UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 20-F

 

 REGISTRATION STATEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OR (g) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

OR

 

ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021

 

OR

 

 TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

For the transition period from _________ to _________.

 

OR

 

 SHELL COMPANY REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

Date of event requiring this shell company report:

 

Commission file number: 001-39339

 

HITEK GLOBAL INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as Specified in its Charter)

 

Cayman Islands

(Jurisdiction of Incorporation or Organization)

 

Unit 304, No. 30 Guanri Road, Siming District,

Xiamen City, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China

+86 592-5395967

(Address of Principal Executive Offices)

 

Xiaoyang Huang, Chief Executive Officer

+86 592-5395967

Unit 304, No. 30 Guanri Road, Siming District,

Xiamen City, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China

(Name, Telephone, E-mail and/or Facsimile Number and Address of Company Contact Person)

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

Title of Each Class   Trading Symbol   Name of Each Exchange On Which Registered
Ordinary shares, par value US$0.0001 per share   HKIT   NASDAQ Capital Market

 

Securities registered or to be registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:

 

None

(Title of Class)

 

Securities for which there is a reporting obligation pursuant to Section 15(d) of the Act:

 

None

(Title of Class)

 

 

 

 

The number of outstanding shares of each of the issuer’s classes of capital or common stock as of December 31, 2021 was: 10,987,679 ordinary shares, par value $0.0001 per share.

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

 

Yes    No 

 

If this report is an annual or transition report, indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934.

 

Yes    No 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.

 

Yes    No 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§ 232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).

 

Yes    No 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, or a non-accelerated filer. See definition of “accelerated filer and large accelerated filer” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. (Check one):

 

Large accelerated filer ☐ Accelerated filer ☐ Non-accelerated filer Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. 

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

 

Indicate by check mark which basis of accounting the registrant has used to prepare the financial statements included in this filing:

 

U.S. GAAP International Financial Reporting Standards as issued by the
International Accounting Standards Board
Other

 

If “Other” has been checked in response to the previous question, indicate by check mark which financial statement item the registrant has elected to follow:

 

Item 17    Item 18 

 

If this is an annual report, indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).

 

Yes    No 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

      Page
      Number
INTRODUCTORY NOTES   ii
     
FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS   iii
       
ITEM 1. IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS   1
ITEM 2. OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE   1
ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION   1
ITEM 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY   22
ITEM 4A. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS   27
ITEM 5. OPERATING AND FINANCIAL REVIEW AND PROSPECTS   27
ITEM 6. DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND EMPLOYEES   38
ITEM 7. MAJOR SHAREHOLDERS AND RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS   43
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL INFORMATION   44
ITEM 9. THE OFFER AND LISTING   45
ITEM 10. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION   45
ITEM 11. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK   58
ITEM 12. DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES   58
ITEM 13. DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES   59
ITEM 14. MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS   59
ITEM 15. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES   59
ITEM 16A. AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT   60
ITEM 16B. CODE OF ETHICS   60
ITEM 16C. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES   60
ITEM 16D. EXEMPTIONS FROM THE LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES   61
ITEM 16E. PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS   61
ITEM 16F. CHANGE IN REGISTRANT’S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANTS   61
ITEM 16G. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE   61
ITEM 16H. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE   61
ITEM 16I. DISCLOSURE REGARDING FOREIGN JURISDICTIONS THAT PREVENT INSPECTIONS   61
ITEM 17. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS   62
ITEM 18. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS   62
ITEM 19. EXHIBITS   63

 

i

 

 

INTRODUCTORY NOTES

 

Except as otherwise indicated by the context and for the purposes of this report only, references in this report to:

 

  “we”, “us” or the “Company” are to Hitek Global Inc.;
     
  “affiliated entities” are to our subsidiaries and variable interest entities (“VIE”);
     
  “China” or the “PRC” are to the People’s Republic of China, excluding Taiwan and the special administrative regions of Hong Kong and Macau for the purposes of this annual report only;
     
  “HiTek HK” are to the Company’s wholly owned subsidiary, HiTek Hong Kong Ltd., a Hong Kong corporation;
     
  “HiTek”, or “VIE entity”, are to Xiamen Hengda HiTek Computer Network Co., Ltd., a limited liability company organized under the laws of the PRC, that we control via a series of contractual arrangements between WFOE and HiTek;
     
  “Huasheng” are to Xiamen Huasheng HiTek Computer Network Co., Ltd., a limited liability company organized under the laws of the PRC that function as HiTek’s operating subsidiary;
     
  “Huoerguosi” are to Huoerguosi Hengda Information Technology Co., Ltd., a limited liability company organized under the laws of the PRC that function as HiTek’s operating subsidiary;
     
  “WFOE” are to Tian Dahai (Xiamen) Information Technology Co. Ltd. (“Tian Dahai”), a limited liability company organized under the laws of the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC”), which is wholly-owned by us through HiTek HK; and
     
  “Haitian Weilai” are to Xiamen Haitian Weilai Technology Co., Ltd., a limited liability company organized under the laws of the PRC that is fully owned by Tian Dahai;
     
  “Ordinary Shares” are to the Ordinary Shares of Hitek Global Inc., par value $0.0001 per share.

 

Our business is conducted via HiTek, a VIE entity in the PRC, using RMB, the currency of China. Our consolidated financial statements are presented in United States dollars. In this annual report, we refer to assets, obligations, commitments and liabilities in our consolidated financial statements in United States dollars. These dollar references are based on the exchange rate of RMB to United States dollars, determined as of a specific date or for a specific period. Changes in the exchange rate will affect the amount of our obligations and the value of our assets in terms of United States dollars which may result in an increase or decrease in the amount of our obligations (expressed in dollars) and the value of our assets.

 

ii

 

 

FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This annual report on Form 20-F contains forward-looking statements that reflect our current expectations and views of future events. These statements are made under the “safe harbor” provisions of the U.S. Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. You can identify these forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “aim,” “estimate,” “intend,” “plan,” “believe,” “is/are likely to,” “potential,” “continue” or other similar expressions. We have based these forward-looking statements largely on our current expectations and projections about future events and financial trends that we believe may affect our financial condition, results of operations, business strategy and financial needs. These forward-looking statements include, but are not limited to:

 

  the adverse effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on our business or the market price of our ordinary shares;

 

  our goals and strategies;

 

  our future business development, financial condition and results of operations;

 

  our expectations regarding the market for our concrete products;

 

  our expectations regarding demand for and market acceptance of our nutraceutical and dietary supplements products;

 

  our plans to establish partnerships and develop new businesses;

 

  our plans to invest in our business;

 

  our relationships with our partners;

 

  our future business development, results of operations and financial condition;

 

  market conditions affecting our equity capital;

 

  change in macroeconomic conditions;

 

  competition in our industry; and

 

  relevant government policies and regulations relating to our industry.

 

We would like to caution you not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements and you should read these statements in conjunction with the risk factors disclosed in “Item 3. Key Information—D. Key Information—Risk Factors.” Those risks are not exhaustive. We operate in an evolving environment. New risks emerge from time to time and it is impossible for our management to predict all risk factors, nor can we assess the impact of all factors on our business or the extent to which any factor, or combination of factors, may cause actual results to differ from those contained in any forward-looking statement. We do not undertake any obligation to update or revise the forward-looking statements except as required under applicable law. You should read this annual report and the documents that we reference in this annual report completely and with the understanding that our actual future results may be materially different from what we expect.

 

iii

 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. IDENTITY OF DIRECTORS, SENIOR MANAGEMENT AND ADVISERS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 2. OFFER STATISTICS AND EXPECTED TIMETABLE

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 3. KEY INFORMATION

 

A. [RESERVED]

 

B. Capitalization and indebtedness.

 

Not applicable.

 

C. Reasons for the offer and use of proceeds.

 

Not applicable.

 

1

 

 

D. Risk factors.

 

An investment in our ordinary shares involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks and uncertainties described below together with all other information contained in this annual report, including the matters discussed under the headings “Forward-Looking Statements” and “Operating and Financial Review and Prospects” before you decide to invest in our ordinary shares. We are a holding company with substantial operations in China and are subject to a legal and regulatory environment that in many respects differs from the United States. If any of the following risks, or any other risks and uncertainties that are not presently foreseeable to us, actually occur, our business, financial condition, results of operations, liquidity and our future growth prospects could be materially and adversely affected.

 

Risks Related to Our Business Operations

 

We face risks related to health epidemics such as the COVID-19, and other outbreaks, which could significantly disrupt our operations and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our business could be materially and adversely affected by health epidemics such as the COVID-19 and other outbreaks affecting the PRC. Health epidemics may give rise to severe interruptions to public transportation and usual business operations, which could severely disrupt our operations. Our business operations depend on overall economy and demand for IT consulting and solutions service in Xiamen area, which could be disrupted by health epidemics. For example, our office had to shut down from February 3, 2020 to February 23, 2020. Public transportation services in Xiamen city were curtailed over COVID-19 concerns. For our Tax Devices and Services sector, we have to collect the service fee on-site from those customers who have not used our online payment platform, which may lead to a delay in collection. The number of new customers has decreased in February 2020. The COVID-19 outbreak may have the same impact on our IT services sector. As of the date this annual report, there is no clear sign of slow-down in our hardware and software sales. However, since the customers of these two sectors are located in different provinces, including some severe epidemic areas, the COVID-19 outbreak may have a negative impact on our revenue in the short run. A prolonged outbreak of the COVID-19 or other adverse public health developments in China would likely have a material adverse effect on our business operations because such outbreak or other development could significantly impact the Chinese economy and IT service industry, severely disrupt our operations and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our future revenues and growth prospects depend on the ACTCS pricing model mandated by the PRC government. If the PRC government continues to reduce the annual fee per user we are allowed to charge, our operations and revenues may be negatively impacted.

 

We sell ACTCS tax devices and provide ACTCS supporting services to our clients. The prices of GTD and annual service fees are regulated and subject to the State Tax Administration’s pricing mandates. In the past 20 years, the annual service fee has undergone three major adjustments -- from RMB 450 per year per user to RMB 370 per year per user, and then further reduced to RMB 330 per year per user. Most recently, the ACTCS annual service fee was again reduced to RMB 280 per year per user, according to the “Notice of the National Development and Reform Commission on Relevant Issues Concerning the Reduction of ACTCS Products and Maintenance Service Fee” (Development and Reform Commission Case [2017] No. 1243). In addition, State Administration of Taxation, Goods and Services Tax Division issued a notice related to the tax control service fee on January 31, 2019. According to the notice, the small-scale taxpayers which the sales amount did not exceed RMB 100,000 for each month are exempt from Anti-Counterfeiting Tax Control System or Golden Tax Disk technical service fee. The notice was updated on April 1, 2021 that the small-scale taxpayers which the sales amount did not exceed RMB 150,000 for each month are exempt from Anti-Counterfeiting Tax Control System or Golden Tax Disk technical service fee.  Since we do not control the pricing of the ACTCS services, we cannot guarantee our profit margin will be stable or we will make a profit on such services at all. We cannot guarantee that the annual service fee will not be further reduced, and therefore our revenues to be derived from ACTCS supporting services may be subject to significant fluctuation.

 

Our future revenues and growth prospects depend on the growth of new business entities in the Xiamen metropolitan areas, which is not within our control and the growth rate may decrease. As such, our operations and revenues may be negatively impacted.

 

The willingness of people to establish business entities in the Xiamen metropolitan areas is beyond our control. There are multiple reasons people may find appealing to establish a particular business in the Xiamen metropolitan areas, such as people’s personal belief and volatility in the Chinese capital markets. To the extent that people are unwilling to establish new businesses in the Xiamen metropolitan area either due to political or economic climate, we will not be able to acquire new customers to our ACTCS services. Thus, our ability to generate revenue or operate profitably may be negatively impacted.

 

Increased use of electronic invoice will reduce the number of customers using our ACTCS services.

 

In recent years, the Chinese tax regulators have been rolling out the electronic invoicing system. Currently, electronic invoices are mostly used by businesses in the Fast Moving Consumer Goods (“FMCG”) industry such as fast food restaurants and coffee shops. The electronic invoices enable FMCG enterprises to apply for, issue, transfer and check the invoices through the unified online electronic invoice management system of Chinese tax authorities. Electronic invoices are very useful in helping business entities reduce operating costs and streamline service process, since they do not involve printing, storage and postage procedures. Businesses who use electronic invoices still need to purchase tax reporting devices such as GTD. But they will not need maintenance services. Currently, approximately 1.5% of our SME clients are FMCG business entities. Increased use of electronic invoices will reduce our annual service fee revenue and thus negatively affect our total revenue.

 

2

 

 

Increasing competition within our industry could have an impact on our business prospects.

 

While the VAT reporting service industry in China is a heavily regulated industry where new players must obtain approval by the relevant PRC government agencies before entering this industry, it is still highly possible that new competitors will enter into the market and have significantly greater financial and other resources than we have and may offer services that is more attractive and more advanced that we can provide for large business enterprises and SMEs. Thus, we anticipate increasing competition, which may have a negative impact on both our revenues and our profit margins.

 

Our IT services and hardware and software sales rely on evolving information technologies to maintain our competitiveness, and any failure to adapt to technological developments or industry trends could harm our business.

 

We depend upon the use of sophisticated information technologies and systems, including technologies and systems utilized for communications, procurement and administrative systems. As our operations grow in both size and scope, we continuously need to improve and upgrade our systems and infrastructure to offer an increasing number of clients enhanced products, services, features and functionality, while maintaining the reliability and integrity of our systems and infrastructure. Our future success in IT services and hardware and software sales also depends on our ability to adapt to rapidly changing technologies, particularly the increasing use of internet-based products and services, to change our services and infrastructure so they address evolving industry standards and to improve the performance, features and reliability of our services in response to competitive service and product offerings in the Chinese software markets and the evolving demands of the IT service markets. If there are technological impediments to introducing new technological products or maintaining current technologies or other products and services, or if these products and services do not meet the requirements of our clients’ evolving needs, our business, financial condition or results of operations may be adversely affected.

 

In addition, the emergence of competitors who may be able to optimize products, services or strategies that use advanced computing such as cloud computing, as well as other technological changes and developing technologies, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, have, and will mandate us to make new and costly investments. Transitioning to new technologies may be disruptive to resources and the services we provide, and may increase our reliance on third party service providers. We may not be successful, or may be less successful than our current or new competitors, in developing technology that operates effectively across multiple devices and platforms and that is appealing to our customers, either of which would negatively affect our business and financial performance.

 

It is possible that, if we are not able to maintain existing systems, obtain new technologies and systems, or replace or introduce new technologies and systems as quickly as our competitors or in a cost-effective manner, our business and operations could be materially adversely affected. Also, we may not achieve the benefits anticipated or required from any new technology or system, or be able to devote financial resources to new technologies and systems in the future.

 

We are dependent upon software, equipment and services provided by third parties.

 

We are dependent upon software, equipment and services provided and/or managed by third parties in the operation of our business. In the event that the performance of such software, equipment or services provided and/or managed by third parties deteriorates or our arrangements with any of these third parties related to the provision and/or management of software, equipment or services are terminated, we may not be able to find alternative services, equipment or software on a timely basis or on commercially reasonable terms, or at all, or be able to do so without significant cost or disruptions to our business, and our relationships with our customers may be adversely impacted.

 

3

 

 

A significant portion of our revenue is concentrated on a few large customers, and we do not have long-term service agreements with our key customers and rely upon our longstanding relationship with them. If we lose one or more of our customers, our results of operations may be adversely and materially impacted.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2021, two customers accounted for 42% of total HiTek’s revenues, the largest of which represented 28%. For the year ended December 31, 2020 two customers accounted for 32% of total HiTek’s revenues, the largest of which represented 22%, while one customer which is a related party of HiTek represented 10% of HiTek’s revenues. Since we do not have long-term customer supply agreements with such large customers and rely primarily upon our goodwill and reputation to sustain the business relationship, our results of operations may be adversely and materially impacted if one or more of these customers stop purchasing from us.

 

Extended payment terms may cause deferred payments or bad debts, which could negatively affect our business operations.

 

The Company gave a two-year credit period to large customers such as large-scale oil and coal mining groups. Their collection period is usually longer than other medium or small-sized companies. An extended credit period will have a potential risk of causing deferred payments or bad debts, which could negatively affect our business operations.

 

We source our retail hardware primarily from a limited number of suppliers. If we lose one or more of the suppliers, our operation may be disrupted, and our results of operations may be adversely and materially impacted.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2021, two suppliers accounted for 21% of the total purchases. For the year ended December 31, 2020, two suppliers accounted for 38% of the total purchases. If we lose suppliers and are unable to swiftly engage new suppliers, our operations may be disrupted or suspended, and we may not be able to deliver hardware products to our customers on time. We may also have to pay a higher price to source from a different supplier on short notice. While we are actively searching for and negotiating with new suppliers, there is no guarantee that we will be able to locate appropriate new suppliers or supplier merger targets in our desired timeline. As such, our results of operations may be adversely and materially impacted.

 

We may need additional capital to fund our future operations and, if it is not available when needed, we may need to reduce our planned expansion and marketing efforts, which may reduce our revenue.

 

We believe that our existing working capital and cash available from operations will enable us to meet our working capital requirements for at least the next 12 months. However, if cash from future operations is insufficient, or if cash is used for acquisitions or other currently unanticipated uses, we may need additional capital. As a result, we could be required to raise additional capital. To the extent that we raise additional capital through the sale of equity or convertible debt securities, the issuance of such securities could result in dilution of the shares held by existing shareholders. If additional funds are raised through the issuance of debt or equity securities, such securities may provide the holders certain rights, preferences, and privileges senior to those of shareholders holding Ordinary Shares, and the terms of any such debt securities could impose restrictions on our operations. We cannot assure you that additional capital, if required, will be available on acceptable terms, or at all. If we are unable to obtain sufficient amounts of additional capital, we may be required to reduce the scope of our planned product development and marketing efforts, which could harm our business, financial condition and operating results.

 

If we are unable to manage our anticipated growth effectively, our business could be adversely affected.

 

In order to develop our business, we need to hire and retain key managers and executives in all areas of our operations. Our future operating results depend to a large extent on our ability to develop and manage expansion and growth successfully. For us to manage such growth, we must put in place legal and accounting systems, and implement human resource management and other tools. We have taken preliminary steps to put this structure in place. However, there is no assurance that we will be able to expand our business or successfully manage any growth that may result. Failure to expand our operations or manage our growth effectively could materially and adversely affect our ability to market our services in multiple venues.

 

4

 

 

Because we rely upon a third party to perform the payment processing for our clients, the failure or inability of the third party to provide these services could impair our ability to operate.

 

Because we do not possess an internal payment method, all payments by participants are processed by third parties such as Alipay and WeChat Pay. The payment processing business is highly regulated, and it is subject to a number of risks that could materially and adversely affect their abilities to provide payment processing and escrow services to us, including:

 

  increased regulatory focus and the requirement that it comply with numerous complex and evolving laws, rules and regulations;
     
  increases in the costs to the third party, including fees charged by banks to process funds through the third parties, which could result in increased costs to us and to our participants;
     
  dissatisfaction with the third parties’ services;
     
  a decline in the use of the third parties’ services generally which could result in increases in costs to users such as us and our participants;
     
  the ability of the third parties to maintain adequate security procedures to prevent the hacking or other unauthorized access to account and other information provided by us and the participants who use the system;
     
  system failures or failure to effectively scale the system to handle large and growing transaction volumes;
     
  the failure or inability of the third parties to manage funds accurately or the loss of funds by the third parties, whether due to employee fraud, security breaches, technical errors or otherwise; and
     
  the failure or inability of these third parties to adequately manage business and regulatory risks.

 

We rely on the convenience and ease of use that third party’s payment methods provide to our users. If the quality, utility, convenience or attractiveness of these payment services declines for any reason, the attractiveness of our services could be materially impaired. If we need to migrate to other third-party payment services for any reason, the transition could require considerable time and management resources, and the third-party payment services may not be as effective, efficient or well-received by our clients. Further, our clients may be reluctant to use a different payment system.

 

Our success depends substantially on the continued retention of certain key personnel and our ability to hire and retain qualified personnel in the future to support our growth and execute our business strategy.

 

If one or more of our senior executives or other key personnel are unable or unwilling to continue in their present positions, our business may be disrupted and our financial condition and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected. While we depend on the abilities and participation of our current management team generally, we rely particularly upon Mr. Shenping Yin, Chairman of the Board and Ms. Xiaoyang Huang, our chief executive officer who is responsible for the development and implementation of our business plan. The loss of the services of Mr. Yin for any reason could significantly adversely impact our business and results of operations. Competition for senior management and senior technology personnel in the PRC is intense and the pool of qualified candidates is very limited. We cannot assure you that the services of our senior executives and other key personnel will continue to be available to us, or that we will be able to find a suitable replacement for them if they were to leave.

 

We may not be able to adequately protect our intellectual property rights, and our competitors may be able to offer similar products and services, which would harm our competitive position.

 

Our success depends in part upon our intellectual property rights. We rely primarily on copyright, trade secret laws, confidentiality procedures, license agreements and contractual provisions to establish and protect our proprietary rights over our products, procedures and services. Other persons could copy or otherwise obtain and use our technology without authorization, or develop similar IP independently. We may also pursue the registration of our domain names, trademarks, and service marks in other jurisdictions, including the United States. However, the intellectual property laws in China are not considered as strong as comparable laws in the United States or the European Union. We cannot assure you that we will be able to protect our proprietary rights. Further, our competitors may be able to independently develop similar or more advanced technology, duplicate our products and services or design around any intellectual property rights we hold. Further, our intellectual property rights may be subject to termination or expirations. The loss of intellectual property protections or the inability to timely regain intellectual property protections could harm our business and ability to compete.

 

5

 

 

We have engaged in transactions with related parties, and such transactions present possible conflicts of interest that could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.

 

We have entered into a number of transactions with related parties, including our significant shareholder and director. For example, we have entered into several transactions with Beijing Zhongzhe Yuantong Technology Co., Ltd. and one of the minority shareholder of HiTek is under common control or business entities affiliated with or owned by Chairman, Shenping Yin, where we have sales revenues or have advances from these entities. See “Related Party Transactions”. We may in the future enter into additional transactions with entities in which members of our board of directors and other related parties hold ownership interests.

 

Transactions with related parties present potential for conflicts of interest, as the interests of related party may not align with the interests of our shareholders. Although we believe that these transactions were in our best interests, we cannot assure you that these transactions were entered into on terms as favorable to us as those that could have been obtained in an arms-length transaction. We may also engage in transactions with related parties in the future. Conflicts of interests arise when we transact business with related parties. These transactions, individually or in the aggregate, may have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations or may result in government enforcement actions or other litigation.

 

Risks Relating to Our Corporate Structure

 

We do not have direct ownership of our operating entities in China, but have control rights and the rights to the assets, property, and revenue of HiTek and its subsidiaries through VIE Agreements, which may not be effective in providing control over HiTek.

 

We do not have direct ownership of our operating entities in China, but have control rights and the rights to the assets, property, and revenue of HiTek and its subsidiaries through VIE Agreements. All of our current revenue and net income is derived from HiTek, the VIE in China. Foreign ownership of internet technology businesses, such as distribution of online information, is subject to restrictions under current PRC laws and regulations. For example, foreign investors are not allowed to own more than 50% of the equity interests in a value-added telecommunication service provider (except e-commerce) and any such foreign investor must have experience in providing value-added telecommunications services overseas and maintain a good track record in accordance with the Special Administrative Measures for Entrance of Foreign Investment (Negative List) (2020 Version) promulgated on June 23, 2020 and became effective on July 23, 2020, respectively, and other applicable laws and regulations.

 

To comply with PRC laws and regulations, we do not intend to have an equity ownership interest in HiTek but rely on VIE Agreements with HiTek to control and operate its business. However, as discussed above, these VIE Agreements may not be effective from PRC laws in providing us with the necessary control over HiTek and its operations. Any deficiency in these VIE Agreements may result in our loss of control over the management and operations of HiTek, which will result in a significant loss in the value of an investment in our company. Because of the practical restrictions on direct foreign equity ownership imposed by the Fujian provincial government authorities, we must rely on contractual rights through the VIE structure to effect control over and management of HiTek, which exposes us to the risk of potential breach of contract by the shareholders of HiTek. In addition, as our Chairman of the Board Mr. Yin, along with his wife Ms. Huang, owns approximately 74.55% of HiTek’s outstanding equity, it may be difficult for us to change our corporate structure if such shareholders refuse to cooperate with us.

 

Because we are an offshore holding company and our business was conducted through VIE Agreements with HiTek, the VIE in China, if we fail to comply with applicable PRC law, we could be subject to severe penalties and our business could be adversely affected.

 

We are an offshore holding company incorporated in the Cayman Islands. As a holding company with no material operations, our operations were conducted in China by our subsidiaries and through VIE Agreements with HiTek, the VIE in China, the equity of which is owned by Xiaoyang Huang, Shenping Yin, Bo Shi, Zhishuang Wang, Liuqing Huang, Jingru Li, Mian Tang, Ce Tian, Xianfeng Lin, Inner Mongolia Guangxin Investment Co., Ltd. and Baotou Zhongzhe Hengtong Technology Co., Ltd. through VIE Agreements, as a result of which, under United States generally accepted accounting principles, the assets and liabilities of HiTek are treated as our assets and liabilities and the results of operations of HiTek are treated in all respects as if they were the results of our operations. There are uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of PRC laws, rules and regulations, including but not limited to the laws, rules and regulations governing the validity and enforcement of the VIE Agreements between WFOE and HiTek.

 

The Provisions Regarding Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Projects by Foreign Investors (the “M&A Rules”) requires an overseas special purpose vehicle that are controlled by PRC companies or individuals formed for the purpose of seeking a public listing on an overseas stock exchange through acquisitions of PRC domestic companies using shares of such special purpose vehicle or held by its shareholders as considerations to obtain the approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, prior to the listing and trading of such special purpose vehicle’s securities on an overseas stock exchange. However, the application of the M&A Rules remains unclear. If CSRC approval is required, it is uncertain whether it would be possible for us to obtain the approval. Any failure to obtain or delay in obtaining CSRC approval for this offering would subject us to sanctions imposed by the CSRC and other PRC regulatory agencies.

 

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Furthermore, regulatory requirements on cybersecurity, data security and data privacy in China are constantly evolving and can be subject to varying interpretations or significant changes, resulting in uncertainties about the scope of HiTek’s responsibilities in that regard. On June 10, 2021, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress promulgated the PRC Data Security Law, which took effect from September 1, 2021. The Data Security Law provides for a security review procedure for the data activities that may affect national security. Furthermore, Measures for Cybersecurity Review, which became effective on June 1, 2020, set forth the cybersecurity review mechanism for critical information infrastructure operators, and provided that critical information infrastructure operators who intend to purchase internet products and services that affect or may affect national security shall be subject to a cybersecurity review. On December 28, 2021, the CAC published the CAC Revised Measures which further restates and expands the applicable scope of the cybersecurity review. The CAC Revised Measures took effect on February 15, 2022. Pursuant to the CAC Revised Measures, if a network platform operator holding personal information of over one million users seeks for “foreign” listing, it must apply for the cybersecurity review, and operators of critical information infrastructure purchasing network products and services are also obligated to apply for the cybersecurity review for such purchasing activities. Although the CAC Revised Measures provides no further explanation on the extent of “network platform operator” and “foreign” listing, we do not believe we are obligated to apply for a cybersecurity review pursuant to the CAC Revised Measures, considering that (i) we are not in possession of or otherwise holding personal information of over one million users and it is also very unlikely that we will reach such threshold in the near future; and (ii) as of the date of this annual report, we have not received any notice or determination from applicable PRC governmental authorities identifying it as a critical information infrastructure operator. That being said, considering that the CAC Revised Measures empowers the cybersecurity review office to initiate cybersecurity review when they believe any particular data processing activities “affect or may affect national security”, and it is uncertain whether the competent government authorities will deem that HiTek’s data processing activities may affect national security and thus initiating the cybersecurity review against HiTek’s businesses. Failure of cybersecurity, data privacy and data security compliance could subject HiTek to penalties, damage its reputation and brand, and harm its business and results of operations.

 

If WFOE, HiTek or their ownership structure or the VIE Agreements are determined to be in violation of any existing or future PRC laws, rules or regulations, or WFOE or HiTek fails to obtain or maintain any of the required governmental permits or approvals, the relevant PRC regulatory authorities would have broad discretion in dealing with such violations, including:

 

revoking the business and operating licenses of WFOE or HiTek;

 

discontinuing or restricting the operations of WFOE or HiTek;

 

imposing conditions or requirements with which we, WFOE, or HiTek may not be able to comply;

 

requiring us, WFOE, or HiTek to restructure the relevant ownership structure or operations which may significantly impair the rights of the holders of our Ordinary Shares in the equity of HiTek;

 

restricting or prohibiting our use of the proceeds from our initial public offering to finance our business and operations in China; and

 

imposing fines.

 

We cannot assure you that the PRC courts or regulatory authorities may not determine that our corporate structure and VIE Agreements violate PRC laws, rules or regulations. If the PRC courts or regulatory authorities determine that our contractual arrangements are in violation of applicable PRC laws, rules or regulations, the VIE Agreements will become invalid or unenforceable, and HiTek will not be treated as a VIE entity and we will not be entitled to treat HiTek’s assets, liabilities and results of operations as our assets, liabilities and results of operations, which could effectively eliminate the assets, revenue and net income of HiTek from our balance sheet, which would most likely require us to cease conducting our business and would result in the delisting of our Ordinary Shares from Nasdaq Capital Market and a significant impairment in the market value of our Ordinary Shares.

 

We may have difficulty in enforcing any rights we may have under the VIE Agreements in PRC.

 

As all of the VIE Agreements with HiTek are governed by the PRC laws and provide for the resolution of disputes through arbitration in the PRC, they would be interpreted in accordance with PRC law and any disputes would be resolved in accordance with PRC legal procedures. The legal environment in the PRC is not as developed as in the United States. As a result, uncertainties in the PRC legal system could further limit our ability to enforce these VIE Agreements. Furthermore, these VIE Agreements may not be enforceable in China if PRC government authorities or courts take a view that such VIE Agreements contravene PRC laws and regulations or are otherwise not enforceable for public policy reasons. In the event we are unable to enforce these VIE Agreements, we may not be able to exert effective control over HiTek, and our ability to conduct our business may be materially and adversely affected.

 

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The approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission and other compliance procedures may be required in connection with this offering, and, if required, we cannot predict whether we will be able to obtain such approval. As a result, both you and us face uncertainty about future actions by the PRC government that could significantly affect the operating company’s financial performance and the enforceability of the VIE Agreements.

 

The Provisions Regarding Mergers and Acquisitions of Domestic Projects by Foreign Investors (the “M&A Rules”) requires an overseas special purpose vehicle that are controlled by PRC companies or individuals formed for the purpose of seeking a public listing on an overseas stock exchange through acquisitions of PRC domestic companies using shares of such special purpose vehicle or held by its shareholders as considerations to obtain the approval of the China Securities Regulatory Commission, or the CSRC, prior to the listing and trading of such special purpose vehicle’s securities on an overseas stock exchange. However, the application of the M&A Rules remains unclear. If CSRC approval is required, it is uncertain whether it would be possible for us to obtain the approval. Any failure to obtain or delay in obtaining CSRC approval for this offering would subject us to sanctions imposed by the CSRC and other PRC regulatory agencies.

 

Our PRC legal counsel has advised us based on their understanding of the current PRC laws, regulations and rules that the CSRC’s approval may not be required for the listing and trading of our Ordinary Shares on the Nasdaq Capital Market in the context of this offering, given that: (i) the CSRC currently has not issued any definitive rule or interpretation concerning whether offerings like ours in this annual report are subject to this regulation, (ii) we establish our WFOE by means of direct investment and acquiring equity interest or assets of an entity other than “PRC domestic company” as defined under the M&A Rules, and (iii) no explicit provision in the M&A Rules clearly classifies VIE Agreements as a type of transaction subject to such Rules.

 

However, our PRC legal counsel has further advised us that there remains some uncertainty as to how the M&A Rules will be interpreted or implemented in the context of an overseas offering and its opinions summarized above are subject to any new laws, regulations and rules or detailed implementations and interpretations in any form relating to the M&A Rules. We cannot assure you that relevant PRC regulatory agencies, including the CSRC, would reach the same conclusion as our PRC legal counsel does. If it is determined that CSRC approval is required for this offering, we may face sanctions by the CSRC or other PRC regulatory agencies for failure to obtain or delay in obtaining CSRC approval for this offering. These sanctions may include fines and penalties on our operations in China, limitations on our operating privileges in China, delays in or restrictions on the repatriation of the proceeds from this offering into the PRC, restrictions on or prohibition of the payments or remittance of dividends by our subsidiaries in China, or other actions that could have a material and adverse effect on our business, reputation, financial condition, results of operations, prospects, as well as the trading price of the Ordinary Shares. The CSRC or other PRC regulatory agencies may also take actions requiring us, or making it advisable for us, to halt this offering before the settlement and delivery of the Ordinary Shares that we are offering. Consequently, if you engage in market trading or other activities in anticipation of and prior to the settlement and delivery of the Ordinary Shares we are offering, you would be doing so at the risk that the settlement and delivery may not occur. In addition, if the CSRC or other regulatory agencies later promulgate new rules or explanations requiring that we obtain their approvals for this offering, we may be unable to obtain a waiver of such approval requirements.

 

Recently, the General Office of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued the Opinions on Severe and Lawful Crackdown on Illegal Securities Activities, which was available to the public on July 6, 2021. These opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities and the supervision on overseas listings by China-based companies. These opinions proposed to take effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems, to deal with the risks and incidents facing China-based overseas-listed companies and the demand for cybersecurity and data privacy protection. The aforementioned policies and any related implementation rules to be enacted may subject us to additional compliance requirement in the future. As of the date of this annual report, we have not received or denied any permission from the PRC authorities to list on U.S. stock exchanges. As these opinions were recently issued, official guidance and interpretation of the opinions remain unclear in several respects at this time. Therefore, we cannot assure you that we will remain fully compliant with all new regulatory requirements of these opinions or any future implementation rules on a timely basis, or at all. We face uncertainty about future actions by the PRC government that could significantly affect the operating company’s financial performance and the enforceability of the VIE Agreements.

 

PRC laws and regulations governing our current business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain and any changes in such laws and regulations may impair our ability to operate profitable.

 

There are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations including, but not limited to, the laws and regulations governing our business and the enforcement and performance of our arrangements with customers in certain circumstances. The laws and regulations are sometimes vague and may be subject to future changes, and their official interpretation and enforcement may involve substantial uncertainty. The effectiveness and interpretation of newly enacted laws or regulations, including amendments to existing laws and regulations, may be delayed, and our business may be affected if we rely on laws and regulations which are subsequently adopted or interpreted in a manner different from our understanding of these laws and regulations. New laws and regulations that affect existing and proposed future businesses may also be applied retroactively. We cannot predict what effect the interpretation of existing or new PRC laws or regulations may have on our business.

 

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On July 6, 2021, the General Office of the Communist Party of China Central Committee and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued a document to crack down on illegal activities in the securities market and promote the high-quality development of the capital market, which, among other things, requires the relevant governmental authorities to strengthen cross-border oversight of law-enforcement and judicial cooperation, to enhance supervision over China-based companies listed overseas, and to establish and improve the system of extraterritorial application of the PRC securities laws. Since this document is relatively new, uncertainties still exist in relation to how soon legislative or administrative regulation making bodies will respond and what existing or new laws or regulations or detailed implementations and interpretations will be modified or promulgated, if any, and the potential impact such modified or new laws and regulations will have on companies like us.

 

Regulations relating to offshore investment activities by PRC residents may limit our ability to acquire PRC companies and could adversely affect our business.

 

In July 2014, State Administration of Foreign Exchange, or SAFE, promulgated the Circular on Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Administration Over the Overseas Investment and Financing and Roundtrip Investment by Domestic Residents Via Special Purpose Vehicles, or Circular 37, which replaced Relevant Issues Concerning Foreign Exchange Control on Domestic Residents’ Corporate Financing and Roundtrip Investment through Offshore Special Purpose Vehicles, or Circular 75. Circular 37 requires PRC residents to register with local branches of SAFE in connection with their direct establishment or indirect control of an offshore entity, referred to in Circular 37 as a “special purpose vehicle” for the purpose of holding domestic or offshore assets or interests. Circular 37 further requires amendment to a PRC resident’s registration in the event of any significant changes with respect to the special purpose vehicle, such as an increase or decrease in the capital contributed by PRC individuals, share transfer or exchange, merger, division or other material event. Under these regulations, PRC residents’ failure to comply with specified registration procedures may result in restrictions being imposed on the foreign exchange activities of the relevant PRC entity, including the payment of dividends and other distributions to its offshore parent, as well as restrictions on capital inflows from the offshore entity to the PRC entity, including restrictions on its ability to contribute additional capital to its PRC subsidiaries. Further, failure to comply with the SAFE registration requirements could result in penalties under PRC law for evasion of foreign exchange regulations.

 

Mr. Shenping Yin and Ms. Xiaoyang Huang, together with other ten PRC residents, who are our beneficial owners, have filed applications for Circular 37 registration, and our PRC counsel believes that there is no substantial legal impediment to the registration of the aforementioned beneficial owners’ Circular 37 registration. However, we cannot guarantee that all or any of those shareholders will complete the Circular 37 registration before the closing of this Offering. As the promulgation of Circular 37 is relatively recent, it is unclear how these regulations will be interpreted and implemented. We cannot assure you that our ultimate shareholders who are PRC residents will in the future provide sufficient supporting documents required by the SAFE or complete the required registration with the SAFE in a timely manner, or at all. Any failure by any of our shareholders who is a PRC resident, or is controlled by a PRC resident, to comply with relevant requirements under these regulations could subject us to fines or sanctions imposed by the PRC government, including restrictions on our overseas or cross-border investment activities, restrictions on WFOE’s ability to pay dividends or make distributions to us and on our ability to increase our investment in the WFOE.

 

Although we believe that our agreements relating to our structure are in compliance with current PRC regulations, we cannot assure you that the PRC government would agree that these VIE Agreements comply with PRC licensing, registration or other regulatory requirements, with existing policies or with requirements or policies that may be adopted in the future.

 

Uncertainties exist with respect to the interpretation and implementation of the Foreign Investment Law and how it may impact the viability of our current corporate structure, corporate governance and business operations.

 

On March 15, 2019, the National People’s Congress approved the Foreign Investment Law, which has come into effect on January 1, 2020 and replaced the trio of existing laws regulating foreign investment in China, namely, the Sino-foreign Equity Joint Venture Enterprise Law, the Sino-foreign Cooperative Joint Venture Enterprise Law and the Wholly Foreign-invested Enterprise Law, together with their implementation rules and ancillary regulations. The Foreign Investment Law embodies an expected PRC regulatory trend to rationalize its foreign investment regulatory regime in line with prevailing international practice and the legislative efforts to unify the corporate legal requirements for both foreign and domestic investments. However, since it is relatively new, uncertainties still exist in relation to its interpretation and implementation. For instance, under the Foreign Investment Law, “foreign investment’’ refers to the investment activities directly or indirectly conducted by foreign individuals, enterprises or other entities in China. Though it does not explicitly classify VIE Agreements as a form of foreign investment, there is no assurance that operation conducted by foreign investors or foreign-invested enterprises via contractual arrangement would not be interpreted as a type of indirect foreign investment activities under the definition in the future. In addition, the definition contains a catch-all provision which includes investments made by foreign investors through means stipulated in laws or administrative regulations or other methods prescribed by the State Council. Therefore, it still leaves leeway for future laws, administrative regulations or provisions promulgated by the Stale Council to provide for VIE Agreements as a form of foreign investment. In any of these cases, it will be uncertain whether the VIE Agreements will be deemed to be in violation of the market access requirements for foreign investment under the PRC laws and regulations. Furthermore, if future laws, administrative regulations or provisions prescribed by the State Council mandate further actions to be taken by companies with respect to existing VIE Agreements, we may face substantial uncertainties as to whether we can complete such actions in a timely manner, or at all. Failure to take timely and appropriate measures to cope with any of these or similar regulatory compliance challenges could materially and adversely affect our current corporate structure, corporate governance and business operations

 

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Risks Relating to Doing Business in the PRC

 

Although the audit report included in this annual report is prepared by U.S. auditors who are currently inspected by the PCAOB, there is no guarantee that future audit reports will be prepared by auditors inspected by the PCAOB and, as such, in the future investors may be deprived of the benefits of such inspection. Furthermore, trading in our securities may be prohibited under the HFCA Act if the SEC subsequently determines our audit work is performed by auditors that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely, and as a result, U.S. national securities exchanges, such as the Nasdaq, may determine to delist our securities. Furthermore, on June 22, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, which, if enacted, would amend the HFCA Act and require the SEC to prohibit an issuer’s securities from trading on any U.S. stock exchanges if its auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspections for two consecutive years instead of three.

 

As an auditor of companies that are registered with the SEC and publicly traded in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, our auditor is required under the laws of the United States to undergo regular inspections by the PCAOB to assess their compliance with the laws of the United States and professional standards.

 

Our auditor, the independent registered public accounting firm that issues the audit report included elsewhere in this annual report, as an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess its compliance with the applicable professional standards. Our auditor is currently subject to PCAOB inspections and PCAOB is able to inspect our auditor. However, the recent developments would add uncertainties to our offering and we cannot assure you whether Nasdaq or regulatory authorities would apply additional and more stringent criteria to us after considering the effectiveness of our auditor’s audit procedures and quality control procedures, adequacy of personnel and training, or sufficiency of resources, geographic reach or experience as it relates to the audit of our financial statements

 

As part of a continued regulatory focus in the United States on access to audit and other information currently protected by national law, in particular China’s, in June 2019, a bipartisan group of lawmakers introduced bills in both houses of the U.S. Congress which, if passed, would require the SEC to maintain a list of issuers for which PCAOB is not able to inspect or investigate the audit work performed by a foreign public accounting firm completely. The proposed Ensuring Quality Information and Transparency for Abroad-Based Listings on our Exchanges (“EQUITABLE”) Act prescribes increased disclosure requirements for these issuers and, beginning in 2025, the delisting from U.S. national securities exchanges such as the Nasdaq of issuers included on the SEC’s list for three consecutive years. It is unclear if this proposed legislation will be enacted. Furthermore, there have been recent deliberations within the U.S. government regarding potentially limiting or restricting China-based companies from accessing U.S. capital markets. On May 20, 2020, the U.S. Senate passed the HFCA Act, which includes requirements for the SEC to identify issuers whose audit work is performed by auditors that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely because of a restriction imposed by a non-U.S. authority in the auditor’s local jurisdiction. The U.S. House of Representatives passed the HFCA Act on December 2, 2020, and the HFCA Act was signed into law on December 18, 2020. Additionally, in July 2020, the U.S. President’s Working Group on Financial Markets issued recommendations for actions that can be taken by the executive branch, the SEC, the PCAOB or other federal agencies and department with respect to Chinese companies listed on U.S. stock exchanges and their audit firms, in an effort to protect investors in the United States. In response, on November 23, 2020, the SEC issued guidance highlighting certain risks (and their implications to U.S. investors) associated with investments in China-based issuers and summarizing enhanced disclosures the SEC recommends China-based issuers make regarding such risks. On March 24, 2021, the SEC adopted interim final rules relating to the implementation of certain disclosure and documentation requirements of the HFCA Act. We will be required to comply with these rules if the SEC identifies us as having a “non-inspection” year (as defined in the interim final rules) under a process to be subsequently established by the SEC. The SEC is assessing how to implement other requirements of the HFCA Act, including the listing and trading prohibition requirements described above. Under the HFCA Act, our securities may be prohibited from trading on the Nasdaq or other U.S. stock exchanges if our auditor is not inspected by the PCAOB for three consecutive years, and this ultimately could result in our Ordinary Shares being delisted. Furthermore, on June 22, 2021, the U.S. Senate passed the Accelerating Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, which, if enacted, would amend the HFCA Act and require the SEC to prohibit an issuer’s securities from trading on any U.S. stock exchanges if its auditor is not subject to PCAOB inspections for two consecutive years instead of three, which would reduce the time before our securities may be prohibited from trading or be delisted.. On September 22, 2021, the PCAOB adopted a final rule implementing the HFCA Act, which provides a framework for the PCAOB to use when determining, as contemplated under the HFCA Act, whether the Board is unable to inspect or investigate completely registered public accounting firms located in a foreign jurisdiction because of a position taken by one or more authorities in that jurisdiction.

 

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On December 2, 2021, the SEC issued amendments to finalize rules implementing the submission and disclosure requirements in the HFCA Act. The rules apply to registrants that the SEC identifies as having filed an annual report with an audit report issued by a registered public accounting firm that is located in a foreign jurisdiction and that PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely because of a position taken by an authority in foreign jurisdictions.

 

On December 16, 2021, SEC announced that the PCAOB designated China and Hong Kong as the jurisdictions where the PCAOB is not allowed to conduct full and complete audit inspections as mandated under the HFCA Act.

 

The Company’s auditor, UHY LLP, is based in the United States, and therefore is not currently subject to the determinations announced by the PCAOB on December 16, 2021,

 

The lack of access to the PCAOB inspection in China prevents the PCAOB from fully evaluating audits and quality control procedures of the auditors based in China. As a result, the investors may be deprived of the benefits of such PCAOB inspections. The inability of the PCAOB to conduct inspections of auditors in China makes it more difficult to evaluate the effectiveness of these accounting firms’ audit procedures or quality control procedures as compared to auditors outside of China that are subject to the PCAOB inspections, which could cause existing and potential investors in our stock to lose confidence in our audit procedures and reported financial information and the quality of our financial statements.

 

Although we operate through HiTek in mainland China, a jurisdiction where the PCAOB is currently unable to conduct inspections without the approval of the Chinese government authorities, our auditor, the independent registered public accounting firm that issues the audit report included elsewhere in this annual report, as an auditor of companies that are traded publicly in the United States and a firm registered with the PCAOB, is subject to laws in the United States pursuant to which the PCAOB conducts regular inspections to assess our auditor’s compliance with the applicable professional standards.

 

While the Company’s auditor is based in the U.S. and is registered with PCAOB and subject to PCAOB inspection, in the event it is later determined that the PCAOB is unable to inspect or investigate completely the Company’s auditor because of a position taken by an authority in a foreign jurisdiction, then such lack of inspection could cause trading in the Company’s securities to be prohibited under the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act, and ultimately result in a determination by a securities exchange to delist the Company’s securities. In addition, the recent developments would add uncertainties to our offering and we cannot assure you whether Nasdaq or regulatory authorities would apply additional and more stringent criteria to us after considering the effectiveness of our auditor’s audit procedures and quality control procedures, adequacy of personnel and training, or sufficiency of resources, geographic reach or experience as it relates to the audit of our financial statements. It remains unclear what the SEC’s implementation process related to the above rules will entail or what further actions the SEC, the PCAOB or Nasdaq will take to address these issues and what impact those actions will have on U.S. companies that have significant operations in the PRC and have securities listed on a U.S. stock exchange (including a national securities exchange or over-the-counter stock market). In addition, the above amendments and any additional actions, proceedings, or new rules resulting from these efforts to increase U.S. regulatory access to audit information could create some uncertainty for investors, the market price of our common stock could be adversely affected, and we could be delisted if we and our auditor are unable to meet the PCAOB inspection requirement or being required to engage a new audit firm, which would require significant expense and management time.

 

While we understand that there has been dialogue among the CSRC, the SEC and the PCAOB regarding the inspection of PCAOB-registered accounting firms in China, there can be no assurance that we will be able to comply with requirements imposed by U.S. regulators. Delisting of our Ordinary Shares would force holders of our Ordinary Shares to sell their Ordinary Shares. The market price of our Ordinary Shares could be adversely affected as a result of anticipated negative impacts of these executive or legislative actions upon, as well as negative investor sentiment towards, companies with significant operations in China that are listed in the United States, regardless of whether these executive or legislative actions are implemented and regardless of our actual operating performance.

 

The recent joint statement by the SEC, proposed rule changes submitted by Nasdaq, and an act passed by the U.S. Senate and the U.S. House of Representatives, all call for additional and more stringent criteria to be applied to emerging market companies. These developments could add uncertainties to our offering, business operations, share price and reputation.

 

U.S. public companies that have substantially all of their operations in China have been the subject of intense scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity by investors, financial commentators and regulatory agencies, such as the SEC. Much of the scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity has centered on financial and accounting irregularities and mistakes, a lack of effective internal controls over financial accounting, inadequate corporate governance policies or a lack of adherence thereto and, in many cases, allegations of fraud.

 

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On December 7, 2018, the SEC and the PCAOB issued a joint statement highlighting continued challenges faced by the U.S. regulators in their oversight of financial statement audits of U.S.-listed companies with significant operations in China. On April 21, 2020, SEC Chairman Jay Clayton and PCAOB Chairman William D. Duhnke III, along with other senior SEC staff, released a joint statement highlighting the risks associated with investing in companies based in or have substantial operations in emerging markets including China, reiterating past SEC and PCAOB statements on matters including the difficulty associated with inspecting accounting firms and audit work papers in China and higher risks of fraud in emerging markets and the difficulty of bringing and enforcing SEC, Department of Justice and other U.S. regulatory actions, including in instances of fraud, in emerging markets generally.

 

On May 20, 2020, the U.S. Senate passed the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act requiring a foreign company to certify it is not owned or controlled by a foreign government if the PCAOB is unable to audit specified reports because the company uses a foreign auditor not subject to PCAOB inspection. If the PCAOB is unable to inspect the company’s auditors for three consecutive years, the issuer’s securities are prohibited to trade on a national exchange. On December 2, 2020, the U.S. House of Representatives approved the Holding Foreign Companies Accountable Act.

 

On May 21, 2021, Nasdaq filed three proposals with the SEC to (i) apply minimum offering size requirement for companies primarily operating in a “Restrictive Market”, (ii) prohibit Restrictive Market companies from directly listing on Nasdaq Capital Market, and only permit them to list on Nasdaq Global Select or Nasdaq Global Market in connection with a direct listing and (iii) apply additional and more stringent criteria to an applicant or listed company based on the qualifications of the company’s auditors.

 

As a result of these scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity, the publicly traded stock of many U.S. listed Chinese companies sharply decreased in value and, in some cases, has become virtually worthless. Many of these companies are now subject to shareholder lawsuits and SEC enforcement actions and are conducting internal and external investigations into the allegations. It is not clear what effect this sector-wide scrutiny, criticism and negative publicity will have on us, our offering, business and our share price. If we become the subject of any unfavorable allegations, whether such allegations are proven to be true or untrue, we will have to expend significant resources to investigate such allegations and/or defend our company. This situation will be costly and time consuming and distract our management from developing our growth. If such allegations are not proven to be groundless, we and our business operations will be severely affected and you could sustain a significant decline in the value of our share.

 

Nasdaq may apply additional and more stringent criteria for our initial and continued listing because we plan to have a small public offering and our insiders will hold a large portion of our listed securities.

 

Nasdaq Listing Rule 5101 provides Nasdaq with broad discretionary authority over the initial and continued listing of securities in Nasdaq and Nasdaq may use such discretion to deny initial listing, apply additional or more stringent criteria for the initial or continued listing of particular securities, or suspend or delist particular securities based on any event, condition, or circumstance that exists or occurs that makes initial or continued listing of the securities on Nasdaq inadvisable or unwarranted in the opinion of Nasdaq, even though the securities meet all enumerated criteria for initial or continued listing on Nasdaq. In addition, Nasdaq has used its discretion to deny initial or continued listing or to apply additional and more stringent criteria in the instances, including but not limited to: (i) where the company engaged an auditor that has not been subject to an inspection by PCAOB, an auditor that PCAOB cannot inspect, or an auditor that has not demonstrated sufficient resources, geographic reach, or experience to adequately perform the company’s audit; (ii) where the company planned a small public offering, which would result in insiders holding a large portion of the company’s listed securities. Nasdaq was concerned that the offering size was insufficient to establish the company’s initial valuation, and there would not be sufficient liquidity to support a public market for the company; and (iii) where the company did not demonstrate sufficient nexus to the U.S. capital market, including having no U.S. shareholders, operations, or members of the board of directors or management. Our initial public offering will be relatively small and the insiders of our Company will hold a large portion of the company’s listed securities following the consummation of the offering. Therefore, we may be subject to the additional and more stringent criteria of Nasdaq for our initial and continued listing, which might cause delay or even denial of our listing application.

 

It may be difficult for overseas shareholders and/or regulators to conduct investigation or collect evidence within China.

 

Shareholder claims or regulatory investigation that are common in the United States generally are difficult to pursue as a matter of law or practicality in China. For example, in China, there are significant legal and other obstacles to providing information needed for regulatory investigations or litigation initiated outside China. Although the authorities in China may establish a regulatory cooperation mechanism with the securities regulatory authorities of another country or region to implement cross-border supervision and administration, such cooperation with the securities regulatory authorities in the Unities States may not be efficient in the absence of mutual and practical cooperation mechanism. Furthermore, according to Article 177 of the PRC Securities Law, or Article 177, which became effective in March 2020, no overseas securities regulator is allowed to directly conduct investigation or evidence collection activities within the territory of the PRC. While detailed interpretation of or implementation rules under Article 177 have yet to be promulgated, the inability for an overseas securities regulator to directly conduct investigation or evidence collection activities within China may further increase difficulties faced by you in protecting your interests. 

 

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Our principal business operation is conducted in the PRC. In the event that the U.S. regulators carry out investigation on us and there is a need to conduct investigation or collect evidence within the territory of the PRC, the U.S. regulators may not be able to carry out such investigation or evidence collection directly in the PRC under the PRC laws. The U.S. regulators may consider cross-border cooperation with securities regulatory authority of the PRC by way of judicial assistance, diplomatic channels or regulatory cooperation mechanism established with the securities regulatory authority of the PRC.

 

Because we are a Cayman Islands corporation and all of our business is conducted in the PRC, you may be unable to bring an action against us or our officers and directors or to enforce any judgment you may obtain.

 

We are a company incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands, we conduct substantially all of our operations in China, and substantially all of our assets are located in China. In addition, all our senior executive officers reside within China for a significant portion of the time and are all PRC nationals. As a result, it may be difficult for our shareholders to effect service of process upon us or those persons in the Cayman Islands or in China. In addition, China does not have treaties providing for the reciprocal recognition and enforcement of judgments of courts with the Cayman Islands and many other countries and regions. Therefore, recognition and enforcement in China of judgments of a court in any of these non-PRC jurisdictions in relation to any matter not subject to a binding arbitration provision may be difficult or impossible. See “Enforceability of Civil Liabilities.”

 

Shareholder claims that are common in the United States, including securities law class actions and fraud claims, generally are difficult to pursue as a matter of law or practicality in China. For example, in China, there are significant legal and other obstacles to obtaining information needed for shareholder investigations or litigation outside China or otherwise with respect to foreign entities. Although the local authorities in China may establish a regulatory cooperation mechanism with the securities regulatory authorities of another country or region to implement cross-border supervision and administration, such regulatory cooperation with the securities regulatory authorities in the Unities States have not been efficient in the absence of mutual and practical cooperation mechanism. According to Article 177 of the PRC Securities Law which became effective in March 2020, no overseas securities regulator is allowed to directly conduct investigation or evidence collection activities within the territory of the PRC.

 

In addition, our corporate affairs are governed by our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, the Companies Act or the common law of the Cayman Islands. The rights of shareholders to take action against the directors, actions by minority shareholders and the fiduciary responsibilities of our directors to us under Cayman Islands law are to a large extent governed by the common law of the Cayman Islands. The common law of the Cayman Islands is derived in part from comparatively limited judicial precedent in the Cayman Islands as well as from English common law, the decisions of whose courts are of persuasive authority, but are not binding on a court in the Cayman Islands. The rights of our shareholders and the fiduciary responsibilities of our directors under Cayman Islands law are different from statutes or judicial precedent in some jurisdictions in the United States. In particular, the Cayman Islands has a different body of securities laws as compared to the United States. In addition, Cayman Islands companies may not have standing to initiate a shareholder derivative action in a Federal court of the United States.

 

We have been advised by our Cayman Islands legal counsel, Maples and Calder (Cayman) LLP, that the courts of the Cayman Islands are unlikely (i) to recognize or enforce against us judgments of courts of the United States predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States or any state; and (ii) in original actions brought in the Cayman Islands, to impose liabilities against us predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States or any state, so far as the liabilities imposed by those provisions are penal in nature. In those circumstances, although there is no statutory enforcement in the Cayman Islands of judgments obtained in the United States, the courts of the Cayman Islands will recognize and enforce a foreign money judgment of a foreign court of competent jurisdiction without retrial on the merits based on the principle that a judgment of a competent foreign court imposes upon the judgment debtor an obligation to pay the sum for which judgment has been given provided certain conditions are met. For a foreign judgment to be enforced in the Cayman Islands, such judgment must be final and conclusive and for a liquidated sum, and must not be in respect of taxes or a fine or penalty, inconsistent with a Cayman Islands judgment in respect of the same matter, impeachable on the grounds of fraud or obtained in a manner, and or be of a kind the enforcement of which is, contrary to natural justice or the public policy of the Cayman Islands (awards of punitive or multiple damages may well be held to be contrary to public policy). A Cayman Islands Court may stay enforcement proceedings if concurrent proceedings are being brought elsewhere.

 

As a result of all of the above, public shareholders may have more difficulty in protecting their interests in the face of actions taken by management, members of the board of directors or controlling shareholders than they would as public shareholders of a United States company.

 

Economic conditions in China could impact our business and results of operations in both lines of our business

 

The VIE entity and its subsidiaries’ business and operating results are impacted by Chinese economic conditions, such as a potential general reduction in net disposable income as a result of fiscal measures adopted by Chinese government to address high levels of budgetary indebtedness, which may adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. The most recent global financial crisis and recession resulted in large-scale business failures and tightened credit markets in China, which directly impacts the Chinese IT service market and VAT reporting service industry. Future adverse economic developments in areas such as employment levels, business conditions, interest rates, tax rates, fuel and energy costs and other matters could reduce discretionary spending and cause the industries where we operate to contract.

 

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There may be changes in the regulations of PRC government bodies and agencies relating to VAT collection procedure and ACTCS business

 

PRC laws, regulations and policies concerning VAT collection procedures and ACTCS business are evolving and the PRC government authorities may promulgate new laws, regulations and policies in the future. We cannot assure you that our practices would not be deemed to violate any PRC laws, regulations or policies either now or in the future.

 

Moreover, developments in the ACTCS service industry may lead to changes in PRC laws, regulations and policies or in the interpretation and application of existing laws, regulations and policies, which may limit or restrict the ACTCS hardware and services we offer. Furthermore, we cannot rule out the possibility that the PRC government will institute a new licensing regime covering services we provide in the future. If such a licensing regime were introduced, we cannot assure you that we would be able to obtain any newly required license in a timely manner, or at all, which could materially and adversely affect our business and impede our ability to continue our operations.

 

Changes in the policies of the PRC government could have a significant impact upon our ability to operate profitably in the PRC.

 

We conduct all of our operations and all of our revenue is generated in the PRC. Accordingly, economic, political and legal developments in the PRC will significantly affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. Policies of the PRC government can have significant effects on economic conditions in the PRC and the ability of businesses to operate profitably. Our ability to operate profitably in the PRC may be adversely affected by changes in policies by the PRC government, including changes in laws, regulations or their interpretation, particularly those dealing with the Internet, including censorship and other restriction on material which can be transmitted over the Internet, security, intellectual property, money laundering, taxation and other laws that affect our ability to operate our website.

 

China’s economic, political and social conditions, laws and regulations, as well as possible interventions and influences of any government policies and actions are uncertain and could have a material adverse effect on our business and the value of our Ordinary Shares.

 

China’s economy differs from the economies of most developed countries in many respects, including the amount of government involvement, level of development, growth rate, control of foreign exchange and allocation of resources. While the PRC economy has experienced significant growth in the past two to three decades, growth has been uneven, both geographically and among various sectors of the economy. Although China’s economy has been transitioning from a planned economy to a more market oriented economy since the late 1970s, the PRC government continues to play a significant role in regulating industry development by imposing industrial policies. The PRC government also exercises significant control over China’s economic growth through allocating resources, controlling the incurrence and payment of foreign currency-denominated obligations, setting monetary policy and providing preferential treatment to particular industries or companies. Changes in any of these policies, laws and regulations could adversely affect the economy in China and could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

The PRC government has implemented various measures to encourage foreign investment and sustainable economic growth and to guide the allocation of financial and other resources. However, we cannot assure you that the PRC government will not repeal or alter these measures or introduce new measures that will have a negative effect on us, or more specifically, we cannot assure you that the PRC government will not initiate possible governmental actions or scrutiny to us, which could substantially affect our operation and the value of our Ordinary Shares may depreciate quickly. China’s economic, political and social conditions, as well as interventions and influences of any government policies, laws and regulations are uncertain and could have a material adverse effect on our business.

 

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Because our business is dependent upon government policies that encourage a market-based economy, change in the political or economic climate in the PRC may impair our ability to operate profitably, if at all.

 

Although the PRC government has been pursuing a number of economic reform policies for more than two decades, the PRC government continues to exercise significant control over economic growth in the PRC. Because of the nature of our business, we are dependent upon the PRC government pursuing policies that encourage private ownership of businesses. Restrictions on private ownership of businesses would affect the VAT filing and collection in general and businesses using ACTCS in particular. We cannot assure you that the PRC government will pursue policies favoring a market-oriented economy or that existing policies will not be significantly altered, especially in the event of a change in leadership, social or political disruption, or other circumstances affecting political, economic and social life in the PRC.

 

Because our business is conducted in RMB and the price of our Ordinary Shares is quoted in United States dollars, changes in currency conversion rates may affect the value of your investments.

 

Our business is conducted in the PRC, our books and records are maintained in RMB, which is the currency of the PRC, and the financial statements that we file with the SEC and provide to our shareholders are presented in United States dollars. Changes in the exchange rate between the RMB and dollar affect the value of our assets and the results of our operations in United States dollars. The value of the RMB against the United States dollar and other currencies may fluctuate and is affected by, among other things, changes in the PRC’s political and economic conditions and perceived changes in the economy of the PRC and the United States. Any significant revaluation of the RMB may materially and adversely affect our cash flows, revenue and financial condition. Further, our Ordinary Shares offered by this annual report are offered in United States dollars, we will need to convert the net proceeds we receive into RMB in order to use the funds for our business. Changes in the conversion rate between the United States dollar and the RMB will affect that amount of proceeds we will have available for our business.

 

Under the PRC Enterprise Income Tax Law, or the EIT Law, we may be classified as a “resident enterprise” of China, which could result in unfavorable tax consequences to us and our non-PRC shareholders.

 

The EIT Law and its implementing rules provide that enterprises established outside of China whose “de facto management bodies” are located in China are considered “resident enterprises” under PRC tax laws. The implementing rules promulgated under the EIT Law define the term “de facto management bodies” as a management body which substantially manages, or has control over the business, personnel, finance and assets of an enterprise. In April 2009, the State Administration of Taxation, or SAT, issued a circular, known as Circular 82, which provides certain specific criteria for determining whether the “de facto management bodies” of a PRC-controlled enterprise that is incorporated offshore is located in China. However, there are no further detailed rules or precedents governing the procedures and specific criteria for determining “de facto management body.” Although our board of directors and management are located in the PRC, it is unclear if the PRC tax authorities would determine that we should be classified as a PRC “resident enterprise.”

 

If we are deemed as a PRC “resident enterprise,” we will be subject to PRC enterprise income tax on our worldwide income at a uniform tax rate of 25%, although dividends distributed to us from our existing PRC subsidiary and any other PRC subsidiaries which we may establish from time to time could be exempt from the PRC dividend withholding tax due to our PRC “resident recipient” status. This could have a material and adverse effect on our overall effective tax rate, our income tax expenses and our net income. Furthermore, dividends, if any, paid to our shareholders may be decreased as a result of the decrease in distributable profits. In addition, if we were considered a PRC “resident enterprise”, any dividends we pay to our non-PRC investors, and the gains realized from the transfer of our Ordinary Shares may be considered income derived from sources within the PRC and be subject to PRC tax, at a rate of 10% in the case of non-PRC enterprises or 20% in the case of non-PRC individuals (in each case, subject to the provisions of any applicable tax treaty). It is unclear whether holders of our Ordinary Shares would be able to claim the benefits of any tax treaties between their country of tax residence and the PRC in the event that we are treated as a PRC resident enterprise. This could have a material and adverse effect on the value of your investment in us and the price of our Ordinary Shares.

 

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There are significant uncertainties under the EIT Law relating to the withholding tax liabilities of our PRC subsidiary, and dividends payable by our PRC subsidiary to our offshore subsidiaries may not qualify to enjoy certain treaty benefits.

 

Under the PRC EIT Law and its implementation rules, the profits of a foreign invested enterprise generated through operations, which are distributed to its immediate holding company outside the PRC, will be subject to a withholding tax rate of 10%. Pursuant to a special arrangement between Hong Kong and the PRC, such rate may be reduced to 5% if a Hong Kong resident enterprise owns more than 25% of the equity interest in the PRC company. Our PRC subsidiary is wholly-owned by our Hong Kong subsidiary. Moreover, under the Notice of the State Administration of Taxation on Issues regarding the Administration of the Dividend Provision in Tax Treaties promulgated on February 20, 2009, the tax payer needs to satisfy certain conditions to enjoy the benefits under a tax treaty. These conditions include: (1) the taxpayer must be the beneficial owner of the relevant dividends, and (2) the corporate shareholder to receive dividends from the PRC subsidiary must have continuously met the direct ownership thresholds during the 12 consecutive months preceding the receipt of the dividends. Further, the State Administration of Taxation promulgated the Notice on How to Understand and Recognize the “Beneficial Owner” in Tax Treaties on October 27, 2009, which limits the “beneficial owner” to individuals, projects or other organizations normally engaged in substantive operations, and sets forth certain detailed factors in determining the “beneficial owner” status. In current practice, a Hong Kong enterprise must obtain a tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority to apply for the 5% lower PRC withholding tax rate. As the Hong Kong tax authority will issue such a tax resident certificate on a case-by-case basis, we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain the tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority. As of the date of this annual report, we have not commenced the application process for a Hong Kong tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority, and there is no assurance that we will be granted such a Hong Kong tax resident certificate.

 

Even after we obtain the Hong Kong tax resident certificate, we are required by applicable tax laws and regulations to file required forms and materials with relevant PRC tax authorities to prove that we can enjoy 5% lower PRC withholding tax rate. HiTek HK intends to obtain the required materials and file with the relevant tax authorities when it plans to declare and pay dividends, but there is no assurance that the PRC tax authorities will approve the 5% withholding tax rate on dividends received from HiTek HK.

 

The disclosures in our reports and other filings with the SEC and our other public pronouncements are not subject to the scrutiny of any regulatory bodies in the PRC.

 

We are regulated by the SEC and our reports and other filings with the SEC are subject to SEC review in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the SEC under the Securities Act and the Exchange Act. Our SEC reports and other disclosure and public pronouncements are not subject to the review or scrutiny of any PRC regulatory authority. For example, the disclosure in our SEC reports and other filings are not subject to the review by China Securities Regulatory Commission, a PRC regulator that is responsible for oversight of the capital markets in China. Accordingly, you should review our SEC reports, filings and our other public pronouncements with the understanding that no local regulator has done any review of us, our SEC reports, other filings or any of our other public pronouncements.

 

We operate in an emerging and evolving market. If our market does not grow as we expect, or if we fail to adapt and respond effectively to rapidly changing technology, evolving industry standards, changing regulations, and changing customer needs, requirements or preferences, our products and solutions may become less competitive.

 

There are uncertainties over the size and rate at which the IT service market will grow, as well as whether our solutions and products will be widely adopted. Moreover, the ACTCS industry is subject to rapid technological change, evolving industry standards, changing regulations, as well as changing customer needs, requirements and preferences. The success of our business will depend, in part, on our ability to adapt and respond effectively to these changes on a timely basis. If we are unable to develop new solutions and products that satisfy our customers and provide enhancements and new features for our existing products that keep pace with rapid technological and industry change, our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected. If new technologies emerge that are able to deliver competitive products and services at lower prices, more efficiently, more conveniently or more securely, such technologies could adversely impact our ability to compete effectively.

 

Our platform must also integrate with a variety of network, hardware, software platforms and technologies, and we need to continuously modify and enhance our products and platform to adapt to changes and innovation. For example, if customers adopt new software platforms or infrastructure, we may be required to develop new versions of our products to be compatible with those new software platforms or infrastructure. This development effort may require significant resources, which would adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition. Any failure of our products and platform to operate effectively with evolving or new software platforms and technologies could reduce the demand for our products. If we are unable to respond to these changes in a cost-effective manner, our products may become less marketable and less competitive or obsolete, and our business, results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected.

 

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In light of recent events indicating greater oversight by the Cyberspace Administration of China, or CAC, over data security, particularly for companies seeking to list on a foreign exchange, we are subject to a variety of laws and other obligations regarding cybersecurity and data protection, and any failure to comply with applicable laws and obligations could have a material and adverse effect on our business, our listing on Nasdaq, financial condition, results of operations, and the offering.

 

We are subject relating various risks and costs associated with to the collection, use, sharing, retention, security, and transfer of confidential and private information, such as personal information and other data. This data is wide ranging and relates to our investors, employees, contractors and other counterparties and third parties. Our compliance obligations include those relating to the Data Protection Act (As Revised) of the Cayman Islands and the relevant PRC laws in this regard. These PRC laws apply not only to third-party transactions, but also to transfers of information between us, our WFOE, the VIE, and the VIE’s subsidiaries, and among us, our WFOE, the VIE, and the VIE’s subsidiaries, and other parties with which we have commercial relations. These laws continue to develop, and the PRC government may adopt other rules and restrictions in the future. Non-compliance could result in penalties or other significant legal liabilities.

 

Pursuant to the PRC Cybersecurity Law, which was promulgated by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on November 7, 2016 and took effect on June 1, 2017, personal information and important data collected and generated by a critical information infrastructure operator in the course of its operations in China must be stored in China, and if a critical information infrastructure operator purchases internet products and services that affects or may affect national security, it should be subject to cybersecurity review by the CAC. Due to the lack of further interpretations, the exact scope of “critical information infrastructure operator” remains unclear. On December 28, 2021, the CAC published the CAC Revised Measures which further restates and expands the applicable scope of the cybersecurity review. The CAC Revised Measures took effect on February 15, 2022. Pursuant to the CAC Revised Measures, if a network platform operator holding personal information of over one million users seeks for “foreign” listing, it must apply for the cybersecurity review. In addition, operators of critical information infrastructure purchasing network products and services are also obligated to apply for the cybersecurity review for such purchasing activities. Although the CAC Revised Measures provides no further explanation on the extent of “network platform operator” and “foreign” listing, as confirmed by our PRC counsel, Jingtian & Gongcheng, we are not subject to cybersecurity review with the CAC , because (i) we are not in possession of or otherwise holding personal information of over one million users and it is also very unlikely that it will reach such threshold in the near future; and (ii) as of the date of this annual report, we have not received any notice or determination from applicable PRC governmental authorities identifying it as a critical information infrastructure operator. However, we cannot guarantee that we will not be subject to cybersecurity review in the future as we offer IT services and sell hardware and software in China. During such review, we may be required to suspend our operation experience other disruptions to our operations. Cybersecurity review could also result in negative publicity with respect to our company and diversion of our managerial and financial resources.

 

Furthermore, if we were found to be in violation of applicable laws and regulations in China during such review, we could be subject to administrative penalties, such as warnings, fines, or service suspension. Therefore, cybersecurity review could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

In addition, the PRC Data Security Law, which was promulgated by the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress on June 10, 2021 and took effect on September 1, 2021, requires data collection to be conducted in a legitimate and proper manner, and stipulates that, for the purpose of data protection, data processing activities must be conducted based on data classification and hierarchical protection system for data security. As the Data Security Law was recently promulgated, we may be required to make further adjustments to our business practices to comply with this law. If our data processing activities were found to be not in compliance with this law, we could be ordered to make corrections, and under certain serious circumstances, such as severe data divulgence, we could be subject to penalties, including the revocation of our business licenses or other permits. Furthermore, the recently issued Opinions on Strictly Cracking Down Illegal Securities Activities in Accordance with the Law require (i) speeding up the revision of the provisions on strengthening the confidentiality and archives management relating to overseas issuance and listing of securities and (ii) improving the laws and regulations relating to data security, cross-border data flow, and management of confidential information. As there remain uncertainties regarding the further interpretation and implementation of those laws and regulations, we cannot assure you that we will be compliant such new regulations in all respects, and we may be ordered to rectify and terminate any actions that are deemed illegal by the regulatory authorities and become subject to fines and other sanctions. As a result, we may be required to suspend our relevant businesses, shut down our website, take down our operating applications, or face other penalties, which may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

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On August 20, 2021, the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress of China promulgated the Personal Information Protection Law of the PRC, or the PIPL, which took effect in November 2021. As the first systematic and comprehensive law specifically for the protection of personal information in the PRC, the PIPL provides, among others, that (i) an individual’s consent shall be obtained to use sensitive personal information, such as biometric characteristics and individual location tracking, (ii) personal information operators using sensitive personal information shall notify individuals of the necessity of such use and impact on the individual’s rights, and (iii) where personal information operators reject an individual’s request to exercise his or her rights, the individual may file a lawsuit with a People’s Court. As uncertainties remain regarding the interpretation and implementation of the PIPL, we cannot assure you that we will comply with the PIPL in all respects, we may become subject to fines and/or other penalties which may have material adverse effect on our business, operations and financial condition.

 

While we take measures to comply with all applicable data privacy and protection laws and regulations, we cannot guarantee the effectiveness of the measures undertaken by us and our business partners. However, compliance with any additional laws could be expensive, and may place restrictions on our business operations and the manner in which we interact with our users. In addition, any failure to comply with applicable cybersecurity, privacy, and data protection laws and regulations could result in proceedings against us by government authorities or others, including notification for rectification, confiscation of illegal earnings, fines, or other penalties and legal liabilities against us, which could materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and the value of our Ordinary Shares. In addition, any negative publicity on our website or platform’s safety or privacy protection mechanism and policy could harm our public image and reputation and materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition, and results of operations.

 

We are subject to anti-corruption, anti-bribery, and similar laws, and noncompliance with such laws can subject us to criminal penalties or significant fines and harm our business and reputation.

 

We are subject to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act of 1977, and other anti-corruption, anti-bribery, anti-money laundering, and similar laws in China and the United States. Anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws, which have been enforced aggressively and are interpreted broadly, prohibit companies and their employees and agents from promising, authorizing, making, or offering improper payments or other benefits to government officials and others in the public sector. We leverage our business partners, including channel partners, to sell our products and solutions and host many of our facilities for our network. We may also rely on our business partners to conduct our business abroad. We and our business partners may have direct or indirect interactions with officials and employees of government agencies or state-owned or affiliated entities and we may be held liable for the corrupt or other illegal activities of our business partners and intermediaries, our employees, representatives, contractors, channel partners and agents, even if we do not explicitly authorize such activities.

 

We cannot assure you that all of our employees and agents have complied with, or in the future will comply with, our policies and applicable law. The investigation of possible violations of these laws, including internal investigations and compliance reviews that we may conduct from time to time, could have a material adverse effect on our business. Noncompliance with these laws could subject us to investigations, severe criminal or civil sanctions, settlements, prosecution, loss of export privileges, suspension or debarment from Chinese government contracts and other contracts, other enforcement actions, the appointment of a monitor, disgorgement of profits, significant fines, damages, other civil and criminal penalties or injunctions, whistleblower complaints, adverse media coverage and other consequences. Other internal and government investigations, regulatory proceedings, or litigation, including private litigation filed by our shareholders, may also follow as a consequence. Any investigations, actions, or sanctions could materially harm our reputation, business, results of operations, and financial condition. Further, the promulgation of new laws, rules or regulations or new interpretations of current laws, rules or regulations could impact the way we do business in other countries, including requiring us to change certain aspects of our business to ensure compliance, which could reduce revenues, increase costs, or subject us to additional liabilities.

 

Failure to comply with laws and regulations applicable to our business in China could subject us to fines and penalties and could also cause us to lose customers or otherwise harm our business.

 

Our business is subject to regulation by various governmental agencies in China, including agencies responsible for monitoring and enforcing compliance with various legal obligations, such as value-added telecommunication laws and regulations, privacy and data protection-related laws and regulations, intellectual property laws, employment and labor laws, workplace safety, environmental laws, consumer protection laws, governmental trade laws, import and export controls, anti-corruption and anti-bribery laws, and tax laws and regulations. In certain jurisdictions, these regulatory requirements may be more stringent than in China. These laws and regulations impose added costs on our business. Noncompliance with applicable regulations or requirements could subject us to:

 

investigations, enforcement actions, and sanctions;

 

mandatory changes to our network and products;

 

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disgorgement of profits, fines, and damages;

 

civil and criminal penalties or injunctions;

 

claims for damages by our customers or channel partners;

 

termination of contracts;

 

loss of intellectual property rights;

 

failure to obtain, maintain or renew certain licenses, approvals, permits, registrations or filings necessary to conduct our operations; and

 

temporary or permanent debarment from sales to public service organizations.

 

If any governmental sanctions are imposed, or if we do not prevail in any possible civil or criminal litigation, our business, results of operations, and financial condition could be adversely affected. In addition, responding to any action will likely result in a significant diversion of our management’s attention and resources and an increase in professional fees. Enforcement actions and sanctions could materially harm our business, results of operations, and financial condition.

 

Additionally, companies in the technology industry have recently experienced increased regulatory scrutiny. Any reviews by regulatory agencies or legislatures may result in substantial regulatory fines, changes to our business practices, and other penalties, which could negatively affect our business and results of operations. Changes in social, political, and regulatory conditions or in laws and policies governing a wide range of topics may cause us to change our business practices. Further, our expansion into a variety of new fields also could raise a number of new regulatory issues. These factors could negatively affect our business and results of operations in material ways.

 

Moreover, we are exposed to the risk of misconduct, errors and failure to functions by our management, employees and parties that we collaborate with, who may from time to time be subject to litigation and regulatory investigations and proceedings or otherwise face potential liability and penalties in relation to noncompliance with applicable laws and regulations, which could harm our reputation and business.

 

We face exposure to foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, and such fluctuations could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.

 

The conversion of Renminbi into foreign currencies, including the U.S. dollar, is based on rates set by the People’s Bank of China. The Renminbi has fluctuated against the U.S. dollar and other currencies, at times significantly and unpredictably. The value of Renminbi against the U.S. dollar and other currencies is affected by changes in China’s political and economic conditions and by China’s foreign exchange policies, among other things. We cannot assure you that Renminbi will not appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar and other currencies in the future. It is difficult to predict how market forces or PRC or U.S. government policy may impact the exchange rate between Renminbi and U.S. dollar in the future.

 

Significant revaluation of the Renminbi may have a material and adverse effect on your investment. For example, to the extent that we need to convert U.S. dollars we receive from this offering into Renminbi for our operations, appreciation of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar would have an adverse effect on the Renminbi amount we would receive from the conversion. Conversely, if we decide to convert our Renminbi into U.S. dollars for the purpose of making payments for dividends on our ordinary shares or for other business purposes, appreciation of the U.S. dollar against the Renminbi would have a negative effect on the U.S. dollar amount available to us.

 

Very limited hedging options are available in China to reduce our exposure to exchange rate fluctuations. As of the date of this annual report, we have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to foreign currency exchange risk. While we may decide to enter into hedging transactions in the future, the availability and effectiveness of these hedges may be limited and we may not be able to adequately hedge our exposure, or at all. In addition, our currency exchange losses may be magnified by PRC exchange control regulations that restrict our ability to convert Renminbi into foreign currency.

 

Substantially all of our revenues and costs are denominated in Renminbi. We are a holding company and we rely on dividends paid by our operating subsidiaries in China for our cash needs. Any significant revaluation of Renminbi may materially and adversely affect our results of operations and financial position reported in Renminbi when translated into U.S. dollars. To the extent that we need to convert U.S. dollars we receive from this offering into Renminbi for our operations, appreciation of the Renminbi against the U.S. dollar would have an adverse effect on the Renminbi amount we would receive. Conversely, if we decide to convert our Renminbi into U.S. dollars for the purpose of making payments for dividends on our Ordinary Shares or for other business purposes, appreciation of the U.S. dollar against the Renminbi would have a negative effect on the U.S. dollar amount.

 

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Increases in labor costs in the PRC may adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

China’s economy has experienced increases in labor costs in recent years. China’s overall economy and the average wage in China are expected to continue to grow. The average wage level for our employees has also increased in recent years. We expect that our staff costs, including wages and employee benefits, will continue to increase. Unless we are able to pass on these increased labor costs to our customers by increasing prices for our products or services, our profitability and results of operations may be materially and adversely affected.

 

In addition, we have been subject to stricter regulatory requirements in terms of entering into labor contracts with our employees and paying various statutory employee benefits, including housing, pension, medical insurance and unemployment insurance programs to designated government agencies for the benefit of our employees. Compared with its predecessors, the current Labor Contract Law of the PRC imposes stricter requirements on employers in terms of signing labor contracts, minimum wages, paying remuneration, determining the term of employees’ probation and unilaterally terminating labor contracts, further increasing our labor-related costs such as by limiting our ability to terminate some of our employees or otherwise change our employment or labor practices in a cost-effective manner. In addition, as the interpretation and implementation of labor-related laws and regulations are still developing, we cannot assure you that our employment practices have been or will at all times be deemed in compliance with the labor-related laws and regulations in China. If we are subject to severe penalties in connection with labor disputes or government investigations, our business, financial condition and results of operations will be adversely affected.

 

The Chinese government exerts substantial influence over the manner in which we must conduct our business activities. Any actions by Chinese government, including any decision to intervene or influence our operations or to exert control over any offering of securities conducted overseas and/or foreign investment in China-based issuers, may cause us to make material changes to our operation, may limit or completely hinder our ability to offer or continue to offer securities to investors, and may cause the value of such securities to significantly decline or be worthless.

 

The Chinese government has exercised and continues to exercise substantial control over virtually every sector of the Chinese economy through regulation and state ownership. Substantially all of our operations are located in China. Our ability to operate in China may be harmed by changes in its laws and regulations, including those relating to taxation, environmental regulations, land use rights, property and other matters. The central or local governments of these jurisdictions may impose new, stricter regulations or interpretations of existing regulations that would require additional expenditures and efforts on our part to ensure our compliance with such regulations or interpretations. Accordingly, government actions in the future, including any decision not to continue to support recent economic reforms and to return to a more centrally planned economy or regional or local variations in the implementation of economic policies, could have a significant effect on economic conditions in China or particular regions thereof, and could require us to divest ourselves of any interest we then hold in Chinese properties.

 

For example, the Chinese cybersecurity regulator announced on July 2, 2021, that it had begun an investigation of Didi Global Inc. (NYSE: DIDI) and two days later ordered that the company’s app be removed from smartphone app stores.

 

As such, our business segments may be subject to various government and regulatory interference in the provinces in which they operate. We could be subject to regulation by various political and regulatory entities, including various local and municipal agencies and government sub-divisions. We may incur increased costs necessary to comply with existing and newly adopted laws and regulations or penalties for any failure to comply.

 

Furthermore, it is uncertain when and whether we will be required to obtain permission from the PRC government to list on U.S. exchanges or enter into VIE Agreements in the future, and even when such permission is obtained, whether we will be denied or rescinded. Although we are currently not required to obtain permission from any of the PRC federal or local government to obtain such permission and has not received any denial to list on the U.S. exchange and or enter into VIE Agreements, our operations could be adversely affected, directly or indirectly, by existing or future laws and regulations relating to our business or industry.

 

We must remit the offering proceeds to the PRC before they may be used to benefit our business in the PRC, and this process may take a number of months.

 

The proceeds of this offering must be sent back to the PRC, and the process for sending such proceeds back to the PRC may take several months after the closing of this offering. We may be unable to use these proceeds to grow our business until we receive such proceeds in the PRC. In order to remit the offering proceeds to the PRC, we will take the following actions:

 

First, we will open a special foreign exchange account for capital account transactions. To open this account, we must submit to State Administration for Foreign Exchange (“SAFE”) certain application forms, identity documents, transaction documents, form of foreign exchange registration of overseas investments by domestic residents, and foreign exchange registration certificate of the invested company.

 

Second, we will remit the offering proceeds into this special foreign exchange account.

 

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Third, we will apply for settlement of the foreign exchange. In order to do so, we must submit to SAFE certain application forms, identity documents, payment order to a designated person, and a tax certificate.

 

The timing of the process is difficult to estimate because the efficiencies of different SAFE branches can vary materially. Ordinarily, the process takes several months to complete but is required by law to be accomplished within 180 days of application. Until the abovementioned approvals, the proceeds of this offering will be maintained in an interest-bearing account maintained by us in the United States.

 

PRC laws and regulations governing our current business operations are sometimes vague and uncertain and any changes in such laws and regulations may impair our ability to operate profitably.

 

There are substantial uncertainties regarding the interpretation and application of PRC laws and regulations including, but not limited to, the laws and regulations governing our business and the enforcement and performance of our arrangements with customers in certain circumstances. The laws and regulations are sometimes vague and may be subject to future changes, and their official interpretation and enforcement may involve substantial uncertainty. The effectiveness and interpretation of newly enacted laws or regulations, including amendments to existing laws and regulations, may be delayed, and our business may be affected if we rely on laws and regulations which are subsequently adopted or interpreted in a manner different from our understanding of these laws and regulations. New laws and regulations that affect existing and proposed future businesses may also be applied retroactively. We cannot predict what effect the interpretation of existing or new PRC laws or regulations may have on our business.

 

The PRC legal system is a civil law system based on written statutes. Unlike the common law system, prior court decisions under the civil law system may be cited for reference but have limited precedential value. Since these laws and regulations are relatively new and the PRC legal system continues to rapidly evolve, the interpretations of many laws, regulations and rules are not always uniform and the enforcement of these laws, regulations and rules involves uncertainties.

 

In 1979, the PRC government began to promulgate a comprehensive system of laws and regulations governing economic matters in general. The overall effect of legislation over the past three decades has significantly enhanced the protections afforded to various forms of foreign investments in China. However, China has not developed a fully integrated legal system, and recently enacted laws and regulations may not sufficiently cover all aspects of economic activities in China. In particular, the interpretation and enforcement of these laws and regulations involve uncertainties. Since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory provisions and contractual terms, it may be difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy. These uncertainties may affect our judgment on the relevance of legal requirements and our ability to enforce our contractual rights or tort claims. In addition, the regulatory uncertainties may be exploited through unmerited or frivolous legal actions or threats in attempts to extract payments or benefits from us.

 

Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules, some of which are not published on a timely basis or at all and may have retroactive effect. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of any of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. In addition, any administrative and court proceedings in China may be protracted, resulting in substantial costs and diversion of resources and management attention.

 

From time to time, we may have to resort to administrative and court proceedings to enforce our legal rights. However, since PRC administrative and court authorities have significant discretion in interpreting and implementing statutory and contractual terms, it may be more difficult to evaluate the outcome of administrative and court proceedings and the level of legal protection we enjoy than in more developed legal systems. Furthermore, the PRC legal system is based in part on government policies and internal rules (some of which are not published in a timely manner or at all) that may have retroactive effect. As a result, we may not be aware of our violation of these policies and rules until sometime after the violation. Such uncertainties, including uncertainty over the scope and effect of our contractual, property (including intellectual property) and procedural rights, and any failure to respond to changes in the regulatory environment in China could materially and adversely affect our business and impede our ability to continue our operations.

 

Recently, the General Office of the Central Committee of the Communist Party of China and the General Office of the State Council jointly issued the “Opinions on Severely Cracking Down on Illegal Securities Activities According to Law,” or the Opinions, which was made available to the public on July 6, 2021. The Opinions emphasized the need to strengthen the administration over illegal securities activities, and the need to strengthen the supervision over overseas listings by Chinese companies. Effective measures, such as promoting the construction of relevant regulatory systems will be taken to deal with the risks and incidents of China-concept overseas listed companies, and cybersecurity and data privacy protection requirements and similar matters. The Opinions and any related implementing rules to be enacted may subject us to compliance requirement in the future.

 

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Item 4. INFORMATION ON THE COMPANY

 

A. History and development of the Company

 

We were incorporated in the Cayman Islands on November 3, 2017. HiTek Hong Kong Limited (“HiTek HK”), our wholly-owned subsidiary, was incorporated in Hong Kong on November 20, 2017. Tian Dahai (Xiamen) Information Technology Co. Ltd. (“WFOE”), HiTek HK’s wholly owned subsidiary, was organized pursuant to PRC laws on March 15, 2018. In April 2021, Xiamen Haitian Weilai Technology Co., Ltd. (“Haitian Weilai”), a wholly owned subsidiary of WFOE was incorporated under the laws of the PRC. The variable interest entity, Xiamen Hengda HiTek Computer Network Co., Ltd., which we refer to as HiTek, was established on January 18, 1996 in Xiamen, Fujian Province, PRC pursuant to PRC laws. HiTek’s shareholders include certain PRC residents and corporate entities controlled by PRC residents.

 

On March 31, 2018, the Company consummated a reorganization pursuant to which, WFOE, HiTek and HiTek’s shareholders entered into a series of contractual arrangements. Such agreements are described under “Business — Contractual Agreements between WFOE and HiTek. Hitek Global Inc. is a holding company with no business operation other than holding the shares in HiTek HK and HiTek HK is a pass-through entity with no business operation. WFOE is exclusively engaged in the business of managing the operation of HiTek.

 

B. Our Business

 

We are an information technology (“IT”) consulting and solutions service provider focusing on delivering services to business in various industry sectors in China. As of the date of annual report, we have two lines of businesses— 1) services to small and medium businesses (“SMEs”), which consists of Anti-Counterfeiting Tax Control System (“ACTCS”) tax devices, including Golden Tax Disk (“GTD”) and printers, ACTCS services, and IT services, and 2) services to large businesses, which consists of hardware sales and software sales. We expect to actively develop our system integration services and online service platform in the near future. Our vision is to become a one-stop consulting destination for holistic IT and other business consulting services in China.

 

The VIE entity, HiTek, is authorized to carry out the sales of Golden Tax Disk and a market leader in the Xiamen metropolitan area with respect to ACTCS tax device and services since 1996. We provide our customers with the necessary ACTCS for their value added tax (“VAT”) reporting, collection and processing. VAT reporting is mandatory for all business enterprises in China. The ACTCS is one of the two major VAT control systems that a business entity may choose to comply with the VAT reporting requirements. Developed by the PRC government, ACTCS was intended to effectively eliminate counterfeit invoices, providing accurate and complete tax information for the regional and national audit system. We are authorized by the State Taxation Bureau, Xiamen Branch, as one of the first ACTCS service providers in the Xiamen metropolitan area. GTD is an ACTCS device necessary for normal operation of ACTCS software. The purchase of GTD is allowed only in conjunction with the use of the ACTCS software and its supporting services. Since 1996, we have been the number one ACTCS services provider for Xiamen business enterprises according to the data compiled by Xiamen Province Taxation Bureau.

 

Complementing our physical service center, we started developing online service center in 2018 to enable tens of thousands of businesses in the Xiamen metropolitan area to securely process VAT reporting and payment from their desktop virtually anytime and anywhere. Currently, our customers range from small, medium to large enterprises across industries in the Xiamen metropolitan area. Coupled with our first-mover advantage, this broad applicability has been driving our client base, resulting around 63,611 active users, which accounted for approximately 31.6% of Xiamen’s tax collection market as of December 31, 2021, according to the Xiamen Province Taxation Bureau’s statistics.

 

Since the beginning of 2017, HiTek has also generated revenue from its IT service business provided to SMEs in Xiamen area. HiTek provides outsourced IT support and maintenance services for its clients. HiTek’s IT service business is directly responsible for, without limitation, periodically check, daily repairing and maintenance service, technical support for client’s IT facilities and IT disaster recovery.

 

As part of the services provided to large businesses, HiTek currently sells Communication Interface System (“CIS”), its self-developed software which provides embedded system interface solutions for large businesses. CIS is a universal embedded interface system used in petrochemical and coal businesses to collect industrial, electricity, facility pressure and temperature statistics and convert to readable format for analytical purposes.

 

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As part of our services provided to large businesses, Huasheng currently sells hardware such as laptops, printers, desktop computers and associated accessories, together with certain internet servers, cameras and monitors. Huasheng’s major business strategy in its market is to connect and source through exclusive relationships with manufacturers so that Huasheng can offer competitively priced hardware. Huasheng has established its online support system in the beginning of 2018. The online system further enhances Huasheng’s customer experience, which is complemented by highly trained professionals and attractive physical store environment.

 

Services

 

For the year ended December 31, 2021, HiTek’s two business lines operated in three revenue streams: (1) services to large businesses-- hardware sales (37.7%), software sales (31.8%), and (2) ACTCS devices and services (30.5%). For the year ended December 31, 2020, HiTek’s two business lines operated in four revenue streams: (1) services to large businesses-- hardware sales (40.7%), software sales (18.1%), and (2) services to SMEs-- IT services (2.4%), ACTCS devices and services (38.8%).

 

We generate substantial revenue from our ACTCS related services. Our SMEs client base and excellent customer support allow us to enhance the effectiveness of each of our targeted ACTCS service link, thereby strengthening our overall monetization capabilities.

 

We started to generate revenue by offering IT services, primarily contracted to resolve our clients’ IT issues in 2017. We also generate revenue from selling CIS software that we developed in 2014. In addition, we generate substantial revenue from hardware sales, which consist of selling laptops, printers, desktop computers and associated accessories, together with certain internet servers, cameras and monitors.

 

ACTCS Device and Services

 

For ACTCS supporting services, we charge fees on a yearly basis. This service guarantees smooth functions of ACTCS software covers any technical breakdowns related to the ACTCS software. For tax control system risk investigation service, we charge a one time service charge for each investigation request.

 

Our ACTCS device consist primarily of selling GTD. For ACTCS devices sales, we charge one a piece-by-piece basis. Revenue generated from our ACTCS device and services accounted for 30.5% and 38.8%, respectively, of the total revenue derived from our businesses in 2021 and 2020. 

 

In January 2019, we began to operate new service areas such as online agent accounting platforms and online IT outsourcing platforms. We intend to actively grow such general business management services.

 

IT Services

 

Our IT services primarily focus on resolving our clients’ IT issues, for which we charge fees on a project basis.

 

There was no IT service sale during the six months ended December 31, 2021. Revenue generated from our IT services accounted for nil and 2.4%, respectively, of the total revenue derived from our businesses in 2021 and 2020. Revenue from IT service contracts are recognized ratably over service period if the collections of payments can be reasonably assured as the Company performs periodical IT services. If the collections of payments cannot be reasonably assured, the Company recognizes IT service revenue when cash is collected. As of December 31, 2021, the company is still providing IT services. For the year ended December 31, 2021, as all the payments received by the company are receivables of previous years, the revenue has not been recognized yet. 

 

Software Sales

 

For our software sales, we sell our self-developed Communication Interface System (“CIS”). This software provides embedded system interface solutions for large businesses. CIS is a universal embedded interface system used in petrochemical and coal businesses to collect industrial, electricity, facility pressure and temperature statistics and convert to readable format for analytical purposes. Currently, almost all of the software sales revenue comes from sales of CIS. We do not resell any software developed by any third party.

 

Revenue generated from our software sales accounted for 31.8% and 18.1%, respectively, of the total revenue derived from our businesses in 2021 and 2020.

 

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Hardware Sales

 

We also generate revenue from our hardware sales, which includes sales of computer hardware such as laptops, printers, desktop computers and associated accessories, together with certain internet servers, cameras and monitors. We have established a carefully designed sales network in the Xiamen metropolitan area that combines online platforms developed in the beginning of 2018 and our retail storefront. We have developed our hardware sale client base over time via our marketing from our physical store. After we launched CIS sales, we also introduced our hardware products to our CIS users. We plan to market large scale hardware integration systems such as router for commercial use, industrial switch, server, large internet firewall etc. to large businesses in the future.

 

Revenue generated from our hardware sales accounted for 37.7% and 40.7%, respectively, of the total revenue derived from our businesses in 2021 and 2020. 

 

Our Technology

 

We provide effective information technology services and secured tax solutions to business enterprises across a variety of monetization models. We have a dedicated team of nine highly skilled in-house IT specialists, which includes three full-time IT professionals responsible for research and development. The following is a list of our self-developed software.

 

Technology  Completion Date  Certificate Date  General Functions
Mobile Invoice System (“MIS”)  October 15, 2013  June 15, 2015  MIS enables our clients to generate invoices anywhere, anytime.
          
Micro Service System (“MSS”)  July 30, 2014  June 16, 2015  MSS resolves service issues between service providers and our customers.
          
Secured Coordination System (“SCS”)  April 10, 2013  June 16, 2015  SCS provides real-time backup for the invoicing information generated by the users.
          
Communication Interface System (“CIS”)  April 17, 2014  June 15, 2015  CIS is based on LINUX, which is a general embedded interface system used in petrochemical and coal enterprises. The system can be used to communicate the RCTX-X module and collect data from work diagrams, electricity diagrams, pressure diagrams and temperature diagrams. It can generate the data from the txt, and then copy and import it to the software of the windows platform to display analysis.
          
Universal Invoice System (“UIS”)  February 13, 2014  June 16, 2015  AIS facilitates data transmission between users’ management and financial systems and ACTCS software.
          
Invoice Query Management System (“IQMS”)  October 30, 2013  June 15, 2015  IQMS facilitates users’ invoice inquiries and verification process.
          
Micro-App System (“MAS”)  August 10, 2017  December 1, 2017  MAS diagnoses and resolves user-end application issues.
          
WeChat Cloud Business System (“WCBS”)  May 10, 2017  December 1, 2017  WCBS facilitates online transactions between the Company and its clients.
          
Collaborative Management System (“CMS”)  October 10, 2017  December 1, 2017  CMS facilitates our clients’ business and data management process amongst multiple operating systems.
          
HiTek APP application software  November 25, 2018  December 10, 2018  It is another name of “enterprise service platform”. It worked as HiTek’s online service platform, including IT services, sales and financial and tax services, etc.
          
HiTek network background management system  November 25, 2018  December 10, 2018  It is used for backstage unified management of HiTek’s app and HiTek online service platform.
          
Remote monitoring system  October 19, 2018  October 19, 2018  It is used for remote monitoring, debugging and early warning of the App.

 

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Customers

 

We rely upon several of our large customers from whom we generated substantial revenue each year, and the composition of our largest customers has changed from year to year. For the year ended December 31, 2021, two customers accounted for 42% of total HiTek’s revenues, the largest of which represented 28%. For the year ended December 31, 2020 two customers accounted for 32% of total HiTek’s revenues, the largest of which represented 22%, while one customer which is a related party of HiTek represented 10% of HiTek’s revenues. While we believe that one or more of our major customers could account for a significant portion of our sales for at least the year 2021, we anticipate that our customer base will continue to expand and that in the future we will be less dependent on major customers.

 

Suppliers

 

Aside from a set number of suppliers from whom we purchase general hardware for our resale business, we are required by the government to purchase our ACTCS devices from specific suppliers. In general, For the year ended December 31, 2021, two suppliers accounted for 21% of the total purchases. For the year ended December 31, 2020, two suppliers accounted for 38% of the total purchases. 

 

We enter into procurement agreements in the ordinary course of business with our suppliers, pursuant to a form of supply order typically on a “deal by deal” basis.

 

Marketing and Sales

 

Since inception, our user base in both the services to large businesses and service to SMEs has grown primarily through word of mouth recommendations, digital advertising, and social media advertising. We accumulated a loyal customer base to our hardware sales via our physical store. In general, we focus on delivering a superior user experience through better products and services, which we believe can expand our user base and enhance our brand. We do not have a specific budget for advertising since we have built our brand with very low marketing costs.

 

While we have significantly benefited from the effects of word of mouth recommendation, digital advertising, and social media advertising, we are considering cooperating with professional advertising companies to initiate campaigns designed to further promote our brand and services. We will finalize a definitive plan for this marketing initiation after our initial public offering on NASDAQ.

 

With respect to the services to SMEs, given the geographic limitation of our ACTCS services, we plan to focus on marketing and promotion of the business management service, which will include agent accounting services, online IT outsourcing services, IT internet operation and maintenance service and equipment purchasing and delivery Door-to-Door service to the SMEs. On the services to large business side, we plan to focus on marketing and promotion of hardware integration system going forward.

 

Intellectual Property

 

Protection of our intellectual property is a strategic priority for our business. We rely on a combination of copyright, trademark and trade secret laws, as well as confidentiality agreements, to establish and protect our proprietary rights. Except for Chinese government developed ACTCS software used in connection with our day-to-day operations, we generally do not rely on third-party licenses of intellectual property for use in our business.

 

Our research and development activities are project based and the number of projects we work on varies annually. As of December 31, 2021, we had 3 full-time research and development professionals. From 2014 to 2015, we had 9 full-time research and development professionals focused on various software development projects. We were successful in developing 12 software products and had obtained 6 Registration of Computer Software Copyright Certificates (the “Certificates”) in 2015, 3 Certificates in 2017 and 3 Certificates in 2018. Our Certificates last indefinitely. In the beginning of 2018, we established 3 joint IT research collaborative syndicates with other Internet technology companies for innovative Internet service projects such as the Tax Service Mobile APP, WeChat Cloud Charging System and Remote monitoring system. In addition to the foregoing protections, we generally control access to and use of our proprietary and other confidential information through the use of internal and external controls, such as use of confidentiality agreement with our employees and outside consultants.

 

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Research and Development

 

From 2014 to 2015, our R&D team mainly focused on developing two categories of software-- data collection software and ACTCS ancillary software. Among all the software we have developed, CIS is the only software product we are currently marketing and generated revenue. Our R&D team has established joint research syndicates with other Internet technology companies in early 2018.

 

Corporate Information

 

Our principal executive offices are located at Unit 304, No. 30 Guanri Road, Siming District, Xiamen City, Fujian Province, People’s Republic of China, and our phone number is +86 592-5395967. We maintain a corporate website at http://www.xmhitek.com/. The information contained in, or accessible from, our website or any other website does not constitute a part of this annual report.

 

C. Organizational Structure

 

Our corporate structure as of the date of this annual report is as follows:

 

 

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D. Property

 

Our headquarters are located at Unit 304, No. 30 Guanri Road, Siming District, Xiamen City, Fujian Province, PRC, where we own the office building with an aggregate floor area of approximately 495 square meters. This includes our sales and marketing, communication and business development personnel and our management and operations facilities and customer services.

 

We currently lease approximately 83 square meters of office space at Room 101, NO.77 Tianhu Road, Siming District, Xiamen, China. The lease expires on November 19, 2023 and can be renewed subject to mutual agreements. In addition, the company also leased three other locations in Xiamen as warehouses.

 

Item 4A. Unresolved Staff Comments

 

Not required.

 

Item 5. Operating and Financial Review and Prospects

 

MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITIONS AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

The following discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with our financial statements and related notes thereto.

 

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT REGARDING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

This report contains certain statements that may be deemed “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of United States of America securities laws. All statements, other than statements of historical fact, that address activities, events or developments that we intend, expect, project, believe or anticipate and similar expressions or future conditional verbs such as will, should, would, could or may occur in the future are forward-looking statements. Such statements are based upon certain assumptions and assessments made by our management in light of their experience and their perception of historical trends, current conditions, expected future developments and other factors they believe to be appropriate.

 

These statements include, without limitation, statements about our anticipated expenditures, including those related to general and administrative expenses; the potential size of the market for our services, future development and/or expansion of our services in our markets, our ability to generate revenues, our ability to obtain regulatory clearance and expectations as to our future financial performance. Our actual results will likely differ, perhaps materially, from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of various factors, including: our need and ability to raise additional cash. The forward-looking statements included in this report are subject to a number of additional material risks and uncertainties, including but not limited to the risks described in our filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

 

The following discussion and analysis of our financial condition and results of operations should be read together with our financial statements and the related notes to those statements included in this filing. In addition to historical financial information, this discussion may contain forward-looking statements reflecting our current plans, estimates, beliefs and expectations that involve risks and uncertainties. As a result of many important factors, our actual results and the timing of events may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements.

 

Overview

 

We are an offshore holding company incorporated in the Cayman Islands. As a holding company with no material operations, our operations were conducted in China by our subsidiaries and through VIE Agreements, with HiTek and its subsidiaries. This is an offering of the ordinary shares of the offshore holding company in Cayman Islands. You are not investing in HiTek, our VIE. Neither we nor our subsidiaries own any share in HiTek. Instead, we control and receive the economic benefits of HiTek’s business operation through a series of contractual arrangements, also known as VIE Agreements, on March 31, 2018, which have not been tested in a court of law. Through the VIE Agreements among WFOE, HiTek and HiTek’s shareholders, we are regarded as the primary beneficiary of HiTek for accounting purpose, and, therefore, we are able to consolidate the financial results of HiTek in our consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP. However, the VIE structure cannot completely replicate a foreign investment in China-based companies, as the investors will not and may never hold equity interests in the Chinese operating entities. Instead, the VIE structure provides contractual exposure to foreign investment in us. 

 

We are an information technology (“IT”) consulting and solutions service provider focusing on delivering services to business in various industry sectors in China. As of the date of annual report, we have two lines of businesses— 1) services to small and medium businesses (“SMEs”), which consists of Anti-Counterfeiting Tax Control System (“ACTCS”) tax devices, ACTCS services, and IT services, and 2) services to large businesses, which consists of hardware sales and software sales. We expect to actively develop our system integration services and online service platform in the near future. Our vision is to become a one-stop consulting destination for holistic IT and other business consulting services in China.

 

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Our VIE entity, HiTek, is authorized to carry out the sales of Golden Tax Disk (“GTD) and a market leader in the Xiamen metropolitan area with respect to ACTCS tax device and services since 1996. We provide our customers with the necessary ACTCS for their value added tax (“VAT”) reporting, collection and processing. VAT reporting is mandatory for all business enterprises in China. The ACTCS is one of the two major VAT control systems that a business entity may choose to comply with the VAT reporting requirements. Developed by the government-owned entity China Aerospace Science and Technology Corporation (“CASTC”), ACTCS was intended to effectively eliminate counterfeit invoices, providing accurate and complete tax information for the regional and national audit system. We are authorized by the State Taxation Bureau, Xiamen Branch, as one of the first ACTCS service providers in the Xiamen metropolitan area. GTD is an ACTCS hardware necessary for normal operation of ACTCS software. The purchase of GTD is allowed only in conjunction with the use of the ACTCS software and its supporting services. Since 1996, we have been the number one ACTCS services provider for Xiamen business enterprises according to the data compiled by Xiamen Province Taxation Bureau.

 

While we are confident that our competitive strengths will continue improving our business, we are keenly aware of the challenges that our business faces, especially the challenges in our services to SMEs which are stemmed from the ACTCS services. The services provided to the SMEs are restricted in the Xiamen metropolitan areas since authorization by the State Taxation Bureau, Xiamen Branch to provide ACTCS services is required which is the cornerstone of our services to the SMEs. Prices of GTD and ACTCS annual service fees are regulated and subject to the State Tax Administration’s pricing mandates. We are not able to adjust such pricing and as such our profit margin is limited. The Chinese tax regulators have been rolling out the electronic invoicing system starting from 2018. Increasing the use of electronic invoices will reduce our SME client base by around 5% in the future since electronic invoicing system will enable some of our existing clients to apply for, issue, transfer and check the invoices through the unified online electronic invoice management system of Chinese Tax authority. Our client base growth may be limited in spite of our diligent marketing efforts, since it is beyond our control how many new SMEs will open each year in the Xiamen metropolitan area.

 

Complementing our physical service center, we started developing online service center in 2018. As of January 2019, the online service center enables tens of thousands of businesses in the Xiamen metropolitan area to securely process. Coupled with our first-mover advantage, this broad applicability has been driving our client base, resulting around 63,611 active users, which accounted for approximately 31.6% of Xiamen’s tax collection market as of December 31, 2021, according to the Xiamen Province Taxation Bureau’s statistics. We plan to offer business management service, such as agent accounting services and online IT outsourcing services, to the SME clients using our ACTCS services. We also plan to expand our service to large businesses to other geographic regions.

 

Since the beginning of 2017, HiTek has also generated revenue from its IT service business provided to SMEs in Xiamen area. HiTek provides outsourced IT support and maintenance services for its clients. HiTek’s IT service business is directly responsible for, without limitation, periodically check, daily repairing and maintenance service, technical support for client’s IT facilities and IT disaster recovery.

 

In April 2021, WFOE established a wholly-owned subsidiary, Xiamen Haitian Weilai Technology Co., Ltd. (“Haitian Weilai”) under the laws of the PRC.  The strategy purpose of establishing the new subsidiary is for the integration of tax service business line from Hitek to Haitian Weilai.

 

As part of the services provided to large businesses, HiTek currently sells Communication Interface System (“CIS”), its self-developed software which provides embedded system interface solutions for large businesses. CIS is a universal embedded interface system used in petrochemical and coal businesses to collect industrial, electricity, facility pressure and temperature statistics and convert to readable format for analytical purposes.

 

As part of our services provided to large businesses, Huasheng currently sells hardware such as laptops, printers, desktop computers and associated accessories, together with certain internet servers, cameras and monitors. After we launched CIS sales, we also introduced our hardware products to our CIS users. Our major business strategy in the market is to connect and source through exclusive relationships with manufacturers so that Huasheng can offer competitively priced hardware. We plan to market large scale hardware integration systems such as router for commercial use, industrial switch, server, large internet firewall etc. in the future. We have established the online support system in the beginning of 2018. The online system further enhances our customer experience, which is complemented by highly trained professionals and attractive physical store environment.

 

For the year ended December 31, 2021, HiTek’s two business lines operated in three revenue streams: (1) services to large businesses-- hardware sales (37.7%), software sales (31.8%), and (2) ACTCS devices and services (30.5%). For the year ended December 31, 2020, HiTek’s two business lines operated in four revenue streams: (1) services to large businesses-- hardware sales (40.7%), software sales (18.1%), and (2) services to SMEs-- IT services (2.4%), ACTCS devices and services (38.8%). In recent years, the Chinese tax regulators have been rolling out the electronic invoicing system.

 

In January 2020, the World Health Organization declared a global health emergency as the COVID-19 outbreak continues to spread beyond China. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 a global epidemic, the negative impact on our operation from the beginning of year 2020 to date and the operating result for fiscal year 2020. For example, our office had to shut down from February 3, 2020 to February 23, 2020. Public transportation services in Xiamen city were curtailed over COVID-19 concerns. For our Tax Devices and Services sector in the short run, we have to collect the service fee on-site from those customers who have not used our online payment platform, which may lead to a delay in collection. The number of new customers decreased in February 2020 and the Company’s operation was affected by the COVID-19 to certain extent. As the IT service clients are mainly small and medium-sized and concentrated in Xiamen city. Because of the COVID-19, IT service end customers shut down their offices from February to April to work from home. The end customers’ reduced demand directly led to the decrease in the IT service revenue. There has been no negative effect in our hardware and tax devices and service sales. As of the date of this prospectus, the COVID-19 pandemic is generally considered under control in China. In light of the current circumstances, based on available information, the Company estimates its financial results will not be adversely affected in fiscal year 2022. The Company is closely monitoring the development of the COVID-19 pandemic and continuously evaluating any further potential impact on its business, results of operations and financial condition. If the outbreak persists or escalates, the Company may be subject to further negative impact on its business operations and financial condition. 

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Consolidation

 

The Company provides substantially all of its services to large businesses and SMEs in China via its VIE and its subsidiaries, due to PRC legal restrictions of foreign ownership in certain sectors. Substantially all of the Company’s revenues, costs and net income in China are directly or indirectly generated through the VIE and its subsidiaries. The Company has signed various agreements with its VIE and legal shareholders of the VIE to allow the transfer of economic benefits from the VIE to the Company and to direct the activities of the VIE.

 

Total assets and liabilities presented on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets and revenue, expense, net income presented on consolidated statement of operations and comprehensive income as well as the cash flow from operating, investing and financing activities presented on the consolidated statement of cash flows are substantially the financial position, operation and cash flow of the Company’s VIE and VIE’s subsidiaries. The Company has not provided any financial support to the VIE and the VIE’s subsidiaries for the years ended at December 31, 2021 and 2020. As of December 31, 2021, our variable interest entities accounted for an aggregate of 93% and 100% of our total assets and total liabilities, respectively. As of December 31, 2020,our variable interest entities accounted for an aggregate of 87% and 100% of our total assets and total liabilities, respectively. As of December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, $1,557,325 and $1,335,727 of cash and cash equivalents were denominated in RMB, respectively. The following table sets forth the assets, liabilities, results of operations and changes in cash, cash equivalents the VIE and its subsidiaries taken as a whole, which were included in the Company’s consolidated balance sheets and statements of comprehensive income and statements of cash flows with intercompany transactions eliminated:

 

   As of December 31, 
   2021   2020 
         
Current assets  $11,779,996   $8,952,038 
Total non-current assets  $4,173,234   $3,628,891 
Total Assets  $15,953,230   $12,580,929 
Total liabilities  $3,793,609   $3,238,595 

 

   For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2021   2020 
         
Revenues  $6,473,638   $5,804,727 
Net income  $2,061,517   $1,735,340 

 

   For the Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2021   2020 
         
Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities  $(757,861)  $3,025,193 
Net cash provided by(used in) investing activities  $400,006   $(865,047)
Net cash used in financing activities  $-   $- 

 

Critical Accounting Policies

 

Our consolidated financial statements are prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States, which require us to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities. On an ongoing basis, we evaluate our estimates, including those estimates that may have a significant effect on our financial condition and results of operations. Our significant accounting policies are disclosed in Note 2 to our consolidated financial statements. The following discussion of critical accounting policies addresses those policies that are both important to the portrayal of our financial condition and results of operations and require significant judgment and estimates. We base our estimates and judgment on historical experience and on various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances. Actual results may differ from these estimates under different assumptions or conditions.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

Beginning January 1, 2019, the Company has adopted the ASU 2014-09, Topic 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” and its related amendments (collectively referred to as “FASB ASC 606”) for its new revenue recognition accounting policy that depicts the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. Based on the Company’s analysis, it did not identify a material cumulative catch-up adjustment to the opening consolidated balance sheet on January 1, 2019. With adoption of ASC 606, revenue is now recognized when all of the following five steps are met: (i) identify the contract(s) with the customer; (ii) identify the performance obligations in the contract; (iii) determine the transaction price; (iv) allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations; (v) recognize revenue when (or as) each performance obligation is satisfied. The adoption of the new revenue recognition standard has no material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements for any periods prior to 2019. Therefore, prior period amounts are not adjusted.

 

The Company generates its revenues primarily from four sources: (1) hardware sales, (2) software sales, (3) IT services and (4) tax devices and services. The Company recognizes revenue when performance obligations under the terms of a contract with its customers are satisfied. This occurs when the control of the goods and services have been transferred to the customer.

 

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Hardware sales

 

Hardware revenues are generated primarily from the sale of computer and network hardware to end users. The products include computers, printers, internet cables, certain internet servers, cameras and monitors. The sales of hardware represent a single performance obligation. The Company usually recognizes the revenue at the point in time when ownership is transferred to end customers. The Company’s revenue derived from sales of hardware is reported on a gross basis since the Company is primarily obligated in the transaction, bears inventory and credit risk and has discretion in establishing the prices. Hardware sales are classified as “Revenue-Hardware” on the Company’s consolidated statements of operations.

 

Software sales

 

HiTek also does business in software sales and focuses on the perpetual licenses sales for one of the self-developed software Communication Interface System(“CIS”). CIS is based on LINUX, which is a general embedded interface system used in petrochemical and coal enterprises. The system is used to communicate the RCTX-X module, collect the work diagram, the electricity diagram, the pressure temperature and other measures, and can extract the data and import it to the software of the windows platform to display analysis.

 

Performance Obligations - Software contracts with customers include multiple performance obligations such as sale of software license, installation of software, operation training service and warranty. The installation and operation training are essential to the functionality of the software which are provided to the clients prior to the acceptance of the software. The Company provides one-year warranty which mainly telephone supports. The Company estimates that costs associated with warranty are de minimis to the overall contract. Therefore, the Company does not further allocate transaction price.

 

The Company recognizes the revenue at the point in time when the software is accepted by the customer. Revenues from software sales contracts are classified as “Revenue-Software” on the Company’s consolidated statements of operations.

 

IT Services

 

HiTek provides IT support and maintenance services for its clients. HiTek’s IT service business is directly responsible for periodical check, on-call repairing and maintenance service, technical support for client’s IT facilities and IT disaster recovery etc., The sales of IT service represent a single performance obligation.

 

Revenue from IT service contracts are recognized ratably over service period if the collections of payments can be reasonably assured as the Company performs periodical IT services. If the collections of payments cannot be reasonably assured, the Company recognizes IT service revenue when cash is collected. As of December 31, 2021, the company is still providing IT services. For the year ended December 31, 2021, as all the payments received by the company are receivables of previous years, the revenue has not been recognized yet.

 

Tax Devices and Services

 

Before January 21, 2021, all VAT general taxpayer businesses in China are required to purchase the Anti-Counterfeiting Tax Control System (“ACTCS” or Golden Tax Disk or GTD) tax devices to issue the VAT Invoice and for quarterly VAT filing. HiTek is authorized to carry out the implementation of ACTCS specialty hardware retailing. The price of GTD and related supporting services are determined by the National Development and Reform Commission. From January 21, 2021, the new taxpayers can receive electronic tax control ukey for free from the Tax authority. HiTeck could provide supporting services to the new taxpayers.

 

Performance Obligations - Tax devices and services contracts with customers include multiple performance obligations such as delivery of products, installation and after-sales supporting services, tax control system risk investigation service, and tax invoicing management service, such as training service on issuing electronic invoice, complete tax declaration automatically and back up data online.

 

Revenue from the sales of GTD devices is recognized at the point in time when ownership is transferred to end customers. The Company provides the tax device after-sales supporting services and tax invoicing management service, charging the service fee on an annual basis because the service period is usually one year. Revenue related to its service is recognized as the services are performed and amounts are earned, using the straight-line method over the term of the related services agreement. The Company also charges a one time service charge for each investigation request. Revenue related to tax control system risk investigation service is recognized at the point in time when the services are performed. Revenue is recognized based on each performance obligation’s standalone selling price that are sold separately and charged to customers at contract inception.  

 

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The Company’s revenue derived from its gross billings and is reported on a gross basis since the Company is primarily obligated in the transaction, is subject to inventory and credit risk and has several but not all of the indications that revenue should be recorded on the gross basis.

 

Contract balances

 

Prepayments received from customers prior to the services being performed are recorded as deferred revenue. Deferred revenue consists of the annual service fees for Golden Tax Disk and tax invoicing management service received from customers while the services have not yet been performed. The Company recognizes the service fees amount as revenue on a straight-line basis in accordance with the service periods.

 

Practical expedients and exemptions

 

The Company generally expenses sales commissions if any incurred because the amortization period would have been one year or less.

 

Accounts Receivable, Accounts Receivable - related party and Concentration of Risk

 

Accounts receivable are presented net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. If any, the Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of its customers to make required payments. The Company reviews the collectability of its receivables on an ongoing basis. After all attempts to collect a receivable have failed. The receivable is written off against the allowance.

 

The Company reviews the accounts receivable on a periodic basis and makes general and specific allowances when there is doubt as to the collectability of individual balances. In evaluating the collectability of individual receivable balances, the Company considers many factors, including the age of the balance, a customer’s historical payment history, its current credit-worthiness and current economic trends.

 

The Company considers the following factors where determining whether to permit a longer payment period:

 

  the customer’s past payment history;

 

  the customer’s general risk profile, including factors such as the customer’s size, age and public or private status;

 

  macroeconomic conditions that may affect a customer’s ability to pay; and

 

  the relative importance of the customer relationship to the Company’s business.

 

The normal payment period was approximately 6 months to 1 year after the customers received goods or were served. The Company gave customers different credit period considering the above factors. For the large customers such as large-scale oil and coal mine customers, the Company gave a two-year credit period. For IT outsourcing customers, the Company gave a year and half credit period. For small and medium customers, the Company gave a half year credit period.

 

In accordance with ASC 210-10-45, the non-current accounts receivable and non-current accounts receivable-related parties represent the amounts that the Company does not reasonably expect to be realized during the normal operating cycle of the Company based on the Company’s best estimates and customers’ historical payment behaviors. The Company uses approximates one-year time period as the basis to the separation of current and non-current assets.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (weighted average basis) or net realizable value. The methods of determining inventory costs are used consistently from year to year. Allowance for inventory obsolescence is provided when the market value of certain inventory items is lower than the cost.

 

Results of Operations

 

The following consolidated results of operations include the results of operations of the Company, its wholly owned subsidiary and consolidated VIEs.

 

Our historical reporting results are not necessarily indicative of the results to be expected for any future period.

 

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Year Ended December 31, 2021 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2020

 

Revenue

 

   For the Years Ended December 31, 
           Increase /   Percentage 
   2021   2020   (Decrease)   Change 
Hardware  $2,434,694   $2,360,362   $74,332    3.1%
CIS Software   2,056,106    1,053,467    1,002,639    95.2%
IT Services   -    136,722    (136,722)   (100)%
Tax devices and service   1,970,363    2,254,176    (283,813)   (12.6)%
Total revenues  $6,461,163   $5,804,727   $656,436    11.3%

 

We have the following four revenue streams - hardware retail and wholesale, software sales, outsourced IT services, and Anti-Counterfeiting Tax Control System (“ACTCS”) sales and services. For the year ended December 31, 2021, we did not recognize the IT revenue because we could not reasonably be assured of collections of payments, and we will recognize the IT revenue when cash is collected in the future. From January 21, 2021, the new taxpayers can receive electronic tax control ukey for free from the Tax authorization, and the hardware sales of golden tax disks have decreased significantly, which was offset by the increase of tax device service due to the increased demand for electronic invoicing technical service. We expect the tax devices and service sales will be affected in the future. Our total revenues for the year ended December 31, 2021 were $6,461,163, an increase of $656,436 or 11.3% from $5,804,727 for the year ended December 31, 2020. The overall increase in revenue was mainly resulted from the increase of software sales as the business recovery from coronavirus outbreak in 2020.

 

The Company expects to expand tax control system risk investigation service for SMEs and also increase orders for software and hardware sales from major customers in 2022.

 

Cost and Margin

 

   For the Years Ended December 31, 
           Increase /   Percentage 
   2021   2020   (Decrease)   Change 
Total revenues  $6,461,163   $5,804,727   $656,436    11.3%
                     
Cost of revenues   2,581,218    2,633,455    (52,237)   (2.0)%
                     
Gross profit   3,879,945    3,171,272    708,673    22.3%
Margin %   60.1%   54.6%   5.5%     

 

Cost of revenue is comprised of (i) the direct cost of our hardware products purchased from third parties; (ii) logistics-related costs, which primarily include product packaging and freight-in charges; (iii) third-party royalties paid related to the GTD; and (iv) compensation for the employees who handle the products and perform IT services and other costs that are necessary for us to provide the services to our customers.

 

Cost of revenues decreased to $2,581,218 for the year ended December 31, 2021 from $2,633,455 for the same period in 2020. A decrease of $52,237 or 2.0%. This decrease was mainly caused by the decrease of IT services sales and costs, and a significant increase in high-margin software revenue. 

 

Gross Profit. Our gross profit increased to $3,879.945 for the year ended December 31, 2021 from $3,171,272 for the same period in 2020. Our gross profit as a percentage of revenue increased to 60.1% for the year ended December 31, 2021 from 54.6% for the same period in 2020. This was mainly due to the increase of sales in software, which has a relatively high gross profit margin compared with other revenue streams. The Company expects to continue to focus on projects with high gross profit such as services for SMEs, and at the same time, increase the hardware and software sales of large customers.

 

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Operating Expenses

 

   For the Years Ended December 31, 
           Increase /   Percentage 
   2021   2020   (Decrease)   Change 
Selling expenses  $76,477   $2,012   $74,465    3,701.0%
% of revenue   1.18%   0.03%   1.15%   - 
General and administrative expenses   1,699,934    1,415,484    

284,450

   20.1%
% of revenue   26.3%   24.4%   1.9%   - 
Operating expenses  $1,776,411   $1,417,496   $358,915   25.3%

 

Selling Expenses. Selling expenses consist primarily of shipping and handling costs for products sold and advertisement and marketing expenses for promotion of our products. Selling expenses increased by 3,701.0% or $74,465 to $76,477 in the year ended December 31, 2021 from $2,012 in the same period of 2020. The increase was mainly because of the increase of the company’s sales commission in connection with obtaining new orders. Selling expenses were 1.18% of total revenue for the year ended December 31, 2021 and 0.03% of total revenue in the same period of 2020. The company expects to maintain the current ratio of Selling expenses to revenue in 2022.

 

General and Administrative Expenses. General and administrative expenses consist primarily of costs in salary and welfare expenses for our general administrative and management staff, facilities costs, depreciation expenses, professional fees, accounting fees, and other miscellaneous expenses incurred in connection with general operations. General and administrative expenses increased in 20.1% or $284,450 to $1,699,934 for the year ended December 31, 2021from $1,415,484 in the same period of 2020. The increase was mainly due to the increase of social security expense of $52,651 and professional service fee of $371,269, and offset with the decrease of depreciation expense of $22,856 and $95,552 of bad debt provision. General and administrative expenses were 26.3% of total revenue for the year ended December 31, 2021 and 24.4% of total revenue in the same period of 2020. The company expects to maintain the current ratio of G&A expenses to revenue in 2022.

 

Net Income

 

   For the Years Ended December 31, 
           Increase /   Percentage 
   2021   2020   (Decrease)   Change 
Operating income  $2,103,534   $1,753,776   $349,758    19.9%
Total other income   108,676    204,325    (95,649)   (46.8)%
Income before income taxes   2,212,210    1,958,101    254,109    13.0%
Income tax expense   (542,853)   (269,242)   (273,611)   101.6%
Net income  $1,669,357   $1,688,859   $(19,502)   (1.2)%
Effective tax rate   24.5%   13.8%   10.8%     

 

Operating income. Operating income was $2,103,534 for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $1,753,776 for the same period of 2020. The increase in operating income in 2021was primary due to the increase in revenue and gross profit.

 

Other income. Other income includes government subsidy income, net investment income (loss), and interest income and expenses. Other income was $108,676 and $204,325 for the year ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The decrease was primarily due to the Government subsidies in the amount of $101,965 for the year ended December 31, 2020, compared with the Government subsidies in the amount of $6,883 for the same period of 2021.

 

Income tax expense. Income tax expense was $542,853 for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to $269,242 for the same period of 2020. The increase in income tax expense was mainly because that the total profit was increased to $2,212,210 for the year ended December 31, 2021 from $1,958,101 in the same period of 2020, and Hitek no longer enjoys preferential tax rates for small and micro businesses in 2021.

 

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Effective tax rate. Effective tax rate was 24.5% for the year ended December 31, 2021, compared to 13.8% for the same period of 2020.

 

Net income. As a result of the factors described above, net income was 1,669,357 for the year ended December 31, 2021, a decrease of $19,502 from net income $1,688,859 for the same period of 2020.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of December 31, 2021, and December 31, 2020, we had cash in the amount of approximately $2,091,308 and $1,861,554, respectively.

 

Working Capital. Total working capital as of December 31, 2021 amounted to $10,178,635 compared to $8,394,937 as of December 31, 2020. The increase was mainly due to an increase in short term investments of $2,370,960, accounts receivable of $227,831, advances to suppliers of $ 208,463 and inventory of $289,212, which partially offset by a decrease in accounts receivable – related parties of $281,447 and prepaid expenses and other current assets of $714,647. Current liabilities amounted to $2,788,504 as of December 31, 2021 as compared to $2,381,231 as of December 31, 2020. This increase of liabilities was attributable mainly to an increase in tax payable of $355,695 and accounts payable of $139,326 which partially offset by a decrease in accrued expenses and other current liabilities of $121,150.

 

Capital Resources and Capital Needs. To date, we have financed our operations primarily through cash flows from operations. With the uncertainty of the current market, our management believes it is necessary to enhance collection of outstanding accounts receivable and other receivables, and to be cautious on operational decisions and project selection. Our management believes that our current operations can satisfy our daily working capital needs.

 

During 2020, the Company engages an external vendor to develop software APP. As of December 31, 2021, the Company paid product development costs totaled $333,717 and the total contract amount was $472,000. In March 2021, the Company signed a supplementary agreement to postpone the official launch after closing of the Company’s initial public offering. The Company will restart the project and make the final payment of $138,283 in December 2022, regardless of whether the IPO is completed or not.

 

The Company reviews the accounts receivable on a periodic basis and makes general and specific allowances when there is doubt as to the collectability of individual balances. Our management is confident in the collecting account receivables and other receivables. The account receivable, net and the account receivable of related party balance was $5,491,475 and $963,034 as of December 31, 2021, respectively. Subsequent to December 31, 2021 the Company has collected receivables in the total amount of $1,077,273 as of the date of the filing. As of December 31, 2022, the Company expects to collect additional $1,694,480. We may also raise capital through public offerings.

 

The Company gave customers different credit period considering the scale of the customer and past credit experience. For large customers such as large-scale oil and coal mine customers, the Company gave a two-year credit period starting from March 2019 because of these customers’ long repayment cycle. The account receivable, net balance was $6,171,410 and $4,769,470 as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. From January 2022 to April 2022, these companies have repaid $827,200. As of December 31, 2022, the Company expects to collect additional $1,680,395.

 

For IT outsourcing customers, the Company gave a year and half credit period. The accounts receivable, net balance was $64,478 and $592,859 as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. From January 2022 to April 2022, these companies have repaid $31,452. As of December 31, 2022, the Company expects to collect additional $14,084.

 

For small and medium customers, the Company gave a half year credit period. The account receivable, net balance was $218,621 and $286,103 as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively. The Company has collected the remaining balance by April 30, 2022. 

 

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Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements.

 

We have not entered into any financial guarantees or other commitments to guarantee the payment obligations of any third parties. In addition, we have not entered into any derivative contracts that are indexed to our own shares and classified as shareholders’ equity, or that are not reflected in our financial statements. Furthermore, we do not have any retained or contingent interest in assets transferred to an unconsolidated entity that serves as credit, liquidity or market risk support to such entity. Moreover, we do not have any variable interest in an unconsolidated entity that provides financing, liquidity, market risk or credit support to us or engages in leasing, hedging or research and development services with us.

 

Cash Flows Analysis

 

Year Ended December 31, 2021 Compared to Year Ended December 31, 2020 

 

(a) Operating Activities

 

  (1) Net cash used in operating activities were $214,575 for the years ended December 31, 2021, while, Net cash provided by operating activities were $1,932,850 for the years ended December 31, 2020. The decrease of $2,147,425 in net cash provided by operating activities for the year ended December 31, 2021 was mainly due to (1) a decrease of $2,034,581 in accounts receivable, (2) a decrease of $2,450,837 in short-term investments, (3) a decrease of $674,275 in inventory. These were partially offset by an increase of $391,934 in account receivable-related party, $664,280 in advances to suppliers and $1,442,932 in prepaid expenses and other current assets,

 

(b) Investing Activities

 

  (2) Net cash provided by investing activities was $400,006 for the year ended December 31, 2021, while, Net cash used in investing activities was $865,047 for the year ended December 31, 2020. The increase of $1,265,053 in net cash provided by investing activities for the year ended December 31, 2021 was mainly due to (1) an increase of $259,764 in advance payment for software development, (2) an increase of $317,059 in repayment from third-party loans, (3) an increase of $1,223,403 in purchase of Held-to-maturity investments. These were partially offset by a decrease of $323,503 in redeem of Held-to-maturity investments.

 

Holding Company Structure

 

Overview

 

We are a holding company with no material operations of our own. We conduct substantially all of our business in China through contractual arrangements with Xiamen Hengda HiTek Computer Network Co., Ltd., the variable interest entity, and its subsidiaries. See “Business — Contractual Agreements between WFOE and HiTek” for a summary of these VIE arrangements. As of December 31, 2021, the variable interest entities accounted for an aggregate of 93% and 100% of our total assets and total liabilities, respectively. As of December 31, 2020, the variable interest entities accounted for an aggregate of 87% and 100% of our total assets and total liabilities, respectively. As of December 31, 2021 and December 31, 2020, $1,557,325 and $1,335,727 of cash and cash equivalents were denominated in RMB, respectively.

 

Conducting our operations through contractual arrangements with the variable interest entities entails a risk that we may lose the power to direct the activities that most significantly affect the economic performance of the variable interest entities, which may result in our being unable to consolidate their financial results with our results and may impair our access to their cash flow from operations and thereby reduce our liquidity. See “Risk Factors — Risks Relating to Doing Business in the PRC” for more information, including the risk factors titled “Our contractual arrangements with HiTek and its shareholders may not be effective in providing control over HiTek” and “Because we conduct our business through HiTek, a VIE, if we fail to comply with applicable law, we could be subject to severe penalties and our business could be adversely affected.”

 

In addition, any transfer of funds from us to any of our PRC subsidiaries or VIEs, either as a shareholder loan or as an increase in registered capital, is subject to certain statutory limit requirements and registration or approval of the relevant PRC governmental authorities, including the relevant administration of foreign exchange and/or the relevant examining and approval authority. Our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs are not permitted under PRC law to directly lend money to one another.

 

Therefore, it is difficult to change our capital expenditure plans once the relevant funds are remitted from our company to our PRC subsidiaries or VIEs. These limitations on the free flow of funds between us and our PRC subsidiaries and VIEs could restrict our ability to act in response to changing market conditions and reallocate funds internally in a timely manner.

 

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Dividend Distributions

 

We intend to keep any future earnings to re-invest in and finance the expansion of our business, and we do not anticipate that any cash dividends will be paid in the foreseeable future. Under Cayman Islands law, a Cayman Islands company may pay a dividend on its shares out of either profit or share premium amount, provided that in no circumstances may a dividend be paid if this would result in the company being unable to pay its debts due in the ordinary course of business. If we determine to pay dividends on any of our Ordinary Shares in the future, as a holding company, we will be dependent on receipt of funds from our Hong Kong subsidiary, HiTek HK.

 

Current PRC regulations permit our indirect PRC subsidiaries to pay dividends to the Company only out of their accumulated profits, if any, determined in accordance with Chinese accounting standards and regulations. In addition, each of our subsidiaries in China is required to set aside at least 10% of its after-tax profits each year, if any, to fund a statutory reserve until such reserve reaches 50% of its registered capital. Each of such entity in China is also required to further set aside a portion of its after-tax profits to fund the employee welfare fund, although the amount to be set aside, if any, is determined at the discretion of its board of directors. Although the statutory reserves can be used, among other ways, to increase the registered capital and eliminate future losses in excess of retained earnings of the respective companies, the reserve funds are not distributable as cash dividends except in the event of liquidation.

 

The PRC government also imposes controls on the conversion of RMB into foreign currencies and the remittance of currencies out of the PRC. Therefore, we may experience difficulties in completing the administrative procedures necessary to obtain and remit foreign currency for the payment of dividends from our profits, if any. Furthermore, if our subsidiaries in the PRC incur debt on their own in the future, the instruments governing the debt may restrict their ability to pay dividends or make other payments. If we or our subsidiaries are unable to receive all of the revenues from our operations through the current VIE Agreements, we may be unable to pay dividends on our Ordinary Shares.

 

Cash dividends, if any, on our Ordinary Shares will be paid in U.S. dollars. If we are considered a PRC tax resident enterprise for tax purposes, any dividends we pay to our overseas shareholders may be regarded as China-sourced income and as a result may be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10.0%.

 

In order for us to pay dividends to our shareholders, we will rely on payments made from HiTek to WFOE, pursuant to VIE Agreements between them, and the distribution of such payments to HiTek HK as dividends from WFOE. Certain payments from our HiTek to WFOE are subject to PRC taxes, including business taxes and VAT.

 

Pursuant to the Arrangement between Mainland China and the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and Tax Evasion on Income, or the Double Tax Avoidance Arrangement, the 10% withholding tax rate may be lowered to 5% if a Hong Kong resident enterprise owns no less than 25% of a PRC project. However, the 5% withholding tax rate does not automatically apply and certain requirements must be satisfied, including without limitation that (a) the Hong Kong project must be the beneficial owner of the relevant dividends; and (b) the Hong Kong project must directly hold no less than 25% share ownership in the PRC project during the 12 consecutive months preceding its receipt of the dividends. In current practice, a Hong Kong project must obtain a tax resident certificate from the Hong Kong tax authority to apply for the 5% lower PRC withholding tax rate. As the Hong Kong tax authority will issue such a tax resident certificate on a case-by-case basis, we cannot assure you that we will be able to obtain the tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority and enjoy the preferential withholding tax rate of 5% under the Double Taxation Arrangement with respect to dividends to be paid by our PRC subsidiary to its immediate holding company, HiTek HK. As of the date of this annual report, we have not applied for the tax resident certificate from the relevant Hong Kong tax authority. HiTek HK intends to apply for the tax resident certificate when WFOE plans to declare and pay dividends to HiTek HK. See “Risk Factors- There are significant uncertainties under the EIT Law relating to the withholding tax liabilities of our PRC subsidiary, and dividends payable by our PRC subsidiary to our offshore subsidiaries may not qualify to enjoy certain treaty benefits.”

 

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Risks in relation to the VIE structure

 

The VIE structure through contractual arrangements has been adopted by many PRC-based companies, including us, to obtain necessary licenses and permits in the industries that are currently subject to foreign investment restrictions in China. The MOFCOM published a discussion draft of the proposed PRC Foreign Investment Law in January 2015, or the 2015 Draft FIL, according to which, variable interest entities that are controlled via contractual arrangements would also be deemed as foreign-invested entities, if they are ultimately “controlled” by foreign investors. In March 2019, the PRC National People’s Congress promulgated the PRC Foreign Investment Law, and in December 2019, the State Council promulgated the Implementing Rules of PRC Foreign Investment Law, or the Implementing Rules, to further clarify and elaborate the relevant provisions of the PRC Foreign Investment Law. The PRC Foreign Investment Law and the Implementing Rules both became effective from January 1, 2020 and replaced the major previous laws and regulations governing foreign investments in the PRC. Pursuant to the PRC Foreign Investment Law, “foreign investments” refer to investment activities conducted by foreign investors (including foreign natural persons, foreign enterprises or other foreign organizations) directly or indirectly in the PRC, which include any of the following circumstances: (i) foreign investors setting up foreign-invested enterprises in the PRC solely or jointly with other investors, (ii) foreign investors obtaining shares, equity interests, property portions or other similar rights and interests of enterprises within the PRC, (iii) foreign investors investing in new projects in the PRC solely or jointly with other investors, and (iv) investment in other methods as specified in laws, administrative regulations, or as stipulated by the State Council. The PRC Foreign Investment Law and the Implementing Rules do not introduce the concept of “control” in determining whether a company would be considered as a foreign-invested enterprise, nor do they explicitly provide whether the VIE structure would be deemed as a method of foreign investment. However, the PRC Foreign Investment Law has a catch-all provision that includes into the definition of “foreign investments” made by foreign investors in China in other methods as specified in laws, administrative regulations, or as stipulated by the State Council, and as the PRC Foreign Investment Law and the Implementing Rules are newly adopted and relevant government authorities may promulgate more laws, regulations or rules on the interpretation and implementation of the PRC Foreign Investment Law, the possibility cannot be ruled out that the concept of “control” as stated in the 2015 Draft FIL may be embodied in, or the VIE structure adopted by us may be deemed as a method of foreign investment by, any of such future laws, regulations and rules. If our consolidated VIE was deemed as a foreign-invested enterprise under any of such future laws, regulations and rules, and any of the businesses that we operate would be in any “negative list” for foreign investment and therefore be subject to any foreign investment restrictions or prohibitions, further actions required to be taken by us under such laws, regulations and rules may materially and adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations. Furthermore, if future laws, administrative regulations or provisions mandate further actions to be taken by companies with respect to existing contractual arrangements, we may face substantial uncertainties as to whether we can complete such actions in a timely manner, or at all. Failure to take timely and appropriate measures to cope with any of these or similar regulatory compliance challenges could materially and adversely affect our current corporate structure, business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Tabular Disclosure of Contractual Obligations

 

Below is a table setting forth all of our contractual obligations as of December 31, 2021:

 

 

Payment Due by Period
       Less than   1 – 3   3 – 5   More than 
Contractual Obligations  Total   1 year   years   years   5 years 
Operating lease obligations  $44,256   $26,051   $18,205   $    -   $      - 
Total  $44,256   $26,051   $18,205   $-   $- 

 

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Item 6. Directors, Senior Management and Employees

 

A. Directors and Senior Management

 

Our directors and executive officers are as follows:

 

Name   Age   Position(s)
Shenping Yin   52   Chairman of the Board
Xiaoyang Huang   52   Chief Executive Officer and Director
Tianyu Xia   32   Chief Financial Officer
Bo Shi   47   Chief Technology Officer
Wenhua Yang   53   Independent Director*
Jianben Song   63   Independent Director*
Lawrence Venick   49   Independent Director*

 

 

*Appointment effective upon the closing of the Company’s initial public offering

 

Below is a summary of the business experience of each of our executive officers and directors:

 

Shenping Yin

 

Mr. Shenping Yin has been our Chairman since our inception. Mr. Yin has been the Chief Executive Officer and a director of Recon Technology, Ltd. (NASDAQ: RCON) since 2007. In 2003, Mr. Yin founded Nanjing Recon, a Chinese company that provides services to automate and enhance the extraction of petroleum in China, and has been the Chief Executive Officer since that time. Mr. Yin has founded and operated a number of companies engaged in the IT industry including: Xiamen Hengda Haitian Computer Network Co., Ltd. (1994), Baotou Hengda Haitian Computer Network Co., Ltd. (1997), Beijing Jingke Haitian Electronic Technology Development Co., Ltd. (1999), and Jingsu Huasheng Information Technology Co., Ltd. (2000). Mr. Yin received his bachelor’s degree in 1991 from Nanjing Agricultural University in Information Systems. 

 

Xiaoyang Huang

 

Ms. Xiaoyang Huang has been our CEO since our inception. Ms. Huang will be appointed as our director upon closing of our initial public offering. She has been the Chief Executive Officer of HiTek, the VIE since 2000. Ms. Huang graduated from Nanjing Agricultural University and majored in Agricultural Information. She also went through a one-year accounting program in Renmin University of China from 2010 to 2011.

 

Tianyu Xia

 

Ms. Tianyu Xia has been our CFO since August 15, 2018. From April 2014 to December 2015, she worked as an Investor Relations Manager at Recon Technology Ltd. From December 2015 to October 2017, she worked as an Investor Relations Manager at Smartisan Technology Co., Ltd. Ms. Xia graduated from Saint Louis University, John Cook School of Business in 2012 and received her bachelor’s degree in Accounting. She also minored in Information Technology Management. Ms. Xia received her Master’s degree in Investor Relations from Fordham University, Graduate School of Business in 2013. She received her Master’s degree in Business Administration from Cheung Kong Graduate School of Business in 2018.

 

Bo Shi

 

Mr. Bo Shi has been our CTO since our inception. From July 1996 to March 1998, he worked as a maintenance engineer at Xiamen Automotive Friction and Sealing Material Co., Ltd. He has been working for HiTek since March 1998 and has undertaken various responsibilities such as maintenance engineer, technical manager, technical director, deputy general manager and general manager. He is now the general manager of HiTek. Mr. Shi graduated from Wuhan University of Technology (formerly known as “Wuhan Automotive University”) in July 1996, with a bachelor’s degree in Computer Science and Application.

 

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Wenhua Yang

 

Mr. Wenhua Yang will be appointed as our independent director upon closing of the our initial public offering. He was the Vice President of Beijing Huaxia Bank, Guanghua Road Branch from July 2002 to May 2004. From June 2004 to September 2006, he served as the Vice President of Beijing Guangda Bank, Guanghua Road Branch. From April 2006 to date, he served as the general manager of Beijing Nengju Trading Development Co., Ltd. He has worked for 15 years in the banking and business industries. Mr. Yang holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Accounting and a Master’s Degree in Business Management at Capital University of Economics and Business.

 

Jianben Song

 

Mr. Jianben Song will be appointed as our independent director upon closing of our initial public offering. Mr. Song has been the data architect of Charter Communications since February 2013. From November 2010 to January 2013, he worked as a data architect for Bank of America, where he was responsible for designing databases. He has extensive experience in software engineering. Mr. Song graduated from Tsinghua University with a Bachelor’s degree in physics. He holds a Master’s degree in biophysics from the Institute of Biophysics, Academia China. He holds a Ph.D. in biophysics at the University of Rochester, New York.

 

Lawrence Venick

 

Mr. Lawrence Venick will be appointed as our independent director upon closing of our initial public offering. Mr. Venick has been a Partner at Loeb & Loeb LLP since 2007. He is a corporate and securities lawyer focusing his practice on United States capital market transactions and corporate governance matters involving U.S. listed companies. Over the course of his career, Mr. Venick has represented a number of publicly traded companies listed on NASDAQ and The NYSE. Mr. Venick currently splits his time between Loeb & Loeb LLP’s Hong Kong and Beijing offices. He serves as the Managing Partner of the Hong Kong office and is the Chief Legal Representative of the Beijing office. From 2004 to 2012, Mr. Venick worked as a corporate lawyer in Loeb & Loeb LLP’s Los Angeles office. Prior to that time, Mr. Venick worked as a corporate lawyer in Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati PC’s Palo Alto office. Mr. Venick holds a B.A. from the University of California at Santa Barbra and a J.D. from Loyola Law School.

 

B. Compensation

 

Executive Compensation

 

The following table represents compensation earned by our executive officers in the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021:

 

Summary Compensation Table

 

Name and Principal Position  Year   Salary
($)
   Bonus
($)
   Share Awards
($)
   Option Awards
($)
   Non-Equity Incentive Plan
Compensation
   Deferred Compensation Earnings   Other   Total
($)
 
Xiaoyang Huang, Chief Executive Officer  2021    13,023    62,016    0    0    0    0    0    75,040 
   2020    12,464    57,970    0    0    0    0    0    70,434 
   2019    14,477    57,909    0    0    0    0    0    72,386 
   2018    11,187    45,354    0    0    0    0    0    56,541 
   2017    10,059    36,983    0    0    0    0    0    47,042 
                                             
Bo Shi, Chief Technology Officer  2021    28,861    31,008    0    0    0    0    0    59,869 
   2020    26,826    28,985    0    0    0    0    0    55,811 
   2019    26,360    28,954    0    0    0    0    0    55,315 
   2018    15,692    37,795    0    0    0    0    0    53,487 
   2017    13,166    27,367    0    0    0    0    0    40,533 
                                             
Tianyu Xia, Chief Financial Officer  2021    55,815    0    0    0    0    0    0    55,815 
   2020    52,173    0    0    0    0    0    0    52,173 
   2019    52,118    0    0    0    0    0    0    52,118 
   2018    18,412    0    0    0    0    0    0    18,412 
   2017    0    0    0    0    0    0    0    0 

 

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Grants of Plan Based Awards

 

None.

 

Employment Agreements

 

We entered into employment agreements with our CEO and CTO on July 1, 2018, and with our CFO on September 2, 2018. Each of our executive officers is employed for a specified time period, which will be renewed upon both parties’ agreement thirty days before the end of the current employment term. We may terminate the employment for cause, at any time, without notice or remuneration, for certain acts of the executive officer, including but not limited to the commitments of any serious or persistent breach or non-observance of the terms and conditions of the employment, conviction of a criminal offense, willful disobedience of a lawful and reasonable order, fraud or dishonesty, receipt of bribery, or severe neglect of his or her duties. An executive officer may terminate his or her employment at any time with a one-month prior written notice. Each executive officer has agreed to hold, both during and after the employment agreement expires, in strict confidence and not to use or disclose to any person, corporation or other entity without written consent, any confidential information. In addition, each executive officer has agreed to be bound by non-competition and non-solicitation restrictions during the term of his employment and for one year following termination of the employment.

 

Our employment agreement with Xiaoyang Huang, our CEO, provides her term of one year with an annual salary of $70,000.

 

Our employment agreement with Bo Shi, our CTO, provides his term of one year with an annual salary of $55,000.

 

Our employment agreement with Tianyu Xia, our CFO, provides her term of three years with an annual salary of $60,000.

 

Outstanding Equity Awards at Fiscal Year-End; Option Exercises and Stock Vested

 

None.

 

Pension Benefits

 

None of the named executives currently participates in or has account balances in qualified or nonqualified defined benefit plans sponsored by us.

 

Nonqualified Deferred Compensation

 

None of the named executives currently participates in or has account balances in nonqualified defined contribution plans or other deferred compensation plans maintained by us.

 

Other than as disclosed above, we have not entered into any agreements or arrangements with our executive officers or directors, and have not made any agreements to provide benefits upon termination of employment.

 

C. Board Practices

 

Committees of the Board of Directors

 

We will establish three committees under the board of directors immediately upon closing of Company’s initial public offering: an Audit Committee, a Compensation Committee and a Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. Even though we are exempted from corporate governance standards because we are a Foreign Private Issuer (“FPI”), we have voluntarily adopted a charter for each of the three committees. Each committee’s members and functions are described below.

 

Audit Committee. Our audit committee will consist of Mr. Wenhua Yang, Mr. Jianben Song and Mr. Lawrence Venick. Mr. Wenhua Yang will be the chairman of our audit committee. We have determined that Mr. Yang, Mr. Song and Mr. Venick will satisfy the “independence” requirements of Section 5605(a)(2) of the Nasdaq Listing Rules and Rule 10A-3 under the Securities Exchange Act. Our board also has determined that Mr. Yang qualifies as an audit committee financial expert within the meaning of the SEC rules or possesses financial sophistication within the meaning of the Nasdaq Listing Rules. The audit committee will oversee our accounting and financial reporting processes and the audits of the financial statements of our company. The audit committee will be responsible for, among other things:

 

  appointing the independent auditors and pre-approving all auditing and non-auditing services permitted to be performed by the independent auditors;

 

40

 

 

  reviewing with the independent auditors any audit problems or difficulties and management’s response;

 

  discussing the annual audited financial statements with management and the independent auditors;

 

  reviewing the adequacy and effectiveness of our accounting and internal control policies and procedures and any steps taken to monitor and control major financial risk exposures;

 

  reviewing and approving all proposed related party transactions;

 

  meeting separately and periodically with management and the independent auditors; and

 

  monitoring compliance with our code of business conduct and ethics, including reviewing the adequacy and effectiveness of our procedures to ensure proper compliance.

 

Compensation Committee. Our compensation committee will consist of Mr. Wenhua Yang, Mr. Jianben Song and Mr. Lawrence Venick upon the effectiveness of their appointments. Mr. Song will be the chairman of our compensation committee. We have determined that Mr. Yang, Mr. Song and Mr. Venick will satisfy the “independence” requirements of Section 5605(a)(2) of the NASDAQ Listing Rules and Rule 10A-3 under the Securities Exchange Act. The compensation committee will assist the board in reviewing and approving the compensation structure, including all forms of compensation, relating to our directors and executive officers. Our chief executive officer may not be present at any committee meeting during which his compensation is deliberated. The compensation committee will be responsible for, among other things:

 

  reviewing and approving to the board with respect to the total compensation package for our most senior executive officers;
     
  approving and overseeing the total compensation package for our executives other than the most senior executive officers;

 

  reviewing and recommending to the board with respect to the compensation of our directors;

 

  reviewing periodically and approving any long-term incentive compensation or equity plans;

 

  selecting compensation consultants, legal counsel or other advisors after taking into consideration all factors relevant to that person’s independence from management; and

 

  programs or similar arrangements, annual bonuses, employee pension and welfare benefit plans.

 

Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee. Our nominating and corporate governance committee currently consists of will consist of Mr. Wenhua Yang, Mr. Jianben Song and Mr. Lawrence Venick upon the effectiveness of their appointments. Mr. Venick will be the chairperson of our nominating and corporate governance committee. Mr. Yang, Mr. Song and Mr. Venick satisfy the “independence” requirements of Section 5605(a)(2) of the NASDAQ Listing Rules and Rule 10A-3 under the Securities Exchange Act. The nominating and corporate governance committee will assist the board of directors in selecting individuals qualified to become our directors and in determining the composition of the board and its committees. The nominating and corporate governance committee will be responsible for, among other things:

 

  identifying and recommending nominees for election or re-election to our board of directors or for appointment to fill any vacancy;

 

  reviewing annually with our board of directors its current composition in light of the characteristics of independence, age, skills, experience and availability of service to us;

 

  identifying and recommending to our board the directors to serve as members of committees;

 

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  advising the board periodically with respect to significant developments in the law and practice of corporate governance as well as our compliance with applicable laws and regulations, and making recommendations to our board of directors on all matters of corporate governance and on any corrective action to be taken; and

 

  monitoring compliance with our code of business conduct and ethics, including reviewing the adequacy and effectiveness of our procedures to ensure proper compliance.

 

D. Employees

 

We had 66 and 75 employees as of December 31, 2021, and 2020, respectively. The following table sets forth the numbers of our employees categorized by function as of December 31, 2021:

 

   As of
December 31,
2021
 
Function:    
Management Department (HiTek)   7 
Financial Department (HiTek)   6 
Purchase and Sales Department (HiTek)   4 
Technical Service Department (HiTek)   22 
Sales Training Department (HiTek)   4 
Hotline Service Department (HiTek)   5 
Research and Development Department (HiTek)   3 
Operation and Maintenance Department (HiTek)   4 
Financial Department (Huasheng)   2 
Management Department (Huoerguosi)   1 
Technical Service Department (weilai)   4 
Operation and Maintenance Department (Huoerguosi)   4 
Total   66 

 

As of December 31, 2021, our employees were located in Xiamen, Fujian province and Huoerguosi, Xinjiang, China.

 

As required by PRC laws and regulations, we participate in various employee social security plans that are organized by municipal and provincial governments, including housing, pension, medical insurance and unemployment insurance programs. We are required under Chinese law to make contributions to employee benefit plans at specified percentages of the salaries, bonuses and certain allowances of our employees, up to a maximum amount specified by the local government from time to time.

 

We believe that we maintain a good working relationship with our employees, and we have not experienced any labor disputes.

 

E. Share ownership.

 

The following table sets forth information regarding the beneficial of our ordinary shares as of April 27, 2022:

 

each person known by us to be the beneficial owner of more than 5% of our outstanding ordinary shares;

 

each of our executive officers and directors; and

 

all our executive officers and directors as a group.

 

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The beneficial ownership of ordinary shares is determined in accordance with the rules of the SEC and generally includes any ordinary shares over which a person exercises sole or shared voting or investment power. For purposes of the table below, we deem shares subject to options, warrants or other exercisable or convertible securities that are exercisable or convertible currently or within 60 days of April 27, 2022, to be outstanding and to be beneficially owned by the person holding the options, warrants or other currently exercisable or convertible securities for the purposes of computing the percentage ownership of that person but we do not treat them as outstanding for the purpose of computing the percentage ownership of any other person. Unless otherwise indicated below, to our knowledge, all persons named in the table have sole voting and investment power with respect to their shares, except to the extent authority is shared by spouses under community property laws.

 

   Ordinary Shares 
   Beneficially Owned 
   Number   % 
Directors and Executive Officers:          
Shenping Yin   8,192,000(1)(2)   74.55%
Xiaoyang Huang   8,192,000(1)(2)   74.55%
Tianyu Xia   -      
Bo Shi   431,000(3)   3.92%
Wenhua Yang   -      
Jianben Song   -      
Lawrence Venick   -      
5% Shareholders:          
Shenping Yin   8,192,000(1)(2)   74.55%
Xiaoyang Huang   8,192,000(1)(2)   74.55%

 

 

(1)

These Ordinary Shares are deemed as beneficially owned by Shenping Yin and Xiaoyang Huang as they are husband and wife.

(2) These Ordinary Shares are held by Fortune Enterprise Holdings Limited, a British Virgin Islands company. Since Mr. Yin and Ms. Huang are the shareholders and directors of Fortune Enterprise Holdings Limited, they are deemed as the beneficial owners of these securities.
(3) Represents 431,000 Ordinary Shares held by Star Discover Global Limited, a British Virgin Islands company which Bo Shi owns and controls 60% equity interest and voting power.

 

Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions

 

A. Major shareholder

 

Please refer to Item 6 “Directors, Senior Management and Employees—E. Share Ownership.”

 

B. Related party transactions.

 

Contractual Arrangements with WFOE, HiTek and Its Shareholders

 

To comply with PRC laws restricting foreign ownership in the IT business in China, we conduct our IT business through HiTek, a VIE entity that we control through a series of contractual arrangements between our PRC subsidiary WFOE, HiTek and its shareholders, Xiaoyang Huang, Shenping Yin, Bo Shi, Zhishuang Wang, Liuqing Huang, Jingru Li, Mian Tang, Ce Tian, Xianfeng Lin, Inner Mongolia Guangxin Investment Co., Ltd. and Baotou Zhongzhe Hengtong Technology Co., Ltd. Such contractual arrangements provide us (i) the power over HiTek, (ii) the exposure or rights to variable returns from our involvement with HiTek, and (iii) the ability to affect those returns through use of our power over HiTek to affect the amount of our returns. Therefore, we control HiTek. For a description of these contractual arrangements, see “Business — Our History and Corporate Structure”. 

 

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Advances from Related Parties

 

As of December 31, 2021, Company has outstanding advances owed to Fengqi (Beijing) Zhineng Technology Co., Ltd., 5.7% owned by HiTek’s Chairman Mr. Shenping Yin, in the amount $4,163. The advances are due on demand and non-interest bearing.

 

As of December 31, 2020, Company has outstanding advances owed to Fengqi (Beijing) Zhineng Technology Co., Ltd., 5.7% owned by HiTek’s Chairman Mr. Shenping Yin, in the amount $3,005. The advances are due on demand and non-interest bearing.

 

Sales revenues from related parties

 

The Company generated sales revenues from Beijing Zhongzhe Yuantong Technology Co., Ltd., which is under the same common control with Baotou Zhongzhe Hengtong Technology Co., Ltd., in hardware sales of $nil for fiscal year ended December 31,2021 and $255,344 for fiscal year ended December 31, 2020; and software sales of $nil for fiscal year ended December 31,2021 and $353,977 for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2020. 

 

Accounts receivables from related parties

 

As of December 31, 2021, accounts receivable from Beijing Zhongzhe Yuantong Technology Co., Ltd. is $963,034.

 

As of December 31, 2020, accounts receivable from Beijing Zhongzhe Yuantong Technology Co., Ltd. is $1,509,383.

 

Cost of revenues from related parties

 

The Company purchased from Fengqi (Beijing) Zhineng Technology Co., Ltd., 5.7% owned by HiTek’s Chairman Mr. Shenping Yin, in hardware of $52,961 for fiscal year ended December 31,2021 and $nil for fiscal year ended December 31, 2020

 

Employment Agreements

 

See “Item 6.B — Compensation — Employment Agreements”.

 

C. Interests of experts and counsel.

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 8. FINANCIAL INFORMATION

 

A. Consolidated Statements and Other Financial Information

 

Financial Statements

 

We have appended consolidated financial statements filed as part of this report. See Item 18 “Financial Statements.”

 

Legal Proceedings 

 

We are currently not a party to any material legal or administrative proceedings. We may from time to time be subject to various legal or administrative claims and proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business. Litigation or any other legal or administrative proceeding, regardless of the outcome, is likely to result in substantial cost and diversion of our resources, including our management’s time and attention.

 

Dividends

 

We have not paid dividends on our ordinary shares and do not anticipate paying such dividends in the foreseeable future.

 

B. Significant Changes

 

Not applicable

 

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ITEM 9. THE OFFER AND LISTING

 

A. Offer and Listing Details

 

We have applied to have our Ordinary Shares listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market upon our initial public offering is completed under the symbol “HKIT”. We cannot assure you that our application will be approved; if it is not approved, we will not complete the proposed initial public offering.

 

B. Plan of Distributions

 

Not applicable.

 

C. Markets

 

We have applied to have our Ordinary Shares listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market upon our initial public offering is completed under the symbol “HKIT”. We cannot assure you that our application will be approved; if it is not approved, we will not complete the proposed initial public offering.

 

D. Selling Shareholders

 

Not applicable.

 

E. Dilution

 

Note applicable.

 

F. Expenses of the Issue.

 

Note applicable.

 

ITEM 10. ADDITIONAL INFORMATION

 

A. Share Capital

 

Not applicable.

 

B. Memorandum and Articles of Association

 

The following description of our memorandum and articles of association, as amended and restated from time to time, are summaries and do not purport to be complete.

 

As of the date of this Annual Report, our authorized share capital consists of US$50,000 divided into 500,000,000    shares, par value US$0.0001 per share, comprised of 490,000,000 ordinary Shares, and 10,000,000 preference shares.

 

We have conditionally adopted our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, which will become effective immediately prior to the completion of the initial public offering and will replace our current memorandum and articles of association in its entirety. Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association, or our post-offering amended and restated memorandum and articles of association provide that, our authorized share capital upon completion of our initial public offering will be $50,000 divided into 500,000,000 shares of a par value of $0.0001, comprised of 490,000,000 ordinary Shares, and 10,000,000 preference shares. Our directors may, in their absolute discretion and without the approval of our shareholders, create and designate out of the unissued preference shares of our company one or more classes or series of preference shares, comprising such number of preference shares, and having such designations, powers, preferences, privileges and other rights, including dividend rights, voting rights, conversion rights, terms of redemption and liquidation preferences, as our directors may determine. Immediately upon the completion of this offering, we will have 14,987,679 Ordinary Shares issued and outstanding. We will issue Ordinary Shares in this offering. The following are summaries of material provisions of our proposed post-offering memorandum and articles of association and the Companies Law insofar as they relate to the material terms of our ordinary shares that we expect will become effective upon the completion of this offering.

 

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Ordinary shares

 

Dividends. Subject to any rights and restrictions of any other class or series of shares, our board of directors may, from time to time, declare dividends on the shares issued and authorize payment of the dividends out of our lawfully available funds. No dividends shall be declared by the board out of our company except the following: 

 

  profits; or
     
  “share premium account,” which represents the excess of the price paid to our company on issue of its shares over the par or “nominal” value of those shares, which is similar to the U.S. concept of additional paid in capital.

 

However, no dividend shall bear interest against the Company.

 

Voting Rights. Holders of our ordinary shares vote as a single class on all matters submitted to a vote of our shareholders, except as may otherwise be required by law. Subject to any special rights or restrictions as to voting attached to any shares, every shareholder who is present in person and every person representing a shareholder by proxy shall have one vote for each share of which he or the person represented by proxy is the holder. At any general meeting a resolution put to the vote of the meeting shall be decided by poll.

 

Any ordinary resolution to be made by the shareholders requires the affirmative vote of a simple majority of the votes of the ordinary shares cast in a general meeting, while a special resolution requires the affirmative vote of no less than two-thirds of the votes of the ordinary shares cast.

 

Under Cayman Islands law, some matters, such as amending the memorandum and articles of association, changing the name or resolving to be registered by way of continuation in a jurisdiction outside the Cayman Islands, require approval of shareholders by a special resolution.

 

There are no limitations on non-residents or foreign shareholders in the memorandum and articles of association to hold or exercise voting rights on the ordinary shares imposed by foreign law or by the charter or other constituent document of our company. However, no person will be entitled to vote at any general meeting or at any separate meeting of the holders of the ordinary shares unless the person is registered as of the record date for such meeting and unless all calls or other sums presently payable by the person in respect of ordinary shares in the Company have been paid.

 

Winding Up; Liquidation. Upon the winding up of our company, after the full amount that holders of any issued shares ranking senior to the ordinary shares as to distribution on liquidation or winding up are entitled to receive has been paid or set aside for payment, the holders of our ordinary shares are entitled to receive any remaining assets of the Company available for distribution as determined by the liquidator. The assets received by the holders of our ordinary shares in a liquidation may consist in whole or in part of property, which is not required to be of the same kind for all shareholders.

 

Calls on Ordinary Shares and Forfeiture of Ordinary Shares. Our board of directors may from time to time make calls upon shareholders for any amounts unpaid on their ordinary shares in a notice served to such shareholders at least 14 days prior to the specified time and place of payment. Any ordinary shares that have been called upon and remain unpaid are subject to forfeiture.

 

Redemption of Ordinary Shares. We may issue shares that are, or at its option or at the option of the holders are, subject to redemption on such terms and in such manner as it may, before the issue of the shares, determine. Under the Companies Law, shares of a Cayman Islands company may be redeemed or repurchased out of profits of the company, out of the proceeds of a fresh issue of shares made for that purpose or out of capital, provided the memorandum and articles of association authorize this and it has the ability to pay its debts as they come due in the ordinary course of business.

 

No Preemptive Rights. Holders of ordinary shares will have no preemptive or preferential right to purchase any securities of our company.

 

Variation of Rights Attaching to Shares. If at any time the share capital is divided into different classes of shares, the rights attaching to any class (unless otherwise provided by the terms of issue of the shares of that class) may, subject to the memorandum and articles of association, be varied or abrogated with the consent in writing of the holders of three-fourth of the issued shares of that class or with the sanction of a special resolution passed at a general meeting of the holders of the shares of that class.

 

Anti-Takeover Provisions. Some provisions of our current memorandum and articles of association may discourage, delay or prevent a change of control of our company or management that shareholders may consider favorable, including provisions that authorize our board of directors to issue preference shares in one or more series and to designate the price, rights, preferences, privileges and restrictions of such preference shares without any further vote or action by our shareholders.

 

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Exempted Company. We are an exempted company with limited liability under the Companies Law. The Companies Law distinguishes between ordinary resident companies and exempted companies. Any company that is registered in the Cayman Islands but conducts business mainly outside of the Cayman Islands may apply to be registered as an exempted company. The requirements for an exempted company are essentially the same as for an ordinary company except that an exempted company:

 

  does not have to file an annual return of its shareholders with the Registrar of Companies;
     
  is not required to open its register of members for inspection;
     
  does not have to hold an annual general meeting;
     
  may issue shares with no par value;
     
  may obtain an undertaking against the imposition of any future taxation (such undertakings are usually given for 20 years in the first instance);
     
  may register by way of continuation in another jurisdiction and be deregistered in the Cayman Islands;
     
  may register as a limited duration company; and
     
  may register as a segregated portfolio company.

 

“Limited liability” means that the liability of each shareholder is limited to the amount unpaid by the shareholder on the shares of the company.

 

Register of Members

 

Under Cayman Islands law, we must keep a register of members and there shall be entered therein:

 

  (a) the names and addresses of the members, a statement of the shares held by each member, and of the amount paid or agreed to be considered as paid, on the shares of each member;

 

  (b) the date on which the name of any person was entered on the register as a member; and

 

  (c) the date on which any person ceased to be a member.

 

Under Cayman Islands law, the register of members of our company is prima facie evidence of the matters set out therein (i.e. the register of members will raise a presumption of fact on the matters referred to above unless rebutted) and a member registered in the register of members shall be deemed as a matter of Cayman Islands law to have legal title to the shares as set against its name in the register of members. Upon the closing of this public offering, the register of members shall be immediately updated to reflect the issue of shares by us. Once our register of members has been updated, the shareholders recorded in the register of members shall be deemed to have legal title to the shares set against their name.

 

However, there are certain limited circumstances where an application may be made to a Cayman Islands court for a determination on whether the register of members reflects the correct legal position. Further, the Cayman Islands court has the power to order that the register of members maintained by a company should be rectified where it considers that the register of members does not reflect the correct legal position. If an application for an order for rectification of the register of members were made in respect of our ordinary shares, then the validity of such shares may be subject to re-examination by a Cayman Islands court.

 

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Preference shares

 

Our amended and restated memorandum and articles of association authorizes the issuance of 10,000,000 preference shares with such designation, rights and preferences as may be determined from time to time by our board of directors. Accordingly, our board of directors is empowered, without shareholder approval, to issue preference shares with dividend, liquidation, redemption, voting or other rights which could adversely affect the voting power or other rights of the holders of ordinary shares. We may issue some or all of the preference shares to effect a business combination. In addition, the preference shares could be utilized as a method of discouraging, delaying or preventing a change in control of us. Although we do not currently intend to issue any preference shares, we cannot assure you that we will not do so in the future.

 

Certain Differences in Corporate Law

 

Cayman Islands companies are governed by the Companies Law. The Companies Law is modeled on English Law but does not follow recent English Law statutory enactments, and differs from laws applicable to United States corporations and their shareholders. Set forth below is a summary of the material differences between the provisions of the Companies Law applicable to us and the laws applicable to companies incorporated in the United States and their shareholders.

 

Mergers and Similar Arrangements.

 

In certain circumstances, the Companies Law allows for mergers or consolidations between two Cayman Islands companies, or between a Cayman Islands company and a company incorporated in another jurisdiction (provided that is facilitated by the laws of that other jurisdiction).

 

Where the merger or consolidation is between two Cayman Islands companies, the directors of each company must approve a written plan of merger or consolidation containing certain prescribed information. That plan or merger or consolidation must then be authorized by either (a) a special resolution (usually a majority of 66.6% in value) of the shareholders of each company; or (b) such other authorization, if any, as may be specified in such constituent company’s articles of association. No shareholder resolution is required for a merger between a parent company (i.e., a company that owns at least 90% of the issued shares of each class in a subsidiary company) and its subsidiary company. The consent of each holder of a fixed or floating security interest of a constituent company must be obtained, unless the court waives such requirement. If the Cayman Islands Registrar of Companies is satisfied that the requirements of the Companies Law (which includes certain other formalities) have been complied with, the Registrar of Companies will register the plan of merger or consolidation.

 

Where the merger or consolidation involves a foreign company, the procedure is similar, save that with respect to the foreign company, the director of the Cayman Islands company is required to make a declaration to the effect that, having made due enquiry, he is of the opinion that the requirements set out below have been met: (i) that the merger or consolidation is permitted or not prohibited by the constitutional documents of the foreign company and by the laws of the jurisdiction in which the foreign company is incorporated, and that those laws and any requirements of those constitutional documents have been or will be complied with; (ii) that no petition or other similar proceeding has been filed and remains outstanding or order made or resolution adopted to wind up or liquidate the foreign company in any jurisdictions; (iii) that no receiver, trustee, administrator or other similar person has been appointed in any jurisdiction and is acting in respect of the foreign company, its affairs or its property or any part thereof; (iv) that no scheme, order, compromise or other similar arrangement has been entered into or made in any jurisdiction whereby the rights of creditors of the foreign company are and continue to be suspended or restricted.

 

Where the surviving company is the Cayman Islands company, the director of the Cayman Islands company is further required to make a declaration to the effect that, having made due enquiry, he is of the opinion that the requirements set out below have been met: (i) that the foreign company is able to pay its debts as they fall due and that the merger or consolidated is bona fide and not intended to defraud unsecured creditors of the foreign company; (ii) that in respect of the transfer of any security interest granted by the foreign company to the surviving or consolidated company (a) consent or approval to the transfer has been obtained, released or waived; (b) the transfer is permitted by and has been approved in accordance with the constitutional documents of the foreign company; and (c) the laws of the jurisdiction of the foreign company with respect to the transfer have been or will be complied with; (iii) that the foreign company will, upon the merger or consolidation becoming effective, cease to be incorporated, registered or exist under the laws of the relevant foreign jurisdiction; and (iv) that there is no other reason why it would be against the public interest to permit the merger or consolidation.

 

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Where the above procedures are adopted, the Companies Law provides for a right of dissenting shareholders to be paid a payment of the fair value of his shares upon their dissenting to the merger or consolidation if they follow a prescribed procedure. In essence, that procedure is as follows (a) the shareholder must give his written objection to the merger or consolidation to the constituent company before the vote on the merger or consolidation, including a statement that the shareholder proposes to demand payment for his shares if the merger or consolidation is authorized by the vote; (b) within 20 days following the date on which the merger or consolidation is approved by the shareholders, the constituent company must give written notice to each shareholder who made a written objection; (c) a shareholder must within 20 days following receipt of such notice from the constituent company, give the constituent company a written notice of his intention to dissent including, among other details, a demand for payment of the fair value of his shares; (d) within seven days following the date of the expiration of the period set out in paragraph (b) above or seven days following the date on which the plan of merger or consolidation is filed, whichever is later, the constituent company, the surviving company or the consolidated company must make a written offer to each dissenting shareholder to purchase his shares at a price that the company determines is the fair value and if the company and the shareholder agree the price within 30 days following the date on which the offer was made, the company must pay the shareholder such amount; (e) if the company and the shareholder fail to agree a price within such 30 day period, within 20 days following the date on which such 30 day period expires, the company (and any dissenting shareholder) must file a petition with the Cayman Islands Grand Court to determine the fair value and such petition must be accompanied by a list of the names and addresses of the dissenting shareholders with whom agreements as to the fair value of their shares have not been reached by the company. At the hearing of that petition, the court has the power to determine the fair value of the shares together with a fair rate of interest, if any, to be paid by the company upon the amount determined to be the fair value. Any dissenting shareholder whose name appears on the list filed by the company may participate fully in all proceedings until the determination of fair value is reached. These rights of a dissenting shareholder are not be available in certain circumstances, for example, to dissenters holding shares of any class in respect of which an open market exists on a recognized stock exchange or recognized interdealer quotation system at the relevant date or where the consideration for such shares to be contributed are shares of any company listed on a national securities exchange or shares of the surviving or consolidated company.

 

Moreover, Cayman Islands law also has separate statutory provisions that facilitate the reconstruction or amalgamation of companies in certain circumstances, schemes of arrangement will generally be more suited for complex mergers or other transactions involving widely held companies, commonly referred to in the Cayman Islands as a “scheme of arrangement” which may be tantamount to a merger. In the event that a merger was sought pursuant to a scheme of arrangement (the procedure of which are more rigorous and take longer to complete than the procedures typically required to consummate a merger in the United States), the arrangement in question must be approved by a majority in number of each class of shareholders and creditors with whom the arrangement is to be made and who must in addition represent three-fourths in value of each such class of shareholders or creditors, as the case may be, that are present and voting either in person or by proxy at a meeting, or meeting summoned for that purpose. The convening of the meetings and subsequently the terms of the arrangement must be sanctioned by the Grand Court of the Cayman Islands. While a dissenting shareholder would have the right to express to the court the view that the transaction should not be approved, the court can be expected to approve the arrangement if it satisfies itself that:

 

we are not proposing to act illegally or beyond the scope of our corporate authority and the statutory provisions as to majority vote have been complied with;

 

the shareholders have been fairly represented at the meeting in question;

 

the arrangement is such as a businessman would reasonably approve; and

 

the arrangement is not one that would more properly be sanctioned under some other provision of the Companies Law or that would amount to a “fraud on the minority.”

 

If a scheme of arrangement or takeover offer (as described below) is approved, any dissenting shareholder would have no rights comparable to appraisal rights, which would otherwise ordinarily be available to dissenting shareholders of United States corporations, providing rights to receive payment in cash for the judicially determined value of the shares.

 

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Squeeze-out Provisions.

 

When a takeover offer is made and accepted by holders of 90% of the shares to whom the offer relates within four months, the offeror may, within a two-month period, require the holders of the remaining shares to transfer such shares on the terms of the offer. An objection can be made to the Grand Court of the Cayman Islands but this is unlikely to succeed unless there is evidence of fraud, bad faith, collusion or inequitable treatment of the shareholders.

 

Further, transactions similar to a merger, reconstruction and/or an amalgamation may in some circumstances be achieved through other means to these statutory provisions, such as a share capital exchange, asset acquisition or control, through contractual arrangements, of an operating business.

 

Shareholders’ Suits.

 

Our Cayman Islands counsel is not aware of any reported class action having been brought in a Cayman Islands court. Derivative actions have been brought in the Cayman Islands courts, and the Cayman Islands courts have confirmed the availability for such actions. In most cases, we will be the proper plaintiff in any claim based on a breach of duty owed to us, and a claim against (for example) our officers or directors usually may not be brought by a shareholder. However, based both on Cayman Islands authorities and on English authorities, which would in all likelihood be of persuasive authority and be applied by a court in the Cayman Islands, exceptions to the foregoing principle apply in circumstances in which:

 

a company is acting, or proposing to act, illegally or beyond the scope of its authority;

 

the act complained of, although not beyond the scope of the authority, could be effected if duly authorized by more than the number of votes which have actually been obtained; or

 

those who control the company are perpetrating a “fraud on the minority.”

 

A shareholder may have a direct right of action against us where the individual rights of that shareholder have been infringed or are about to be infringed.

 

Enforcement of civil liabilities.

 

The Cayman Islands has a different body of securities laws as compared to the United States and may provide less protection to investors. Additionally, Cayman Islands companies may not have standing to sue before the Federal courts of the United States.

 

We have been advised by our Cayman Islands legal counsel that the courts of the Cayman Islands are unlikely (i) to recognize or enforce against us judgments of courts of the United States predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States or any state; and (ii) in original actions brought in the Cayman Islands, to impose liabilities against us predicated upon the civil liability provisions of the federal securities laws of the United States or any state, so far as the liabilities imposed by those provisions are penal in nature. In those circumstances, although there is no statutory enforcement in the Cayman Islands of judgments obtained in the United States, the courts of the Cayman Islands will recognize and enforce a foreign money judgment of a foreign court of competent jurisdiction without retrial on the merits based on the principle that a judgment of a competent foreign court imposes upon the judgment debtor an obligation to pay the sum for which judgment has been given provided certain conditions are met. For a foreign judgment to be enforced in the Cayman Islands, such judgment must be final and conclusive and for a liquidated sum, and must not be in respect of taxes or a fine or penalty, inconsistent with a Cayman Islands judgment in respect of the same matter, impeachable on the grounds of fraud or obtained in a manner, and or be of a kind the enforcement of which is, contrary to natural justice or the public policy of the Cayman Islands (awards of punitive or multiple damages may well be held to be contrary to public policy). A Cayman Islands Court may stay enforcement proceedings if concurrent proceedings are being brought elsewhere.

 

Special Considerations for Exempted Companies.

 

We are an exempted company with limited liability under the Companies Law. The Companies Law distinguishes between ordinary resident companies and exempted companies. Any company that is registered in the Cayman Islands but conducts business mainly outside of the Cayman Islands may apply to be registered as an exempted company. The requirements for an exempted company are essentially the same as for an ordinary company except for the exemptions and privileges listed below:

 

annual reporting requirements are minimal and consist mainly of a statement that the company has conducted its operations mainly outside of the Cayman Islands and has complied with the provisions of the Companies Law;

 

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an exempted company’s register of members is not open to inspection;

 

an exempted company does not have to hold an annual general meeting;

 

an exempted company may issue negotiable or bearer shares or shares with no par value;

 

an exempted company may obtain an undertaking against the imposition of any future taxation (such undertakings are usually given for 20 years in the first instance);

 

an exempted company may register by way of continuation in another jurisdiction and be deregistered in the Cayman Islands;

 

an exempted company may register as a limited duration company; and

 

an exempted company may register as a segregated portfolio company.

 

VStock Transfer, LLC is the transfer agent and registrar for our Ordinary Shares as its principal office at 18 Lafayette Place, Woodmere, New York 11598.

 

C. Material Contracts

 

We have not entered into any material contracts other than in the ordinary course of business and other than those described in “Item 4. Information on the Company,” “Item 7. Major Shareholders and Related Party Transactions—B. Related Party Transactions,” or elsewhere in this annual report on Form 20-F.

 

D. Exchange Controls

 

Cayman Islands

 

There are currently no exchange control regulations in the Cayman Islands applicable to us or our shareholders.

 

The PRC

 

China regulates foreign currency exchanges primarily through the following rules and regulations:

 

  Foreign Currency Administration Rules of 1996, as amended; and

 

  Administrative Rules of the Settlement, Sale and Payment of Foreign Exchange of 1996.

 

Renminbi is not a freely convertible currency at present. Under the current PRC regulations, conversion of Renminbi is permitted in China for routine current-account foreign exchange transactions, including trade and service related foreign exchange transactions, payment of dividends and service of foreign debts. Conversion of Renminbi for most capital-account items, such as direct investments, investments in PRC securities markets and repatriation of investments, however, is still subject to the approval of SAFE.

 

Pursuant to the above-mentioned administrative rules, foreign-invested enterprises may buy, sell and/or remit foreign currencies for current account transactions at banks in China with authority to conduct foreign exchange business by complying with certain procedural requirements, such as presentment of valid commercial documents. For capital-account transactions involving foreign direct investment, foreign debts and outbound investment in securities and derivatives, approval from SAFE is a pre-condition. Capital investments by foreign-invested enterprises outside China are subject to limitations and requirements in China, such as prior approvals from the PRC Ministry of Commerce or SAFE.

 

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E. Taxation

 

The following summary of the material Cayman Islands, PRC and U.S. tax consequences of an investment in our ordinary shares is based upon laws and relevant interpretations thereof in effect as of the date hereof, all of which are subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect. This summary is not intended to be, nor should it be construed as, legal or tax advice and is not exhaustive of all possible tax considerations. This summary also does not deal with all possible tax consequences relating to an investment in our ordinary shares, such as the tax consequences under state, local, non-U.S., non-PRC, and non-Cayman Islands tax laws. Investors should consult their own tax advisors with respect to the tax consequences of the acquisition, ownership and disposition of our ordinary shares.

 

People’s Republic of China Enterprise Taxation

 

The following brief description of Chinese enterprise laws is designed to highlight the enterprise-level taxation on our earnings, which will affect the amount of dividends, if any, we are ultimately able to pay to our shareholders. See “Dividend Policy.”

 

We are a holding company incorporated in the Cayman Islands and we gain substantial income by way of dividends paid to us from our PRC subsidiaries. The EIT Law and its implementation rules provide that China-sourced income of foreign enterprises, such as dividends paid by a PRC subsidiary to its equity holders that are non-resident enterprises, will normally be subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of 10%, unless any such foreign investor’s jurisdiction of incorporation has a tax treaty with China that provides for a preferential tax rate or a tax exemption.

 

Under the EIT Law, an enterprise established outside of China with a “de facto management body” within China is considered a “resident enterprise,” which means that it is treated in a manner similar to a Chinese enterprise for enterprise income tax purposes. Although the implementation rules of the EIT Law define “de facto management body” as a managing body that actually, comprehensively manage and control the production and operation, staff, accounting, property and other aspects of an enterprise, the only official guidance for this definition currently available is set forth in SAT Notice 82, which provides guidance on the determination of the tax residence status of a Chinese-controlled offshore incorporated enterprise, defined as an enterprise that is incorporated under the laws of a foreign country or territory and that has a PRC enterprise or enterprise group as its primary controlling shareholder. Although Hitek Global Inc. does not have a PRC enterprise or enterprise group as our primary controlling shareholder and is therefore not a Chinese-controlled offshore incorporated enterprise within the meaning of SAT Notice 82, in the absence of guidance specifically applicable to us, we have applied the guidance set forth in SAT Notice 82 to evaluate the tax residence status of Hitek Global Inc. and its subsidiaries organized outside the PRC.

 

According to SAT Notice 82, a Chinese-controlled offshore incorporated enterprise will be regarded as a PRC tax resident by virtue of having a “de facto management body” in China and will be subject to PRC enterprise income tax on its worldwide income only if all of the following criteria are met: (i) the places where senior management and senior management departments that are responsible for daily production, operation and management of the enterprise perform their duties are mainly located within the territory of China; (ii) financial decisions (such as money borrowing, lending, financing and financial risk management) and personnel decisions (such as appointment, dismissal and salary and wages) are decided or need to be decided by organizations or persons located within the territory of China; (iii) main property, accounting books, corporate seal, the board of directors and files of the minutes of shareholders’ meetings of the enterprise are located or preserved within the territory of China; and (iv) one half (or more) of the directors or senior management staff having the right to vote habitually reside within the territory of China.

 

We believe that we do not meet some of the conditions outlined in the immediately preceding paragraph. For example, as a holding company, the key assets and records of Hitek Global Inc., including the resolutions and meeting minutes of our board of directors and the resolutions and meeting minutes of our shareholders, are located and maintained outside the PRC. In addition, we are not aware of any offshore holding companies with a corporate structure similar to ours that has been deemed a PRC “resident enterprise” by the PRC tax authorities. Accordingly, we believe that Hitek Global Inc. and its offshore subsidiaries should not be treated as a “resident enterprise” for PRC tax purposes if the criteria for “de facto management body” as set forth in SAT Notice 82 were deemed applicable to us. However, as the tax residency status of an enterprise is subject to determination by the PRC tax authorities and uncertainties remain with respect to the interpretation of the term “de facto management body” as applicable to our offshore entities, we will continue to monitor our tax status.

 

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The implementation rules of the EIT Law provide that, (i) if the enterprise that distributes dividends is domiciled in the PRC or (ii) if gains are realized from transferring equity interests of enterprises domiciled in the PRC, then such dividends or gains are treated as China-sourced income. It is not clear how “domicile” may be interpreted under the EIT Law, and it may be interpreted as the jurisdiction where the enterprise is a tax resident. Therefore, if we are considered as a PRC tax resident enterprise for PRC tax purposes, any dividends we pay to our overseas shareholders which are non-resident enterprises as well as gains realized by such shareholders from the transfer of our shares may be regarded as China-sourced income and as a result become subject to PRC withholding tax at a rate of up to 10%. We are unable to provide a “will” opinion because Jingtian& Gongcheng, our PRC counsel, believes that it is possible but highly unlikely that the Company and its offshore subsidiaries would be treated as a “resident enterprise” for PRC tax purposes because they do not meet some of the conditions outlined in SAT Notice 82. In addition, we are not aware of any offshore holding companies with a corporate structure similar to ours that has been deemed a PRC “resident enterprise” by the PRC tax authorities as of the date of the annual report. Therefore, it is possible but highly unlikely that the income received by our overseas shareholders will be regarded as China-sourced income.

 

Cayman Islands Tax Considerations

 

The following is a discussion on certain Cayman Islands income tax consequences of an investment in the securities of the Company. The discussion is a general summary of present law, which is subject to prospective and retroactive change. It is not intended as tax advice, does not consider any investor’s particular circumstances, and does not consider tax consequences other than those arising under Cayman Islands law.

 

Under Existing Cayman Islands Laws:

 

Payments of dividends and capital in respect of our securities will not be subject to taxation in the Cayman Islands and no withholding will be required on the payment of a dividend or capital to any holder of the securities nor will gains derived from the disposal of the securities be subject to Cayman Islands income or corporation tax. The Cayman Islands currently have no income, corporation or capital gains tax and no estate duty, inheritance tax or gift tax.

 

No stamp duty is payable in respect of the issue of the warrants. An instrument of transfer in respect of a warrant is stampable if executed in or brought into the Cayman Islands.

 

No stamp duty is payable in respect of the issue of our Ordinary Shares or on an instrument of transfer in respect of such shares.

 

The Company has been incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands as an exempted company with limited liability and, as such, has applied for and expects to obtain after the effectiveness of the registration statement on Form F-1 (File No. 333-228498) an undertaking from the Financial Secretary of the Cayman Islands in the following form:

 

The Tax Concessions Law (2018 Revision)

 

Undertaking as to Tax Concessions

 

In accordance with the provision of Section 6 of The Tax Concessions Law (2018 Revision), the Financial Secretary undertakes with Hitek Global Inc. (“the Company”):

 

  1. That no law which is hereafter enacted in the Islands imposing any tax to be levied on profits, income, gains or appreciations shall apply to the Company or its operations; and

 

  2. In addition, that no tax to be levied on profits, income, gains or appreciations or which is in the nature of estate duty or inheritance tax shall be payable:

 

  a. On or in respect of the shares, debentures or other obligations of the Company; or

 

  b. by way of the withholding in whole or part, of any relevant payment as defined in Section 6(3) of the Tax Concessions Law (2018 Revision).

 

These concessions shall be for a period of twenty years from the date hereof.

 

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United States Federal Income Taxation

 

The following does not address the tax consequences to any particular investor or to persons in special tax situations such as:

 

  banks;
     
  financial institutions;
     
  insurance companies;
     
  regulated investment companies;

 

  real estate investment trusts;
     
  broker-dealers;
     
  traders that elect to mark-to-market;
     
  U.S. expatriates;
     
  tax-exempt entities;
     
  persons liable for alternative minimum tax;
     
  persons holding our Ordinary Shares as part of a straddle, hedging, conversion or integrated transaction;
     
  persons that actually or constructively own 10% or more of our voting shares;
     
  persons who acquired our Ordinary Shares pursuant to the exercise of any employee share option or otherwise as consideration; or
     
  persons holding our Ordinary Shares through partnerships or other pass-through entities.

 

Prospective purchasers are urged to consult their own tax advisors about the application of the U.S. Federal tax rules to their particular circumstances as well as the state, local, foreign and other tax consequences to them of the purchase, ownership and disposition of our Ordinary Shares.

 

Taxation of Dividends and Other Distributions on our Ordinary Shares

 

Subject to the passive foreign investment company rules discussed below, the gross amount of distributions made by us to you with respect to the Ordinary Shares (including the amount of any taxes withheld therefrom) will generally be includable in your gross income as dividend income on the date of receipt by you, but only to the extent that the distribution is paid out of our current or accumulated earnings and profits (as determined under U.S. federal income tax principles). With respect to corporate U.S. Holders, the dividends will not be eligible for the dividends-received deduction allowed to corporations in respect of dividends received from other U.S. corporations.

 

With respect to non-corporate U.S. Holders, including individual U.S. Holders, dividends will be taxed at the lower capital gains rate applicable to qualified dividend income, provided that (1) the Ordinary Shares are readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States, or we are eligible for the benefits of an approved qualifying income tax treaty with the United States that includes an exchange of information program, (2) we are not a passive foreign investment company (as discussed below) for either our taxable year in which the dividend is paid or the preceding taxable year, and (3) certain holding period requirements are met. Under U.S. Internal Revenue Service authority, Ordinary Shares are considered for purpose of clause (1) above to be readily tradable on an established securities market in the United States if they are listed on the Nasdaq Capital Market. You are urged to consult your tax advisors regarding the availability of the lower rate for dividends paid with respect to our Ordinary Shares, including the effects of any change in law after the date of this annual report.

 

54

 

 

Dividends will constitute foreign source income for foreign tax credit limitation purposes. If the dividends are taxed as qualified dividend income (as discussed above), the amount of the dividend taken into account for purposes of calculating the foreign tax credit limitation will be limited to the gross amount of the dividend, multiplied by the reduced rate divided by the highest rate of tax normally applicable to dividends. The limitation on foreign taxes eligible for credit is calculated separately with respect to specific classes of income. For this purpose, dividends distributed by us with respect to our Ordinary Shares will constitute “passive category income” but could, in the case of certain U.S. Holders, constitute “general category income.”

 

To the extent that the amount of the distribution exceeds our current and accumulated earnings and profits (as determined under U.S. federal income tax principles), it will be treated first as a tax-free return of your tax basis in your Ordinary Shares, and to the extent the amount of the distribution exceeds your tax basis, the excess will be taxed as capital gain. We do not intend to calculate our earnings and profits under U.S. federal income tax principles. Therefore, a U.S. Holder should expect that a distribution will be treated as a dividend even if that distribution would otherwise be treated as a non-taxable return of capital or as capital gain under the rules described above.

 

Taxation of Dispositions of Ordinary Shares

 

Subject to the passive foreign investment company rules discussed below, you will recognize taxable gain or loss on any sale, exchange or other taxable disposition of a share equal to the difference between the amount realized (in U.S. dollars) for the share and your tax basis (in U.S. dollars) in the Ordinary Shares. The gain or loss will be capital gain or loss. If you are a non-corporate U.S. Holder, including an individual U.S. Holder, who has held the Ordinary Shares for more than one year, you will be eligible for (a) reduced tax rates of 0% (for individuals in the 10% or 15% tax brackets), (b) higher tax rates of 20% (for individuals in the 39.6% tax bracket) or (c) 15% for all other individuals. The deductibility of capital losses is subject to limitations. Any such gain or loss that you recognize will generally be treated as United States source income or loss for foreign tax credit limitation purposes.

 

Passive Foreign Investment Company

 

Based on our current and anticipated operations and the composition of our assets, we do not expect to be a passive foreign investment company, or PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax purposes for our current taxable year. Our actual PFIC status for the current taxable year will not be determinable until the close of such taxable year and, accordingly, there is no guarantee that we will not be a PFIC for the current taxable year. PFIC status is a factual determination for each taxable year which cannot be made until the close of the taxable year. A non-U.S. corporation is considered a PFIC for any taxable year if either:

 

  at least 75% of its gross income is passive income; or
     
  at least 50% of the value of its assets (based on an average of the quarterly values of the assets during a taxable year) is attributable to assets that produce or are held for the production of passive income (the “asset test”).

 

We will be treated as owning our proportionate share of the assets and earning our proportionate share of the income of any other corporation in which we own, directly or indirectly, at least 25% (by value) of the stock.

 

We must make a separate determination each year as to whether we are a PFIC. As a result, our PFIC status may change from no to yes. In particular, because the value of our assets for purposes of the asset test will generally be determined based on the market price of our Ordinary Shares, our PFIC status will depend in large part on the market price of our Ordinary Shares. Accordingly, fluctuations in the market price of the Ordinary Shares may cause us to become a PFIC. In addition, the application of the PFIC rules is subject to uncertainty in several respects and the composition of our income and assets will be affected by how, and how quickly, we spend the cash we raise in this offering. If we are a PFIC for any year during which you hold Ordinary Shares, we will continue to be treated as a PFIC for all succeeding years during which you hold Ordinary Shares. However, if we cease to be a PFIC, you may avoid some of the adverse effects of the PFIC regime by making a “deemed sale” election with respect to the Ordinary Shares.

 

55

 

 

If we are a PFIC for any taxable year during which you hold Ordinary Shares, you will be subject to special tax rules with respect to any “excess distribution” that you receive and any gain you realize from a sale or other disposition (including a pledge) of the Ordinary Shares, unless you make a “mark-to-market” election as discussed below. Distributions you receive in a taxable year that are greater than 125% of the average annual distributions you received during the shorter of the three preceding taxable years or your holding period for the Ordinary Shares will be treated as an excess distribution. Under these special tax rules:

 

  the excess distribution or gain will be allocated ratably over your holding period for the Ordinary Shares;

 

  the amount allocated to the current taxable year, and any taxable year prior to the first taxable year in which we were a PFIC, will be treated as ordinary income, and

 

  the amount allocated to each other year will be subject to the highest tax rate in effect for that year and the interest charge generally applicable to underpayments of tax will be imposed on the resulting tax attributable to each such year.

 

The tax liability for amounts allocated to years prior to the year of disposition or “excess distribution” cannot be offset by any net operating losses for such years, and gains (but not losses) realized on the sale of the Ordinary Shares cannot be treated as capital, even if you hold the Ordinary Shares as capital assets.

 

A U.S. Holder of “marketable stock” (as defined below) in a PFIC may make a mark-to-market election for such stock to elect out of the tax treatment discussed above. If you make a mark-to-market election for the Ordinary Shares, you will include in income each year an amount equal to the excess, if any, of the fair market value of the Ordinary Shares as of the close of your taxable year over your adjusted basis in such Ordinary Shares. You are allowed a deduction for the excess, if any, of the adjusted basis of the Ordinary Shares over their fair market value as of the close of the taxable year. However, deductions are allowable only to the extent of any net mark-to-market gains on the Ordinary Shares included in your income for prior taxable years. Amounts included in your income under a mark-to-market election, as well as gain on the actual sale or other disposition of the Ordinary Shares, are treated as ordinary income. Ordinary loss treatment also applies to the deductible portion of any mark-to-market loss on the Ordinary Shares, as well as to any loss realized on the actual sale or disposition of the Ordinary Shares, to the extent that the amount of such loss does not exceed the net mark-to-market gains previously included for such Ordinary Shares. Your basis in the Ordinary Shares will be adjusted to reflect any such income or loss amounts. If you make a valid mark-to-market election, the tax rules that apply to distributions by corporations which are not PFICs would apply to distributions by us, except that the lower applicable capital gains rate for qualified dividend income discussed above under “— Taxation of Dividends and Other Distributions on our Ordinary Shares” generally would not apply.

 

The mark-to-market election is available only for “marketable stock”, which is stock that is traded in other than de minimis quantities on at least 15 days during each calendar quarter (“regularly traded”) on a qualified exchange or other market (as defined in applicable U.S. Treasury regulations), including the Nasdaq Capital Market. If the Ordinary Shares are regularly traded on the Nasdaq Capital Market and if you are a holder of Ordinary Shares, the mark-to-market election would be available to you were we to be or become a PFIC.

 

Alternatively, a U.S. Holder of stock in a PFIC may make a “qualified electing fund” election with respect to such PFIC to elect out of the tax treatment discussed above. A U.S. Holder who makes a valid qualified electing fund election with respect to a PFIC will generally include in gross income for a taxable year such holder’s pro rata share of the corporation’s earnings and profits for the taxable year. However, the qualified electing fund election is available only if such PFIC provides such U.S. Holder with certain information regarding its earnings and profits as required under applicable U.S. Treasury regulations. We do not currently intend to prepare or provide the information that would enable you to make a qualified electing fund election. If you hold Ordinary Shares in any year in which we are a PFIC, you will be required to file U.S. Internal Revenue Service Form 8621 regarding distributions received on the Ordinary Shares and any gain realized on the disposition of the Ordinary Shares.

 

You are urged to consult your tax advisors regarding the application of the PFIC rules to your investment in our Ordinary Shares and the elections discussed above.

 

56

 

 

Information Reporting and Backup Withholding

 

Dividend payments with respect to our Ordinary Shares and proceeds from the sale, exchange or redemption of our Ordinary Shares may be subject to information reporting to the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and possible U.S. backup withholding at a current rate of 24%. Backup withholding will not apply, however, to a U.S. Holder who furnishes a correct taxpayer identification number and makes any other required certification on U.S. Internal Revenue Service Form W-9 or who is otherwise exempt from backup withholding. U.S. Holders who are required to establish their exempt status generally must provide such certification on U.S. Internal Revenue Service Form W-9. U.S. Holders are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding the application of the U.S. information reporting and backup withholding rules.

 

Backup withholding is not an additional tax. Amounts withheld as backup withholding may be credited against your U.S. federal income tax liability, and you may obtain a refund of any excess amounts withheld under the backup withholding rules by filing the appropriate claim for refund with the U.S. Internal Revenue Service and furnishing any required information. We do not intend to withhold taxes for individual shareholders.

 

Under the Hiring Incentives to Restore Employment Act of 2010, certain United States Holders are required to report information relating to Ordinary Shares, subject to certain exceptions (including an exception for Ordinary Shares held in accounts maintained by certain financial institutions), by attaching a complete Internal Revenue Service Form 8938, Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets, with their tax return for each year in which they hold Ordinary Shares. U.S. Holders are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding the application of the U.S. information reporting and backup withholding rules.

 

F. Dividends and Paying Agents

 

Not applicable.

 

G. Statement by Experts

 

Not applicable.

 

H. Documents on Display

 

The Company is subject to the informational requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and will file reports, registration statements and other information with the SEC. The Company’s reports, registration statements and other information can be inspected on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov and such information can also be inspected and copies ordered at the public reference facilities maintained by the SEC at the following location: 100 F Street NE, Washington, D.C. 20549. You may also visit us on the World Wide Web at http http://www.xmhitek.com/. However, information contained on our website does not constitute a part of this annual report.

 

I. Subsidiary Information

 

Not applicable.

 

57

 

 

ITEM 11. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Interest Rate Risk

 

We deposit surplus funds with Chinese banks earning daily interest. We do not invest in any instruments for trading purposes. Most of our outstanding debt instruments carry loan prime rates plus basis points of interest. Our operations generally are not directly sensitive to fluctuations in interest rates and we currently do not have any long-term debt outstanding. Management monitors the banks’ prime rates in conjunction with our cash requirements to determine the appropriate level of debt balances relative to other sources of funds. We have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to interest rate risk.

 

Foreign Exchange Risk

 

While our reporting currency is the U.S. dollar, substantially all of our consolidated revenues and consolidated costs and expenses are denominated in RMB. Substantially all of our assets are denominated in RMB. As a result, we are exposed to foreign exchange risk as our revenues and results of operations may be affected by fluctuations in the exchange rate between the U.S. dollar and the RMB. If the RMB depreciates against the U.S. dollar, the value of our RMB revenues, earnings and assets as expressed in our U.S. dollar financial statements will decline. Assets and liabilities are translated at exchange rates at the balance sheet dates and revenue and expenses are translated at the average exchange rates and equity is translated at historical exchange rates. Any resulting translation adjustments are not included in determining net income but are included in determining other comprehensive income, a component of equity. The appreciation of the RMB against the U.S. dollar in 2021 increased our comprehensive income to $736,196   based on our outstanding revenues, costs and expenses, assets and liabilities denominated in RMB as of December 31, 2021. As of December 31, 2021. We have not entered into any hedging transactions in an effort to reduce our exposure to foreign exchange risk.

 

The value of RMB against the U.S. dollar and other currencies is affected by, among other things, changes in China’s political and economic conditions. Since July 2005, RMB has not been pegged to the U.S. dollar. Although the People’s Bank of China regularly intervenes in the foreign exchange market to prevent significant short-term fluctuations in the exchange rate, RMB may appreciate or depreciate significantly in value against the U.S. dollar in the medium to long term. Moreover, it is possible that in the future, PRC authorities may lift restrictions on fluctuations in RMB exchange rate and lessen intervention in the foreign exchange market.

 

Inflation

 

Inflationary factors such as increases in the cost of our product and overhead costs may adversely affect our operating results. Although we do not believe that inflation has had a material impact on our financial position or results of operations to date, a high rate of inflation in the future may have an adverse effect on our ability to maintain current levels of gross margin and selling, general and administrative expenses as a percentage of net revenues if the selling prices of our products do not increase with these increased costs.

 

ITEM 12. DESCRIPTION OF SECURITIES OTHER THAN EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Not applicable.

 

58

 

 

PART II

 

ITEM 13. DEFAULTS, DIVIDEND ARREARAGES AND DELINQUENCIES

 

None.

 

ITEM 14. MATERIAL MODIFICATIONS TO THE RIGHTS OF SECURITY HOLDERS AND USE OF PROCEEDS

 

See “Item 10. Additional Information” for a description of the rights of securities holders, which remain unchanged

 

Use of Proceeds

 

Although our registration statement on Form F-1 (333-228498) filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission pursuant to the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, and the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, has been declared effective on March 30, 2020, as of the date of this Annual Report, we have not completed our initial public offering of our Ordinary Shares under the registration statement.

 

ITEM 15. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES

 

Evaluation of Disclosure Controls and Procedures

 

Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and chief financial officer, has performed an evaluation of the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures (as defined in Rule 13a-15(e) under the Exchange Act) as of the end of the period covered by this report, as required by Rule 13a-15(b) under the Exchange Act. Based on the foregoing evaluation, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer concluded that, as of December 31, 2021, our disclosure controls and procedures were not effective at the reasonable assurance level due to the material weaknesses described below.

 

Management’s Report on Internal Control over Financial Reporting

 

Our management is responsible for establishing and maintaining adequate internal control over financial reporting, as defined in Rules 13a-15 (f) under the Exchange Act. Our management, with the participation of our chief executive officer and our chief financial officer, evaluated the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting based on criteria established in the framework in Internal Control—Integrated Framework (2013) issued by the Committee of Sponsoring Organizations of the Treadway Commission. Based on this evaluation under the 2013 Framework, our principal executive officer and principal financial officer have concluded that our internal control over financial reporting was not effective as of December 31, 2021 due to the following material weaknesses: 

  

  We had insufficient financial reporting and accounting with appropriate knowledge of U.S. GAAP and SEC reporting requirements to properly address complex U.S. GAAP accounting issues;

 

  We do not have sufficient systems and procedures in place to ensure effective supervision and monitoring of our annual financial statements preparation process;

  

A material weakness is a deficiency, or a combination of deficiencies, within the meaning of PCAOB Auditing Standard AS 2201, in internal control over financial reporting, such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement of the Company's annual or interim financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis.

 

We plan to address the weaknesses identified above by implementing the following measures:

 

(1) recruiting qualified professionals with appropriate levels of knowledge and experience to assist in resolving accounting issues in non-routine or complex transactions;

 

(2) investing in technology infrastructure to support our financial reporting function; and

 

(3)

improving the communication between management, board of directors and chief financial officer. 

 

59

 

 

Attestation Report of the Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

Because the Company is a non-accelerated filer, this annual report does not include an attestation report of our registered public accounting firm regarding internal control over financial reporting.

 

Changes in Internal Control Over Financial Reporting

 

There were no changes in our internal control over financial reporting that occurred during the period covered by this annual report on Form 20-F that have materially affected, or are reasonably likely to materially affect, our internal controls over financial reporting.

 

ITEM 16A. AUDIT COMMITTEE FINANCIAL EXPERT

 

Our board of directors has determined that Mr. Wenhua Yang will be an independent director upon the completion of our initial public offering as defined by the rules of the NASDAQ Stock Market as well as qualifies as an audit committee financial expert as defined by the rules of the NASDAQ Stock Market, Inc. and Rule 10A-3 under the Exchange Act.

 

ITEM 16B. CODE OF ETHICS

 

On July 9, 2019, we have adopted a code of ethics applicable to our directors, officers, and employees in accordance with applicable federal securities law and NASDAQ rules.

 

ITEM 16C. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTANT FEES AND SERVICES

 

The following table sets forth the aggregate fees by categories specified below in connection with certain professional services rendered by UHY LLP (our independent registered public accounting firm), we did not pay any other fees to our independent registered public accounting firm during the periods indicated below.

 

   Year Ended
December 31,
2021
   Year Ended
December 31,
2020
 
Audit fees(1)   $181,380   $187,981 
Audit related fees(2)   -    - 
Tax fees(3)   -    - 
All other fees(4)   -    - 
TOTAL  $

181,380

   $187,981 

 

 

(1) “Audit fees” means the aggregate fees billed for each of the fiscal years for professional services rendered by our principal accountant for the audit of our annual financial statements or services that are normally provided by the accountant in connection with statutory and regulatory filings or engagements for those fiscal years.
(2) “Audit related fees” means the aggregate fees billed for each of the fiscal years for assurance and related services by our principal accountant that are reasonably related to the performance of the audit or review of our financial statements and are not reported under paragraph (1).
(3) “Tax Fees” represents the aggregate fees billed in each of the fiscal years listed for the professional tax services rendered by our principal auditors.
(4) “All Other Fees” represents the aggregate fees billed in each of the fiscal years listed for services rendered by our principal auditors other than services reported under “Audit fees,” “Audit-related fees” and “Tax fees.”

 

The policy of our audit committee and our board of directors is to pre-approve all audit and non-audit services provided by our principal auditors, including audit services, audit-related services, and other services as described above, other than those for de minimis services which are approved by the audit committee or our board of directors prior to the completion of the services.

 

60

 

 

ITEM 16D. EXEMPTIONS FROM THE LISTING STANDARDS FOR AUDIT COMMITTEES

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 16E. PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES BY THE ISSUER AND AFFILIATED PURCHASERS

 

None.

 

ITEM 16F. CHANGE IN REGISTRANT’S CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANTS

 

Not applicable.

 

ITEM 16G. CORPORATE GOVERNANCE

 

Other than as described in this section, our corporate governance practices do not differ from those followed by domestic companies listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market. NASDAQ Listing Rule 5635 generally provides that shareholder approval is required of U.S. domestic companies listed on the NASDAQ Capital Market prior to issuance (or potential issuance) of securities (i) equaling 20% or more of the company’s Ordinary Shares or voting power for less than the greater of market or book value (ii) resulting in a change of control of the company; and (iii) which is being issued pursuant to a stock option or purchase plan to be established or materially amended or other equity compensation arrangement made or materially amended. Notwithstanding this general requirement, NASDAQ Listing Rule 5615(a)(3)(A) permits foreign private issuers to follow their home country practice rather than these shareholder approval requirements. The Cayman Islands do not require shareholder approval prior to any of the foregoing types of issuances. The Company, therefore, is not required to obtain such shareholder approval prior to entering into a transaction with the potential to issue securities as described above. The Board of Directors of the Company has elected to follow the Company’s home country rules as to such issuances and will not be required to seek shareholder approval prior to entering into such a transaction.

 

ITEM 16H. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURE

 

Not applicable. 

 

ITEM 16I. DISCLOSURE REGARDING FOREIGN JURISDICTIONS THAT PREVENT INSPECTIONS

 

Not applicable.

 

61

 

 

 

PART III

 

ITEM 17. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

We have elected to provide financial statements pursuant to Item 18.

 

ITEM 18. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

Results of Operations and Financial Condition

 

Following are the audited financial results for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 of Hitek Global Inc.

 

62

 

 

INDEX TO FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

 

HITEK GLOBAL INC.

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

    Page
INDEX TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS OF HITEK GLOBAL INC.    
     
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (UHY LLP, New York, New York, PCAOB #1195)   F-2
     
Consolidated Balance Sheets as of December 31, 2021 and 2020   F-3
     
Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Income for the Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020   F-4
     
Consolidated Statement of Changes in Shareholders’ Equity for the Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020   F-5
     
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020   F-6
     
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements   F-7

 

F-1

 

   

REPORT OF INDEPENDENT REGISTERED PUBLIC ACCOUNTING FIRM

 

To the Board of Directors and Shareholders of Hitek Global Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Hitek Global Inc. (the “Company”) as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, and the related consolidated statements of operations and comprehensive income, changes in shareholders’ equity, and cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2021, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the consolidated financial statements). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2021 and 2020, and the results of their operations and their cash flows for each of the years in the two-year period ended December 31, 2021, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (PCAOB) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audit to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of its internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits, we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud, and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

/s/ UHY LLP  
   
We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2017.  
   
New York, New York  
   
May 13, 2022  

  

F-2

 

 

HITEK GLOBAL INC.

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   As of December 31, 
   2021   2020 
Assets        
Current assets        
Cash and cash equivalents  $2,091,308   $1,861,554 
Short-term investments   5,197,015    2,826,055 
Accounts receivable, net   2,357,114    2,129,283 
Accounts receivable-related parties, net   414,639    696,086 
Advances to suppliers, net   1,110,923    902,460 
Inventories, net   409,021    119,809 
Deferred offering cost   1,026,567    1,165,722 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   360,552    1,075,199 
Total current assets   12,967,139    10,776,168 
           
Non-current assets          
Non-current accounts receivable   3,134,361    2,009,766 
Non-current accounts receivable-related parties   548,395    813,297 
Non-current advance to a third party   333,717    301,625 
Property, equipment and software, net   156,761    504,203 
Total non-current assets   4,173,234    3,628,891 
Total Assets  $17,140,373   $14,405,059 
           
Liabilities and Equity          
Current Liabilities          
Accounts payable  $518,739   $379,413 
Deferred revenue   784,530    752,286 
Taxes payable   1,299,147    943,452 
Due to related parties   4,163    3,005 
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities   181,925    303,075 
Total Current Liabilities   2,788,504    2,381,231 
           
Non-current Liabilities          
Deferred income tax liabilities, non-current   1,225,641    857,364 
Total non-current liabilities   1,225,641    857,364 
Total Liabilities   4,014,145    3,238,595 
           
Commitments and Contingencies   
 
    
 
 
           
Shareholders’ Equity          
Ordinary Shares* (par value $0.0001 per share, 490,000,000 shares authorized; 10,987,679 and 10,987,679 shares issued and outstanding at December 31, 2021 and 2020, respectively)   1,099    1,099 
Additional paid-in capital   2,628,356    2,628,356 
Statutory reserve   767,207    713,737 
Retained earnings   8,993,370    7,377,483 
Accumulated other comprehensive income   736,196    445,789 
Total Shareholders’ Equity   13,126,228    11,166,464 
           
Total Liabilities and Shareholders’ Equity  $17,140,373   $14,405,059 

 

*Retrospectively restated for effect of Reverse Split.

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-3

 

 

HITEK GLOBAL INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS AND COMPREHENSIVE INCOME

 

   Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2021   2020 
Revenues        
Hardware  $2,434,694   $2,105,018 
Hardware - related party   
-
    255,344 
Tax devices and service   1,970,363    2,254,176 
Software   2,056,106    699,490 
Software - related party   
-
    353,977 
IT services   
-
    136,722 
Total revenues   6,461,163    5,804,727 
Cost of revenues   (2,581,218)   (2,633,455)
Gross profit   3,879,945    3,171,272 
           
Operating expenses:          
General and administrative expenses   1,699,934    1,415,484 
Selling expenses   76,477    2,012 
Total operating expenses   1,776,411    1,417,496 
           
Operating income   2,103,534    1,753,776 
           
Other income (expense)          
Government subsidies   6,883    101,965 
Net investment income   103,375    99,574 
Financial (expense) income, net   (2,190)   2,607 
Other, net   608    179 
Total other income   108,676    204,325 
           
Net income before provision for income taxes   2,212,210    1,958,101 
Income tax expense   542,853    269,242 
           
Net income  $1,669,357   $1,688,859 
Comprehensive income          
Net income  $1,669,357   $1,688,859 
Foreign currency translation gain   290,407    521,914 
           
Comprehensive income  $1,959,764   $2,210,773 
Earnings per ordinary share          
– Basic and diluted  $0.15   $0.15 
           
Weighted average number of ordinary shares outstanding          
– Basic and diluted   10,987,679    10,987,679 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-4

 

 

HITEK GLOBAL INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN SHAREHOLDERS’ EQUITY

 

   Ordinary Shares   Additional           Accumulated
other
     
   Number of
shares
   Amount   paid-in
capital
   Statutory
reserve
   Retained
earnings
   comprehensive
(loss) income
   Total Equity 
Balance as of January 1, 2020   10,987,679   $1,099   $2,628,356   $664,747   $5,737,614   $(76,125)  $8,955,691 
Foreign currency translation   -    
-
    
-
    
-
    
-
    521,914    521,914 
Net income   -    
-
    
-
    
-
    1,688,859    
-
    1,688,859 
Appropriation of Statutory reserve   -    
-
    
-
    48,990    (48,990)   
-
    
-
 
Balance as of December 31, 2020   10,987,679   $1,099   $2,628,356   $713,737   $7,377,483   $445,789   $11,166,464 
Foreign currency translation   -    
-
    
-
    
-
    
-
    290,407    290,407 
Net income   -    
-
    
-
    
-
    1,669,357    
-
    1,669,357 
Appropriation of Statutory reserve   -    
-
    
-
    53,470    (53,470)   
-
    
-
 
Balance as of December 31, 2021   10,987,679   $1,099   $2,628,356   $767,207   $8,993,370   $736,196   $13,126,228 

 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-5

 

 

HITEK GLOBAL INC.

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   Years Ended
December 31,
 
   2021    2020  
         
Operating Activities        
Net income  $1,669,357   $1,688,859 
Adjustments to reconcile net income to net cash (used in) provided by operating activities:          
Depreciation and amortization   355,738    378,594 
Loss on disposal of property, plant and equipment   
-
    94 
Interest income   (6,525)   (6,522)
Net investment gain   (103,375)   (99,574)
Reversal for doubtful accounts of receivables and advances to suppliers   (123,754)   (33,519)
(Reversal) provision of obsolete inventories provision   (5,317)   6,783 
Deferred income tax   340,624    242,296 
Changes in operating assets and liabilities:          
Short-term investment –Trading securities   (2,625,216)   (174,379)
Accounts receivable   (1,100,056)   934,525 
Accounts receivable from related parties   578,157    186,223 
Advances to suppliers   (184,369)   (848,649)
Deferred offering cost   155,915    (335,898)
Inventory, net   (276,672)   397,603 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   769,913    (673,019)
Due from related party   
-
    708 
Accounts payable   127,422    172,025 
Deferred revenue   12,089    (58,463)
Taxes payable   327,807    159,464 
Due to related parties   1,062    2,843 
Accrued expenses and other current liabilities   (127,375)   (7,144)
Net cash (used in) provided by operating activities   (214,575)   1,932,850 
           
Investing Activities          
Advance payment for software development   (25,582)   (285,346)
Loans lent to third parties   (356,595)   (144,925)
Repayment from third-party loans   317,059    
-
 
Purchases of Held-to-maturity investments   (1,240,329)   (2,463,732)
Redemption of Held-to-maturity Investments   1,705,453    2,028,956 
Net cash provided by (used in) investing activities   400,006    (865,047)
           
Effect of exchange rate changes on cash and cash equivalents   44,323    17,531 
Net increase in cash and cash equivalents   229,754    1,085,334 
Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year   1,861,554    776,220 
Cash and cash equivalents at end of year  $2,091,308   $1,861,554 
           
Supplemental disclosures of cash flow information:          
Cash paid for income taxes  $32,646   $26,300 

 

The accompanying notes are an integral part of these consolidated financial statements.

 

F-6

 

 

HITEK GLOBAL INC.

Notes to CONSOLIDATED Financial Statements

 

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

HiTek Global Inc. (the “Company”) was incorporated under the laws of the Cayman Islands on November 3, 2017 in anticipation of an initial public offering. The Company through its variable interest entity (“VIE”) and VIE’s subsidiaries provide hardware sales, software sales, Information Technology (“IT”) maintenance services and tax devices and services in the People’s Republic of China (the “PRC”).

 

The Company issued an aggregate of 10,987,679 ordinary shares to Fortune Enterprise Holdings Limited, an entity 100% owned by Shenping Yin, and eight other shareholders on November 3, 2017 and December 16, 2017. Of the 10,987,679 ordinary shares, 74.55% was owned by Fortune Enterprise Holdings Limited. On November 20, 2017, the Company formed its wholly-owned subsidiary, HiTek Hong Kong Limited (“HiTek HK”) in Hong Kong. On March 15, 2018, HiTek HK formed its wholly-owned subsidiary, Tian Dahai (Xiamen) Information Technology Co. Ltd. (“WFOE”) in PRC.

 

Xiamen Hengda HiTek Computer Network Co., Ltd. (“HiTek”), was established in January 1996 by Shenping Yin, Xiaoyang Huang (the spouse of Shenping Yin) and nine other shareholders, who held 29.83%, 44.74% and 25.43% of its equity interests, respectively, in Xiamen, Fujian Province, PRC pursuant to PRC laws. The Company entered into a series of contractual arrangements with HiTek which were effective in March 2018, and its equity holders through WFOE to obtain control and became the primary beneficiary of HiTek for accounting purpose.

 

In September 1999, Xiamen Huasheng HiTek Computer Network Co., Ltd (“Huasheng”), a fully owned subsidiary of HiTek was incorporated under the laws of the PRC.

 

In September 2017, Huoerguosi Hengda Information Technology Co., Ltd (“Huoerguosi”), a fully owned subsidiary of HiTek was established in XinJiang Province, PRC.

 

In April 2021, Xiamen Haitian Weilai Technology Co., Ltd. (“Haitian Weilai”), a fully owned subsidiary of WFOE was incorporated under the laws of the PRC.

 

 

F-7

 

 

As all the above mentioned companies presented were under common control, the series of contractual arrangements between the Company and HiTek in March 2018 constituted a reorganization under common control and were required to be retrospectively applied to the consolidated financial statements at their historical amounts. The consolidated financial statements have been prepared as if the existing corporate structure had been in existence throughout all periods. This includes a retrospective presentation for all equity related disclosures, including share and per share, which have been revised to reflect the effects of the reorganization. 

 

NOTE 2 – BASIS OF PRESENTATION AND SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

 

Basis of Financial Information

 

The accounting and financial reporting policies of the Company conform to generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”) in the United States and the preparation of the consolidated financial statements is in conformity with GAAP which requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect reported amounts and disclosures.

 

Reclassification

 

Certain prior year amounts have been reclassified for consistency with the current year presentation. These reclassifications had no effect on the reported results of operations.

 

Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements include financial information related to the Company and its wholly-owned subsidiaries and those variable interest entities (“VIEs”) where the Company is the primary beneficiary (“PB”).

 

In preparing the consolidated financial statements, all significant inter-company accounts and transactions have been eliminated. Assets held in an agency or fiduciary capacity are not included in the consolidated financial statements.  

 

VIE Agreements with HiTek

 

Due to PRC legal restrictions of foreign ownership in certain sectors, neither we nor our subsidiaries own any equity interest in HiTek. Instead, WFOE, HiTek and HiTek’s shareholders entered into a series of contractual arrangements (“VIE Agreements”) on March 31, 2018, which have not been tested in a court of law. The VIE Agreements by and among WFOE, HiTek, and HiTek’s shareholders include (i) certain power of attorney agreements and equity interest pledge agreement, which provide WFOE effective control over HiTek; (ii) an exclusive technical consulting and service agreement which allows WFOE to receive substantially all of the economic benefits from HiTek; and (iii) certain exclusive equity interest purchase agreements which provide WFOE with an exclusive option to purchase all or part of the equity interests in and/or assets of HiTek when and to the extent permitted by PRC laws. Accordingly, the Company is considered the primary beneficiary of VIE for accounting purpose and has consolidated the VIE and the VIE’s subsidiaries’ assets, liabilities, results of operations, and cash flows in the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

Each of the VIE Agreements is described in detail below:

 

Exclusive Technical Consulting and Service Agreement

 

Pursuant to the Exclusive Technical Consulting and Service Agreement between HiTek and WFOE, WFOE provides HiTek with technical support, consulting services and other management services relating to its day-to-day business operations and management, on an exclusive basis. The Exclusive Technical Consulting and Service Agreement has come into effect as of March 31, 2018. For services rendered to HiTek by WFOE under this agreement, WFOE is entitled to collect a service fee that shall be paid per quarter of 100% of HiTek’s quarterly profit. The term of the Exclusive Technical Consulting and Service Agreement is ten years unless it is terminated by WFOE with 30-day prior notice.

 

F-8

 

 

Equity Interest Pledge Agreement

 

WFOE, HiTek and HiTek shareholders entered into an Equity Interest Pledge Agreement, pursuant to which HiTek shareholders pledged all of their equity interests in HiTek to WFOE in order to guarantee the performance of HiTek’s obligations under the Exclusive Technical Consulting and Service Agreement as described above. The Equity Interest Pledge Agreement has come into effect as of March 31, 2018. During the term of the pledge, WFOE is entitled to receive any dividends declared on the pledged equity interests of HiTek. The Equity Interest Pledge Agreement ends when all contractual obligations under the Exclusive Technical Consulting and Service Agreement have been fully performed.

 

Exclusive Equity Interests Purchase Agreement

 

Under the Exclusive Equity Interests Purchase Agreement, the HiTek Shareholders granted WFOE (or its designee) an exclusive option to purchase, to the extent permitted under PRC law, part or all of their equity interests in HiTek. The option price is equal to the capital paid in by the HiTek Shareholders subject to any appraisal or restrictions required by applicable PRC laws and regulations. The Exclusive Equity Interests Purchase Agreement remains effective for a term of ten years and may be renewed at WFOE’s election.

 

Power of Attorney

 

Each shareholder of the HiTek has executed an irrevocable power of attorney in favor of WFOE. Pursuant to this power of attorney, the WFOE has full power and authority to exercise all of such shareholders’ rights with respect to their equity interest in the VIE Companies, including HiTek, Huasheng and Huoerguosi. The power of attorney will remain in force for so long as the shareholder remains a shareholder of HiTek.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, there were no transactions in HiTek Global Inc. and HiTek HK besides minimal capital transactions and professional fee payments. As of December 31, 2021, the variable interest entities accounted for an aggregate of 93% and 100% of our total assets and total liabilities, respectively. As of December 31, 2020, the variable interest entities accounted for an aggregate of 87% and 100% of our total assets and total liabilities, respectively. As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, $1,557,325 and $1,335,727 of cash and cash equivalents were denominated in RMB, respectively.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of the consolidated financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period.

 

Significant accounting estimates reflected in the Company’s consolidated financial statements include allowance for doubtful accounts, inventory obsolescence, deferred taxes, and the useful lives of property and equipment. Since the use of estimates is an integral component of the financial reporting process, actual results could differ from those estimates.

 

F-9

 

 

Fair Values of Financial Instruments

 

The U.S. GAAP accounting standards regarding fair value of financial instruments and related fair value measurements define fair value, establish a three-level valuation hierarchy that requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value.

 

The three levels of inputs are defined as follows:

 

Level 1 inputs to the valuation methodology are quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets.

 

Level 2 inputs to the valuation methodology include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, and inputs that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the financial instrument. 

 

Level 3 inputs to the valuation methodology are unobservable.

 

ASC 825-10 “Financial Instruments”, allows entities to voluntarily choose to measure certain financial assets and liabilities at fair value (fair value option). The fair value option may be elected on an instrument-by-instrument basis and is irrevocable, unless a new election date occurs. If the fair value option is elected for an instrument, unrealized gains and losses for that instrument should be reported in earnings at each subsequent reporting date. The Company did not elect to apply the fair value option to any outstanding instruments.

 

The carrying amounts reported in the consolidated balance sheets for cash, accounts receivable, accounts receivable – related party, advances to suppliers, deferred offering costs, prepaid expenses and other, accounts payable and accrued liabilities, income taxes payable, VAT and other taxes payable, and due to related parties approximate their fair market value based on the short-term maturity of these instruments.

 

The Company’s investments measured at fair value on a recurring basis consist of trading securities and held-to-maturity debt securities. The valuation for the Level 1 position is based on quoted prices in active markets. The following table presents information about our assets and liabilities that are measured at fair value on a recurring basis as of December 31, 2021 and 2020 and indicates the fair value hierarchy of the valuation techniques we utilized to determine such fair value. The valuation techniques are based on the fair value measurement on a recurring basis of trading securities and held-to-maturity debt securities. As of December 31, 2021, the Held-to-maturity debt securities had been fully redeemed.

 

       Quoted   Significant   Significant 
       Prices in   Other   Other 
       Active   Observable   Unobservable 
   December 31,   Markets   Inputs   Inputs 
   2021   (Level 1)   (Level 2)   (Level 3) 
Trading securities  $5,197,015   $188,208   $5,008,807   $- 
Total  $5,197,015   $188,208   $5,008,807   $- 

 

       Quoted   Significant   Significant 
       Prices in   Other   Other 
       Active   Observable   Unobservable 
   December 31,   Markets   Inputs   Inputs 
   2020   (Level 1)   (Level 2)   (Level 3) 
Trading securities  $2,366,475   $191,130   $2,175,345   $- 
Held-to-maturity debt securities   459,580    
-
    459,580    
-
 
Total  $2,826,055   $191,130   $2,634,925   $- 

 

Earnings Per Share

 

Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of ordinary shares outstanding during the period. Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing net income by the weighted-average number of ordinary shares and dilutive potential ordinary shares outstanding during the period.

 

For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, there were no other contracts to issue ordinary shares, such as options, warrants or conversion rights, which would have a dilutive effect on earnings per share.

 

F-10

 

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

Cash consists of cash on hand and cash in banks. The Company considers all highly liquid investments with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased to be cash equivalents. The Company maintains cash with various financial institutions in the PRC. As of December 31, 2021 and 2020, cash balances held in PRC banks are uninsured. The Company has not experienced any losses in bank accounts during the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020.

   

Concentrations of Credit Risk

 

Currently, all of the Company’s operations are carried out in the PRC. Accordingly, the Company’s business, financial condition and results of operations may be influenced by the political, economic and legal environment in the PRC, and by the general state of the PRC’s economy. The Company’s operations in the PRC are subject to specific considerations and significant risks not typically associated with companies in North America. The Company’s results may be adversely affected by changes in governmental policies with respect to laws and regulations, anti-inflationary measures, currency conversion and remittance abroad, and rates and methods of taxation, among other things.

 

Financial instruments which potentially subject the Company to concentrations of credit risk consist principally of cash and cash equivalents, short-term investments, trade accounts receivable, and accounts receivable – related parties and advances to suppliers. A portion of the Company’s sales are credit sales which are to the customers whose ability to pay is dependent upon the industry economics prevailing in these areas; however, concentrations of credit risk with respect to trade accounts receivables is limited due to generally short payment terms. The Company also performs ongoing credit evaluations of its customers to help further reduce credit risk.

 

Short-term Investments

 

Short-term investments consist of trading stock and debt securities, which include mutual funds and wealth management products issued by commercial bank. The Company accounts for short term investment in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 320 “Investments — Debt and Equity Securities.” Dividend and interest income, including amortization of the premium and discount arising at acquisition, for all categories of investments in securities are included in Consolidated Statements of Operations. Net realized and unrealized holding gains and losses for short term investments are included in Consolidated Statements of Operations.

 

If a security is acquired with the intent of selling it within hours or days, the security shall be classified as trading securities. The Company classifies investments in trading stock and mutual funds as trading securities. Unrealized holding gains and losses for trading securities are included in earnings.

 

If the Company has positive intent and ability to hold to maturity, the security shall be classified as held-to-maturity securities. The Company classifies investments in wealth management products issued by commercial banks as held-to-maturity securities as the Company intends to hold these investments in wealth management products until maturity and the maturity terms of these investments are within one year.  Due to the short term maturity, the investments in wealth management products are valued at carrying value, which approximates the amortized cost. For individual securities classified as held-to-maturity securities, the Company evaluates whether a decline in fair value below the amortized cost basis is other-than-temporary, in accordance with ASC 320. Other-than-temporary impairment loss is recognized in earnings equal to the entire excess of the debt security’s amortized cost basis over its fair value at the balance sheet date of the reporting period for which the assessment is made.

   

Accounts Receivable, Accounts Receivable - related party and Concentration of Risk

 

Accounts receivable are presented net of an allowance for doubtful accounts. If any, the Company maintains an allowance for doubtful accounts for estimated losses resulting from the inability of its customers to make required payments. The Company reviews the collectability of its receivables on an ongoing basis. After all attempts to collect a receivable have failed. The receivable is written off against the allowance.