTIONARY NOTE REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This prospectus, including sections entitled “Prospectus Summary,” “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operation” and “Business,” contains forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to, statements about:

 

implementation of our business strategy;

 

our anticipated capital requirements and future operating performance; and

 

our use of the net proceeds from this Offering.

 

Any statements that relate to future events or conditions, including, without limitation, the statements included in this prospectus that are not historical facts, that relate to industry prospects and that concern our prospective results of operations or financial position, may be deemed to be forward-looking statements. Often, however, our uses of the words “believe,” “anticipate,” “plan,” “expect,” “intend” and similar expressions will identify forward-looking statements, but the absence of these words does not necessarily mean that a statement is not forward-looking. Although we believe that the expectations reflected in the forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus are reasonable, these statements represent our current expectations and are inherently uncertain. The factors discussed above under “Risk Factors,” among others, could cause actual results, levels of activity, performance or achievements to differ materially from those indicated by these forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements represent our views as of the date of this prospectus. While we may elect to update these forward-looking statements in the future, we disclaim any obligation to do so, even if subsequent events cause our views to change. For all of these reasons, you should not unduly rely on any forward-looking statements.

 

7

 

 

RISK FACTORS

 

You should consider carefully all of the information in this prospectus, including the risks and uncertainties described below and our consolidated financial statements and related notes, before making an investment in our Ordinary Shares. Any of the following risks and uncertainties could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. The market price of our Ordinary Shares could decline significantly as a result of any of these risks and uncertainties, and you may lose all or part of your investment.

 

Risks Related to Our Business

 

We partner with a limited number of Chinese host universities for certain Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs and our revenues are concentrated from a limited number of major partners. If we are not able to continue to secure agreements with some or all of our existing partners, or secure new agreements with additional partners, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our revenues generated under Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs represented 72.6% and 50.11% of our net revenues for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018, respectively. Although we continue to introduce new projects and to diversify our core business, the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs we actively service still generated a majority of our net revenues. In addition, for 2017 and 2018, we generated a vast majority of our Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Program revenues from our major partners, Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic, or FMP and Minjiang University. We expect that this line of business will continue to generate approximately one-third of our annual net revenue in the next three years. During the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018, we operated five such programs with four universities. However, we have ceased or will cease to provide services in connection with two of the existing programs because we assessed that these two programs are not profitable. More specifically, we have ceased to offer our courses under the International Scholarly Exchange Curriculum program with Fujian University of Technology, or the FUT ISEC Program, after the then existing students graduated in July 2018. We will cease to offer our courses under the New Zealand Tertiary College Program with Fujian Preschool Education College, or the NZTC Program, after the existing students graduate in July 2019. Despite our long term working relationships with FMP and Minjiang University, one or more of these universities may decide to terminate their agreements with us and discontinue our cooperation for reasons such as expiration of Sino-foreign program permits, a change or expiration of programs, students’ inability to achieve the targeted level of language proficiency, undersubscription of students due to a global economic down-turn or otherwise, or simply decline to renew the agreements upon their expiration. If any of these situations occur, we cannot assure you that we will be able to timely secure other cooperation agreements with other programs, if at all, and therefore, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

The services we provide under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs may be subject to regulatory and policy changes, as well as the continuous approval of and supervision by relevant PRC authorities.

 

We provide services to Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs offered by our partner schools. According to PRC laws and regulations, schools offering Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs are required to obtain permits to operate schools from the relevant education authorities or the authorities that regulate labor and social welfare in the PRC, depending on the type of diploma or degrees granted. The Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs we service are subject to approvals by the Ministry of Education, or MOE. Additionally, these programs are subject to continuous supervision by relevant PRC authorities, including the MOE, the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security and their local counterparts. Such supervision may include a verification system for the foreign degrees/diplomas awarded by Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, and an annual report system and periodic evaluation system for those Sino-foreign institutions and programs that offer undergraduate or higher degrees.

 

In 2018, the MOE approved the termination of certain Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs as a move to improve quality, tighten regulatory control, and promote reforms in China’s educational systems. Such actions were taken because problems had appeared in institutions and projects (none of which we service) that were previously approved by the relevant authorities. These problems included insufficient utilization of high quality educational resources, low instructional quality, weak specialized capabilities in academic departments, lack of content-based development mechanisms, low student satisfaction and poor attractiveness of programs. These problems made it difficult for those institutions and projects to continue operating and they were therefore closed down. This action by the MOE was taken to close down institutions and projects that were originally approved but at the time of termination did not have enrolled students any more. Thus, this action was also taken to improve the overall quality of the industry. In light of this, Fujian Province, the province where all of the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs we service are located, set a minimum score for English (as a subject) for those students who are applying for any four-year Sino-foreign joint programs that offer undergraduate degrees. As a result of these new regulatory controls and policy adjustments, even though none of the programs we service were terminated by MOE, overall student recruiting and enrollment under our Sino-foreign joint education programs was negatively impacted, because some potential candidates could not meet the minimum score for English. For example, student enrollments under our joint education programs with Strait College of Minjiang University actually decreased by 300 students from 2017 to 2018 due to the higher eligibility requirements for students to enroll in any Sino-foreign joint education programs in Fujian Province. We cannot assure you that the local government in Fujian Province or the MOE will not set an even higher eligibility standard for students to enroll in these joint education programs in the future, in which case our student enrollment numbers, result of operations and financial conditions may be negatively impacted.

 

8

 

 

Our partnering schools have the ability to withhold our portion of tuition payments in certain circumstances, and to the extent that our portion is withheld, our revenue, results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our results of operations are directly affected by the level of the tuition we charge to our students. Typically, students pay to the Sino-foreign Joint Managed Academic Programs tuition fees ranging from RMB15,000 (approximately US$2,268) to RMB28,000 (approximately US$4,233) per student per academic school year. As a result of us servicing our partnering schools, we are entitled to receive approximately 30% to 50% of such student tuitions. Our contracts with Chinese host universities/colleges provide that (1) the host universities/colleges will withhold the tuition collected from students for one to three months after the academic school year starts in September, and then remit the portion of tuition fees to us after the student headcounts have been finalized, and (2) the portion of tuition fee that we are entitled to receive is calculated based on the final actual number of students retained with the universities/colleges after any student dropout has been adjusted. Accordingly, any tuition refund has already been deducted by host universities/colleges before we receive our portion of the tuition fees. For accounting purposes, at the beginning of each academic school year, we initially accrue the estimated refund based on an historical 1% student dropout rate, and make subsequent true-up adjustments after the final number of students retained with the host universities/colleges is determined. Such adjustments were immaterial for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

However, our ability to receive our portion of tuition fee from Chinese host universities/colleges largely depends on whether Chinese host universities/colleges are satisfied with our teaching services, or whether we can maintain positive communication with Chinese host universities/colleges to resolve any service deficiency on a timely manner. Any extended tuition withholding or delayed tuition payment to us from Chinese host universities/colleges due to our service deficiency, may materially affect our revenue, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We rely heavily on the continuous reputation of our partnering schools in order to attract and maintain a significant number of students enrolled in our courses offered in these schools.

 

We partner with schools to provide courses within Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, including offering language courses and/or major specific courses to their students who intend to study abroad. These schools then pay us directly based on the headcount of the students enrolled in the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs. If these schools experience a decrease in the number of their enrolled students due to student or parent dissatisfaction, negative publicity, poor track records, or other disruption of their reputation out of our control, they may experience withdrawals of currently enrolled students and a decrease in the enrollment of perspective students, which could in turn materially and adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

 

If one or more of the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs were to lose their Sino-foreign program permits, our results of operations and financial condition may suffer substantially.

 

Universities or colleges who host Sino-foreign programs in the PRC are required to obtain and maintain Sino-foreign program permits from the appropriate education authorities at the PRC central government, provincial, municipal or local level, depending on the certifications required to offer these programs. We cannot assure you that the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs we service will maintain their permits in good standing within the permit periods, or that these permits will be renewed or extended after the permit periods. If one or more of the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs were to lose their Sino-foreign program permits and we are not able to timely secure new partnering programs, our results of operations and financial condition may suffer substantially.

 

Our track record of successfully assisting students to obtain student visas to study abroad may fall and satisfaction with our consulting services may otherwise decline.

 

The success of our business depends on our students’ ability to obtain student visas for their overseas study. Although almost all of our students were granted student visas in the past, we cannot ensure that our students will be granted student visas and be accepted to overseas schools at rates we have experienced in the past, and parents and students may not be satisfied with our ability to help students gain admission to universities. Any such negative developments could result in a student’s withdrawal or decrease in future enrollment, and therefore, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Changes to immigration policies in the countries our students plan to attend schools in may negatively affect our results of operations and financial condition.

 

A significant portion of our business relies upon our students’ confidence in, among other things, their ability to obtain student visas from the countries they intend to study in, including Italy and Germany. We cannot assure you that immigration policies of the popular destination countries among our students will remain the same or become friendlier to overseas students, and there is no assurance that our students will be granted visas to study in the countries of their choices. Any such negative developments could result in a student’s withdrawal or decrease in future enrollment, and therefore, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

 

If we fail to increase student enrollments, our net revenues may decline, and we may not be able to maintain growth.

 

Our growing one-on-one consulting services offered to students (mostly art students) generate revenue from the tuition we collect from these students. It is critical for us to enroll prospective students in a cost-effective manner. Some of the factors, many of which are largely beyond our control, could prevent us from successfully increasing enrollments of new students in a cost-effective manner, or at all. These factors include, among other things, (i) reduced interest in the degrees, professions or schools which our services are targeting (art and computer science); (ii) improved quality and number of art schools in the PRC; (iii) the inability of students to pay tuition; (iv) increasing market competition, particularly price reductions by competitors that we are unable or unwilling to match; and (v) adverse changes in relevant government policies or general economic conditions. If one or more of these factors reduce market demand for our services, our student enrollments could be negatively affected or our costs associated with student acquisition and retention could increase, or both, any of which could materially affect our ability to grow our gross billings and net revenues. These developments could also harm our brand and reputation, which would negatively impact our ability to expand our business. 

9

 

 

If fewer Chinese students, particularly art students, choose to study abroad, demand for our international program may decline.

 

One of the principal drivers of the growth of our business is the increasing number of Chinese students, particularly art students who choose to study abroad, reflecting the growing Chinese students demand for higher education in overseas countries. As such, any restrictive changes in immigration policy, terrorist attacks, geopolitical uncertainties and any international conflicts involving countries of popular demand could make it more difficult for Chinese students to obtain student visas to study overseas, or decrease the appeal of studying in such countries to Chinese students. Any significant changes in admission standards adopted by overseas educational institutions could also affect the demand for overseas education by Chinese students. Additionally, Chinese students may also become less attracted to studying abroad for other reasons, such as improving domestic educational or employment opportunities associated with increased economic development in China. These factors could cause declines in the demand for our international program, which may adversely affect our revenue and profitability.

 

We cannot assure you that the new China Liberal-branded schools that we intend to open in Beijing and in Italy will be opened as scheduled, if at all.

 

We intend to open our own branded schools in Beijing at our current headquarters as well as in Italy later in 2019. However, we cannot assure you that either or both schools can obtain permits or licenses, if required, can enroll the viable number of students to ensure profits, can hire qualified teachers to teach the courses, or for our Italian location, can successfully cooperate with our local partner. Failure to accomplish any one or more of these factors could substantially delay the schools’ openings, if the schools can be opened at all, and our results of operations and financial prospects may suffer substantially.

 

Our smart campus solutions may not be accepted by the intended users of our products, which could harm our future financial performance.

 

There can be no assurance that our smart campus solutions systems will achieve wide acceptance by our intended users, including management, teachers, and students of our current and future partnering schools. The degree of acceptance for products and services based on our technology will also depend upon a number of factors, such as whether we are able to meet and exceed the expectation of our uses in speed and safety, availability of various functions, user-friendliness and the ability to integrate different user platforms and data. Long-term subscription of our products and services will also depend, in part, on the capabilities and operating features of our products and technologies as compared to those of other available products and services. As a result, there can be no assurance that currently available solutions will be able to achieve revenue growth or profitability, which could harm our future financial performance.

 

We depend upon the development of new solutions and enhancements to existing solutions for our current and future partnering schools. If we fail to predict and respond to emerging technological trends and clients’ and intended users’ changing needs, our operating results and market share may suffer.

 

The market for our smart campus solutions is characterized by rapidly changing technology, evolving industry standards, new product introductions, and evolving methods of building and maintaining our products. Our operating results depend on our ability to develop and introduce innovative products and to maintain the integrated system we have implemented. The process of developing new technology, including Software as a Service, or SaaS model cloud computing technology, more programmable, flexible and virtual networks, and technology related to other market transitions- such as security, digital transformation and IoT and IoE (Internet of Everything), and cloud- is complex and uncertain, and if we fail to accurately predict clients’ and intended end users’ changing needs and emerging technological trends our business could be harmed.

 

We may need to commit significant resources, including monetary investments and developer personnel to developing new products before knowing for sure whether such investments will result in products the intended end users’ will accept. Similarly, our business could be harmed if we fail to develop, or fail to develop in a timely fashion, offerings to address other evolving needs, or if the offerings addressing these other transitions that ultimately succeed are based on technology, or an approach to technology, different from ours. In addition, our business could be adversely affected in periods surrounding the launch of new products if customers delay their purchasing decisions to evaluate the new product offerings.

 

Furthermore, we may not execute successfully on our vision or strategy because of challenges with regard to product planning and timing, technical hurdles that we fail to overcome in a timely fashion, or a lack of necessary resources. This could result in competitors, some of which are technology giants in the PRC, providing those solutions before we do, which in turn, causes us loss of market share, revenue, and earnings.

 

Historically, the gross margin from the smart campus solutions line of business was lower than our other lines of business, and we cannot assure you that such line of business will be profitable in the foreseeable future, if at all.

 

Historically, the gross margin from the smart campus solutions line of business was lower than our other lines of business, with gross margin of 6.5% in 2017 and gross margin of 19.7% in 2018. This is due to the nature of the smart campus solutions business, that is, higher cost associated with the customization of software, higher hardware facilities and device costs, and higher investment into the research and development of the technology serving the smart campus solutions. We cannot assure you that the profit margin will become higher in the future. Therefore, there can be no assurance that we can generate income from the smart campus solutions line of business, or that any income that we achieve can be sustained.

 

10

 

 

We provide our technology consulting services to a limited number of schools for their smart campus solutions, and if we are not able to continue to secure agreements with some or all of these schools, or secure new agreements with other schools, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Currently, we provide our technology consulting services to two universities for smart campus hardware and software build-out or servers upgrade. We also provide smart campus solutions equipment procurement and installment services to three other universities. However, one or more of these universities may decide to terminate their agreements with us for reasons such as dissatisfaction of our services, a change of programs or curriculum, hiring of in-house tech support personnel, or simply not to choose us as their service provider after a project is completely. If any of these situations occur, we cannot assure you that we will be able to timely secure other service agreements with other schools, if at all, and therefore, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our reputation in the job readiness training market relies heavily upon the student-employees trained by us remaining in their respective positions and performing in a satisfactory manner, which is not within our control. If these student-employees are not able to stay in their respective positions for a reasonable amount of time or are consistently not able to meet the employers’ criteria, our reputation in the job readiness training market may suffer.

 

While our job readiness training services are highly tailored in order to train the student-employees to meet the specific requirements of our contracted employers, there may be situations not within our control which may lead to a student-employee’s leaving his/her position before the end of required length of services. Such situations may include a student-employee’s voluntary resignation without good reason or his/her violation of the employer’s internal guidelines and rules. Although such situations are not within our control, our reputation may be damaged if similar situations occur repeatedly.

 

We do not generate revenues under our job readiness training until a student is successfully placed and we will not be fully paid by the employer until such student-employee stay with the employer for a set period of time. If a student-employee fails to stay in his/her position for an agreed upon amount of time, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our business model under the job readiness training line of business is such that we will not start generating revenues until a student is successfully placed and starts working for the target employer. Once these conditions have been met, the employer will start paying us monthly starting at the end of the first month of employment for the fixed period of time set forth in our agreement with the employer. However, if a student-employee leaves due to voluntary resignation without good reason or is asked to leave before the end of the applicable length of services, we will not be compensated for the remaining months that such student-employee is not providing services. Although we typically sign a separate agreement with a student before providing training services whereby the student is required to pay us for any of such remaining months, we cannot assure you that he/she will perform this obligation fully according to such agreement, in which case our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

We have grown steadily and expect to continue to invest in our growth for the foreseeable future. If we fail to manage this growth effectively, the success of our business model will be compromised.

 

We have experienced steady growth in net revenues in recent years, primarily driven by the diversifying of our core business while leveraging our network of trusted schools. Our net revenues grew by 22.8% from RMB 21 million ($3,163,302) in 2016 to RMB 26.26 million ($3,885,886) in 2017 and further increased by 23.8% to RMB 31.82 million ($4,808,993) in 2018.

 

Our growth may place a significant strain on our sales and marketing capacities, administrative and operating infrastructure, facilities and other resources. To maintain our growth, we need to continue to acquire more partnering Sino-foreign programs or institutes, enroll more students, increase our academic and administrative faculty, as well as further developing and strengthening our software and systems. We will also be required to refine our operational, financial and management controls and reporting systems and procedures. If we fail to efficiently manage this expansion of our business, our costs and expenses may increase more than anticipated and we may not successfully attract a sufficient number of students and qualified academic and administrative faculty in a cost-effective manner, respond to competitive challenges, or otherwise execute our business plans. In addition, we may, as part of carrying out our growth strategies, adopt new initiatives to offer additional course packages and educational content and to implement new pricing models and strategies. We cannot assure you that these initiatives may achieve the anticipated results. These proposed changes may not be well received by our existing and prospective students, in which case their experience with our education services may suffer, which could damage our reputation and business prospect.

 

Our ability to effectively implement our strategies and manage any significant growth of our business will depend on a number of factors, including our ability to: (i) effectively market our products and services to potential partners and students with sufficient growth potential; (ii) develop and improve educational content to  appeal to existing and prospective partners and students; (iii) maintain and increase our student enrollments; (iv) effectively recruit, train and motivate a large number of new employees, including our faculty members, foreign teachers and sales and marketing personnel; (v) successfully implement enhancements and improvements to our software and systems; (vi) continue to improve our operational, financial and management controls and efficiencies; (vii) protect and further develop our intellectual property rights; and (viii) make sound business decisions in light of the scrutiny associated with operating as a public company. These activities require significant capital expenditures and investment of valuable management and financial resources, and our growth will continue to place significant demands on our management. There are no guarantees that we will be able to effectively manage any future growth in an efficient, cost-effective and timely manner, or at all. Our growth in a relatively short period of time is not necessarily indicative of results that we may achieve in the future. If we do not effectively manage the growth of our business and operations, our reputation, results of operations and overall business and prospects could be negatively impacted.

 

11

 

 

If we are unable to conduct sales and marketing activities cost-effectively, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

We rely heavily on our sales and marketing efforts to increase student enrollment. Our sales and marketing expenses consist primarily of employee salaries and student enrollment. We incurred approximately $541,424 and $704,060, respectively, in sales and marketing expenses in 2017 and 2018. We expect our sales and marketing expenses to continue to increase in the future as we further expand our operations.

 

Our sales and marketing activities may not be well received by the market and may not result in the levels of sales that we anticipate. We also may not be able to retain or recruit a sufficient number of experienced sales and marketing personnel, or to train newly hired sales and marketing personnel, which we believe is critical to implementing our sales and marketing strategies cost-effectively. Further, sales and marketing approaches and tools in China’s private education market are evolving rapidly. This requires us to continually enhance our sales and marketing approaches and experiment with new methods to keep pace with industry developments and student preferences.

 

Failure to engage in sales and marketing activities in a cost-effective manner may reduce our market share, cause our revenues and gross billings to decline, negatively impact our profitability, and materially harm our business, financial condition and results of operation.

 

Part of our core business is seasonal and we have increased risk from disruption during peak periods which makes our operating results difficult to predict.

 

We derive a significant portion of our net revenues from our Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, which typically occur around the commencement of an academic year in October and November. In addition, we typically see a “rush” to subscribe to our one-on-one consulting services by art students in June to December due to the annual registration cycle of overseas art schools, and thus, our net revenues from this core business fluctuate substantially accordingly. In addition, payments from our technology consulting services provided under the smart campus solutions typically settle at the end of a calendar year. Any shortfalls or disruptions in our operations during these peak periods, therefore, will have a disproportionately large impact on our annual operating results and the potential future growth of our business.

 

As a result of this seasonality, which corresponds to the academic calendar, our revenues fluctuate significantly quarter to quarter depending upon the timing of where we are in our “rush” cycle and sequential quarter-over-quarter comparisons of our revenues and operating results are to some extent not likely to be meaningful. In addition, our operating results from these two core businesses for any given quarter cannot be used as an accurate indicator of our results for the year. In particular, we anticipate that our ability to accurately forecast financial results for future periods will be most limited at the time we present our third quarter financial results, which will generally occur after the “rush” to subscription to our one-on-one courses in the spring and precede the fall academic year.

 

We base our operating expense budgets on expected net revenue trends. Operating expenses, similar to revenues and cost of revenues, fluctuate significantly quarter to quarter due to the seasonality of our business and are generally higher during the first and second quarters as we incur marketing expense in connection with our peak periods before the registration deadlines for art schools overseas as well as at the beginning of each academic year in the PRC. As a result, sequential quarterly comparison of our financial results has not been meaningful. We expect our seasonality to shift as a result of our continuous diversifying of our business by offering and maintaining our smart campus solution. Further, a portion of our expenses, such as office space lease obligations and personnel costs, are largely fixed and are based on our expectations of our peak levels of operations. We also intend to start enrolling students and offering preparation services to more art students on a much larger scale by operating our own branded schools in the PRC and in Italy, from which we expect more revenues to offset potential shortfall during off-peak periods. Nonetheless, we expect to continue to incur significant marketing expenses during peak periods and to have fixed expenses for office space and personnel and as such, we may be unable to adjust spending quickly enough to offset any unexpected revenues shortfall. Accordingly, any shortfall in net revenues may cause significant variation in operating results in any quarter.

 

12

 

 

We face regulatory risks and uncertainties surrounding PRC laws and regulations governing the education industry in general, including the amendments to the Implementation Rules for the Law for Promoting Private Education.

 

Our provision of Overseas Study Consulting Services offered language and art training to students, as advised by Tian Yuan Law Firm, our PRC legal counsel, is not considered running a private school, because we are not currently engaging in education that would lead to the issuance of a diploma, pre-school education, study assistance to students enrolled to take examinations for specific courses in order to obtain college degrees without attending conventional classroom-based universities, other cultural education or training of professional skills, or vocational qualifications, and thus, we are not a private school. Therefore, we are not required to hold a private school permit required under the Law for Promoting Private Education (2018) and the Implementation Rules for the Law for Promoting Private Education (2004) (collectively, “Private Education Law”).

 

Our plan to open and operate a China Liberal school, i.e., a for-profit private school, will subject us to the Private Education Law. Nonetheless, as advised by Tian Yuan Law Firm, the current PRC laws and regulations, including the Private Education Law, remain unclear as to whether the requirement for a private school operating permit is applicable to us, because in practice, private schools providing language and art training are usually not required to hold this permit.

 

The issuance of the draft submitted for approval for the amendment to the Implementation Rules for the Law for Promoting Private Education (the “MOJ Draft Amendments”) will make it clear that our planned China Liberal school in the PRC will not require a permit or approval, because this school will be providing language and art training to students, which is exempted from a permit or approval, and only a regular business recording with authority is required.

 

Nevertheless, we cannot assure you that the MOJ Draft Amendments will be adopted into law in its entirety without any revisions. Therefore, we cannot assure you that we will not be required to obtain a private school operating permit  in the future. If the PRC government requires us to obtain a private school operating permit, and if we fail to do so and still operate the school, we may be subject to monetary fines up to five times the illegitimate gains generated from the provision of training services without a proper license, other administrative sanctions, such as being ordered to stop conducting our educational activities, refund tuition payments to the students, or criminal liabilities, for our lack of a private school operating permit.

 

We may also be subject to regulatory requirements that are more stringent than the ones currently applicable to us, including those relating to sales and marketing, courses and educational content offerings, teachers’ qualification, as well as tuition fee rates and tuition refund policies, or laws and regulations that require us to obtain and maintain additional licenses and permits, and we may incur substantial expenses or alter or change our business to comply with these requirements.

 

We face regulatory risks and uncertainties associated with our teacherslack of teaching qualifications.

 

Pursuant to the Detailed Rules for the Implementation of Supervision and Administration of For-profit Private Schools issued by the Ministry of Education, the Ministry of Human Resources and Social Security and the then State Administration for Industry and Commerce (the “Detailed Rules”), teachers employed by a for-profit private school shall obtain teaching licenses or hold relevant professional skill qualifications. The Detailed Rules do not specifically provide whether “teachers”, “tutors”, or however they may be called in practice (collectively, “teachers”) of non-school tutoring institutions shall obtain teaching licenses or other relevant teaching qualifications. However, the Detailed Rules require that for-profit private tutoring institutions shall also be regulated by reference to the Detailed Rules. Further, PRC laws and regulations do not explicitly set forth what “relevant professional skill qualifications” other than teaching licenses the teachers in private schools or tutoring institutions shall obtain. In practice, there may be various interpretations and implementations by local education authorities as to whether and what qualifications are to be obtained by such teachers.

 

As advised by Tian Yuan Law Firm, our PRC counsel, we do not believe that we are subject to the regulations of for-profit private schools because we do not provide education for diploma, pre-school education, study assistance to students enrolled to take examinations for specific courses in order to obtain college degrees without attending conventional classroom-based universities, other cultural education or training of professional skills, or vocational qualifications. However, since we also deliver language and art training to prepare students for their studies abroad, we may be deemed a for-profit tutoring institution by local education authorities. In such case, we may be subject to the Detailed Rules, and thus, our teachers may be required to obtain relevant professional skill qualifications by local education authorities. Although we have been maintaining high standards to recruit skilled and qualified employees, we cannot assure you that the teachers responsible for the foregoing language and art training would obtain all relevant qualifications required by local education authorities from time to time.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, we have not received any notice of warning or been subject to any penalties or disciplinary action from government authorities due to the teachers’ lack of qualifications. In the event that our teachers are required by laws or local education authorities to obtain certain specific qualifications, we may not be able to ensure that our teachers do so timely, if at all. Therefore, we may be ordered to rectify such noncompliance or subject to penalties under the then-effective PRC laws and regulations, in which case our business may be disrupted, and our financial condition, reputation and prospects would be materially and adversely affected.

 

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Our failure to obtain and maintain approval and permit related to publishing and selling our textbooks could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial conditions and results of operations.

 

Pursuant to PRC laws and regulations related to publication, the publication and sale of our textbooks require government approval and permit, even though we limit the use of our textbooks to students enrolled under some of our Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs. We have not applied for such government approval or permit. Although we are a course provider printing and distributing our own teaching materials at a small scale without obtaining any permit for publication and distribution, and although as of the date of this prospectus, we have not been subject to any fines or other form of regulatory or administrative penalties or sanctions due to the lack of any the above-mentioned approvals or permits, we cannot guarantee that the government authorities will not impose any penalties or sanctions on us in the future for any incompliance in the past, which may include fines, mandates to remedy any violations, confiscation of the gains derived from the services for which approval or permit is required, an order to cease to provide such services and/or criminal liabilities, in which case, we could be subject to operational disruption and our financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

We have a limited history of operating some of our business lines.

 

We have been operating the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs since 2011. However, we have only been offering one-on-one consulting services and technological consulting services for smart campus solutions since 2017, and job readiness training since late 2018. Our limited history of operating part or all of our business may not serve as an adequate basis for evaluating our future prospects and operating results, including gross billings, net revenue, cash flows and profitability.

 

We may not be able to continue to recruit, train and retain a sufficient number of qualified faculty members.

 

Our faculty members are key to the quality of our educational services, as well as our brand and reputation. Our ability to continue to attract faculty members with the necessary experience and qualifications is a key driver in the success of our business. We seek to recruit qualified faculty members who are dedicated to teaching and are able to stay up-to-date with ever-changing teaching methods and approaches.

 

Additionally, given that our services are provided to students with goals to study abroad, we tend to hire teachers with strong education background and qualifications. The market for the recruitment of faculty members in the PRC is competitive. In order to attract and recruit talents, we must provide candidates with competitive compensation packages and offer attractive career development opportunities. Although we have not experienced major difficulties in recruiting or training qualified teachers in the past, we cannot guarantee that we will be able to continue to recruit, train and retain a sufficient number of qualified faculty members in the future as we continue to expand our business, which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our failure to obtain and maintain permit related to human resources services could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial conditions and results of operations.

 

Pursuant to the Interim Regulations on Human Resources Market, effective as of October 1, 2018, any for-profit human resources service provider shall obtain approval from the administrative department of human resources and social security to conduct human resources services. We recommend foreign teachers based on certain standards found in our agreements with partner universities or programs. We recommended three foreign teachers in 2016, three foreign teachers in 2017 and one foreign teacher in 2018, which may subject us to the qualification requirements of a human resources services provider. However, we have ceased to recommend new foreign teachers since 2019. Besides, as of the date of this prospectus, we have not been subject to any fines or other form of regulatory or administrative penalties or sanctions due to the lack of such approval or permit. Nevertheless, due to the broad provisions and discretionary implementation of the PRC laws, we cannot guarantee that the government authorities will not impose any penalties or sanctions on us in the future for any incompliance in the past, which may include fines, mandates to remedy any violations, confiscation of the gains derived from the services for which approval or permit is required, and/or an order to cease to provide such services, in which case, we could be subject to operational disruption and our financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected.

 

Failure to adequately and promptly respond to changes in the exams our students must take or in the requirements our students must meet to pursue their desired degrees or schools could cause our education services to be less attractive to our students.

 

There have been continuous changes in the curriculum requirements associated with, and the format of, the exams our existing and prospective students must take to pursue their desired degrees or schools, the manner in which the exams are administered, topics frequently tested in the exams, as well as the materials and documents students must submit for admission. These changes require us to continually update and enhance our course offerings, our educational and consultancy content and our teaching methods. Any inability to track and respond to these changes in a timely and cost-effective manner would make our education services less attractive to students, which may materially and adversely affect our reputation and ability to continue to attract students without a significant decrease in our tuition.

 

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Delays or failures in responding to issues raised by end users of our platforms could harm our operations.

 

The performance and reliability of our platforms used by management, teachers and students is critical to our operations and reputation. We provide our campus management, teaching and/or learning platforms to our partnering schools and we rely on our end users to promptly give us feedback regarding their user experience as well as any issues in connection with such platforms. However, there may be delay in feedback from these end users, or delay or failure on our end to address such issues. These could damage our reputation, decrease end user satisfaction, negatively impact our current coopering relationships, adversely impact our ability to attract new partners, and materially disrupt our operations. If any of these occur, our business operations, reputation and prospects could be harmed.

 

Our business depends on the continued success of our brand “China Liberal,” and if we fail to maintain and enhance recognition of our brand, we may face difficulty enrolling new students, and our reputation and operating results may be harmed.

 

We believe that market awareness of our brand “China Liberal” has contributed significantly to the success of our business. Maintaining and enhancing our brand are critical to our efforts to grow our business. Failure to maintain and enhance our brand recognition could have a material and adverse effect on our business, operating results and financial condition. We have devoted significant resources to our brand promotion efforts in recent years, but we cannot assure you that these efforts will be successful. If we are unable to further enhance our brand recognition, or if we incur excessive marketing and promotion expenses, or if our brand image is negatively impacted by any negative publicity, our business and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

 

If we fail to effectively identify, pursue and consummate strategic alliances or acquisitions, our ability to grow and to achieve profitability could be impacted.

 

We may from time to time engage in evaluations of, and discussions with, possible domestic and international acquisition or alliance candidates, including our business partner Linguaviva Educational Group in Italy. We may not be able to identify suitable strategic alliances or acquisition opportunities, complete such transactions on commercially favorable terms, or successfully integrate business operations, infrastructure and management philosophies of acquired businesses and companies. There may be particular complexities, regulatory or otherwise, associated with our expansion into new markets, and our strategies may not succeed beyond our current markets. If we are unable to effectively address these challenges, our ability to execute acquisitions as a component of our long-term strategy will be impaired, which could have an adverse effect on our growth.

 

We face intense competition in our industry, which could divert student to our competitors, lead to pricing pressure and loss of market share, and significantly reduce our gross billings and net revenues.

 

China’s education market targeting students going overseas is intensely competitive. We compete with other Chinese education service providers engaged in Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs and overseas study consultancy, for student enrollments and acquisition, high-quality academic and administrative faculty, and sales and marketing personnel, among other things. Some of our current and future competitors may have substantially greater name recognition and financial and other resources than we do, which may enable them to compete more effectively for potential students and decrease our market share. We also expect to face competition as a result of new entrants particularly those who provide consultancy services targeting art students.

 

We may not be able to compete successfully against current or future competitors and may face competitive pressures that could adversely affect our business or results of operations. The increasingly competitive landscape may also result in longer and more complex sales cycles with a prospective student or a decrease in our market share, any of which could negatively affect our gross billings and net revenues and our ability to grow our business.

 

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If our security measures are breached or fail and result in unauthorized disclosure of data by our employees, we could lose existing partners, fail to attract new partners and be exposed to protracted and costly litigation.

 

Maintaining software and system security is of critical importance to our partnering schools and our end users because the system stores and transmits proprietary and confidential information, including sensitive personally identifiable information that may be subject to stringent legal and regulatory obligations. As a technology driven smart campus solutions provider, we face continuous security threats to our system, including unauthorized activity and access by our employees, system viruses, worms, malicious code and organized cyberattacks, which could breach our security and disrupt our business. We take the proprietary and confidential information of our Company, our partners and our end users seriously. Each of our employees is required to sign and is abide by an employment agreement that contains standard confidentiality agreements. Our employees are also required to attend internal continuing training sessions. Additionally, our research and development personnel regularly monitor and maintain our software and system. We intend to, in the near future, establish a team of maintenance personnel to conduct real-time monitoring. These measures, however, may not be as effective as we anticipate. If our security measures are breached or fail as a result of third-party action, employee error, malfeasance or otherwise, we could be subject to liability or our business could be interrupted, potentially over an extended period of time. Any or all of these issues could harm our reputation, adversely affect our ability to maintain existing partners or attract prospective partners, or subject us to third-party lawsuits, regulatory fines or other action or liability. Further, any reputational damage resulting from breach of our security measures could create distrust of our company by prospective partners or investors. We may be required to expend significant additional resources to protect against the threat of these disruptions and security breaches or to alleviate problems caused by such disruptions or breaches.

 

We rely heavily on Aliyun, a cloud-based server provider to provide server service to us. Any interruption to such service could significantly disrupt our operations.

 

A vast majority of our data, codes and solutions is stored on the cloud-based service platform, Aliyun, we subscribe to. Although the use of such service is perceived to have lower risks than a conventional physical server, we may still face risks such as closure or discontinuity of services without adequate notice, financial difficulties (such as bankruptcy) faced by the server provider or their contractor(s), or any system vulnerability or security risk that are not timely fixed by Aliyun, which may have negative effects on our business, the nature and extent of which are difficult to predict.

 

Privacy concerns could limit our ability to collect and leverage our user data and disclosure of user data could adversely impact our business and reputation.

 

In the ordinary course of our business and in particular in connection with the technological consulting services provided under smart campus solutions, we collect and utilize data supplied by our users. We currently face certain legal obligations regarding the manner in which we treat such information. Increased regulation of data utilization practices, including self-regulation or findings under existing laws that limit our ability to collect, transfer, integrate and use data, could have an adverse effect on our business. Failure to comply with these obligations could subject us to liability, and to the extent that we need to alter our business model or practices to adapt to these obligations, we could incur additional expenses.

 

Our success depends on the continuing efforts of our senior management team and other key employees.

 

We depend on the continued contributions of our senior management and other key employees. The loss of the services of any of our senior management or other key employees could harm our business. Competition for qualified talents in the PRC is intense. If one or more of our senior management or other key employees are unable or unwilling to continue in their present positions, we may not be able to find replacements in a timely manner, or at all, and our business may be disrupted. Moreover, if any member of our senior management team or any of our other key personnel joins a competitor or forms or invests in a competing business, we may lose student enrollment, qualified teaching faculty members and other key sales and marketing personnel to our competitors. Our future success is also dependent on our ability to attract a significant number of qualified employees and retain existing key employees. If we are unable to do so, our business and growth may be materially and adversely affected. Our need to significantly increase the number of our qualified employees and retain key employees may cause us to materially increase compensation-related costs, including share-based compensation.

 

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We may from time to time be subject to infringement claims relating to intellectual properties of third parties.

 

We cannot assure you that our course offerings, educational contents, textbooks, software and platforms do not or will not infringe upon copyrights or other intellectual property rights held by third parties. We may encounter disputes from time to time over rights and obligations concerning intellectual properties, and we may not prevail in those disputes.

 

We have adopted policies and procedures to prohibit our users, students and employees from infringing upon third-party copyright or intellectual property rights. However, we cannot ensure that they will not, against our policies, use third-party copyrighted materials or intellectual property without proper authorization. We may incur liability for unauthorized duplication or distribution of materials posted used in our classes or posted on our platforms. Any intellectual property infringement claim could result in costly litigation and divert our management attention and resources, which in turn could negatively affect our business, financial condition and prospect.

 

If we fail to protect our intellectual property rights, our brand and business may suffer.

 

We rely on a combination of copyright, trademark and trade secret laws and restrictions on disclosure to protect our intellectual property rights. Although we seek to obtain copyright or trademark protection for our intellectual property when applicable, it is possible that we may not be able to do so successfully or that the copyright or trademark we have obtained may not be sufficient to protect all of our intellectual property rights. In particular, we rely, to a significant extent, upon our educational content developed in-house, including textbooks and teaching materials, course syllabi and outlines, quiz banks, and teaching notes, to provide high-quality education services. Additionally, we have developed and will continue to develop and maintain our copyrighted software offered within our smart campus solution. Despite our efforts to protect our intellectual property rights, unauthorized parties may attempt to copy or duplicate our intellectual property or otherwise use our intellectual properties without obtaining our consent. For example, unauthorized third parties may use our “China Liberal” brand to operate similar businesses, or to make illegal copies of our textbooks and teacher materials for market resale. Monitoring unauthorized use of our intellectual property is difficult and costly, and we cannot be certain that the steps we have taken will effectively prevent misappropriation of our intellectual properties. If we are not successful in protecting our intellectual property rights, our business and results of operations may be adversely affected.

 

Our end users may engage in intentional or negligent misconduct or other improper activities or misuse our software and systems, which could harm our brand and reputation.

 

We are exposed to the risk of fraud or other misconduct committed by the end users of our software and systems. The PRC laws governing the fair use of these third-party materials are imprecise and adjudicated on a case-by-case basis, which makes it challenging for us to adopt and implement policies governing these practices. We could, as a result, incur liability to third parties for the unauthorized duplication, distribution or other use of these materials. Any such claims could subject us to costly litigation and impose a significant strain on our financial resources and attention of management personnel regardless of whether the claims have merit. Additionally, we may be required to alter or cease our uses of such materials, which may include changing or removing content from courses or altering the functionality of our platform, or to pay monetary damages. Fraud or other misconduct by our students, employees or third parties may also involve engaging in unauthorized misrepresentation to our potential students and misappropriating third-party intellectual property and other propitiatory rights during marketing activities, misusing sensitive personal information of our students, and engaging in bribery or other unlawful payments, any of which could result in customer complaints, regulatory and legal liabilities, as well as serious harm to our brand and reputation.

 

If we fail to implement and maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may be unable to accurately or timely report our results of operations or prevent fraud, and investor confidence and the market price of our Ordinary Shares may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Prior to this offering, we were a private company with limited accounting personnel and other resources with which to address our internal controls and procedures. Our management has not completed an assessment of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting, and our independent registered public accounting firm has not conducted an audit of our internal control over financial reporting. In the course of auditing our consolidated financial statements as of December 31, 2018 and for the year ended December 31, 2018, we and our independent registered public accounting firm identified four material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting and other control deficiencies as of December 31, 2018. A “material weakness” is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the company’s annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

The material weaknesses identified relate to (i) a lack of accounting staff and resources with appropriate knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles in the United States (“U.S. GAAP”) and SEC reporting and compliance requirements; (ii) a lack of sufficient documented financial closing policies and procedures; (iii) a lack of independent directors and an audit committee; and (iv) a lack of an effective review process by the accounting manager.

 

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Following the identification of the material weaknesses and control deficiencies, we plan to continue to take remedial measures including (i) hiring more qualified accounting personnel with relevant U.S. GAAP and SEC reporting experience and qualifications to strengthen the financial reporting function and to set up a financial and system control framework; (ii) implementing regular and continuous U.S. GAAP accounting and financial reporting training programs for our accounting and financial reporting personnel; (iii) setting up an internal audit function as well as engaging an external consulting firm to assist us with assessment of Sarbanes-Oxley compliance requirements and improvement of overall internal control; and (iv) appointing independent directors, establishing an audit committee, and strengthening corporate governance.

 

We have taken measures and plan to continue to take measures to remedy these material weaknesses. The implementation of these measures may not fully address the material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, and we cannot conclude that they have been fully remedied. Our failure to correct theses material weaknesses or our failure to discover and address any other material weaknesses could result in inaccuracies in our financial statements and could also impair our ability to comply with applicable financial reporting requirements and related regulatory filings on a timely basis. As a result, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects, as well as the trading price of our Ordinary Shares, may be materially and adversely affected. Moreover, ineffective internal control over financial reporting significantly hinders our ability to prevent fraud.

 

Upon the completion of this offering, we will become a public company in the United States subject to the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or Section 404, will require that we include a report from management on our internal control over financial reporting in our annual report on Form 20-F beginning with our annual report for the fiscal year ending December 31, 2019. In addition, once we cease to be an “emerging growth company” as such term is defined in the JOBS Act, our independent registered public accounting firm must attest to and report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. Our management may conclude that our internal control over financial reporting is not effective. Moreover, even if our management concludes that our internal control over financial reporting is effective, our independent registered public accounting firm, after conducting its own independent testing, may issue a report that is qualified if it is not satisfied with our internal controls or the level at which our controls are documented, designed, operated or reviewed, or if it interprets the relevant requirements differently from us. In addition, after we become a public company, our reporting obligations may place a significant strain on our management, operational and financial resources and systems for the foreseeable future. We may be unable to timely complete our evaluation testing and any required remediation.

 

During the course of documenting and testing our internal control procedures, in order to satisfy the requirements of Section 404, we may identify weaknesses and deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting. In addition, if we fail to maintain the adequacy of our internal control over financial reporting, as these standards are modified, supplemented or amended from time to time, we may not be able to conclude on an ongoing basis that we have effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404. Generally speaking, if we fail to achieve and maintain an effective internal control environment, we could suffer material misstatements in our financial statements and fail to meet our reporting obligations, which would likely cause investors to lose confidence in our reported financial information. This could in turn limit our access to capital markets, harm our results of operations and lead to a decline in the trading price of our Ordinary Shares, if and when they trade. Additionally, ineffective internal control over financial reporting could expose us to increased risk of fraud or misuse of corporate assets and subject us to potential delisting from the stock exchange on which we list, regulatory investigations and civil or criminal sanctions.

 

Failure to qualify for or obtain any preferential tax treatments that are available in China could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

 

The modified Enterprise Income Tax Law, effective on February 24, 2017, or the EIT Law, and its implementation rules generally impose a uniform income tax rate of 25% on all enterprises, but grant preferential treatment to “high and new technology enterprises strongly supported by the state,” or HNTEs, to enjoy a preferential enterprise tax rate of 15%. China Liberal Beijing is currently accredited as an HNTE. According to the relevant administrative measures, to qualify as an “HNTE,” China Liberal Beijing must meet certain financial and non-financial criteria and complete verification procedures with the administrative authorities. Continued qualification as an HNTE is subject to a three-year review by the relevant government authorities in China, and in practice certain local tax authorities also require annual evaluation of the qualification. In the event that China Liberal Beijing fails to obtain accreditation as HNTE or are not verified by the local tax authorities, it will be subject to the standard PRC enterprise income tax rate of 25%.

 

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We will incur increased costs as a result of being a public company, particularly after we cease to qualify as an “emerging growth company.”

 

Upon completion of this offering, we will become a public company and expect to incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses that we did not incur as a private company. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, as well as rules subsequently implemented by the SEC and the NASDAQ, impose various requirements on the corporate governance practices of public companies. As a company with less than US$1.07 billion in revenues for our last fiscal year, we qualify as an “emerging growth company” pursuant to the JOBS Act. An emerging growth company may take advantage of specified reduced reporting and other requirements that are otherwise applicable generally to public companies. These provisions include exemption from the auditor attestation requirement under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or Section 404, in the assessment of the emerging growth company’s internal control over financial reporting. The JOBS Act also permits an emerging growth company to delay adopting new or revised accounting standards until such time as those standards apply to private companies.

 

After we are no longer an “emerging growth company,” we expect to incur significant expenses and devote substantial management effort toward ensuring compliance with the requirements of Section 404 and the other rules and regulations of the SEC. For example, as a result of becoming a public company, we will need to increase the number of independent directors and adopt policies regarding internal controls and disclosure controls and procedures. We also expect that operating as a public company will make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. In addition, we will incur additional costs associated with our public company reporting requirements. It may also be more difficult for us to find qualified persons to serve on our Board of Directors or as executive officers. We are currently evaluating and monitoring developments with respect to these rules and regulations, and we cannot predict or estimate with any degree of certainty the amount of additional costs we may incur or the timing of such costs.

 

We may grant share incentives, which may result in increased share based compensation expenses.

 

We believe the granting of share-based awards is of significant importance to our ability to attract and retain key personnel and employees, and we may grant share-based awards in the future. As a result, we may start to incur expenses associated with share-based compensation, which may have an adverse effect on our results of operations.

 

Failure to make adequate contributions to various government-sponsored employee benefits plans as required by PRC regulations may subject us to penalties.

 

Companies operating in China are required to participate in various government-sponsored employee benefit plans, including certain social insurance, housing funds and other welfare-oriented payment obligations, and contribute to the plans in amounts equal to specified percentages of salaries, including bonuses and allowances, of employees up to a maximum amount specified by the local government from time to time at locations where our employees are based. The requirements of employee benefit plans have not been implemented consistently by the local governments in China given the different levels of economic development in different regions. We did not pay, or were not able to make, certain social insurance or housing fund contributions for all of our employees and the amount we paid was lower than the requirements of relevant PRC regulations. Our failure in making contributions to social security and housing providence fund plans and in complying with applicable PRC labor-related laws may subject us to penalties and/or late payment fees, as the case maybe, in addition to the payment of outstanding contributions for these plans, e.g., the failure to contribute full payment to the social security funds and subsequent refusal to make up the payment within specified time limit may lead to fines amounting to one to three times the unpaid amount. If we are subject to late fees or fines in relation to the underpaid employee benefits, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected. In addition, to the extent that we can make a reasonable estimate of the liability arising from our failure in making full contributions to various employee benefit plans, we record a related contingent liability. However, the amount of our estimates may be inaccurate, in which case our financial condition and cash flow may be adversely affected if we were to pay late fees or fines in relation to the underpaid employee benefits.

 

Increases in labor costs in the PRC may adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

The currently effective PRC Labor Contract Law was first adopted on June 29, 2007 and later amended on December 28, 2012. The PRC Labor Contract Law has reinforced the protection of employees who, under the PRC Labor Contract Law, have the right, among others, to have written employment contracts, to enter into employment contracts with no fixed term under certain circumstances, to receive overtime wages and to terminate or alter terms in labor contracts. Furthermore, the PRC Labor Contract Law sets forth additional restrictions and increases the costs involved with dismissing employees. To the extent that we need to significantly reduce our workforce, the PRC Labor Contract Law could adversely affect our ability to do so in a timely and cost-effective manner, and our results of operations could be adversely affected. In addition, for employees whose employment contracts include noncompetition terms, the PRC Labor Contract Law requires us to pay monthly compensation after such employment is terminated, which will increase our operating expenses.

 

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In addition, we are required by PRC laws and regulations to maintain social insurance registration and open housing fund accounts with the relevant governmental authorities and pay for various statutory employee benefits, including pensions, housing fund, medical insurance, work-related injury insurance, unemployment insurance and maternity insurance to designated government agencies for the benefit of our employees. The relevant government agencies may examine whether an employer has made adequate payments of the requisite statutory employee benefits, and those employers who fail to make adequate payments may be subject to late payment fees, fines and/or other penalties. If we fail to make adequate social insurance and housing fund contributions, we may be subject to fines and legal sanctions, and our business, financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected. We expect that our labor costs, including wages and employee benefits, will continue to increase. Unless we are able to pass on these increased labor costs to our customers by increasing the prices of our products and services, our financial conditions and results of operations would be materially and adversely affected.

 

We may not be able to renew leases or control rent increases at our existing locations at reasonable terms.

 

We lease all real properties used by us, except our Hangzhou office, where we are allowed to use the office free of charge because of our cooperation relationship with China Academy of Art. We lease from Beijing Sino-U.S. Star International Film & Television Culture Media Co., Ltd. for our headquarters location, which is currently the location where we provide one-on-one consultancy services, as well as the location we intend to host our school in the near future.

 

The term of this lease is for four years, expiring May 31, 2022, and is renewable upon six months notice by the Company. However, there is no assurance that the lessor will agree to renew the lease at the level of rent or at a price that is acceptable to us. Similarly, leases for our Beijing Tongzhou District location and our Fuzhou location require us to re-negotiate in order to keep those leases, and the lease for our Ji’nan location does not set forth terms and provisions relating to renewal. Therefore, there is no assurance that the lessors of these locations will agree to sign new leases with us at the level of rent or at a price that is acceptable to us, if at all. There is also no assurance that China Academy of Art will continue to allow us to use their office free of charge. As a result, we may fail to reach agreements for rental prices or otherwise fail to continue to lease or use one or more of these properties. We may be forced to relocate the affected operations to a new location or pay substantially higher rent, which could involve substantial rent increases and material business interruptions.

 

In addition, we cannot assure you that the lessors or the owner of our offices have duly obtained the title certificates of the properties subject to our leases or otherwise have the right to lease the properties. If any of our leases or our rights to occupy and use were terminated as a result of challenges by third-parties or governmental authorities, we may be forced to relocate the affected operations and incur significant expenses. There is no assurance that we may find suitable replacement sites in a timely manner on terms acceptable to us.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, we are not aware of any actions, claims or investigations being contemplated by or pending before any governmental authorities with respect to our leased or occupied properties. We have not received any notice of claim from any third-party for our use of such leased or occupied properties. However, if any of these risks materializes, our business, financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected. See “Business—Facilities/Properties” for more information.

 

Accidents or injuries may occur at our properties, which could affect our reputation and student retention and enrollment.

 

We could be held liable for the accidents or injuries or other harm to students or other people at our locations, including those caused by or otherwise arising in connection with our facilities or employees. We could also face claims alleging that we were negligent, provided inadequate maintenance to our facilities or supervision to our employees and therefore should be held liable for accidents or injuries suffered by our students or other people at our schools. Our schools may be perceived to be unsafe, which may discourage prospective students from enrolling in our services. Although we maintain certain liability insurance, this insurance coverage may not be adequate to fully protect us from these kinds of claims. In addition, we may not be able to obtain liability insurance in the future at reasonable prices or at all. A liability claim against us or any of our employees could adversely affect our reputation and student enrollment and retention. Even if unsuccessful, such a claim could create unfavorable publicity, cause us to incur substantial expenses and divert the time and attention of our management.

 

We currently do not have any business insurance coverage.

 

Insurance companies in China currently do not offer as extensive an array of insurance products as insurance companies in more developed economies. Currently, we do not have any business liability or disruption insurance to cover our operations. We have determined that the costs of insuring for these risks and the difficulties associated with acquiring such insurance on commercially reasonable terms make it impractical for us to have such insurance. As a result, we do not have any liability, business interruption, litigation or property insurance coverage for our operations in China. Any uninsured business disruptions may result in our incurring substantial costs and the diversion of resources, which could have an adverse effect on our results of operations and financial condition.

 

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We face risks related to natural disasters, extreme weather conditions, health epidemics and other catastrophic incidents, which could significantly disrupt our operations.

 

In the past, China has experienced significant natural disasters, including earthquakes, extreme weather conditions, as well as health scares related to epidemics, and any similar event could materially impact our business in the future. If a disaster or other disruption were to occur in the future that affects the regions where we operate our business, our operations could be materially and adversely affected due to loss of personnel, damages to property and insufficient student enrollments. Even if we are not directly affected, such a disaster or disruption could affect the operations or financial condition of our ecosystem participants, which could harm our results of operations.

 

In addition, our business could be affected by public health epidemics. If any of our employees or if one or more of our students who receive our services in person (for example, those students enrolled in our one-on-one consulting services program) is suspected of having contracted a contagious disease, we may be required to apply quarantines or suspend our operations. Furthermore, any future outbreak may restrict economic activities in affected regions, resulting in reduced business volume, temporary closure of our offices or other disruptions of our business operations and adversely affect our results of operations.

 

Risks Related to Our Corporate Structure

 

The beneficial owners have substantial influence over our Company. Their interests may not be aligned with the interests of the Company and our other shareholders, and these beneficial owners, if voting as a group, could prevent or cause a change of control or other transactions that could be beneficial to our Company and other minority shareholders.

 

As of the date of this prospectus, although no single shareholder currently own more than 41.16% of our outstanding Ordinary Shares, our beneficial owners Ngai Ngai Lam, Choi Sio Peng, Yuk Sing Lai and Lin Ailian beneficially own an aggregate of 72.4276% of our outstanding Ordinary Shares. Upon completion of this Offering, our beneficial owners will beneficially own approximately 3,621,380 Ordinary Shares, or approximately 59% of our outstanding Ordinary Shares.

 

Accordingly, these beneficial owners could have significant influence in determining the outcome of any corporate transaction or other matter submitted to the shareholders for approval, including mergers, consolidations, the election of directors and other significant corporate actions. In cases where their interests are aligned and they vote together, these beneficial owners will also have the power to prevent or cause a change in control. Without the consent of some or all of these shareholders, we may be prevented from entering into transactions that could be beneficial to us or our minority shareholders. The interests of these beneficial owners may differ from the interests of our other shareholders. The concentration in the ownership of our Ordinary Shares may cause a material decline in the value of our Ordinary Shares. For more information regarding our beneficial owners and their affiliated entities, see “Principal Shareholders.”

 

In the event we are presented with business combination opportunities, we may be unable to complete such transactions efficiently or on favorable terms due to complicated merger and acquisition regulations and certain other PRC regulations

 

On August 8, 2006, six PRC regulatory authorities, including MOFCOM, the State Assets Supervision and Administration Commission, SAT, the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, CSRC and SAFE, jointly issued the Regulations on Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors (the “M&A Rules”), which became effective on September 8, 2006 and was amended in June 2009. The M&A Rules, governing the approval process by which foreign investors merge with PRC business entities or acquire PRC assets and/or equity interests in PRC business entities, require the PRC parties to make a series of applications and supplemental applications to PRC government authorities, depending on the structure of the transaction. In some instances, the application process may require presentation of economic data concerning a transaction, including appraisal of the target business and evaluation of the acquirer, which are designed to allow the government to assess the transaction. Accordingly, due to the M&A Rules, our ability to engage in cross-border business combination transactions has become significantly more complicated, time-consuming and expensive, and we may not be able to negotiate a transaction that is acceptable to our shareholders or sufficiently protect their interests in such transaction.

 

The M&A Rules allow PRC government agencies to assess the economic terms of a business combination transaction. Parties to a business combination transaction may have to submit to MOFCOM and other relevant government agencies an appraisal report, an evaluation report and the acquisition agreement, all of which form part of the application for approval, depending on the structure of the transaction. The M&A Rules also prohibit a transaction at an acquisition price obviously lower than the appraised value of the PRC business or assets in order to prevent disguised transfer of capital from China to foreign countries, and in certain structures, among others, in the structures where foreign investors merge with Chinese enterprises and establish foreign-invested enterprises, require that considerations must be paid within defined periods, generally not in excess of a year after the business license of the foreign-invested enterprise has been issued. In addition, the M&A Rules also limit our ability to negotiate various terms of the acquisition, including aspects of the initial consideration, contingent consideration, holdback provisions, indemnification provisions and provisions relating to the assumption and allocation of assets and liabilities. Transaction structures involving trusts, nominees and similar entities are prohibited. Moreover, the Anti-Monopoly Law of the People’s Republic of China, effective as of August 1, 2008, and relevant implementation rules require that the MOC be notified in advance of any of concentrations of undertaking if certain turnover thresholds are triggered. Besides, Notice of the General Office of the State Council on the Establishment of the Security Review System for Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Enterprises by Foreign Investors, issued on February 3, 2011 and became effective on March 3, 2011 establishes a security review system for merger and acquisition of domestic companies by foreign investors. These security review rules specify that mergers and acquisitions by foreign investors that raise “national defense and security” concerns and mergers and acquisitions through which foreign investors may acquire de facto control over domestic enterprises that raise “national security” concerns are subject to strict review by the MOC, and the rules prohibit any activities attempting to bypass a security review, including by structuring the transaction through a proxy or contractual control arrangement. Therefore, such regulation may impede our ability to negotiate and complete a business combination transaction on legal and/or financial terms that satisfy our investors and protect our shareholders’ economic interests. 

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You may face difficulties in protecting your interests, and your ability to protect your rights through U.S. courts may be limited, because we are incorporated under Cayman Islands law.

 

We are an exempted company incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands. Our corporate affairs are governed by our memorandum and articles of association, the Companies Law (2018 Revision) of the Cayman Islands and the common law of the Cayman Islands. The rights of shareholders to take action against our directors, actions by our minority shareholders and the fiduciary duties of our directors to us under Cayman Islands law are to a large extent governed by the common law of the Cayman Islands. The common law of the Cayman Islands is derived in part from comparatively limited judicial precedent in the Cayman Islands as well as from the common law of England, the decisions of whose courts are of persuasive authority, but are not binding, on a court in the Cayman Islands. The rights of our shareholders and the fiduciary duties of our directors under Cayman Islands law are not as clearly established as they would be under statutes or judicial precedent in some jurisdictions in the United States. In particular, the Cayman Islands have a less developed body of securities laws than the United States. Some U.S. states, such as Delaware, have more fully developed and judicially interpreted bodies of corporate law than the Cayman Islands. In addition, Cayman Islands companies may not have standing to initiate a shareholder derivative action in a federal court of the United States.

 

Shareholders of Cayman Islands exempted companies like us have no general rights under Cayman Islands law to inspect corporate records or to obtain copies of lists of shareholders of these companies. Our directors have discretion under our articles of association that will become effective immediately prior to completion of this offering to determine whether or not, and under what conditions, our corporate records may be inspected by our shareholders, but are not obliged to make them available to our shareholders. This may make it more difficult for you to obtain the information needed to establish any facts necessary for a shareholder motion or to solicit proxies from other shareholders in connection with a proxy contest.

 

As a result of all of the above, our public shareholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests in the face of actions taken by our management, members of the board of directors or controlling shareholders than they would as public shareholders of a company incorporated in the United States. For a discussion of significant differences between the provisions of the Companies Law of the Cayman Islands and the laws applicable to companies incorporated in the United States and their shareholders, see “Description of Securities to be Registered.”

 

You may be unable to present proposals before annual general meetings or extraordinary general meetings not called by shareholders.

 

Cayman Islands law provides shareholders with only limited rights to convene a general meeting, and does not provide shareholders with any right to put any proposal before a general meeting. However, these rights may be provided in a company’s articles of association. Our articles of association allow our shareholders holding shares representing in aggregate not less than one third of our voting share capital in issue, to convene a general meeting of our shareholders, in which case our directors are obliged to call such meeting. Advance notice of at least ten clear days is required for the convening of our general meetings. A quorum required for a meeting of shareholders consists of at least one shareholder present or by proxy, representing not less than one-third in nominal value of the total issued voting shares in the Company.

 

Recently introduced economic substance legislation of the Cayman Islands may impact the Company or its operations

 

The Cayman Islands, together with several other non-European Union jurisdictions, have recently introduced legislation aimed at addressing concerns raised by the Council of the European Union as to offshore structures engaged in certain activities which attract profits without real economic activity. Effective January 1, 2019, the International Tax Co-operation (Economic Substance) Law, 2018 (the “Substance Law”) and issued Regulations and Guidance Notes came into force in the Cayman Islands introducing certain economic substance requirements for “relevant entities” which are engaged in certain “relevant activities,” which in the case of exempted companies incorporated before January 1, 2019, will apply in respect of fiscal years commencing July 1, 2019, onwards. A “relevant entity” includes an exempted company incorporated in the Cayman Islands; however, it does not include an entity that is tax resident outside the Cayman Islands. Accordingly, for so long as the Company is a tax resident outside the Cayman Islands, it is not required to satisfy the economic substance test. Although it is presently anticipated that the Substance Law will have little material impact on the Company or its operations, as the legislation is new and remains subject to further clarification and interpretation it is not currently possible to ascertain the precise impact of these legislative changes on the Company.

 

Certain judgments obtained against us by our shareholders may not be enforceable.

 

We are a Cayman Islands company and substantially all of our assets are located outside of the United States. Substantially all of our current operations are conducted in the PRC. In addition, most of our current directors and officers are nationals and residents of countries other than the United States. Substantially all of the assets of these persons are located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult or impossible for you to bring an action against us or against these individuals in the United States in the event that you believe that your rights have been infringed under the U.S. federal securities laws or otherwise. Even if you are successful in bringing an action of this kind, the laws of the Cayman Islands and of the PRC may render you unable to enforce a judgment against our assets or the assets of our directors and officers. For more information regarding the relevant laws of the Cayman Islands and the PRC, see “Enforceability of Civil Liabilities.”

 

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Risks Related to Doing Business in China

 

Changes in China’s economic, political or social conditions or government policies could have a material adverse effect on our business and operations.

 

Substantially all of our assets and operations are located in the PRC. Accordingly, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects may be influenced to a significant degree by political, economic and social conditions in the PRC generally. The Chinese economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including the level of government involvement, development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange and allocation of resources. Although the Chinese government has implemented measures emphasizing the utilization of market forces for economic reform, the reduction of state ownership of productive assets, and the establishment of improved corporate governance in business enterprises, a substantial portion of productive assets in the PRC is still owned by the government. In addition, the Chinese government continues to play a significant role in regulating industry development by imposing industrial policies. The Chinese government also exercises significant control over the PRC’s economic growth through allocating resources, controlling payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies.

 

While the Chinese economy has experienced significant growth over past decades, growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy. Any adverse changes in economic conditions in the PRC, in the policies of the Chinese government or in the laws and regulations in the PRC could have a material adverse effect on the overall economic growth of the PRC. Such developments could adversely affect our business and operating results, lead to a reduction in demand for our services and adversely affect our competitive position. The Chinese government has implemented various measures to encourage economic growth and guide the allocation of resources. Some of these measures may benefit the overall Chinese economy, but may have a negative effect on us. For example, our financial condition and results of operations may be adversely affected by government control over capital investments or changes in tax regulations. In addition, in the past the Chinese government has implemented certain measures, including interest rate adjustment, to control the pace of economic growth. These measures may cause decreased economic activity in the PRC, which may adversely affect our business and operating results.

 

Uncertainties with respect to the PRC legal system could adversely affect us.

 

The PRC legal system is a civil law system based on written statutes. Unlike the common law system, prior court decisions under the civil law system may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value.

 

In 1979, the PRC government began to promulgate a comprehensive system of laws and regulations governing economic matters generally. The overall effect of legislation over the past three decades has significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in the PRC. However, the PRC has not developed a fully integrated legal system, and recently enacted laws and regulations may not sufficiently cover all aspects of economic activities in the PRC. In particular, the interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations involve uncertainties. Since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory provisions and contractual terms, it may be difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy. These uncertainties may affect our judgment on the relevance of legal requirements and our ability to enforce our contractual rights or tort claims. In addition, these regulatory uncertainties may be exploited through unmerited or frivolous legal actions or threats in attempts to extract payments or benefits from us.

 

Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules, some of which are not published on a timely basis or at all and may have a retroactive effect. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of any of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. In addition, any administrative and court proceedings in the PRC may be protracted, resulting in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention.

 

You may experience difficulties in effecting service of legal process, enforcing foreign judgments or bringing actions in China against us or our management named in the prospectus based on foreign laws.

 

We conduct substantially all of our operations in China, and substantially all of our assets are located in China. In addition, our CEO, Mr. Jianxin Zhang and our CFO, Mr. Wenhuai Zhuang reside within China for a significant portion of the time and are PRC nationals. As a result, it may be difficult for our shareholders to effect service of process upon us or those persons inside the PRC. In addition, the PRC does not have treaties providing for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments of courts with the Cayman Islands and many other countries and regions. Therefore, recognition and enforcement in the PRC of judgments of a court in any of these non-PRC jurisdictions in relation to any matter not subject to a binding arbitration provision may be difficult or impossible.

 

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We may rely on dividends and other distributions on equity paid by our PRC Subsidiary to fund any cash and financing requirements we may have, and any limitation on the ability of our PRC Subsidiary to make payments to us could have a material and adverse effect on our ability to conduct our business.

 

We rely principally on dividends and other distributions on equity from our PRC Subsidiary for our cash requirements, including for services of any debt we may incur.

 

Our PRC Subsidiary’s ability to distribute dividends is based upon its distributable earnings. Current PRC regulations permit our PRC Subsidiary to pay dividends to its respective shareholders only out of their accumulated profits, if any, determined in accordance with PRC accounting standards and regulations. In addition, our PRC Subsidiary is required to set aside at least 10% of its after-tax profits each year, if any, to fund a statutory reserve until such reserve reaches 50% of its registered capital. Our PRC Subsidiary, as a Foreign Invested Enterprise, or FIE, is also required to further set aside a portion of its after-tax profits to fund the employee welfare fund, although the amount to be set aside, if any, is determined at its discretion. These reserves are not distributable as cash dividends. If our PRC operating subsidiary incur debt on their own behalf in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay dividends or make other payments to us. Any limitation on the ability of our PRC Subsidiary to distribute dividends or other payments to their respective shareholders could materially and adversely limit our ability to grow, make investments or acquisitions that could be beneficial to our businesses, pay dividends or otherwise fund and conduct our business.

 

In addition, the Enterprise Income Tax Law and its implementation rules provide that a withholding tax rate of up to 10% will be applicable to dividends payable by Chinese companies to non-PRC-resident enterprises unless otherwise exempted or reduced according to treaties or arrangements between the PRC central government and governments of other countries or regions where the non-PRC resident enterprises are incorporated.

 

The custodians or authorized users of our controlling non-tangible assets, including chops and seals, may fail to fulfill their responsibilities, or misappropriate or misuse these assets.

 

Under the PRC law, legal documents for corporate transactions, including agreements and contracts are executed using the chop or seal of the signing entity or with the signature of a legal representative whose designation is registered and filed with relevant PRC industry and commerce authorities.

 

In order to secure the use of our chops and seals, we have established internal control procedures and rules for using these chops and seals. In any event that the chops and seals are intended to be used, the responsible personnel will submit the application through our office automation system and the application will be verified and approved by authorized employees in accordance with our internal control procedures and rules. In addition, in order to maintain the physical security of our chops, we generally have them stored in secured locations accessible only to authorized employees. Although we monitor such authorized employees, the procedures may not be sufficient to prevent all instances of abuse or negligence. There is a risk that our employees could abuse their authority, for example, by entering into a contract not approved by us or seeking to gain control of our PRC operating subsidiary. If any employee obtains, misuses or misappropriates our chops and seals or other controlling non-tangible assets for whatever reason, we could experience disruption to our normal business operations. We may have to take significant corporate or legal actions, which could involve significant time and resources to resolve and divert management from our operations.

 

PRC regulation of loans to and direct investment in PRC entities by offshore holding companies and governmental control of currency conversion may delay us from using the proceeds of this offering to make loans or additional capital contributions to our PRC Subsidiary, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

 

Any funds we transfer to our PRC Subsidiary, either as a shareholder loan or as an increase in registered capital, are subject to approval by or registration with relevant governmental authorities in China. According to the relevant PRC regulations on foreign-invested enterprises, or FIEs, in China, capital contributions to our PRC Subsidiary are subject to the approval of or filing with the Ministry of Commerce, or MOFCOM or its local branches and registration with a local bank authorized by the State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE. In addition, (i) any foreign loan procured by our PRC Subsidiary is required to be registered with SAFE or its local branches and (ii) our PRC Subsidiary may not procure foreign loans which exceed the difference between its total investment amount and registered capital, or twice of the amount of the PRC Subsidiary’s net assets, whichever is larger. As of March 31, 2019, such maximum amount of foreign loans that our PRC Subsidiary is allowed to procure is RMB 79,324,680.30 (approximately $11,482,518). For more information on restrictions and limitations on the amount of loans, please see “Regulations—Regulations on loans to and direct investment in the PRC entities by offshore holding companies”. Any medium or long-term loan to be provided by us to our PRC operating entity, i.e., China Liberal Beijing, must be registered with the NDRC and the SAFE or its local branches. We may not be able to complete such registrations on a timely basis, with respect to future capital contributions or foreign loans by us to our PRC Subsidiary. If we fail to complete such registrations, our ability to use the proceeds of this offering and to capitalize our PRC operations may be negatively affected, which could adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.

 

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On March 30, 2015, the SAFE promulgated the Circular on Reforming the Management Approach Regarding the Foreign Exchange Capital Settlement of Foreign-Invested Enterprises, or SAFE Circular 19, which took effect as of June 1, 2015. SAFE Circular 19 launched a nationwide reform of the administration of the settlement of the foreign exchange capitals of FIEs and allows FIEs to settle their foreign exchange capital at their discretion, but continues to prohibit FIEs from using the Renminbi fund converted from their foreign exchange capital for expenditure beyond their business scopes, providing entrusted loans or repaying loans between nonfinancial enterprises. The SAFE issued the Circular on Reforming and Regulating Policies on the Control over Foreign Exchange Settlement of Capital Accounts, or SAFE Circular 16, effective in June 2016. Pursuant to SAFE Circular 16, enterprises registered in China may also convert their foreign debts from foreign currency to Renminbi on a self-discretionary basis. SAFE Circular 16 provides an integrated standard for conversion of foreign exchange under capital account items (including but not limited to foreign currency capital and foreign debts) on a self-discretionary basis which applies to all enterprises registered in China. SAFE Circular 16 reiterates the principle that Renminbi converted from foreign currency-denominated capital of a company may not be directly or indirectly used for purposes beyond its business scope or prohibited by PRC laws or regulations, while such converted Renminbi shall not be provided as loans to its non-affiliated entities. As this circular is relatively new, there remains uncertainty as to its interpretation and application and any other future foreign exchange related rules. Violations of these Circulars could result in severe monetary or other penalties. SAFE Circular 19 and SAFE Circular 16 may significantly limit our ability to use Renminbi converted from the net proceeds of this offering to fund our PRC operating subsidiary, to invest in or acquire any other PRC companies through our PRC Subsidiary, which may adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Fluctuations in exchange rates could have a material and adverse effect on our results of operations and the value of your investment.

 

The value of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar and other currencies is affected by, among other things, changes in China’s political and economic conditions and China’s foreign exchange policies. The conversion of Renminbi into foreign currencies, including U.S. dollars, has been based on exchange rates set by the People’s Bank of China. On July 21, 2005, the PRC government changed its decade-old policy of pegging the value of the Renminbi solely to the U.S. dollar, and the Renminbi appreciated more than 20% against the U.S. dollar over the following three years. Between July 2008 and June 2010, however, this appreciation halted and the Renminbi was traded within a narrow range against the U.S. dollar. Between July 2010 and November 2015, the Renminbi fluctuated against the U.S. dollar, at times significantly and unpredictably. On November 30, 2015, the Executive Board of IMF completed the regular five-year review of the basket of currencies that make up the Special Drawing Right, or the SDR, and decided that effective October 1, 2016, Renminbi is determined to be a freely usable currency and will be included in the SDR basket as a fifth currency, along with the U.S. dollar, the Euro, the Japanese yen and the British pound. In the fourth quarter of 2016, the Renminbi depreciated significantly in the backdrop of a surging U.S. dollar and persistent capital outflows from China. This depreciation halted in 2017, and the RMB appreciated approximately 7% against the U.S. dollar during this one-year period. Since February 2018, the RMB has depreciated significantly, over 8% against the U.S. dollar. With the development of the foreign exchange market and progress towards interest rate liberalization and Renminbi internationalization, the PRC government may announce further changes to the exchange rate system in the future, and we cannot assure you that the Renminbi will not appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the future. It is difficult to predict how market forces, PRC or U.S. government policies may impact the exchange rate between the Renminbi and the U.S. dollar in the future.

 

Significant revaluation of the Renminbi may have a material and adverse effect on your investment. For example, to the extent that we need to convert U.S. dollars we receive from this offering into Renminbi for our operations, appreciation of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar would have an adverse effect on the Renminbi amount we would receive from the conversion. Conversely, if we decide to convert our Renminbi into U.S. dollars for the purpose of making payments for dividends on our ordinary shares or for other business purposes, appreciation of the U.S. dollar against the Renminbi would have a negative effect on the U.S. dollar amount available to us. The net proceeds from this offering will be denominated in U.S. dollars. Fluctuations in exchange rates, primarily those involving the U.S. dollar, may affect the relative purchasing power of these proceeds. In addition, appreciation or depreciation in the value of the Renminbi relative to the U.S. dollar would affect our financial results reported in U.S. dollar terms without giving effect to any underlying change in our business or results of operations. Fluctuations in the exchange rate will also affect the relative value of earnings from and the value of any U.S. dollar-denominated investments we make in the future.

 

Very limited hedging options are available in China to reduce our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. To date, we have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk. While we may decide to enter into hedging transactions in the future, the availability and effectiveness of these hedges may be limited and we may not be able to adequately hedge our exposure, if at all. In addition, our currency exchange losses may be magnified by PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert Renminbi into foreign currencies. As a result, fluctuations in exchange rates may have a material adverse effect on your investment.

 

If we are classified as a PRC resident enterprise for PRC enterprise income tax purposes, such classification could result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC shareholders.

 

Under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law and its implementation rules, an enterprise established outside of the PRC with its “de facto management body” within the PRC is considered a “resident enterprise” and will be subject to the enterprise income tax on its global income at the rate of 25%. The implementation rules define the term “de facto management body” as the body that exercises full and substantial control and overall management over the business, productions, personnel, accounts and properties of an enterprise. In 2009, the State Administration of Taxation, or SAT, issued a circular, known as SAT Circular 82, which provides certain specific criteria for determining whether the “de facto management body” of a PRC-controlled enterprise that is incorporated offshore is located in China. Although this circular only applies to offshore enterprises controlled by PRC enterprises or PRC enterprise groups, not those controlled by PRC individuals or foreigners, the criteria set forth in the circular may reflect the SAT’s general position on how the “de facto management body” text should be applied in determining the tax resident status of all offshore enterprises. According to SAT Circular 82, an offshore incorporated enterprise controlled by a PRC enterprise or a PRC enterprise group will be regarded as a PRC tax resident by virtue of having its “de facto management body” in China, and will be subject to PRC enterprise income tax on its global income only if all of the following conditions are met: (i) the primary location of the day-to-day operational management is in the PRC; (ii) decisions relating to the enterprise’s financial and human resource matters are made or are subject to approval by organizations or personnel in the PRC; (iii) the enterprise’s primary assets, accounting books and records, company seals, and board and shareholder resolutions are located or maintained in the PRC; and (iv) at least 50% of voting board members or senior executives habitually reside in the PRC. 

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We believe our company is not a PRC resident enterprise for PRC tax purposes. However, the tax resident status of an enterprise is subject to determination by the PRC tax authorities and uncertainties remain with respect to the interpretation of the term “de facto management body.” If the PRC tax authorities determine that our company is a PRC resident enterprise for enterprise income tax purposes, we will be subject to PRC enterprise income on our worldwide income at the rate of 25%. Furthermore, we be required to withhold a 10% withholding tax from dividends we pay to our shareholders that are non-resident enterprises. In addition, non-resident enterprise shareholders may be subject to PRC tax on gains realized on the sale or other disposition of ordinary shares, if such income is treated as sourced from within the PRC. Furthermore, if we are deemed a PRC resident enterprise, dividends paid to our non-PRC individual shareholders and any gain realized on the transfer of or ordinary shares by such shareholders may be subject to PRC tax at a rate of 20% (which, in the case of dividends, may be withheld at source by us). These rates may be reduced by an applicable tax treaty, but it is unclear whether non-PRC shareholders of our company would be able to claim the benefits of any tax treaties between their country of tax residence and the PRC in the event that we are treated as a PRC resident enterprise. Any such tax may reduce the returns on your investment in the ordinary shares.

 

There are significant uncertainties under the EIT Law relating to the withholding tax liabilities of our PRC Subsidiary, and dividends payable by our PRC Subsidiary to our offshore subsidiaries may not qualify to enjoy certain treaty benefits.

 

Under the PRC EIT Law and its implementation rules, the profits of a foreign invested enterprise generated through operations, which are distributed to its immediate holding company outside the PRC, will be subject to a withholding tax rate of 10%. Pursuant to a special arrangement between Hong Kong and the PRC, this rate may be reduced to 5% if a Hong Kong resident enterprise owns more than 25% of the equity interest in the PRC company. Our PRC Subsidiary is wholly-owned by our Hong Kong subsidiary. Moreover, under the Notice of the State Administration of Taxation on Issues regarding the Administration of the Dividend Provision in Tax Treaties promulgated on February 20, 2009, the tax payer needs to satisfy certain conditions to enjoy the benefits under a tax treaty. The beneficial owner of the relevant dividends and the corporate shareholder to receive dividends from the PRC Subsidiary must have continuously met the direct ownership thresholds during the 12 consecutive months preceding the receipt of the dividends. Further, the State Administration of Taxation promulgated the Notice on How to Understand and Recognize the “Beneficial Owner” in Tax Treaties on October 27, 2009, which limits the “beneficial owner” to individuals, projects or other organizations normally engaged in substantive operations, and sets forth certain detailed factors in determining the “beneficial owner” status. In current practice, a Hong Kong enterprise must obtain a tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority to apply for the 5% lower PRC withholding tax rate. As the Hong Kong tax authority will issue such a tax resident certificate on a case-by-case basis, we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain the tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not commenced the application process for a Hong Kong tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority, and there is no assurance that we will be granted such a Hong Kong tax resident certificate.

 

Even after we obtain the Hong Kong tax resident certificate, we are required by applicable tax laws and regulations to file the required forms and materials with the relevant PRC tax authorities to prove that we can enjoy 5% lower PRC withholding tax rate. Boya Hong Kong intends to obtain the required materials and file with the relevant tax authorities when it plans to declare and pay dividends, but there is no assurance that the PRC tax authorities will approve the 5% withholding tax rate on dividends received from Boya Hong Kong.

 

We face uncertainty with respect to indirect transfers of equity interests in PRC resident enterprise by its non-PRC holding companies.

 

On February 3, 2015, the SAT issued the Public Notice Regarding Certain Corporate Income Tax Matters on Indirect Transfer of Properties by Non-Tax Resident Enterprises, or SAT Bulletin 7. SAT Bulletin 7 extends its tax jurisdiction to transactions involving the transfer of taxable assets through offshore transfer of a foreign intermediate holding company. In addition, SAT Bulletin 7 has introduced safe harbors for internal group restructurings and the purchase and sale of equity through a public securities market. SAT Bulletin 7 also brings challenges to both foreign transferor and transferee (or other person who is obligated to pay for the transfer) of taxable assets.

 

On October 17, 2017, the SAT issued the Announcement of the State Administration of Taxation on Issues Concerning the Withholding of Non-resident Enterprise Income Tax at Source, or SAT Bulletin 37, which came into effect on December 1, 2017. The SAT Bulletin 37 further clarifies the practice and procedure of the withholding of non-resident enterprise income tax.

 

Where a non-resident enterprise transfers taxable assets indirectly by disposing of the equity interests of an overseas holding company, which is an Indirect Transfer, the non-resident enterprise as either transferor or transferee, or the PRC entity that directly owns the taxable assets, may report such Indirect Transfer to the relevant tax authority. Using a “substance over form” principle, the PRC tax authority may disregard the existence of the overseas holding company if it lacks a reasonable commercial purpose and was established for the purpose of reducing, avoiding or deferring PRC tax. As a result, gains derived from such Indirect Transfer may be subject to PRC enterprise income tax, and the transferee or other person who is obligated to pay for the transfer is obligated to withhold the applicable taxes, currently at a rate of 10% for the transfer of equity interests in a PRC resident enterprise. Both the transferor and the transferee may be subject to penalties under PRC tax laws if the transferee fails to withhold the taxes and the transferor fails to pay the taxes.

 

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We face uncertainties as to the reporting and other implications of certain past and future transactions where PRC taxable assets are involved, such as offshore restructuring, sale of the shares in our offshore subsidiaries and investments. Our company may be subject to filing obligations or taxed if our company is a transferor in such transactions, and may be subject to withholding obligations if our company is a transferee in such transactions, under SAT Bulletin 7 and/or SAT Bulletin 37. For transfer of shares in our company by investors who are non-PRC resident enterprises, our PRC Subsidiary may be requested to assist in the filing under SAT Bulletin 7 and/or SAT Bulletin 37. As a result, we may be required to expend valuable resources to comply with SAT Bulletin 7 and/or SAT Bulletin 37 or to request the relevant transferors from whom we purchase taxable assets to comply with these circulars, or to establish that our company should not be taxed under these circulars, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

Regulation and censorship of information disseminated over the internet in China may adversely affect our business and reputation and subject us to liability for information displayed on our website.

 

The PRC government has adopted regulations governing internet access and the distribution of news and other information over the internet. Under these regulations, internet content providers and internet publishers are prohibited from posting or displaying over the internet content that, among other things, violates PRC laws and regulations, impairs the national dignity of China, or is reactionary, obscene, superstitious, fraudulent or defamatory. Failure to comply with these requirements may result in the revocation of licenses to provide internet content and other licenses, and the closure of the concerned websites. The website operator may also be held liable for such censored information displayed on or linked to the websites. If our website is found to be in violation of any such requirements, we may be penalized by relevant authorities, and our operations or reputation could be adversely affected.

 

Risks Related to this Offering and the Trading Market

 

An active trading market for our Ordinary Shares may not develop and the trading price for our Ordinary Shares may fluctuate significantly.

 

We have applied to list our Ordinary Shares on the Nasdaq Capital Market. Prior to the completion of this offering, there has been no public market for our Ordinary Shares, and we cannot assure you that a liquid public market for our Ordinary Shares will develop. If an active public market for our Ordinary Shares does not develop following the completion of this offering, the market price and liquidity of our Ordinary Shares may be materially and adversely affected. The initial public offering price for our Ordinary Shares will be determined by us and the Underwriter based upon several factors, and we can provide no assurance that the trading price of our Ordinary Shares after this offering will not decline below the initial public offering price. As a result, investors in our securities may experience a significant decrease in the value of their holding of our Ordinary Shares.

 

The trading price of our Ordinary Shares is likely to be volatile, which could result in substantial losses to investors.

 

The trading price of our Ordinary Shares is likely to be volatile and could fluctuate widely due to factors beyond our control. This may happen because of broad market and industry factors, including the performance and fluctuation of the market prices of other companies with business operations located mainly in China that have listed their securities in the United States. In addition to market and industry factors, the price and trading volume for our Ordinary Shares may be highly volatile for factors specific to our own operations and our industry, including the following:

 

variations in our revenues, earnings and cash flows;
announcements of new investments, acquisitions, strategic partnerships or joint ventures by us or our competitors;
announcements of new offerings, solutions and expansions by us or our competitors;
changes in financial estimates by securities analysts;
detrimental adverse publicity about us, our services or our industry;
announcements of new regulations, rules or policies relevant for our business;
additions or departures of key personnel;
release of lockup or other transfer restrictions on our outstanding equity securities or sales of additional equity securities; and
potential litigation or regulatory investigations.

 

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Any of these factors may result in large and sudden changes in the volume and price at which our Ordinary Shares will trade.

 

In the past, shareholders of public companies have often brought securities class action suits against those companies following periods of instability in the market price of their securities. If we were to be involved in a class action suit, it could divert a significant amount of our management’s attention and other resources from our business and operations and require us to incur significant expenses to defend the suit, which could harm our results of operations. Any such class action suit, whether or not successful, could harm our reputation and restrict our ability to raise capital in the future. In addition, if a claim is successfully made against us, we may be required to pay significant damages, which could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

 

The initial public offering price for our Ordinary Shares may not be indicative of prices that will prevail in the trading market and such market prices may be volatile.

 

The initial public offering price for our Ordinary Shares has been determined by negotiations between us and the underwriter, and does not bear any relationship to our earnings, book value or any other indicia of value. We cannot assure you that the market price of our Ordinary Shares will not decline significantly below the initial public offering price. The financial markets in the United States and other countries have experienced significant price and volume fluctuations in the last few years. Volatility in the price of our Ordinary Shares may be caused by factors outside of our control and may be unrelated or disproportionate to changes in our results of operations.

 

Because our initial public offering price is substantially higher than our net tangible book value per share, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution.

 

If you purchase our Ordinary Shares in this offering, you will pay more for your Ordinary Shares than the amount paid by our existing shareholders for their ordinary shares per share. As a result, you will experience immediate and substantial dilution of approximately $4.30 per Ordinary Share, representing the difference between the assumed initial public offering price of $6.00 per share and our net tangible book value per share as of December 31, 2018, after giving effect to the net proceeds to us from this offering. See “Dilution” for a more complete description of how the value of your investment in our Ordinary Shares will be diluted upon the completion of this offering.

 

The offering price of the primary offering and resale offering could differ.

 

The offering price of our Ordinary Shares in the initial public offering has been determined by negotiations between the Company and the underwriter. The offering price in the initial public bears no relationship to our assets, earnings or book value, or any other objective standard of value. The selling shareholder may sell the resale shares at prevailing market prices or privately negotiated prices after close of the offering and listing of the Ordinary Shares on NASDAQ. Therefore, the offering prices of the initial public and resale offering could differ. As a result, the purchasers in the resale offering could pay more or less than the offering price in the primary offering.

   

The Resale by the Selling Shareholder may cause the market price of our Ordinary Shares to decline.

 

The resale of Ordinary Shares by the selling shareholder, as well as the issuance of Ordinary Shares in this Offering could result in resales of our Ordinary Shares by our current shareholders concerned about the potential dilution of their holdings. In addition, the resale by the selling shareholder after expiration of the lock-up period could have the effect of depressing the market price for our Ordinary Shares.

 

If securities or industry analysts do not publish research or reports about our business, or if they adversely change their recommendations regarding the Ordinary Shares, the market price for the Ordinary Shares and trading volume could decline.

 

The trading market for our Ordinary Shares will be influenced by research or reports that industry or securities analysts publish about our business. If industry or securities analysts decide to cover us and in the future downgrade our Ordinary Shares, the market price for our Ordinary Shares would likely decline. If one or more of these analysts cease to cover us or fail to regularly publish reports on us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which in turn could cause the market price or trading volume for our Ordinary Shares to decline.

 

The sale or availability for sale of substantial amounts of our Ordinary Shares could adversely affect their market price.

 

Sales of substantial amounts of our Ordinary Shares in the public market after the completion of this offering, or the perception that these sales could occur, could adversely affect the market price of our Ordinary Shares and could materially impair our ability to raise capital through equity offerings in the future. The Ordinary Shares sold in this offering will be freely tradable without restriction or further registration under the Securities Act, and shares held by our existing shareholders may also be sold in the public market in the future subject to the restrictions in Rule 144 under the Securities Act and the applicable lockup agreements. There will be 6,166,667 ordinary shares outstanding immediately after this offering. In connection with this offering, we, our directors, executive officers and existing shareholders have agreed, subject to certain exceptions, not to sell any Ordinary Shares for six months to one year after the date of this prospectus without the prior written consent of the Underwriter. We cannot predict what effect, if any, market sales of securities held by our significant shareholders or any other shareholder or the availability of these securities for future sale will have on the market price of our Ordinary Shares. See “Underwriting” and “Shares Eligible for Future Sale” for a more detailed description of the restrictions on selling our securities after this offering.

 

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Techniques employed by short sellers may drive down the market price of our Ordinary Shares.

 

Short selling is the practice of selling securities that the seller does not own but rather has borrowed from a third party with the intention of buying identical securities back at a later date to return to the lender. The short seller hopes to profit from a decline in the value of the securities between the sale of the borrowed securities and the purchase of the replacement shares, as the short seller expects to pay less in that purchase than it received in the sale. As it is in the short seller’s interest for the price of the security to decline, many short sellers publish, or arrange for the publication of, negative opinions regarding the relevant issuer and its business prospects in order to create negative market momentum and generate profits for themselves after selling a security short. These short attacks have, in the past, led to selling of shares in the market.

 

Public companies that have substantially all of their operations in the PRC have been the subject of short selling. Much of the scrutiny and negative publicity has centered on allegations of a lack of effective internal control over financial reporting resulting in financial and accounting irregularities and mistakes, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud. As a result, many of these companies are now conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations and, in the interim, are subject to shareholder lawsuits and/or SEC enforcement actions.

 

It is not clear what effect such negative publicity could have on us. If we were to become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we could have to expend a significant amount of resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend ourselves. While we would strongly defend against any such short seller attacks, we may be constrained in the manner in which we can proceed against the relevant short seller by principles of freedom of speech, applicable law or issues of commercial confidentiality. Such a situation could be costly and time-consuming, and could distract our management from growing our business. Even if such allegations are ultimately proven to be groundless, allegations against us could severely impact our business operations, and any investment in our Ordinary Shares could be greatly reduced or even rendered worthless.

 

Because we do not expect to pay dividends in the foreseeable future after this offering, you must rely on a price appreciation of our Ordinary Shares for a return on your investment.

 

We currently intend to retain most, if not all, of our available funds and any future earnings after this offering to fund the development and growth of our business. As a result, we do not expect to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. Therefore, you should not rely on an investment in our Ordinary Shares as a source for any future dividend income.

 

Our Board of Directors has complete discretion as to whether to distribute dividends, subject to certain requirements of Cayman Islands law. In addition, our shareholders may by ordinary resolution declare a dividend, but no dividend may exceed the amount recommended by our directors. Under Cayman Islands law, a Cayman Islands company may pay a dividend out of either profit or share premium account, provided that in no circumstances may a dividend be paid if this would result in the company being unable to pay its debts as they fall due in the ordinary course of business. Even if our Board of Directors decides to declare and pay dividends, the timing, amount and form of future dividends, if any, will depend on our future results of operations and cash flow, our capital requirements and surplus, the amount of distributions, if any, received by us from our subsidiaries, our financial condition, contractual restrictions and other factors deemed relevant by our Board of Directors. Accordingly, the return on your investment in our Ordinary Shares will likely depend entirely upon any future price appreciation of our Ordinary Shares. There is no guarantee that our Ordinary Shares will appreciate in value after this offering or even maintain the price at which you purchased our Ordinary Shares. You may not realize a return on your investment in our Ordinary Shares and you may even lose your entire investment in our Ordinary Shares.

 

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We are an emerging growth company within the meaning of the Securities Act and may take advantage of certain reduced reporting requirements.

 

We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, and we may take advantage of certain exemptions from requirements applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies, including, most significantly, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 for so long as we remain an emerging growth company. As a result, if we elect not to comply with such auditor attestation requirements, our investors may not have access to certain information they may deem important.

 

We are a foreign private issuer within the meaning of the rules under the Exchange Act, and as such we are exempt from certain provisions applicable to U.S. domestic public companies.

 

Because we qualify as a foreign private issuer under the Exchange Act, we are exempt from certain provisions of the securities rules and regulations in the United States that are applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, including:

 

the rules under the Exchange Act requiring the filing with the SEC of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q or current reports on Form 8-K;
the sections of the Exchange Act regulating the solicitation of proxies, consents or authorizations in respect of a security registered under the Exchange Act;
the sections of the Exchange Act requiring insiders to file public reports of their stock ownership and trading activities and liability for insiders who profit from trades made in a short period of time; and
the selective disclosure rules by issuers of material nonpublic information under Regulation FD.

 

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We will be required to file an annual report on Form 20-F within four months of the end of each fiscal year. In addition, we intend to publish our results on a quarterly basis as press releases, distributed pursuant to the rules and regulations of NASDAQ. Press releases relating to financial results and material events will also be furnished to the SEC on Form 6-K. However, the information we are required to file with or furnish to the SEC will be less extensive and less timely compared to that required to be filed with the SEC by U.S. domestic issuers. As a result, you may not be afforded the same protections or information that would be made available to you were you investing in a U.S. domestic issuer.

 

Because we are a foreign private issuer and are exempt from certain Nasdaq corporate governance standards applicable to U.S. issuers, you will have less protection than you would have if we were a domestic issuer.

 

Nasdaq Listing Rules require listed companies to have, among other things, a majority of its board members be independent. As a foreign private issuer, however, we are permitted to, and we may, follow home country practice in lieu of the above requirements, or we may choose to comply with the Nasdaq requirement within one year of listing. The corporate governance practice in our home country, the Cayman Islands, does not require a majority of our board to consist of independent directors. Since a majority of our board of directors will not consist of independent directors, fewer board members will be exercising independent judgment and the level of board oversight on the management of our company may decrease as a result. In addition, the Nasdaq listing rules also require U.S. domestic issuers to have a compensation committee, a nominating/corporate governance committee composed entirely of independent directors, and an audit committee with a minimum of three members. We, as a foreign private issuer, are not subject to these requirements. The Nasdaq listing rules may require shareholder approval for certain corporate matters, such as requiring that shareholders be given the opportunity to vote on all equity compensation plans and material revisions to those plans, certain ordinary share issuances. We intend to comply with the requirements of Nasdaq Listing Rules in determining whether shareholder approval is required on such matters and to appoint a nominating and corporate governance committee. However, we may consider following home country practice in lieu of the requirements under Nasdaq listing rules with respect to certain corporate governance standards which may afford less protection to investors.

 

If we are classified as a passive foreign investment company, United States taxpayers who own our Ordinary Shares may have adverse United States federal income tax consequences.

 

A non-U.S. corporation such as ourselves will be classified as a passive foreign investment company, which is known as a PFIC, for any taxable year if, for such year, either

 

  At least 75% of our gross income for the year is passive income; or
  The average percentage of our assets (determined at the end of each quarter) during the taxable year which produce passive income or which are held for the production of passive income is at least 50%.

 

Passive income generally includes dividends, interest, rents and royalties (other than rents or royalties derived from the active conduct of a trade or business) and gains from the disposition of passive assets.

 

If we are determined to be a PFIC for any taxable year (or portion thereof) that is included in the holding period of a U.S. taxpayer who holds our Ordinary Shares, the U.S. taxpayer may be subject to increased U.S. federal income tax liability and may be subject to additional reporting requirements.

 

Depending on the amount of cash we raise in this offering, together with any other assets held for the production of passive income, it is possible that, for our 2018 taxable year or for any subsequent year, more than 50% of our assets may be assets which produce passive income, In which case we would be deemed a PFIC, which could have adverse US federal income tax consequences for US taxpayers who are shareholders. We will make this determination following the end of any particular tax year.

 

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ENFORCEABILITY OF CIVIL LIABILITIES

 

We are incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands as an exempted company with limited liability. We are incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands because of certain benefits associated with being a Cayman Islands corporation, such as political and economic stability, an effective judicial system, a favorable tax system, the absence of foreign exchange control or currency restrictions and the availability of professional and support services. However, the Cayman Islands has a less developed body of securities laws as compared to the United States and provides significantly less protection for investors than the United States.

 

Substantially all of our assets are located in the PRC. In addition, a majority of our directors and officers are nationals or residents of the PRC and all or a substantial portion of their assets are located outside the United States. As a result, it may be difficult for investors to effect service of process within the United States upon us or these persons, or to enforce against us or them judgments obtained in United States courts, including judgments predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States.

 

We have appointed Hunter Taubman Fischer & Li LLC as our agent to receive service of process with respect to any action brought against us in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York under the federal securities laws of the United States or of any state in the United States or any action brought against us in the Supreme Court of the State of New York in the County of New York under the securities laws of the State of New York.

 

Campbells, our counsel to the laws of Cayman Islands, and Tian Yuan Law Firm, our counsel to PRC law, have advised us that there is uncertainty as to whether the courts of the Cayman Islands or the PRC would (i) recognize or enforce judgments of United States courts obtained against us or our directors or officers predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States or (ii) entertain original actions brought in the Cayman Islands or the PRC against us or our directors or officers predicated upon the securities laws of the United States or any state in the United States.

 

Campbells has further advised us that the United States and the Cayman Islands do not have a treaty providing for reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments of courts of the United States in civil and commercial matters and that a final judgment for the payment of money rendered by any general or state court in the United States based on civil liability, whether or not predicated solely upon the U.S. federal securities laws, may not be recognized and enforceable in the Cayman Islands on the grounds that such provisions are penal in nature. Although there is no statutory enforcement in the Cayman Islands of judgments obtained in the United States, courts of the Cayman Islands will recognize and enforce a foreign judgment of a court of competent jurisdiction if such judgment is final, for a liquidated sum, provided it is not in respect of taxes or a fine or penalty, is not inconsistent with a Cayman Islands’ judgment in respect of the same matters, and was not obtained in a manner which is contrary to the public policy of the Cayman Islands. In addition, a Cayman Islands court may stay proceedings if concurrent proceedings are being brought elsewhere.

 

Tian Yuan Law Firm has further advised us that the recognition and enforcement of foreign judgments are provided for under the PRC Civil Procedure Law. PRC courts may recognize and enforce foreign judgments in accordance with the requirements of the PRC Civil Procedure Law based either on treaties between China and the country where the judgment is made or on reciprocity between jurisdictions. Tian Yuan Law Firm has advised us further that there are no treaties between China and the United States for the mutual recognition and enforcement of court judgments, thus making the recognition and enforcement of a U.S. court judgment in China difficult.

 

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USE OF PROCEEDS

 

We estimate that we will receive net proceeds from this offering, after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and the estimated offering expenses payable by us and based upon an assumed initial public offering price of US$6.00 per Ordinary Share, of approximately $7,000,000. If the underwriter exercises its over-allotment option in full, we estimate that the net proceeds to us from this offering will be approximately $5,500,000, after deducting the underwriting discounts and estimated offering expenses payable by us.

 

   Use of
Proceeds
Cash Flow for Smart Campus Solutions  US$ 1,000,000
Research and Development  US$   1,500,000
Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education  US$  1,500,000
Establishment of Big Data Calculation Training School, As Support to Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education  US$   1,500,000

  

The foregoing represents our current intentions based upon our present plans and business conditions to use and allocate the net proceeds of this Offering. Our management, however, will have significant flexibility and discretion to apply the net proceeds of this Offering. If an unforeseen event occurs or business conditions change, we may use the proceeds of this Offering differently than as described in this prospectus. To the extent that the net proceeds we receive from this Offering are not immediately used for the above purposes, we intend to invest our net proceeds in short-term, interest-bearing bank deposits or debt instruments.

 

As an offshore holding company, we are permitted under PRC laws and regulations to provide funding to our PRC Subsidiary through loans or capital contributions, subject to applicable regulatory approvals. We currently cannot make loans or capital contributions to our PRC Subsidiary without first obtaining regulatory approvals, registration or filings, i.e., making a filing with the local branch of the MOFCOM, and registering with the local branch of the State Administration for Market Regulation, or SAMR, and the approval of and registration with a local bank authorized by the SAFE. The maximum amount of loans that our PRC Subsidiary is allowed to procure as of March 31, 2019 is RMB 79,324,680.30 (approximately $11,482,518), which is higher than the maximum amount that we expect to raise from this Offering. However, there is no such restriction on capital contributions. Although to the best of our knowledge there is no material regulatory obstacles for us to obtain such approvals, registration or filings, we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain these approvals, registration or filings in a timely manner. See “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Doing Business in China—PRC regulation of loans to and direct investment in PRC entities by offshore holding companies and governmental control of currency conversion may delay us from using the proceeds of this offering to make loans or additional capital contributions to our PRC Subsidiary, which could materially and adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to fund and expand our business.”

 

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DETERMINATION OF OFFERING PRICE

 

The offering price of the shares has been determined arbitrarily by us and the Underwriter. The price does not bear any relationship to our assets, book value, earnings, or other established criteria for valuing a privately held company. In determining the number of shares to be offered and the offering price, we took into consideration our cash on hand and the amount of money we would need to implement our business plan, as well as the most recent selling price of shares of our Ordinary Shares in private placements, if any. Accordingly, the offering price should not be considered an indication of the actual value of the securities.

 

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DIVIDEND POLICY

 

We intend to keep any future earnings to finance the expansion of our business, and we do not anticipate that any cash dividends will be paid in the foreseeable future.

 

Under Cayman Islands law, a Cayman Islands company may pay a dividend on its shares out of either profit or share premium amount, provided that in no circumstances may a dividend be paid if this would result in the company being unable to pay its debts due in the ordinary course of business.

 

If we determine to pay dividends on any of our Ordinary Shares in the future, as a holding company, we will be dependent on receipt of funds from our BVI subsidiary, Yi Xin International Investment Limited.

 

Current PRC regulations permit our PRC Subsidiary to pay dividends to Boya Hong Kong from the revenues from the operations of our PRC operating entity, China Liberal Beijing, if any, determined in accordance with Chinese accounting standards and regulations. In addition, China Liberal Beijing is required to set aside at least 10% of its after-tax profits each year, if any, to fund a statutory reserve until such reserve reaches 50% of its registered capital. China Liberal Beijing is also required to further set aside a portion of its after-tax profits to fund the employee welfare fund, although the amount to be set aside, if any, is determined at the discretion of its board of directors. Although the statutory reserves can be used, among other ways, to increase the registered capital and eliminate future losses in excess of retained earnings of the respective companies, the reserve funds are not distributable as cash dividends except in the event of liquidation.

 

The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of RMB into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC. Therefore, we may experience difficulties in completing the administrative procedures necessary to obtain and remit foreign currency for the payment of dividends from our profits, if any. Furthermore, if our subsidiaries and affiliates in the PRC incur debt on their own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay dividends or make other payments. If we or our subsidiaries are unable to receive all of the revenues from the operations of our PRC operating entity, China Liberal Beijing, we may be unable to pay dividends on our Ordinary Shares.

 

Cash dividends, if any, on our Ordinary Shares will be paid in U.S. dollars. Boya Hong Kong may be considered a non-resident enterprise for tax purposes, so that any dividends China Liberal Beijing pays to Boya Hong Kong may be regarded as China-sourced income and as a result may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10%. See “Taxation—People’s Republic of China Enterprise Taxation.” 

 

In order for us to pay dividends to our shareholders, we will rely on payments made from China Liberal Beijing to Boya Hong Kong. Certain payments from China Liberal Beijing to Boya Hong Kong are subject to PRC taxes, including business taxes and VAT. In addition, if China Liberal Beijing or its subsidiaries or branches incur debt on their own behalves in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict its ability to pay dividends or make other distributions to us.

 

Pursuant to the Arrangement between Mainland China and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and Tax Evasion on Income, or the Double Tax Avoidance Arrangement, the 10% withholding tax rate may be lowered to 5% if a Hong Kong resident enterprise owns no less than 25% of a PRC project. However, the 5% withholding tax rate does not automatically apply and certain requirements must be satisfied, including without limitation that (a) the Hong Kong project must be the beneficial owner of the relevant dividends; and (b) the Hong Kong project must directly hold no less than 25% share ownership in the PRC project during the 12 consecutive months preceding its receipt of the dividends. In current practice, a Hong Kong project must obtain a tax resident certificate from the Hong Kong tax authority to apply for the 5% lower PRC withholding tax rate. As the Hong Kong tax authority will issue such a tax resident certificate on a case-by-case basis, we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain the tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority and enjoy the preferential withholding tax rate of 5% under the Double Taxation Arrangement with respect to dividends to be paid by China Liberal Beijing to its immediate holding company, Boya Hong Kong. As of the date of this prospectus, we have not applied for the tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority. Boya Hong Kong intends to apply for the tax resident certificate when China Liberal Beijing plans to declare and pay dividends to Boya Hong Kong. See “Risk Factors—There are significant uncertainties under the EIT Law relating to the withholding tax liabilities of our PRC Subsidiary, and dividends payable by our PRC Subsidiary to our offshore subsidiaries may not qualify to enjoy certain treaty benefits.”

 

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CAPITALIZATION

 

The following table sets forth our capitalization as of December 31, 2018:

 

on an actual basis;
on an as adjusted basis to reflect the issuance and sale of 1,166,667 Ordinary Shares by us in this Offering at the assumed initial public offering price of $6.00 per Ordinary Share, after deducting the estimated discounts to the Underwriter and the estimated offering expenses payable by us.

 

You should read this capitalization table in conjunction with “Use of Proceeds,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and the consolidated financial statements and the related notes appearing elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

   December 31, 2018 
   Actual   Pro Forma As adjusted (1) 
   US$   US$ 
Equity        
Share capital US$0.001 par value, 50,000,000 Ordinary Shares  authorized, 5,000,000 Ordinary Shares issued and  outstanding;  6,166,667 Ordinary Shares issued and outstanding pro forma   5,000    6,167 
Additional paid-in capital    4,579,116    10,313,771 
Statutory reserve    294,158    294,158 
Retained earnings    88,967    88,967 
Accumulated other comprehensive income    (234,237)   (234,237)
Total equity    4,733,004    10,468,826 
Total capitalization          

   

(1)Reflects the sale of ordinary shares in this offering at an assumed initial public offering price of $6.00 per share, and after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and estimated offering expenses payable by us. The pro forma as adjusted information is illustrative only, and we will adjust this information based on the actual initial public offering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing. Additional paid-in capital reflects the net proceeds we expect to receive, after deducting the underwriting discounts and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We estimate that such net proceeds will be approximately $7,000,000.

 

A US$0.05 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of US$6.00 per Ordinary Share would increase (decrease) each of additional paid-in capital, total shareholders’ equity and total capitalization by US$0.06 million, assuming the number of Ordinary Shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting the estimated underwriting discounts and estimated expenses payable by us.

 

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DILUTION

 

Unless otherwise indicated, all share amounts and per share amounts in this prospectus have been presented giving effect to a stock split of our outstanding Ordinary Shares at a ratio of 1,000-for-1 that occurred on July 8, 2019, and an issuance of 3,999,000 Ordinary Shares on July 15, 2019.

 

If you invest in our Ordinary Shares, your interest will be diluted for each Ordinary Share you purchase to the extent of the difference between the initial public offering price per Ordinary Share and our net tangible book value per Ordinary Share after the Offering. Dilution results from the fact that the initial public offering price per Ordinary Share is substantially in excess of the net tangible book value per Ordinary Share attributable to the existing shareholders for our presently outstanding Ordinary Shares.

 

After giving effect to the sale of 1,166,667 ordinary shares in this offering at the assumed initial public offering price of $6.00 per ordinary share and after deducting the underwriting discounts and estimated offering expenses payable by us, our pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value at December 31, 2018 would have been $10,468,826, or $1.70 per ordinary share. This represents an immediate increase in pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value of $0.75 per ordinary share to existing investors and immediate dilution of $4.30 per ordinary share to new investors. The following table illustrates such dilution to new investors purchasing ordinary shares in this offering:

 

   Post-Offering (1)   Full
Exercise
of Over-
allotment
Option
 
Assumed initial public offering price per ordinary share  $6.00   $6.00 
Net tangible book value per ordinary share as of December 31, 2018  $0.95   $0.95 
Increase in pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per ordinary share attributable to new investors purchasing ordinary shares in this offering  $0.75   $0.85 
Pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per ordinary share after this offering  $1.70   $1.80 
Dilution per ordinary share to new investors in this offering  $4.30   $4.20 

  

Each $0.50 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $6.00 per ordinary share would increase (decrease) our pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value as of December 31, 2018 after this offering by approximately $0.09 per ordinary share, and would increase (decrease) dilution to new investors by $0.41 per ordinary share, assuming that the number of ordinary shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same, and after deducting the underwriting discounts and estimated offering expenses payable by us. The pro forma as adjusted information is illustrative only, and we will adjust this information based on the actual initial public offering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing.

 

If the underwriter exercises their over-allotment option in full, the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per ordinary share after the offering would be $1.80, the increase in net tangible book value per ordinary share to existing shareholders would be $0.85, and the immediate dilution in net tangible book value per ordinary share to new investors in this offering would be $4.20.

 

The table and discussion above is based on 5,000,000 ordinary shares outstanding as of December 31, 2018. 

 

To the extent that we issue additional ordinary shares in the future, there will be further dilution to new investors participating in this offering.

 

(1)Assumes that the underwriter’s over-allotment option has not been exercised.

  

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MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF
FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and the related notes included elsewhere in this prospectus. This discussion contains forward-looking statements reflecting our current expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. See “Disclosure Regarding Forward-Looking Statements” for a discussion of the uncertainties, risks, and assumptions associated with these statements. Actual results and the timing of events could differ materially from those discussed in our forward-looking statements as a result of many factors, including those set forth under “Risk Factors” and elsewhere in this prospectus.

 

Unless otherwise indicated, all share amounts and per share amounts in this prospectus have been presented giving effect to a stock split of our Ordinary Shares at a ratio of 1,000-for-1, which occurred on July 8, 2019, and an issuance of 3,999,000 Ordinary Shares on July 15, 2019.

 

Overview

 

We are an educational service provider operating under the “China Liberal” brand in the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC”).

 

We offer a wide range of educational services and programs to our customers, consisting primarily of Sino-foreign jointly managed and delivered academic programs (“Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs”), overseas study consulting services (“Overseas Study Consulting Services”), technological consulting services provided for targeted Chinese universities to improve their campus information and data management system and to optimize their teaching, operating and management environment, under the concept of “creating a smart campus” (“Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions”). We also develop and provide textbooks and other course materials to students enrolled under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs to ensure the quality of students’ learning outcomes. Since December 2018, we started to provide job readiness training services acting as the key bridge between our partner schools and employers, and to provide tailored job readiness training to graduating students (“Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education”). We did not start generating revenue from this line of business until January 2019.

 

Our revenues increased by $923,107, or 23.8%, from $3,885,886 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017, to $4,808,993 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018. Revenues from our services provided for joint education programs accounted for 50.1% and 72.6% of our total revenues for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, revenues from our study abroad consulting services accounted for 11.4% and 1.6% of our total revenues for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, while revenue from providing technological consulting services accounted for 37.9% and 24.5% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. Revenue from sales of textbooks and course materials accounted for 0.6% and 1.3% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

The following table illustrates the amount and percentage of our revenue derived from our different services provided:

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
   2018   2017 
   Amount   %   Amount   % 
Revenue from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs  $2,410,781    50.1%  $2,821,602    72.6%
Revenue from textbook and course material sales   29,717    0.6%   52,345    1.3%
Revenue from Overseas Study Consulting Services   547,521    11.4%   60,947    1.6%
Revenue from Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions   1,820,974    37.9%   950,992    24.5%
Total revenue  $4,808,993    100.0%  $3,885,886    100.0%

 

Key Factors that Affect Our Results of Operations

 

We believe the following key factors may affect our financial condition and results of operations:

 

Demand for International Education from Chinese Students

 

Education services are an investment for the future. We are optimistic that the Chinese economy’s steady growth will likely drive incomes and consumption levels for Chinese citizens, who will have more capital for their children’s educations. We believe that tuition fees are impacted less by volatility in the overall economy as people in China generally cut back on other spending before they reduce spending on their children’s education.

 

We have benefited from Chinese students’ increasing demand for international education. Such demand is primarily driven by an increasing number of Chinese students seeking quality educations and who aspire to study abroad, which is in turn driven by factors such as: (i) an increasing number of affluent families in China, (ii) the rising recognition of the quality of higher education overseas, (iii) the emphasis placed by Chinese parents on the importance of enrollment in globally-recognized universities to improve their children’s career prospects, and (iv) other economic and political factors. Any material change to these factors will significantly affect our operation results.

 

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Number of Student Enrollments

 

Our revenues primarily consist of tuition and fees from students enrolled in the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs in which we are engaged to provide coordination, teaching and supporting services, as well as our consulting service fees charged to students contemplating studying abroad. The number of student enrollments is largely driven by the demand for the educational services and programs offered by us, the amount of fees we charge, the effectiveness of our marketing and brand promotion efforts, our ability to maintain the consistency and quality of our teaching, as well as our ability to respond to competitive pressures. The level of students enrolled in our Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, and the number of students who come to us for study abroad consulting services directly affects our revenue and profitability.

 

Our Tuition and Service Fees Charged

 

Our results of operations are directly affected by the level of the tuition and service fees we charge to our students. Under our cooperation with Chinese host universities/colleges for Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Education Programs, the Chinese host universities/colleges determine on the amount of tuitions and fees charged to enrolled students, ranging from RMB 15,000 (USD 2,268) per student per school year to RMB 28,000 (USD 4,233) per student per school year, depending on the applicable education programs. The total fees we receive from tuition collected by these universities and colleges varies based on the terms of our contracts with the Chinese host universities we partner with, and are based on our services rendered and can range from RMB 2,250 (USD 340) to RMB 11,200 (USD 1,693) per student per school year. With respect to Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, our contracts with Chinese host universities/colleges provide that (1) the host universities/ colleges will withhold the tuition collected from students for one to three months after the academic school year starts in September, and then remit the portion of tuition fees to us after the student headcounts have been finalized, and (2) the portion of tuition fee that we are entitled to receive is calculated based on the final actual number of students retained with the universities/colleges after any student dropout has been adjusted. Accordingly, any tuition refund has already been deducted by host universities/ colleges before we receive our portion of the tuition fees. For accounting purposes, at the beginning of each academic school year, we initially accrue the estimated refund based on an historical 1% student dropout rate, and make subsequent true-up adjustments after the final number of students retained with the host universities/colleges is determined. Such adjustments were immaterial for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. Our ability to receive our portion of tuition fee from Chinese host universities/ colleges largely depends on whether Chinese host universities/ colleges are satisfied with our teaching services, or whether we can maintain positive communication with Chinese host universities/colleges to resolve any service deficiency on a timely manner. Any extended tuition withholding or delayed tuition payment to us from Chinese host universities/ colleges due to our service deficiency, may negatively impact our revenue, results of operations and financial condition.

 

We determine overseas study consulting service fees based on services provided to each individual student to satisfy his or her needs. Under the smart campus solutions, our fees are based on the scope of services specified in our agreements with the Chinese universities we service. Any change in our service fees would have a material impact on our revenue and profitability.

 

Our Ability to Control Costs and Expenses and Improve Our Operating Efficiency

 

Staffing costs and administrative expenses have a direct impact on our profitability. The size of our staff, particularly our foreign faculty teachers appointed to selected Chinese host universities/colleges, generally increases as the student base expands, while other expenses, particularly those relating to administrative functions, are relatively fixed. With respect to Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, our contracts with Chinese host universities/colleges provide that foreign teachers assigned by us should be substituted, and teaching textbooks, course materials and curriculums should be adjusted in a timely manner in order to ensure a satisfactory teaching result. The Chinese host universities/ colleges have the right to withhold our portion of the tuition if we do not take corrective action when our service deficiency is identified. Any costs related to teacher substitution, textbooks, course materials and curriculums adjustment should be borne by us. Historically, we have maintained active communications with the host universities/ colleges in order to obtain feedback on the quality of the services performed, and any identified service deficiency has been corrected on a timely manner, which led to immaterial costs associated with teacher substitution, textbooks, course materials and curriculums adjustment for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. Our ability to drive the productivity of our staff and enhance our operating efficiency affects our profitability. If we fail to implement initiatives to control costs (including teacher substitution, textbooks, course materials and curriculums adjustment related costs) and improve our operating efficiency over time, our profitability will be negatively impacted.

 

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If we are unable to compete successfully, our financial condition and results of operations may be harmed.

 

The education sector in China is rapidly evolving, highly fragmented and competitive, and we expect competition in this sector to persist and intensify. We face competition in each service segment we offer. Significant competition could reduce our operating margins and profitability and result in a loss of market share. Some of our existing and potential competitors may have competitive advantages, such as significantly greater brand recognition, financial, marketing, or other resources and may be able to mimic and adopt our business model. Significant competition could lead to lower prices and decreased revenues, gross margins and profits, any of which could have a material and adverse effect on our results of operations. 

 

A severe or prolonged slowdown in the global or Chinese economy could materially and adversely affect our business and our financial condition.

 

The rapid growth of the Chinese economy has slowed down since 2012 and this slowdown may continue in the future. There is considerable uncertainty over trade conflicts between the United States and China and the long-term effects of the expansionary monetary and fiscal policies adopted by the central banks and financial authorities of some of the world’s leading economies, including the United States and China. The withdrawal of these expansionary monetary and fiscal policies could lead to a contraction. There continue to be concerns over unrest and terrorist threats in the Middle East, Europe, and Africa, which have resulted in volatility in oil and other markets. There are also concerns about the relationships between China and other Asian countries, which may result in or intensify potential conflicts in relation to territorial disputes. The eruption of armed conflict could adversely affect global or Chinese discretionary spending, either of which could have a material and adverse effect on our business, results of operation in financial condition. Economic conditions in China are sensitive to global economic conditions, as well as changes in domestic economic and political policies and the expected or perceived overall economic growth rate in China. Any severe or prolonged slowdown in the global or Chinese economy would likely materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. In addition, continued turbulence in the international markets may adversely affect our ability to access capital markets to meet liquidity needs.

 

Key Financial Performance Indicators

 

Our key financial performance indicators consist of the number of student enrollment, average tuition fees we received from students enrolled under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, average service fees we charged to students for our Overseas Study Consulting Services , as well as the number of contracts we signed for smart campus solution projects, which significantly impacted our net revenues, cost of revenues and operating expenses, as discussed in greater detail under “Results of Operations” below.

 

We derived net revenues from our four operating segments in terms of percentages of our total net revenues from continuing operations as follows in fiscal year 2018 and 2017:

 

   For the years ended
December 31,
 
   2018   2017 
Revenue from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs   50.1%   72.6%
Revenue from textbook and course material sales   0.6%   1.3%
Revenue from Overseas Study Consulting Services   11.4%   1.6%
Revenue from Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions   37.9%   24.5%
Total revenue   100.0%   100.0%

 

Revenues from our services provided for the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs accounted for 50.1% and 72.6% of our total revenues for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively; revenues from our Overseas Study Consulting Services accounted for 11.4% and 1.6% of our total revenues for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively; revenues from providing Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions accounted for 37.9% and 24.5% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively; and revenues from sales of textbooks and course materials accounted for 0.6% and 1.3% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

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Our revenues from the Sino- foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs and Overseas Study Consulting Services segments are primarily generated from tuition fees or service fees we charged to students. Those revenues are linked to the number of student enrollments. Our students enrollment is affected by a mix of factors including the number and variety of our programs or service offerings, overall demand for our programs or service offerings, the geographic markets where the programs or services are offered, the pricing of our education programs or services, the fees charged by our competitors for the same or similar programs or services, any changes in the regulatory regime applicable to the education industry in China, and our reputation.

 

The total number of students enrolled under our Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs were 2,390 in fiscal year 2018 and 2,877 in fiscal year 2017. We had 49 students who signed up for our Overseas Study Consulting Services in fiscal year 2018 and 7 students in fiscal year 2017. In terms of tuition fee, our Chinese host universities/colleges determine the amount of tuitions and fees charged to enrolled students, ranging from RMB 15,000 (USD 2,268) per student per school year to RMB 28,000 (USD 4,233) per student per school year, depending on the applicable education programs. The total fees we receive from tuition collected by these universities and colleges vary based on the terms of our contracts with the Chinese host universities we partner with, and are based on our services rendered and can range from RMB 2,250 (USD 340) to RMB 11,200 (USD 1,693) per student per school year. Consulting fees we charge students to provide Overseas Study Consulting Services range from RMB 50,000 ($7,558) per person to RMB 80,000 ($12,093) per person, depending on different majors that our students are planning to pursue in foreign countries, which majors then determine the level of customized tutoring services we provide.

 

Our revenue from the sale of textbooks and course material is largely affected by the number of students enrolled under the Sino-foreign joint education programs. Revenue from this segment only accounted for 0.6% and 1.3% of our total revenue for the fiscal year 2018 and 2017, respectively. We expect revenue in this segment to keep a steady pace in the foreseeable future.

 

Our revenue from Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions largely depends on the number of contracts we may enter into with customers, and on our ability to customize our solutions in a cost-effective way. Our “smart campus” related technological consulting service contracts are primarily on a fixed-price basis, which require us to perform services including project planning, project solution and design, data management application customization, installations of hardware equipment and components, integration of hardware and software application, and post-contract continuous maintenance support, based on the specific needs of each customer. For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, we have successfully provided smart campus solutions to FMP and several other Chinese universities, namely Strait College of Minjiang University, Capital Normal University, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and University of International Business and Economics. Based on our experience and reputation, we anticipate we will enter into additional smart campus solution contracts with a larger number of Chinese universities/ colleges in fiscal year 2019 and beyond. To manage and support our growth and profitability in this segment, we plan to enhance our operational, administrative and technological systems and our financial and management controls. If we cannot achieve these operational improvements, our financial condition and results of operations may be materially adversely affected.

 

Cost of revenues

 

Our cost of revenues consists of salary, welfare and insurance costs for our faculty, rent expense for foreign faculty, textbook and course materials costs, travel, meals and entertainment expenses associated with teaching activities, consulting fees paid to third-parties for course design and teacher training, hardware parts and components purchase costs as well as labor costs incurred to undertake the software application customization for the smart campus projects, and business taxes. Our cost of revenues accounted for 56.2% and 55.6% of our total revenue for the fiscal year 2018 and 2017, respectively. We expect our cost of revenues to increase as we further expand our operations by opening our China Liberal Schools in Beijing and Italy, driven in large part by a planned increase in the number of our teachers and study advisors and increased utility and lease payment for our schools to support our study abroad consulting service business segment. In addition, in anticipation of the increase in our smart campus solution contracts with additional Chinese universities/ colleges, we expect our costs associated with hardware equipment and facilities purchase as well as data management application system customization will further increase in the foreseeable future.

 

Operating expenses

 

Our operating expenses consist of selling and marketing expenses and general and administrative expenses.

 

Our selling expenses primarily include expenses incurred for various sales activities, advertising, payroll expense paid to our sales and marketing personnel as well as shipping and delivery expenses. As a percentage of revenues, our selling expenses accounted for 14.6% and 13.9% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. We expect that our overall sales and marketing expenses, including but not limited to, advertising expenses, brand promotion expenses and salaries, will continue to increase in the foreseeable future if our business further grows.

 

Our general and administrative expenses primarily consist of employee salaries, welfare and insurance expenses, depreciation and professional service expenses. As a percentage of revenues, general and administrative expenses were 12.1% and 10.5% of our revenue in fiscal year 2018 and 2017, respectively. We expect our general and administrative expenses, including, but not limited to, salaries and business consulting expenses, to continue to increase in the foreseeable future, as we hire additional personnel and incur additional expenses in connection with the expansion of our business operations. We expect our professional fees for legal, audit, and advisory services to increase as we become a public company upon the completion of this offering.

 

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Results of Operations

 

The following table summarizes the results of our operations during the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively, and provides information regarding the dollar and percentage increase or (decrease) during such years.

 

   For the Years Ended December  31,         
   2018   2017         
   Amount   As %
of Sales
   Amount   As %
of Sales
   Amount
Increase
(Decrease)
   Percentage
Increase
(Decrease)
 
                         
Revenue  $4,808,993    100.0%  $3,885,886    100.0%  $923,107    23.8%
Cost of revenue   2,702,297    56.2%   2,161,322    55.6%   540,975    25.0%
Gross profit   2,106,696    43.8%   1,724,564    44.4%   382,132    22.2%
Operating expenses                              
Selling expenses   704,060    14.6%   541,424    13.9%   162,636    30.0%
General and administrative expenses   579,500    12.1%   408,762    10.5%   170,738    41.8%
Total operating expenses   1,283,560    26.7%   950,186    24.5%   333,374    35.1%
Income from operations   823,136    17.1%   774,378    19.9%   48,758    6.3%
Other income (expenses)                              
Interest income   88,926    1.8%   70,743    1.8%   18,183    25.7%
Other income   180,191    3.7%   187,794    4.8%   (7,603)   (4.0)%
Total other income, net   269,117    5.6%   258,537    6.7%   10,580    4.1%
Income before income taxes   1,092,253    22.7%   1,032,915    26.6%   59,338    5.7%
Provision for income taxes   167,813    3.5%   158,109    4.1%   9,704    6.1%
Net income  $924,440    19.2%  $874,806    22.5%  $49,634    5.7%
Less: net income attributable to non-controlling interest   81,779    1.7%   5,800    0.1%   75,979    1310.0%
Net income attributable to the Company  $842,661    17.5%  $869,006    22.4%  $(26,345)   (3.0)%

  

Revenues. Revenues increased by $923,107, or 23.8%, to $4,808,993 in 2018 from $3,885,886 in 2017. The increase in our revenue was due to more consulting services have been rendered in 2018 as compared to 2017.

 

Our revenue by service type is as follows:

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
   2018   2017   Changes 
   Amount   %   Amount   %   Amount   % 
Revenue from Sino-foreign Joint Managed Academic Programs  $2,410,781    50.1%  $2,821,602    72.6%  $(410,821)   -14.6%
Revenue from textbook and course material sales   29,717    0.6%   52,345    1.3%   (22,628)   -43.2%
Revenue from Overseas Study Consulting Services   547,521    11.4%   60,947    1.6%   486,574    798.4%
Revenue from Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions   1,820,974    37.9%   950,992    24.5%   869,982    91.5%
Total  $4,808,993    100.0%  $3,885,886    100.0%  $923,107    23.8%

 

Revenue from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs

 

Our revenue from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs primarily consists of our cooperation with the following Chinese universities:

 

(i) Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic (FMP)

 

FMP is currently hosting the Australia English for Academic Purposes Program, or the FMP EAP Program. Before FMP rebranded in January 2017, FMP’s former entity operating under the name IEN College of Minjiang University also hosted the International General Education Courses, or IGEC program.

 

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(ii) Strait College of Minjiang University (Strait College)

 

Strait College is currently hosting the Fujian-Taiwan Universities Joint Talent Training Program. Since January 2017, Strait College has also been hosting the IGEC program after it took over this program from the then IEN College of Minjiang University.

 

(iii) Fujian University of Technology (FUT)

 

FUT hosted the Fujian University of Technology International Scholarly Exchange Curriculum Program, or FUT ISEC Program. However, as discussed below, we made a decision to cease recruitment and enrollment activity, and the program was discontinued after the then last class of students graduated in July 2018.

 

(iv) Fujian Preschool Education College

 

Fujian Preschool Education College is currently hosting the New Zealand Tertiary College, or NZTC Program. However, as discussed below, we made a decision to cease recruitment and enrollment activity, and the program will be discontinued after the last class of students graduate in July 2019.

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
   2018   2017   Changes 
   Amount   %   Amount   %   Amount   % 
Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic  $465,081    19.3%  $1,455,013    51.6%  $(989,932)   -68.0%
Strait College of Minjiang University   1,744,233    72.4%   943,447    33.4%   800,786    84.9%
Fujian University of Technology   70,799    2.9%   210,686    7.5%   (139,887)   -66.4%
Fujian Preschool Education College   130,668    5.4%   212,456    7.5%   (81,788)   -38.5%
Total  $2,410,781    100.0%  $2,821,602    100.0%  $(410,821)   -14.6%
                 
Number of students under joint education programs                
Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic   551        1,307               (756)   -57.9% 
Strait College of Minjiang University   1,676         1,220         456    37.3%
Fujian University of Technology   51         154         (103)   -67.1%
Fujian Preschool Education College   112         196         (84)   -42.9%
Total number of students   2,390         2,877         (487)   -17.0%
                               
Average tuition fee the Company received per student                          
Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic  $844        $1,113        $(269)   -24.2%
Strait College of Minjiang University  $1,041        $773        $268    34.6%
Fujian University of Technology  $1,397        $1,368        $29    2.1%
Fujian Preschool Education College  $1,170        $1,086        $84    7.8%

 

Our revenues from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs decreased by $410,821 or 14.6% from $2,821,602 in fiscal year 2017 to $2,410,781 in fiscal year 2018. This decrease can be primarily attributed to a decrease in the number of students by 488 or 17.0%, from 2,877 students in fiscal year 2017 to 2,389 students in fiscal year 2018, and affected by the changes in average tuition fees we collected from Chinese host universities/colleges. The following factors impact the revenue we generate from services provided for joint education programs for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017:

 

(1) In 2018, China’s Ministry of Education, or MOE, approved the termination of certain Sino-foreign cooperative education programs as a move to improve quality, tighten regulatory control, and promote reforms in China’s educational system. These changes were made because problems had appeared in certain institutions and projects (none of which we service) that were previously approved by the relevant authorities. These problems included insufficient utilization of high quality educational resources, low instructional quality, weak specialized capabilities in academic departments, lack of content-based development mechanisms, low student satisfaction and poor attractiveness of programs, making it difficult for those institutions and projects to continue operating and they were therefore closed down. In order to clarify the above described action by MOE, we made an anonymous phone call inquiry with the MOE. We were informed by the MOE that this action was never taken by MOE before, and that this action was taken to close down institutions and projects that were originally approved but at the time of termination did not have enrolled students any more. We were further informed that the purpose of this action was to improve the overall quality of the industry. In light of this, Fujian Province, the province where all of the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs we service are located, set a minimum score for English (as a subject) for those students who are applying for any four-year Sino-foreign joint programs that offer undergraduate degrees. As a result of these new regulatory controls and policy adjustments, even though none of the programs we service were terminated by the MOE, overall student recruiting and enrollment under our Sino-foreign joint education programs was negatively impacted, because some potential candidates could not meet the minimum score for English. For example, student enrollments under our joint education programs with Strait College of Minjiang University only increased by 456 students from 2017 to 2018, such increase was resulted from the transfer of the 756 students under the IGEC programs originally enrolled with IEN College and not from new enrolled students. Without taking into account this IGEC program transfer from FMP to Strait College of Minjiang University, the total number of students enrolled with Strait College of Minjiang University would have actually decreased by 300 students from 2017 to 2018 due to the higher eligibility requirements for students to enroll in any Sino-foreign joint education programs in Fujian Province. We cannot assure you that the local government in Fujian Province or the MOE will not set an even higher eligibility standard for students to enroll in these joint education programs in the future, in which case our enrollment numbers, result of operations and financial conditions could be negatively impacted. 

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(2) FMP was formerly known as IEN College of Minjiang University, and our IGEC program (the “Strait IGEC Program”) was previously hosted by IEN College of Minjiang University from September 2013 to July 2017. In January 2017, IEN College of Minjiang University was approved by the provincial government of Fujian and became the first Sino-foreign joint institution with independent legal status in Fujian Province and accordingly changed its name to FMP. As a result of this rebranding, FMP stopped hosting the IGEC program beginning September 2017 and the program was taken over by Strait College of Minjiang University going forward. This led to a decrease in the total number of students enrolled with FMP, from 1,307 students in fiscal year 2017 to 551 students in fiscal year 2018 because students originally enrolled under the IGEC programs have been transferred to Strait College of Minjiang University. Starting September 2017, FMP only continued to provide the FMP EAP Program.

 

(3) The reason our revenue generated from the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Program with FMP decreased by $989,932 or 68.0% from $1,455,013 in fiscal year 2017 to $465,081 in fiscal year 2018 can be attributed to two factors: (i) in connection with the transfer of IGEC program from FMP to Strait College of Minjiang University, the total number of enrolled students with FMP decreased by 756, or 57.2%; and (ii) we receive a lower percentage of tuition fees from the FMP EPA Program than from the IGEC program. Under the FMP EPA Program, our services and responsibility only cover the first two-year EAP trainings, but under the Strait IGEC Program, we are responsible for promoting the program, recruiting students, staffing foreign language teachers, and ensuring students are connected with appropriate foreign universities in North America or Europe. Under the FMP EAP Program, the average tuition that FMP charges enrolled students is RMB 18,000 (USD 2,721) per student per school year, of which we are entitled to receive RMB 9,000 (USD 1,360) per student per school year for their freshman years and RMB 3,000 (USD 453) per student per school year for their sophomore years. On the other hand, under the Strait IGEC Program, the average tuition fee that Strait College charges enrolled students is RMB 28,000 per student per school year, of which we receive RMB 9,800 (USD 1,481) per student per school year for the first two years, and then RMB 11,200 (USD 1,693) per student per school year for the remaining two years. Therefore, the tuition fee from Strait IGEC Program is higher than the tuition fee we receive from the FMP EAP Program. As a result of the transfer of the IGEC program from FMP to Strait College, our tuition revenue from FMP decreased by $989,932 or 68.0% because the average tuition fee decreased from $1,113 per student in fiscal year 2017 to $844 per student in fiscal year 2018. On the other hand, our tuition revenue from Strait College increased by $800,786 or 84.9% because the average tuition fee increased from $773 per student in fiscal year 2017 to $1,041 per student in fiscal year 2018.

 

(4) Our joint programs with Fujian University of Technology (FUT) and Fujian Preschool Education College (FPEC) were originally designed to improve students’ English language skills. However, due to the overall low language proficiency backgrounds of the students enrolled, we noted that most students could not adapt to the high standards of an English teaching environment. For example, a total of 193 students were recruited by FUT under the architecture, civil engineering and software engineering majors in our joint programs with FUT. According to the curriculum designs and outlines, some core courses had to be taught by foreign teachers in English. Therefore, students who could follow the course lecture were those who had adequate English reading, writing and listening skills. However, after those 193 students started these programs, we noted that their overall English language proficiency was low and we had to add Chinese teachers in the classrooms to conduct simultaneous translation and interpretation in order to help the students fully understand the course content. Adding extra teachers for translation doubled our teaching costs as qualified translators were difficult to find and salaries paid to translators roughly amounted to the amount of salaries paid to foreign teachers. In addition, any inappropriate translation could have negatively impacted how our course was perceived and the value of such course to our existing and prospective students. Our joint program with FPEC provides Chinese students with the opportunity to enroll in courses delivered by New Zealand Tertiary College (“NZTC”). Upon completion of this program, students would receive a Ministry of Education, or MOE, Diploma in Early Childhood Education in the PRC and a certificate in Early Childhood Teaching issued by NZTC. This program is a three-year education degree program in which students may choose to complete their first two-years of education in China and go to NZTC for their third-year and final year in the program, or, alternatively, to stay with the Chinese host college for the entire three years of study. Since we launched this program, approximately 300 students have been recruited into this program. However, most of the enrolled students had low English language proficiency, which led to limited number of students choosing to study abroad in New Zealand. As of the date of this prospectus, only 3 students have decided to go to New Zealand after finishing the first two-year education with the Chinese host college. NZTC did request that we send more students to NZTC for purposes of increasing their revenue. However, based on our assessment, in order for us to train existing students to meet the minimum language requirements for studying abroad, we would have to add one more year of English courses to existing students, which would significantly increase our teaching costs. Additionally, most of our existing students are reluctant to extend their education by an additional year since they can find a job in the market relatively easily after obtaining the certificate in Early Childhood Teaching issued by FPEC.

 

Therefore, the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs with these two institutions became increasingly less attractive and less profitable. As a result, we decided to stop recruiting and enrolling new students into the FUT ISEC Program after the Class of July 2018 graduated. We also decided to suspend recruiting for the NZTC Program after current students graduate in July 2019. As a result of such business decision, the number of students enrolled in FUT decreased by 67.1% from 154 students in fiscal year 2017 to 51 students in fiscal year 2018, and the number of students enrolled in FPEC decreased by 42.9% from 196 students in fiscal year 2017 to 112 students in fiscal year 2018. The average tuition fee we collected from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs was adjusted. As a result, average tuition fee collected from FUT and FPEC slightly increased by 2.1% and 7.8% in fiscal year 2018 as compared to fiscal year 2017, respectively. Consequently, the decrease in tuition revenue from both FUT and FPEC resulted from decrease in number of enrolled students and was offset by the increase in average tuition fee.

 

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Revenue from textbooks and course material sales

 

In order to ensure the quality of the course content delivered to students and to meet international standards, we have developed and edited more than 16 English textbooks and course materials with an emphasis on language training, and distributed these materials to students enrolled under our Sino-foreign joint education programs. Revenue from sales of textbooks and course materials decreased by $22,628 or 43.2% from $52,345 in fiscal year 2017 to $29,717 in fiscal year 2018. The decrease in textbook and course material sales was primarily attributable to the total number of students enrolled under the joint education programs which decreased from 2,877 students in fiscal year 2017 to 2,389 students in fiscal year 2018. As discussed above, we stopped recruiting and enrolling new students into the FUT ISEC Program with FUT after the then existing students graduated in July 2018. We also suspended recruiting for the NZTC Program with FPEC after current students graduate in July 2019. As a result of such business decision, the number of students enrolled with FUT decreased by 67.1% from 154 students in fiscal year 2017 to 51 students in fiscal year 2018, and the number of students enrolled with FPEC decreased by 42.9% from 196 students in fiscal year 2017 to 112 students in fiscal year 2018. As a result of this business decision, for the academic school year starting from September 2018, there were no additional new students recruited into the joint education programs with these two academic institutions. Accordingly, we reduced the textbooks and course material sales in 2018. The total number of textbooks and course materials sold decreased by 11.4% from 3,591 in fiscal year 2017 to 3,183 in fiscal year 2018. In addition, for our Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs with FMP, in 2018, FMP made some teaching course content and curriculum settings adjustment, which led to FMP purchase textbooks and course materials from other vendors in order to match the new curriculum settings. As a result, our textbook sales to FMP reduced accordingly.

 

Revenue from Overseas Study Consulting Services

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
   2018   2017   Changes 
           Amount   % 
Revenue from overseas study consulting services  $547,521   $60,947   $486,574    798.4%
                     
Number of students for study abroad consulting service   49    7    42    600.0%
                     
Average consulting service fee per student  $11,174   $8,707   $2,467    28.3%

 

Our Overseas Study Consulting Services target those students who wish to study in foreign countries to enrich their learning experiences, expand their horizons, and gain exposure to a broader array of employment opportunities. We provide customized consulting services to students on an individual basis. Fees we charge students to provide overseas study consulting services range from RMB 50,000 ($7,558) per person to RMB 80,000 ($12,093) per person. We typically charge higher consulting service fees to students planning to pursue art majors in foreign countries than we do for students pursuing general majors such as business, technology and other majors, because art programs typically require demonstration of a student’s specialty in art, which is usually reflected in an art portfolio that the student submits along with other application materials. We have to assign qualified teachers to provide more detailed and customized tutoring to these students pursuing art majors and accordingly we charge them higher consulting service fee.

 

Revenue from providing study abroad consulting services increased by $486,574 or 798.4%, from $60,947 in fiscal year 2017 to $547,521 in fiscal year 2018. The increase was due to an increased number of students who came to us for study abroad consulting services, from 7 students in fiscal year 2017 to 49 students in fiscal year 2018. In addition, we served more students pursing art major in fiscal year 2018 than in fiscal year 2017. As a result, our average service fee increased by 28.3% from $8,707 per student in fiscal year 2017 to $11,174 per student in fiscal year 2018.

 

Revenue from Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Projects

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
   2018   2017   Changes 
   Amount   Amount   Amount   % 
Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic  $1,670,450    700,592   $969,858    138.4%
Strait College of Minjiang University   -    215,642    (215,642)   -100.0%
Fujian High School and others   -    34,758    (34,758)   -100.0%
Capital normal university   84,574    -    84,574    100.0%
Beijing University of Chinese Medicine   38,365    -    38,365    100.0%
University of International Business and Economics and others   27,585    -    27,585    100.0%
Total  $1,820,974   $950,992   $869,982    91.5%

 

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Revenue from providing smart campus related technological consulting service increased by $869,982 or 91.5% from $950,992 in fiscal year 2017 to $1,820,974 in fiscal year 2018, primarily due to increased revenues recognized from the smart campus project with Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic. In 2017, we entered into a contract with FMP to provide a total solution for its smart campus project, which includes a big data center, digital classrooms, and an experience-based simulation teaching center for its business school. These facilities will be linked and bundled with the campus data management application system software to create a smart campus for FMP. In addition to the installation of hardware and software to allow the smart campus system to meet its expected operational conditions, we are also responsible for maintenance and providing continuing technological support during the period of 2019 to 2021. The total contract price under the FMP “smart campus” project is RMB 16.68 million (approximately $2.4 million) for completion of the software and hardware installation. Post-installation maintenance and continuing technical support fees amount to RMB 5.05 million (approximately $0.73 million). Based on the contract payment terms, after completion of the required smart campus project, FMP is obligated to make three installment payments of RMB 5.56 million (approximately $808,593) each in 2019, 2020 and 2021, respectively. Among the RMB 5.05 million maintenance and support fee, RMB 1.04 million (USD $151,644) contract receivable for maintenance and technical support services rendered in 2018 has been received in January 2019. The remaining RMB 4.01 million (approximately $0.58 million) post-contract maintenance and technical support fee will be paid in three equal installments in 2019 to 2021 when services are rendered. We recognized revenue of $700,592 from the technology services we provided to FMP for its smart campus project in 2017. Services we provided included setting up the required hardware device and facilities such as digital portal, electronic blackboards, smartboards, projectors, LED display panels, high definition classroom audio and sound system, as well as data management software that could be linked together to bring the contracted digital classroom project to completion, which passed the inspection and was accepted by FMP. Therefore, our smart campus solutions revenue in 2017 was primarily generated from completion of the above-described digital classroom project for FMP. In 2018, we recognized more revenue from our FMP smart campus project. We upgraded the experiment centers for FMP’s business school and completed the big data center project through bundling of data management software with hardware facilities and device. We also bundled the data management software. These services were completed, passed inspection and were accepted by FMP. FMP put these facilities into use by November 2018. As a result, we recognized $1,670,450 revenue in 2018 from FMP smart campus projects.

 

In addition to the smart campus project with FMP, we were also involved with a campus server rooms upgrade project for Strait College of Minjiang University in 2017, and generated revenue of $215,642. We also provided smart campus solution consulting services to Capital Normal University, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and University of International Business and Economics in 2018 and generated revenue of $84,574, $38,365 and $27,585, respectively. The increase in our exposure and cooperation with more academic institutions on smart campus-related projects also helped us increase our revenue in 2018 as compared to 2017.

 

Cost of Revenues

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
   2018   2017   Changes   % 
                 
Teacher salary, welfare benefit and insurance  $877,292   $801,909   $75,383    9.4%
Textbook and course materials   19,490    46,532    (27,042)   -58.1%
Travel, meals and entertainment expense relating to teaching activities   34,040    38,633    (4,593)   -11.9%
Apartment rent expense for teachers   145,225    109,106    36,119    33.1%
Hardware and software application costs for “smart campus” projects   1,249,445    774,347    475,098    61.4%
Professional fees for course design, teacher training   331,222    340,626    (9,404)   -2.8%
Business tax   31,776    29,063    2,713    9.3%
Others   13,807    21,106    (7,299)   -34.6%
Total cost of revenue  $2,702,297   $2,161,322   $540,975    25.0%

 

Our cost of revenues consists of salary, welfare and insurance costs for our faculty, rent expense for foreign faculty, textbook and course materials costs, travel, meals and entertainment expenses associated with teaching activities, consulting fees paid to third-parties for course design and teacher training, hardware parts and components purchase costs as well as labor costs incurred to undertake the software application customization for the smart campus projects, and business taxes. Our overall cost of revenue increased by $540,975 or 25.0% from $2,161,322 in fiscal year 2017 to $2,702,297 in fiscal year 2018, primarily due to increased hardware and software costs associated with the smart campus projects of $475,098, increased rent expense of $36,119 because we leased larger office space in 2018 in order to meet our expanded business operation, and increased salary, welfare and insurance costs for teachers and faculty by $75,382 because we hired more qualified teachers to provide one-on-one tutoring to the students for our overseas studying consulting services. Our cost of revenue accounted for 56.2% and 55.6% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Our cost of revenue by business segment is as follows:

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
   2018   2017   Changes   % 
                 
Cost associated with Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs  $1,155,854   $1,175,646   $(19,792)   -1.7%
Cost associated with Overseas Study Consulting Services   64,321    49,765    14,556    29.2%
Cost associated with Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus related   1,462,435    889,379    573,056    64.4%
Cost associated with textbooks and course materials sales   19,687    46,532    (26,845)   -57.7%
Total cost of revenue  $2,702,297   $2,161,322   $540,975    25.0%

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Cost of revenues associated with Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs decreased by $19,792 or 1.7% from $1,175,646 in fiscal year 2017 to $1,155,854 in fiscal year 2018, primarily due to decreased costs associated with faculty involvement as the total number of students enrolled under the Sino-foreign joint education programs decreased from 2,877 students in fiscal year 2017 to 2,389 students in fiscal year 2018.

 

Cost of revenues associated with Overseas Studying Consulting Services increased by $14,556 or 29.2%, from $49,765 in fiscal year 2017 to $64,321 in fiscal year 2018. We launched the study abroad consulting services in April 2017 and only provided consulting services to 7 students in fiscal year 2017, as compared to 49 students served in 2018. As a result, we incurred higher costs in fiscal year 2018 as we placed greater emphasis on student coaching efforts to help prepare students for school selection, school applications, language training, and visa applications.

 

Cost of revenues associated with Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions increased by $573,056 or 64.4%, from $889,379 in fiscal year 2017 to $1,462,435 in fiscal year 2018. This increase was in line with the increased revenue we recognized in 2018. In 2017, we entered into a contract with FMP to help FMP implement a comprehensive solution for its smart campus project, which includes a big data center, digital classrooms, and an experience-based simulation teaching center for its business school. We completed part of the hardware facility installation in 2017 and completed all of the remaining hardware and software projects by November 2018, all of which have passed inspection and were accepted by FMP. As a result, more hardware components purchase costs and installation related labor costs have been allocated in 2018 as compared to 2017. In addition to the FMP smart campus projects, in 2018, we also provided smart campus solution consulting services to Capital Normal University, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and University of International Business and Economics. The increase in our revenues corresponds to the increased cost of revenues associated with these smart campus projects in 2018 as compared to fiscal year 2017.

 

Cost of revenue associated with textbook and course material sales decreased by $26,845 or 57.7% from $46,532 in fiscal year 2017 to $19,687 in fiscal year 2018. The decrease was in line with a decrease in number of textbooks and course materials delivered, which resulted from a decrease in the number of students enrolled under the Sino-foreign jointly managed and delivered academic programs.

 

Gross profit

 

   For the years ended December 31, 
   2018   2017   Changes 
   Amount   %   Amount   %   Amount   % 
Gross profit from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs  $1,254,927    52.1%  $1,645,956    58.3%  $(391,029)   -6.2%
Gross profit from textbook and course material sales   10,030    33.8%   5,813    11.1%   4,217    22.7%
Gross profit from Overseas Study Consulting Services   483,200    88.3%   11,182    18.3%   472,018    70.0%
Gross profit from Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus   358,539    19.7%   61,613    6.5%   296,926    13.2%
Total  $2,106,696    43.8%  $1,724,564    44.4%  $382,132    -0.6%

 

Our overall gross profit increased by $382,132 or 22.2% from $1,724,564 in fiscal year 2017 to $2,106,696 in fiscal year 2018, while gross profit margin decreased by 0.6% from 44.4% in fiscal year 2017 to 43.8% in fiscal year 2018.

 

Our gross profit associated with Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs decreased by $391,029, from $1,645,956 in fiscal year 2017 to $1,254,927 in fiscal year 2018, because tuition we received under the joint education programs decreased by $410,821 when the total number of students enrolled under these programs decreased by 488 from 2,877 students in 2017 to 2,389 students in 2018. Although this decrease in the number of students led to a decreased associated cost of revenue by $19,792 when we reduced the faculty involvement, we still carried higher overhead costs, such as rent expense, teaching and supporting related costs in order to keep the joint education programs running, irrespective of how many students were left within each joint education program. Our gross margin associated with such joint education programs also decreased by 6.2% from 58.3% in fiscal year 2017 to 52.1% in fiscal year 2018.

 

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Our gross profit associated with sales of textbook and course material increased by $4,218, from $5,813 in fiscal year 2017 to $10,030 in fiscal year 2018, because the cost of revenues associated with our textbook sales was $46,532 in 2017, as compared to $19,687 in 2018. The higher costs of revenue of $26,845 in 2017 can be attributed to higher textbook printing costs in 2017 than in 2018. As a result, gross profit associated with the textbook sales in 2017 was lower than that of 2018.

 

Our gross profit associated with Overseas Study Consulting Services increased by $472,018, from $11,182 in fiscal year 2017 to $483,200 in fiscal year 2018, due to increased recognized revenue of $486,574 when the number of students subscribed to our study abroad consulting services increased from seven students in 2017 to 49 students in 2018. Gross profit margin in this segment increased by 70.0% from 18.3% in fiscal year 2017 to 88.3% in fiscal year 2018 because we assisted more students pursuing art majors, for whom we charged higher service fees than we normally charge to students pursuing other majors with international academic institutions.

 

Our gross profit associated with Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions increased by $296,926, from $61,613 in fiscal year 2017 to $358,539 in fiscal year 2018. The smart campus projects normally leverage hardware such as sensors, internet of things devices such as digital portals, electronic blackboards, smartboards, projectors, LED display panels, high definition classroom audio and sound systems and other lab-based equipment, together with data management applications, to create total solutions for targeted Chinese universities. In order to complete each individual project, we need to purchase parts and hardware components from outside vendors, to be used in conjunction with our data management software or other solutions. Our profit margin is affected by the fluctuation of the purchase price of the applicable hardware, purchase channels, and the price we paid to laborers in the installation process. Additionally, our engagement under each contract may include different tasks and jobs, some of them only require limited hardware purchase and put more focus on the software side, while others may require more hardware components to be included. Normally, software components have higher margin than hardware components. All of these factors impact our gross margin for each reporting period. Our gross margin in fiscal year 2018 was higher than in fiscal year 2017, because the 2017 smart campus projects with FMP primarily related to 40 digital classrooms, which required more hardware components (such as digital portal, electronic blackboards, smartboards, projectors, LED display panels, high definition classroom audio and sound system) purchase. In addition, the 2017 smart campus project with Strait College of Minjiang University primarily related to server rooms upgrade, which also required more hardware components purchased from external third-party suppliers. As more purchased hardware components instead of software components were used in these smart campus projects, our gross margin in 2017 was only 6.5%. In 2018, our smart campus project with FMP primarily consisted of upgrades of experiment centers for the business school and completion of the big data center through bundling of data management software with hardware facilities and device. Additionally, we gradually reduced hardware components for FMP and focused more on FMP’s software and application, as well as maintenance and technical support. In addition, our other smart campus projects, i.e., projects with Capital Normal University, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and University of International Business and Economics were all focused on higher-margin campus data management system upgrades, and as a result, our gross profit margin in 2018 from smart campus projects reached 19.7%.

 

Operating expenses

 

The following table sets forth the breakdown of our operating expenses for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017

 

   For the years ended December 31,   Change 
   2018   %   2017   %   Amount   % 
Selling expenses  $704,060    54.9%  $541,424    57.0%  $162,636    30.0%
General and administrative expenses   579,500    45.1%   408,762    43.0%   170,738    41.8%
Total operating expenses  $1,283,560    100.0%  $950,186    100.0%  $333,374    35.1%

 

Selling expenses

 

Our selling expenses primarily include expenses incurred for various sales activities, advertisings, payroll expense paid to our sales and marketing personnel as well as shipping and delivery expenses. Selling expenses increased by $162,636 or 30.0% from $541,424 in 2017 to $704,060 in 2018. This increase in selling expenses can be attributed primarily due to an increase in our brand advertising expenses by $19,469, an increase in salary and employee welfare benefit expenses by $117,907 resulting from our hiring of additional sales and marketing personnel to promote our business, an increase of entertainment expenses associated with sales activities by $16,657, and an increase of business travel and transportation expenses by $22,781 for marketing and promotion activities. As a percentage of revenues, our selling expenses accounted for 14.6% and 13.9% of our total revenue for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The increase in selling expenses is consistent with the increase of revenues. We expect that our overall sales and marketing expenses, including but not limited to, advertising expenses, brand promotion expenses and salaries, will continue to increase in the foreseeable future if our business further grows.

 

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General and Administrative Expenses

 

Our general and administrative expenses primarily consist of employee salaries, welfare and insurance expenses, depreciation and professional service expenses. General and administrative expenses increased by $170,738 or 41.8% from $408,762 in 2017 to $579,500 in 2018, primarily due to an increase in salaries, welfare expenses and insurance expenses by $74,926, when we hired more administrative employees and expanded our management team to meet the business growth demand, an increase of professional consulting fees by $82,473 and increased property management fees by $10,124. As a percentage of revenues, general and administrative expenses were 12.1% and 10.5% of our revenue in 2018 and 2017, respectively. We expect our general and administrative expenses, including, but not limited to, salaries and business consulting expenses, to continue to increase in the foreseeable future, as our business further grows. We expect our professional fees for legal, audit, and advisory services to increase as we become a public company upon the completion of this offering.

 

Interest Income

 

Our interest income increased by $18,183 or 25.7%, from $70,743 in 2017 to $88,926 in 2018. On March 17, 2017, we advanced a $1,997,726 (RMB 13 million) interest bearing short-term loan to a third party Jinjiang Hengfeng Trading Co., Ltd. (“Hengfeng”) as working capital, with interest rate of 4.8% per annum and a maturity date of September 19, 2017. Immediately before the maturity date, on September 5, 2017, the Company and Hengfeng signed a supplemental agreement to extend the maturity date to December 19, 2018 with adjusted interest rate of 5% per annum. The loan was guaranteed by a third party Fujian Rongde Cotton Spinning Co., Ltd. As a result of the interest rate adjustment in 2018, we reported higher interest income on the third-party loan in 2018 as compared to 2017.

 

Other Income

 

Our other income primarily includes government subsidies in the form of immediate refund of the levied VAT tax back to us, as an incentive to encourage education service provider like us to expand the business. Total government subsidy amounted to $177,160 and $158,625 for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. In addition, we used cash to buy bank financial product and generated short-term investment income of $3,500 and $29,747 for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. As a result, total other income was $180,191 in 2018 and $187,794 in 2017.

 

Provision for Income Taxes

 

Our provision for income taxes was $167,813 in 2018, an increase of $9,704 from $158,109 in 2017 due to our increased taxable income. The principal business of our subsidiary, China Liberal Beijing, is performed in the PRC, and is therefore subject to PRC income tax, which is computed according to the relevant laws and regulations in the PRC. As a High and New Technology Enterprises (“HNTEs”), China Liberal Beijing is entitled to a reduced income tax rate of 15% instead of 25%, beginning December 2016, which is valid for three years. Accordingly, our income taxes provision for fiscal 2018 and 2017 were reported at a reduced rate of 15% as a result of China Liberal Beijing being approved as a HNTE. The impact of the tax holidays noted above decreased foreign taxes by $105,864 and $100,549 for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively. The benefit of the tax holidays on net income per share (basic and diluted) was $0.02 and $0.02 for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, respectively.

 

Net Income

 

As a result of the foregoing, we reported a net income of $924,440 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2018, representing a $49,634 increase from a net income of $874,806 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017.

 

Net income attributable to non-controlling interest

 

Non-controlling interests represent five minority shareholders’ 8.8228% ownership interest in our major operating subsidiary China Liberal Beijing. In December 2017, five minority shareholders contributed an aggregate of RMB 2,952,206 (approximately $453,669) cash into China Liberal Beijing, for an aggregate of 8.8228% ownership interest. Net income attributable to non-controlling interest increased by $75,979 for fiscal year 2018 as compared to fiscal year 2017, because five individual minority shareholders completed the cash injection and registration in December 2017 and only a small portion of our fiscal year 2017 net income was allocated to non-controlling shareholders in 2017. However, we allocated more net income to non-controlling shareholders in fiscal year 2018 because these minority shareholders still held the ownership interest in China Liberal Beijing as of December 31, 2018.

 

Net income attributable to the Company

 

As a result of the above, net income attributable to the Company decreased by $26,345, or 3.0%, from $869,006 in fiscal year 2017 to $842,661 in fiscal year 2018.

 

B. Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

To date, we have financed our operations primarily through cash flow from operations and working capital loans from our major shareholders, when necessary. We plan to support our future operations primarily from cash generated from our operations and cash on hand.

 

As of December 31, 2018, we had $2,077,166 in cash on hand as compared to $7,970 as of December 31, 2017. We also had $833,174 in accounts receivable for consulting services rendered, including $346,332 in accounts receivable from overseas study consulting services, $486,842 in tuition receivable from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs. 

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   December 31, 2018   December 31, 2017 
Accounts receivable- Overseas Study Consulting Services  $346,332   $- 
Accounts receivable- Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs   486,842    632,724 
Less: allowance for doubtful accounts   -    - 
Accounts receivable, net  $833,174   $632,724 

 

Most of our accounts receivable as of December 31, 2018 and 2017 were aged less than 3 months.  Between January and March 2019, we have fully collected the December 31, 2018 accounts receivable balances of $486,842 associated with Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs and $346,332 associated with our overseas study consulting services. 

 

As of December 31, 2018, we also had outstanding contract receivable of $2,577,423 derived from providing smart campus technological consulting services to FMP:

 

   December 31, 2018   December 31, 2017 
Contract receivable- “Smart Campus” related technological consulting services  $2,425,779   $845,050 
Contract receivable- “Smart campus” project maintenance and technical support fee   151,644    - 
Less: allowance for doubtful accounts   -    - 
Total contract receivable, net   2,577,423    845,050 
Less: current portion of contract receivable   960,237    160,270 
Contract  receivable, non-current  $1,617,186   $684,780 

 

For contract receivable associated with smart campus technological consulting services, our contract with FMP for providing smart campus solution related technological consulting services has the following payment schedule:

 

Payment term  RMB   USD 
2019   5,561,180   $808,593 
2020   5,561,180    808,593 
2021   5,561,180    808,593 
Total   16,683,540   $2,425,779 

 

Based on the above schedule, as of December 31, 2018, $808,593 contract receivable aged above 1 year was scheduled to be settled by FMP within 2019. Subsequently in April 2019, FMP made a payment of RMB 2 million (USD $290,799) to us as part of the 2019 payment and we expect to collect the remaining $517,794 from FMP by October 2019.

 

We believe the contract receivable related to smart campus projects are fully collectible based on the payment terms and based on our continuing cooperation with our partner Chinese universities. The collection of our accounts and contract receivable will make cash available use in our operation as working capital, if necessary.

 

As of December 31, 2018, we also had deferred revenue of  $149,560 derived from customer deposits for consulting services. Such amounts will be recognized as revenue as our consulting services are rendered.

 

As of December 31, 2018, we had positive working capital of  $3,533,188. Our working capital requirements are influenced by the level of our operations, the numerical volume and dollar value of our sales contracts, the progress of execution on our customer contracts, and the timing of accounts receivable collections.

 

We believe that our current cash and cash flows provided by operating activities, loans from our principal shareholders, and the estimated net proceeds from this offering will be sufficient to meet our working capital needs in the next 12 months from the date the audited financial statements were issued. If we experience an adverse operating environment or incur unanticipated capital expenditure requirements, or if we decide to accelerate our growth, then additional financing may be required. We cannot guarantee, however, that additional financing, if required, would be available at all or on favorable terms. Such financing may include the use of additional debt or the sale of additional equity securities. Any financing which involves the sale of equity securities or instruments that are convertible into equity securities could result in immediate and possibly significant dilution to our existing shareholders.

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In the coming years, we will be looking to other sources, such as raising additional capital by issuing shares of stock, to meet our cash needs. While facing uncertainties in regards to the size and timing of capital raises, we are confident that we can continue to meet operational needs solely by utilizing cash flows generated from our operating activities and shareholder working capital funding, as necessary.

 

The following table sets forth summary of our cash flows for the periods indicated:

 

   For the Years Ended December  31, 
   2018   2017 
Net cash provided by (used in) operating activities  $261,816   $(3,715,193)
Net cash provided by investing activities   1,881,329    2,833,955 
Net cash provided by financing activities   8,094    455,249 
Effect of exchange rate change on cash   (82,043)   (4,738)
Net increase (decrease) in cash   2,069,196    (430,727)
Cash, beginning of year   7,970    438,697 
Cash, end of year  $2,077,166   $7,970 

 

Operating Activities

 

Net cash provided by operating activities was approximately $261,816 in 2018, primarily consisted of the following:

 

Net income of $924,440 for the year;

An increase in accounts receivable of $243,769 because we provided increased overseas study consulting services to students and we had portion of tuition receivable from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs not collected back as of the balance sheet date. We fully collected our December 31, 2018 outstanding accounts receivable during the period of January to March 2019.

 

An increase in contract receivable of $1,848,073 because we provided technological consulting services to FMP for “smart campus” solutions, these amounts represent services rendered, billed but not received as of the balance sheet date. Based on our contract payment term with FMP, these outstanding contract receivable will be paid in three installment payment during 2019 to 2021. Subsequently in January 2019, we received $151,644 smart campus project maintenance support fee from FMP for our maintenance support services rendered in 2018. In addition, As of December 31, 2018, $808,593 contract receivable aged above 1 year was scheduled to be settled by FMP within 2019. Subsequently in April 2019, FMP made a payment of RMB 2 million (USD $290,799) to us as part of the 2019 payment and we expect to collect the remaining $517,794 from FMP by October 2019.

A decrease in advance to suppliers by $1,484,014 because in 2017 we made advance payments to suppliers for purchase of materials and equipment to be used in the smart campus projects and we received the purchase in 2018;

An increase of prepaid expenses and other current assets by $130,282 due to increased temporary cash advance to sales and marketing employees to expand our business, these amount were not reimbursed as of the balance sheet date and will be reimbursed in subsequent accounting period; and increased interest receivable on third party loan receivable when the interest rate was adjusted from original 4.8% per annum in 2017 to 5% per annum in 2018; and

An increase in taxes payable by $78,988 due to increased taxable income for 2018.

 

Net cash used in operating activities was approximately $3,715,193 in 2017, primarily consisted of:

 

Net income of $874,806 for the year; offset by

An increase in accounts receivable of $552,457 because we had portion of tuition receivable from Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs not collected back as of the balance sheet date. We fully collected our December 31, 2017 outstanding accounts receivable during the period of January to February 2018.

 An increase in contract receivable of $813,737 because we started to provide technological consulting services to FMP for “smart campus” solutions in 2017, these amounts represent services rendered, billed but not received as of the balance sheet date. We completed the digital classroom projects for FMP in 2017 and accordingly recognized revenue when such services were completed, passed inspection and were accepted by FMP.

An increase in advance to suppliers by $1,471,166 because we made advance payments to suppliers for purchase of materials and equipment to be used in the smart campus projects;

A decrease in deferred revenue by $1,847,265 when previously received tuition payments from the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs have been recognized as revenue when revenue recognition criteria have been met.

 

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Investing Activities

 

Net cash provided by investing activities amounted to $1,881,329 for the year ended December 31, 2018, primarily consist of:

 

Purchase of property and equipment of $83,515 and

A collection of third-party loan receivables by $1,964,844. On March 17, 2017, we advanced an interest-bearing short-term loan in the amount of $1,964,844 (RMB 13 million) to an unrelated third party, Jinjiang Hengfeng Trading Co., Ltd. (“Hengfeng”), as working capital, bearing an interest rate of 4.8% per annum with a maturity date of September 19, 2017. Immediate before the maturity date, on September 5, 2017, the Company and Hengfeng signed a supplemental agreement to extend the maturity date to December 19, 2018 with an adjusted interest rate of 5% per annum. The loan was guaranteed by another non-related third party Fujian Rongde Cotton Spinning Co., Ltd.

 

Net cash provided by investing activities amounted to $2,833,955 for the year ended December 31, 2017, primarily consisting of:

 

Purchase of property and equipment of $9,353;

An increase in loan receivable by $1,923,703 because, on March 17, 2017, we advanced an RMB 13 million interest bearing short-term loan to a non-related third party, Jinjiang Hengfeng Trading Co., Ltd.(“Hengfeng”), as working capital, bearing interest rate of 4.8% per annum with maturity date on September 19, 2017.

At the same time, we collected back a short-term interest bearing loan of $443,931 (RMB 3 million) that we advanced to another non-related third-party individual in 2016 at interest rate of 4.35% per annum.

In addition, in late 2016, we planned to expand our business into the kindergarten education sector and made an investment deposit of RMB 11.2 million with third-party Haixi Baby Early Childhood Education Center (“Haixi”) in an attempt to acquire Haixi after the due diligence is completed. The intended acquisition was terminated in early 2017 and the investment deposit of RMB 11.2 million (USD $1,659,491) was refunded back to us in 2017;

Furthermore, in 2016, we used cash of RMB18 million (equivalent to $2,663,589) to purchase a wealth management product from China Bank of Communication for 180 days in order to earn interest income at 4.8% interest rate per annum. This short-term investment was collected back upon maturity in 2017.

 

Financing Activities

 

Net cash provided by financing activities amounted to $8,094 for the year ended December 31, 2018 and primarily consist of borrowings from related parties as working capital. Such borrowing are non-interest bearing and due on demand.

 

Net cash provided by financing activities amounted to $455,249 for the year ended December 31, 2017, primarily consisting $453,669 capital contribution by five minority shareholders. In 2017, five individual shareholders contributed an aggregate of RMB2.95 million (approximately $453,669) into our main operating subsidiary China Liberal Beijing for an 8.8228% ownership interest and such amount was used to increase the paid-in capital of China Liberal Beijing. In addition, we also borrowed $1,580 from related parties as working capital.

 

Contractual obligations

 

Our main operating subsidiary China Liberal Beijing leases office spaces for its headquarter office and local branches under non-cancelable operating lease agreements with various expiration dates between 2019 and 2022. Rent expense for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 was $271,585 and $229,525, respectively.

 

As of December 31, 2018, our obligation under the operating leases for minimum rentals is as follows:

 

For the Twelve Months Ended December 31,    
2019  $305,808 
2020   282,364 
2021   277,078 
2022   110,466 
   $975,716 

 

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Trend Information

 

Other than as disclosed elsewhere in this registration statement, we are not aware of any trends, uncertainties, demands, commitments, or events that are reasonably likely to have a material effect on our net revenues, income from continuing operations, profitability, liquidity or capital resources, or that would cause reported financial information not necessarily to be indicative of future operating results or financial condition.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements as of December 31, 2018.

 

Inflation

 

Inflation does not materially affect our business or the results of our operations.

 

Seasonality

 

Seasonality affects our business or the results of our operations to some extent. We have experienced, and expect to continue to experience, seasonal fluctuations in our operations, primarily due to seasonal changes in student enrollments. Historically, our one-on-one consulting services tend to have the largest student enrollments in our third and fourth fiscal quarters, which run from July 1 to December 31 of each year, primarily because many students enroll in our courses to prepare for admissions and assessment tests in subsequent school terms, and the Sino-foreign joint programs typically make payments to us for our language training courses in October or November based on their student enrollments in the fall.

 

Critical Accounting Policies and Estimates

 

Our discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations are based upon our consolidated financial statements. These financial statements are prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP, which requires us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of our assets and liabilities and revenues and expenses, to disclose contingent assets and liabilities on the date of the consolidated financial statements, and to disclose the reported amounts of revenues and expenses incurred during the financial reporting period. The most significant estimates and assumptions include the valuation of accounts receivable, advances to suppliers, useful lives of property and equipment, the recoverability of long-lived assets, provision necessary for contingent liabilities, and revenue recognition. We continue to evaluate these estimates and assumptions that we believe to be reasonable under the circumstances. We rely on these evaluations as the basis for making judgments about the carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Since the use of estimates is an integral component of the financial reporting process, actual results could differ from those estimates. Some of our accounting policies require higher degrees of judgment than others in their application. We believe critical accounting policies as disclosed in this prospectus reflect the more significant judgments and estimates used in preparation of our consolidated financial statements.

 

The following critical accounting policies rely upon assumptions and estimates and were used in the preparation of our consolidated financial statements:

 

Uses of estimates

 

In preparing the consolidated financial statements in conformity with US GAAP, management makes estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. These estimates are based on information as of the date of the consolidated financial statements. Significant estimates required to be made by management include, but are not limited to, the valuation of accounts receivable, advances to suppliers, useful lives of property and equipment, the recoverability of long-lived assets, provision necessary for contingent liabilities and revenue recognition. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

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Accounts and contract receivable, net

 

Accounts and contract receivable are recognized and carried at original invoiced amount less an estimated allowance for uncollectible accounts.

 

The Company determines the adequacy of reserves for doubtful accounts based on individual account analysis and historical collection trend. The Company establishes a provision for doubtful receivables when there is objective evidence that the Company may not be able to collect amounts due. The allowance is based on management’s best estimate of specific losses on individual exposures, as well as a provision on historical trends of collections. Actual amounts received may differ from management’s estimate of credit worthiness and the economic environment. Delinquent account balances are written-off against the allowance for doubtful accounts after management has determined that the likelihood of collection is not probable. As of December 31, 2018 and 2017, there was no allowance recorded as the Company considers all of the accounts receivable fully collectible.

 

Our contract receivable represents balance derived from technological consulting services for “smart campus” solutions provided to Chinese university Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic (“FMP’), when the projects under the contract have been completed and accepted by FMP, but the balance has not been past due based on the contracted payment schedule. We offer longer credit terms to FMP for the purpose of maintaining long-term relationship. In addition to the “smart campus” solutions related services provided to FMP, we also have Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs services with FMP since 2011. We had not incurred any bad debts with FMP in the past, and accordingly considers the contract receivable fully collectible. Thus, there was no allowance recorded on such outstanding contract receivable for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

Revenue recognition

 

The Company’s revenue is recognized when persuasive evidence that an arrangement exists, delivery of services or products has occurred, the selling price is fixed or determinable and the collection is reasonably assured. Revenue is reported net of all value added taxes (“VAT”).

 

The primary sources of the Company’s revenue are as follows:

 

Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs

 

We recommend and coordinate the forging of partnerships between reputable accredited international universities/colleges and Chinese host universities/colleges to establish international education programs at diploma or undergraduate degree levels. Chinese host universities/colleges then utilize their existing administration ability, campus classrooms and facilities to recruit Chinese students into such programs. We also select and recommend for recruitment qualified foreign faculty to teach major-specific courses at selected Chinese host universities/colleges and bears all faculty related costs. We provide continuing support to foreign faculty, develop and deliver major course content and materials to ensure the teaching quality meeting international standards, and help optimize students’ learning outcomes and help prepare them for overseas educations and assist in obtaining course credit conversion in the event that any student decides to pursue further study overseas. We actively support and interact with enrolled students throughout their programs to ensure successful program completion. As a result of performing the above mentioned services, we are entitled to receive 30% to 50% of such student tuitions, which are first collected by the Chinese host universities/colleges from enrolled students at the beginning of each academic school year, and then remitted to us.

 

With respect to Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, the Company is not involved in recruiting students, collecting tuition or refunding tuition when students dropout, all of which are handled by the host universities/ colleges. The host universities/ colleges normally offer tuition refund if a student drops out from school within the first month of each academic school year. Collected tuition fees become non-refundable after the one-month refund policy window. Historically, for students enrolled under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, the average student dropout rate was below 1%. The Company’s contracts with Chinese host universities/colleges provide that (1) the host universities/ colleges will withhold the tuition collected from students for one to three months after the academic school year starts in September, and then remit the portion of tuition fees to the Company after the student headcounts have been finalized, and (2) the portion of tuition fee that the Company is entitled to receive is calculated based on the final actual number of students retained with the universities/colleges after any student dropout has been adjusted. Accordingly, any tuition refund has already been deducted by host universities/ colleges before the Company receives its portion of the tuition fees. For accounting purposes, at the beginning of each academic school year, the Company initially accrues the estimated refund based on an historical 1% student dropout rate, and makes subsequent true-up adjustments after the final number of students retained with the host universities/colleges is determined. Such adjustments were immaterial for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017.

 

The Company’s contracts with Chinese host universities/colleges provide that foreign teachers assigned by the Company should be substituted, and teaching textbooks, course materials and curriculums should be adjusted in a timely manner in order to ensure a satisfactory teaching result. The Chinese host universities/ colleges have the right to withhold the Company’s portion of the tuition if the Company does not take corrective action when the Company’s service deficiency is identified. Any costs related to teacher substitution, textbooks, course materials and curriculums adjustment should be borne by the Company. The Company maintains active communications with the host universities/ colleges in order to obtain feedback on the quality of the services performed. Any service deficiency is being corrected and improved on in a timely manner so as to achieve satisfactory long-term cooperation with the host universities/ colleges. There were no complaints received from the host universities/ colleges with respect to the Company’s services for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017 which required material adjustment to the amount of fees received by the Company.

 

The portion of tuition fees we receive are initially recorded as deferred revenue and recognized ratably over the applicable academic year as our teaching, management and supporting services are incurred over the whole academic school year.

 

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Sales of textbooks and course materials

 

In order to ensure the quality of the course content to meet international standards, we have developed and edited more than 16 English textbooks and course materials with emphasis on language training, and sells these textbooks and course materials to students enrolled under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs.

 

Revenue from sales of textbooks and related course materials is recognized upon delivery of textbooks and course materials, which is when the risks and titles are transferred.

 

Overseas Study Consulting Services

 

Our overseas study consulting services target those students who wish to study in foreign countries to enrich their learning experiences, expand their horizons, and gain exposure to a broader array employment possibilities. Our overseas study consulting services are typically performed one a one-on-one basis lasting between four to six months. We provide school and university information to help students to make informed decisions about which institution and major to choose, help them prepare for the school application and admission, provides study plans, language training and test preparation courses to help students to improve their foreign language abilities and help them achieve higher scores in international admission and assessment tests. We also help students with their visa applications and paperwork, and offer overseas extended services such as finding accommodation and travel assistance. In connection with these services, we collect an up-front fee based on the scope of consulting services requested by the student. 90% of the consulting fee is non-refundable and is recognized ratably as revenue over the service period, while 10% of the consulting fee is refundable and is deferred and recognized as revenue when students are successfully admitted by foreign institution and student visas are granted.

 

Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions

 

Under the concept of “creating smart campuses”, our technological consulting services utilize the advanced information technology such as cloud computing, mobile internet, artificial intelligence and big data analytics to provide total solutions to targeted Chinese universities/colleges in order to integrate and improve their teaching, research, student data management, storage and processing, and campus life services, and to optimize their teaching and operating environment and improve operational efficiency. Our “smart campus” related technological consulting service contracts are primarily on a fixed-price basis. These contracts typically require us to perform services including project planning, project solutions and design, data management application customization, installation of hardware equipment and components for digital classrooms and academic experiment centers or labs, integration of the hardware and software application, and post-contract continuous maintenance support, based on the specific needs from each customer. Upon delivery of the services, project completion inspection and customer acceptance are generally required. In the same contract, it may also include provision that require us to provide post-contract maintenance support for a period ranging from several months to three years after customized “smart campus” solutions and services are delivered.

 

We evaluate “smart campus” solution service contracts and determine whether these contracts contain multiple deliverable arrangements. An arrangement is separated, if (1) the delivered element(s) has (have) value to the customer on a stand-alone basis, (2) there is reliable evidence of the fair value of the undelivered element (s) and (3) if the arrangement includes a general right of return relative to the delivered element(s), delivery or performance of the undelivered element (s) is (are) considered probable and substantially in the control of us. If all three criteria are fulfilled, appropriate revenue recognition convention is then applied to each separate unit of accounting. If the three criteria are not met, revenue is deferred until such criteria are met or until the period in which the last undelivered element is delivered. We determine “smart campus” solution and application customization service, installations of hardware and software components, and post-contract continuous maintenance support, as separated deliverables in same fixed-fee contract, because our promise to transfer each of these services is separately identifiable from other promises in the contract. We allocate contract revenue to the identified separate units based on their relative fair value.

 

Reliable fair values are sales prices for the component when it is regularly sold on a stand-alone basis, third-party prices for similar components or, under certain circumstances, cost plus, an adequate business specific profit margin related to the relevant element. The amount allocable to the delivered elements is limited to the amount that is not contingent upon delivery of additional elements or meeting other specified performance conditions. Revenue allocated to technological consulting services for “smart campus” solution is recognized upon completion of each unit of service. In instances where substantive completion inspection and customer acceptance provisions are specified in contracts, revenues are deferred until all inspection and acceptance criteria have been met.

 

Income Tax

 

We account for current income taxes in accordance with the laws of the relevant tax authorities. Deferred income taxes are recognized when temporary differences exist between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their reported amounts in the consolidated financial statements. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the years in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period including the enactment date. Valuation allowances are established, when necessary, to reduce deferred tax assets to the amount expected to be realized.

 

An uncertain tax position is recognized as a benefit only if it is “more likely than not” that the tax position would be sustained in a tax examination. The amount recognized is the largest amount of tax benefit that is greater than 50% likely of being realized on examination. For tax positions not meeting the “more likely than not” test, no tax benefit is recorded. Penalties and interest incurred related to underpayment of income tax are classified as income tax expense in the period incurred. No significant penalties or interest relating to income taxes have been incurred during the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. All of the tax returns of the Company remain subject to examination by the tax authorities for three years from the date of filing. 

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Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In May 2014, the Financial Accounting Standard Board (the “FASB”) issued ASU No. 2014-09, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606)” (“ASU 2014-09”). ASU 2014-09 requires an entity to recognize the amount of revenue to which it expects to be entitled for the transfer of promised goods or services to customers. ASU 2014-09 will replace most existing revenue recognition guidance in U.S. GAAP when it becomes effective and permits the use of either the retrospective or cumulative effect transition method. The guidance also requires additional disclosure about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from customer contracts. In August 2015, the FASB issued ASU No. 2015-14, “Deferral of the Effective Date” (“ASU 2015-14”), which defers the effective date for ASU 2014-09 by one year. For public entities, the guidance in ASU 2014-09 will be effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017 (including interim reporting periods within those periods). In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-08, “Principal versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Revenue versus Net)” (“ASU 2016-08”), which clarifies the implementation guidance on principal versus agent considerations in the new revenue recognition standard.

 

As an “emerging growth company,” or EGC, the Company has elected to take advantage of the extended transition period provided in the Securities Act Section 7(a)(2)(B) for complying with new or revised accounting standards applicable to private companies. The amendments in this ASU are effective for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within annual reporting period beginning after December 15, 2019.

 

We adopted ASC 606 on January 1, 2019, using the modified retrospective method. We have completed the assessment of the impact of this new guidance by reviewing our existing customer contracts and current accounting policies and practices to identify differences that might result from applying the new requirements, including the evaluation of its performance obligations, transaction price, customer payments, transfer of control and principal versus agent considerations. Based on the assessment, we concluded that there was no change to the timing and pattern of revenue recognition for our current revenue streams in scope of Topic 606. The adoption of Topic 606 did not result in a cumulative catch-up adjustment to our opening balance sheets of retained earnings at the effective date and therefore there were no material changes to our consolidated financial statements. Our future financial statements will include additional disclosures as required by Topic 606.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842), which requires lessees to recognize a right-of-use asset and lease liability on the balance sheet for all leases, including operating leases, with a term in excess of 12 months. The guidance also expands the quantitative and qualitative disclosure requirements. The guidance will be effective in fiscal year 2020, with early adoption permitted, and must be applied using a modified retrospective approach. In July 2018, the FASB issued updates to the lease standard making transition requirements less burdensome. The update provides an option to apply the transition provisions of the new standard at its adoption date instead of at the earliest comparative period presented in the company’s financial statements. The new guidance requires the lessee to record operating leases on the balance sheet with a right-of-use asset and corresponding liability for future payment obligations. FASB further issued ASU 2018-11 “Target Improvement” and ASU 2018-20 “Narrow-scope Improvements for Lessors.” As an emerging growth company, we will adopt this guidance effective January 1, 2020. We do not expect the cumulative effect resulting from the adoption of this guidance will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2018, the FASB has issued Accounting Standards Update (ASU) No. 2018-02, “Reclassification of Certain Tax Effects from Accumulated Other Comprehensive Income.” The ASU amends ASC 220, Income Statement — Reporting Comprehensive Income, to “allow a reclassification from accumulated other comprehensive income to retained earnings for stranded tax effects resulting from the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act.” In addition, under the ASU, an entity will be required to provide certain disclosures regarding stranded tax effects. The ASU is effective for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, and interim periods within those fiscal years. We do not believe this guidance will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2018, the FASB issued ASU 2018-05 — Income Taxes (Topic 740): Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118 (“ASU 2018-05”), which amends the FASB Accounting Standards Codification and XBRL Taxonomy based on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (the “Act”) that was signed into law on December 22, 2017, and Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 118 (“SAB 118”) that was released by the Securities and Exchange Commission. The Act changes numerous provisions that impact U.S. corporate tax rates, business-related exclusions, and deductions and credits and may additionally have international tax consequences for many companies that operate internationally. We do not expect this guidance will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2018, the FASB Accounting Standards Board issued ASU No. 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement” (“ASU 2018-13”). ASU 2018-13 modifies the disclosure requirements on fair value measurements. ASU 2018-13 is effective for public entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, with early adoption permitted for any removed or modified disclosures. The removed and modified disclosures will be adopted on a retrospective basis and the new disclosures will be adopted on a prospective basis. We do not expect this guidance will have a material impact on our consolidated financial statements.

 

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INDUSTRY

 

All the information and data presented in this section have been derived from Frost & Sullivan (Beijing) Inc., Shanghai Branch Co. (“Frost & Sullivan”)’s industry report dated April 2019 entitled “The PRC Sino-Foreign Joint Programs, Study Aboard Consulting and Training Services, Smart Campus Solutions and School-Enterprise Cooperation Services Industry Independent Market Research” (the “Frost & Sullivan Report”), unless otherwise noted. The Frost & Sullivan Report was commissioned by us, and was independently prepared by Frost & Sullivan. Frost & Sullivan has advised us that the statistical and graphical information contained herein is drawn from its database and other sources. The following discussion projections for future growth, which may not occur at the rates that are projected or at all.

 

OVERVIEW OF THE MACROECONOMIC ENVIRONMENT IN THE PRC

 

Nominal GDP per Capital

 

According to the International Monetary Fund, from 2014 to 2018, nominal GDP per capita in the PRC rose from USD7,701.7 in 2014 to USD9,608.4 in 2018, representing a CAGR of approximately 5.7%. The growth in nominal GDP per capita has largely stimulated the development of the overseas education market in the PRC from 2014 to 2018.

 

 

Source: International Monetary Fund, Frost & Sullivan Report

 

Per Capita Disposable Income of Urban Residents in the PRC

 

According to the National Bureau of Statistic of the PRC, the per capita disposable income of urban residents in the PRC increased from USD 4,305.1 in 2014 to US$5,858.4 in 2018, representing a CAGR of 8%. In line with the trend of nominal GDP, the disposable income of urban residents in the PRC increased from 2013-2018, as there was a rise in overall household spending capabilities due the blooming economy.

 

 

Source: National Bureau of Statistic of China

Note: The GDP per capita is converted to USD at RMB/USD of 6.7

 

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Number of Students in Secondary and Higher Education Institutions

 

According to the Ministry of Education of the PRC, the total number of students in secondary education institutions was relatively stable at a CAGR of approximately 0.1%, from 85.5 million students in 2014 to 85.8 million students in 2018. Benefiting from the rapid growth of the PRC economy and the increasing demand for higher education, the total number of students in higher education institutions increased from 35.6 million students in 2014 to 38.3 million students in 2018, representing a CAGR of approximately 1.9% during the period.

 

 

Source: Ministry of Education of the PRC, Frost & Sullivan Report

 

Number of PRC Students Studying Abroad

 

 

Source: National Bureau of Statistics of the PRC, Frost & Sullivan Report

 

The growing economy has contributed to the emergence of middle-class families in the PRC and their increasing desire to send their children abroad for higher education and international experiences. According to the National Bureau of Statistics of China, from 2014 to 2018, the total number of students from the PRC studying abroad rose from 459.8 thousand to 631.0 thousand, at a CAGR of approximately 8.2% during the period.

 

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Majors among PRC Students Studying Abroad

 

With the process of globalization, the rapid growth of the global economy and stable development of the labor market, business, economy and engineering have remained top areas of study for PRC students. According to the Frost & Sullivan Report, in 2018, engineering, business and economics programs were the most popular courses of study for PRC students studying abroad, accounting for 23.7%, 16.4% and 15.1% of the entire overseas Chinese students respectively. At the same time, 7.8%, 6.9%, and 6.3% of Chinese students studying abroad chose science, language, arts as their majors in 2018.

 

 

Source: Frost & Sullivan Report

 

OVERVIEW OF THE SINO-FOREIGN JOINTLY MANAGED ACADEMIC PROGRAMS MARKET

 

Introduction

 

Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs refer to education programs offered by joint ventures of the PRC and foreign institutions. There is a large number of Sino-foreign programs in the PRC across all levels of education, primarily in undergraduate and postgraduate education, as well as diploma and non-degree higher education, and a small amount of senior secondary education programs. The Sino-foreign joint educational institutions in China usually provide various kinds of programs, including languages, and liberal arts, business. There are mainly three modes of Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs in higher education:

 

Model of Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs

Description

 

3+1 model

 

Students are required to spend their first three years of study in Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs in the PRC, including language courses and major-related courses. After they finish the 3-year study period in the PRC and pass the English qualification test, students can be admitted to the foreign educational institution in the origin country that cooperated with the program.
2+2 model Similar to 3+1 model, students in 2+2 models need to spend their first two years of study in a Sino-foreign jointly managed academic program in the PRC. After the 2-year study period, students who pass the language qualifications test can be admitted to the foreign educational institutions and continue their final 2-year study.  
4+0 model Unlike 3+1 and 2+2 models, students in 4+0 model have to finish their study within the PRC and will not study in the foreign schools. However, their syllabi and teaching materials are provided by foreign educational institutions.
Others model (2+1/2.5+1+1) Like  the 2+1 model, students have their two years in the PRC and one year in origin country; Students in 2.5+1+1 model have to complete their first two and a half years of language and major-related coursework within the PRC. After the 2.5-year study period, qualified students can be admitted to the foreign institution and study in the origin country of the foreign institution. Students completing their 1-year studies in the foreign country can receive bachelor’s degrees from the foreign institution and they can choose to continue their study for 1 more year to obtain a master’s degree in the foreign institution.

 

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Generally, except in the 4+0 model, students can receive both diplomas from the Chinese universities/colleges and foreign institutions when they complete their studies. The institution in the PRC issues a graduation certificate and a degree certificate while the foreign institution issues a certificate to student.

 

Some Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs cooperate with language training course providers to provide language training to students, such as English for academic purpose (EAP) programs to prepare students for IELTS or TOEFL. Other than English, the language training courses providers can provide other language courses to the schools, such as German, Italian and Japanese courses.

 

Market Size of Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs in the PRC

 

The stable growth of the PRC’s economy has driven the rise of incomes and helped to improve the education level of its people. People have higher requirements for educational credentials and are more willing to invest in high-quality education for the next generation. Therefore, Sino-foreign jointly managed programs are getting more popular in the PRC and have seen stable growth since 2014. According to the Frost & Sullivan Report, the revenue of Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs in the PRC increased from USD2.0 billion in 2014 to USD2.7 billion in 2018, representing a CAGR of 7.7%. Along with this increasing demand for high-quality education in the PRC market, the market for Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs is expected to be USD3.9 billion in 2023, at a CAGR of 7.5% from 2019 to 2023.

  

 

Source: Frost & Sullivan Report

Note: The Market Size is converted to USD at RMB/USD of 6.7

 

Market Drivers and Trends

 

Demand for High-Quality Education - The educational institutions in the PRC have a problems with ensuring qualify, which is mainly attributable to urban and rural differences, as well as PRC government education policies. The schools in first tier cities, such as Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Shenzhen, usually have government support with more education funding and are able to provide higher quality education, such as higher quality teachers and teaching materials, than the schools in second and third tiers cities. For examples, higher education institutions designated in Project 985, Project 211, and Plan 111 that were announced by the PRC government have received more resources and support from the government. As household incomes are increasing in the PRC, PRC families are willing to pay more for better education for future generations, because they believe education can increase their children’s chances in a competitive society and help them build a better future. Sino-foreign joint programs are unlike normal domestic educational institutions in the PRC as they can provide teaching materials and study syllabi similar to those of foreign schools and are able to provide high level languages education in languages such as English, Italian, and Japanese. Students can experience high-quality foreign education in the PRC.

 

Rapid Economic Development and Competitive Environment in the PRC- As the national economy in the PRC has witnessed rapid development, the competition between people is getting more intense. To increase personal competitiveness in the PRC, PRC students have to achieve higher educational levels and acquire qualified academic credentials. Sino-foreign joint programs provide high-quality programs with syllabi and teaching materials from foreign educational institutions which allow local students to receive foreign education within the PRC. Moreover, educational credentials are becoming more important in the job market, as employers highly value candidates with good academic levels and certifications from prestigious PRC and foreign universities. Therefore, Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs have become more popular under this competitive environment as they are able to provide better educational services and have more opportunities for students to study abroad or pursue exchange programs.

 

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Diversified Disciplines and Majors - Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs provide a broader selection of disciplines and majors for students compared to domestic universities in the PRC. Students attending such programs are able to receive higher quality educational services and increase their competitiveness in the PRC education market. Domestic universities in the PRC may not have the resources to provide some of the majors or are unable to reach the same quality as foreign universities, such physiotherapy, marine engineering, heritage preservation, etc. Therefore, more domestic educational institutions in China tend to cooperate with foreign educational institutions to provide various disciplines and majors to fulfill the needs of different students. Moreover, Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs usually provide languages training to students, especially IELTS (International English Language Testing System) and TOELF (Test of English as Foreign Language) training. Other than English, some of the programs also provide language training depending on the origin country of foreign cooperators, such as Italian, Spanish, French, and Japanese.

 

Regulations for Sino foreign Jointly Managed Academic Program

 

The State Council has launched the Regulations of the PRC on Sino-foreign Cooperative Education《中華人民共和國中外合作辦學條例》since 1 March, 2003, which was later amended and became effective on 18 July, 2013. The Ministry of Education enforced the Implementing Measures for the Regulation of the PRC on Sino-foreign Cooperative Education《中華人民共和國中外合作辦學條例實施辦法》in 2004. These laws aim to regulate the establishment and operation of educational establishments in the PRC by joint venture of foreign educational institutions and local Chinese educational institutions which primarily seek to enroll Chinese students. The Sino-foreign joint ventures that apply to run Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs are required to follow these regulations and ensure the quality of education they provide. For example, these regulations require the foreign teachers and administrators employed by the Sino-foreign joint institutions to possess a bachelor’s degree or above, have related occupational certificates, and have at least two years of work experience in education and teaching. Additionally, Sino-foreign joint ventures are not allowed to conduct compulsory education or education of certain fields, such as military, police and political education. Moreover, all Sino-foreign joint educational institutions need to be approved by the relevant government authorities and obtain Sino-foreign cooperative education licenses (中外合作辦學許可證).

 

Overview of Competitive Landscape of Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs in the PRC

 

According to Ministry of Education of the PRC, as of June 2018, there were over 2,300 Sino-foreign joint institutions or programs in the PRC, of which nearly 1,100 of Sino-foreign joint institutions or programs were undergraduate level or above. The Sino-foreign Joint institutions and programs are distributed throughout the PRC geographically, expect certain remote areas, such as Tibet and Ningxia. The majority of Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs are located in well-developed areas, especially in the coastal areas, first-tier cities and second-tier cities, such as Beijing, Shanghai, Jiangsu, Shandong, Zhejiang, and Guangdong, because these areas have better economic environments and higher incomes, as well as higher populations that have larger demand for Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs.

 

OVERVIEW OF STUDY ABROAD CONSULTING AND TRAINING SERVICES MARKET

 

Definition

 

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The PRC study abroad consulting and training services industry consists of any related study service products aimed at assisting PRC students who intend to study abroad. Study abroad consulting and training services intuitions are approved by an educational service organization cooperating with overseas higher education institutions, academic programs and other academic institutions, or to operate independently, to conduct study abroad consulting and training service to assist PRC students to study abroad. Such institutions consist of professional study abroad consulting institutions, comprehensive study service consulting agency service sector, online study consulting platforms and academic institutions.

 

PRC study abroad consulting and training service institutions provide study planning programs for PRC students who intend to study abroad. They prepare tailored study plans, assist students in preparing materials for application processes, prepare applicants for interviews with overseas institutions and schools, and provide consulting services for communications. These study plaining programs aim to help the PRC students have better understanding toward study life in foreign countries and provide assistances during the study abroad application process.

 

Market Size

 

According to the Frost & Sullivan Report, the continuing increase in disposable income per household provides income flexibility for parents to invest in higher quality education programs for their children. These households are primarily in tier 1 to 3 cities but lower tier cities are also experiencing a steady growth in their incomes as well. This growth in disposable income and wealth among cities will have a positive effect on expanding the number of students studying abroad and may increase the demand for overseas study abroad consulting services. The market size by revenue of the study abroad consulting and training services in the PRC increased from USD1.9 billion in 2013 to USD3.8 billion in 2018 and is expected to reach USD7.3 billion by 2023, at a CAGR of 13.5% from 2019.

  

 

Source: Frost & Sullivan Report

Note: The Market Size is converted to USD at RMB/USD of 6.7

 

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Market Drivers and Trends

 

Economic development leads to more destination choices- The cost of studying abroad has become increasingly more affordable as the booming economy has allowed more parents and students to meet the high costs associated with overseas study, giving more Chinese students the opportunity to study abroad. These households were mostly found in tier 1 to 3 cities but lower tier cities were found to be steadily increasing their income. English-speaking countries, like the United States, United Kingdoms, Australia and Canada remain the top destinations to study abroad. Although the majority of students still choose these countries, the number of students who choose to study in non-English speaking countries has increased in recent years, especially to countries such as France, Germany, Italy, Japan and South Korea. This is primarily due to the rise in lower-tier cities and the overall affordability of non-English speaking countries, where the cost of tuition, educational programs, and living expenses are much lower than English speaking countries. In addition, instead of traditional English-speaking countries, emerging study abroad educational markets, such as Spain and Italy, have become increasingly attractive for students to study abroad in. At the same time, specific advantages of non-English regions, such as the industrial advantages of Germany and Japan, and Italy’s luxury goods and art industry, have become key considerations for attracting Chinese students to study abroad. According to the Frost & Sullivan Report, there were more students from the PRC studying in France, Italy, the South Korea, Japan and Germany in 2018 than in 2014.

 

 

Source: Frost & Sullivan Report

 

China’s Belt and Road Initiative- The Belt and Road Initiative is viewed as “the 21st-century Silk Road” connecting countries in Asia, Africa and Europe such as Malaysia, South Korea, Russia, etc. with the hopes of promoting the development of Asian, African and European countries along the route, regardless of economic, trade, politics, culture and so on. This has created broader horizons for students to experience and study in. Through studying in countries along the Belt and Road, students can accumulate valuable cultural knowledge, as well as experience the culture and political business environments of these countries, which is conducive to students’ future career development. With the Belt and Road countries becoming new growth points, according to the Ministry of Education of the PRC, in 2017, the number of students studying in the countries along the “Belt and Road” was 66,100, an increase of 15.7% over the previous year. The Belt and Road Initiative brings more choices to Chinese students and indirectly promotes the demand for study abroad consulting and training services market.

 

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Change in student preferences- According to the Frost and Sullivan Report, there are also trends evident in the change of degree preferences by Chinese students. Engineering, business and economics have been the most popular degrees pursued by PRC students. However, more recently there is a rising trend in students choosing to follow their own academic preferences over parental preferences and what is traditionally expected of them. According to the Frost & Sullivan Report, the percentage of students from the PRC majoring in art, literature, languages and education have increased in 2018.

 

 

Source: Frost & Sullivan Report

 

OVERVIEW OF THE SMART CAMPUS SOLUTIONS MARKET

 

Introduction and Definition

 

A smart campus is a school campus that uses innovated technologies, information and communications technology (ICT) tools, Internet of Things (IoT) and digitalized equipment to increase the efficiency and productivity of schools.

 

The building of a smart campus consists of setting up both software and hardware. The service provider supplies customizable software as a service (SaaS) according to the school’s requirements, such as online e-learning systems, registrar administration systems, office automation systems, teaching resources systems, and human resources. The users of these systems include students, teachers and school management teams. The big data collected from the smart campus systems can provide analytics for schools to improve the efficiency.

 

Other than software, hardware is also a crucial part of a smart campus. The providers need to ensure the campus will have enough wireless access points (AP) and full Internet coverage to allow teachers and students access to the Internet at any time. Moreover, the building of smart classrooms is a key point of smart campus. Smart classrooms in smart campuses should have a multimedia system consisting of essential multi-media devices, such as computers and projectors. Additionally, recording systems, IoT systems, classroom cloud desktop and wireless network coverage are essential for a smart classroom. Other than classrooms, smart campus solutions can also be use in car parks, dormitories, canteens and different parts of a campus as the providers can provide different services according to the locations and users.

 

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Market Size of Smart Campus Solutions in the PRC

 

According to the Frost & Sullivan Report, the rapid technology development combined with support from the government, such as the Ten Years Development Plan of Education Informatization (2011-2020) and the Main Working Points of Education Informatization in 2016, the smart campus solutions market has seen growth from 2014 to 2018. The market of smart campus solutions increased from USD4.4 billion to USD6.8 billion in 2018, representing a CAGR of 11.2%. With continued development and upgrade of the education industry in the PRC, more schools are expected to use smart campus solutions. According to the Frost and Sullivan Report, the smart campus solutions coverage in the PRC has increased from approximately 34% in 2016 to approximately 50% in 2018. Demand is expected to boost the market for smart campus solutions and will reach USD10.2 billion by 2023, at a CAGR of 8.5% from 2019 to 2023.

 

 

Source: Frost & Sullivan Report

Note: The Market Size is converted to USD at RMB/USD of 6.7.

 

Market Drivers and Trends

 

Supports from the PRC government- The PRC government has implemented policies to support the development of the education industry in the PRC, including the promotion of smart campus and education informatization. For example, the Ten Years Development Plan of Education Informatization (2011-2020) 《教育信息化十年發展規劃(2011-2020)》 released in 2012 by the Ministry of Education aimed to build up green, safe and civilized smart campuses by increasing internet coverage on campuses, safety information platforms, set up and usage of smart classrooms, and data management centers for teaching and research. The Ministry of Education announced The Main Working Points of Education Informatization 《教育信息化工作要點》 in 2016 targeted to achieve 95% internet coverage for primary school and middle schools in the country. With this support from the government and rapid technology development, the market of smart campus solutions is expected to have strong growth.

 

Increasing internet coverage and technology development- Under the stable growing trend of national economy and technology development in the PRC, the Internet coverage has been increased and more people can now have access to the Internet. According to the National Bureau of Statistics of China, there were about 772 million people with access to the Internet in the PRC in 2017. The Internet has rapidly become a part of people’s daily lives. According to the Frost & Sullivan Report, there will be over 1 billion people with access to the internet in the PRC by 2023. As a result, demand for smart campuses is expected to increase in the future.

 

Key Success Factors for Smart Campus Solutions

 

Ability to provide one-stop smart campus solutions- Smart campus is becoming popular in different level of schools and more schools are willing to invest in smart campus solutions. The ability to provide one-stop smart campus solutions is an important point when clients are choosing their providers. As most of the clients may not have comprehensive and professional knowledge about the software and hardware in smart campuses, the services providers with the ability to provide one-stop solutions, such as the set-up of smart classrooms, designing mobile apps and online platforms and set up of internet access points tend to have more competitive advantages. Moreover, due to the maturation of technology and expansion of the market, more companies are expected to participate in the smart campus solutions market. In order to compete with other participants, the ability to provide one-stop smart campus solutions and pricing strategy are critical to increasing competitiveness in the market.

 

Research and development of smart campus systems- The building of a smart campus requires various systems, such as different managing systems, human resources systems, multi-media systems, recording systems in smart classrooms and others online platforms for students and teachers. The development of these systems requires professional talents and investment in research and development. Smart campus solutions providers need to keep up with technology trends and develop suitable software for their systems. Moreover, the providers need to update the systems on a regular base to satisfy the need from customers and provide excellent user experiences.

 

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OVERVIEW OF JOB READINESS TRAINING MARKET IN THE PRC

 

Introduction

 

School-enterprise cooperation is a popular theme among educational institutions including vocational schools and universities who are designing curriculum and courses for students based on the demand of enterprises, which is expected to boost the development of vocational education and university education and help enterprises to find competent employees. Enterprises are encouraged to participate in the operation and curriculum design of vocational schools and universities in the form of sole proprietorships or joint ventures, and grant more internship and/or full-time vacancies to students from these schools.

 

Major modes of school-enterprise cooperation in the PRC consist of education reform on classroom content and curriculum, teacher training, construction of practice facilities, job readiness training, innovation and entrepreneurship fund, and education reform on innovation and entrepreneurship.

 

 

Source: Frost & Sullivan Report

 

Job readiness training is one of the modes of School-enterprise cooperation, which refers to programs which prepare students for a specific job. Benefiting from the rapid development and supportive policies of school-enterprise cooperation, market participants in the PRC are offering job readiness training under the framework of school-enterprise cooperation. Different from traditional job readiness training, these training programs under school-enterprise cooperation are designed based on specific requirements and conditions of the enterprises and will help students to be better equipped to serve the enterprises at their respective job positions.

 

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Market Size of Job Readiness Training Market

 

Major participants in the job readiness training market in the PRC include educational institutions, consulting service providers and enterprises. According to the Frost & Sullivan Report, from 2014 to 2018, total market size for job readiness training in the PRC rose from $5.5 billion in 2014 to $8.6 billion in 2018, representing a CAGR of approximately 11.5%. Stimulated by the issuance of Several Opinions of the General Office of the State Council of the PRC on Deepening Integration of Industries into Education (《国务院办公厅关于深化产教融合的若干意见》) and continuous support from Ministry of Education and National Development and Reform Commission of the PRC, overall market size of job readiness training is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 12.6% from $9.7 billion in 2019 to $15.5 billion by the end of 2023.

 

 

Note: Market size is converted into RMB at RMB/USD of 6.7.

Source: Frost & Sullivan Report

 

Market Drivers and Trends

 

Stimulus government policies – The development of school-enterprise cooperation and job readiness training in the PRC is largely driven by government policies and regulations. For example, in 2014 and 2015, the State Council of the PRC stated that vocational schools and universities should enhance their integration with enterprises in order to train qualified workers and improve the education system. Further, in 2017, the announcement of Several Opinions of the General Office of the State Council on Deepening Integration of Industries into Education (《国务院办公厅关于深化产教融合的若干意见》) has set the strategic development plan to encourage the cooperation between vocational schools and universities, and enterprises, with the aim to match higher education with the real demands of enterprises.

 

Rising demand for practical talent – Supported by the restructuring of various industries and the booming labor market in the PRC, the demand for technical and practical talents has been continuously increasing over the past five years. In order to satisfy higher requirements on talents, the development and implementation practical programs and job readiness trainings are needed to better cultivate practical talent, which is expected to boost the growth of job readiness training market in the PRC.

 

Fierce competition in job market – As the number of graduates rises, graduates in the PRC face slowing employment demand and fierce competition. Enterprises are looking for more experienced and practical talent who are better equipped to work at specific positions. Further, enhancing employability of their graduates being one of their major missions, it is crucial for educational institutions to cooperate with enterprises to attract funding, improve educational resources, enhance faculty development, and design better curriculum for students. This will contribute to the expansion of school-enterprise cooperation and job readiness training market.

 

Key Success Factors of Job Readiness Training Market

 

Stable cooperation with enterprises – The establishment and maintenance of long-term business relationships with enterprises is essential for market participants to ensure the continuous and stable operation of the programs.

 

Availability of qualified faculty – It is crucial for market participants to recruit and organize a team of qualified teaching staff, as qualified teachers are considered as the most important educational resource and will have a direct effect on the quality of the programs.

 

Sufficient student enrollment – Vocational schools and universities are the major sources of students enrolled in school-enterprise initiatives and job readiness training programs. It is important for market participants to maintain a stable relationship with educational institutions and have enough students to participate in their programs.

 

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BUSINESS

 

Overview

 

We are an exempted company incorporated in the Cayman Islands on February 25, 2019. Through our operating company China Liberal Beijing, incorporated in the PRC on August 10, 2011, we are an educational service provider operating under the “China Liberal” brand in the PRC. Our mission is to provide China’s students with the tools to excel in a global environment. We strive to meet the needs of the ever growing number of young talents in China.

 

We provide a wide variety of educational services and products intended to address the needs of our partnering schools and our students:

 

Services provided under Sino-foreign jointly managed academic programs (“Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs”), which services represent the core of our business;
Overseas study consulting services (“Overseas Study Consulting Services”);
Technological consulting services provided to targeted Chinese universities to improve campus information and data management systems and optimize teaching, operating and management environment, creating a “smart campus”; these consulting services include campus intranet solution buildout, school management software customization, smart devices (mainly Internet of things, or IoT devices, extending the Internet connectivity to physical devices) installation and testing, and school management data collection and analysis, all of which can be specifically are tailored to meet a client’s particular needs (“Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions”); and
Tailored job readiness training to graduating students (“Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education”), acting as the key bridge between our partner schools and employers, but we did not start generating revenue from this line of business until January 2019.

 

We also develop and provide textbooks and other course materials to students enrolled under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs to ensure the quality of students’ learning outcomes.

 

We started generating revenue in the year ended December 31, 2012 through our services provided under certain Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs. We continued to maintain and expand this core business throughout the years, giving us revenues of $2,821,602 and $2,410,781 for the years ended December 31, 2017, and 2018, respectively, representing 72.6% and 50.11% of our net revenues for those respective years. A vast majority of these revenues derives from our two major partners, Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic, or FMP and Minjiang University. Additionally, since starting our Overseas Study Consulting Services in 2017, this line of business has been a source of growing revenue. We generated $60,947 and $547,521 in revenues from our Overseas Study Consulting Services for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018, respectively, representing a sharp increase from 2% to 11% of our total revenue of that respective year. We also started generating revenues from our Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions business in 2017, with revenues of $950,992 and $1,820,974, representing 25% and 38% for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2018, respectively. We did not generate any revenue from our Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education business because this line of business was newly added in December 2018.

 

We started our operations in Beijing where our headquarters are located. We established our first branch in Fujian Province in 2011 and subsequently expanded to various locations in the PRC, covering the cities of Hangzhou, Fuzhou and Ji’nan on the east coast of China.

 

Our Services and Products

 

We currently primarily generate revenue from providing the following services or products:

 

Our Services Provided under Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs

 

Background

 

Formal education in China is typically comprised of kindergarten, primary school, middle school, high school and some combination of vocational school, university, junior college, and graduate school. There are several key differences between studying at universities and junior colleges. These differences include: (i) universities grant bachelor’s degrees to students graduating after 4 years of study, while junior colleges grant diplomas to students graduating after 3 years of study; and (ii) students enrolled in junior colleges typically obtain lower scores on the National College Entrance Examination open to most students graduating high school, and hence, are not able to meet the score threshold of a university. Nevertheless, students enrolled in junior colleges may have opportunities to transfer to a degree-based university or program, depending on the school they enroll in.

 

The below chart illustrates the main segments of China’s education system:  

 

 

Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs refer to education programs offered by joint ventures of the PRC and foreign institutions. There are a large number of Sino-foreign programs in the PRC across all levels of education, primarily focused on undergraduate and postgraduate education, as well as diploma and non-degree higher education, and a small amount of senior secondary education programs. The Sino-foreign joint educational institutions in China usually provide various kinds of programs, including languages, liberal arts and business. 

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Typically, the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs offer degree programs to their students in the form of “2+1”, “2+2”, “3+1” or “2.5+1+1”, which enable enrolled students to study at the Chinese host universities/colleges for the first two to three years (as applicable), and finish their remaining one or two years of academic studies at the overseas partner universities.

 

The Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs are unique in that the first two or three years’ studies at Chinese host universities/colleges help students to increase their exposure to foreign textbooks and curriculums, improve their foreign language skills, and experience cross-cultural international education without leaving the country. It is proven to be attractive to Chinese students, because they can enjoy the opportunity to study abroad within the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs without undergoing another lengthy admission process from a foreign university. Moreover, for students continuing their studies in a foreign country, they can benefit from their early exposure to the internationally recognized curriculum and learning environment.

 

Additionally, Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs are designed to be sufficiently flexible to meet the needs of students in different majors and with different personal goals. Students may choose to finish their remaining one or two years of academic studies at the overseas partner universities, or continue their studies with the same Chinese host universities/colleges until graduation. Students enrolled in the programs can earn academic credits from both the Chinese host universities and the overseas partner universities, and can receive both Chinese and foreign diplomas/certificates when they complete their studies.

 

Further, this arrangement affords lower costs to students as compared with conventional full length studies for associate or undergraduate degrees overseas because the tuitions and living expenses are generally lower in China.

 

Our Services Provided under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs

 

Under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, the Chinese host universities/colleges can utilize their existing administration ability, campus classrooms and facilities to recruit Chinese students into such programs, while leveraging the recognized name and reputation of the international partner universities.

 

These Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs are required to obtain Sino-foreign cooperation education permits from the appropriate level of education authorities of the PRC, depending on the level of degrees. Applications for these permits are submitted by the programs under their own names, and we as service provider are not required to obtain permits separately. 

 

Under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, we are responsible for one or more of the followings, depending on the terms of the agreements we have in connection with a specific program:

 

(1)recommending and coordinating with accredited international universities to forge partnership with Chinese host universities/colleges to establish international education programs that offer degrees to graduating students;
(2)developing, drafting, delivering and teaching language course content and teaching materials to improve students’ language skills to meet admission and academic standards overseas;
(3)electing, recommending and assisting in recruiting qualified foreign faculty to teach major-specific courses or language courses at selected Chinese host universities and provide continuing support to such foreign faculty;
(4)developing, drafting, delivering and teaching major-specific course content and teaching materials tailored towards the program course curriculum to ensure that the teaching quality and the entire program quality meet international standards, to optimize students’ learning outcome and to prepare them for further education overseas; and
(5)providing course credit conversion services, offering students consistency and transparency in evaluating their academic achievement, and ensuring the academic credits these students earned at Chinese host universities can be recognized internationally.

 

Typically, students pay to the Sino-foreign Joint Managed Academic Programs tuition fees ranging from RMB15,000 (approximately US$2,268) to RMB28,000 (approximately US$4,233) per student per academic school year. As a result of performing the above-mentioned services, we are entitled to receive approximately 30% to 50% of such student tuitions. The Chinese host universities/colleges collect tuition paid by enrolled students at the beginning of each academic school year in September, and our portion is usually remitted to us by the host universities/colleagues in November of the same year.

 

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From our inception in 2011 to December 31, 2018, we have coordinated and actively engaged in providing services under several Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs. The following is a list of the programs we engaged in for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017. As of the date of this prospectus, we have ceased recruitment of students to the FUT ISEC Program and NZTC Program for the reasons discussed below.

 

Program Name   Chinese host university/college   Launch time
(i) FMP Australia English for Academic Purposes Program (“FMP EAP Program”)   Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic (“FMP”) (formerly IEN College of Minjiang University, and changed its name to FMP after rebranding in January 2017)   September 2011
         
(ii) Fujian-Taiwan Universities English for Academic Purposes Program (“Fu-Tai EAP Program”)   Strait College of Minjiang University   September 2011
         
(iii) Strait College International General Education Courses Program (“Strait IGEC Program”)   Initially hosted by IEN College of Minjiang University in September 2013, then transferred to Strait College of Minjiang University after IEN College of Minjiang University rebranded to FMP in January 2017   September 2013
         
(iv) Fujian University of Technology International Scholarly Exchange Curriculum Program (“FUT ISEC Program”)   Fujian University of Technology   September 2013
         
(v) Sino-New Zealand NZTC Program (“NZTC Program”)   Fujian Preschool Education College   September 2013

  

(i) FMP EAP Program

 

We started providing our EAP language training services to FMP since September 2011 (the “FMP EAP Program”). FMP offers various Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs (the “FMP-MP Joint Programs”) as a Sino-foreign joint education institute established between Chinese host FMP and Melbourne Polytechnic of Australia (“MP”) in Australia. FMP was formerly known as IEN College of Minjiang University, which later rebranded to Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic, or FMP, and became a standalone legal entity.

 

Students enrolled in the FMP-MP Joint Programs typically follow the “2.5+1+1” model, studying two years in FMP in the PRC, half a year language training in Australia language training school, one undergraduate year in MP to receive a bachelor’s degree and one more postgraduate year in MP to receive a master’s degree. Students who successfully follow this model will earn their diplomas from both FMP and MP upon graduation. For those students who choose not to further pursue the overseas education, they will stay with FMP for additional one year to complete the general courses education to satisfy a three-year junior college education requirement in order to obtain a diploma from FMP.

 

Students taking our language courses under the FMP EAP Program are typically those who have lower English proficiency and who would have difficulty in being admitted to a university overseas. However, these students benefit from the intensive English curriculum, receiving two years of Australia English for Academic Purposes, or EAP training from our teachers, with 756 class hours for their freshman year and 252 class hours for their sophomore year. Each class typically accommodates 25 to 29 students. Upon completion of two-year EAP courses, students are targeted to meet level of proficiency of 5.5 (between modest user and competent user level) on a nine-band scale in IELTS, an international standardized test of English language proficiency for non-native English language speakers, and accepted by most Australian, British, Canadian and New Zealand academic institutions, and students are expected to be ready to attend classes in MP in their major or area of focus.

 

Pursuant to our currently effective EAP Agreement with FMP, which covers students in graduating classes from 2019 to 2023, we are responsible for designing curriculum meeting EAP English standards, recommending and managing EAP faculty, providing a mobile learning platform to students, providing a course preparation platform to teachers, and execution and performance of the curriculum we develop. Our educational services and responsibility only cover the first two year of EAP training. Afterwards, we are not responsible for providing additional services to students, no matter whether they choose to continue to stay with FMP for one additional year for a diploma, or choose to pursue the overseas study in Australia for higher education.

 

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Our EAP faculty under the FMP EAP Program consists of English teachers we recommend to FMP for recruitment from overseas and in the PRC. These teachers split their teaching responsibilities depending on the requirements and nature of a specific course. For example, a spoken English course is typically staffed with native English speakers, while a reading comprehension course is typically staffed with English teachers who speak Mandarin Chinese.

 

The average tuition fee that FMP charges to enrolled students is RMB18,000 (USD 2,721) per student per school year. Since our services only cover the first two-year EAP courses training, we receive RMB9,000 (approximately $1,360) per student per school year for the first year and RMB3,000 (approximately $453) per student per school for the second year.

 

As of December 31, 2018, there were 551 students enrolled in the FMP EAP Program. Since 2014, we have served a total of 1,988 students (including those enrolled in IEN College of Minjiang University before the institute’s rebranding).

 

(ii) Fu-Tai EAP Program

 

We provide Fu-Tai EAP Program in connection with the Fujian-Taiwan Universities Joint Talent Training Program (the “Joint Talent Program”), established in September 2011 between Chinese host Strait College of Minjiang University and Taiwan Chinese Culture University.

 

The Joint Talent Program follows the “3+1” dual campuses model. Students spend the first two years and the last year of their university studies at Strait College and their third year at Taiwan Chinese Culture University. At graduation, students receive a bachelor’s degree from Minjiang University and certificate of completion or academic credit certificate from Taiwan Chinese Culture University.

 

Students enrolled in the Joint Talent Program receive two years of EAP training from our teachers (even if they spend three years at Strait College). These students include those who major in business and art. Students in business majors receive 360 class hours of EAP training during their first two years, and art students receive 300 class hours. Each class typically accommodates 25 to 29 students. Upon completion, the targeted level of English proficiency for average students is CET4, i.e., PRC’s College English Test Band 4, the level required to be met upon graduating a four-year university; for some students, their targeted level of proficiency can be CET6 (the level required to be met upon graduating a master’s program) or 5.5 to 6.0 (from between modest user and competent user to competent user level) in IELTS.

 

Pursuant to our current EAP Agreement with Strait College, which covers students graduating from 2020 to 2024, we are responsible for designing the curriculum meeting EAP English standard, recommending and managing EAP faculty, providing a mobile learning platform to students, providing a course preparation platform to teachers, and execution and performance of the curriculum we develop.

 

Similar to our FMP EAP Program, our EAP faculty under the Fu-Tai EAP Program consists of English teachers we recommend to Strait College for recruitment from overseas and in the PRC. These teachers split their teaching responsibilities depending on the requirements and nature of a specific course.

 

As of December 31, 2018, there had been 783 students enrolled in the Joint Talent Program. Since 2014, we have assisted 4,291 students.

 

(iii) Strait IGEC Program

 

The International General Education Courses (“IGEC”) program is a Sino-foreign joint education program developed and introduced by the Chinese Service Center for Scholarly Exchange (“CSCSE”), a public organization under the MOE of the PRC, in order to improve the overall reform and internationalization of PRC’s higher education. As a nationwide program, it is designed to encourage the exchange of teachers and students and the recognition of academic credits and degrees between Chinese and foreign universities. Currently there are four universities that are qualified to offer IGEC programs and we work with one of them. These participating universities have to undergo the review and approval of experts designated by CSCSE every year.

 

The Strait IGEC Program was launched in July 2013. Students enrolled in this program typically follow the “2+2” model which requires them to study at Chinese host Strait College for at least the first two years. Following the initial two year term, students may choose to finish their remaining two years’ academic study overseas. Students in the “2+2” model under the Strait IGEC Program can transfer their academic credits to a partner school overseas, and upon graduation, will receive bachelor’s degrees from both Strait College of Minjiang University and the foreign university. Other students may choose the “4+0” model and spend the entire four years studying at Strait College, upon which they would receive an undergraduate degree from the Chinese host Strait College of Minjiang University. For those students who choose the “4+0” model, our educational services and responsibility cover the whole four-year period.

 

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We are responsible for offering 14 courses, including six English courses, four general knowledge courses and four major-related courses. All of these courses are provided by us and taught in English by the faculty we recommend to the program.

 

For the six English courses, we are responsible for designing the English intensive courses, providing the entire curriculum and teaching materials (including those for IELTS), and assisting in organizing and training the English teaching faculty, consisting of English teachers recruited from overseas and in the PRC. These six English courses are provided to students during their freshman and sophomore years, and include College Academic English Writing 1 (the general education course as required by an IGEC program), English Phonetics, Spoken English 1, Spoken English 2, Spoken English 3 and Spoken English 4. These English courses are based on English for General Purposes or everyday English, with focuses and directed by EAP, under the framework of English for Specific Purposes (a student’s major).

 

Students under the Strait IGEC Program are also required to complete four general knowledge courses provided by us. Depending on a student’s major, these courses can fall into categories including academic language and thinking, science, art and human science, and social studies.

 

The major-related courses we offer under the Strait IGEC Program are developed by adopting the major-specific curriculum systems offered at universities in the U.S. and are taught with English textbooks used by U.S. universities, with goals of strengthening academic foundations but focusing on application of knowledge. Currently, the involved majors include Economics and Accounting.

 

Under the Strait IGEC Program, we are responsible for promotion of the program, recruitment of students, staffing and management of foreign language teachers, and ensuring students to be connected with appropriate foreign universities in North America or Europe for the second half of their four-year studies for the “2+2” students.

 

The Strait IGEC Program is governed by an agreement originally signed between the Company and IEN College of Minjiang University in July 2013. After its rebranding efforts in 2017, IEN College began its operations under the name of Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic, or FMP and ceased to host the IGEC program, and Strait College of Minjiang University took over this agreement without modifications by an amendment to host our Strait IGEC Program. This agreement between the Company and Strait College is effective for ten years from July 8, 2013, and will be automatically renewed for another ten years if at the time of expiration Strait College is still cooperating with CSCSE to host the IGEC program going forward.

 

The average tuition fee that the Strait College charges to enrolled students is RMB28,000 (approximately $4,233) per school year, and we receive 35%/40% of the tuition fee. The portion of tuition fees we receive from Strait College is RMB 9,800 ($1,481) per student per school year for enrolled students for the first two years, and RMB 11,200 ($1,693) per student per school year for enrolled students for the remaining two years.

 

As of December 31, 2018, there had been 893 students enrolled in the Strait IGEC Program. Over the years, we have assisted the aggregate of 4,507 students.

 

(iv) ISEC Program

 

The International Scholarly Exchange Curriculum (“ISEC”) program is a PRC government sponsored and highly profiled program affiliated with the China Scholarship Council (“CSC”) directly under the MOE in the PRC.

 

The FUT ISEC Program is governed by an agreement signed between the Company and FUT in December 2012. The program officially started providing courses to students in September 2013. By adopting and utilizing English textbooks used by U.S. universities, and by implementing interactive bilingual lectures, the FUT ISEC Program focuses on integrating domestic and international curriculum systems and teaching concepts to ensure students’ exposure to international learning environment and instill in them strong English communication skills, a global vision, and team-work spirit, making them attractive to domestic and international employers, no matter which model students choose to follow.

 

Students enrolled in this program typically follow the “2+2” model which requires them to study at Chinese host FUT for the first two years, and finish their remaining two years’ academic study overseas. Other students may choose the “4+0” model and spend the entire four years studying at Strait College. Students in the “2+2” model under the FUT ISEC Program can transfer their academic credits to a partner school overseas, and upon graduation, will receive bachelor’s degrees from both FUT and the foreign university.

 

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Under the FUT ISEC Program, we are responsible for promoting the program, recruiting students, staffing and managing foreign language teachers, and ensuring students are connected with the appropriate foreign universities in North America or Europe for the second half of their four-year studies. Students enrolled in the FUT ISEC Program can transfer their academic credits to a partner school overseas, and upon graduation, will receive bachelor’s degrees from both FUT and the foreign university.

 

We are responsible for offering 16 courses (18 for architecture majors), including six English courses, four general knowledge courses and six major-related courses (eight for architecture majors).

 

For the six English courses, we are responsible for providing the entire curriculum and teaching materials (for IELTS) and assisting in organizing and training the English teaching faculty to ensure the quality of English teaching. These six English courses are provided to students during their freshman and sophomore years, and include College Academic English Writing 1 (the general education course as required by an ISEC program), English Phonetics, Spoken English 1, Spoken English 2, Spoken English 3 and Spoken English 4.

 

Under the FUT ISEC Program, we offer major-specific courses in architecture, civil engineering and software engineering. Architecture-related courses include: Building Mechanics, Construction Materials, History of Foreign Architecture, Building Equipment, Principles of Urban Planning, Residential District Planning and Design, Landscape Design Principles, and Urban Design. Civil engineering courses include: Elements of Building Construction, Introductory Environmental Engineering, Water Resources, Safety Production Technology and Management, Water and Wastewater Transport System, and Foundation Engineering. Our software engineering-related courses include: Computer Organization, Database Management Systems, Operation Systems, Software Engineering, Computer Network Systems, and Information Security.

 

(v) NZTC Program

 

The NZTC Program was launched in September 2013 based on an exclusive agreement between the Chinese host Fujian Preschool Education College (“FPEC”) and New Zealand Tertiary College (“NZTC”). The NZTC Program provides Chinese students with the opportunity to study courses delivered by NZTC. In completing this program, students receive a Ministry of Education, or MOE Diploma in Early Childhood Education in the PRC and a certificate in Early Childhood Teaching issued by NZTC. The NZTC Program provides insightful knowledge to Chinese students as they are exposed to international perspectives and approaches in early childhood education. The NZTC Program also places great emphasis on English language skills, which are of growing importance in China for teachers and educators of young children.

 

Under the NZTC Program, we are responsible for designing English teaching plans and providing the entire curriculum and teaching materials (including IELTS). We provide five English courses under the NZTC Program, which are General English (Spoken English 1), General English (Spoken English 2), Academic English (Spoken English 1), Academic English (Spoken English 2), Academic English (Written English 2), and are responsible for selecting, recommending for recruitment and managing foreign faculty.

 

We also provide 10 major-related courses under the NZTC Program, including Introduction to Learning Online, Early Childhood Writing and Research 1 and 2, Play as a Framework for Learning, Planning and Learning, positive Chide Guidance, Early Childhood Curriculum 1 and 2, Lifespan Studies 2, and Infants and toddlers.

 

The NZTC Program is governed by an agreement between the Company and FPEC. The term of the agreement is from September 2016 to July 2019, and without a renewal, the contract term expire in July 2019 when the enrolled students graduate from FPEC.

 

Discontinuation of ISEC Program and NZTC Program

 

Our programs provided under the ISEC Program and NZTC program were originally focused on improving students’ English language skills. However, due to the overall low English proficiency of the students enrolled, we noted that most students could not adapt to the high standards of an English teaching environment. As a result, we ceased to recruit and enroll new students into the FUT ISEC Program with Fujian University of Technology after the then existing students graduated in July 2018. We also made a decision to suspend our continuous recruiting efforts for the NZTC Program with Fujian Preschool Education College after current students graduate in July 2019.

 

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Sales of Textbooks and Course Materials

 

In connection with our educational services provided to students enrolled under the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, we are responsible for recommending foreign faculty to teach in Chinese host universities/colleges, and are responsible for development and delivery of major course content and teaching materials to ensure that the teaching quality meets international standards. As of December 31, 2018, we have developed and edited more than 16 English textbooks and course materials with emphasis on language training (including reading, writing, speaking and listening skills) and have distributed those to the Chinese host universities to be used in the joint education programs. We own the copyright to our textbooks.

 

Overseas Study Consulting Services

 

One-on-one Private Tutoring Model

 

We started offering Overseas Study Consulting Services in 2017. Our Overseas Study Consulting Services cater to students who wish to study overseas to enrich their life learning experiences and to expand their horizons and employment options. Our Overseas Study Consulting Services are typically provided under a one-on-one private tutoring model with a duration of four to six months. Most of the students who accept our services are interested in pursuing art major in foreign academic institutions. We have established and maintained a working relationship with nearly 100 foreign academic institutions globally.

 

We provide school and university information to our students to help them make informed decisions on the institutions to submit application to and majors to pursue. We seek to recommend the appropriate schools to our students based on their individual needs and situations.

 

In addition, we help our students prepare their school application packages and advise on their entire admission process. We provide services to students with respect to study plans, language training and test preparation courses to assist them in improving their foreign language skills and help them achieve higher scores in international admission and assessment tests.

 

Moreover, we also help students on their visa applications and related paperwork, and offer optional overseas services, such as finding accommodation and travel assistance.

 

For our Overseas Study Consulting Services, we charge students a one-time up-front fee based on the scope of consulting services requested by the students and recognize revenue over the service period. 90% of the service fee collected is non-refundable and is recognized ratably as revenue over the service period; while the remaining 10% of the service fee is refundable and is deferred and recognized as revenue when a student is successfully admitted by a foreign institution and a student visa is granted. For the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, we refunded approximately $8,300 of our services fees due to one student either not being admitted or not obtaining the required visa. Our average fee charged to students under the one-on-one private tutoring model ranges from RMB 50,000 (approximately $7,353) to RMB 80,000 (approximately $11,765) per student. Additionally, for our students who intend to study in Italy, after arrival, they are still required to attend language schools for at least six months (up to 12 months, depending on the type of visa they hold) in Italy. Presently, we cooperate with Bridge School S.R.I., a language school and overseas service provider in Milan, to better serve these students. In return, we receive an additional $2,600 to $3,115 per student from the local partner after the student pays such local partner’s language and art related course tuition in full.

 

A physical location is not always needed under this one-one-one model, and when a physical location is required, services are offered at our headquarters location in Beijing.

 

On-campus Overseas Study Consulting Services

 

We have recently entered into cooperation agreements with the School of Continuing Education of Beijing Foreign Studies University for a German language program, and with China Academy of Art for an Italian language program, in order to provide our Overseas Study Consulting Services utilizing these partnering schools’ facilities and other hardware. Our services will be similar to those we provide under our one-on-one model, including language training, art portfolio enhancement, school application review, and visa application and interview preparation.

 

We have not yet generated any revenue under those agreements since we are currently in the process of enrolling students for the academic year of fall of 2019 to 2020. With the well-recognized brand names of these schools and our marketing expertise, we expect to generate substantial revenues from the on-campus consulting services to be provided in the academic year of fall of 2019 to 2020. We believe we are strategically positioned to be fully enrolled, that is, for Beijing Foreign Studies University, 25 students, and for China Academy of Art, 20 students. The service fees we expect to receive is approximated $2,580 per student per school year for Beijing Foreign Studies University and approximately $8,284 per student per school year for China Academy of Art.

 

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Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions

 

We started to provide smart campus related technological consulting services to targeted Chinese universities since 2017. Our Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions utilize advanced information technology such as cloud computing, mobile internet, artificial intelligence and big data analytics to provide overall solutions to Chinese universities in order to improve their teaching, research, student data management, storage and processing, and campus life services, and to optimize their teaching and operating environment and improve operational efficiency. By leveraging hardware such as sensors, digital portals, electronic blackboards, smartboards, projectors, LED display panels, high definition classroom audio and sound system and other lab-based equipment, together with data management applications, our solutions are built on both software and hardware to deliver capabilities for real-time and predictive analytics, increased collaboration and performance management. By way of illustration, some of the services we provide include campus intranet solution buildout, school management software customization, smart devices (mainly Internet of things, or IoT devices, extending the Internet connectivity to physical devices) installation and testing, and school management data collection and analysis, all of which can be specifically tailored to meet a client’s particular needs.

 

Our Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions agreements are primarily on a fixed-price basis. Typically, we are required to perform services including project planning, project solution and design, data management application customization, installations of hardware equipment and components for digital classrooms and academic experiment centers or labs, integration of hardware and software application, and post-contract continuous maintenance support, based on the specific needs from each customer. Upon delivery of services, project completion inspection and customer acceptance are generally required. We may also be required to provide post-completion maintenance support for a period ranging from several months to three years after customized smart campus solutions and services are delivered. Since 2017, we have successfully provided such technological consulting services to several Chines universities, including but not limit to, Fuzhou Melbourne Polytechnic, Strait College of Minjiang University, Capital Normal University, Beijing University of Chinese Medicine and University of International Business and Economics. In addition, teachers and students involved in the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs can access our teaching and learning platforms to enhance their respective teaching and learning experience.

 

Case Study: Smart Campus Solutions for FMP

 

Pursuant to our 2017 Smart Campus Project Agreement with FMP (the “FMP Smart Campus Agreement”), we were commissioned to design and develop a comprehensive software and hardware solution (including the SaaS-based platform we develop) to FMP to address traditional campus challenges it faced, such as low management efficiency, poor service experience, severe energy waste, weak comprehensive security, and high operational costs. Under this agreement, we retain the copyrights of the 20 software we developed for this project.

 

Big Data Center. Our big data center is a business systems cluster based on SaaS, or software as a service, a software licensing and delivery model in which the licensing is on a subscription basis and is centrally hosted. We developed and maintain all of the business systems, which include mobile online learning system, registrar administration system, office automation system, teaching resources database system, and human resources system. These systems are used by students, management and teachers of FMP, as the case may be. We were required to complete the development of this big data center by December 20, 2018 and will provide continuous maintenance and upgrade services until the end of 2021. As of the date of this prospectus, we have already completed and delivered such big data center.

 

Smart Classroom. We will set up the multimedia system, recording system, internet of things system, classroom cloud desktop, wireless network coverage, speech laboratory, trapezoid classrooms, and premises distribution system for FMP.

 

Business Experimental Center. We will also build out the business experimental center for FMP by providing internal design installment, hardware device and teaching resources software.

 

Pursuant to the FMP Smart Campus Agreement, we also act as a general contractor to procure software and hardware required by the overall smart campus solution. We have entered into several procurement agreements with software providers such as e-commerce virtual simulation systems, cloud teaching systems, simulated trading analysis system, digital sandbox software, virtual business society environment comprehensive practice teaching platform.

 

We are paid in installments from 2019 to 2021 under the FMP Smart Campus Agreement. As of the date of this prospectus, we have received the full payment from FMP for the amount due.

 

Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education

 

In order to further diversify our business and to utilize our resources and network, we rolled out a new line of business, i.e., Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education in late 2018. Currently, we contract with employers to provide job readiness training to graduating students from the appropriate partner schools so that such students would be better equipped to serve the employer at their respective job positions. Our training programs typically last for one month and are tailored to meet the specific requirements of the contracting employer as well as the positions to be filled.

 

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Pursuant to an agreement we entered with Beijing Quanqing Xiangqian Technology Co., Ltd. (“Quanqing”) effective from January 1 to December 31, 2019 (the “Recruitment and Training Agreement”), we are engaged to train and help recruit 200 technical support engineers for Quanqing in 2019. Pursuant to the Recruitment and Training Agreement, Quanqing is required to furnish to us details of positions to be filled, and based on such descriptions, we will identify and cooperate with six universities/colleges to offer training courses to students with certain qualifications. Each student enrolled will go through a one-month training process with us, covering professionalism (such as occupational mentality, communications skills, interview skills and service capacities), technical fundamentals (such as operations system, internet fundamentals and office IT applications) and professional techniques (such as trouble-shooting, repairing tools and methods for assembling and disassembling of equipment). A class typically has 20 to 30 students. After such training, students are tested on their professionalism, technical knowledge and technical skills by Quanqing. If a student passes in all three aspects, he/she will be hired by Quanqing, and Quanqing will pay us approximately $75 per month starting at the end of the first month of employment for a period of eight months, i.e., the fixed period of time set forth in the Recruitment and Training Agreement. These payments from Quanqing are the only compensation we receive for providing the services under the Recruitment and Training Agreement. If a student-employee leaves Quanqing without good reason or violates certain rules before the end of the eighth month of his/her employment, we will only be paid by Quanqing for those months that such student-employees are employed. We typically sign a separate agreement with a student-employee before providing training services, pursuant to which the student-employee pays us approximately $149 per month for the remaining months that the such student is not working for Quanqing. Nevertheless, we cannot assure you that such student-employee will pay us according to the agreement. See “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Business – We do not generate revenues under our job readiness training until a student is successfully placed and we will not be fully paid by the employer until such student-employee stay with the employer for a set period of time. If a student-employee fail to stay in his/her position for a reasonable amount of time, our results of operations and financial condition may be materially and adversely affected.

 

Our Recruitment Partners

 

We have built a network of art studios operated by entities or individuals in cities throughout China as well as overseas, including Italy, Germany, Russia and Malaysia in order to reach more potential students for our services. We have not signed any agreements with these partners, but we evaluate our cooperative relationships with them annually. Typically, these partners are allowed to charge markups to students they recruit for us, and any markups to our standard tuitions are paid to these partners as commission. Additionally, we may reward these partners with 5%-10% of our standard tuitions as additional commissions, if they recruit more than five students within one year.

 

Our Teachers

 

We maintain a database of more than 6,000 teachers across academic areas including Philosophy, Economics, Law, Education, Literature, History, Science, Engineering, Medicine, Management, Art and language. Based on the specific needs and requirements of each school or educational institution, we are able to contact teachers listed in our database in the relevant field of education so as to recommend them to a teaching position at one of our clients. For example, pursuant to agreements related to the Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, we are required to staff the courses we provide to those institutions with foreign teachers that meet standards such as bachelor’s degree or higher, two or more years of experience of teaching overseas, and a TESOL (or teachers of English to speakers of other languages) certificate.

 

Currently, there are thirteen foreign language teachers recommend by us teaching at FMP and Strait College (including the Fu-Tai EAP Program and the Strait IGEC program).

 

Our History and Corporate Structure

 

China Liberal Education Holdings Limited, or China Liberal, was incorporated in the Cayman Islands on February 25, 2019. As of the date of this prospectus, our authorized share capital is $50,000 divided into 50,000 ordinary shares. We directly hold 100% of the equity interests of Yi Xin International Investment Limited, a company incorporated in the British Virgin Islands, which in turn holds 100% of China Boya Education Group Co., Limited, a Hong Kong limited liability company (“Boya Hong Kong”). Boya Hong Kong originally holds 91.1772% equity interests of China Liberal Beijing, our PRC operating entity. On February 1, 2019, Boya Hong Kong entered into share transfer agreements with each of the non-controlling shareholders of China Liberal Beijing and completed the acquisition of the 8.8228% non-controlling interest in China Liberal Beijing. After this transaction, Boya Hong Kong owns 100% interest of China Liberal Beijing.

 

We commenced our operations in August 2011 through China Liberal Beijing.

 

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The following diagram illustrates our corporate structure as of the date of this prospectus and upon completion of the Offering based on 1,166,667 Ordinary Shares being offered and assuming the over-allotment option is not exercised by the Underwriter:

 

 

Our Competitive Strengths

 

We believe our success is primarily attributable to the following strengths:

 

Innovative, flexible and cost-effective smart campus solutions

 

The SaaS platform developed by our Company offers comprehensive smart campus solutions, including teaching, student affairs, human resources, office and financial management. This platform is flexible and programmable to meet the needs of different campuses with fast and low-cost programming. Additionally, our big data module is programmable based on our client’s needs, which enables us to provide campuses with cost-effective big data products.

 

Innovative and visionary management team with proven track record

 

We have an innovative and visionary management team with a unique combination of experience in the education and technology sectors. We have a stable, long-serving management team with prior experience working with market leading educational consulting and software companies.

 

Our management team has deep industry insights, clear strategies, and strong execution capabilities. We started as an educational provider under our Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, but rapidly expanded our services to fill the market gaps with the goal of forming a closed loop education related service provider and problem solver. For example, our pre-session on campus training services stemmed from our one-on-one consulting services and is a more scalable model. We developed the smart campus solutions for one of our long-time partners, and are now able to offer such solutions to more campuses.  

 

We have built a strong sales team with a focus on art students

 

We have built a specialized art and creativity talent online-community operations team with more than 100,000 followers over several social media platforms, including Zhihu, Weibo and WeChat. These followers fall into various interest categories, such as comics, art portfolio studies, clothing design and overseas studies for art students. Overall, we have invested more than $500,000 each year in 2017 and 2018 in marketing and promotion.

 

Our Business Strategy

 

We continue to generate revenue from our core businesses, while expanding to related business segments in our effort to maximize our existing resources, as well as striving to meet the needs of our clients. In the coming years, we plan to diversify our income model by growing our four business sections simultaneously. We are dedicated to enabling our students to capture life-changing opportunities by delivering transformative education services and by working with our partners. Our goal is to provide China’s students with the tools to excel in a global environment. We intend to achieve our goal by pursuing the following strategies:

 

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Continue to invest in technology and leverage our exceptional strength in our intellectual property

 

We intend to continually invest in technology in order to further develop our smart campus solution. We plan to invest $179,447 and staff 11 R&D personnel in optimizing and upgrading the SaaS platform owned and developed by us for FMP, and to provide demo solutions to Strait Institute by April 2019. By May 2019, we plan to invest $112,155 and staff seven R&D personnel to develop a no-touch attendance tracking system. By September 2019, we plan to invest $239,263 and staff 14 R&D personnel to develop a big data training platform based on the existing teaching platform. By September 2019, we plan to invest $119,632 and staff seven R&D personnel to complete the big data laboratory integration solution. By December 2019, we plan to invest $97,201 and staff six R&D personnel to complete implementation of our SaaS platform to one or two more campus(es).

 

Offer our smart campus solutions to other partnering schools

 

Our smart campus solutions provide an integrated ecosystem for management, teachers and students of a school, allowing highly efficient coordination of data and information. These solutions, including the SaaS platform developed by us can be duplicated and applied to other campuses. Currently, we are negotiating with seven other schools to provide similar solutions to them. We intend to continue these conversations and enter into formal agreements with these schools.

 

Expand our focuses to include computer science students

 

We intend to expand and diversify our focuses to include computer science major. We have already reached a mutual understanding with a vocational college to set up a “Big Data and Applicable Technology” major on its campus, where we will provide education to students with strong focuses on their job readiness and practical training.

 

Continue to invest in sales and marketing activities to recruit art students for our one-on-one consulting services

 

We will continue to boost our sales and marketing efforts to recruit art students in two ways: (1) ground promotion, i.e., to target local schools and art studios to promote our services in the cities or provinces of Hangzhou, Shandong, Guangzhou, Beijing, Hebei, Fuzhou and Chongqing; and (2) online promotion. We expect to recruit a majority of our art students from ground promotion, and plan to spend approximately $45,000 in Hangzhou and $30,000 in Shandong alone. We currently plan to spend approximately $22,000 in online promotion.

 

Expand classroom-based pre-session training services based on our current proven one-on-one consulting model

 

Based on our successful one-on-one consulting services model, we have sought to cooperate with schools with established brand names in foreign language studies in order to provide on-campus pre-session training (or training before students going overseas) utilizing the PRC partnering schools’ facilities and other hardware. We intend to continue to seek potential partners to scale this model.

 

Establish our own-branded schools

 

In 2019, we intend to further diversify our services by introducing two schools with our own “China Liberal” brand, located in Beijing and Italy, respectively. These schools will provide preparatory courses similar to those offered under the on-campus pre-sessional programs, but at our own campuses and under our own brand name.

 

For the China Liberal school located in Beijing, we plan to use our current headquarters as classrooms, which are lecture-ready. We plan to offer an area of 3,000 square feet, six classrooms with the capacity of hosting 100 students. We plan to staff 10 teachers and invest operational capital. We expect to enroll 80 students in 2019 at this location. We are actively communicating with the local education commission regarding our plan and timeline. The local education commission is the authority to issue to us the necessary private school permit. See “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Business – ‘We cannot assure you that the new China Liberal-branded schools that we intend to open in Beijing and in Italy will be opened as scheduled, if at all.’”.

 

As for our school in Italy, we are currently in discussions with Linguaviva Educational Group to establish a school in Milan. We expect to start providing services in November 2019 with 60 to 70 students enrolled at this location. Under our proposed agreement, Linguaviva will be responsible for the Italian language courses (EUR5,500 per student for 1,000 course hours), while we will be responsible for art courses (EUR3,300 EUR for less than 200 course hours). We will both recruit students for this school and for each student one entity brings in, the other will pay a certain percentage of commission based on such student’s tuition fee. See “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Business – We cannot assure you that the new China Liberal-branded schools that we intend to open in Beijing and in Italy will be opened as scheduled, if at all.

 

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Employees

 

We had 80 full-time employees as of June 30, 2019. Most of our full-time employees have signed employment agreements for three years. The Company and its employees may elect to re-negotiate and renew the employment agreements before expiration. We also hired 13 part-time financial, education or sales and marketing consultants as of June 30, 2019. The following table sets forth the number of our full-time employees, categorized by function as of June 30, 2019.

 

As of June 30, 2019

 

Management     3  
Sales staff     25  
Technical support staff     18  
Operations staff     18  
Administrative staff     16  
Total     80

 

As required by PRC laws and regulations, we participate in various employee social security plans for our employees that are administered by local governments, including housing, pension, medical insurance and unemployment insurance. We compensate our employees with basic salaries as well as performance-based bonuses. None of our employees are represented by any collective bargaining arrangements, and we consider our relations with our employees to be good.

 

Competition

 

The education sector and overseas studies consulting sector in the PRC are rapidly evolving, highly fragmented and competitive. We expect competition in these sectors to persist and intensify. We face competition in each line of business, each major program we offer and each geographic market in which we operate.

 

Line of Business   Competitors
Services Provided under Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs   ●     China Maple Leaf Educational Systems Limited
  ●     Beida Jade Bird Group
  ●     Huali University Group Limited
   
Overseas Study Consulting Services   ●     Dadi Education Holdings Limited
  ●     China Media Group
  ●     Beijing Lanxum Technology Holdings Limited
   
Technological Consulting Services Provided for Smart Campus Solutions   ●     Wasu Media Holding Co., Ltd.
  ●     Newcapec Electronics Co., Ltd.
  ●     Zhejiang Zhengyuan Zhihui Technology Holdings Limited
   
Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education   ●     Shiji Dingli Holdings Limited
  ●     Shanghai Xin Nanyang Angli Education Technology Holdings Limited
  ●     Changsha Kaiyuan Instrument Co., Ltd.

  

We believe that the principal competitive factors in our markets include brand recognition, student performance track records, overall student experience, parent satisfaction, quality of teachers, ability to effectively market programs, services and products to a broad base of prospective students, effectively identifying and successfully cooperating with prominent schools, diversity of programs and products offered, and tuition fees.

 

We believe that our primary competitive advantages are our strong sales team, our innovative and cost-effective smart campus solutions, and experienced and visionary management team with a proven track record. However, some of our existing and potential competitors may have more resources than we do. These competitors may be able to devote greater resources than we can to the development, promotion and sale of their programs, services and products and respond more quickly than we can to changes in student demands, testing materials, admissions standards, market needs or new technologies. In addition, we face competition from many different smaller sized organizations that focus on some of our targeted markets, which may be able to respond more promptly to changes in student preferences in these markets.

 

Legal Proceedings

 

We are not currently a party to any litigation the outcome of which, if determined adversely to us, would individually or in the aggregate be reasonably expected to have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, cash flows or financial condition.

 

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Intellectual Property

 

Our trademarks, copyrights, domain names, trade secrets and other intellectual property rights distinguish our products and services from those of our competitors and enhance our ability to compete in our target markets. Our principal intellectual property assets consist of copyrights in our software and our textbooks. Ownership of such copyrights secures the exclusive right to publish or use the work in the PRC.

 

In addition, our intellectual property rights also include seven trademark registrations in the PRC and six domain names registrations. We do not own any patents. See “Regulations-Regulations on Intellectual Property Rights.”

 

We believe we have taken, and take in the ordinary course of business, all appropriate available legal steps to reasonably protect our intellectual property in all material jurisdictions. To protect our brand and other intellectual property, we rely on a combination of trademark, copyright, domain names, know-how and trade secret laws as well as confidentiality agreements with our employees, contractors and others. We cannot be certain that our efforts to protect our intellectual property rights will be adequate or that third parties will not infringe or misappropriate these rights. See “Risk Factors-If we fail to protect our intellectual property rights, our brand and business may suffer.”

  

Copyrights

 

As of the date of this prospectus, we have registered 16 copyrights in our textbooks in the PRC, details of which are set out below:

 

No.   Name of Publication   Copyright Owner   Date of Completion(1)
1   EGP Listening 1   China Liberal Beijing   September 2015
2   EGP Listening 2   China Liberal Beijing   September 2015
3   EGP Speaking 1   China Liberal Beijing   September 2015
4   EGP Speaking 2   China Liberal Beijing   September 2015
5   EGP Reading 1   China Liberal Beijing   September 2015
6   EGP Reading 2   China Liberal Beijing   September 2015
7   EGP Writing 1   China Liberal Beijing   September 2015
8   EGP Writing 2   China Liberal Beijing   September 2015
9   EAP Listening 1   China Liberal Beijing   January 2016
10   EAP Listening 2   China Liberal Beijing   January 2016
11   EAP Speaking 1   China Liberal Beijing   January 2016
12   EAP Speaking 2   China Liberal Beijing   January 2016
13   EAP Reading 1   China Liberal Beijing   January 2016
14   EAP Reading 2   China Liberal Beijing   January 2016
15   EAP Writing 1   China Liberal Beijing   January 2016
16   EAP Writing 2   China Liberal Beijing   January 2016

 

 
(1)According to the PRC’s intellectual property laws, we obtain the copyrights to our textbooks upon completion.

 

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As of the date of this prospectus, we have registered 23 software copyright registration in the PRC, details of which are set out below:

 

No.   Software Name   Registration No.   Date of Development   Date of First Publication
1   China Liberal Cloud Classroom Management System 1.0   2016SR040754   September 30, 2015   October 1, 2015
2   China Liberal Cloud Classroom Teacher Software 1.0   2016SR046771   September 30, 2015   October 1, 2015
3   China Liberal Cloud Classroom Student Software 1.0   2016SR044977   September 30, 2015   October 1, 2015
4   China Liberal Cloud Classroom Lesson Planning System 1.0   2016SR123004   September 30, 2015   October 1, 2015
5   China Liberal Cloud Classroom Learning Statistical Data System 1.0   2016SR122336   September 30, 2015   October 1, 2015
6   China Liberal Cloud Classroom Recommendation System 1.0   2016SR130198   September 30, 2015   October 1, 2015
7   China Liberal Cloud Classroom Practice Questions System 1.0   2016SR123966   September 30, 2015   October 1, 2015
8   Pocket Classroom (Android) Software 1.0   2017SR036399   September 1, 2016   Not published
9   Pocket Classroom (IOS) Software 1.0   2017SR037051   September 1, 2016   Not published
10   Pocket Classroom (Android) Software 1.0   2017SR040835   September 1, 2016   Not published
11   Pocket Classroom (IOS) Software 1.0   2017SR040674   September 1, 2016   Not published
12   Pocket Classroom Date Management System 1.0   2017SR036411   September 1, 2016   Not published
13   China Liberal Smart Campus Registrar System (For Teacher)   2017SR712252   September 1, 2017   Not published
14   China Liberal Smart Campus Registrar System (For Student)   2017SR714193   September 1, 2017   Not published
15   My Lessons (Android) Software   2017SR710050   September 1, 2017   Not published
16   My Lessons (IOS) Software   2017SR707597   September 1, 2017   Not published
17   My Textbook (Android) Software   2017SR712427   September 1, 2017   Not published
18   My Textbook (IOS) Software   2017SR709724   September 1, 2017   Not published
19   China Liberal Smart Campus Office Automation Management System   2019SR0023351   September 1, 2018   Not published
20   China Liberal Smart Campus Human Resources Management System   2019SR0021945   November 2, 2018   Not published
21   China Liberal IoT Attendance Management Platform   2019SR0324187   January 4, 2019   January 4, 2019
22   China Liberal Laboratory Operations and Maintenance Management Platform   2019SR03433739   March 11, 2019   March 11, 2019
23   China Liberal Laboratory Safety Management Platform   2019SR0346228   March 11, 2019   March 11, 2019

 

The right to publish and to monetary gains related to copyrights and software copyrights lasts for 50 years in the PRC, which will expire on December 31 of the 50th year after the date of publication. Such protection will not be extended if the textbook or software is not published within 50 years after the date of its completion or development.  

 

Trademarks

 

As of the date of this prospectus, we have seven registered trademarks in the PRC, details of which are set out below:

 

No.  Trademark  Class  Registration No.  Registration Date  Expiry Date
1    41  12291328  August 28, 2014  August 27, 2024
2    42  12291054  August 28, 2014  August 27, 2024
3    9  17328159  September 7, 2016  September 6, 2026
4    42  17328158  September 7, 2016  September 6, 2026
5    41  21854350  December 28, 2017  December 27, 2027
6    42  21854351  December 28, 2017  December 27, 2027
7    41  21869652  December 28, 2017  December 27, 2027

  

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Domain Names

 

As of the date of this prospectus, we have registered the following domain names in the PRC, details of which are set out below:

  

No.   Holder   Domain name   Registration Date   Expiry Date
1.   China Liberal Beijing   chinaliberal.com   July 30, 2013   July 30, 2022
2   China Liberal Beijing   artopia-zone.com   August 8, 2016   August 8, 2019
3   China Liberal Beijing   aeacip.com   January 10, 2019   January 10, 2020
4   China Liberal Beijing   aeacip.cn   January 10, 2019   January 10, 2020
5   China Liberal Beijing   arttopia.cn   August 5, 2016   August 5, 2019

 

Facilities/Properties

 

Our current principal executive office is located on the second floor of Building No. 1, Huateng Century Park Headquarters, Chaoyang District, Beijing, PRC. We lease nine rooms with an aggregate of approximately 9,800 square feet at this location for office and language training purposes. Our lease will end on May 31, 2022.

 

We also lease two other offices in Beijing, one in Hangzhou City, Zhejiang Province, one in Fuzhou City, Fujian Province, and one in Ji’nan City, Shandong Province to support part of our sales and marketing activities.

 

The below table shows details of our current leases:

 

No.  Location  Use  Area (sq. ft.)  Rent  Expiration  Renewal Terms
1 

(Headquarters)

Beijing Chaoyang District Huateng Century Park Headquarters Bldg. No. 1, 2nd Fl.

  Office/
Training
  9,784.4   $18,400 per month  May 31, 2022  The Company shall send written notice to the landlord six months before expiration of its intention to renew the lease.
2  Beijing Tongzhou District  Art Studio  1,399.3   $11,951 per year  April 30, 2021  The Company shall send written notice to the landlord three months before expiration of its intention to continue to lease the property; a new lease shall be signed if the landlord agrees.
3  China Academy of Art (Hangzhou)  Office  Unknown  Not applicable 

November 9, 2021

  We have a cooperation relationship with China Academy of Art and they allow us to use this office without charge
4  Fuzhou City Taijiang District  Office  756.2  $997 first year;
$1,067 second year;
$1,141 third year
  July 26, 2021  The Company shall send written notice to the landlord two months before expiration of its intention to continue to lease the property; a new lease shall be signed if the landlord agrees.
5  Shandong Ji’nan Lixia District  Office  1,150.1  $1,643 per month  July 31, 2019 

No renewal terms.

6  Beijing Chaoyang District  Office  co-working space   $1,813 per month  December 31, 2019  Automatic renewal; the lease becomes a month-to-month lease.

 

Except our Hangzhou office where we are allowed to use the office free of charge due to our cooperation relationship with China Academy of Art, we lease all of the facilities that we currently occupy from independent third parties. We believe that the facilities that we currently lease are adequate to meet our needs for the foreseeable future.

 

Seasonality

 

We have experienced, and expect to continue to experience, seasonal fluctuations in our operations, primarily due to seasonal changes in student enrollments. Historically, our one-on-one consulting services tend to have the largest student enrollments in our third and fourth fiscal quarters, which runs from July 1 to December 31 of each year, primarily because many students enroll in our courses to prepare for admissions and assessment exams in subsequent school terms, and our language training courses offered at Sino-foreign joint programs typically make payments to us in October or November based on their student enrollments in the fall.

 

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REGULATIONS

 

We operate our business in the PRC under a legal regime consisting of the State Council, which is the highest authority of the executive branch of the PRC central government, and several ministries and agencies under its authority, including the State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, the Ministry of Commerce, or MOFCOM, the National Development and Reform Commission, or NDRC, the Ministry of Education, or MOE, the General Administration of Press and Publication, or GAPP, the State Administration for Market Regulation, or SAMR, formerly known as the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, the Ministry of Civil Affairs, or MCA, the Ministry of Culture, or MOC, and their respective authorized local counterparts.

 

Regulations on Education

 

The principal regulations governing private education in China consist of the Education Law of the PRC, The Law for Promoting Private Education (2018) and The Implementation Rules for the Law for Promoting Private Education (2004), and the Regulations on Sino-Foreign Cooperation in Operating Schools. Below is a summary of relevant provisions of these regulations.

 

Education Law of the PRC

 

On March 18, 1995, the National People’s Congress enacted the Education Law of the PRC, which was later amended on June 1, 2016. The Education Law sets forth provisions relating to the fundamental education systems of the PRC, including a school system of pre-school education, primary education, secondary education and higher education, a system of nine-year compulsory education, a system of vocational education and a system of continuing education. The Education Law stipulates that the government formulates plans for the development of education and establishes and operates schools and other institutions of education and in principle, enterprises, social organizations and individuals are encouraged to operate schools and other types of educational organizations in accordance with PRC laws and regulations. Meanwhile, schools and other educational institutions established or run with fiscal expenses or donated assets shall not operate for profit-making purposes. The Education Law of the PRC establishes a general regulatory framework of education industry in the PRC, while specific requirements and obligations applicable to education providers are set forth in various regulations. China Liberal Beijing is not aware of any of our its current business activities being in violation of the Education Law of the PRC.

 

Regulations on Sino-foreign Cooperation in Operating Schools

 

Sino-foreign cooperation in operating schools or training programs is specifically governed by the Regulations on Operating Sino-foreign Schools, promulgated by the State Council in 2003 and amended in 2013 in accordance with the Education Law, the Occupational Education Law and the Law for Promoting Private Education, and the Implementing Rules for the Regulations on Operating Sino-foreign Schools, or the Implementing Rules, which were issued by the MOE in 2004.

 

The Regulations on Operating Sino-foreign Schools and its Implementing Rules encourage substantive cooperation between overseas educational organizations with the requisite qualifications and experience in providing high-quality education and Chinese educational organizations to jointly operate schools in the PRC, with such cooperation in the areas of higher education and occupational education being encouraged. Sino-foreign cooperative schools are not permitted, however, to engage in compulsory education and military, police, political and other kinds of education that are deemed to be of a sensitive in the PRC.

 

Permits for Sino-foreign Cooperation in Operating Schools shall be obtained from the relevant education authorities or the authorities that regulate labor and social welfare in the PRC.

 

China Liberal Beijing is not required to obtain such permits. Rather, the Chinese host universities/colleges are responsible for obtaining and maintaining currently valid permits.

 

Regulations on Private Schools

 

The Law for Promoting Private Education (2018) and The Implementation Rules for the Law for Promoting Private Education (2004)

 

The Decision of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on Amending the Law for Promoting Private Education of the PRC, has been promulgated by Order No. 55 of the President of the PRC on November 7, 2016, became effective on September 1, 2017, and later further amended on December 29, 2018 (the “2018 Private Education Law”). 

 

The Implementation Rules for the Law for Promoting Private Education (2004) became effective on April 1, 2004 (the “2004 Implementation Rules”). Under these regulations, “private schools” are defined as schools established by social organizations or individuals using non-government funds.

 

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In addition, private schools providing certifications, pre-school education, education for self-study aid and other academic education are subject to approval by the education authorities at or above the county level, while private schools engaging in occupational qualification training and occupational skill training are subject to approvals from the authorities in charge of labor and social welfare at or above the county level. A duly approved private school will be granted a Permit for operating a Private School, and shall be registered with the MCA or its local counterparts as a privately run non-enterprise institution.

 

On August 10, 2018, the Ministry of Justice, or MOJ published the draft submitted for approval for the amendment to the Implementation Rules for the Law for Promoting Private Education (the “MOJ Draft Amendments”), for public comments. The MOJ Draft Amendments stipulate that the establishment of private training and educational organizations enrolling students of kindergarten, primary school, middle and high school age and implementing activities relating to cultural and educational courses at school, or examination-related and further education-related tutoring and other cultural and educational activities, would be subject to the review and approval by education authorities at or above the county level in accordance with the Article 12 of the 2018 Private Education Law. The establishment of private training and educational organizations that implement activities aiming at essential-qualities-oriented improvement and personality development in the areas of linguistic competence, arts, physical activities, technology, and activities targeting at cultural education for adults and non-degree continuing education can apply to register as a legal person directly, i.e., there is no need to apply for approval. However, such private training and/or educational organization must not carry out the cultural and educational activities mentioned above, which requires the review and approval of the applicable education authorities.

 

Under the above regulations, private schools have the same status as public schools, though private schools are prohibited from providing military, police, political and other kinds of education of a sensitive nature. However, the operation of a private school is highly regulated.

 

The sponsors of privately-run schools may establish non-profit or for-profit privately-run schools at their own discretion. However, they are prohibited from establishing for-profit privately-run schools providing compulsory education. The sponsor of a for-profit privately-run school may gain proceeds from school running, and the cash surplus of the school shall be disposed of in accordance with the Company Law and other relevant laws and administrative regulations. Private schools are divided into two categories: non-profit privately-run school and for-profit privately-run schools.

 

At the end of each fiscal year, every private school is required to allocate a certain amount to its development fund for the construction or maintenance of the school or procurement or upgrade of educational equipment. In the case of a private school that requires reasonable returns, this amount shall be no less than 25% of the annual net income of the school, while in the case of a private school that does not require reasonable returns, this amount shall be equal to no less than 25% of the annual increase in the net assets of the school, if any. Private schools that do not require reasonable returns shall be entitled to the same preferential tax treatment as public schools, while the preferential tax treatment policies applicable to private schools requiring reasonable returns shall be formulated by the finance authority, taxation authority and other authorities under the State Council. To date, however, no regulations have been promulgated by the relevant authorities in this regard.

 

Under the 2018 Private Education Law and the 2004 Implementation Rules, there is no explicit provisions that China Liberal Beijing is required to obtain any permit or approval for providing art or language related training courses, including a future China Liberal-branded school. Therefore, we do not believe that our business activities are in violation of the 2018 Private Education Law as in effect and the 2004 Implementation Rules, nor do we anticipate that a future China Liberal-branded school would violate such law and rules. If the MOJ Draft Amendments to the Implementation Rules are passed and adopted in their current form, it will be explicitly confirmed under these regulations that China Liberal Beijing is not required to obtain any permit or approval for the services it provides, or will provide under the China Liberal-branded school, which will further and formally confirm that our current and future business are in compliance with laws and regulations in connection with regulations on private educations. See “Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Business - We face regulatory risks and uncertainties surrounding PRC laws and regulations governing the education industry in general, including the amendments to the Implementation Rules for the Law for Promoting Private Education”.

 

Regulations on Publishing and Distribution of Publications

 

In December 2001, the PRC State Council promulgated the Administrative Regulations on Publications, which became effective on February 1, 2002 and were later amended several times in 2011, 2013, 2014 and February 6, 2016 (the “Publication Regulation”). The Publication Regulations apply to publication activities, i.e., the publishing, printing, copying, importation or distribution of publications, including books, newspapers, periodicals, audio and video products and electronic publications, each of which requires approval from the relevant publication administrative authorities.

 

On April 13, 2005, the State Council announced a policy on private investments in China that relate to cultural matters, which affects private investments in businesses that involve publishing. The policy authorizes MOC and several other central government authorities to adopt detailed rules to implement the policy. In July 2005, MOC, together with other central government authorities, issued a regulation that prohibits private and foreign investors from engaging in the publishing business.

 

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Subsequent to the implementation of the Publication Regulations, the GAPP issued the Administrative Regulations on Publications Market which became effective on September 1, 2003 and which were amended on June 16, 2004 and June 1, 2016. According to the Administrative Regulations on Publications Market, any organization or individual engaged in general distribution, wholesale or retail of publications shall obtain a Permit for Operating Publications. Distribution of publications in the PRC is regulated on different administrative levels. An entity engaged in general distribution of publications shall obtain such permit from the GAPP and may conduct general distribution of the publications in the PRC; an entity engaged in wholesaling of publications shall obtain such permit from the provincial counterpart of GAPP and may not engage in general distribution in the PRC; and an entity engaged in retail distribution of publications shall obtain such permit from the local counterpart of GAPP at the county level and may not conduct general distribution or wholesaling of publications in the PRC.

 

We are subject to these regulations on publishing and distribution of publications even though we limit the use of our textbooks to a small number of students (rather than selling to the general public). Currently, we have not applied for such approval and permit. Although as of the date of this prospectus, we have not been subject to any fines or other forms of regulatory or administrative penalties or sanctions due to the lack of any the above-mentioned approvals or permits, we cannot assure you the government authorities will not impose any penalties or sanctions on us in the future for any incompliance in the past. See “Risk Factors – Risks Related to our Business - Our failure to obtain and maintain approval and permit related to publishing and selling our textbooks could have a material adverse impact on our business, financial conditions and results of operations.

 

Regulations on Protection of the Right of Dissemination through Information Networks

 

On May 18, 2006, the State Council promulgated the Regulations on Protection of the Right of Dissemination through Information Networks, which became effective on July 1, 2006 and were later amended on January 30, 2013. The new regulations require that every organization or individual who disseminates a third party’s work, performance, audio or visual recording products to the public through information networks shall obtain permission from, and pay compensation to, the legitimate copyright owner of such products, unless otherwise provided under relevant laws and regulations. The legitimate copyright owner may take technical measures to protect his or her right of dissemination through information networks and any organization or individual shall not intentionally avoid, destroy or otherwise assist others in avoiding such protective measures unless permissible under law. The new regulations also provide that permission from and compensation for the copyright owner are not required in the event of limited dissemination to teaching or research staff for the purpose of school teaching or scientific research only. Since we are only disseminating publications to a limited number of students within the programs we service, we are not aware of any events of our business activities in violation of such regulations.

 

Provisions on Foreign Investment

 

All limited liability companies and joint stock limited companies incorporated and operating in the PRC are governed by the Company Law of the People’s Republic of China, or the Company Law, which was amended and promulgated by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on October 26, 2018. In the latest amendment, paid-in capital registration, minimum requirements of registered capital and timing requirements of capital contributions were abolished. Foreign invested projects must also comply with the Company Law, with exceptions as specified in foreign investment laws.

 

With respect to the establishment and operation of wholly foreign-owned projects, or WFOE, the MOFCOM and NDRC, promulgated the Special Administrative Measures for the Access of Foreign Investment (Negative List) (2019 Version) (the “2019 Negative List”) on June 30, 2019, which became effective on July 30, 2019. The 2019 Negative List has replaced the Special Administrative Measures for the Access of Foreign Investment (2018 Version) (the “2018 Negative List”) and serves as the main basis for management and guidance for the MOFCOM to manage and supervise foreign investments. Those industries not set out in the 2019 Negative List shall be classified as industries permitted for foreign investment. None of our four lines of business, i.e. Sino-foreign Jointly Managed Academic Programs, Overseas Study Consulting Services, Technological Consulting Services for Smart Campus Solutions, and Integration of Enterprises and Vocational Education, are on the 2019 Negative List. Therefore, the Company is able to conduct its business through its wholly owned PRC Subsidiary, China Liberal Beijing, without being subject to restrictions imposed by the foreign investment laws and regulations of the PRC.

 

On September 3, 2016, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress promulgated the Decision of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on Amending Four Laws Including the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Wholly Foreign-owned Enterprises (the “Decision”), which provides record-filing in lieu of administrative approval for the establishments and alterations of foreign invested enterprises (the “FIEs”) not subject to special administrative measures. On October 8, 2016, the MOFCOM issued the Interim Measures for Record-filing for the Establishment and Alteration of Foreign-invested Enterprises (the “Interim Measure”), and the MOFCOM and the NDRC jointly issued a statement (the “Joint Statement”), clarifying that the special administrative measures in this case are implemented by referencing the Catalogue of Industries for Guiding Foreign Investment Industries (amended in 2017) (the “Catalogue”). Specifically, the special administrative measures to be implemented are the restricted and prohibited industry categories as well as encouraged industry categories having shareholding and executive management requirements prescribed in the Catalogue (the Special Administrative Measures for the Access of Foreign Investment specified in the Catalogue was replaced by the 2018 Negative List and further replaced by the 2019 Negative List, and the Catalogue of Industries for Encouraged Foreign Investment specified in the Catalogue was replaced by the Catalogue of Industries for Encouraged Foreign Investment (2019 Version). Since then, FIE establishments and alterations that are not subject to special administrative measures have been changed from a pre-approval system to a more standardized and convenient filing process. On June 30, 2018, the MOFCOM further revised the “Interim Measures”. The modification includes among others that where the conversion of a non-foreign investment enterprise into a foreign investment enterprise due to merger and acquisition or merger by absorption falls under the filing scope stipulated in these Measures, the establishment filing information for foreign investment enterprise shall be submitted together online at the time when the enterprise completes change registration formalities with the administration for industry and commerce and the market supervision administrative authorities and upon obtaining the filing information forwarded by the administration for industry and commerce and the market supervision administrative authorities, the filing authorities shall start to process the filing and notify the investor(s) simultaneously. 

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China Liberal Beijing completed its registration as a whole foreign owned enterprise on February 1, 2019 and the Administrative Bureau for Industry and Commerce of the City of Beijing issued China Liberal Beijing the relevant business license on the same date.

 

PRC Regulation of Wholly Foreign-owned Enterprises

 

The abovementioned Company Law of the People’s Republic of China provides that companies established in the PRC may take the form of company of limited liability or company limited by shares. Each company has the status of a legal person and owns its assets itself. Assets of a company may be used in full for the company’s liability. The Company Law applies to foreign-invested companies unless relevant laws provide otherwise.

 

Under the Wholly Foreign-Owned Enterprise Law of the PRC promulgated in 1986 and last amended in 2016 and the Detailed Implementing Rules for the Wholly Foreign-Owned Enterprise Law of the PRC which was promulgated in 1990 and was last amended on February 19, 2014, an application for establishing a wholly foreign-owned enterprise shall be subject to examination and approval by the MOFTEC, currently known as the MOFCOM, before the approval certificate is issued. Within 90 days of the date of receipt of an application, the examination and approval authority shall decide whether or not to grant the approval. After application for the establishment of a wholly foreign-owned enterprise is approved by the Examination and Approval Authority, the foreign investors shall, within 30 days of the date of receipt of the approval certificate, submit registration to, and collect the business license from the administrative authority for industry and commerce.

 

On September 3, 2016, the Decision of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on Revising Four Laws including the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Wholly Foreign-owned Enterprises (the “Decision on Revision of Four Laws”) was promulgated and became effective on October 1, 2016. The Interim Measures for the Administration of Establishment and Change Filings of Foreign-invested Enterprises (the “Filings Measures”) was last amended on June 30, 2018. The Decision on Revision of Four Laws and the Filings Measures revised relevant administrative approval provisions of the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Wholly Foreign-owned Enterprises, the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Sino-foreign Equity Joint Ventures, the Law of the People’s Republic of China on Sino-foreign Cooperative Joint Ventures and the Law of the People’s Republic of China on the Protection of the Investments of Taiwan Compatriots and relevant formality regime for the incorporation and change of foreign-invested enterprises, whereby if the incorporation or change of foreign-invested enterprises and enterprises funded by Taiwan compatriots does not involve special access administrative measures prescribed by the PRC government, the examination and approval process is now being replaced by the recording-filing administration process.

 

The 2019 Law of Foreign Investment was adopted by the second meeting of the 13th National People’s Congress on March 15, 2019, which will be effective on January 1, 2020. It will replace the trio of existing laws regulating foreign investment in China, including, among others, the abovementioned Law of the People’s Republic of China on Wholly Foreign-owned Enterprises. The 2019 Law of Foreign Investment stipulates that the PRC implements a system of pre-establishment national treatment plus negative list for the administration of foreign investment. Foreign investors are not allowed to invest in fields or sectors prohibited in the market access negative list for foreign investment. Foreign investors that intend to invest in the fields subject to access restrictions stipulated in market access negative list for foreign investment shall satisfy the conditions stipulated in such negative list. The PRC policies supporting enterprise development are equally applicable to foreign-invested enterprises. The PRC does not impose expropriation on foreign investment. Under special circumstances, if it requires imposing expropriation on foreign investment due to the need of public interest, expropriation shall be imposed according to legal procedures, and the foreign-invested enterprises concerned shall receive fair and reasonable compensation. Foreign-invested enterprises can raise funds through public issuance of stocks, corporate bonds and other securities in accordance with the law. Overall, the 2019 Law of Foreign Investment establishes the clear principle of applying national treatment to FIEs except those engaged in industries on the 2019 Negative List. Since our current and planned business is not on the 2019 Negative List, to the best of our knowledge, we do not anticipate the new law will create any material adverse effect to our Company’s business.

 

PRC Regulation of Intellectual Property Rights

 

The State Council and the NCAC have promulgated various rules and regulations and rules relating to protection of software in China. Under these rules and regulations, software owners, licensees and transferees may register their rights in software with Copy Protection Center of China or its local branches and obtain software copyright registration certificates. Although such registration is not mandatory under PRC law, software owners, licensees and transferees are encouraged to go through the registration process and registered software rights may be entitled to better protections.

 

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The PRC Trademark Law  which became effective on March 1, 1983, was revised in 2001, 2013 respectively and took effect on May 1, 2014 (which was further amended on April 23, 2019 and will be effective on November 1, 2019) with its implementation rules adopted in 2002 and revised in 2014, protects registered trademarks. The Trademark Office of the SAMR handles trademark registrations and grants a protection term of ten years to registered trademarks.

 

Regulations on Foreign Exchange

  

Regulations on Loans to and Direct Investment in the PRC Entities by Offshore Holding Companies

 

According to the Implementation Rules for the Provisional Regulations on Statistics and Supervision of Foreign Debt promulgated by SAFE on September 24, 1997 and the Interim Provisions on the Management of Foreign Debts promulgated by SAFE, the NDRC and the MOF that became effective from March 1, 2003, loans by foreign companies to their subsidiaries in China, which accordingly are foreign-invested enterprises, are considered foreign debts. Pursuant to the Measures for the Administration of Foreign Debt Registration issued by SAFE on April 28, 2013 and the Notice on Matters concerning the Macro-Prudential Administration of Full-Covered Cross-Border Financing issued by the People’s Bank of China on January 11, 2017, the total amount of accumulated foreign debt borrowed by a foreign-invested enterprise is subject to a upper limit calculated based on a statutory formula, and the foreign-invested enterprise is required to file with SAFE after entering into relevant foreign debt contract and within at least three business days before drawing any money from the foreign debts.

 

According to applicable PRC regulations on foreign-invested enterprises, if a foreign holding company makes capital contributions to its PRC Subsidiary, which are considered foreign-invested enterprises, the PRC Subsidiary must file with the MOFCOM or its local counterpart in connection with the increase of its registered capital. The PRC Subsidiary may not procure loans which exceed the difference between its total investment amount and registered capital, or twice of the amount of the PRC Subsidiary’s net assets, whichever is larger. 

 

Currently, China Liberal Beijing does not owe any outstanding debts to any of its offshore parent companies. For any capital contributions contributed to China Liberal Beijing by its offshore parent companies, China Liberal Beijing has obtained appropriate approval or filed with the appropriate authorities, as the case may be.

 

Regulations Relating to Employment and Social Insurance

 

Pursuant to the PRC Labor Law effective as of January 1, 1995 (as amended on December 29, 2018), and the PRC Labor Contract Law effective as of January 1, 2008 (as amended on December 28, 2012), a written labor contract shall be executed by employer and an employee when the employment relationship is established, and an employer is under an obligation to sign an unlimited-term labor contract with any employee who has worked for the employer for ten consecutive years. Further, if an employee requests or agrees to renew a fixed-term labor contract that has already been entered into twice consecutively, the resulting contract must have an unlimited term, with certain exceptions. All employers are required to establish a system for labor safety and sanitation, strictly abide by state rules and standards and provide employees with appropriate workplace safety training. Moreover, all PRC enterprises are generally required to implement a standard working time system of eight hours a day and forty hours a week, and if the implementation of such standard working time system is not appropriate due to the nature of the job or the characteristics of business operation, the enterprise may implement a flexible working time system or comprehensive working time system after obtaining approvals from the relevant authorities.

 

Pursuant to the Social Insurance Law of China effective from December 29, 2018, and the Regulations on the Administration of Housing Accumulation Funds effective as of April 3, 1999 (as amended on March 24, 2002 and further amended on March 24, 2019), employers in China shall pay contributions to the social insurance plan and the housing fund plan for their employees, and such contribution amount payable shall be calculated based on the employee actual salary in accordance with the relevant regulations.

 

As of December 31, 2018, China Liberal Beijing has complied with all these regulations.

 

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MANAGEMENT

 

Set forth below is information as of the date of this prospectus concerning our directors, executive officers and other key employees.

 

Name   Age   Position(s)
Jianxin Zhang   49   Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer
Wenhuai Zhuang   33   Chief Financial Officer
Nan Hu*   38   Director Nominee
David Sherman*   71   Independent Director Nominee
Ngo Yin Tsang*   45   Independent Director Nominee
Joseph Levinson*   43   Independent Director Nominee

 

*This individual has indicated his consent to occupy such position upon closing of this offering.

 

The following is a brief biography of each of our executive officers and directors:

 

Mr. Jianxin Zhang has been our Company’s Chief Executive Officer and the Chairman of the Board since April 2019 and a director and the standing deputy general manager of China Liberal Beijing since January 2015. From January 2013 to December 2014, Mr. Zhang served as a partner and attorney at Beijing H&J Law Firm. From February 2000 to December 2012, Mr. Zhang served as a partner at Beijing Mingtai Law Firm. From September 1995 to January 2000, Mr. Zhang served as the director of the Research and Development Department of China Ocean Human Resources Co., Ltd. Mr. Zhang has over 20 years of management and operations experience of various industries. Mr. Zhang holds a master’s degree in Civil and Commercial Law from Renmin University of China.

 

Mr. Wenhuai Zhuang has been our Company’s Chief Financial Officer since April 2019 and the Chief Finance Officer of China Liberal Beijing since March 2019. From December 2017 to February 2017, Mr. Zhuang served as a partner of Yingzhi (Xiamen) Management and Consulting Co., Ltd. From August 2016 to November 2017, Mr. Zhuang served as a project manager of Dingsheng (Xiamen) Investment Co., Ltd. From September 2010 to July 2016, Mr. Zhuang served as a project manager of Bangmeng Huijun Management Consulting (Xiamen) Co., Ltd. Mr. Zhuang holds a bachelor’s degree in Accounting from Jimei University.

 

Mr. Nan Hu is a director nominee of our Company. Mr. Hu has been the Chief Technology Officer of China Liberal Beijing since January 2016. From July 2014 to December 2015, Mr. Hu served as the Chief Product Officer of Beijing Mishi Technology Co., Ltd., a commercial social media platform based on mobile device business cards. From May 2011 to June 2014, Mr. Hu was the co-founder and served as the Chief Technology Officer of Zhimo Network Technology (Beijing) Co., Ltd., an iPhone/Android system platform applications development company, providing mobile internet product solutions to leading advertisement and marketing company hdtMEDIA and Weiwang Tonglian Co., Ltd. From April 2008 to October 2010, Mr. Hu served as a research and development engineer and project manager of SA Penbase in France, a company that first developed mobile application platform online, providing mobile terminal data management products. Mr. Hu holds a bachelor’s degree and a master’s degree in Computer Science from Université Montpellier II.

 

Mr. H. David Sherman is an independent director nominee of the Company. Since July 1985, Mr. Sherman has been a full time financial management and accounting professor at Northeastern University. Since July 2019, he has been a board member and treasurer of D-Tree International, a non-profit that develops electronic clinical protocols for healthcare workers. From February 2011 to March 2016, he served as a board member and the chair of the audit committee for Kingold Jewelry Inc., a public company listed on NASDAQ that manufactures gold jewelry. From February 2012 to November 2014, Mr. Sherman was a board member, chairman of the audit committee, and chairman of the compensation committee of AgFeed Industries, Inc., a formerly NASDAQ company that deals with hog production in US and China. Mr. Sherman has over 40 years of experience in accounting, auditing, financial management, business management, and corporate governance. Mr. Sherman holds a bachelor’s degree in Economics from Brandeis University, a master’s of business administration from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration, and a doctorate in business administration from the Harvard Graduate School of Business Administration. He is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountant.

 

Ms. Ngo Yin Tsang is an independent director nominee of the Company. Since April 2014, Ms. Tsang has been the executive director of Good Talent Limited, a Hong Kong-based staffing and recruiting company. Since December 2016, Ms. Tsang has been the independent non-executive director of LKS Holding Group Limited, a public company listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange engaging in interior renovation for residential, industrial and commercial properties in Hong Kong. Since June 2017, Ms. Tsang has been the company secretary with Zhuoxin International Holdings Limited, a public company listed on the Hong Kong Stock Exchange engaging in the trading of electronic hardware components as well as property development and investment. Ms. Tsang has over 18 years’ experience in auditing, accounting, corporate governance monitoring and financial management. Ms. Tsang holds a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from Simon Fraser University, a bachelor’s degree in Law from Tsinghua University, and a master’s degree in Law from the University of Wolverhampton. She is a member of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants.

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Mr. Joseph Levinson is an independent director nominee of the Company. From December 2015 to June 2019, Mr. Levinson served as a director of Takung Art Co, Inc, an NYSE American-listed online art trading platform group. From January 2012 to June 2015, he was a director of China Xingbang Industry Group Inc., a U.S. public company providing e-commerce related services and marketing consultancy services. He has also worked for firms such as KPMG and Deloitte & Touche early in his career. Mr. Levinson has over 20 years of experience in managing cross-border issues pertaining to U.S.-listed foreign companies, as well as experience in accounting and banking management. Mr. Levinson holds a bachelor’s degree from the University at Buffalo with a double major in finance and accounting, graduating summa cum laude. He has held a United States Certified Public Accountant license for more than 20 years.

 

Family Relationships

 

There are no family relationships among the directors and executive officers of the Company.

 

Involvement in Certain Legal Proceedings

 

To the best of our knowledge, none of our directors or executive officers has, during the past ten years, been involved in any legal proceedings described in subparagraph (f) of Item 401 of Regulation S-K.

 

Board of Directors

 

Our board of directors will consist of five directors upon the closing of this offering.

 

Duties of Directors

 

Under Cayman Islands law, all of our Directors owe fiduciary duties to the Company, including a duty of loyalty, a duty to act honestly and a duty to act in what they consider in good faith to be in our best interests. Our Directors must also exercise their powers only for a proper purpose. Our Directors also have a duty to exercise the skill they actually possess and such care and diligence that a reasonably prudent person would exercise in comparable circumstances. In fulfilling their duty of care to us, our Directors must ensure compliance with our memorandum and articles of association, as amended from time to time. The Company has the right to seek damages if a duty owed by any of our directors is breached. In limited exceptional circumstances, a shareholder may have the right to seek damages in our name if a duty owed by our directors is breached.

 

Terms of Directors and Executive Officers

 

Each of our directors holds office until a successor has been duly elected and qualified unless the director was appointed by the board of directors, in which case such director holds office until the next following annual meeting of shareholders at which time such director is eligible for reelection. All of our executive officers are appointed by and serve at the discretion of our board of directors.

 

Qualification

 

There is currently no shareholding qualification for directors.

 

Insider Participation Concerning Executive Compensation

 

The sole director of the Registrant, Jianxin Zhang, was making all determinations regarding executive officer compensation from the inception of the Company up until the time when the three independent directors were installed.

 

Committees of the Board of Directors

 

We have established three committees under the board of directors: an audit committee, a compensation committee and a nominating and corporate governance committee. We have adopted a charter for each of the three committees. Each committee’s members and functions are described below.

 

Audit Committee. Our audit committee consists of David Sherman, Ngo Yin Tsang and Joseph Levinson. David Sherman is the chairman of our audit committee. We have determined that David Sherman, Ngo Yin Tsang and Joseph Levinson satisfy the “independence” requirements of Section 5605(a)(2) of the Nasdaq Listing Rules and Rule 10A-3 under the Securities Exchange Act. Our board also has determined that Ngo Yin Tsang qualifies as an audit committee financial expert within the meaning of the SEC rules or possesses financial sophistication within the meaning of the Nasdaq Listing Rules. The audit committee oversees our accounting and financial reporting processes and the audits of the financial statements of our company. The audit committee is responsible for, among other things:

 

  appointing the independent auditors and pre-approving all auditing and non-auditing services permitted to be performed by the independent auditors;

 

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  reviewing any audit problems or difficulties and management’s response with the independent auditors;
  discussing the annual audited financial statements with management and the independent auditors;
  reviewing the adequacy and effectiveness of our accounting and internal control policies and procedures and any steps taken to monitor and control major financial risk exposures;
  reviewing and approving all proposed related party transactions;
  meeting separately and periodically with management and the independent auditors; and
  monitoring compliance with our code of business conduct and ethics, including reviewing the adequacy and effectiveness of our procedures to ensure proper compliance.

 

Compensation Committee. Our compensation committee consists of David Sherman, Ngo Yin Tsang and Joseph Levinson. Joseph Levinson is the chairman of our compensation committee. We have determined that David Sherman, Ngo Yin Tsang and Joseph Levinson satisfy the “independence” requirements of Section 5605(a)(2) of the NASDAQ Listing Rules and Rule 10A-3 under the Securities Exchange Act. The compensation committee assists the board in reviewing and approving the compensation structure, including all forms of compensation, relating to our directors and executive officers. Our chief executive officer may not be present at any committee meeting during which his compensation is deliberated. The compensation committee is responsible for, among other things:

 

  reviewing and recommending compensation packages for our most senior executive officers to the board;
  approving and overseeing compensation packages for our executives other than the most senior executive officers;
  reviewing and recommending to the board with respect to the compensation of our directors;
  reviewing periodically and approving any long-term incentive compensation or equity plans;
  selecting compensation consultants, legal counsel or other advisors after taking into consideration all factors relevant to that person’s independence from management; and
  programs or similar arrangements, annual bonuses, employee pension and welfare benefit plans.

 

Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. Our nominating and corporate governance committee currently consists of David Sherman, Ngo Yin Tsang and Joseph Levinson. Ngo Yin Tsang is the chairperson of our nominating and corporate governance committee. David Sherman, Ngo Yin Tsang and Joseph Levinson satisfy the “independence” requirements of Section 5605(a)(2) of the NASDAQ Listing Rules and Rule 10A-3 under the Securities Exchange Act. The nominating and corporate governance committee assists the board of directors in selecting individuals qualified to become our directors and in determining the composition of the board and its committees. The nominating and corporate governance committee is responsible for, among other things:

 

  identifying and recommending nominees for election or re-election to our board of directors or for appointment to fill any vacancy;
  reviewing annually with our board of directors its current composition in light of the characteristics of independence, age, skills, experience and availability of service to us;
  identifying and recommending to our board the directors to serve as members of committees;
  advising the board periodically with respect to significant developments in the law and practice of corporate governance as well as our compliance with applicable laws and regulations, and making recommendations to our board of directors on all matters of corporate governance and on any corrective action to be taken; and
  monitoring compliance with our code of business conduct and ethics, including reviewing the adequacy and effectiveness of our procedures to ensure proper compliance.

 

Corporate Governance

 

Our board of directors has adopted a code of business conduct and ethics, which is applicable to all of our directors, officers and employees. We will make our code of business conduct and ethics publicly available on our website prior to the initial closing of this offering.

 

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EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

The following table sets forth certain information with respect to compensation for the years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, earned by or paid to our chief executive officer and principal executive officer, our principal financial officer, and our other most highly compensated executive officers whose total compensation exceeded US$100,000 (the “named executive officers”).

 

Name and Principal Position   Year     Salary
($)
    Bonus
($)
    Stock
Awards
($)
    Option
Awards
($)
    Non-Equity
Incentive
Plan
Compensation
    Deferred
Compensation
Earnings
    Other     Total
($)
 
                                                       
Jianxin Zhang,
CEO and Chairman of the Company and director and standing deputy general manager of China
    2018       22,269          0          0         0           0           0       0       22,269  
Liberal Beijing     2017       22,106       0       0       0       0       0       0       22,106  
                                                                         
Wenhuai Zhuang,
CFO of the Company and
    2018       0       0       0       0       0       0       0       0  
China Liberal Beijing     2017       0       0       0       0       0       0       0       0  

  

Agreements with Named Executive Officers

 

Each of our executive officers is employed for a specified time period, which will be renewed upon both parties’ agreement thirty days before the end of the current employment term. We may terminate the employment for cause, at any time, without notice or remuneration, for certain acts of the executive officer, including but not limited to the commitments of any serious or persistent breach or non-observance of the terms and conditions of their employment, conviction of a criminal offense, willful disobedience of a lawful and reasonable order, fraud or dishonesty, receiving bribes, or severe neglect of his or her duties. An executive officer may terminate his or her employment at any time with a one-month prior written notice. Each executive officer has agreed to hold, both during and after the employment agreement expires, in strict confidence and not to use or disclose to any person, corporation or other entity without written consent, any confidential information.

 

Our employment agreement with Jianxin Zhang, our CEO, provides for a term of one year beginning on April 1, 2019, with an annual salary of US$50,000.

 

Our employment agreement with Wenhuai Zhuang, our CFO, provides for a term of one year  beginning on April 1, 2019, with an annual salary of US$30,000.

 

Compensation of Directors

 

For the fiscal years ended December 31, 2018 and 2017, we did not make any compensation payments to our directors.

 

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PRINCIPAL SHAREHOLDERS

 

The following table sets forth information with respect to the beneficial ownership, within the meaning of Rule 13d-3 under the Exchange Act, of our Ordinary Shares as of the date of this prospectus, and as adjusted to reflect the sale of the Ordinary Shares offered in this offering for

 

  each of our directors and executive officers who beneficially own our Ordinary Shares; and
  each person known to us to own beneficially more than 5.0% of our Ordinary Shares.

 

Beneficial ownership includes voting or investment power with respect to the securities. Except as indicated below, and subject to applicable community property laws, the persons named in the table have sole voting and investment power with respect to all Ordinary Shares shown as beneficially owned by them. Percentage of beneficial ownership of each listed person prior to this offering is based on 5,000,000 Ordinary Shares outstanding as of the date of this prospectus (reflecting a 1,000-for-1 stock split of our Ordinary Shares effective on July 8, 2019 and an issuance of 3,999,000 Ordinary Shares on July 15, 2019).

 

The number and percentage of Ordinary Shares beneficially owned after the offering are based on 6,166,667 Ordinary Shares outstanding following the sale of 1,166,667 Ordinary Shares. Information with respect to beneficial ownership has been furnished by each director, officer or beneficial owner of 5% or more of our Ordinary Shares. Beneficial ownership is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and generally requires that such person have voting or investment power with respect to securities. In computing the number of Ordinary Shares beneficially owned by a person listed below and the percentage ownership of such person, Ordinary Shares underlying options, warrants or convertible securities held by each such person that are exercisable or convertible within 60 days of the date of this prospectus are deemed outstanding, but are not deemed outstanding for computing the percentage ownership of any other person. Except as otherwise indicated in the footnotes to this table, or as required by applicable community property laws, all persons listed have sole voting and investment power for all Ordinary Shares shown as beneficially owned by them. As of the date of the prospectus, we have 4 shareholders of record holding beneficial ownership of 5% or more, none of which are located in the United States.

 

    Ordinary Shares
Beneficially Owned
Prior to this Offering
    Ordinary Shares
Beneficially Owned
After this Offering
    Percentage of
Votes Held
After this
Offering
 
    Number     Percent     Number     Percent     Percent  
Directors and Executive Officers:                              
Jianxin Zhang     0       0 %     0       0 %     0 %
Wenhuai Zhuang     0       0 %     0       0 %     0 %
Nan Hu     0       0 %     0       0 %     0 %
Ngo Yin Tsang     0       0 %     0       0 %     0 %

David Sherman

    0       0 %     0       0 %     0 %

Joseph Levinson