10-K 1 a2210166z10-k.htm 10-K

Use these links to rapidly review the document
TABLE OF CONTENTS
PART IV

Table of Contents

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549



FORM 10-K

(Mark One)

ý   Annual Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the fiscal year ended May 31, 2012
or

o

 

Transition Report Pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934

For the transition period from                to                

Commission file number 1-6263

AAR CORP.
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

Delaware
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  36-2334820
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

One AAR Place, 1100 N. Wood Dale Road, Wood Dale, Illinois 60191
(Address of principal executive offices, including zip code)

Registrant's telephone number, including area code: (630) 227-2000

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

Title of Each Class
 
Name of Each Exchange on Which Registered
Common Stock, $1.00 par value   New York Stock Exchange
Chicago Stock Exchange

 

 

 
Common Stock Purchase Rights   New York Stock Exchange
Chicago Stock Exchange

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ý No o

         Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý No o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý No o

         Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant's knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K.    ý

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, or a smaller reporting company. See definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer" and "smaller reporting company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.(Check one):

Large accelerated filer ý   Accelerated filer o   Non-Accelerated filer o
(Do not check if a
smaller reporting company)
  Smaller reporting company o

         Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).
Yes o No ý

         At November 30, 2011, the aggregate market value of the registrant's voting stock held by nonaffiliates was approximately $699,537,824 (based upon the closing price of the Common Stock at November 30, 2011 as reported on the New York Stock Exchange).

         On June 30, 2012, there were 40,167,070 shares of Common Stock outstanding.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

         Portions of the Company's proxy statement for the Company's 2012 Annual Meeting of Stockholders, to be held October 10, 2012, are incorporated by reference in Part III of this report.


Table of Contents


TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
   
  Page  

PART I

       

Item 1.

 

Business

   
2
 

Item 1A.

 

Risk Factors

   
7
 

Item 1B.

 

Unresolved Staff Comments

   
13
 

Item 2.

 

Properties

   
13
 

Item 3.

 

Legal Proceedings

   
13
 

Item 4.

 

Mine Safety Disclosures

   
13
 

 

Supplemental Item—Executive Officers of the Registrant

   
13
 

PART II

       

Item 5.

 

Market for Registrant's Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

   
15
 

Item 6.

 

Selected Financial Data

   
16
 

Item 7.

 

Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

   
17
 

Item 7A.

 

Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures about Market Risk

   
29
 

Item 8.

 

Financial Statements and Supplementary Data

   
30
 

Item 9.

 

Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure

   
74
 

Item 9A.

 

Controls and Procedures

   
74
 

Item 9B.

 

Other Information

   
76
 

PART III

       

Item 10.

 

Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance

   
76
 

Item 11.

 

Executive Compensation

   
76
 

Item 12.

 

Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters

   
77
 

Item 13.

 

Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence

   
77
 

Item 14.

 

Principal Accountant Fees and Services

   
77
 

PART IV

       

Item 15.

 

Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules

   
78
 

SIGNATURES

   
79
 

EXHIBIT INDEX

       

1


Table of Contents


PART I

ITEM 1.    BUSINESS
(Dollars in thousands)

General

        AAR CORP. and its subsidiaries are referred to herein collectively as "AAR," "Company," "we," "us," and "our" unless the context indicates otherwise. AAR was founded in 1951, organized in 1955 and reincorporated in Delaware in 1966. We are a diversified provider of products and services to the worldwide aviation and government and defense markets. We conduct our business activities primarily through seven principal operating subsidiaries: AAR Parts Trading, Inc.; AAR Aircraft & Engine Sales & Leasing, Inc.; AAR Services, Inc.; AAR Aircraft Services, Inc.; AAR Manufacturing, Inc.; AAR Airlift Group, Inc.; and AAR International, Inc. Our international business activities are conducted primarily through AAR International, Inc.

        We report our activities in four business segments: (i) Aviation Supply Chain, comprised primarily of business activities conducted through AAR Parts Trading, Inc.; AAR Allen Services, Inc. (a wholly-owned subsidiary of AAR Services, Inc.); AAR Aircraft & Engine Sales & Leasing, Inc. and AAR International, Inc.; (ii) Government and Defense Services, comprised primarily of business activities conducted through AAR Parts Trading, Inc. and AAR Airlift Group, Inc.; (iii) Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul, comprised primarily of business activities conducted through AAR Services, Inc; AAR Allen Services, Inc. and AAR Aircraft Services, Inc.; and (iv) Structures and Systems, comprised primarily of business activities conducted through AAR Manufacturing, Inc.

Aviation Supply Chain

        Activities in our Aviation Supply Chain segment include the purchase, sale, lease, repair and overhaul of a wide variety of new, overhauled and repaired engine and airframe parts and components and avionics, electrical, electronic, fuel, hydraulic and pneumatic components and instruments for our airline customers. We also provide customized inventory supply and management programs for engine and airframe parts and components in support of airline customers' maintenance activities. The types of services provided under these programs include material planning, sourcing, logistics, information and program management, and parts and component repair and overhaul. We are an authorized distributor for more than 100 leading aviation product manufacturers. On October 11, 2011, we acquired Airinmar Holdings Limited ("Airinmar"), a sophisticated repair, outsourcing and warranty claim manager based in the United Kingdom. We acquire aviation parts and components from domestic and foreign airlines, original equipment manufacturers, independent aviation service companies and aircraft leasing companies. From time to time, we also purchase aircraft and engines for disassembly into individual parts and components. These assets may be leased to airlines on a short-term basis prior to disassembly. The majority of our sales are made pursuant to standard commercial purchase orders but certain inventory supply and management program agreements reflect negotiated terms and conditions.

        Activities in our Aviation Supply Chain segment also include the sale and lease of used commercial aircraft. Each sale or lease is negotiated as a separate agreement which includes term, price, representations, warranties and lease return provisions. Since 2008, our strategy has been to gradually reduce our investment in our joint venture and wholly-owned aircraft portfolio available for lease or sale to the commercial airline market. At May 31, 2012, the total number of aircraft held in joint ventures was 18 and two were wholly-owned.

        As of the third quarter of fiscal 2012, we no longer reported the operating results of our Amsterdam component repair business as a discontinued operation. We made the decision to retain the operation after considering the results of our sales process and reviewing strategic alternatives for the business. As a result of this change in strategy, the operating results for the Amsterdam business have been reclassified from

2


Table of Contents

discontinued operations and are reported in continuing operations for all periods presented and are not material to our financial position or results of operations.

Government and Defense Services

        Activities in our Government and Defense Services segment include the business of AAR Airlift Group, Inc. ("Airlift") and our Defense Systems and Logistics and Integrated Technologies services businesses. We acquired Airlift, formerly known as Aviation Worldwide Services, in April 2010. Airlift is a leading provider of expeditionary airlift services to the United States and other government customers. Airlift provides fixed- and rotary-wing flight operations, transporting personnel and cargo principally in support of the U.S. Department of Defense, and performs engineering and design modifications on rotary-wing aircraft for government customers. Airlift operates a fleet of customized fixed-wing and rotary-wing aircraft, principally in Afghanistan, Northern Africa and the Western Pacific. Airlift holds FAR Part 133 and 135 certificates to operate aircraft and a FAR Part 145 certificate to operate a repair station. Airlift is also Commercial Aircraft Review Board certified with the U.S. Department of Defense.

        In this segment, we also provide customized performance-based logistics programs in support of U.S. Department of Defense and foreign governments. The types of services provided under these programs include material planning, sourcing, logistics, information and program management, airframe maintenance and maintenance planning and component repair and overhaul. We also provide engineering, design and system integration services for specialized command and control systems.

Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

        Activities in our Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul ("MRO") segment include major airframe maintenance inspection and overhaul, painting services, line maintenance, airframe modifications, structural repairs, avionic service and installation, exterior and interior refurbishment and engineering services and support for many types of commercial and military aircraft. We also repair and overhaul landing gears, wheels and brakes for commercial and military aircraft.

        We currently operate four airframe maintenance facilities and one landing gear overhaul facility. We have a long-term lease to occupy a portion of an aircraft maintenance facility in Indianapolis, Indiana (the "Indianapolis Maintenance Center" or "IMC"), which is owned by the Indianapolis Airport Authority ("IAA"). The IMC is comprised of 12 airframe maintenance bays, backshop space and warehouse and office space. Our lease with the IAA allows us to occupy up to ten of the maintenance bays and certain office space through December 2014, with a ten-year renewal option. We also operate aircraft maintenance facilities in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma and Miami, Florida and a regional aircraft maintenance facility in Hot Springs, Arkansas. In June 2012, we signed a lease agreement to occupy an airframe maintenance facility in Duluth, Minnesota. The initial term of the lease agreement is seven years, and we have five, five-year renewal option periods. We have a termination right, exercisable upon 180 days' notice, at any time during the initial seven-year term and option periods. We expect the Duluth facility to operate as a satellite of the IMC. In addition to our aircraft maintenance facilities, we operate a landing gear repair center in Miami, Florida where we repair and overhaul landing gear, wheels, brakes and actuators for different types of commercial and military aircraft.

        In this segment, we purchase replacement parts from OEMs and other suppliers that are used in our maintenance, repair and overhaul operations. We have ongoing arrangements with OEMs that provide us access to parts, repair manuals and service bulletins in support of parts manufactured by the OEMs. Although the terms of each arrangement vary, they typically are made on standard OEM terms as to duration, price and delivery. When possible, we obtain replacement parts used in repair and overhaul activities from operating units in our Aviation Supply Chain segment.

3


Table of Contents

Structures and Systems

        Activities in our Structures and Systems segment include the design, manufacture and repair of airdrop and other transportation pallets, and a wide variety of containers and shelters used in support of military and humanitarian tactical deployment activities. The containers and shelters are used in numerous mission requirements, including armories, supply and parts storage, refrigeration systems, tactical operation centers, briefing rooms, laundry and kitchen facilities, water treatment and sleeping quarters.

        In this segment, we also design, manufacture and install in-plane cargo loading and handling systems for commercial and military aircraft and helicopters. We are a provider of complex machined and fabricated parts, components and sub-systems for various aerospace and defense programs and other applications, and we design and manufacture advanced composite materials for commercial, business and military aircraft. In this segment, sales are made to customers pursuant to standard commercial purchase orders and contracts. We purchase raw materials for this business, including steel, titanium, aluminum, extrusions and castings and other necessary supplies, from a number of vendors.

        On December 2, 2011, we acquired Telair International GmbH ("Telair") and Nordisk Aviation Products, AS ("Nordisk"). Telair designs, manufactures and supports cargo loading systems for wide-body and narrow-body aircraft for both Airbus and Boeing and operates from facilities in Germany, Sweden and Singapore. Nordisk designs and manufactures heavy-duty pallet and lightweight cargo containers for commercial airlines from facilities in Norway and China.

Raw Materials

        We historically have been able to obtain raw materials and other items for our inventories for each of our segments at competitive prices, terms and conditions from numerous sources, and we expect to be able to continue to do so.

Terms of Sale

        In the Aviation Supply Chain, Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul, and Structures and Systems segments, we generally sell our products under standard 30-day payment terms. On occasion, certain customers (principally foreign customers) will negotiate extended payment terms (60-90 days). Except for customary warranty provisions, customers do not have the right to return products nor do they have the right to extended financing. For aircraft sales in Aviation Supply Chain, we sell our products on a cash due at delivery basis, standard 30-day payment terms or on an extended payment term basis, and aircraft purchasers do not have the right to return the aircraft. Our contracts with the U.S. Department of Defense and its contractors, U.S. Department of State and other governmental agencies are typically firm agreements to provide products and services at a fixed price or on a time and material basis, and have a term of one year or less, frequently subject to extension for one or more additional periods of one year at the option of the government customer.

Customers

        For each of our business segments, we market and sell products and services primarily through our own employees. In certain markets outside of the United States, we rely on foreign sales agents to assist in the sale of our products and services.

4


Table of Contents

        The principal customers for our products and services in the Aviation Supply Chain and Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segments are domestic and foreign commercial airlines, regional and commuter airlines, business and general aviation operators, original equipment manufacturers, aircraft leasing companies, domestic and foreign military organizations and independent aviation support companies. In the Government and Defense Services segment, our principal customers are the U.S. Department of Defense and its contractors, the U.S. Department of State, and foreign military organizations or governments. In the Structures and Systems segment, our principal customers include the U.S. Department of Defense and its contractors, foreign government and defense organizations, domestic and foreign passenger and freight airlines, original equipment manufacturers, large system providers and other industrial entities.

        Sales of aviation products and services to our airline customers are generally affected by such factors as the number, type and average age of aircraft in service, the levels of aircraft utilization (e.g., frequency of schedules), the number of airline operators, the general economy and the level of sales of new and used aircraft. Sales to the U.S. Department of Defense, U.S. Department of State and other government agencies are subject to a number of factors, including the level of troop deployment worldwide, government funding, competitive bidding and requirements generated by world-wide geopolitical events.

Licenses

        We have 11 Federal Aviation Administration ("FAA") licensed repair stations in the United States and Europe. Of the 11 licensed FAA repair stations, six are also European Aviation Safety Agency ("EASA") licensed repair stations. Such licenses, which are ongoing in duration, are required in order for us to perform authorized maintenance, repair and overhaul services for our customers and are subject to revocation by the government for non-compliance with applicable regulations. Of the 11 FAA licensed repair stations, four are in the Aviation Supply Chain segment, one is in the Government and Defense Services segment, five are in the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment and one is in the Structures and Systems segment. Of the six EASA licensed repair stations, two are in the Aviation Supply Chain segment and four are in the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment. In our Government and Defense Services segment, we also hold FAR Part 133 and 135 certificates to operate aircraft. We also are Commercial Aircraft Review Board certified with the U.S. Department of Defense. We believe that we possess all licenses and certifications that are material to the conduct of our business.

Competition

        Competition in each of our markets is based on quality, ability to provide a broad range of products and services, speed of delivery and price. Competitors in both the Aviation Supply Chain and the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segments include OEMs, the service divisions of large commercial airlines and other independent suppliers of parts and repair and overhaul services. Our manufacturing, machining and engineering activities in our Structures and Systems segment compete with a number of divisions of large corporations and other large and small companies. In our Government and Defense Services segment, our expeditionary airlift services activities compete with a few domestic government contracting companies and our performance-based logistic services activities compete with large domestic companies and other independent suppliers of these types of services. Although certain of our competitors have substantially greater financial and other resources than we do, in each of our four business segments we believe that we have maintained a satisfactory competitive position through our responsiveness to customer needs, our attention to quality and our unique combination of market expertise, and technical and financial capabilities.

Backlog

        At May 31, 2012, backlog believed to be firm was approximately $928,700 compared to $963,100 at May 31, 2011. These amounts do not include expected sales from the A400M cargo system (see

5


Table of Contents

Item 1A—Risk Factors). The reduction in backlog from May 31, 2011 is due to lower backlog at the Company's mobility products business unit in the Structures and Systems segment. Approximately $701,200 of our May 31, 2012 backlog is expected to be filled within the next 12 months.

Employees

        At May 31, 2012, we employed approximately 6,700 persons worldwide, of which 460 employees are subject to a collective bargaining agreement. We also retain approximately 900 contract workers, the majority of whom are located at our airframe maintenance facilities.

Sales to Government and Defense Customers

        Sales to global government and defense customers were $930,409 (45.1% of total sales), $948,317 (52.5% of total sales) and $651,637 (48.2% of total sales) in fiscal years 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Sales to branches, agencies and departments of the U.S. government and their contractors were $888,489 (43.0% of total sales), $893,066 (49.5% of total sales) and $607,348 (44.9% of total sales) in fiscal years 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively. Sales to government and defense customers are reported in each of our reportable segments (See Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements). Because such sales are subject to competitive bidding and government funding, no assurance can be given that such sales will continue at levels previously experienced. The majority of our U.S. government contracts are for products and services supporting U.S. Department of Defense logistics and mobility strategy, as well as for supplemental airlift services and are, therefore, subject to changes in defense and other governmental agency funding and spending. Our government contracts are subject to termination by the customer; in the event of such a termination we would be entitled to recover all allowable costs incurred by us through the date of termination.

Available Information

        For additional information concerning our business segments, see Item 7, "Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and "Business Segment Information" in Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements under Item 8, "Financial Statements and Supplementary Data."

        Our internet address is www.aarcorp.com. We make available free of charge through our web site our annual report on Form 10-K, quarterly reports on Form 10-Q, current reports on Form 8-K and all amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish such material to, the Securities and Exchange Commission. Information contained on our web site is not a part of this report.

6


Table of Contents

ITEM 1A.    RISK FACTORS

        The following is a description of the principal risks inherent in our business.

We are affected by factors that adversely impact the commercial aviation industry.

        As a provider of products and services to the commercial aviation industry, we are greatly affected by overall economic conditions of that industry. The commercial aviation industry is historically cyclical and has been negatively affected in the past by geopolitical events, high oil prices, lack of capital and weak economic conditions. In addition, as a result of these and other events, from time-to-time certain of our customers have filed for bankruptcy protection or ceased operation.

        In calendar year 2008 and into 2009, demand for air transportation in the United States and abroad declined due to economic deterioration in the U.S. and other global economies. Although global economic conditions improved in the 2010 to 2012 period, the recovery has generally been sluggish in the U.S., and in many other developed nations. The impact of high fuel costs and the continued sluggish or weak world-wide economic conditions may lead airlines to reduce domestic or international capacity. In addition, certain of our airline customers have in the past been impacted by tight credit markets, which limited their ability to buy parts, services, engines and aircraft.

        A reduction in the operating fleet of aircraft both in the U.S. and abroad will result in reduced demand for parts support and maintenance activities for the type of aircraft affected. Further, tight credit conditions negatively impact the amount of liquidity available to buy parts, services, engines and aircraft. A deteriorating airline environment may also result in additional airline bankruptcies, and we may not be able to fully collect outstanding accounts receivable. Reduced demand from customers caused by weak economic conditions, including tight credit conditions and customer bankruptcies, may adversely impact our financial condition or results of operations.

        Our business, financial condition, results of operations and growth rates may be adversely affected by these and other events that impact the aviation industry, including the following:

    deterioration in the financial condition of our existing and potential customers;

    reductions in the need for, or the deferral of, aircraft maintenance and repair services and spare parts support;

    retirement of older generation aircraft, resulting in lower prices for spare parts and services for those aircraft;

    reductions in demand for used aircraft and engines;

    increased in-house maintenance by airlines;

    high oil prices;

    future terrorist attacks and the ongoing war on terrorism;

    future outbreaks of infectious diseases; and

    acts of God.

Our U.S. government contracts may not continue at present sales levels, which may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

        Our sales to branches, agencies and departments of the U.S. government and their contractors were $888,489 (43.0% of consolidated sales) in fiscal year 2012 (See Note 15 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements). The majority of our U.S. government contracts are for products and services supporting U.S. Department of Defense logistics and mobility strategy, as well as for supplemental airlift services and are,

7


Table of Contents

therefore, subject to changes in defense and other governmental agency funding and spending. Our contracts with the U.S. government, including the Department of Defense and its contractors, are typically agreements to provide products and services at a fixed price and have a term of one year or less, frequently subject to extension for one or more additional periods of one year at the option of the government customer. Sales to agencies of the U.S. government and their contractors are subject to a number of factors, including the level of troop deployment worldwide, competitive bidding, U.S. government funding requirements generated by world events, and budgetary constraints. Defense funding is currently facing pressure due to U.S. budget deficit challenges. In August 2011, Congress enacted the Budget Control Act ("BCA") of 2011 which reduces defense spending by $487 billion over a ten-year period starting in fiscal 2012. Under the BCA, an automatic sequestration process was triggered when the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, a committee of twelve members of Congress, failed to agree on a deficit reduction plan for the U.S. federal budget. The sequestration is scheduled to commence on January 2, 2013, absent legislative or other remedial action. Of the $1.2 trillion in reduced spending required by sequestration over the ten-year period beginning in fiscal year 2013, approximately $50 billion per year would be borne by the Department of Defense. Whether or not sequestration goes into effect, we expect the defense budget to be reduced, which could adversely affect our results from operations and financial condition.

Acquisitions expose us to risks, including the risk that we may be unable to effectively integrate acquired businesses.

        We continue to grow through acquisitions. On December 2, 2011, we acquired Telair and Nordisk from Teleflex International. On October 11, 2011, we acquired Airinmar, a sophisticated repair, outsourcing and warranty claim manager based in the UK. We acquired Airlift, formerly known as Aviation Worldwide Services, in April 2010. Airlift is a leading provider of expeditionary airlift services to the United States and other government customers. Further, we explore and have discussions with third parties regarding additional acquisitions on a regular basis. Acquisitions involve risks, including difficulties in integrating the operations and personnel, the effects of amortization of any acquired intangible assets and the potential impairment of goodwill, and the potential loss of key employees of the acquired business. For our recent acquisitions, and for any businesses we may acquire in the future, we may not be able to execute our operational, financial or integration plans for the acquired businesses, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

We face risks of cost overruns and losses on fixed-price contracts.

        We sell certain of our products and services to our commercial, government and defense customers under firm contracts providing for fixed unit prices, regardless of costs incurred by us. The cost of producing products or providing services may be adversely affected by increases in the cost of labor, materials, fuel, overhead and other unknown variants, including manufacturing and other operational inefficiencies and differences between assumptions used by us to price a contract and actual results. Increased costs may result in cost overruns and losses on such contracts, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Significant cost issues may develop in connection with the A400M cargo system.

        In June 2005, we announced that our Cargo Systems business in our Structures and Systems segment was selected to provide cargo handling systems for the new Airbus A400M Military Transport Aircraft ("A400M"). We have incurred, and are expected to continue to incur, significant development costs in connection with this program (see Note 14 in Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements). Our portion of revenue to be generated from this program is expected to exceed $300 million through fiscal 2021, based on current sales projections for the A400M as provided to us by Airbus. Based on program delays and information provided by Airbus, planned first shipments under this program have slipped to late fiscal 2013 or early fiscal 2014. If the A400M experiences significant additional delivery delays or order cancellations, or if we fail to develop the system according to contract specifications, or if we fail to reach

8


Table of Contents

agreement on the final negotiated price with Airbus due to changes in contract specifications, then we may not be able to recover our development costs, and our operating results and financial condition could be adversely affected.

Success within our Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment is dependent upon continued outsourcing by the airlines.

        We currently perform airframe maintenance, repair and overhaul activities at leased facilities in Indianapolis, Indiana; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Miami, Florida; and Hot Springs, Arkansas. Revenues at these facilities fluctuate based on demand for maintenance which, in turn, is driven by the number of aircraft operating and the extent of outsourcing of maintenance activities by airlines. If either the number of aircraft operating or the level of outsourcing of maintenance activities declines, we may not be able to execute our operational and financial plans at our maintenance, repair and overhaul facilities, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

We operate in highly competitive markets, and competitive pressures may adversely affect us.

        The markets for our products and services to our commercial, government and defense customers are highly competitive, and we face competition from a number of sources, both domestic and international. Our competitors include aircraft and aircraft component and parts manufacturers, airline and aircraft service companies, other companies providing maintenance, repair and overhaul services, other aircraft spare parts distributors and redistributors, and other expeditionary airlift service providers. Some of our competitors have substantially greater financial and other resources than we have and others may price their products and services below our selling prices. These competitive pressures could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

We are subject to significant government regulation and may need to incur significant expenses to comply with new or more stringent governmental regulation.

        The aviation industry is highly regulated by the FAA in the United States and equivalent regulatory agencies in other countries. Before we sell any of our products that are to be installed in an aircraft, such as engines, engine parts and components, and airframe and accessory parts and components, they must meet certain standards of airworthiness established by the FAA or the equivalent regulatory agencies in certain other countries. We operate repair stations that are licensed by the FAA and the equivalent regulatory agencies in certain other countries, and hold certificates to operate aircraft. Specific regulations vary from country to country, although regulatory requirements in other countries are generally satisfied by compliance with FAA requirements. New and more stringent governmental regulations may be adopted in the future that, if enacted, may have an adverse impact on us.

        If any of our material licenses, certificates, authorizations or approvals were revoked or suspended by the FAA or equivalent regulatory agencies in other countries, our results of operations and financial condition may be adversely affected.

If we fail to comply with complex procurement laws and regulations, we could lose business and be liable for various penalties or sanctions.

        We must comply with laws and regulations relating to the formation, administration and performance of U.S. government contracts. These laws and regulations include the Federal Acquisition Regulations, the Truth in Negotiations Act, Cost Accounting Standards, and laws, regulations and orders restricting the use and dissemination of classified information under U.S. export control laws, and the export of certain products and technical information. In complying with these laws and regulations, we may incur significant costs, and non-compliance may result in the imposition of fines and penalties, including contractual damages. If we fail to comply with these laws and regulations or if a government audit, review or

9


Table of Contents

investigation uncovers improper or illegal activities, we may be subject to civil or criminal penalties or administrative sanctions. Our reputation could suffer harm if allegations of impropriety were made against us, which could adversely affect our operating performance and may result in additional expenses and possible loss of revenue.

The majority of Airlift's revenue is derived from providing expeditionary airlift services in Afghanistan.

        Airlift derives most of its revenue from providing supplemental airlift in Afghanistan for the U.S. Department of Defense. The US and its allies are currently preparing to withdraw the majority of foreign combat troops by the end of calendar 2014. Although we expect significant ongoing demand for airlift services in Afghanistan from the U.S. Department of Defense and other governmental departments, we are exposed to the risk that our revenues at Airlift may decline, which could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition. We are working to diversify our customer base to help mitigate potential reductions in the U.S. Department of Defense work in Afghanistan. Our inability to diversify our customer base could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

        U.S. government contractors that provide support services in theaters of conflict such as Afghanistan have come under increasing scrutiny by agency inspector generals, government auditors and congressional committees. Investigations pursued by any or all of these groups may result in adverse publicity for us and reputational harm, regardless of the underlying merit of the allegations being investigated.

We are exposed to risks associated with operating internationally.

        We conduct our business in certain foreign countries, some of which are politically unstable or subject to military or civil conflicts. Consequently, we are subject to a variety of risks that are specific to international operations, including the following:

    military conflicts, civil strife and political risks;

    export regulations that could erode profit margins or restrict exports;

    compliance with the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and other anti-bribery laws;

    the burden and cost of compliance with foreign laws, treaties and technical standards and changes in those regulations;

    contract award and funding delays;

    potential restrictions on transfers of funds;

    import and export duties and value added taxes;

    foreign exchange risk;

    transportation delays and interruptions; and

    uncertainties arising from foreign local business practices and cultural considerations.

        While we have and will continue to adopt measures to reduce the potential impact of losses resulting from the risks of doing business internationally, we cannot ensure that such measures will be adequate. There can be no assurances that the regions in which we operate will continue to be stable enough to allow us to operate profitably or at all.

10


Table of Contents

Market values for our aviation products fluctuate, and we may be unable to re-lease or sell aircraft and engines when their current lease expires.

        We use a number of assumptions when determining the recoverability of inventories and aircraft and engines which are on lease or available for lease. These assumptions include historical sales trends, current and expected usage trends, replacement values, current and expected lease rates, residual values, future demand, and future cash flows. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we decided to offer one narrow body aircraft for sale from our wholly-owned aircraft portfolio and as a result, we recorded a $5,355 pre-tax impairment charge to reduce the carrying value of the aircraft to its net realizable value. Reductions in demand for our inventories or declining market values, as well as differences between actual results and the assumptions utilized by us when determining the recoverability of our inventories, aircraft and engines, could result in additional impairment charges in future periods.

        We lease aircraft and engines to our customers on an operating lease basis. Our ability to re-lease or sell these assets on acceptable terms when the lease expires is subject to a number of factors which drive industry capacity, including new aircraft deliveries, availability of used aircraft and engines in the marketplace, competition, financial condition of our customers, overall health of the airline industry and general economic conditions. During fiscal 2013, four 737-400 aircraft will be up for lease renewal. Our inability to re-lease these aircraft, or other aircraft and engines that are currently on lease, could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

We are dependent upon continued availability of financing to manage our business and to execute our business strategy, and additional financing may not be available on terms acceptable to us.

        Our ability to manage our business and to execute our business strategy is dependent, in part, on the continued availability of debt and equity capital. Access to the debt and equity capital markets may be limited by various factors, including the condition of overall credit markets, general economic factors, the state of the aviation industry, our financial performance and credit ratings. Debt and equity capital may not continue to be available to us on favorable terms, or at all. Our inability to obtain financing on favorable terms could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Our existing debt includes restrictive and financial covenants.

        Certain of our loan and debt agreements require us to comply with various restrictive covenants and some contain financial covenants that require us to comply with specified financial ratios and tests. Our failure to meet these covenants could result in default under these loan and debt agreements and may result in a cross-default under other debt agreements. In the event of a default and our inability to obtain a waiver of the default, all amounts outstanding under our debt agreements could be declared immediately due and payable. Our failure to comply with these covenants could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Our industry is susceptible to product and other liability claims, and claims not adequately covered by insurance may adversely affect our financial condition.

        Our business exposes us to possible claims for property damage and personal injury or death which may result if an engine, engine part or component, airframe part or accessory or any other aviation product which we have sold, manufactured or repaired fails, or if an aircraft we operated, serviced or in which our products are installed crashes and the cause cannot be determined. We carry substantial liability insurance in amounts that we believe are adequate for our risk exposure and commensurate with industry norms. However, claims may arise in the future, and our insurance coverage may not be adequate to protect us in all circumstances. Additionally, we might not be able to maintain adequate insurance coverage in the future at an acceptable cost. Any liability claim not covered by adequate insurance could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

11


Table of Contents

Our business could be negatively affected by cyber or other security threats or other disruptions.

        As a U.S. defense contractor, we face cyber threats, threats to the physical security of our facilities and employees, and terrorist acts, as well as the potential for business disruptions associated with information technology failures, natural disasters, or public health crises.

        Cyber security threats are evolving and include, but are not limited to, malicious software, attempts to gain unauthorized access to our Company sensitive information, including our customers, suppliers, subcontractors and joint venture partners, and other electronic security breaches that could lead to disruptions in mission critical systems, unauthorized release of confidential or otherwise protected information and corruption of data.

        Although we utilize various procedures and controls to monitor and mitigate these threats, there can be no assurance that these procedures and controls will be sufficient to prevent security threats from materializing. If any of these events were to materialize, the costs related to cyber or other security threats or disruptions may not be fully insured or indemnified and could have a material adverse effect on our reputation, operating results and financial condition.

We must comply with extensive environmental requirements, and any exposure to environmental liabilities may adversely affect us.

        Federal, state and local requirements relating to the discharge and emission of substances into the environment, the disposal of hazardous wastes, the remediation and abatement of contaminants, and other activities affecting the environment have had and may continue to have an impact on our operations. Management cannot assess the possible effect of compliance with future environmental requirements or of future environmental claims for which we may not have adequate indemnification or insurance coverage. If we were required to pay the expenses related to any future environmental claims for which neither indemnification nor insurance coverage were available, these expenses could have an adverse impact on our results of operations and financial condition.

        Future environmental regulatory developments in the United States and abroad concerning issues such as climate change, could adversely affect operations and increase operating costs and, through their impact on our customers, reduce demand. Actions may be taken in the future by the U.S. government, state governments within the United States, foreign governments, the International Civil Aviation Organization, or by signatory countries through a new global climate change treaty to regulate the emission of greenhouse gases by the aviation industry. The precise nature of any such requirements and their applicability to us and our customers are difficult to predict, but the impact to us and the aviation industry would likely be adverse and could be significant, including the potential for increased fuel costs, carbon taxes or fees, or a requirement to purchase carbon credits.

We may need to make significant capital expenditures to keep pace with technological developments in our industry.

        The industries in which we participate are constantly undergoing development and change, and it is likely that new products, equipment and methods of repair and overhaul services will be introduced in the future. We may need to make significant expenditures to purchase new equipment and to train our employees to keep pace with any new technological developments. These expenditures could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

Our operations would be adversely affected by a shortage of skilled personnel or work stoppages.

        Because of the complex nature of many of our products and services, we are dependent on an educated and highly skilled workforce. Furthermore, we have a collective bargaining agreement covering 460 employees. Our ability to operate successfully and meet our customers' demands could be jeopardized if we are unable to attract and retain a sufficient number of skilled personnel, including qualified licensed mechanics, to conduct our business, or if we experience a significant or prolonged work stoppage, and may adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition.

12


Table of Contents

ITEM 1B.    UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

        Not Applicable.

ITEM 2.    PROPERTIES

        Our principal parts distribution activities for the Aviation Supply Chain segment are conducted from our headquarters in Wood Dale, Illinois, which we own subject to a mortgage. In addition to warehouse space, this facility includes executive, sales and administrative offices. We also lease facilities in Garden City, New York and London, England, and own a building near Schiphol International Airport in the Netherlands to support activities in the Aviation Supply Chain segment.

        Our principal activities in the Government and Defense Services segment are conducted from our headquarters in Wood Dale, Illinois, which we own subject to a mortgage, and leased facilities in Jacksonville, Florida; Melbourne, Florida and Huntsville, Alabama.

        Our principal activities in the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment are conducted at facilities leased by us in Indianapolis, Indiana; Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Miami, Florida and Hot Springs, Arkansas.

        Our principal activities in the Structures and Systems segment are conducted at facilities we own in Clearwater, Florida; Cadillac, Michigan and Goldsboro, North Carolina. We also lease facilities in Huntsville, Alabama; Cullman, Alabama; Lebanon, Kentucky; Sacramento, California; Miesbach, Germany; Holmestrand, Norway; Singapore, Republic of Singapore; Lund, Sweden and Kunshan, China.

        We also operate sales offices which support all our activities and are leased in London, England; Melbourne, Australia; Paris, France; Rio de Janeiro, Brazil; Shanghai, China; Hong Kong, China; Tokyo, Japan; Abu Dhabi, UAE and Simi Valley, California.

        We believe that our owned and leased facilities are suitable and adequate for our operational requirements.

ITEM 3.    LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

        We are not a party to any material, pending legal proceeding (including any governmental or environmental proceedings) other than routine litigation incidental to our business.

ITEM 4.    MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

        Not Applicable.

Supplemental Item:

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS OF THE REGISTRANT

        Information concerning each of our executive officers is set forth below:

Name
  Age  
Present Position with the Company

David P. Storch

  59  

Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Director

Timothy J. Romenesko

  55  

President and Chief Operating Officer, Director

Richard J. Poulton

  47  

Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer

Robert J. Regan

  54  

Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary

Michael J. Sharp

  50  

Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer

Terry D. Stinson

  70  

Group Vice President, Structures and Systems

Randy J. Martinez

  57  

Group Vice President, Government and Defense Services

Dany Kleiman

  51  

Group Vice President, Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

John Holmes

  35  

Group Vice President, Aviation Supply Chain

13


Table of Contents

        Mr. Storch was elected Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer in October 2005. Previously, he served as President and Chief Executive Officer from 1996 to 2005 and Chief Operating Officer from 1989 to 1996. Prior to that, he served as a Vice President of the Company from 1988 to 1989. Mr. Storch joined the Company in 1979 and also served as president of a major subsidiary from 1984 to 1988. Mr. Storch has been a director of the Company since 1989.

        Mr. Romenesko was appointed President and Chief Operating Officer effective June 1, 2007. Previously, he served as Vice President and Chief Financial Officer since 1994. He also served as Controller of the Company from 1991 to 1995, and in various other positions since joining the Company in 1981. Mr. Romenesko has been a director of the Company since 2007.

        Mr. Poulton was appointed Vice President, Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer effective June 1, 2007. Previously he served as Vice President of Acquisitions and Strategic Investments since joining the Company in September 2006. Prior to joining the Company, he spent ten years in the aviation industry and held senior executive leadership positions with UAL Corporation, including Senior Vice President of Business Development and Senior Vice President and Chief Procurement Officer for United Airlines, Inc.

        Mr. Regan was appointed Vice President, General Counsel and Secretary of the Company effective June 1, 2009. Previously he served as Vice President and General Counsel and prior to that as Associate General Counsel after joining the Company in February 2008. Prior to joining the Company, he was a partner at the law firm of Schiff Hardin LLP since 1989.

        Mr. Sharp has served as Vice President, Controller and Chief Accounting Officer since 1999. Previously, he served as Controller of the Company from 1996 to 1999. Prior to joining the Company, he was with Kraft Foods from 1994 to 1996, and with KPMG LLP from 1984 to 1994.

        Mr. Stinson has served as Group Vice President of Structures and Systems since joining the Company in July 2007. Previously, he was President of Commercial Operations for Thomas Group, an operational consulting firm, and Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Xelus Inc. Prior to that he served as Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Bell Helicopter Textron, Inc. from 1991 to 2001 and before that held leadership positions with United Technologies Corporation ("UTC"), including President and Chief Executive Officer of Hamilton Standard, a UTC division, from 1986 to 1991.

        Mr. Martinez was named Group Vice President, Government and Defense Systems on April 20, 2010. Previously he served as Senior Vice President, Government and Defense Programs after joining the Company in March 2009. Prior to joining the Company, he served as Chief Executive Officer of World Air Holdings, Inc. and prior to that, he had a distinguished 21-year career with the U.S. Air Force (Colonel retired and Command Pilot), most recently serving as Principal Adviser to the Chief of Staff of NATO's Strategic Planning Staff.

        Mr. Kleiman was named Group Vice President, Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul on June 10, 2010. Previously he served as Vice President, Operations since joining the Company in September 2009. Prior to joining the Company, he held various leadership positions within the aerospace industry, most recently serving as President of a major airframe maintenance and modification company.

        Mr. Holmes was named Group Vice President, Aviation Supply Chain on July 17, 2012. Previously, he served as General Manager and Division President of Allen Asset Management since 2003, and prior thereto in various other positions since joining the Company in September 2001.

        Each executive officer is elected annually by the Board of Directors at the first meeting of the Board held after the annual meeting of stockholders. Executive officers continue to hold office until their successors are duly elected or until their death, resignation, termination or reassignment.

14


Table of Contents


PART II

ITEM 5.    MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

        Our Common Stock is traded on the New York Stock Exchange and the Chicago Stock Exchange. On July 1, 2012, there were approximately 1,290 holders of Common Stock, including participants in security position listings.

        On June 20, 2006 our board of directors authorized us to repurchase up to 1,500,000 shares of our common stock on the open market. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, we did not repurchase any shares under this program. The remaining authorization under this program totaled 611,022 shares at May 31, 2012. This program was replaced with a new share buyback program on June 14, 2012, under which our board of directors authorized the repurchase of up to $50 million of our outstanding shares of Common Stock on the open market or in private transactions in accordance with applicable U.S. federal securities laws and regulations, including SEC Rule 10b-18. The program may be modified, suspended or discontinued at any time. This program does not have an expiration date.

        Additional information required by this item is incorporated by reference to Note 16 in Item 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

15


Table of Contents

ITEM 6.    SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA
(In thousands, except per share amounts)

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010   2009   2008  

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

                               

Sales from continuing operations1

  $ 2,064,998   $ 1,805,112   $ 1,352,151   $ 1,423,976   $ 1,384,919  

Gross profit

    318,557     307,056 2   243,519     241,615 2   264,072  

Operating income

    130,702     133,628 2   90,332     102,892 2   134,518  

(Loss) gain on extinguishment of debt

    (664 )   97     893     14,701 3   (2,040 )

Interest expense

    37,772     30,667     26,832     31,416     29,491  

Income from continuing operations1

    68,029     69,826     43,202     58,721     68,759  

Loss from discontinued operations1

                (1,949 )   (601 )

Net income attributable to AAR

    67,723     69,826     44,628     56,772     68,158  
                       

Share data:

                               

Earnings (loss) per share—basic:

                               

Earnings from continuing operations

  $ 1.68   $ 1.76   $ 1.17   $ 1.54   $ 1.85  

Loss from discontinued operations

                (0.05 )   (0.02 )
                       

Earnings per share—basic

  $ 1.68   $ 1.76   $ 1.17   $ 1.49   $ 1.83  

Earnings (loss) per share—diluted:

                               

Earnings from continuing operations

  $ 1.65   $ 1.73   $ 1.16   $ 1.50   $ 1.72  

Loss from discontinued operations

                (0.05 )   (0.01 )
                       

Earnings per share—diluted

  $ 1.65   $ 1.73   $ 1.16   $ 1.45   $ 1.71  

Weighted average common shares outstanding—basic

    38,814     38,355     38,182     38,059     37,194  
                       

Weighted average common shares outstanding—diluted

    43,084     43,593     43,091     42,809     43,745  
                       

FINANCIAL POSITION

                               

Total cash and cash equivalents

  $ 67,720   $ 57,433   $ 79,370   $ 112,505   $ 109,391  

Working capital

    590,046     497,975     521,642     596,894     564,932  

Total assets

    2,195,653     1,703,727     1,500,181     1,375,905     1,359,263  

Short-term recourse debt

    122,780 4   111,323     98,301     50,205     1,236  

Short-term non-recourse debt

        823     757     11,722     20,212  

Long-term recourse debt

    669,404 5   313,981     317,594     302,823     372,740  

Long-term non-recourse debt

        11,032     11,855     16,728     19,190  

Total recourse debt

    792,184     425,304     415,895     353,028     373,976  

Equity

    866,022     835,289     746,350     696,734     650,867  
                       

Number of shares outstanding at end of year

    40,273     39,781     39,484     38,884     38,773  
                       

Book value per share of common stock

  $ 21.50   $ 21.00   $ 18.90   $ 17.92   $ 16.79  
                       

Notes:

1
During fiscal 2007, we decided to exit, and in November 2008 we sold, our industrial turbine business located in Frankfort, New York. The operating results and the loss on disposal are classified as discontinued operations.

2
In fiscal 2011 we recorded a $5,355 impairment charge related to an aircraft. In fiscal 2009 we recorded $31,133 of impairment charges related to three aircraft and certain engine and airframe parts. See Note 12 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

3
During fiscal 2009, we retired $110,510 par value of our convertible notes for $72,916 cash. The gain after consideration of unamortized debt issuance costs was $14,701.

4
The 1.75% convertible notes due February 1, 2026 with an outstanding balance of $94,913 at May 31, 2012 are included in short-term recourse debt because the holders have the right to require us to purchase the notes on February 1, 2013. See Note 2 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

5
In January 2012, we sold $175,000 principal amount of 7.25% Senior Notes due January 15, 2022. Our unsecured revolving credit facility, which totaled $280,000 at May 31, 2012, was classified as long-term debt. See Note 2 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

16


Table of Contents

ITEM 7.    MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS
(Dollars in thousands)

Forward-Looking Statements

        Management's Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations contain certain statements relating to future results, which are forward-looking statements as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements are based on the beliefs of management, as well as assumptions and estimates based on information available to us as of the dates such assumptions and estimates are made, and are subject to certain risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from historical results or those anticipated, depending on a variety of factors, including those factors discussed under Item 1A, "Risk Factors." Should one or more of those risks or uncertainties materialize adversely, or should underlying assumptions or estimates prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those described. Those events and uncertainties are difficult or impossible to predict accurately and many are beyond our control. We assume no obligation to update any forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date of such statements or to reflect the occurrence of anticipated or unanticipated events.

General Overview

        We report our activities in four business segments: Aviation Supply Chain; Government and Defense Services; Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul; and Structures and Systems.

        Sales in the Aviation Supply Chain segment are derived from the sale and lease of a wide variety of new, overhauled and repaired engine and airframe parts and components principally to the commercial aviation market. We also offer customized inventory supply chain management programs and aircraft component repair management services. Sales also include the sale and lease of commercial aircraft and jet engines and technical and advisory services. Cost of sales consists principally of the cost of product, direct labor, overhead (primarily indirect labor, facility cost and insurance) and the cost of lease revenue (primarily depreciation and insurance).

        Sales in the Government and Defense Services segment are derived from the sale of new and overhauled engine and airframe parts and components, customized performance-based logistics programs, expeditionary airlift services, aircraft modifications and engineering, design, and integration services to our government and defense customers. Cost of sales consists principally of the cost of the product (primarily aircraft and engine parts), direct labor, overhead and aircraft maintenance costs.

        Sales in the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment are principally derived from aircraft maintenance and modifications, engineering services, painting, and the repair, overhaul and exchange of landing gear. Cost of sales consists principally of the cost of product (primarily replacement aircraft parts), direct labor and overhead.

        Sales in the Structures and Systems segment are derived from the engineering, design and manufacture of containers, pallets and shelters used to support the U.S. military's requirements for a mobile and agile force, heavy-duty pallets and lightweight cargo containers for the commercial market, complex machined and fabricated parts, components and sub-systems for various aerospace and defense programs and other applications, in-plane cargo loading and handling systems for commercial and military applications and composite products for aviation and industrial use. Cost of sales consists principally of the cost of product, direct labor and overhead.

        Our chief operating decision making officer (Chief Executive Officer) evaluates performance based on the reportable segments and utilizes gross profit as a primary profitability measure. The tables below set

17


Table of Contents

forth consolidated sales and gross profit for our four business segments for each of the last three fiscal years ended May 31.

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Sales:

                   

Aviation Supply Chain

  $ 588,406   $ 465,108   $ 405,955  

Government and Defense Services

    552,687     571,343     194,944  

Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

    422,169     393,671     301,348  

Structures and Systems

    501,736     374,990     449,904  
               

  $ 2,064,998   $ 1,805,112   $ 1,352,151  
               

 

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Gross Profit:

                   

Aviation Supply Chain

  $ 106,029   $ 76,247   $ 70,490  

Government and Defense Services

    78,635     105,538     42,304  

Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

    55,488     55,871     38,206  

Structures and Systems

    78,405     69,400     92,519  
               

  $ 318,557   $ 307,056   $ 243,519  
               

Business Trends and Highlights

        On December 2, 2011, we acquired Telair and Nordisk. Telair designs, manufactures and supports cargo loading systems for wide-body and narrow-body aircraft for both Airbus and Boeing and operates from facilities in Germany, Sweden and Singapore. Nordisk designs and manufactures heavy-duty pallets and lightweight cargo containers for commercial airlines from facilities in Norway and China. Telair and Nordisk are included in the Structures and Systems segment. On October 11, 2011, we acquired Airinmar, an international provider of aircraft component repair management services which is based in the UK. Airinmar operates as part of our Aviation Supply Chain segment.

        During fiscal 2012, sales to commercial customers increased 32.4% compared to the prior year and represented 54.9% of consolidated sales. Commercial sales growth during fiscal 2012 was driven by strong organic growth in the Aviation Supply Chain and Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul businesses and by the Telair and Nordisk acquisitions. Commercial sales growth during fiscal 2012 occurred against a backdrop of global economic uncertainty, including persistently high oil prices, recent bankruptcies in the aviation industry and the debt crisis in Europe. We continue to monitor these events and their potential impact on our commercial customers.

        During fiscal 2012, sales to global government and defense customers decreased 1.9% compared to the prior year and represented 45.1% of consolidated sales. Defense funding is currently facing pressure due to U.S. budget deficit challenges. In August 2011, Congress enacted the Budget Control Act ("BCA") of 2011 which reduces defense spending by $487 billion over a ten-year period starting in fiscal 2012. Under the BCA, an automatic sequestration process was triggered when the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction, a committee of twelve members of Congress, failed to agree on a deficit reduction plan for the U.S. federal budget. The sequestration is scheduled to commence on January 2, 2013, absent legislative or other remedial action. Of the $1.2 trillion in reduced spending required by sequestration over the ten-year period beginning in fiscal year 2013, approximately $50 billion per year would be borne by the Department of Defense. Whether or not sequestration goes into effect, we expect the defense budget will be reduced. Although there may be additional opportunities for those business units within our Supply Chain and Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segments that support the Department of Defense, as a

18


Table of Contents

result of defense spending reductions, we expect our businesses that support the Department of Defense within our Structures and Systems segment will be adversely affected.

Outlook for Fiscal 2013

        For fiscal 2013, we expect our commercial aviation results to remain strong and to increase on a year-over-year basis as the full-year impact of Telair and Nordisk's operations are included in results. We also expect improved results at AAR Airlift as it benefits from actions taken to improve aircraft availability and reduce costs. Results at our mobility products and defense systems logistics businesses are expected to be down year-over-year. As a result, we expect fiscal 2013 consolidated sales of approximately $2.1 to $2.2 billion and diluted earnings per share of $1.55 to $1.65.

Results of Operations

Fiscal 2012 Compared with Fiscal 2011

        Consolidated sales for fiscal 2012 increased $259,886 or 14.4% compared to the prior year period. Sales to commercial customers increased 32.4% compared to the prior year and included strong organic growth in our Aviation Supply Chain and Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segments, as well as sales from the newly acquired businesses, Telair and Nordisk. Sales to government and defense customers decreased 1.9% principally due to lower sales at our defense logistics business.

        In the Aviation Supply Chain segment, sales increased $123,298 or 26.5% compared to the prior year due to strength at our parts supply businesses, which benefited from the improved commercial airline environment and the recent investments of assets, the sale of four aircraft for approximately $49,000 from our aircraft sales and leasing portfolio and the addition of Airimar sales of $26,058. Gross profit in the Aviation Supply Chain segment increased $29,782 or 39.1% and the gross profit margin percentage increased to 18.0% from 16.4% in the prior year primarily due to the mix of products sold. The prior year gross profit margin was also negatively impacted by a $5,355 pre-tax impairment charge recorded in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011 to reduce the carrying value of an aircraft held for sale to its estimated sales price.

        In the Government and Defense Services ("GDS") segment, sales decreased $18,656 or 3.3% compared to the prior year. The sales decrease primarily reflects the decline in the defense logistics business including the fourth quarter fiscal 2012 adjustment to the KC10 support contract. During the fourth quarter of 2012, we recorded a $9,500 pre-tax charge as a result of lowering our profit expectations on the KC10 support contract. This adjustment represents the difference between the new margin expectation and the previous margin expectation for the period of performance since contract inception, which was February 2010. GDS gross profit decreased $26,903 or 25.5% and the gross profit margin percentage declined to 14.2% from 18.5% in the prior year. The decline in gross profit was due to decreased Airlift margins as a result of unfavorable aircraft availability in the last half of fiscal 2012 and the impact of the KC10 support contract adjustment.

        In the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment, sales increased $28,498 or 7.2% versus the prior year due to continued growth and share gains at our heavy maintenance facilities, partially offset by lower sales at our engineering services business. Gross profit decreased $383 or 0.7% and the gross profit margin percentage decreased to 13.1% from 14.2% due to lower sales in fiscal 2012 of high margin engineering services.

        In the Structures and Systems segment, sales increased $126,746 or 33.8% compared to the prior year due to the inclusion of sales from Telair and Nordisk, which contributed $119,429 of revenue during fiscal 2012. Gross profit in the Structures and Systems segment increased $9,005 or 13.0%; however the gross profit margin percentage decreased to 15.6% from 18.5% in the prior year. Factors impacting the decline in margin percentage include the mix of products sold, losses on certain programs and start-up costs on

19


Table of Contents

new programs at our precision machining business, and the restructuring and impairment charges taken in the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 of $3,700 (see Note 12 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).

        During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we sold the assets of a non-strategic product line within our Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment. Proceeds from the sale of the product line were $10,000 cash, and the net carrying value of the assets sold was $4,078. The gain on this transaction has been classified as a component of operating income.

        Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $6,703 or 3.7% due to the inclusion of selling, general and administrative expenses for the three acquired companies. Earnings from aircraft joint ventures decreased $1,802 compared to the prior year due to the sale of two aircraft from our joint venture aircraft portfolio during the prior year. Operating income decreased $2,926 or 2.2% compared with the prior year primarily due to lower gross profit in the Government and Defense Services segment and increased selling general and administrative expenses, partially offset by increased gross profit in the Aviation Supply Chain and Structures and Systems segment. Net interest expense increased $6,211 or 20.5% compared to the prior year primarily due to an increase in outstanding borrowings incurred for the purchase of Telair and Nordisk.

        Our effective income tax rate was 27.2% in fiscal 2012 compared to 32.5% in fiscal 2011. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, we recorded a $3,300 reduction in income tax expense primarily relating to revisions in book versus tax differences. During the third quarter of fiscal 2012, we recorded a $3,976 reduction in income tax expense primarily relating to a reduction in our state income tax rate due to the implementation of state income tax planning strategies related to our corporate structure and the relocation of one of our significant businesses. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we recorded a net $2,300 tax benefit, which was primarily the result of a $3,531 federal income tax benefit as a result of the completion of an examination of our income tax returns from fiscal 2007 through fiscal 2009.

        During fiscal 2012, we retired $9,421 principal amount of our 1.625% convertible notes resulting in a net loss of $161. We also retired $20,551 principal amount of our 1.75% convertible notes resulting in a net loss of $191. During fiscal 2012 and 2011, we retired $9,100 and $6,000 principal amount of our 2.25% convertible notes resulting in a net loss of $312 and a gain of $97 for years 2012 and 2011, respectively.

        Net income attributable to AAR was $67,723 compared to $69,826 in the prior year due to the factors discussed above.

Fiscal 2011 Compared with Fiscal 2010

        Consolidated sales for fiscal 2011 increased $452,961 or 33.5% compared to the prior year period. Sales to commercial customers increased 22.3% compared to the prior year due to increased demand for supply chain and MRO and engineering services, reflecting improved conditions in the commercial aviation industry and performance on new contract awards. Sales to government and defense customers increased 45.5% principally due to the inclusion of Airlift, and increased sales at our defense logistics business.

        In the Aviation Supply Chain segment, sales increased $59,153 or 14.6% compared to the prior year. Our parts supply businesses benefitted from the improved airline environment as maintenance activity increased and airlines restocked inventory levels. Gross profit in the Aviation Supply Chain segment increased $5,757 or 8.2% and the gross profit margin percentage declined to 16.4% from 17.4% in the prior year primarily due to the mix of products sold. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we recorded a $5,355 pre-tax impairment charge to reduce the carrying value of an aircraft held for sale to its estimated sales price. Prior year gross profit was negatively impacted by the sale of the interest in a leveraged lease, in which we recorded a $3,800 negative gross profit margin.

        In the Government and Defense Services segment, sales increased $376,399 or 193.1% compared to fiscal 2010. The sales increase reflects the inclusion of revenue from Airlift, which contributed

20


Table of Contents

approximately $281,000 of revenue during fiscal 2011, as well as growth in our defense logistics business due to the ramp-up of a new performance-based logistics program. Gross profit increased $63,234 or 149.5% due to increased sales; however, gross profit margin percentage declined to 18.5% from 21.7% in the prior year reflecting lower margins in the defense logistics business due to transition costs associated with the new performance-based logistics program, and a contract adjustment which lowered the pricing for services we deliver under another supply chain program.

        In the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment, sales increased $92,323 or 30.6% versus the prior year due to strong growth at our heavy maintenance and landing gear facilities as well as in our engineering services business. The strong growth was driven by performance on contract awards announced in the previous twelve month period, and the improved airline environment. Gross profit increased $17,665 or 46.2% and the gross profit margin percentage increased to 14.2% from 12.7% in the prior year primarily due to increased volume at each of our MRO facilities.

        In the Structures and Systems segment, sales decreased $74,914 or 16.7% compared to the prior year due to the expected decline in volume at our mobility products business as that business completed contract requirements on two large contracts in fiscal 2010. Gross profit in the Structures and Systems segment decreased $23,119 or 25.0% and the gross profit margin percentage decreased to 18.5% from 20.6% in the prior year due to the mix of products sold and lower volume.

        During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we sold the assets of a non-strategic product line within our Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment. Proceeds from the sale of the product line were $10,000 cash, and the net carrying value of the assets sold was $4,078. The gain on this transaction has been classified as a component of operating income.

        Selling, general and administrative expenses increased $29,395 or 19.2% primarily due to the inclusion of selling, general and administrative expenses of Airlift. Earnings from aircraft joint ventures increased $3,232 compared to the prior year due to the sale of two aircraft from our joint venture aircraft portfolio during fiscal 2011. Operating income increased $43,296 or 47.9% compared with the prior year primarily due to the increase in sales, partially offset by the increase in selling, general and administrative expenses. Net interest expense increased $4,431 or 17.1% compared to the prior year primarily due to an increase in outstanding borrowings. Our effective income tax rate was 32.5% in fiscal 2011 compared to 32.7% in fiscal 2010. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we recorded a net $2,300 tax benefit, which was primarily the result of a $3,531 federal income tax benefit as a result of the completion of an examination of our income tax returns from fiscal 2007 through fiscal 2009. The fiscal 2010 effective tax rate reflects the favorable tax impact from the sale of an interest in an aircraft leveraged lease.

        During fiscal 2011, we retired $6,000 principal amount of our 2.25% convertible notes resulting in a net gain on extinguishment of debt of $97.

        In June 2010, we and partners of AAR Global Solutions, LLC ("AAR GS") agreed to wind down the operations of AAR GS, resulting in $0 reported in loss attributable to noncontrolling interest in fiscal 2011.

        Net income attributable to AAR was $69,826 compared to $44,628 in the prior year due to the factors discussed above.

Liquidity and Capital Resources

        Historically, we have funded our operating activities and met our commitments through the generation of cash from operations, augmented by the periodic issuance of common stock and debt in the public and private markets. In addition to these cash sources, our current capital resources include an unsecured credit facility, as well as a separate secured credit facility. We continually evaluate various financing arrangements, including the issuance of common stock or debt, which would allow us to improve our liquidity position and finance future growth on commercially reasonable terms. Our continuing ability to borrow from our lenders and issue debt and equity securities to the public and private markets in the

21


Table of Contents

future may be negatively affected by a number of factors, including the overall health of the credit markets, general economic conditions, airline industry conditions, geo-political events, and our operating performance. Our ability to generate cash from operations is influenced primarily by our operating performance and changes in working capital. Under a universal shelf registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission that became effective on May 4, 2012, we registered an indeterminate number or principal amount of shares of common stock, shares of preferred stock, debt securities, warrants, stock purchase contracts and stock purchase units which may be sold from time to time, subject to market conditions.

        At May 31, 2012, our liquidity and capital resources included cash of $67,720 and working capital of $590,046. During fiscal 2012, we acquired three companies for a total cash outlay of $298,087. In addition, we also invested in our business through capital additions of $91,218. In order to fund these transactions, we increased the size of our revolving credit facility and borrowings thereunder, completed an offering for $175,000 in 7.25% Senior Notes in a private placement, and entered into a five year full amortization term loan agreement with Development Bank of Japan Inc. for $50,000. These items are described further below.

        On April 12, 2011, we entered into an agreement with various financial institutions, as lenders and Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent for the lenders (as amended, the "Credit Agreement") providing for an unsecured revolving credit facility that we can draw upon for general corporate purposes. The revolving commitment was originally $400,000 and on October 13, 2011 was increased to $580,000. Under certain circumstances, we may request an increase to the revolving commitment by an aggregate amount of up to $100,000, not to exceed $680,000 in total. The Credit Agreement expires on April 12, 2016. Borrowings under the Credit Agreement bear interest at the offered Eurodollar Rate (defined as the British Bankers Association LIBOR Rate) plus 125 to 225 basis points based on certain financial measurements if a Eurodollar Rate loan, or at the offered fluctuating Base Rate plus 25 to 125 basis points based on certain financial measurements if a Base Rate loan.

        The Credit Agreement requires us to comply with certain financial covenants, including a fixed charge coverage ratio, a leverage ratio, and a minimum tangible net worth. The Credit Agreement contains certain affirmative and negative covenants, including those relating to financial reporting and notification, payment of indebtedness, taxes and other obligations, compliance with applicable laws, and limitations on additional liens, indebtedness, acquisitions, investments and disposition of assets. The Credit Agreement also requires our significant domestic subsidiaries, and any subsidiaries that guarantee our other indebtedness, to provide a guarantee of payment under the Credit Agreement.

        Borrowings outstanding under this facility at May 31, 2012 were $280,000 and there were approximately $14,329 of outstanding letters of credit which reduced the availability of this facility to $285,671 at May 31, 2012. There are no other terms or covenants limiting the availability of this facility. We also have $4,370 available under a foreign line of credit.

        On January 23, 2012 we completed an offering of $175,000 aggregate principal amount of 7.25% Senior Notes due 2022 (the "Notes"). The Notes were sold to qualified institutional buyers in accordance with Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and outside the United States to non-U.S. persons in accordance with Regulation S under the Securities Act. The Notes were sold at a price equal to 98.268% of the principal amount thereof, for a yield to maturity of 7.5%. The net proceeds of the offering of the Notes were used to repay a portion of the borrowings under our revolving credit agreement incurred to fund our December 2011 acquisition of Telair and Nordisk.

        The Notes are governed by an Indenture dated as of January 23, 2012 (the "Indenture") by and among AAR, certain subsidiary guarantors identified therein (the "Guarantors") and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee.

22


Table of Contents

        The Notes bear interest at a rate of 7.25% per year, payable semi-annually, in cash in arrears, on January 15 and July 15 of each year, commencing July 15, 2012. The Notes will mature on January 15, 2022. Prior to January 15, 2015, we may redeem up to 35% of the aggregate principal amount of the Notes with the net cash proceeds of certain equity offerings at a redemption price of 107.25% of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued and unpaid interest and additional interest, if any, to the redemption date. At any time prior to January 15, 2017, we may redeem the Notes, in whole or in part, at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the Notes redeemed, plus a make-whole premium, plus any accrued and unpaid interest and additional interest, if any, to the redemption date. We may redeem the Notes at our option, in whole or in part, at any time on or after January 15, 2017, upon not less than 30 nor more than 60 days' notice at the redemption prices (expressed as percentages of the principal amount to be redeemed) set forth below, plus any accrued and unpaid interest and additional interest, if any, to the redemption date if redeemed during the 12-month period beginning on January 15 of the years indicated below:

Year
  Redemption Price  

2017

    103.625 %

2018

    102.417 %

2019

    101.208 %

2020 and thereafter

    100.000 %

        The Notes are unconditionally guaranteed, on a full, joint and several basis, by each of the Guarantors, which consist of all of our existing domestic subsidiaries. The Notes and the guarantees are general unsecured senior obligations of AAR and the Guarantors, respectively, rank equally in right of payment with all existing and future senior debt of AAR and the Guarantors, as applicable, and are senior in right of payment to all future subordinated obligations of AAR or the Guarantors. The Notes and the guarantees are effectively subordinated to secured debt of AAR and the Guarantors, respectively, to the extent of the value of the assets securing that debt. In addition, the Notes are structurally junior to any debt or other liabilities of our nonguarantor subsidiaries.

        The Indenture contains covenants that, amount other things, limit AAR's and its Restricted Subsidiaries' (as defined in the Indenture) abilities to (i) incur additional debt or sell preferred stock, (ii) pay dividends, redeem or repurchase stock or make other distributions, (iii) make certain investments, (iv) make other restricted payments and investments, (v) agree to or allow to exist restrictions on the ability to pay dividends or make other payments on its capital interests, (vi) create liens without granting equal and ratable liens to the holders of the Notes, (vii) enter into sale and leaseback transactions, (viii) merge, consolidate or transfer or dispose of substantially all of their assets, (ix) enter into certain types of transactions with affiliates and (x) sell assets. These covenants are subject to a number of qualifications and limitations. In addition, the Indenture limits AAR's and the Restricted Subsidiaries' abilities to engage in businesses other than businesses in which such companies are engaged on the date of issuance of the Notes and related businesses.

        On March 9, 2012, we entered into a five year full amortization term loan agreement with Development Bank of Japan Inc. (the "Loan Agreement") to refinance a portion of the indebtedness incurred to finance the acquisition of Telair and Nordisk. Borrowings under the Loan Agreement bear interest at the offered Eurodollar Rate (defined as the British Bankers Association LIBOR Rate) plus 250 basis points and are unsecured. As of May 31, 2012, $50,000 was outstanding under this agreement and there is no additional amount available. There are no other terms or covenants limiting the availability of this facility.

23


Table of Contents

        The Loan Agreement requires us to comply with certain financial covenants which are consistent with our Credit Agreement. The Loan Agreement is not guaranteed by any of our subsidiaries. The Loan Agreement also contains certain affirmative and negative covenants, including those relating to financial reporting and notification, payment of indebtedness, taxes and other obligations, compliance with applicable laws, and limitations on additional liens, indebtedness, acquisitions, investments and disposition of assets. In addition to our unsecured Credit Agreement and the Loan Agreement, we have a $65,000 secured revolving credit facility with The Huntington National Bank (the "Huntington Loan Agreement"). Borrowings under the Huntington Loan Agreement are secured by aircraft and related engines and components owned by us. The Huntington Loan Agreement expires on April 23, 2015. Borrowings bear interest at LIBOR plus 325 basis points. As of May 31, 2012, $33,022 was outstanding under this agreement resulting in $31,978 remaining available. There are no other terms or covenants limiting the availability of this facility.

        We are in compliance with all financial covenants under each of our financing arrangements.

        During fiscal 2012, cash flow from operations was $94,217 primarily as a result of net income attributable to AAR and noncontrolling interest and aggregate depreciation and amortization of $174,079. The positive impact on cash from our earnings and aggregate depreciation and amortization, deferred taxes and the change in accounts payable, accounts receivable and equipment on long-term lease was partially offset by increases in inventories primarily to support aviation supply chain customers and program costs for the A400M program.

        During fiscal 2012, our investing activities used $390,225 of cash principally as a result of investments in companies acquired of $298,087 and capital expenditures of $91,218 which primarily represents rotary and fixed-wing aircraft and other equipment purchased to support growth and improve operating performance in our Government and Defense Services segment.

        During fiscal 2012, our financing activities provided $306,843 of cash primarily due to net proceeds from borrowings of $410,264 partially offset by the payment of dividends of $12,081. As noted above, we completed an offering for $175,000 in 7.25% Senior Notes in a private placement, entered into a five year full amortization term loan agreement with Development Bank of Japan Inc. for $50,000 and increased the borrowings on our revolver by $180,000.

24


Table of Contents

Contractual Obligations and Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

        A summary of contractual cash obligations and off-balance sheet arrangements as of May 31, 2012 is as follows:

 
  Payments Due by Period  
 
  Total   Due in
Fiscal
2013
  Due in
Fiscal
2014
  Due in
Fiscal
2015
  Due in
Fiscal
2016
  Due in
Fiscal
2017
  After
Fiscal
2017
 

On Balance Sheet:

                                           

Debt

  $ 451,277 1 $ 108,949   $ 76,003   $   $ 66,325   $   $ 200,000  

Capital Leases

    170     85     85                  

Bank Borrowings

    363,650 2   18,087     22,781     22,782     290,000     10,000      

Interest

    48,931 3   27,281     6,813     5,396     4,885     2,249     2,307  

Off Balance Sheet:

                                           

Facilities and Equipment Operating Leases

    137,699     28,155     23,449     18,789     11,588     9,423     46,295  

Garden City, New York Operating Lease

    21,442     1,647     1,688     1,730     1,773     1,817     12,787  

Purchase Obligations

    259,101     250,458     8,034     412             197  

Pension Contribution

    6,500     6,500                      

Notes:

1
$99,170 par value of our long-term debt is due February 1, 2026; however, we may redeem for cash all or a portion of the notes at any time on or after February 6, 2013. Holders of the notes have the right to require us to purchase all or a portion of notes on February 1, 2013, 2016 and 2021. We have included the outstanding amount for these notes in the due in fiscal 2013 column. See Note 2 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements.

2
The term of our revolving credit agreement extends to April 12, 2016.

3
Interest associated with variable rate debt was determined using the interest rate in effect on May 31, 2012.

        Purchase obligations arise in the ordinary course of business and represent a binding commitment to acquire inventory, including raw materials, parts and components, as well as equipment to support the operations of our business. We routinely issue letters of credit and performance bonds in the ordinary course of business. These instruments are typically issued in conjunction with insurance contracts or other business requirements. The total of these instruments outstanding at May 31, 2012 was $16,798.

Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Estimates

        Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Management has made estimates and assumptions relating to the reporting of assets and liabilities and the disclosure of contingent liabilities to prepare the consolidated financial statements. The most significant estimates made by management include those related to the allowance for doubtful accounts, assumptions used in assessing goodwill impairment, adjustments to reduce the value of inventories and aviation equipment on or available for lease, revenue recognition, loss accruals for aviation equipment operating leases, program development costs and assumptions used in determining pension plan obligations. Accordingly, actual results could differ materially from those estimates. The following is a summary of the accounting policies considered critical by management.

25


Table of Contents

Allowance for Doubtful Accounts

        Our allowance for doubtful accounts is intended to reduce the value of customer accounts receivable to amounts expected to be collected. In determining the required allowance, we consider factors such as general and industry-specific economic conditions, customer credit history, and our customer's current and expected future financial performance.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

        Under accounting standards for goodwill and other intangible assets, goodwill and other intangible assets deemed to have indefinite lives are not amortized, but are subject to annual impairment tests. We review and evaluate our goodwill and indefinite life intangible assets for potential impairment at a minimum annually, on May 31, or more frequently if circumstances indicate that impairment is possible. We use a two-step process to evaluate goodwill for impairment. In the first step, we compare the fair value of each reporting unit with the carrying value of the reporting unit, including goodwill. We estimate the fair value of each reporting unit using a valuation technique based on a multiple of earnings or discounted cash flows. If the estimated fair value of the reporting unit is less than the carrying value of the reporting unit, we would be required to complete a second step to determine the amount of goodwill impairment. In the second step, we would determine an implied fair value of the reporting unit's goodwill by allocating the reporting unit's fair value to all of the assets and liabilities other than goodwill. We then would compare the implied fair value of goodwill to the carrying amount and recognize the difference as an impairment charge.

        The assumptions we used to estimate the fair value of our reporting units are based on historical performance as well as forecasts used in our current business plan.

        The amount reported under the caption "Goodwill and other intangible assets, net" is comprised of goodwill and intangible assets associated with acquisitions we made, principally since the beginning of fiscal 1998.

Inventories

        Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market. Cost is determined by the specific identification, average cost or first-in, first-out methods. Provisions are made for excess and obsolete inventories and inventories that have been impaired as a result of industry conditions. We have utilized certain assumptions when determining the market value of inventories, such as historical sales of inventory, current and expected future aviation usage trends, replacement values and expected future demand. Reductions in demand for certain of our inventories or declining market values, as well as differences between actual results and the assumptions utilized by us when determining the market value of our inventories, could result in the recognition of impairment charges in future periods.

Revenue Recognition

        Certain supply chain management programs that we provide to our customers contain multiple elements or deliverables, such as program and warehouse management, parts distribution and maintenance and repair services. We recognize revenue for each element or deliverable that can be identified as a separate unit of accounting at the time of delivery based upon the relative fair value of the products and services.

        Sales and related cost of sales for certain long-term manufacturing contracts and certain large airframe maintenance contracts and performance-based logistics programs are recognized by the percentage of completion method, either based on the relationship of costs incurred to date to estimated total costs or the units of delivery method. In connection with these contracts and programs, we are required to make certain judgments and estimates concerning the overall profitability of the program and

26


Table of Contents

the relative fair value of each element of the arrangement. Differences may occur between the judgments and estimates made by management and actual program results.

Equipment on or Available for Lease

        The cost of assets under lease is original purchase price plus overhaul costs. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated service life of the equipment, and maintenance costs are expensed as incurred.

        We are required to test for impairment of long-lived assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable from its undiscounted cash flows. When applying accounting standards addressing impairment to equipment on or available for lease, we have utilized certain assumptions to estimate future undiscounted cash flows, including current and future lease rates, lease terms, residual values and market conditions and trends impacting future demand. Differences between actual results and the assumptions utilized by us when determining undiscounted cash flows could result in future impairments of aircraft and engines which are currently being leased or are available for lease. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we recorded a $5,355 pre-tax impairment charge to reduce the carrying value of an aircraft held for sale to its fair value (See Note 12 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements).

Program Development Costs

        In June 2005, we announced that our Cargo Systems business was selected to provide cargo handling systems for the new Airbus A400M Military Transport Aircraft ("A400M"). Our portion of the revenue from this program is expected to exceed $300,000 through fiscal 2021, based on sales projections of the A400M. As of May 31, 2012, we have capitalized, net of reimbursements, $91,942 of costs associated with the engineering and development of the cargo system. In May 2012, we received $15,000 cash as reimbursement for certain program development costs. We have the opportunity to receive additional milestone payments which are tied to deliveries from us through December 31, 2012. The $91,942 is net of the $15,000 cash payment received in May. Sales and related cost of sales will be recognized on the units of delivery method. In determining the recoverability of the capitalized program development costs, we have utilized certain judgments and estimates concerning expected revenues and the cost to manufacture the A400M cargo system. Differences between actual results and the assumptions utilized by us may result in us not fully recovering the value of the program development costs, which would unfavorably impact our financial condition and results of operations.

Pension Plans

        The liabilities and net periodic cost of our pension plans are determined utilizing several actuarial assumptions, the most significant of which are the discount rate and the expected long-term rate of return on plan assets.

        Our discount rate is determined based on a review of long-term, high quality corporate bonds as of May 31, 2012, and models that match projected benefit payments to coupons and maturities from the high quality bonds. The assumption for the expected long-term return on plan assets is developed through analysis of historical asset returns by investment category, our fund's actual return experience and current market conditions. Changes in the discount rate and differences between expected and actual return on plan assets may impact the amount of net periodic pension expense recognized in our consolidated statement of income.

New Accounting Standards

        In June 2011, the FASB issued an accounting standard update to provide guidance on increasing the prominence of items reported in other comprehensive income. This accounting standard update eliminates

27


Table of Contents

the option to present components of other comprehensive income as part of the statement of equity and requires that the total of comprehensive income, the components of net income, and the components of other comprehensive income be presented either in a single continuous statement of comprehensive income or in two separate but consecutive statements. This accounting standard update is effective for us beginning in the first quarter of fiscal 2013, and it will result in changes in our financial statement presentation.

        In August 2011, the FASB approved a revised accounting standard update intended to simplify how an entity tests goodwill for impairment. The amendment will allow an entity to first assess qualitative factors to determine whether it is necessary to perform the two-step quantitative goodwill impairment test. An entity no longer will be required to calculate the fair value of a reporting unit unless the entity determines, based on a qualitative assessment, that it is more likely than not that its fair value is less than its carrying amount. This accounting standard update will be effective for us beginning in the first quarter of fiscal 2013, and early adoption is permitted.

28


Table of Contents

ITEM 7A.    QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK
(Dollars in thousands)

        Our exposure to market risk includes fluctuating interest rates under our credit agreements, changes in foreign exchange rates and credit losses on accounts receivable. See Note 1 of Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements for a discussion on accounts receivable exposure.

        At May 31, 2012, $285,671 was available under our unsecured Credit Agreement. Interest on amounts borrowed under this credit facility is LIBOR based. As of May 31, 2012, the outstanding balance under this agreement was $280,000. A hypothetical 10 percent increase to the average interest rate under the credit facilities applied to the average outstanding balance during fiscal 2012 would have reduced our pre-tax income by approximately $548 during fiscal 2012.

        We use derivative financial instruments to manage our exposure to changes in interest rates on our variable rate debt. During the first quarter of fiscal year 2012, we entered into two derivative financial instruments in order to manage our variable interest exposure over a medium- to long-term period. Our derivative instruments are classified as cash flow hedges. We recognize the gains and losses on our derivative instruments as an adjustment to interest expense in the period the hedged interest payment affects earnings.

        In June 2011, we entered into a floating to fixed interest rate swap agreement with an aggregate notional amount of $50,000 that effectively converted $50,000 of notional principal under the unsecured Credit Agreement from floating-rate debt to fixed-rate debt. At May 31, 2012, we were in a liability position for this interest rate swap, the fair value of which was $4,479.

        Also in June 2011, we entered into an interest rate cap agreement for the purpose of limiting future exposure to interest rate risk on $50,000 of notional principal outstanding under the unsecured Credit Agreement. Under this agreement, we made a premium payment totaling $1,750 to cap the interest rate for the five-year term of the agreement. At May 31, 2012, the interest rate cap had a fair value of $249.

        Revenues and expenses of our foreign operations are translated at average exchange rates during the year, and balance sheet accounts are translated at year-end exchange rates. Balance sheet translation adjustments are excluded from the results of operations and are recorded in stockholders' equity as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss. A hypothetical 10 percent devaluation of foreign currencies against the U.S. dollar would decrease pre-tax income by $2,740 for 2012.

29


Table of Contents

ITEM 8.    FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

TO THE STOCKHOLDERS AND BOARD OF DIRECTORS OF AAR CORP.:

        We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of AAR CORP. and subsidiaries (the Company) as of May 31, 2012 and 2011 and the related consolidated statements of income, changes in equity and cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended May 31, 2012. These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company's management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on these consolidated financial statements based on our audits.

        We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States). Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements are free of material misstatement. An audit includes examining, on a test basis, evidence supporting the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. An audit also includes assessing the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall financial statement presentation. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

        In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements referred to above present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of AAR CORP. and subsidiaries as of May 31, 2012 and 2011 and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the three-year period ended May 31, 2012, in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles.

        We also have audited, in accordance with the standards of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States), the Company's internal control over financial reporting as of May 31, 2012, based on criteria established in Internal Control—Integrated Framework issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission (COSO), and our report dated July 19, 2012 expressed an unqualified opinion on the effective operation of internal control over financial reporting.

    /s/ KPMG LLP

Chicago, Illinois
July 19, 2012

 

 

30


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF INCOME

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  
 
  (In thousands except per share data)
 

Sales:

                   

Sales from products

  $ 1,384,224   $ 1,250,146   $ 1,067,490  

Sales from services

    680,774     554,966     284,661  
               

    2,064,998     1,805,112     1,352,151  
               

Costs and operating expenses:

                   

Cost of products

    1,208,624     1,067,173     922,192  

Cost of services

    534,117     425,528     186,440  

Cost of sales—restructuring and impairment

    3,700     5,355      

Selling, general and administrative

    189,397     182,694     153,299  
               

    1,935,838     1,680,750     1,261,931  
               

Gain on sale of product line

        5,922      

Earnings from joint ventures

    1,542     3,344     112  
               

Operating income

    130,702     133,628     90,332  

(Loss) gain on extinguishment of debt

    (664 )   97     893  

Interest expense

    (37,772 )   (30,667 )   (26,832 )

Interest income

    1,243     349     945  

Loss on sale of investments

            (1,150 )
               

Income before provision for income taxes

    93,509     103,407     64,188  

Provision for income taxes

    25,480     33,581     20,986  
               

Net income attributable to AAR and noncontrolling interest

    68,029     69,826     43,202  

(Income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

    (306 )       1,426  
               

Net income attributable to AAR

  $ 67,723   $ 69,826   $ 44,628  
               

Earnings per share—basic

  $ 1.68   $ 1.76   $ 1.17  

Earnings per share—diluted

  $ 1.65   $ 1.73   $ 1.16  

   

The accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements
are an integral part of these statements.

31


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

ASSETS

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  
 
  (In thousands)
 

Current assets:

             

Cash

  $ 67,720   $ 57,433  

Accounts receivable

    302,056     287,435  

Inventories

    461,166     363,399  

Rotable spares and equipment on or available for short-term lease

    138,586     143,875  

Deposits, prepaids and other

    71,106     38,260  

Deferred tax assets

    22,638     23,583  
           

Total current assets

    1,063,272     913,985  
           

Property, plant and equipment, at cost:

             

Land

    9,036     4,842  

Buildings and improvements

    98,685     95,201  

Equipment, furniture and fixtures

    573,648     459,432  
           

    681,369     559,475  

Accumulated depreciation

    (298,436 )   (235,098 )
           

    382,933     324,377  
           

Other assets:

             

Goodwill and other intangible assets, net

    417,562     181,097  

Equipment on long-term lease

    73,082     93,387  

Investment in joint ventures

    49,892     48,743  

Other

    208,912     142,138  
           

    749,448     465,365  
           

  $ 2,195,653   $ 1,703,727  
           

   

The accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements
are an integral part of these statements.

32


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES
CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

LIABILITIES AND EQUITY

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  
 
  (In thousands)
 

Current liabilities:

             

Short-term debt

  $ 628   $ 100,000  

Current maturities of long-term debt

    122,152     11,323  

Current maturities of non-recourse long-term debt

        823  

Current maturities of long-term capital lease obligations

    85     1,929  

Accounts and trade notes payable

    201,405     185,096  

Accrued liabilities

    148,956     116,839  
           

Total current liabilities

    473,226     416,010  
           

Long-term debt, less current maturities

    669,404     313,981  

Non-recourse debt

        11,032  

Capital lease obligations

    85     4,789  

Deferred tax liabilities

    115,908     98,322  

Other liabilities and deferred income

    71,008     24,304  
           

    856,405     452,428  
           

Equity:

             

Preferred stock, $1.00 par value, authorized 250 shares; none issued

         

Common stock, $1.00 par value, authorized 100,000 shares; issued 44,849 and 44,986 shares, respectively

    44,849     44,986  

Capital surplus

    423,622     423,805  

Retained earnings

    541,772     486,130  

Treasury stock, 4,576 and 5,205 shares at cost, respectively

    (90,404 )   (100,431 )

Accumulated other comprehensive loss

    (55,190 )   (18,645 )
           

Total AAR stockholders' equity

    864,649     835,845  

Noncontrolling interest

    1,373     (556 )
           

Total equity

    866,022     835,289  
           

  $ 2,195,653   $ 1,703,727  
           

   

The accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements
are an integral part of these statements.

33


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN EQUITY

FOR THE THREE YEARS ENDED MAY 31, 2012

 
  Common
Stock
  Capital
Surplus
  Retained
Earnings
  Treasury
Stock
  Accumulated
Other
Comprehensive
Income (Loss)
  Total AAR
Stockholders'
Equity
  Noncontrolling
Interest
  Total
Equity
 

Balance, May 31, 2009

  $ 44,201   $ 405,029   $ 374,659   $ (103,159 ) $ (23,996 ) $ 696,734   $   $ 696,734  

Net income

            44,628             44,628     (1,426 )   43,202  

Exercise of stock options and stock awards

    217     4,753         (950 )       4,020         4,020  

Tax benefit related to share-based plans

        817                 817         817  

Restricted stock activity

    452     6,531                 6,983     408     7,391  

Bond hedge and warrant activity

        86         (338 )       (252 )       (252 )

Equity portion of bond repurchase

        (374 )               (374 )       (374 )

Foreign currency translation loss

                    (2,238 )   (2,238 )       (2,238 )

Change in unrecognized pension and post retirement costs, net of tax

                    (3,412 )   (3,412 )       (3,412 )

Contributions from noncontrolling interest

                            462     462  
                                   

Balance, May 31, 2010

  $ 44,870   $ 416,842   $ 419,287   $ (104,447 ) $ (29,646 ) $ 746,906   $ (556 ) $ 746,350  

Net income

            69,826             69,826         69,826  

Cash dividends

            (2,983 )           (2,983 )       (2,983 )

Exercise of stock options and stock awards

    1     3,719         1,434         5,154         5,154  

Tax benefit related to share-based plans

        247                 247         247  

Restricted stock activity

    115     2,783         5,258         8,156         8,156  

Repurchase of shares

                (2,539 )       (2,539 )       (2,539 )

Bond hedge and warrant activity

        (99 )       (137 )       (236 )       (236 )

Equity portion of bond repurchase

        313                 313         313  

Foreign currency translation gain

                    3,290     3,290         3,290  

Change in unrecognized pension and post retirement costs, net of tax

                    7,711     7,711         7,711  
                                   

Balance, May 31, 2011

  $ 44,986   $ 423,805   $ 486,130   $ (100,431 ) $ (18,645 ) $ 835,845   $ (556 ) $ 835,289  

Net income

            67,723             67,723     306     68,029  

Cash dividends

            (12,081 )           (12,081 )       (12,081 )

Exercise of stock options and stock awards

        4,328         (92 )       4,236         4,236  

Tax benefit related to share-based plans

        482                 482         482  

Restricted stock activity

    (137 )   (4,834 )       13,822         8,851         8,851  

Repurchase of shares

                (3,659 )       (3,659 )       (3,659 )

Bond hedge and warrant activity

        (9 )       (44 )       (53 )       (53 )

Equity portion of bond repurchase

        (150 )               (150 )       (150 )

Unrealized loss on derivatives, net of tax

                    (3,887 )   (3,887 )       (3,887 )

Foreign currency translation net of tax

                    (18,474 )   (18,474 )       (18,474 )

Change in unrecognized pension and post retirement costs, net of tax

                    (14,184 )   (14,184 )       (14,184 )

Assumption of noncontrolling interest

                            1,623     1,623  
                                   

Balance, May 31, 2012

  $ 44,849   $ 423,622   $ 541,772   $ (90,404 ) $ (55,190 ) $ 864,649   $ 1,373   $ 866,022  
                                   

   

The accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements
are an integral part of these statements.

34


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  
 
  (In thousands)
 

Cash flows provided from operating activities:

                   

Net income attributable to AAR and noncontrolling interest

  $ 68,029   $ 69,826   $ 43,202  

Adjustments to reconcile net income attributable to AAR and noncontrolling interest to net cash provided from operating activities:

                   

Depreciation and amortization

    80,333     59,296     38,930  

Amortization of stock-based compensation

    12,546     12,308     9,335  

Amortization of debt discount

    13,171     12,309     11,589  

Deferred tax provision

    32,755     38,861     (3,863 )

Tax benefits from exercise of stock options

    (765 )   (247 )   (817 )

Restructuring and impairment charges

    3,700     5,355      

Loss (gain) on extinguishment of debt

    664     (97 )   (893 )

Loss on sale of investment

            1,150  

Gain on sale of product line

        (5,922 )    

Earnings from joint ventures

    (1,542 )   (3,344 )   (112 )

Changes in certain assets and liabilities, net of acquisitions:

                   

Accounts and notes receivable

    36,286     (45,026 )   33,926  

Inventories

    (47,610 )   (13,017 )   19,015  

Rotable spares and equipment on or available for short-term lease

    5,553     (21,598 )   19,157  

Equipment on long-term lease

    16,543     3,310     3,944  

Accounts and trade notes payable

    18,327     48,701     (1,474 )

Accrued and other liabilities

    (20,877 )   8,230     (376 )

Other, primarily deposits and program costs

    (122,896 )   (60,347 )   (19,557 )
               

Net cash provided from operating activities

    94,217     108,598     153,156  
               

Cash flows provided from (used in) investing activities:

                   

Property, plant and equipment expenditures

    (91,218 )   (124,879 )   (28,855 )

Proceeds from disposal of assets

    4,110     24     109  

Proceeds from sale of product line

        10,000      

Proceeds from disposal of business

            650  

Proceeds from sale of available for sale securities

            1,160  

Companies acquired, net of cash

    (298,087 )       (193,989 )

Proceeds from aircraft joint ventures

    1,585     8,306     44  

Investment in aircraft joint ventures

    (5,801 )   (9,893 )   (4,239 )

Proceeds from leveraged leases

            5,220  

Other

    (814 )   (2,293 )   (2,440 )
               

Net cash used in investing activities

    (390,225 )   (118,735 )   (222,340 )
               

Cash flows provided from (used in) financing activities:

                   

Proceeds from borrowings

    410,264     54,991     60,004  

Reduction in borrowings, net

    (83,529 )   (61,532 )   (25,221 )

Reduction in capital lease obligations

    (6,784 )   (1,796 )   (1,815 )

Reduction in equity due to convertible bond repurchase

    (1,150 )   (236 )   (374 )

Cash dividends

    (12,081 )   (2,983 )    

Purchase of treasury stock

    (3,659 )   (2,539 )    

Stock option exercises

    3,017     2,021     2,297  

Tax benefits from exercise of stock options

    765     247     817  

Contributions from noncontrolling interest

            462  
               

Net cash provided from (used in) financing activities

    306,843     (11,827 )   36,170  
               

Effect of exchange rate changes on cash

    (548 )   27     (121 )
               

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

    10,287     (21,937 )   (33,135 )

Cash and cash equivalents, beginning of year

    57,433     79,370     112,505  
               

Cash and cash equivalents, end of year

  $ 67,720   $ 57,433   $ 79,370  
               

   

The accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements
are an integral part of these statements.

35


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

Description of Business

        AAR CORP. is a diversified provider of products and services to the worldwide aviation and government and defense markets. Products and services include: aviation supply chain and parts support programs; maintenance, repair and overhaul of aircraft and landing gear; design and manufacture of specialized mobility and cargo systems and composite and other high-end precision machined structures; expeditionary airlift services; aircraft modifications and aircraft sales and leasing. We serve commercial, defense and governmental aircraft fleet operators, original equipment manufacturers, and independent service providers around the world, and various other domestic and foreign military customers.

Principles of Consolidation

        The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of the Company and its majority-owned subsidiaries after elimination of intercompany accounts and transactions. The equity method of accounting is used for investments in other companies in which we have significant influence; generally this represents common stock ownership of at least 20% and not more than 50% (see Note 9 for a discussion of aircraft joint ventures).

        As of the third quarter of fiscal 2012, we no longer reported the operating results of our Amsterdam component repair business as a discontinued operation. We made the decision to retain the operation after considering the results of our sales process and reviewing strategic alternatives for the business. As a result of this change in strategy, the operating results for the Amsterdam business have been reclassified from discontinued operations and are reported in continuing operations for all periods presented and are not material to our financial position or results of operations.

Revenue Recognition

        Sales and related cost of sales for product sales are recognized upon shipment of the product to the customer. Our standard terms and conditions provide that title passes to the customer when the product is shipped to the customer. Sales of certain defense products are recognized upon customer acceptance, which includes transfer of title. Under the majority of our expeditionary airlift services contracts, we are paid and record as revenue a fixed daily amount per aircraft for each day an aircraft is available to perform airlift services. In addition, we are paid and record as revenue an amount which is based on number of hours flown. Sales from services and the related cost of services are generally recognized when customer-owned material is shipped back to the customer. We have adopted this accounting policy because at the time the customer-owned material is shipped back to the customer, all services related to that material are complete as our service agreements generally do not require us to provide services at customer sites. Furthermore, serviced units are typically shipped to the customer immediately upon completion of the related services. Sales and related cost of sales for certain long-term manufacturing contracts and certain large airframe maintenance contracts and performance-based logistics programs are recognized by the percentage of completion method, either based on the relationship of costs incurred to date to estimated total costs or the units of delivery method. Lease revenues are recognized as earned. Income from monthly or quarterly rental payments is recorded in the pertinent period according to the lease agreement. However, for leases that provide variable rents, we recognize lease income on a straight-line basis. In addition to a monthly lease rate, some engine leases require an additional rental amount based on the number of hours the engine is used in a particular month. Lease income associated with these contingent

36


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

rentals is recorded in the period in which actual usage is reported to us by the lessee, which is normally the month following the actual usage.

        Certain supply chain management programs we provide our customers contain multiple elements or deliverables, such as program and warehouse management, parts distribution and maintenance and repair services. We recognize revenue for each element or deliverable that can be identified as a separate unit of accounting at the time of delivery based upon the relative fair value of the products and services.

        Included in accounts receivable as of May 31, 2012 and 2011, are $36,218 and $28,867, respectively, of unbilled accounts receivable related to a defense supply chain support agreement. These unbilled accounts receivable relate to costs we have incurred on parts that were requested and accepted by our customer to support the program. These costs have not been billed by us because the customer has not issued the final paperwork necessary to allow for billing.

        In addition to the unbilled accounts receivable, included in Other on the consolidated balance sheet as of May 31, 2012 and 2011, are $27,872 and $19,404, respectively, of costs in excess of amounts billed for the same defense supply chain support agreement. We expect to recover costs in excess of amounts billed through future billings over the life of the program.

Goodwill and Other Intangible Assets

        Under accounting standards for goodwill and other intangible assets, goodwill and other intangible assets deemed to have indefinite lives are not amortized, but are subject to annual impairment tests. We review and evaluate our goodwill and indefinite life intangible assets for potential impairment at a minimum annually, on May 31, or more frequently if circumstances indicate that impairment is possible. We use a two-step process to evaluate goodwill for impairment. In the first step, we compare the fair value of each reporting unit with the carrying value of the reporting unit, including goodwill. We estimate the fair value of each reporting unit using a valuation technique based on a multiple of earnings or discounted cash flows. If the estimated fair value of the reporting unit is less than the carrying value of the reporting unit, we would be required to complete a second step to determine the amount of goodwill impairment. In the second step, we would determine an implied fair value of the reporting unit's goodwill by allocating the reporting unit's fair value to all of the assets and liabilities other than goodwill. We then would compare the implied fair value of goodwill to the carrying amount and recognize the difference as an impairment charge.

        The assumptions we used to estimate the fair value of our reporting units are based on historical performance as well as forecasts used in our current business plan and require considerable management judgment. The fair value measurements used for our goodwill impairment testing use significant unobservable inputs which reflect our own assumptions about the inputs that market participants would use in measuring fair value. The fair value of our reporting units is also impacted by our overall market capitalization and may be impacted by volatility in our stock price and assumed control premium, among other items.

        As of May 31, 2012, we have four operating segments which are also considered to be our reporting units as defined by the accounting standard for goodwill: Aviation Supply Chain; Government and Defense Services; Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul and Structures and Systems. During the fourth quarter of 2012, our stock price declined steeply and at the end of the year traded below our book value. Based on the

37


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

results of the step one impairment test performed as of May 31, 2012, we determined that the estimated fair value of each reporting unit exceeded its net asset carrying value. Accordingly, there was no indication of impairment and the second step was not performed.

        The amount reported under the caption "Goodwill and other intangible assets, net" is comprised of goodwill and intangible assets associated with acquisitions we made, principally since the beginning of fiscal 1998. During 2012, we acquired Telair® International GmbH ("Telair"), Nordisk Aviation Products, AS ("Nordisk") and Airinmar Holdings Limited ("Airinmar"), which increased goodwill by $128,599.

        Goodwill by segment is as follows:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Aviation Supply Chain

  $ 40,596   $ 20,040  

Government and Defense Services

    38,304     38,304  

Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

    28,108     28,108  

Structures and Systems

    155,592     47,549  
           

  $ 262,600   $ 134,001  
           

        At May 31, 2012 and 2011, intangible assets, other than goodwill, are comprised of the following:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Amortizable intangible assets:

             

Customer relationships

  $ 113,384   $ 39,449  

Developed technology

    30,008      

Lease agreements

    21,500     21,500  

FAA certificates

    5,000     5,000  

Covenants not to compete

    1,570     1,570  

Trademarks

    600     600  

Other

    300     300  
           

    172,362     68,419  

Accumulated amortization

    (34,094 )   (21,323 )
           

    138,268     47,096  

Unamortized intangible assets:

             

Trademarks

    16,694      
           

  $ 154,962   $ 47,096  
           

        Customer relationships are being amortized over one- to twenty-year periods, developed technology is being amortized over a seven- to thirty-year period, the lease agreements are being amortized over an eighteen-year period, the FAA certificates are being amortized over a twenty-year period and the covenants not to compete are being amortized over a three-year period. Amortization expense recorded during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 was $12,971, $9,613 and $4,567, respectively. The estimated aggregate

38


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

amount of amortization expense for intangible assets in each of the next five fiscal years is $12,943 in 2013, $9,030 in 2014, $8,981 in 2015, $8,820 in 2016 and $8,820 in 2017.

Cash and Cash Equivalents

        At May 31, 2012 and 2011, there were no cash equivalents.

Marketable Securities

        Occasionally we will invest in equity securities and classify these equity securities as available for sale in the Consolidated Balance Sheet. As of May 31, 2012 and 2011, we had no amounts invested in available for sale securities.

        During fiscal 2010, we sold investments in securities that were classified as available for sale. The loss on sale of these investments was $1,150.

Foreign Currency

        Our foreign subsidiaries utilize the local currency as their functional currency. All balance sheet accounts of foreign subsidiaries transacting business in currencies other than the U.S. dollar are translated at year-end exchange rates. Revenues and expenses are translated at average exchange rates during the year. Translation adjustments are excluded from the results of operations and are recorded in stockholders' equity as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss.

Financial Instruments and Concentrations of Market or Credit Risk

        Financial instruments that potentially subject us to concentrations of market or credit risk consist principally of trade receivables. While our trade receivables are diverse and represent a number of entities and geographic regions, the majority are with the U.S. Department of Defense and its contractors and entities in the aviation industry. Accounts receivable due from the U.S. Department of Defense were $50,598 and $70,652 at May 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. We perform regular evaluations of customer payment experience, current financial condition and risk analysis. We may require collateral in the form of security interests in assets, letters of credit, and/or obligation guarantees from financial institutions for transactions executed on other than normal trade terms.

        The carrying amounts of cash and cash equivalents, accounts receivable, short-term borrowings and accounts and trade notes payable approximate fair value because of the short-term maturity of these instruments. The carrying value of long-term debt bearing a variable interest rate approximates fair value.

        Fair value estimates are made at a specific point in time based on relevant market information about the financial instrument. These estimates are subjective in nature and involve uncertainties and matters of significant judgment and therefore cannot be determined with precision. Changes in assumptions could significantly affect the estimates.

Inventories

        Inventories are valued at the lower of cost or market (estimated net realizable value). Cost is determined by the specific identification, average cost or first-in, first-out methods. From time-to-time, we

39


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

purchase aircraft and engines for disassembly to individual parts and components. Costs are assigned to these individual parts and components utilizing list prices from original equipment manufacturers and recent sales history.

        The following is a summary of inventories:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Raw materials and parts

  $ 101,257   $ 61,314  

Work-in-process

    64,682     51,725  

Aircraft and engine parts, components and finished goods

    295,227     250,360  
           

  $ 461,166   $ 363,399  
           

Equipment under Leases

        Lease revenue is recognized as earned. The cost of the asset under lease is original purchase price plus overhaul costs. Depreciation for aircraft is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated service life of the equipment. The balance sheet classification of equipment under lease is generally based on lease term, with fixed-term leases less than twelve months generally classified as short-term and all others generally classified as long-term.

        Equipment on short-term lease includes aircraft engines and parts on or available for lease to satisfy customers' immediate short-term requirements. The leases are renewable with fixed terms, which generally vary from one to twelve months. Equipment on long-term lease consists of aircraft and engines on lease with commercial airlines generally for more than twelve months.

        We are required to test for impairment of long-lived assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value of an asset may not be recoverable from its undiscounted cash flows. When applying accounting standards addressing impairment to our aircraft and engine portfolio, we utilize certain assumptions to estimate future undiscounted cash flows, including current and future lease rates, lease terms, residual values and market conditions and trends impacting future demand (see Note 12—Restructuring and Impairment Charges). Unfavorable differences between actual and expected results could result in future impairments in our aircraft and engine lease portfolio.

        Future rent due to us under non-cancelable leases during each of the next five fiscal years is $16,675 in 2013, $16,031 in 2014, $14,414 in 2015, $8,354 in 2016 and $6,916 in 2017.

Property, Plant and Equipment

        Depreciation is computed on the straight-line method over useful lives of 10-40 years for buildings and improvements and 3-10 years for equipment, furniture and fixtures and capitalized software. Aircraft and major components in service to support our Airlift business are depreciated over their estimated useful lives which is generally 7-20 years. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the shorter of the estimated useful life or the term of the applicable lease.

40


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

1. Summary of Significant Accounting Policies (Continued)

        Repair and maintenance expenditures are expensed as incurred. Upon sale or disposal, cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts, and related gains and losses are included in results of operations.

Comprehensive Income

        A summary of the components of comprehensive income is as follows:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Net income attributable to AAR and noncontrolling interest

  $ 68,029   $ 69,826   $ 43,202  

Other comprehensive income—

                   

Cumulative translation adjustments, net of tax

    (18,474 )   3,290     (2,238 )

Unrealized loss on derivative instruments, net of tax

    (3,887 )        

Unrecognized pension and post retirement costs, net of tax

    (14,184 )   7,711     (3,412 )
               

Total comprehensive income

  $ 31,484   $ 80,827   $ 37,552  
               

Supplemental Information on Cash Flows

        Supplemental information on cash flows follows:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Interest paid

  $ 16,566   $ 17,167   $ 13,629  

Income taxes paid

    11,418     9,812     30,149  

Income tax refunds and interest received

    7,205     4,541     709  

        During fiscal 2012 Treasury stock decreased $10,027 reflecting the re-issuance of shares upon exercise of stock options, net of shares withheld to satisfy statutory tax obligations, and restricted stock award grants of $13,730, partially offset by the purchase of treasury shares of $3,659 and the impact of net share settlements of $44 of bond hedge and warrants associated with convertible bond repurchases during fiscal 2012. During fiscal 2011 Treasury stock decreased $4,016 reflecting the re-issuance of shares upon exercise of stock options, net of shares withheld to satisfy statutory tax obligations, and restricted stock award grants of $6,692, partially offset by the purchase of treasury shares of $2,539 and the impact of net share settlements of $137 of bond hedge and warrants associated with convertible bond repurchases during fiscal 2011. During fiscal 2010, Treasury stock increased $1,288 reflecting the impact of net share settlements of $338 of bond hedge and warrants associated with convertible bond repurchases during fiscal 2010, and the impact from shares withheld to satisfy statutory tax obligations associated with the exercise of stock options of $950.

Use of Estimates

        We have made estimates and utilized certain assumptions relating to the reporting of assets and liabilities and the disclosures of contingent liabilities to prepare these consolidated financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States. Actual results could differ from those estimates.

41


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

2. Financing Arrangements

Revolving Credit Facilities

        On April 12, 2011, we entered into an agreement with various financial institutions, as lenders and Bank of America, N.A., as administrative agent for the lenders (as amended, the "Credit Agreement"), providing for an unsecured revolving credit facility that we can draw upon for general corporate purposes. The revolving commitment was originally $400,000 and on October 13, 2011 was increased to $580,000. Under certain circumstances, we may request an increase to the revolving commitment by an aggregate amount of up to $100,000, not to exceed $680,000 in total. The Credit Agreement expires on April 12, 2016. Borrowings under the Credit Agreement bear interest at the offered Eurodollar Rate (defined as the British Bankers Association LIBOR Rate) plus 125 to 225 basis points based on certain financial measurements if a Eurodollar Rate loan, or at the offered fluctuating Base Rate plus 25 to 125 basis points based on certain financial measurements if a Base Rate loan. Borrowings outstanding under this facility at May 31, 2012 were $280,000 and there were approximately $14,329 of outstanding letters of credit which reduced the availability of this facility. We also have $4,370 available under a foreign line of credit.

        The Credit Agreement requires us to comply with certain financial covenants, including a fixed charge coverage ratio, a leverage ratio, and a minimum tangible net worth. The Credit Agreement contains certain affirmative and negative covenants, including those relating to financial reporting and notification, payment of indebtedness, taxes and other obligations, compliance with applicable laws, and limitations on additional liens, indebtedness, acquisitions, investments and disposition of assets. The Credit Agreement also requires our significant domestic subsidiaries, and any subsidiaries that guarantee our other indebtedness, to provide a guarantee of payment under the Credit Agreement.

        Borrowing activity under the Credit Agreement and its predecessor facility during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 was as follows:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Maximum amount borrowed

  $ 525,000   $ 135,000   $ 150,000  

Average daily borrowings

    288,320     70,603     40,795  

Average interest rate during the year

    1.90 %   1.95 %   1.72 %

        In addition to our unsecured Credit Agreement, we have a $65,000 secured revolving credit facility with The Huntington National Bank (the "Huntington Loan Agreement"). Borrowings under the Huntington Loan Agreement are secured by aircraft and related engines and components owned by us. The Huntington Loan Agreement expires on April 23, 2015. Borrowings bear interest at LIBOR plus 325 basis points. As of May 31, 2012 and 2011, $33,022 and $54,940, respectively, was outstanding under this agreement.

        On March 9, 2012, we entered into a five year full amortization term loan agreement with Development Bank of Japan Inc. (the "Loan Agreement") to refinance a portion of indebtedness incurred to finance the acquisition of Telair and Nordisk. Borrowings under the Loan Agreement bear interest at the offered Eurodollar Rate (defined as the British Bankers Association LIBOR Rate) plus 250 basis points and are unsecured. As of May 31, 2012, $50,000 was outstanding under this agreement.

        The Loan Agreement requires us to comply with certain financial covenants which are consistent with our Credit Agreement. The Loan Agreement is not guaranteed by our subsidiaries. The Loan Agreement

42


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

2. Financing Arrangements (Continued)

also contains certain affirmative and negative covenants, including those relating to financial reporting and notification, payment of indebtedness, taxes and other obligations, compliance with applicable laws, and limitations on additional liens, indebtedness, acquisitions, investments and disposition of assets.

        A summary of our recourse and non-recourse debt is as follows:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Recourse debt

             

Revolving credit facility expiring April 12, 2016 with interest payable monthly

 
$

280,000
 
$

100,000
 

Revolving credit facility (secured by aircraft and related engines and components) due April 23, 2015 with floating interest rate, payable monthly

    33,022     54,940  

Revolving credit facility subject to annual review in March with interest payable quarterly

    628      

Note payable due July 19, 2012 with interest at 7.22% payable monthly

    8,380     2,217  

Note payable due March 15, 2014 with floating interest rate, payable monthly

    2,590      

Note payable due March 9, 2017 with floating interest rate, payable semi-annually on June 1 and December 1

    50,000      

Note payable due January 15, 2022 with interest at 7.25% payable semi-annually on January 15 and July 15

    172,039      

Mortgage loan (secured by Wood Dale, Illinois facility) due August 1, 2015 with interest at 5.01%

    11,000     11,000  

Convertible notes payable due March 1, 2014 with interest at 1.625% payable semi-annually on March 1 and September 1

    68,493     73,418  

Convertible notes payable due March 1, 2016 with interest at 2.25% payable semi-annually on March 1 and September 1

    46,119     51,309  

Convertible notes payable due February 1, 2026 with interest at 1.75% payable semi-annually on February 1 and August 1

    94,913     107,420  

Industrial revenue bond (secured by trust indenture on property, plant and equipment) due August 1, 2018 with floating interest rate, payable monthly

    25,000     25,000  
           

Total recourse debt

    792,184     425,304  

Current maturities of recourse debt

    (122,780 )   (111,323 )
           

Long-term recourse debt

  $ 669,404   $ 313,981  
           

Non-recourse debt

             

Non-recourse note payable due July 19, 2012 with interest at 7.22%

 
$

 
$

8,201
 

Non-recourse note payable due April 3, 2015 with interest at 8.38%

        3,654  
           

Total non-recourse debt

        11,855  

Current maturities of non-recourse debt

        (823 )
           

Long-term non-recourse debt

  $   $ 11,032  
           

Recourse debt

        On January 23, 2012 we completed an offering of $175,000 aggregate principal amount of 7.25% Senior Notes due January 15, 2022 (the "Notes"). The Notes were sold to qualified institutional buyers in

43


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

2. Financing Arrangements (Continued)

accordance with Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and outside the United States to non-U.S. persons in accordance with Regulation S under the Securities Act. The Notes were sold at a price equal to 98.268% of the principal amount thereof, for a yield to maturity of 7.5%. The net proceeds of the offering of the Notes were used to repay a portion of the borrowings under our revolving credit agreement incurred to fund our December 2011 acquisition of Telair and Nordisk.

        The Notes are governed by an Indenture dated as of January 23, 2012 (the "Indenture") by and among AAR, certain subsidiary guarantors identified therein (the "Guarantors") and U.S. Bank National Association, as trustee.

        The Notes bear interest at a rate of 7.25% per year, payable semi-annually, in cash in arrears, on January 15 and July 15 of each year, commencing July 15, 2012. The Notes will mature on January 15, 2022. Prior to January 15, 2015, AAR may redeem up to 35% of the aggregate principal amount of the Notes with the net cash proceeds of certain equity offerings at a redemption price of 107.25% of the principal amount thereof, plus accrued and unpaid interest and additional interest, if any, to the redemption date. At any time prior to January 15, 2017, AAR may redeem the Notes, in whole or in part, at a redemption price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the Notes redeemed, plus a make-whole premium, plus any accrued and unpaid interest and additional interest, if any, to the redemption date. AAR may redeem the Notes at its option, in whole or in part, at any time on or after January 15, 2017, upon not less than 30 nor more than 60 days' notice at the redemption prices (expressed as percentages of the principal amount to be redeemed) set forth below, plus any accrued and unpaid interest and additional interest, if any, to the redemption date if redeemed during the 12-month period beginning on January 15 of the years indicated below:

Year
  Redemption Price  

2017

    103.625 %

2018

    102.417 %

2019

    101.208 %

2020 and thereafter

    100.000 %

        The Notes are unconditionally guaranteed, on a full, joint and several basis, by each of the Guarantors, which consist of all of our existing domestic subsidiaries. The Notes and the guarantees are general unsecured senior obligations of AAR and the Guarantors, respectively, rank equally in right of payment with all existing and future senior debt of AAR and the Guarantors, as applicable, and are senior in right of payment to all future subordinated obligations of AAR or the Guarantors. The Notes and the guarantees are effectively subordinated to secured debt of AAR and the Guarantors, respectively, to the extent of the value of the assets securing that debt. In addition, the Notes are structurally junior to any debt or other liabilities of our nonguarantor subsidiaries.

        The Indenture contains covenants that, among other things, limit AAR's and its Restricted Subsidiaries' (as defined in the Indenture) abilities to (i) incur additional debt or sell preferred stock, (ii) pay dividends, redeem or repurchase stock or make other distributions, (iii) make certain investments, (iv) make other restricted payments and investments, (v) agree to or allow to exist restrictions on the ability to pay dividends or make other payments on its capital interests, (vi) create liens without granting equal and ratable liens to the holders of the Notes, (vii) enter into sale and leaseback transactions, (viii) merge, consolidate or transfer or dispose of substantially all of their assets, (ix) enter into certain

44


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

2. Financing Arrangements (Continued)

types of transactions with affiliates and (x) sell assets. These covenants are subject to a number of qualifications and limitations. In addition, the Indenture limits AAR's and the Restricted Subsidiaries' abilities to engage in businesses other than businesses in which such companies are engaged on the date of issuance of the Notes and related businesses.

        During February 2008, we completed the sale of $250,000 principal amount of convertible notes, consisting of $137,500 aggregate principal amount of 1.625% convertible senior notes due 2014 and $112,500 aggregate principal amount of 2.25% convertible senior notes due 2016 (together, the "Convertible Notes") in a private offering to qualified institutional buyers pursuant to Rule 144A under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. Interest under the Convertible Notes is payable semiannually on March 1 and September 1.

        Holders may convert their Convertible Notes based on a conversion rate of 28.6144 shares of our common stock per $1,000 principal amount of Convertible Notes, which is equivalent to a conversion price of $34.95 per share, only under the following circumstances: (i) during any calendar quarter beginning after March 31, 2008 (and only during such calendar quarter) if, as of the last day of the preceding calendar quarter, the closing price of our common stock for at least 20 trading days in a period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on the last trading day of such preceding calendar quarter is more than 130% of the applicable conversion price per share of common stock on the last day of such preceding calendar quarter; (ii) during the five business day period after any five consecutive trading day period in which the trading price per $1,000 principal amount of notes of the applicable series for each day of that period was less than 98% of the product of the closing price of our common stock and the then applicable conversion rate; (iii) if a designated event or similar change of control transaction occurs; (iv) upon specified corporate transactions; or (v) beginning on February 1, 2014, in the case of the 2014 notes, or February 1, 2016, in the case of the 2016 notes, and ending at the close of business on the business day immediately preceding the applicable maturity date.

        Upon conversion, a holder of the Convertible Notes will receive for each $1,000 principal amount, in lieu of common stock, an amount in cash equal to the lesser of (i) $1,000 and (ii) the conversion value of a number of shares of our common stock equal to the conversion rate. If the conversion value exceeds the principal amount, we will also deliver at our election, cash or common stock or a combination thereof having a value equal to such excess amount.

        The Convertible Notes are senior, unsecured obligations and rank equal in right of payment with all of our existing and future unsecured and unsubordinated indebtedness. Costs associated with the issuance and sale of the Convertible Notes of approximately $4,366 are being amortized using the effective interest method over a six- and eight-year period.

        In connection with the issuance of the Convertible Notes, we entered into convertible note hedge transactions ("Note Hedges") with respect to our common stock with Merrill Lynch Financial Markets, Inc. ("Hedge Provider"). The Note Hedges are exercisable solely in connection with any conversion of the Convertible Notes and provide for us to receive shares of our common stock from the Hedge Provider equal to the number of shares issuable to the holders of the Convertible Notes upon conversion. We paid $69,676 for the Note Hedges.

        In addition, we entered into separate warrant transactions with Merrill Lynch Financial Markets, Inc. whereby we issued warrants to purchase 7,028,000 shares of our common stock at an exercise price of

45


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

2. Financing Arrangements (Continued)

$48.83 per share. We received $40,114 from the sale of these warrants. The Note Hedges and warrant transactions are intended to reduce potential dilution to our common stock upon future conversion of the Convertible Notes and generally have the effect of increasing the conversion price of the Convertible Notes to approximately $48.83 per share.

        Net proceeds from the Convertible Notes transaction after paying expenses were approximately $214,410 and were used to repay the balance outstanding under our unsecured revolving credit facility, to pay for the net cost of the Note Hedges and warrant transactions and for general corporate purposes.

        On February 1, 2006, we completed the sale of $150,000 principal amount of convertible senior notes. The notes are due on February 1, 2026 unless earlier redeemed, repurchased or converted, and bear interest at 1.75% payable semiannually on February 1 and August 1.

        A holder may convert the notes into shares of common stock based on a conversion rate of 34.5950 shares per $1,000 principal amount of notes, which is equivalent to a conversion price of approximately $28.91 per share, under the following circumstances: (i) during any calendar quarter beginning after March 31, 2006 (and only during such calendar quarter), if, as of the last day of the preceding calendar quarter, the closing price of our common stock for at least 20 trading days in a period of 30 consecutive trading days ending on the last trading day of such preceding calendar quarter is more than 120% of the applicable conversion price per share of common stock on the last day of such preceding calendar quarter; (ii) during the five business day period after any five consecutive trading day period in which the "trading price" per $1,000 principal amount of notes for each day of that period was less than 98% of the product of the closing price of our common stock and the then applicable conversion rate; (iii) upon a redemption notice; (iv) if a designated event or similar change of control transaction occurs; (v) upon specified corporate transactions; or (vi) during the ten trading day period ending at the close of business on the business day immediately preceding the stated maturity date on the notes. Upon conversion, we will have the right to deliver, in lieu of shares of our common stock, cash or a combination of cash and shares of common stock, at our option, in an amount per note equal to the applicable conversion rate multiplied by the applicable stock price.

        We may redeem for cash all or a portion of the notes at any time on or after February 6, 2013 at specified redemption prices. Holders of the notes have the right to require us to purchase for cash all or any portion of the notes on February 1, 2013, 2016 and 2021 at a price equal to 100% of the principal amount of the notes plus accrued and unpaid interest, if any, to the purchase date. The notes are senior, unsecured obligations and rank equal in right of payment with all other unsecured and unsubordinated indebtedness.

        The mortgage loan due August 1, 2015 is secured by our Wood Dale, Illinois facility. At May 31, 2012, the net book value of our Wood Dale, Illinois facility is $13,015.

        During the first quarter of fiscal 2012, the non-recourse note due July 19, 2012 became fully recourse to us and is presented in the recourse portion of the table above. This note was issued by us to a financial institution during fiscal 2008 and is secured by an Airbus 320 passenger aircraft (A320) owned by us. The terms of the note required that if the A320 aircraft was leased to an air carrier with a lease expiration date beyond the note's final repayment date of July 19, 2012, then the note would become fully recourse. On July 17, 2011, we entered into a new lease agreement with an airline for the A320 aircraft. The lease

46


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

2. Financing Arrangements (Continued)

expiration date under the lease is June 16, 2016. As a result, pursuant to the terms of the note, the amount outstanding became fully recourse to us.

        During fiscal 2012, we retired $9,421 principal amount of our 1.625% convertible notes due March 1, 2014. The notes were retired for $8,911 cash, and the loss of $161, after consideration of unamortized discount and debt issuance costs, is recorded in (loss) gain on extinguishment of debt on the Consolidated Statements of Income.

        During fiscal 2012 and 2011, we retired $9,100 and $6,000 principal amount of our 2.25% convertible notes due March 1, 2016, respectively. The notes were retired for $8,116 and $4,667 cash, and the loss of $312 and the gain of $97 for years 2012 and 2011, respectively, after consideration of unamortized discount and debt issuance costs, is recorded in (loss) gain on extinguishment of debt on the Consolidated Statements of Income.

        During fiscal 2012, we retired $20,551 principal amount of our 1.75% convertible notes due February 1, 2026. The notes were retired for $20,340 cash, and the loss of $191, after consideration of unamortized discount and debt issuance costs, is recorded in (loss) gain on extinguishment of debt on the Consolidated Statements of Income.

        During fiscal 2010, we retired $13,110 principal amount of our 1.625% convertible notes due March 1, 2014 and $2,000 principal amount of our 2.25% convertible notes due March 1, 2016. Collectively, the convertible notes were retired for $11,543 cash, and the gain of $893, after consideration of unamortized debt issuance costs, is recorded in (loss) gain on extinguishment of debt on the Consolidated Statements of Income.

        We are subject to a number of covenants under our financing arrangements, including restrictions which relate to the payment of cash dividends, maintenance of minimum net working capital and tangible net worth levels, fixed charge coverage ratio, sales of assets, additional financing, purchase of our shares and other matters. We are in compliance with all financial covenants under our financing arrangements. The aggregate principal amount of recourse debt maturing during each of the next five fiscal years is $127,036 in 2013, $98,784 in 2014, $22,782 in 2015, $356,325 in 2016 and $10,000 in 2017. At May 31, 2012, the face value of our recourse debt was $814,928 and the estimated fair value was approximately $801,289. The fair value of our long-term recourse debt is classified as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy. Level 2 refers to fair values estimated using significant other observable inputs including quoted prices for similar assets or liabilities in active markets and quoted prices for identical or similar assets or liabilities in markets that are not active.

47


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

2. Financing Arrangements (Continued)

        As of May 31, 2012 and 2011, the short-term and long-term debt and equity component (recorded in capital surplus, net of income tax benefit) consisted of the following:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Long-term debt:

             

Principal amount

  $ 229,308   $ 268,380  

Unamortized discount

    (19,783 )   (36,233 )
           

Net carrying amount

  $ 209,525   $ 232,147  
           

Equity component, net of tax

  $ 74,816   $ 74,966  
           

        The discount on the liability component of short-term and long-term debt is being amortized using the effective interest method based on an effective rate of 8.48% for our 1.75% convertible notes; 6.82% for our 1.625% convertible notes and 7.41% for our 2.25% convertible notes. For our 1.75% convertible notes, the discount is being amortized through February 1, 2013, which is the first put date for those notes. For our 1.625% and 2.25% convertible notes, the discount is being amortized through their respective maturity dates of March 1, 2014 and March 1, 2016.

        As of May 31, 2012 and 2011, for each of our convertible note issuances, the "if converted" value does not exceed its principal amount.

        The interest expense associated with the convertible notes was as follows:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Coupon interest

  $ 4,866   $ 4,932   $ 5,102  

Amortization of deferred financing fees

    739     754     775  

Amortization of discount

    13,102     12,309     11,589  
               

Interest expense related to convertible notes

  $ 18,707   $ 17,995   $ 17,466  
               

Non-recourse debt

        During the second quarter of fiscal 2012, we sold an aircraft and the associated non-recourse debt of $3,252, which was due April 3, 2015, was assumed by the purchaser.

48


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

3. Derivative Instruments and Hedging Activities

        We are exposed to interest rate risk associated with fluctuations in interest rates on our variable rate debt. During the first quarter of fiscal 2012, we entered into two derivative financial instruments in order to manage our variable interest rate exposure over a medium- to long-term period. In June 2011, we entered into a floating-to-fixed interest rate swap to hedge interest on $50,000 of notional principal balance under our revolving credit agreement. Also in June 2011, we entered into an interest rate cap agreement on $50,000 of notional principal interest under our revolving credit agreement.

        We do not hold or issue derivative instruments for trading purposes and are not a party to any instruments with leverage or prepayment features. In connection with derivative financial instruments, there exists the risk of the possible inability of counterparties to meet the terms of their contracts. We mitigate this risk by performing financial reviews before the contract is entered into, as well as on-going periodic evaluations. We do not expect any significant losses from counterparty defaults.

        We classify the derivatives as assets or liabilities on the balance sheet. Accounting for the change in fair value of the derivatives is a function of whether the instrument qualifies for, and has been designated as, a hedging relationship, and the type of hedging relationship. As of May 31, 2012, all of our derivative instruments were classified as cash flow hedges. The fair value of the interest rate swap and interest cap agreements represents the difference in the present values of cash flows calculated at the contracted interest rates and at current market interest rates at the end of the reporting period.

        The fair value of the Company's interest rate derivatives are classified as Level 2 in the fair value hierarchy. At May 31, 2012, the fair value of our interest rate derivatives was recorded as follows:

 
   
 
Derivative
Assets
  Derivative
Liabilities
 
 
  Balance Sheet Classification  
Derivatives designated as hedging instruments:
  May 31, 2012   May 31, 2012  

Interest rate cap

 

Long-term assets

 
$

249
 
$

 

Interest rate swap

  Long-term liabilities         (4,479 )

        We include gains and losses on the derivative instruments in other comprehensive income (loss). We recognize the gains and losses on our derivative instruments as an adjustment to interest expense in the period the hedged interest payment affects earnings. The impact of the interest rate swap and interest cap agreement for the year ended May 31, 2012 was a pre-tax loss of $5,981 recorded in accumulated other comprehensive income (loss). We expect minimal gain or loss to be reclassified into earnings within the next 12 months.

4. Stock-Based Compensation

        We provide stock-based awards under the AAR CORP. Stock Benefit Plan ("Stock Benefit Plan") which has been approved by our stockholders. Under the Stock Benefit Plan, we are authorized to issue stock options to employees and non-employee directors that allow the grant recipients to purchase shares of common stock at a price not less than the fair market value of the common stock on the date of grant. Generally, stock options awarded expire ten years from the date of grant and are exercisable in three, four or five equal annual increments commencing one year after the date of grant. We issue common stock upon the exercise of stock options. In addition to stock options, the Stock Benefit Plan also provides for the grant of restricted stock awards and performance-based restricted stock awards. The number of

49


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

4. Stock-Based Compensation (Continued)

performance-based awards earned, subject to vesting, is based on achievement of certain Company-wide financial goals or stock price targets. The Stock Benefit Plan also provides for the grant of stock appreciation units and restricted stock units; however, to date, no such awards have been granted.

        Restricted stock grants are designed, among other things, to align employee interests with the interests of stockholders and to encourage the recipient to build a career with us. Restricted stock typically vests over periods of three to ten years from date of grant. Restricted stock grants may be performance-based with vesting to occur over periods of one to ten years. All restricted stock that has been granted and earned according to performance criteria carries full dividend and voting rights, regardless of whether it has vested.

        Typically, stock options and restricted stock are subject to forfeiture prior to vesting if the employee's employment terminates for any reason other than death, disability or retirement. A total of 8,809,000 shares have been granted under the Stock Benefit Plan since its inception, and as of May 31, 2012, a total of 2,322,527 shares were available for future grant under the Stock Benefit Plan.

Stock Options

        During fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, we granted stock options representing 169,281 shares 720,970 shares and 694,500 shares, respectively.

        The weighted average fair value of stock options granted during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 was $11.42, $8.06 and $7.45, respectively. The fair value of each stock option grant was estimated on the date of grant using the Black-Scholes option pricing model with the following assumptions:

 
  Stock Options Granted
In Fiscal Year
 
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Risk-free interest rate

    1.5 %   1.8 %   2.3 %

Expected volatility of common stock

    46.1 %   47.0 %   49.1 %

Dividend yield

    1.1 %   0.0 %   0.0 %

Expected option term in years

    5.7     5.8     6.0  

        The risk-free interest rate is based on the U.S. Treasury yield curve in effect at the time of grant. The expected volatility is based on historical volatility of our common stock and the expected option term represents the period of time that the stock options granted are expected to be outstanding based on historical exercise trends. The dividend yield represents our anticipated cash dividends at the grant date over the expected option term.

50


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

4. Stock-Based Compensation (Continued)

        A summary of stock option activity for the three years ended May 31, 2012 follows (shares in thousands):

 
  2012   2011   2010  
 
  Shares   Weighted
Average
Exercise Price
  Shares   Weighted
Average
Exercise Price
  Shares   Weighted
Average
Exercise Price
 

Outstanding at beginning of year

    1,994   $ 18.56     1,543   $ 19.28     1,225   $ 21.18  

Granted

    169   $ 28.45     721   $ 17.54     695   $ 15.21  

Exercised

    (339 ) $ 19.95     (128 ) $ 15.85     (217 ) $ 12.47  

Cancelled

    (121 ) $ 19.73     (142 ) $ 21.79     (160 ) $ 22.60  
                                 

Outstanding at end of year

    1,703   $ 17.96     1,994   $ 18.56     1,543   $ 19.28  
                                 

Options exercisable at end of year

    880   $ 17.10     935   $ 19.40     663   $ 20.92  
                                 

        The total fair value of stock options that vested during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 was $3,953, $4,006 and $690, respectively. The total intrinsic value of stock options exercised during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 was $3,349, $1,344 and $2,353, respectively. The aggregate intrinsic value of options outstanding as of May 31, 2012 was $327. The tax benefit realized from stock options exercised during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 was $482, $247 and $817, respectively. Expense charged to operations for stock options during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 was $4,162, $4,152 and $2,265, respectively, recorded in selling, general and administrative expenses. As of May 31, 2012, we had $3,659 of unrecognized compensation expense related to stock options that will be amortized over an average period of 0.8 years.

        The following table provides additional information regarding stock options outstanding as of May 31, 2012 (shares in thousands):

 
  Options Outstanding   Options Exercisable  
Option
Exercise
Price Range
  Number
Outstanding as
of 5/31/12
  Weighted-Average
Remaining Contractual
Life in Years
  Weighted-
Average Exercise
Price
  Number
Exercisable as
of 5/31/12
  Weighted-
Average Exercise
Price
 

$  3.50 - $13.00

    69     1.3   $ 7.27     69   $ 7.27  

$13.01 - $18.50

    1,289     6.7   $ 16.25     655   $ 15.95  

$18.51 - $24.50

    135     5.2   $ 20.62     81   $ 21.47  

$24.51 - $34.50

    210     8.1   $ 30.24     75   $ 31.27  
                             

    1,703     6.5   $ 17.96     880   $ 17.10  
                             

Restricted Stock

        We provide executives and other key employees an opportunity to be awarded performance-based restricted stock. The award is contingent upon the achievement of certain performance objectives, including net income, return on capital, and leverage ratios, or our stock price achieving a certain level over a period of time. After the shares are granted, the restrictions are released over a three- to seven-year period. During fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, we granted 362,500 restricted shares, 269,146 restricted shares and 423,000 restricted shares, respectively, under this program.

51


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

4. Stock-Based Compensation (Continued)

        In addition to the performance-based restricted stock awards, we also granted a total of 45,000 restricted shares to members of the Board of Directors and 299,491 restricted shares to executives and key employees during fiscal 2012. These shares vest over a one- to five-year period.

        The fair value of restricted shares is the market value of our common stock on the date of grant. Expense related to all restricted share programs during fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 was $8,384, $8,701 and $7,070, respectively, recorded in selling, general and administrative expenses.

        Restricted share activity during the fiscal year ended May 31, 2012, is as follows (shares in thousands):

 
  Number of
Shares
  Weighted Average
Fair Value
on Grant Date
 

Nonvested at May 31, 2011

    1,374   $ 23.06  

Granted

    707   $ 24.20  

Vested

    (370 ) $ 26.60  

Forfeited

    (134 ) $ 24.47  
             

Nonvested at May 31, 2012

    1,577   $ 22.65  
             

        As of May 31, 2012, we had $17,167 of unearned compensation related to restricted shares that will be amortized to expense over a weighted average period of 2.1 years.

Shareholders' Rights Plan

        Pursuant to a shareholder rights plan adopted in 2007, each outstanding share of our common stock carries with it a Right to purchase one share at a price of $140 per share. The Rights become exercisable (and separate from the shares) when certain specified events occur, including the acquisition of 15% or more of the common stock by a person or group (an "Acquiring Person") or the commencement of a tender or exchange offer for 15% or more of the common stock.

        In the event that an Acquiring Person acquires 15% or more of the common stock, or if we are the surviving corporation in a merger involving an Acquiring Person or if the Acquiring Person engages in certain types of self-dealing transactions, each Right entitles the holder to purchase for $140 per share (or the then-current exercise price), shares of our common stock having a market value of $280 (or two times the exercise price), subject to certain exceptions. Similarly, if we are acquired in a merger or other business combination or 50% or more of our assets or earning power is sold, each Right entitles the holder to purchase at the then-current exercise price that number of shares of common stock of the surviving corporation having a market value of two times the exercise price. The Rights do not entitle the holder thereof to vote or to receive dividends. The Rights will expire on August 6, 2017, and may be redeemed by us for $.01 per Right under certain circumstances.

52


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

5. Income Taxes

        The provision for income taxes on pre-tax income includes the following components:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Current:

                   

Federal

  $ (9,777 ) $ (8,580 ) $ 21,649  

State

    (450 )   1,500     1,800  

Foreign

    2,952     1,800     1,400  
               

    (7,275 )   (5,280 )   24,849  

Deferred

    32,755     38,861     (3,863 )
               

  $ 25,480   $ 33,581   $ 20,986  
               

        The deferred tax provision results primarily from differences between financial reporting and taxable income arising from depreciation, post-retirement benefits and capitalized program development costs.

        Income tax receivable at May 31, 2012 and 2011 was $22,823 and $9,054, respectively, and is included in deposits, prepaids and other on the consolidated balance sheet.

        The provision for income taxes on pre-tax income differs from the amount computed by applying the U.S. federal statutory income tax rate of 35% for fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010 to income before taxes, for the following reasons:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Provision for income taxes at the federal statutory rate

  $ 32,728   $ 36,193   $ 22,466  

Tax benefits on domestic production activities

            (1,673 )

State income taxes, net of federal benefit and refunds

    (3,465 )   910     1,056  

Research and development credit

    (850 )   (350 )   (418 )

Leveraged lease

            (1,517 )

Noncontrolling interest

    (107 )       499  

Settlement of tax examinations

        (3,531 )    

Federal adjustments

    (3,300 )        

Other

    474     359     573  
               

Provision for income taxes

  $ 25,480   $ 33,581   $ 20,986  
               

53


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

5. Income Taxes (Continued)

        Deferred tax liabilities and assets result primarily from the differences in the timing of the recognition of transactions for financial reporting and income tax purposes and consist of the following components:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Deferred tax assets-current attributable to:

             

Inventory costs

  $ 11,268   $ 17,145  

Employee benefits

    6,036     5,793  

Allowance for doubtful accounts

    2,114     2,109  

AMT, NOL and FTC carrybacks

    7,332     8,400  

Advanced billings and other

    (4,112 )   (9,864 )
           

Total net deferred tax assets-current

  $ 22,638   $ 23,583  
           

Deferred tax assets-noncurrent attributable to:

             

Postretirement benefits

  $ 19,585   $ 12,847  

Bond hedge

    3,086     6,733  

Foreign intangible assets

    39,551      

Other

    4,765      
           

Total deferred tax assets-noncurrent

  $ 66,987   $ 19,580  
           

Total deferred tax assets

  $ 89,625   $ 43,163  
           

Deferred tax liabilities attributable to:

             

Depreciation

  $ (119,049 ) $ (104,202 )

Convertible notes

    (7,039 )   (13,700 )

Capitalized program development costs

    (17,256 )      

Foreign intangible assets

    (39,551 )    
           

Total deferred tax liabilities

  $ (182,895 ) $ (117,902 )
           

Net deferred tax liabilities

  $ (93,270 ) $ (74,739 )
           

        As of May 31, 2012, we have determined that the realization of our deferred tax assets is more likely than not, and that a valuation allowance is not required based upon our history of operating earnings, our expectations for continued future earnings, the nature of certain of our deferred tax assets and the scheduled reversal of deferred tax liabilities, primarily related to depreciation.

        Our effective income tax rate was 27.2% in fiscal 2012 compared to 32.5% in fiscal 2011. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, we recorded a $3,300 reduction in income tax expense primarily relating to revisions in book versus tax differences. During the third quarter of fiscal 2012, we recorded a $3,976 reduction in income tax expense primarily relating to a reduction in our state income tax rate due to the implementation of state income tax planning strategies related to our corporate structure and the relocation of one of our significant businesses.

        During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, an examination of our fiscal years 2007 through 2009 tax returns was completed, which resulted in a reduction of income tax expense in the amount of $3,531, primarily due to the allowance of foreign tax credits which had not previously been benefited. Fiscal years'

54


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

5. Income Taxes (Continued)

2010 and subsequent are open for examination. Various states and foreign jurisdictions also remain open subject to their applicable statute of limitations. We have no unrecognized tax benefits as of May 31, 2012.

6. Earnings Per Share

        The computation of basic earnings per share is based on the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during each period. The computation of diluted earnings per share is based on the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period plus, when their effect is dilutive, incremental shares consisting of shares subject to stock options, shares issuable upon vesting of restricted stock awards and shares to be issued upon conversion of convertible debt.

        We use the "if-converted" method in calculating the diluted earnings per share effect of the assumed conversion of our contingently convertible debt issued in fiscal 2006 because the principal for that issuance can be settled in stock, cash or a combination thereof. Under the "if converted" method, the after-tax effect of interest expense related to the convertible securities is added back to net income, and the convertible debt is assumed to have been converted into common shares at the beginning of the period.

        In accordance with ASC 260-10-45, Share-Based Payment Arrangements and Participating Securities and the Two-Class Method, our unvested restricted stock awards are deemed participating securities since these shares are entitled to participate in dividends declared on common shares. During periods of net income, the calculation of earnings per share for common stock exclude income attributable to unvested restricted stock awards from the numerator and exclude the dilutive impact of those shares from the denominator. During periods of net loss, no effect is given to the participating securities because they do not share in the losses of the Company.

        We adopted the provisions of this standard during fiscal 2011. The impact of this standard was not material for fiscal 2010.

55


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

6. Earnings Per Share (Continued)

        The following table provides a reconciliation of the computations of basic and diluted earnings per share information for each of the years in the three-year period ended May 31, 2012 (shares in thousands).

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Basic EPS:

                   

Net income attributable to AAR and noncontrolling interest

  $ 68,029   $ 69,826   $ 43,202  

Less income attributable to participating shares

    (2,545 )   (2,279 )    

Less (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

    (306 )       1,426  
               

Net income attributable to AAR available to common shareholders

  $ 65,178   $ 67,547   $ 44,628  
               

Basic shares:

                   

Weighted average common shares outstanding

    38,814     38,355     38,182  
               

Earnings per share—basic

  $ 1.68   $ 1.76   $ 1.17  
               

Diluted EPS:

                   

Net income attributable to AAR and noncontrolling interest

  $ 68,029   $ 69,826   $ 43,202  

Less income attributable to participating shares

    (2,346 )        

Less (income) loss attributable to noncontrolling interest

    (306 )       1,426  

Add after-tax interest on convertible debt

    5,863     5,615     5,274  
               

Net income attributable to AAR available to common shareholders

  $ 71,240   $ 75,441   $ 49,902  
               

Diluted shares:

                   

Weighted average common shares outstanding

    38,814     38,355     38,182  

Additional shares from the assumed exercise of stock options

    213     319     196  

Additional shares from the assumed vesting of restricted stock

        851     645  

Additional shares from the assumed conversion of convertible debt

    4,057     4,068     4,068  
               

Weighted average common shares outstanding—diluted

    43,084     43,593     43,091  
               

Earnings per share—diluted

  $ 1.65   $ 1.73   $ 1.16  
               

        At May 31, 2012, 2011 and 2010, respectively, options to purchase 1,627,000 shares, 170,000 shares and 378,000 shares of common stock were outstanding, but were not included in the computation of diluted earnings per share, because the exercise price of these options was greater than the average market price of the common shares for the period then ended.

56


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

7. Employee Benefit Plans

        We have defined contribution and defined benefit plans covering substantially all full-time domestic employees and certain employees in The Netherlands, Germany and Norway.

Defined Benefit Plans

        Prior to January 1, 2000, the pension plan for domestic salaried and non-union hourly employees had a benefit formula based primarily on years of service and compensation. Effective January 1, 2000, we converted our defined benefit plan for substantially all domestic salaried and certain hourly employees to a cash balance pension plan. Under the cash balance pension plan, the retirement benefit is expressed as a dollar amount in an account that grows with annual pay-based credits and interest on the account balance. The interest crediting rate under our cash balance plan is determined quarterly and is equal to 100% of the average 30-year treasury rate for the second month preceding the applicable quarter published by the Internal Revenue Service. The average interest crediting rate under our cash balance plan for the fiscal year ended May 31, 2012 was 5.0%. Effective June 1, 2005, the existing cash balance plan was frozen and the annual pay-based credits were discontinued. Also effective June 1, 2005, the defined contribution plan was modified to include increased employer contributions and an enhanced profit sharing formula. Defined pension benefits for certain union hourly employees are based primarily on a fixed amount per year of service.

        Certain foreign operations of domestic subsidiaries also have a defined benefit pension plan. Benefit formulas are based generally on years of service and compensation. It is the policy of these subsidiaries to fund at least the minimum amounts required by local laws and regulations.

        We provide eligible outside directors with benefits upon retirement on or after age 65 provided they have completed at least five years of service as a director. Benefits are paid quarterly in cash equal to 25% of the annual retainer fee payable to active outside directors. Payment of benefits commence upon retirement and continue for a period equal to the total number of years of the retired director's service up to a maximum of ten years, or death, whichever occurs first. In the fourth quarter of fiscal 2001, we terminated the plan for any new members of the Board of Directors first elected after May 31, 2001.

57


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

7. Employee Benefit Plans (Continued)

Obligations and Funded Status

        The following table sets forth the changes in projected benefit obligations and plan assets for all of our pension plans:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Change in benefit obligation:

             

Benefit obligation at beginning of year

  $ 105,091   $ 104,530  

Benefit obligations from acquired companies

    4,651      

Service cost

    1,619     2,143  

Interest cost

    5,453     5,376  

Plan participants' contributions

    400     385  

Net actuarial (gain) loss

    17,387     (6,415 )

Benefits paid

    (5,455 )   (5,248 )

Plan change

    351      

Curtailment

        (1,277 )

Translation

    (6,537 )   5,597  
           

Benefit obligation at end of year

  $ 122,960   $ 105,091  
           

Change in plan assets:

             

Fair value of plan assets at beginning of year

  $ 94,422   $ 78,892  

Actual return on plan assets

    (8 )   9,987  

Employer contributions

    4,528     4,653  

Plan participants' contributions

    400     385  

Benefits paid

    (5,455 )   (5,248 )

Translation

    (6,218 )   5,753  
           

Fair value of plan assets at end of year

  $ 87,669   $ 94,422  
           

Funded status at end of year

  $ (35,291 ) $ (10,669 )
           

        Amounts recognized in the consolidated balance sheets consisted of the following:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Other assets

  $   $ 5,498  

Accrued liabilities

    (1,887 )   (1,610 )

Other liabilities and deferred income

    (33,404 )   (14,557 )
           

  $ (35,291 ) $ (10,669 )
           

58


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

7. Employee Benefit Plans (Continued)

        Amounts recognized in accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax of $20,161 and $12,661 at May 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively, consisted of the following:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Actuarial loss

  $ 37,281   $ 22,131  

Prior service cost

    747     564  
           

Total

  $ 38,028   $ 22,695  
           

        Information for pension plans with an accumulated benefit obligation in excess of plan assets was as follows:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Projected benefit obligation

  $ 85,158   $ 71,057  

Accumulated benefit obligation

    85,049     70,903  

Fair value of plan assets

    50,171     54,890  

        The accumulated benefit obligation for all pension plans was $118,317 and $100,529 as of May 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

Net Periodic Benefit Cost

        Pension expense charged to results of operations includes the following components:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Service cost

  $ 1,619   $ 2,143   $ 1,528  

Interest cost

    5,453     5,376     5,578  

Expected return on plan assets

    (6,559 )   (5,871 )   (5,936 )

Amortization of prior service cost

    150     138     132  

Recognized net actuarial loss

    990     1,219     1,148  
               

  $ 1,653   $ 3,005   $ 2,450  
               

59


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

7. Employee Benefit Plans (Continued)

Assumptions

        The assumptions used in accounting for our plans are estimates of factors including, among other things, the amount and timing of future benefit payments. The following table presents the key assumptions used in the measurement of our benefit obligations:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Domestic plans:

             

Discount rate

    4.14 %   5.26 %

Rate of compensation increase

    2.50     3.50  

 

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Non-domestic plans:

             

Discount rate

    4.11 %   5.80 %

Rate of compensation increase

    3.00     3.00  

        A summary of the weighted average assumptions used to determine net periodic pension expense is as follows:

 
  For the Year Ended
May 31,
 
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Domestic plans:

                   

Discount rate

    5.26 %   5.60 %   6.82 %

Rate of compensation increase

    3.50     3.50     3.50  

Expected long-term return on plan assets

    8.00     8.00     8.50  

Non-domestic plans:

                   

Discount rate

    5.54 %   4.50 %   5.90 %

Rate of compensation increase

    3.00     3.00     3.00  

Expected long-term return on plan assets

    5.80     4.50     6.50  

        The discount rate was determined by projecting the plan's expected future benefit payments as defined for the projected benefit obligation, discounting those expected payments using a theoretical zero-coupon spot yield curve derived from a universe of high-quality bonds as of the measurement date, and solving for the single equivalent discount rate that resulted in the same projected benefit obligation.

60


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

7. Employee Benefit Plans (Continued)

Plan Assets

        The following table sets forth the actual asset allocation and target allocations for our U.S. pension plans:

 
  May 31,    
 
  Target Asset
Allocation
 
  2012   2011

Equity securities

    59 %   60 % 45 – 75%

Fixed income securities

    22     22   15 – 45%

Other (fund-of-funds hedge fund)

    19     18     0 – 25%
             

    100 %   100 %  
             

        The assets of U.S pension plans are invested in compliance with the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 (ERISA). The investment goals are to provide a total return that, over the long term, optimizes the long-term return on plan assets at an acceptable risk, and to maintain a broad diversification across asset classes and among investment managers. We believe that there are no significant concentrations of risk within our plan assets as of May 31, 2012. Direct investments in our securities and the use of derivatives for the purpose of speculation are not permitted. The assets of the U.S. pension plans are invested primarily in equity and fixed income mutual funds, individual common stocks and fund-of-funds hedge funds.

        The assets of the non-domestic plan are invested in compliance with local laws and regulations and are comprised primarily of equity and fixed income mutual funds.

        To develop our expected long-term rate of return assumption on domestic plans, we use long-term historical return information for our targeted asset mix and current market conditions.

        The following table sets forth by level, within the fair value hierarchy, pension plan assets at their fair value as of May 31, 2012:

 
  Level 11   Level 22   Level 33   Total  

Equity securities:

                         

Large/medium capitalization

  $ 17,500   $   $   $ 17,500  

Small capitalization

    6,379             6,379  

International

    5,452     7,460         12,912  

Fixed income

    11,338     25,952         37,290  

Hedge funds

        3,837     9,358     13,195  

Cash and other

    145     248         393  
                   

Total investments

  $ 40,814   $ 37,497   $ 9,358   $ 87,669  
                   

1
Quoted prices in active markets

2
Significant other observable inputs

3
Significant other unobservable inputs

61


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

7. Employee Benefit Plans (Continued)

Cash Flow

        The following table summarizes our estimated future pension benefits by fiscal year:

 
  Fiscal Year  
 
  2013   2014   2015   2016   2017   2018 to
2022
 

Estimated pension benefits

  $ 8,332   $ 5,103   $ 6,568   $ 5,277   $ 5,228   $ 30,519  

        Our contribution policy for the domestic plans is to contribute annually, at a minimum, an amount which is deductible for federal income tax purposes and that is sufficient to meet actuarially computed pension benefits. We anticipate contributing $5,500 to $7,500 during fiscal 2013.

Additional Information

        The estimated amounts for our plans that will be amortized from accumulated other comprehensive loss into expense over the next fiscal year are as follows:

Amortization of net actuarial loss

  $ 1,874  
       

Amortization of prior service cost

  $ 157  
       

Postretirement Benefits Other Than Pensions

        We provide health and life insurance benefits for certain eligible retirees. The postretirement plans are unfunded and in fiscal 1995, we completed termination of postretirement health and life insurance benefits attributable to future services of collective bargaining and other domestic employees. The unfunded projected benefit obligation for this plan was $1,136 and $1,187 as of May 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively. We have omitted substantially all of the required disclosures related to this plan because the plan is not material to our consolidated financial position or results of operations.

Defined Contribution Plan

        The defined contribution plan is a profit sharing plan which is intended to qualify as a 401(k) plan under the Internal Revenue Code. Under the plan, employees may contribute up to 75% of their pretax compensation, subject to applicable regulatory limits. We may make matching contributions up to 5% of compensation as well as discretionary profit sharing contributions. Our contributions vest on a pro-rata basis during the first three years of employment. We also provide profit sharing benefits for certain executives and key employees to supplement the benefits provided by the defined contribution plan. Expense charged to results of operations for our matching contributions, including profit sharing contributions, was $13,159 in fiscal 2012, $10,469 in fiscal 2011 and $8,065 in fiscal 2010 for these plans.

62


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

8. Acquisitions

        On December 2, 2011, we acquired Telair and Nordisk. Telair is a leader in the design, manufacture and support of cargo loading systems for wide-body and narrow-body aircraft with established positions on the world's most popular current and next-generation passenger and freighter aircraft. Telair operates from facilities in Germany, Sweden and Singapore. Nordisk designs and manufactures heavy duty pallets and lightweight cargo containers for commercial airlines from facilities in Norway and China. The purchase price of the acquisition was $280,000 paid at closing, plus or minus a working capital adjustment. During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012, the working capital adjustment was finalized, which increased the purchase price to $296,500. The businesses operate as part of our Structures and Systems segment.

        On October 11, 2011, we acquired Airinmar, a sophisticated repair, outsourcing and warranty claim manager. Airinmar operates as part of our Aviation Supply Chain segment. Total consideration is estimated to be $43,500, which included $23,200 cash paid at closing, and a potential earn-out payment of $20,300. The potential earn-out payment is based upon Airinmar achieving certain EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) levels over a two-year period, as well as retaining certain key customers. In accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, a liability of $20,300 was recognized as an estimate of the acquisition date fair value of the earn-out and was included in Other non-current liabilities on our consolidated balance sheet as of February 29, 2012. During the fourth quarter of 2012, this estimate was reduced by $3,367 and this change in the fair value of the earn-out was recognized in earnings.

        We are continuing our review of our fair value estimate of assets acquired and liabilities assumed during the measurement period, which will conclude as soon as we receive the information we are seeking about facts and circumstances that existed as of the acquisition date, or learn that more information is not available. This measurement period will not exceed one year from the acquisition date. At the effective date of the acquisition, the assets acquired and liabilities assumed are generally required to be measured at fair value.

        Our fair value estimate of assets acquired and liabilities assumed is pending completion of several elements, including the finalization of an independent appraisal and valuations of fair value of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed and final review by our management. The primary areas that are not yet finalized relate to the fair value of inventories, property and equipment, intangible assets, favorable or unfavorable contracts, operating leases or commitments, contingent liabilities and income and non-income related taxes. Accordingly, there could be material adjustments to our consolidated financial statements, including changes in our depreciation and amortization expense related to the valuation of property and equipment and intangible assets acquired and their respective useful lives among other adjustments.

        The final determination of the assets acquired and liabilities assumed will be based on the established fair value of the assets acquired and the liabilities assumed as of the acquisition date. The excess of the purchase price over the fair value of net assets acquired is allocated to goodwill. The final determination of the purchase price, fair values and resulting goodwill may differ significantly from what is reflected in the consolidated financial statements.

63


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

8. Acquisitions (Continued)

        The preliminary purchase price allocation for Telair, Nordisk and Airinmar follows:

Cash

  $ 5,200  

Accounts receivable

    55,100  

Inventories

    54,500  

Prepaid expenses

    4,700  

Property, plant and equipment

    17,600  

Deferred tax assets

    39,600  

Goodwill and identified intangibles

    266,300  

Notes payable

    (1,600 )

Accounts payable

    (21,400 )

Deferred tax liabilities

    (39,600 )

Accrued liabilities

    (32,900 )

Other long-term liabilities

    (7,500 )

        The following unaudited pro forma information is provided for acquisitions assuming the Telair, Nordisk and Airinmar acquisitions occurred as of the beginning of fiscal 2011.

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Net sales

  $ 2,197,507   $ 2,046,976  

Operating income

    149,227     163,889  

Net income attributable to AAR

    74,788     79,164  

Earnings per share:

             

Basic

  $ 1.86   $ 2.00  

Diluted

  $ 1.81   $ 1.94  

9. Aircraft Portfolio

        Within our Aviation Supply Chain segment, we own commercial aircraft with joint venture partners as well as aircraft that are wholly-owned. These aircraft are available for lease or sale to commercial air carriers.

Aircraft Owned through Joint Ventures

        As of May 31, 2012 and 2011, we had ownership interests in 18 and 23 aircraft, respectively, with joint venture partners. As of May 31, 2012 and 2011, our equity investment in the aircraft owned with joint venture partners was approximately $41,326 and $39,994, respectively, and is included in Investment in joint ventures on the Consolidated Balance Sheet. Our aircraft joint ventures represent investments in limited liability companies that are accounted for under the equity method of accounting. Our membership interest in each of these limited liability companies is 50% and the primary business of these companies is the acquisition, ownership, lease and disposition of certain commercial aircraft. Aircraft are purchased with cash contributions by the members of the companies and debt financing provided to the limited liability companies on a limited recourse basis. Under the terms of servicing agreements with certain of the limited liability companies, we provide administrative services and technical advisory services, including

64


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

9. Aircraft Portfolio (Continued)

aircraft evaluations, oversight and logistical support of the maintenance process and records management. We also provide remarketing services with respect to the divestiture of aircraft by the limited liability companies. During fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, we were paid $600, $1,289 and $772, respectively, for such services. The income tax benefit or expense related to the operations of the ventures is recorded by the member companies.

        Distributions from joint ventures are classified as operating or investing activities in the consolidated statements of cash flows based upon an evaluation of the specific facts and circumstances of each distribution.

        Summarized financial information for these limited liability companies is as follows:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Sales

  $ 45,736   $ 65,161   $ 45,332  

Income before provision for income taxes

    3,651     7,449     967  

 

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Balance sheet information:

             

Assets

  $ 169,643   $ 219,810  

Debt

    75,556     127,037  

Members' capital

    88,794     89,375  

Wholly-Owned Aircraft

        In addition to the aircraft owned with joint venture partners, we own two aircraft at May 31, 2012 and we owned five aircraft at May 31, 2011, for our own account that are considered wholly-owned. Our investment in the wholly-owned aircraft, after consideration of financing, is comprised of the following components:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Gross carrying value

  $ 25,168   $ 44,586  

Debt

    (8,380 )   (14,072 )

Capital lease obligation

        (6,716 )
           

Net AAR investment

  $ 16,788   $ 23,798  
           

65


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

9. Aircraft Portfolio (Continued)

        Information relating to aircraft type, year of manufacture, lessee, lease expiration date and expected disposition upon lease expiration for the 18 aircraft owned with joint venture partners and two wholly-owned aircraft is as follows:

Aircraft owned with joint venture partners

 
 
Quantity
  Aircraft Type   Year
Manufactured
  Lessee   Lease Expiration
Date (FY)
  Post-Lease
Disposition
      2   767-300   1991   United Airlines   2016 and 2017   Re-lease
      16   737-400   Various1   Malaysia Airlines   Various2   Sale/Re-lease
                         
      18                    
                         

1
Five aircraft in 1992; eight aircraft in 1993; two aircraft 1994; and one aircraft in 1997

2
Twelve aircraft in 2013 and four aircraft in 2014. The joint venture partners entered into LOIs for sale of four aircraft and an additional four are expected to go under LOI in fiscal 2013.

Wholly-owned aircraft

 
 
Quantity
  Aircraft Type   Year
Manufactured
  Lessee   Lease Expiration
Date (FY)
  Post-Lease
Disposition
      1   737-300   1997   Small Planet Airlines     2015   Re-lease
      1   A320   1997   Dombassaero Airlines     2017   Re-lease
                           
      2                      
                           

10. Equipment on Long-Term Lease

        In fiscal 2005, we entered into a series of ten-year agreements with a regional airline to provide supply chain services for its fleet of CRJ 700/900, ERJ 145 and CRJ 200 regional jets. As part of the agreements, we purchased from the customer approximately $58,400 of equipment to support the program. The equipment is included in equipment on long-term lease on the Consolidated Balance Sheet and is being depreciated on a straight-line basis over 10 years to a 30% residual value. The net book value of this equipment was $30,871 and $32,200 at May 31, 2012 and 2011, respectively.

66


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

11. Commitments and Contingencies

        On October 3, 2003, we entered into a sale-leaseback transaction whereby we sold and leased back a facility located in Garden City, New York. The lease is classified as an operating lease. Net proceeds from the sale of the facility were $13,991 and the cost and related accumulated depreciation of the facility of $9,472 and $4,595, respectively, were removed from the Consolidated Balance Sheet at the time of sale. The gain realized on the sale of $9,114 has been deferred and is being amortized over the 20-year lease term. The unamortized balance of the deferred gain as of May 31, 2012 is $5,227 and is included in Other liabilities and deferred income on the Consolidated Balance Sheet.

        In addition to the Garden City lease, we lease other facilities and equipment under agreements that are classified as operating leases that expire at various dates through 2034. Under the terms of one of the facility lease agreements, we are entitled to receive rent credits as we increase the space we occupy. During fiscal 2012, 2011 and 2010, we received $239, $34 and $47, respectively, of such rent credits. We are treating the rent credits as lease incentives, which are being amortized over the term of the lease. Future minimum payments under all operating leases at May 31, 2012 are as follows:

Year
  Facilities
and
Equipment
 

2013

  $ 28,155  

2014

    23,449  

2015

    18,789  

2016

    11,588  

2017

    9,423  

2018 and thereafter

    46,295  

        Rental expense during the past three fiscal years was as follows:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Facilities and Equipment

  $ 30,328   $ 27,853   $ 23,232  

Aviation Equipment

            792  

        We enter into purchase obligations which arise in the ordinary course of business and represent a binding commitment to acquire inventory, including raw materials, parts and components, as well as equipment to support the operations of our business. The aggregate amount of purchase obligations due in each of the next five fiscal years is $250,458 in 2013, $8,034 in 2014, $412 in 2015 and $0 in 2016 and 2017.

        We routinely issue letters of credit and performance bonds in the ordinary course of our business. These instruments are typically issued in conjunction with insurance contracts or other business requirements. The total of these instruments outstanding at May 31, 2012 was approximately $16,798.

        We are involved in various claims and legal actions, including environmental matters, arising in the ordinary course of business (see Item 3 Legal Proceedings). In the opinion of management, the ultimate disposition of these matters will not have a material adverse effect on our consolidated financial condition or results of operations.

67


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

12. Restructuring and Impairment Charges

        In order to improve efficiencies and streamline operations in the Structures and Systems segment, during the fourth quarter of fiscal 2012 we decided to close two manufacturing plants and idle one other facility. The financial impact included restructuring and other charges of $3,700. Approximately $1,200 was recorded as severance expense and approximately $2,500 was recorded for asset impairments to reduce the carrying value of certain equipment and inventory to net realizable value. The charges are recorded in Costs of sales—restructuring and impairment in the Consolidated Statement of Income.

        During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we decided to offer one narrow body aircraft for sale from our wholly-owned aircraft portfolio and subsequent to May 31, 2011, we entered into a letter of intent to sell the aircraft to a foreign air carrier. As a result, we recorded a $5,355 pre-tax impairment charge to reduce the carrying value of the aircraft to its net realizable value, which was approximately $8,850 at May 31, 2011.

13. Gain on Sale of Product Line

        During the fourth quarter of fiscal 2011, we sold substantially all of the assets of a non-strategic product line within our Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment. Proceeds from the sale were $10,000 cash paid at closing, and the net carrying value of the assets sold was $4,078, resulting in a pre-tax gain on sale of product line of $5,922. The gain on this transaction has been classified as a component of operating income.

14. Other Noncurrent Assets

        At May 31, 2012 and 2011, other noncurrent assets consisted of the following:

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011  

Capitalized program development costs

  $ 91,942   $ 69,413  

Costs in excess of billings

    27,872     19,404  

Notes receivable

    18,869     2,443  

Assets under deferred compensation plan

    16,315     16,421  

Cash surrender value of life insurance

    15,632     15,164  

Licenses fees

    15,072      

Debt issuance costs

    10,025     5,281  

Other

    13,185     14,012  
           

  $ 208,912   $ 142,138  
           

Program Development Costs

        In June 2005, we announced that our Cargo Systems business in our Structures and Systems segment was selected to provide cargo handling systems for the new Airbus A400M Military Transport Aircraft ("A400M"). Our portion of the revenue from this program is expected to exceed $300,000 through fiscal 2021, based on sales projections of the A400M. As of May 31, 2012, we have capitalized, net of reimbursements, $91,942 of costs associated with the engineering and development of the cargo system. Sales and related cost of sales will be recognized on the units of delivery method.

68


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

14. Other Noncurrent Assets (Continued)

License Fees

        In June 2011, we entered into a ten-year agreement with Unison Industries to be the exclusive worldwide aftermarket distributor for Unison's electrical components, sensors, switches and other systems for aircraft and industrial uses. The agreement is expected to generate approximately $600,000 in revenues for us over its ten-year term. In connection with the agreement, we agreed to pay Unison Industries $20,000 for the exclusive distribution rights with $7,000 paid in June 2011, and $1,300 payable by January 31 of each calendar year beginning in January 2012 through 2021.

        As of May 31, 2012, the unamortized balance of the license is $15,072 and is being amortized over a ten-year period. The current portion of the deferred payments of $1,160 is recorded in Accrued liabilities and the long-term portion of $7,607 is included in Other liabilities and deferred income on the consolidated balance sheet.

15. Business Segment Information

Segment Reporting

        We report our activities in four business segments: Aviation Supply Chain; Government and Defense Services; Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul; and Structures and Systems.

        Sales in the Aviation Supply Chain segment are derived from the sale and lease of a wide variety of new, overhauled and repaired engine and airframe parts and components principally to the commercial aviation market. We also offer customized inventory supply chain management programs and aircraft component repair management services. Sales also include the sale and lease of commercial aircraft and jet engines and technical and advisory services. Cost of sales consists principally of the cost of product, direct labor, overhead (primarily indirect labor, facility cost and insurance) and the cost of lease revenue (primarily depreciation and insurance).

        Sales in the Government and Defense Services segment are derived from the sale of new and overhauled engine and airframe parts and components, customized performance based logistics programs, expeditionary airlift services, aircraft modifications and engineering, design, and integration services to our government and defense customers. Cost of sales consists principally of the cost of the product (primarily aircraft and engine parts), direct labor, overhead and aircraft maintenance costs.

        Sales in the Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul segment are principally derived from aircraft maintenance and modifications, engineering services, painting, and the repair, overhaul and exchange of landing gear. Cost of sales consists principally of the cost of product (primarily replacement aircraft parts), direct labor and overhead.

        Sales in the Structures and Systems segment are derived from the engineering, design and manufacture of containers, pallets and shelters used to support the U.S. military's requirements for a mobile and agile force, heavy-duty pallets and lightweight cargo containers for the commercial market, complex machined and fabricated parts, components and sub-systems for various aerospace and defense programs and other applications, in-plane cargo loading and handling systems for commercial and military applications and composite products for aviation and industrial use. Cost of sales consists principally of the cost of product, direct labor and overhead.

69


Table of Contents


AAR CORP. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS (Continued)

(Dollars in thousands, except per share amounts)

15. Business Segment Information (Continued)

        The accounting policies for the segments are the same as those described in Note 1. Our chief operating decision making officer (Chief Executive Officer) evaluates performance based on the reportable segments and utilizes gross profit as a primary profitability measure. The expenses and assets related to corporate activities are not allocated to the segments. Our reportable segments are aligned principally around differences in products and services.

        Gross profit is calculated by subtracting cost of sales from sales. Selected financial information for each segment is as follows:

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Net sales:

                   

Aviation Supply Chain

  $ 588,406   $ 465,108   $ 405,955  

Government and Defense Services

    552,687     571,343     194,944  

Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

    422,169     393,671     301,348  

Structures and Systems

    501,736     374,990     449,904  
               

  $ 2,064,998   $ 1,805,112   $ 1,352,151  
               

 

 
  For the Year Ended May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Gross profit:

                   

Aviation Supply Chain

  $ 106,029   $ 76,247   $ 70,490  

Government and Defense Services

    78,635     105,538     42,304  

Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul

    55,488     55,871     38,206  

Structures and Systems

    78,405     69,400     92,519  
               

  $ 318,557   $ 307,056   $ 243,519  
               

 

 
  May 31,  
 
  2012   2011   2010  

Total assets:

                   

Aviation Supply Chain

  $ 628,434   $ 533,315   $ 546,067  

Government and Defense Services