10-K 1 ahco-20191231x10k.htm 10-K ahco_Current_Folio_10K

   

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

FORM 10-K

        ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2019

OR

        TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

Commission file number: 001‑38399

AdaptHealth Corp.

(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware

82‑3677704

(State of Other Jurisdiction of incorporation or Organization)

(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)

 

 

220 West Germantown Pike Suite 250,  Plymouth Meeting,  PA 

19462

(Address of principal executive offices)

(Zip code)

 

Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (610)  630‑6357

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:

 

 

    

 

    

Name Of Each Exchange

Title of Each Class

 

Trading Symbol(s)

 

On Which Registered

Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share

 

AHCO

 

The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC

 

 

 

 

 

 

Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act:  None

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.

Yes ☐     No 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act.

Yes ☐   No 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant:  (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes    No

Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically; every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.0405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).    Yes    No

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act.

 

Large accelerated filer 

Accelerated filer

Non-accelerated filer 

Smaller reporting company 

 

 

 

Emerging growth company 

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b‑2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes No

As of June 28, 2019, the last business day of the Registrant's most recently completed second fiscal quarter, the aggregate market value of the shares of Class A Common Stock, par value $0.0001 per share, held by non-affiliates of the Registrant, computed based on the closing sale price of $10.13 per share on June 28, 2019, as reported by The Nasdaq Stock Market LLC, was approximately $253.3 million. Shares of Common Stock held by each executive officer and director and by each shareholder affiliated with a director or an executive officer have been excluded from this calculation because such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. As of March 3, 2020, there were 42,247,356 shares of the Registrant’s Class A Common Stock issued and outstanding and 31,063,799 shares of the Registrant’s Class B Common Stock issued and outstanding.

Documents Incorporated by Reference

The information called for by Part III is incorporated by reference to the Definitive Proxy Statement for the 2020 Annual Meeting of Stockholders of the Registrant which will be filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission not later than April 29, 2020.

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

 

 

 

Page

PART I 

 

 

 

Item 1. Business 

3

 

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors 

13

 

 

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments 

36

 

 

Item 2. Properties 

36

 

 

Item 3. Legal Proceedings 

36

 

 

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures 

36

 

 

PART II 

 

 

 

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities 

37

 

 

Item 6. Selected Financial Data 

38

 

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations 

39

 

 

Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk 

54

 

 

Item 8. Financial Statements and Supplementary Data 

54

 

 

Item 9. Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure 

100

 

 

Item 9A. Controls and Procedures 

100

 

 

Item 9B. Other Information 

101

 

 

PART III 

 

 

 

Item 10. Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance 

101

 

 

Item 11. Executive Compensation 

101

 

 

Item 12. Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters 

101

 

 

Item 13. Certain Relationships and Related Transactions, and Director Independence 

101

 

 

Item 14. Principal Accounting Fees and Services 

102

 

 

PART IV 

 

 

 

Item 15. Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules 

102

 

 

Item 16. Form 10-K Summary 

102

 

1

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT

In this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" in Item 7, and the documents incorporated by reference herein, we make forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. These forward-looking statements relate to expectations for future financial performance, business strategies or expectations for our business. These statements may be preceded by, followed by or include the words "may," "might," "will," "will likely result," "should," "estimate," "plan," "project," "forecast," "intend," "expect," "anticipate," "believe," "seek," "continue," "target" or similar expressions.

These forward-looking statements are based on information available to us as of the date they were made, and involve a number of risks and uncertainties which may cause them to turn out to be wrong. Accordingly, forward-looking statements should not be relied upon as representing our views as of any subsequent date, and we do not undertake any obligation to update forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances after the date they were made, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as may be required under applicable securities laws. As a result of a number of known and unknown risks and uncertainties, our actual results or performance may be materially different from those expressed or implied by these forward- looking statements. Some factors that could cause actual results to differ include:

·

the ability to maintain the listing of our Class A Common Stock on Nasdaq;

·

competition and the ability of our business to grow and manage growth profitably;

·

changes in applicable laws or regulations;

·

fluctuations in the U.S. and/or global stock markets;

·

the possibility that we may be adversely affected by other economic, business, and/or competitive factors; and

·

other risks and uncertainties set forth in this Form 10-K, as well as all documents incorporated by reference herein.

2

PART I

Item 1. Business

We are a leading provider of home healthcare equipment, supplies and related services in the United States. We focus primarily on providing (i) sleep therapy equipment, supplies and related services (including CPAP and bi PAP services) to individuals suffering from obstructive sleep apnea (“OSA”), (ii) home medical equipment  (“HME”) to patients discharged from acute care and other facilities, (iii) oxygen and related chronic therapy services in the home and (iv) other HME medical devices and supplies on behalf of chronically ill patients with diabetes care, wound care, urological, ostomy and nutritional supply needs. We service beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and commercial payors. As of December  31, 2019, we serviced approximately 1.2 million patients annually in 49 states through our network of 173 locations in 35 states. Following our acquisition of the Patient Care Solutions business (“PCS”) from McKesson Corporation in January 2020, we service approximately 1.4 million patients annually in all 50 states through our network of 187 locations in 38 states. Our principal executive offices are located at 220 West Germantown Pike, Suite 250, Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania 19462.

We were originally formed in November 2017 as a special purpose acquisition company under the name DFB Healthcare Acquisitions Corp. for the purpose of effecting a merger, capital stock exchange, asset acquisition, stock purchase, reorganization, or similar business combination involving one or more businesses. On November 8, 2019, we completed our initial business combination, (the “Business Combination”) with AdaptHealth Holdings LLC  (“AdaptHealth Holdings”), a Delaware limited liability company, pursuant to an Agreement and Plan of Merger, dated as of July 8, 2019 (as amended, the "Merger Agreement”), by and among DFB Healthcare Acquisitions Corp. a Delaware corporation (DFB Healthcare Acquisitions Corp. prior to the Business Combination is referred to herein as “DFB”), DFB Merger Sub LLC, a Delaware limited liability company (the “Merger Sub”), our wholly owned subsidiary, AdaptHealth Holdings LLC, AH Representative LLC (the “AdaptHealth Holdings Unitholders’ Representative”), BM AH Holdings, LLC, Access Point Medical Inc. (together the “Blocker Companies”) and, solely for the purposes described therein, Clifton Offshore Investments L.P.,  a British Virgin Islands limited partnership (the “A Blocker Seller”), BlueMountain Foinaven Master Fund L.P., a Cayman Islands exempted limited partnership, BMSB L.P. a Delaware limited partnership, BlueMountain Fursan Fund L.P. a Cayman Islands exempted limited partnership (collectively, the “BM Blocker Sellers” and together with the A Blocker Seller, the “Blocker Sellers”). The transactions contemplated by the Merger Agreement are collectively referred to herein as the "Business Combination". As part of the Business Combination, we changed our name from DFB Healthcare Acquisitions Corp. to AdaptHealth Corp. (“we”, “us”, “our”, “AdaptHealth” or the “Company”). Refer to Note 11, Stockholders’ Equity, included in our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2019 included in this report for additional information.

Industry Overview

The HME industry provides critical medical products and recurring supply services, designed to improve quality of life, to patients in their homes. The HME industry allows patients with complex and chronic conditions to transition to their homes and achieve a greater level of independence, which is often lost in facility-based settings. While the industry has traditionally treated outpatient and lower acuity ailments, recent technological improvements have helped make higher acuity treatment more affordable and, in turn, have allowed the industry to shift to the treatment of more advanced acute ailments. The equipment and supplies that HME providers deliver can include respiratory products, mobility, diabetes management, nutritional and other general home needs (bathroom needs, nutritional needs, hospital beds, etc.).

According to the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (“CMS”), the HME industry has grown from $40 billion in 2010 to $56 billion in 2018 (representing a 4.3% CAGR), of which the Company estimates its total addressable market for its sleep therapy, oxygen services, mobility products and hospice HME business lines to be approximately $12 billion to $15 billion in 2018. During that time Medicaid data shows a continued shift of long-term services and supports spending into the home, with 57% of that spending going to home and community-based services in 2016. According to CMS, the HME market is projected to continue to grow at a 6.1% CAGR over the next nine years. As a result of the acquisition of the diabetic, wound care, ostomy and urological supplies business of PCS in January 2020,

3

the Company believes it has more than doubled its addressable market to more than $25 billion.  Primary drivers of continued market growth include:

·

Aging U.S. Population:  The population of adults aged 65 and older in the U.S., a significant group of end users of AdaptHealth’s products and services, is expected to continue to grow and thus grow AdaptHealth’s market opportunity. According to CMS, in the U.S., the population of adults between the ages of 65 and 84 is expected to grow at a 2.5% CAGR through 2030, while the population of adults over 85 is projected to grow at a 2.9% CAGR during that same time period. Not only is the elderly population expected to grow, but it is also expected to make up a larger percentage of the total U.S. population. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. geriatric population was approximately 15% of the total population in 2014 and is expected to grow to approximately 24% of the total population by 2060. This growth emphasizes the need for companies such as AdaptHealth to provide efficient and effective equipment to a patient’s home, shortening the amount of time that the patient population spends in an inpatient setting.

·

Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Conditions:  HME is necessary to help treat significant health issues affecting millions of Americans. For example, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease was the third leading cause of death in the U.S. in 2014 with over 15 million reported diagnoses, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (“CDC”). Congestive heart failure (“CHF”), another condition where HME plays a role in successful treatment, impacts more than five million Americans, according to the CDC. The CDC also estimates that more than 9% of the US population suffers from diabetes. Finally, according to the American Sleep Apnea Association, OSA affects 20 million people across the nation, with 15 million undiagnosed, including many individuals younger than 65 years old. As these conditions continue to increase in prevalence, AdaptHealth expects that the demand within the HME industry for suppliers, such as AdaptHealth, will grow with it, positioning AdaptHealth to be able to expand its market reach and penetration.

·

Advancements in Technology:  Continuing development of technology and supply logistics has enabled more efficient and effective delivery of care in the home along with the collection of data that can be used for ongoing treatment. This, in turn, has helped grow AdaptHealth’s total addressable market. With improvements in technology, physicians are often able to monitor patients’ adherence to prescribed therapy which previously required admission to a facility. With the advancement of technology, physicians are more confident in shifting care to a patient’s home and patients are more comfortable receiving care in this setting.

·

Increasing Prevalence of and Preference for In-Home Treatments:  The number of conditions that can be treated in the home continues to grow, with recent additions including chronic wound care, sleep testing, dialysis and chemotherapy. In-home care is also increasingly becoming the preferred method of treatment, particularly for the elderly population. According to the AARP Public Policy Institute, 90% of patients over age 55 have indicated a preference to receive care in the home rather than in an institutional setting. Patient preference is supported by data that has shown that the efficacy of home care is often equivalent to that of facility-based care. The home setting provides comfort and convenience for a population that often faces barriers to receiving effective traditional treatment, such as transportation and adherence. By bringing the care to them, the elderly population can maintain a higher quality of life while still receiving high-quality care and equipment. As a result, more companies within the healthcare industry that are primarily facility-based are beginning to shift towards in-home offerings.

·

Home Care is the Lowest Cost Setting:    Not only is in-home care typically just as effective as care delivered in a facility-based setting, but it has also proven to be more cost effective. The cost-effectiveness of in-home care is particularly important within the context of government pressures to lower the cost of care, pushing payors, such as Medicare and Medicaid, and clinicians to seek care settings that are less costly than hospitals and inpatient facilities. On a daily basis, home healthcare has been estimated by Cain Brothers & Company, LLC to be approximately seven times less expensive than care provided in skilled nursing facilities, the closest acuity site of care. Home care generally offers a significant cost reduction opportunity relative to facility-based care without sacrificing quality.

4

Business Strategy

AdaptHealth’s strategy is to grow its revenue while expanding margins through targeted strategies for organic growth as well as opportunistic acquisitions that take advantage of AdaptHealth’s scalable, integrated technology platform.

·

Drive Market Share Gains in the HME MarketAdaptHealth plans to leverage its technological and clinical advantages as well as its relationships with key constituents across the HME supply chain to deepen its presence in the HME market. AdaptHealth has built a strong network of highly diversified referral relationships that its sales force will continue to grow to help expand market penetration in certain geographies. Primary referral sources include acute care hospitals, sleep laboratories, pulmonologist offices, skilled nursing facilities and hospice operators, with no one source accounting for greater than 2% of its revenue as of December 31, 2019. AdaptHealth believes that maintaining and broadening these relationships will drive organic growth. AdaptHealth’s ability to provide many products across its contracted payors is particularly valuable, especially to providers and facilities that discharge patients with a variety of product needs and insurance coverages. While some of its HME competitors focus on certain specific product lines, AdaptHealth is able to offer a wide array of products to its customers. AdaptHealth believes that its strong referral relationships and its broad product portfolio will help drive market share growth.

·

Grow through Acquisitions:    The HME industry is highly fragmented, with more than 6,000 unique suppliers. AdaptHealth believes that ongoing reimbursement changes will continue the consolidation trend in the HME industry that has accelerated in recent years. AdaptHealth believes that in the current environment, companies with the ability to scale operations possess competitive advantages that can drive volume to their platforms. As one of a limited number of national HME companies, AdaptHealth plans to continue to evaluate acquisitions and execute upon attractive opportunities to help drive growth. For the year ended December 31, 2019, AdaptHealth completed 18 acquisitions for aggregate consideration of $67 million (excluding amounts related to contingent consideration), which are expected to add annual net revenues of approximately $116 million. Three of these acquisitions were closed in the fourth quarter of 2019 and represent approximately $18 million in anticipated annual net revenue in 2020.

·

Improve Profitability with Technology-Enabled Platform:  AdaptHealth plans to leverage its integrated technology system (based upon third party applications and proprietary software products) to reduce costs and improve operational efficiency in its current business and the businesses it acquires. During 2018 and 2019, AdaptHealth has deployed its technology solutions with respect to 39 acquisitions and has established the ability to improve logistics performance and operating margins. AdaptHealth intends to continue to improve its technology platform to enhance its communications with referral sources and provide better patient service.

·

Expand Product Portfolio:  In addition to its other growth initiatives, AdaptHealth also plans to augment its product portfolio to help drive growth. While AdaptHealth offers a suite of products to its referrers and patients, it has identified several key expansion opportunities, including products in the respiratory device, respiratory medicine, diabetes management, orthotic bracing and hospice HME markets. AdaptHealth believes that these products will deepen its portfolio and allow it to further address key clinical conditions which, in turn, are expected to help drive growth across its customer base. AdaptHealth’s scale has helped it to be successful in the past when bidding on Medicare contracts.

·

Utilize Value-Based Reimbursement Arrangements:    AdaptHealth’s broad HME service offerings and technology-enabled infrastructure provide the opportunity to enter into value-based reimbursement arrangements with its payors and referrers (including large multi-specialty physician groups, hospital systems, and accountable care organizations) pursuant to which AdaptHealth provides certain HME services on a per-patient, per-month basis or shares in reduction of HME service costs over baseline periods. Such arrangements are attractive to risk-bearing providers (such as capitated medical groups) and payors wishing to reduce administrative costs related to HME services.

5

Competitive Strengths

AdaptHealth believes that the following strengths will continue to enable it to provide high quality products and services to its customers and to create value for stockholders.

·

Differentiated Technology-Enabled Platform:  Over the last five years, AdaptHealth has developed an integrated technology system (based upon best-in-class third party applications and proprietary software products) which AdaptHealth believes provides a competitive advantage within the HME industry. AdaptHealth’s integrated platform distinguishes itself from other industry participants by automating processes that can be complex, prone to mistakes and inefficient. AdaptHealth believes that its platform’s ease of use, improved compliance and automated, integrated workflow for delivery of care appeals to physicians and payors. Additionally, AdaptHealth believes its adoption of e-prescribing solutions enhances transparency and reduces clinical errors and delays. AdaptHealth believes such systems provide better patient service by reducing the time between an order’s receipt and the delivery of the products to the patient. AdaptHealth believes its model is scalable, supporting future organic growth while also allowing for timely on-boarding of acquisitions. AdaptHealth believes that this differentiated technology platform will help generate business from new clients, as other competitors either lack the resources to modernize their technology infrastructure or utilize systems which do not easily allow for changes from traditional, less automated models.

·

National Scale and Operational Excellence:    Following AdaptHealth’s acquisition of PCS in January 2020, AdaptHealth services approximately 1.4 million patients annually across all 50 states and performs over 10,000 equipment and supply deliveries a day through 187 locations, consisting of 140 patient servicing centers, 38 distribution only depots and 9 administrative offices. AdaptHealth also has relationships with national healthcare distribution companies to drop ship certain HME products directly to patients’ homes in one to two days. AdaptHealth believes that its scale makes AdaptHealth attractive to payors as it is able to service its patients across the nation. As of December  31, 2019, AdaptHealth has been able to build a network of more than 1,200 payors, including 10 national and over 150 regional insurers. AdaptHealth’s payor network allows the organization to provide in-network rates for most prospective patients, unlike many of its competitors. AdaptHealth believes that this, in turn, makes it more attractive to referral sources and helps to drive volume. AdaptHealth has a broad distribution network to leverage with respect to timely and efficient delivery of products. AdaptHealth has strategically located small depots across the country based upon equipment volume and drive times to support its delivery fleet and help enhance operational success.

·

Experienced Management Team:  AdaptHealth is led by a proven management team with significant experience in the HME and healthcare services industries. The team has domain knowledge within the industry having been employed at various healthcare organizations throughout their careers. Multiple members of the management team have also built independent HME companies and have the proven ability to scale a business within the HME industry. Additionally, several members of the management team have experience within their specific roles in both private and public company settings. Given the complexity of the highly regulated industry in which AdaptHealth operates, AdaptHealth believes that management’s experience is a meaningful differentiator relative to its competitors.

·

Proven M&A Success:  AdaptHealth’s integrated technology platform includes scalable and centralized front-end and back office processes that facilitate the effective onboarding of potential acquisitions and help achieve cost synergies. AdaptHealth has demonstrated its ability to execute upon acquisitions, deploying over $320 million in capital to complete 64 transactions from its founding through December 31, 2019. As AdaptHealth continues to grow it expects to deploy incrementally more capital and integrate substantially larger targets over time, which in turn it expects will be a source of continued growth for AdaptHealth. For the year ended December 31, 2019, AdaptHealth completed 18 acquisitions for aggregate consideration of $67 million (excluding amounts related to contingent consideration).

6

Company Operations

Product Offering.  AdaptHealth delivers home medical equipment and supplies directly to a patient’s home upon discharge from a hospital and/or receipt of referral. The breadth of AdaptHealth’s products is particularly valuable to acute care hospitals, sleep laboratories and long-term care facilities that discharge patients with complex conditions and multiple product needs.

AdaptHealth is often paid a fixed monthly amount for certain HME products as designated by CMS or commercial payors, such as CPAP, wheelchairs, hospital beds, oxygen concentrators, continuous glucose monitors and other similar products. These types of equipment accounted for approximately 40% of AdaptHealth’s revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019.

For other products, which include those deemed to be consumables, AdaptHealth receives a single payment upon shipment of the product. Sales of these products, which include CPAP masks and related supplies, diabetes management supplies, wound care supplies, wheelchair cushions accessories, orthopedic bracing, breast pumps and supplies, walkers, commodes and canes, nutritional supplies and incontinence supplies, accounted for approximately 60% of AdaptHealth’s revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019.

Supply Chain.  AdaptHealth plays an important role in delivering HME products to patients in their homes. Manufacturers of home medical equipment sell their products to AdaptHealth and ship them to AdaptHealth directly. AdaptHealth also contracts with national healthcare distribution companies to ship certain HME products directly to patients’ homes. These distributors invoice AdaptHealth for the cost of shipped products at the time of sale. AdaptHealth receives referrals from a variety of sources, such as acute care hospitals, sleep laboratories, pulmonologist offices, skilled nursing facilities and hospice operators. AdaptHealth’s products are either shipped to patients’ homes by AdaptHealth-operated or contracted delivery trucks or shipped using proprietary or third-party distribution services. AdaptHealth bills payors and patients directly for the products that are delivered and for the services that are provided. Following AdaptHealth’s acquisition of PCS in January 2020, AdaptHealth services approximately 1.4 million patients annually across all 50 states and performs over 10,000 equipment and supply deliveries a day through 187 locations, consisting of 140 patient servicing centers, 38 distribution-only depots and 9 administrative offices, to help service its patient population efficiently and effectively.

Operating Structure

Management.  AdaptHealth is led by a proven management team with experience in the HME industry across a variety of healthcare organizations. AdaptHealth adopts a centralized approach for key business processes, including M&A activity, revenue cycle management, strategic purchases, payor contracting, finance, compliance, legal, human resources, IT and sales management. In addition, AdaptHealth has centralized many of the functions relating to its CPAP and other resupply businesses. However, AdaptHealth believes that the personalized nature of customer requirements and referral relationships, characteristic of the home healthcare business, mandate that it emphasize a localized operating structure as well. AdaptHealth focuses on regional management to respond promptly and effectively to local market demands and opportunities. AdaptHealth’s regional managers are responsible and accountable for maintaining and developing relationships with referral sources, customer service for non-CPAP supply product lines and logistics for non-drop-shipped products.

IT.  AdaptHealth has established an integrated, technology-enabled, centralized platform, distinguishing itself from many of its competitors who traditionally use less automated processes that are typically complex, can be prone to mistakes and are inefficient. AdaptHealth’s technology enables automated, compliant, and integrated workflow into patients’ delivery of care. AdaptHealth believes that this advanced technology platform provides it with a competitive advantage through its unique components that cater to patients and physicians. AdaptHealth believes that its technology platform has several characteristics that appeal to physicians, including its ease of use, the improved compliance it enables through its integrated systems and the automated, integrated workflow it provides for patients’ delivery of care. Additionally, AdaptHealth’s e-prescribing capabilities enhance transparency and reduce transcription and other errors. AdaptHealth believes that patients are also better served due to the efficiency from time of order to delivery and the seamless integration across points of care enabled by AdaptHealth’s platform. The integrated system also provides

7

AdaptHealth management with critical information in a timely manner, allowing them to track performance levels company wide.

AdaptHealth has formed close relationships with its third-party software providers, including Apacheta Corporation, Brightree, Parachute Health and SnapWorx, LLC, to optimize its HME workflow. An example of this optimization is AdaptHealth’s automated point-of-delivery technology, which tracks AdaptHealth’s drivers and produces paperless, secure delivery tickets which are uploaded directly to the patient’s file and available immediately on an enterprise-wide basis. In addition, to address ongoing and growing threats related to cyberattacks, AdaptHealth continues to deploy market leading defense tools to protect and secure its networks and data.

Revenue Cycle Management.  AdaptHealth’s revenue cycle management and billing processes have both manual and computerized elements that are designed to maintain the integrity of revenue and accounts receivable. Third-party payors that can accommodate electronic claims submission, such as Medicare, certain state Medicaid payors and many commercial payors, are billed electronically on a daily basis. For other payors who are unable to accept electronic submissions, AdaptHealth generates paper claims and invoices.

AdaptHealth contracts with several business process outsourcing providers to provide certain billing and administrative functions related to revenue cycle management. These providers are based in the Philippines, India and Central America and provide AdaptHealth with the ability to scale its workforce in a cost-effective manner. As of December 31, 2019, approximately 1,430 full-time equivalent personnel were provided to AdaptHealth under such arrangements. Following AdaptHealth’s acquisition of PCS in January 2020, approximately 1,500 full-time equivalent personnel are provided to AdaptHealth under such arrangements.

Sales and Marketing

Sales activities are generally carried out by AdaptHealth’s full-time sales representatives with assistance from on-site liaisons in certain markets who interact directly with hospital discharge coordinators and patients. AdaptHealth’s sales team works closely with AdaptHealth’s trained respiratory therapists in carrying out their daily sales activities. AdaptHealth primarily acquires new patients through referrals. Sources of referrals include acute care hospitals, sleep laboratories, pulmonologist offices, skilled nursing facilities and hospice operators, among others. AdaptHealth’s sales representatives maintain continual contact with medical professionals across these facilities. AdaptHealth believes that its relationships with its referral sources are strong and that these entities will continue to be a source of organic growth through new patients. While AdaptHealth views its referral sources as fundamental to its business, no single referral source accounted for more than 2% of its revenues as of December 31, 2019.

Acquisitions

Continuing to grow through accretive acquisitions is a key element of AdaptHealth’s growth strategy, and AdaptHealth continuously reviews its pipeline of potential acquisition candidates. AdaptHealth maintains a dedicated M&A integration team and leverages its scalable front-end and back-office technology platform to facilitate acquisition integration to help realize short-term cost saving synergies and longer-term revenue growth synergies.

During the year ended December 31, 2019, AdaptHealth completed acquisitions involving 18 companies for total purchase consideration of approximately $67 million (excluding amounts related to contingent consideration). For the year ended December 31, 2018, AdaptHealth completed acquisitions involving 21 companies for total purchase consideration of approximately $171 million.

Suppliers

AdaptHealth purchases medical equipment from a variety of suppliers. AdaptHealth’s sleep therapy equipment and supplies are primarily provided by two suppliers, and its mobility and home services products (such as hospital beds, wheelchairs, walkers and commodes) are principally supplied by a single supplier. Notwithstanding its significant supply relationships with these vendors, AdaptHealth believes that it is not dependent upon any single supplier and that its product needs can be met by an adequate number of qualified manufacturers.

8

Facilities

AdaptHealth does not own any properties and leases its headquarters facility located at 220 West Germantown Pike, Suite 250, Plymouth Meeting, PA. As of December 31, 2019, AdaptHealth served approximately 1.2 million patients annually across 49 states and performed over 7,000 equipment and supply deliveries a day through 173 locations, consisting of 128 patient servicing centers, 36 distribution-only depots and 9 administrative offices. Following AdaptHealth’s acquisition of PCS in January 2020, AdaptHealth services approximately 1.4 million patients annually across all 50 states and performs over 10,000 equipment and supply deliveries a day through 187 locations, consisting of 140 patient servicing centers, 38 distribution-only depots and 9 administrative offices.  Full service locations are typically between 300 and 5,000 square feet, and are usually a combination office and warehouse space. Many of these facilities are accredited to provide patient services, and their adjacent warehouse space is used for storage of adequate supplies of equipment and accessories for such patient services. AdaptHealth believes that these facilities are adequate to meet its current needs, and expects to add additional facilities in connection with its growth strategies. AdaptHealth believes that such additional space, when required, will be available on commercially reasonable terms, consistent with historical cost trends.

Employees

As of December 31, 2019, AdaptHealth had approximately 2,590 employees. Following AdaptHealth’s acquisition of PCS in January 2020, AdaptHealth has approximately 3,060 employees. AdaptHealth believes that relations between its management and employees are good.

Competition

The HME market is fragmented and highly competitive. AdaptHealth competes with other large national providers, including AeroCare, Apria Healthcare, Lincare and Rotech; regional providers, including DASCO Home Medical Equipment, Binson’s Medical Equipment, Inc., Norco, Inc. and Protech Home Medical Corp.; and product-specific providers, including Breg, Inc., Byram Healthcare Centers, Inc., Inogen, Inc. and Acelity L.P. Inc, as well as over 6,000 local organizations. In addition, non-HME providers, including CVS, Amazon and certain manufacturers of HME equipment, are considering entering or expanding their presence in the HME market.

Consolidation of the HME market is a continuing trend, as required technology investments and reduced reimbursements put financial pressure on smaller providers. Larger HME providers with integrated technology and automated processes are generally better positioned to gain market share and more attractive vendor pricing. Competitive bidding also emphasizes the importance of relationships with both the payors and referral sources. Because payors typically select a limited number of exclusive suppliers and physicians typically refer based on timely delivery and consistency, relationships with both are critical to the success of competitors in the market.

AdaptHealth believes that the most important competitive factors in the regional and local markets are:

·

Reputation with referral sources, including local physicians and hospital-based professionals;

·

Service quality and efficient, responsive referral process;

·

Differentiated technology platform that provides a superior physician and patient experience;

·

Comprehensive offering across the home medical equipment space;

·

Broad network of payor contracts and regional insurers;

·

Overall ease of doing business; and

·

Quality of patient care, including clinical expertise.

9

AdaptHealth believes that it competes favorably with competitors on the basis of these and other factors.

Legal Proceedings

AdaptHealth is involved in investigations, claims, lawsuits and other proceedings arising in the ordinary course of its business. These matters involve personnel and employment issues, regulatory matters, personal injury, contract and other proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, which have not resulted in any material losses to date. Although AdaptHealth does not expect the outcome of these proceedings will have a material adverse effect on its financial condition or results of operations, such matters are inherently unpredictable. Therefore, AdaptHealth could incur judgments or enter into settlements or claims that could materially impact its financial condition or results of operations.

In addition, on July 25, 2017, AdaptHealth Holdings was served with a subpoena by the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania (“EDPA”) pursuant to 18 U.S.C. §3486 to produce certain audit records and internal communications regarding ventilator billing. The investigation appears to be focused on billing practices regarding one payor that contracted for bundled payments for certain ventilators. AdaptHealth Holdings has cooperated with investigators and, through agreement with the EDPA, has submitted all information requested. An independent third party was retained by AdaptHealth Holdings that identified overpayments and underpayments for ventilator billings related to the payor, and a remittance was sent to reconcile that account. AdaptHealth Holdings has cooperated and fully complied with the subpoena. On October 3, 2019 AdaptHealth received a follow-up civil investigative demand from the EDPA regarding a document previously produced to the EDPA and patients included in the review by the independent third party. AdaptHealth has responded to the EDPA and supplemented its production as requested. At this time, AdaptHealth Holdings cannot provide any assurance as to whether the EDPA will seek additional information or pursue this matter further.

Government Regulation

The federal government and all states in which AdaptHealth currently operates regulate various aspects of AdaptHealth’s business. In particular, AdaptHealth’s operations are subject to federal laws that regulate the reimbursement of its products and services under various government programs and that are designed to prevent fraud and abuse. AdaptHealth’s operations are also subject to state laws governing, among other things, pharmacies, nursing services, medical equipment suppliers and certain types of home health activities. Certain of its employees are subject to state laws and regulations governing the licensure and professional practice of respiratory therapy, pharmacy and nursing.

AdaptHealth maintains a Compliance Program that meets the guidelines set forth by the Office of Inspector General of CMS, and provides ongoing compliance training designed to keep AdaptHealth’s officers, directors and employees well-educated and up-to-date regarding developments on relevant topics and to emphasize AdaptHealth’s policy of strict compliance. Federal and state laws require that AdaptHealth obtain facility and other regulatory licenses and that AdaptHealth enroll as a supplier with federal and state health programs.

As a healthcare provider, AdaptHealth is subject to extensive regulation to prevent fraud and abuse and laws regulating reimbursement under various government programs. The marketing, billing, documenting and other practices of healthcare companies are all subject to government scrutiny. To ensure compliance with Medicare, Medicaid and other regulations, regional health insurance carriers and state agencies often conduct audits and request customer records and other documents to support AdaptHealth’s claims submitted for payment of services rendered to customers. Similarly, government agencies and their contractors periodically open investigations and obtain information from healthcare providers pursuant to the legal process. Violations of federal and state regulations can result in severe criminal, civil and administrative penalties and sanctions, including disqualification from Medicare and other reimbursement programs, which could have a material adverse effect on AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

Numerous federal and state laws and regulations, including HIPAA and the HITECH Act, govern the collection, dissemination, security, use and confidentiality of patient-identifiable health information. As part of

10

AdaptHealth’s provision of, and billing for, healthcare equipment and services, AdaptHealth is required to collect and maintain patient-identifiable health information. New health information standards, whether implemented pursuant to HIPAA, the HITECH Act, congressional action or otherwise, could have a significant effect on the manner in which AdaptHealth handles healthcare-related data and communicate with payers, and the cost of complying with these standards could be significant. If AdaptHealth does not comply with existing or new laws and regulations related to patient health information, it could be subject to criminal or civil sanctions.

Healthcare is an area of rapid regulatory change. Changes in the laws and regulations and new interpretations of existing laws and regulations may affect permissible activities, the relative costs associated with doing business, and reimbursement amounts paid by federal, state and other third-party payers. AdaptHealth cannot predict the future of federal, state and local regulation or legislation, including Medicare and Medicaid statutes and regulations, or possible changes in national healthcare policies. Future legislative and regulatory changes could have a material adverse effect on AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

Implemented Regulation

As a provider of home oxygen, respiratory and other chronic therapy equipment to the home healthcare market, AdaptHealth participates in Medicare Part B, the Supplementary Medical Insurance Program, which was established by the Social Security Act of 1965. Providers of home oxygen and other respiratory therapy services and equipment have historically been heavily dependent on Medicare reimbursement due to the high proportion of elderly persons suffering from respiratory disease. Durable medical equipment, including oxygen equipment, is traditionally reimbursed by Medicare based on fixed fee schedules.

Impact of the ACA and MIPPA. The ACA, the Medicare Improvements for Patients and Providers Act of 2008 (“MIPPA”), the Medicare, Medicaid and SCHIP Extension Act of 2007 (“SCHIP Extension Act”), the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 (“DRA”) and the Medicare Prescription Drug, Improvement, and Modernization Act of 2003 (“MMA”) contain provisions that directly impacted reimbursement for the primary respiratory and other durable medical equipment (“DME”) products provided by AdaptHealth.

In recent years, the U.S. Congress and certain state legislatures have considered and passed a large number of laws intended to result in significant change to the ACA. The law has been subject to legislative and regulatory changes and court challenges, and the current presidential administration and certain members of Congress have stated their intent to repeal or make additional significant changes to the ACA, its implementation or its interpretation. In 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Acts was enacted, which, among other things, removed penalties for not complying with ACA’s individual mandate to carry health insurance. In addition, the president has signed an executive order that directs agencies to minimize “economic and regulatory burdens” of the ACA. Because the penalty associated with the individual mandate was eliminated, a federal judge in Texas ruled in December 2018 that the entire ACA was unconstitutional. However, the law remains in place pending appeal. These changes and court challenges may impact the number of individuals that elect to obtain public or private health insurance or the scope of such coverage, if purchased. The presidential administration and the U.S. Congress may take further action regarding the ACA, including, but not limited to, repeal or replacement. Additionally, all or a portion of the ACA and related subsequent legislation may be modified, repealed or otherwise invalidated through further legislation or judicial challenge, which could result in lower numbers of insured individuals, and reduced coverage for insured individuals. There is uncertainty regarding whether, when, and how the ACA will be further changed, what alternative provisions, if any, will be enacted, and the impact of alternative provisions on providers and other healthcare industry participants. Government efforts to repeal or change the ACA or to implement alternative reform measures could cause AdaptHealth’s revenues to decrease to the extent such legislation reduces Medicaid and/or Medicare reimbursement rates.

MIPPA delayed the implementation of a Medicare competitive bidding program for oxygen equipment and certain other DME items that was scheduled to begin on July 1, 2008, and instituted a 9.5% price reduction nationwide for these items as of January 1, 2009. The SCHIP Extension Act reduced Medicare reimbursement amounts for covered Part B drugs, including inhalation drugs that AdaptHealth provides, beginning April 1, 2008. DRA provisions negatively impacted reimbursement for oxygen equipment beginning in 2009 through the implementation of a capped rental arrangement. MMA changed the pricing formulas used to establish payment rates for inhalation drug therapies resulting

11

in significantly reduced reimbursement beginning in 2005, established a competitive acquisition program for DME, established a Recovery Audit Contractors program, which implemented a new method for recovery of Medicare overpayments by utilizing private companies operating on a contingent fee basis to identify and recoup Medicare overpayments, and implemented quality standards and accreditation requirements for DME suppliers. The RACs are empowered to audit claims submitted by healthcare providers and to withhold future payments, including in cases where the reimbursement rules are unclear or subject to differing interpretations. This activity, as well as the activity of intermediaries and others involved in government reimbursement, may include changes in long-standing interpretations of reimbursement rules, which could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s future financial condition and results of operations. In October 2008, CMS established Zone Program Integrity Contractors (“ZPICs”), who are responsible for ensuring the integrity of all Medicare-related claims. The ZPICs assumed the responsibilities previously held by Medicare’s Program Safeguard Contractors (“PSCs”). These legislative and regulatory provisions, as currently in effect have and will continue to adversely impact AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

Impact of Competitive Bidding.  In December 2003, MMA was signed into law. The MMA legislation directly impacted reimbursement for the primary respiratory and other DME products that AdaptHealth provides. Among other things, MMA established a competitive acquisition program for DME that was expected to commence in 2008, but was subsequently delayed by further legislation. MMA instructed CMS to establish and implement programs under which competitive acquisition areas would be established throughout the United States for purposes of awarding contracts for the furnishing of competitively priced items of DME, including oxygen equipment. The program was initially intended to be implemented in phases such that competition under the program would occur in nine of the largest metropolitan statistical areas (“MSAs”) in the first year and an additional 70 of the largest MSAs in a second, subsequent round of bidding. The second round was subsequently expanded to include 91 MSAs.

For each competitive acquisition area, CMS is required to conduct a competition under which providers submit bids to supply certain covered items of DME. Successful bidders are expected to meet certain program quality standards in order to be awarded a contract, and only successful bidders can supply the covered items to Medicare beneficiaries in the acquisition area (there are, however, regulations in place that allow non-contracted providers to continue to provide equipment and services to their existing customers at the new prices determined through the bidding process). The contracts are expected to be re-bid at least every three years. CMS is required to award contracts to multiple entities submitting bids in each area for an item or service but has the authority to limit the number of contractors in a competitive acquisition area to the number it determines to be necessary to meet projected demand. CMS concluded the bidding process for the first round of MSAs in September 2007. However, in July 2008, Congress enacted the MIPPA legislation which retroactively delayed the implementation of competitive bidding and reduced Medicare prices nationwide by 9.5% beginning in 2009 for the product categories, including oxygen, that were initially included in competitive bidding.

In 2009, CMS reinstituted the bidding process in the nine largest MSA markets. Reimbursement rates from the re-bidding process were publicly released by CMS on June 30, 2010. CMS announced average savings of approximately 32% off the current payment rates in effect for the product categories included in competitive bidding. As of January 1, 2011, these payment rates were in effect in the nine markets only (Charlotte, Cincinnati, Cleveland, Dallas, Kansas City, Miami, Orlando, Pittsburgh and Riverside). AdaptHealth’s annual Medicare revenues from the product categories in the nine markets affected by competitive bidding were approximately $5.6 million at the time the program commenced.

On January 30, 2013, CMS announced new, lower Medicare pricing for the second round of competitive bidding effective July 1, 2013. CMS announced average savings of approximately 45% for the product categories included in Round 2. The ACA legislation requires CMS to expand competitive bidding further to additional geographic markets (certain markets may be excluded at the discretion of CMS) or to use competitive bid pricing information to adjust the payment amounts otherwise in effect for areas that are not competitive acquisition areas by January 1, 2016.

CMS is required by law to re-compete competitive bidding contracts at least once every three years. With the Round 1 rebid contracts expiring on December 31, 2013, new Round 1 re-compete contracts and pricing went into effect on January 1, 2014. Round 1 re-compete bidding occurred in the same nine Metropolitan Statistical Areas (“MSAs”) as the Round 1 rebid. CMS’ contract prices under the Round 1 re-compete averaged 37% below Medicare’s fee schedule rates for the six product categories.

12

On March 7, 2019, CMS announced plans to consolidate the competitive bidding areas included in the Round 2 re-compete and Round 1 2017 DMEPOS Competitive Bidding Program into a single round of competition referred to as “Round 2021.” Round 2021 contracts are scheduled to become effective on January 1, 2021, and extend through December 31, 2023. The competitive bidding process has historically put pressure on the amount AdaptHealth is reimbursed in the markets in which it exists as well as in areas that are not subject to the Competitive Bidding Program. The rates required to win future competitive bids could continue to compress reimbursement rates. AdaptHealth will continue to monitor developments regarding the Competitive Bidding Program. While AdaptHealth cannot predict the outcome of the Competitive Bidding Program on its business in the future nor the Medicare payment rates that will be in effect in future years for the items subjected to competitive bidding, the program may materially adversely affect its future financial condition and results of operations.

Durable Medical Equipment Medicare Administrative Contractor.  In order to ensure that Medicare beneficiaries only receive medically necessary and appropriate items and services, the Medicare program has adopted a number of documentation requirements. For example, the DME MAC Supplier Manuals provide that clinical information from the “patient’s medical record” is required to justify the initial and ongoing medical necessity for the provision of DME. Some DME MACs, CMS staff and government subcontractors have recently taken the position, among other things, that the “patient’s medical record” refers not to documentation maintained by the DME supplier but instead to documentation maintained by the patient’s physician, healthcare facility or other clinician, and that clinical information created by the DME supplier’s personnel and confirmed by the patient’s physician is not sufficient to establish medical necessity. It may be difficult, and sometimes impossible, for AdaptHealth to obtain documentation from other healthcare providers. Moreover, auditors’ interpretations of these policies are inconsistent and subject to individual interpretation, leading to significant increases in individual supplier and industry-wide perceived error rates. High error rates lead to further audit activity and regulatory burdens. If these or other burdensome positions are generally adopted by auditors, DME MACs, other contractors or CMS in administering the Medicare program, AdaptHealth would have the right to challenge these positions as being contrary to law. If these interpretations of the documentation requirements are ultimately upheld, however, it could result in AdaptHealth making significant refunds and other payments to Medicare, and AdaptHealth’s future revenues and cash flows from Medicare may be reduced. AdaptHealth cannot currently predict the adverse impact these interpretations of the Medicare documentation requirements might have on its financial condition and results of operations, but such impact could be material.

Federal and state budgetary and other cost-containment pressures will continue to impact the home respiratory care industry. AdaptHealth cannot predict whether new federal and state budgetary proposals will be adopted or the effect, if any, such proposals would have on its financial condition and results of operations.

Availability of Information

We file or furnish annual, quarterly and current reports, proxy statements and other documents with the Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) under the Exchange Act. The SEC maintains an internet website at www.sec.gov that contains reports, proxy and information statements and other information regarding issuers, including us, that file electronically with the SEC.

We also make available free of charge through our website, https://www.adapthealth.com/investor-relations, electronic copies of certain documents that we file with the SEC, including our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K and amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act as soon as reasonably practicable after we electronically file such material with, or furnish it to, the SEC. Information on our website or any other website is not incorporated by reference into, and does not constitute a part of, this Annual Report.

Item 1A. Risk Factors

We operate in a rapidly changing environment that involves a number of risks. The following discussion highlights some of these risks. and others are discussed elsewhere in this report. These and other risks could materially and adversely affect our business, revenue, financial condition and results of operations.

13

Risks Related to Our Business and Industry

AdaptHealth’s revenue could be impacted by federal and state changes to reimbursement and other aspects of Medicaid and Medicare.

AdaptHealth derived approximately 32% of its revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019 from Medicare and various state-based Medicaid programs. These programs are subject to statutory and regulatory changes affecting overall spending, base rates or basis of payment, retroactive rate adjustments, annual caps that limit the amount that can be paid (including deductible and coinsurance amounts) for rehabilitation therapy services rendered to Medicare beneficiaries, administrative or executive orders and government funding restrictions, all of which may materially adversely affect the rates and frequency at which these programs reimburse AdaptHealth. For example, the Medicaid Integrity Contractor program is increasing the scrutiny placed on Medicaid payments and could result in recoupments of alleged overpayments in an effort to rein in Medicaid spending. Recent budget proposals and legislation at both the federal and state levels have called for cuts in reimbursement for healthcare providers participating in the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Enactment and implementation of measures to reduce or delay reimbursement or overall Medicare or Medicaid spending could result in substantial reductions in AdaptHealth’s revenue and profitability. Payors may disallow AdaptHealth’s requests for reimbursement based on determinations that certain costs are not reimbursable or reasonable because either adequate or additional documentation was not provided or because certain services were not covered or considered reasonably necessary. Additionally, revenue from these payors can be retroactively adjusted after a new examination during the claims settlement process or as a result of post-payment audits.

AdaptHealth’s business may be adversely impacted by healthcare reform efforts, including repeal of or significant modifications to, the ACA.

In recent years, the U.S. Congress and certain state legislatures have considered and passed a number of laws that are intended to result in significant changes to the healthcare industry. However, there is significant uncertainty regarding the future of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (“ACA”), the most prominent of these reform efforts. The law has been subject to legislative and regulatory changes and court challenges, and the current presidential administration and certain members of Congress have stated their intent to repeal or make additional significant changes to the ACA, its implementation or its interpretation. In 2017, the Tax Cuts and Jobs Acts was enacted, which, effective January 1, 2019, among other things, removed penalties for not complying with ACA’s individual mandate to carry health insurance. In addition, President Trump has signed an executive order that directs agencies to minimize “economic and regulatory burdens” of the ACA. Because the penalty associated with the individual mandate was eliminated, a federal judge in Texas ruled in December 2018 that the entire ACA was unconstitutional. The presidential administration and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have both stated that the ruling will have no immediate effect, and on December 18, 2019, the Fifth Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals upheld the lower court’s finding that the individual mandate is unconstitutional and remanded the case back to the lower court to reconsider its earlier invalidation of the full ACA. Pending review, the law remains in effect, but it is unclear at this time what effect the latest ruling will have on the status of the ACA. These changes and court challenges may impact the number of individuals that elect to obtain public or private health insurance or the scope of such coverage, if purchased. The presidential administration and the U.S. Congress may take further action regarding the ACA, including, but not limited to, repeal or replacement. Additionally, all or a portion of the ACA and related subsequent legislation may be modified, repealed or otherwise invalidated through further legislation or judicial challenge, which could result in reduced funding for state Medicaid programs, lower numbers of insured individuals, and reduced coverage for insured individuals. There is uncertainty regarding whether, when, and how the ACA will be further changed, what alternative provisions, if any, will be enacted, and the impact of alternative provisions on providers and other healthcare industry participants. Government efforts to repeal or change the ACA or to implement alternative reform measures could cause AdaptHealth’s revenues to decrease to the extent such legislation reduces Medicaid and/or Medicare reimbursement rates.

14

AdaptHealth is affected by continuing efforts by private third-party payors to control their costs. If AdaptHealth agrees to lower its reimbursement rates due to pricing pressures from private third-party payors, AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations would likely deteriorate.

AdaptHealth derived approximately 57% of its revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019 from third-party private payors. Such payors continually seek to control the cost of providing healthcare services through direct contracts with healthcare providers, increased oversight and greater enrollment of patients in managed care programs and preferred provider organizations. These private payors are increasingly demanding discounted fee structures, including setting reimbursement rates based on Medicare fee schedules and the assumption by the healthcare provider of all or a portion of the financial risk. Reimbursement payments under private payor programs may not remain at current levels and may not be sufficient to cover the costs allocable to patients eligible for reimbursement pursuant to such programs, and AdaptHealth may suffer deterioration in pricing flexibility, changes in payor mix and growth in operating expenses in excess of increases in payments by private third-party payors. AdaptHealth may be compelled to lower its prices due to increased pricing pressures, which could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

Changes in governmental or private payor supply replenishment schedules could adversely affect AdaptHealth.

AdaptHealth generated approximately 42% of its revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019 through the sale of masks, tubing and other ancillary products related to patients utilizing CPAP devices. Medicare, Medicaid and private payors limit the number of times per year that patients may purchase such supplies. To the extent that any governmental or private payor revises their resupply guidelines to reduce the number of times such supplies can be purchased, such reductions could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s revenue, financial condition and results of operations.

AdaptHealth generates a significant portion of its revenue from the provision of sleep therapy equipment and supplies to patients, and AdaptHealth is therefore highly dependent on it for its success.

Approximately 58% of AdaptHealth’s revenue for the year ended December 31, 2019 was generated from the provision of sleep therapy equipment and supplies to patients. AdaptHealth’s ability to execute its growth strategy therefore depends upon the adoption by patients, physicians and sleep centers, among others, of AdaptHealth’s sleep therapy equipment and supplies to treat their patients suffering from OSA. There can be no assurance that AdaptHealth will continue to maintain broad acceptance among physicians and patients. Any failure by AdaptHealth to satisfy physician or patient demand or to maintain meaningful market acceptance will harm its business and future prospects.

AdaptHealth may be adversely affected by consolidation among health insurers and other industry participants.

In recent years, a number of health insurers have merged or increased efforts to consolidate with other non-governmental payors. Insurers are also increasingly pursuing alignment initiatives with healthcare providers. Consolidation within the health insurance industry may result in insurers having increased negotiating leverage and competitive advantages, such as greater access to performance and pricing data. AdaptHealth’s ability to negotiate prices and favorable terms with health insurers in certain markets could be affected negatively as a result of this consolidation. In addition, the shift toward value-based payment models could be accelerated if larger insurers, including those engaging in consolidation activities, find these models to be financially beneficial. There can be no assurance that AdaptHealth will be able to negotiate favorable terms with payors and otherwise respond effectively to the impact of increased consolidation in the payor industry or vertical integration efforts.

AdaptHealth’s payor contracts are subject to renegotiation or termination, which could result in a decrease in AdaptHealth’s revenue or profits.

The majority of AdaptHealth’s payor contracts are subject to unilateral termination by either party on between 30 and 90 days’ prior written notice. Such contracts are routinely amended (sometimes by unilateral action by payors regarding payment policy), renegotiated, subjected to a bidding process with AdaptHealth’s competitors, or terminated altogether. Sometimes in the renegotiation process, certain lines of business may not be renewed or a payor may enlarge

15

its provider network or otherwise adversely change the way it conducts its business with AdaptHealth. In other cases, a payor may reduce its provider network in exchange for lower payment rates. AdaptHealth’s revenue from a payor may also be adversely affected if the payor alters its utilization management expectations and/or administrative procedures for payments and audits, changes its order of preference among the providers to which it refers business or imposes a third-party administrator, network manager or other intermediary. Any reduction in AdaptHealth’s projected home respiratory therapy/home medical equipment revenues as a result of these or other factors could lead to a reduction in AdaptHealth’s revenues. There can be no assurance that AdaptHealth’s payor contracts will not be terminated or altered in ways that are unfavorable to AdaptHealth as a result of renegotiation or such administrative changes. Payors may decide to refer business to their owned provider subsidiaries, such as specialty pharmaceuticals and/or HME networks owned by such payors or by third-party management companies. These activities could materially reduce AdaptHealth’s revenue from these payors.

If AdaptHealth fails to manage the complex and lengthy reimbursement process, its revenue, financial condition and results of operations could suffer.

Because AdaptHealth depends upon reimbursement from Medicare, Medicaid and third-party payors for a significant majority of its revenues, AdaptHealth’s revenue, financial condition and results of operations may be affected by the reimbursement process, which in the healthcare industry is complex and can involve lengthy delays between the time that services are rendered and the time that the reimbursement amounts are settled. Depending on the payor, AdaptHealth may be required to obtain certain payor-specific documentation from physicians and other healthcare providers before submitting claims for reimbursement. Certain payors have filing deadlines and will not pay claims submitted after such time. AdaptHealth cannot ensure that it will be able to effectively manage the reimbursement process and collect payments for its equipment and services promptly.  

If the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) require prior authorization or implement changes in documentation necessary for AdaptHealth’s products, AdaptHealth’s revenue, financial condition and results of operations could be negatively impacted.

CMS has established and maintains a Master List of Items Frequently Subject to Unnecessary Utilization of certain DMEPOS that the Secretary determined, based on prior payment experience, are frequently subject to unnecessary utilization. This list identifies items that CMS has determined could potentially be subject to Prior Authorization as a condition of Medicare payment. Since 2012, CMS has also maintained a list of categories of DMEPOS items to include face-to-face encounters with practitioners and written orders before furnishing the items to beneficiaries.  On November 8, 2019 CMS combined and harmonized the two lists to create a single unified Master List of DMEPOS Items Potentially Subject to Face-To-Face Encounter and Written Order Prior to Delivery and/or Prior Authorization Requirements (“Master List”). In November 2019, CMS also reduced the financial threshold for inclusion on the Master List. With certain exceptions for reductions in Payment Threshold, items remain on the Master List for 10 years from the date the item was added to the Master List. The presence of an item on the Master List does not automatically mean that a prior authorization is required. Currently, CMS selects items from the Master List for inclusion on the “Required Prior Authorization List.” The expanded Master List would increase the number of DMEPOS items potentially eligible to be selected for prior authorization, face-to-face encounter and written order prior to delivery requirements as a condition of payment.

On April 22, 2019, CMS has added items that are a part of AdaptHealth’s product lines to the Master List of Items Frequently Subject to Unnecessary Utilization. If CMS adds additional products to the Master List, expands Prior Authorization requirements or expands Face-to-Face Encounter and Written Order Prior to Delivery requirements to products in AdaptHealth’s product line, such requirements may adversely impact AdaptHealth’s revenue, financial condition and results from operations.

Reimbursement claims are subject to audits by various governmental and private payor entities from time to time and such audits may negatively affect AdaptHealth’s revenue, financial condition and results of operations.

AdaptHealth receives a substantial portion of its revenues from the Medicare program. Medicare reimbursement claims made by healthcare providers, including HME providers, are subject to audit from time to time by governmental

16

payors and their agents, such as Medicare Administrative Contractors (“MACs”) that act as fiscal intermediaries for all Medicare billings, auditors contracted by CMS, and insurance carriers, as well as HHS-OIG, CMS and state Medicaid programs. These include specific requirements imposed by the Durable Medical Equipment Medicare Administrative Contractor (“DME MAC”) Supplier Manuals. To ensure compliance with Medicare, Medicaid and other regulations, government agencies or their contractors, including MACs, Recovery Audit Contractors and Zone Program Integrity Contractors, often conduct audits and request customer records and other documents to support our claims submitted for payment of services rendered. In many instances, there are only limited publicly-available guidelines and methodologies for determining errors with certain audits. As a result, there can be a significant lack of clarity regarding required documentation and audit methodology. The clarity and completeness of each patient medical file, some of which is the work product of physicians not employed by AdaptHealth, is essential to successfully challenging any payment denials. For example, the DME MAC Supplier Manuals provide that clinical information from the “patient’s medical record” is required to justify the initial and ongoing medical necessity for the provision of DME. Some DME MACs, CMS staff and government subcontractors have taken the position, that the “patient’s medical record” refers not to documentation maintained by the Durable Medical Equipment (“DME”) supplier but instead to documentation maintained by the patient’s physician, healthcare facility or other clinician, and that clinical information created by the DME supplier’s personnel and confirmed by the patient’s physician is not sufficient to establish medical necessity. If the physicians working with AdaptHealth’s patients do not adequately document, among other things, their diagnoses and plans of care, AdaptHealth’s risks related to audits and payment denials in general are greater. Depending on the nature of the conduct found in such audits and whether the underlying conduct could be considered systemic, the resolution of these audits could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s revenue, financial condition and results of operations.

CMS has developed and instituted various audit programs under which CMS contracts with private companies to conduct claims and medical record audits. These audits are in addition to those conducted by existing MACs. Some contractors are paid a percentage of the overpayments recovered. One type of audit contractor, the Recovery Audit Contractors (“RACs”), receive claims data directly from MACs on a monthly or quarterly basis and are authorized to review previously paid claims. It is unclear whether CMS intends to conduct RAC prepayment reviews in the future and if so, what providers and claims would be the focus of those reviews.

Moreover, the ACA now requires that overpayments be reported and returned within 60 days of identification of the overpayment. Any overpayment retained after this deadline will now be considered an “obligation” for purposes of the False Claims Act and subject to fines and penalties. CMS currently has a six-year “lookback period,” for reporting and returning the “identified” overpayment. Private payors also reserve rights to conduct audits and make monetary adjustments.

AdaptHealth’s third-party payors may also, from time to time, request audits of the amounts paid, or to be paid, to AdaptHealth. AdaptHealth could be adversely affected in some of the markets in which it operates if the auditing payor alleges substantial overpayments were made to AdaptHealth due to coding errors or lack of documentation to support medical necessity determinations.

AdaptHealth cannot currently predict the adverse impact, if any, that these audits, methodologies and interpretations might have on its financial condition and results of operations.

Significant reimbursement reductions and/or exclusion from markets or product lines could adversely affect AdaptHealth.

All Medicare Durable Medical Equipment, Prosthetics, Orthotics, & Supplies (“DMEPOS”) Competitive Bidding Program contracts expired on December 31, 2018, and, as a result, there is a temporary gap in the entire DMEPOS Competitive Bidding Program that CMS expects will last until December 31, 2020.

On March 7, 2019, CMS announced plans to consolidate the competitive bidding areas (‘CBAs”) included in the Round 1 2017 and Round 2 Recompete DMEPOS Competitive Bidding Programs into a single round of competition named “Round 2021.” Round 2021 contracts are scheduled to become effective on January 1, 2021, and extend through December 31, 2023. The bid window for the Round 2021 DMEPOS Competitive Bidding Program closed on September 18, 2019.

17

For each CBA, providers will submit bids to CMS offering to supply certain covered items of DME in the CBA at certain prices. A number of products in AdaptHealth’s product lines are included on the list of products subject to Round 2021. For the year ended December 31, 2019, AdaptHealth estimates that approximately $145 million of revenue was generated with respect to covered items in competitive bidding areas subject to Round 2021.The $145.0 million estimate excludes amounts generated in non-rural and rural non-bid areas, as well as, products not currently part of Competitive Bidding Programs. As part of the competitive bidding process, single payment amounts (“SPAs”) replace the current Medicare durable medical equipment fee schedule payment amounts for selected items in certain areas of the country. The SPAs are determined by using bids submitted by DME suppliers. CMS will select winning bidders based upon the CMS-determined demand in each CBA, and the price assigned to the winning bidders shall be the price submitted by the final bidder accepted to meet such CBA’s volume demand. Successful bidders are expected to meet certain program quality standards in order to be awarded a contract and only successful bidders can supply the covered items to Medicare beneficiaries in the acquisition area (there are, however, regulations in place that allow non-contracted providers to continue to provide equipment and services to their existing customers at the new prices determined through the bidding process). The contracts are expected to be re-bid at least every three years. CMS is required to award contracts to multiple entities submitting bids in each area for an item or service, but has the authority to limit the number of contractors in a competitive acquisition area to the number it determines to be necessary to meet projected demand. AdaptHealth’s exclusion from certain markets or product lines could materially adversely affect its financial condition and results of operations.

The competitive bidding process has historically put pressure on the amount AdaptHealth is reimbursed in the markets in which it exists, as well as in areas that are not subject to the Competitive Bidding Program. The rates required to win future competitive bids could continue to compress reimbursement rates. AdaptHealth will continue to monitor developments regarding the competitive bidding program. While AdaptHealth cannot predict the outcome of the competitive bidding program on its business in the future nor the Medicare payment rates that will be in effect in future years for the items subjected to competitive bidding, the program may materially adversely affect its financial condition and results of operations.

Failure by AdaptHealth to maintain controls and processes over billing and collections or the deterioration of the financial condition of AdaptHealth’s payors or disputes with third parties could have a significant negative impact on its financial condition and results of operations.

The collection of accounts receivable requires constant focus and involvement by management and ongoing enhancements to information systems and billing center operating procedures. There can be no assurance that AdaptHealth will be able to improve upon or maintain its current levels of collectability and days sales outstanding in future periods. Further, some of AdaptHealth’s payors and/or patients may experience financial difficulties, or may otherwise not pay accounts receivable when due, resulting in increased write-offs. If AdaptHealth is unable to properly bill and collect its accounts receivable, its financial condition and results of operations will be adversely affected. In addition, from time to time AdaptHealth is involved in disputes with various parties, including its payors and their intermediaries regarding their performance of various contractual or regulatory obligations. These disputes sometimes lead to legal and other proceedings and cause AdaptHealth to incur costs or experience delays in collections, increases in its accounts receivable or loss of revenue. In addition, in the event such disputes are not resolved in AdaptHealth’s favor or cause AdaptHealth to terminate its relationships with such parties, there may be an adverse impact on its financial condition and results of operations.

If AdaptHealth is unable to maintain or develop relationships with patient referral sources, its growth and profitability could be adversely affected.

AdaptHealth’s success depends in large part on referrals from acute care hospitals, sleep laboratories, pulmonologist offices, skilled nursing facilities, hospice operators and other patient referral sources in the communities served by AdaptHealth. By law, referral sources cannot be contractually obligated to refer patients to any specific provider. However, there can be no assurance that other market participants will not attempt to steer patients to competing post-acute providers or otherwise limit AdaptHealth’s access to potential referrals. The establishment of joint ventures or networks between referral sources, such as acute care hospitals, and other post-acute providers may hinder patient referrals to AdaptHealth. AdaptHealth’s growth and profitability depend on its ability to establish and maintain

18

close working relationships with patient referral sources and to increase awareness and acceptance of the benefits of inpatient rehabilitation, home health, and hospice care by its referral sources and their patients. There can be no assurance that AdaptHealth will be able to maintain its existing referral source relationships or that it will be able to develop and maintain new relationships in existing or new markets. AdaptHealth’s loss of, or failure to maintain, existing relationships or its failure to develop new relationships could adversely affect its ability to grow its business and operate profitably.

Failure by AdaptHealth to successfully design, modify and implement technology-based and other process changes to maximize productivity and ensure compliance could ultimately have a significant negative impact on AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

AdaptHealth has identified a number of areas throughout its operations, including revenue cycle management and fulfilment logistics, where it intends to centralize and/or modify current processes or systems in order to attain a higher level of productivity or ensure compliance. Failure to achieve the cost savings or enhanced quality control expected from the successful design and implementation of such initiatives may adversely impact AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations. Additionally, Medicare and Medicaid often change their documentation requirements with respect to claims submissions. The standards and rules for healthcare transactions, code sets and unique identifiers also continue to evolve, such as ICD 10 and HIPAA 5010 and other data security requirements. Moreover, government programs and/or commercial payors may have difficulties administering new standards and rules for healthcare transactions and this may adversely affect timelines of payment or payment error rates. The DMEPOS competitive bidding program also imposes new reporting requirements on contracted providers. Failure by AdaptHealth to successfully design and implement system or process modifications could have a significant impact on its operations and financial condition. From time to time, AdaptHealth’s outsourced contractors for certain information systems functions, such as Brightree LLC and Parachute Health LLC, may make operational, leadership or other changes that could impact AdaptHealth’s plans and cost-savings goals. The implementation of many of the new standards and rules will require AdaptHealth to make substantial investments. Further, the implementation of these system or process changes could have a disruptive effect on related transaction processing and operations. If AdaptHealth’s implementation efforts related to systems development are unsuccessful, AdaptHealth may need to write off amounts that it has capitalized related to systems development projects. Additionally, if systems development implementations do not occur, AdaptHealth may need to incur additional costs to support its existing systems.

AdaptHealth’s business depends on its information systems, including software licensed from third parties. AdaptHealth’s information systems and those of AdaptHealth’s third-party software providers are subject to security breaches and other cybersecurity incidents, which may disrupt AdaptHealth’s operations.

AdaptHealth’s business depends on the proper functioning and availability of its computer systems and networks. AdaptHealth relies on an external service provider to provide continual maintenance, upgrading and enhancement of AdaptHealth’s primary information systems used for its operational needs. AdaptHealth licenses third-party software that supports intake, personnel scheduling and other human resources functions, office clinical and centralized billing and receivables management in an integrated database, enabling AdaptHealth to standardize the care delivered across its network of locations and monitor its performance and consumer outcomes. AdaptHealth also uses a third-party software provider for its order processing and inventory management platform. To the extent that its third-party providers fail to support, maintain and upgrade such software or systems, or if AdaptHealth loses its licenses with third-party providers, the efficiency of AdaptHealth’s operations could be disrupted or reduced.  

If AdaptHealth experiences a reduction in the performance, reliability, or availability of its information systems, its operations and ability to process transactions and produce timely and accurate reports could be adversely affected. If AdaptHealth experiences difficulties with the transition and integration of information systems or is unable to implement, maintain, or expand its systems properly, AdaptHealth could suffer from, among other things, operational disruptions, regulatory problems, and increases in administrative expenses.

There can be no assurance that AdaptHealth’s and its third-party software providers’ safety and security measures and disaster recovery plan will prevent damage, interruption or breach of its information systems and operations. Because the techniques used to obtain unauthorized access, disable or degrade service, or sabotage systems

19

change frequently and may be difficult to detect, AdaptHealth may be unable to anticipate these techniques or implement adequate preventive measures. In addition, hardware, software or applications AdaptHealth develops or procures from third parties may contain defects in design or manufacture or other problems that could unexpectedly compromise the security of its information systems. Unauthorized parties may attempt to gain access to AdaptHealth’s systems or facilities, or those of third parties with whom AdaptHealth does business, through fraud or other forms of deceiving its employees or contractors. On occasion, AdaptHealth has acquired additional information systems through its business acquisitions. AdaptHealth has upgraded and expanded its information system capabilities and has committed significant resources to maintain, protect, enhance existing systems and develop new systems to keep pace with continuing changes in technology, evolving industry and regulatory standards, and changing customer preferences. In addition, costs and potential problems and interruptions associated with the implementation of new or upgraded systems and technology or with maintenance or adequate support of existing systems also could disrupt or reduce the efficiency of AdaptHealth’s operations. A cyber security attack or other incident that bypasses AdaptHealth’s information systems security could cause a security breach which may lead to a material disruption to its information systems infrastructure or business and may involve a significant loss of business or patient health information. If a cyber security attack or other unauthorized attempt to access AdaptHealth’s systems or facilities were to be successful, it could result in the theft, destruction, loss, misappropriation or release of confidential information or intellectual property, and could cause operational or business delays that may materially impact AdaptHealth’s ability to provide various healthcare services. Any successful cyber security attack or other unauthorized attempt to access AdaptHealth’s systems or facilities also could result in negative publicity which could damage its reputation or brand with its patients, referral sources, payors or other third parties and could subject AdaptHealth to substantial penalties under HIPAA and other federal and state privacy laws, in addition to private litigation with those affected. Failure to maintain the security and functionality of AdaptHealth’s information systems and related software, or a failure to defend a cyber security attack or other attempt to gain unauthorized access to AdaptHealth’s systems, facilities or patient health information, could expose AdaptHealth to a number of adverse consequences, the vast majority of which are not insurable, including but not limited to disruptions in AdaptHealth’s operations, regulatory and other civil and criminal penalties, fines, investigations and enforcement actions (including, but not limited to, those arising from the SEC, Federal Trade Commission, the OIG or state attorneys general), private litigation with those affected by the data breach, loss of customers, disputes with payors and increased operating expense, which could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

AdaptHealth experiences competition from numerous other home respiratory and mobility equipment providers, and this competition could adversely affect its revenues and its business.

The home respiratory and mobility equipment markets are highly competitive and include a large number of providers, some of which are national providers, but most of which are either regional or local providers, including hospital systems, physician specialists and sleep labs. The primary competitive factors are quality considerations such as responsiveness, access to payor contracts, the technical ability of the professional staff and the ability to provide comprehensive services. These markets are very fragmented. Some of AdaptHealth’s competitors may now or in the future have greater financial or marketing resources than AdaptHealth. In addition, in certain markets, competitors may have more effective sales and marketing activities. AdaptHealth’s largest national home respiratory/home medical equipment provider competitors include AeroCare Holdings, Inc., Apria Healthcare Group Inc., Lincare Holdings Inc. and Rotech Healthcare Inc. The rest of the homecare market in the United States consists of regional providers and product-specific providers, as well as numerous local organizations. Hospitals and health systems are routinely looking to provide coverage and better control of post-acute healthcare services, including homecare services of the types AdaptHealth provides. These trends may continue as new payment models evolve, including bundled payment models, shared savings programs, value based purchasing and other payment systems.

There are relatively few barriers to entry in local home healthcare markets, and new entrants to the home respiratory/home medical equipment markets could have a material adverse effect on AdaptHealth’s business, results of operations and financial condition. A number of manufacturers of home respiratory equipment currently provide equipment directly to patients on a limited basis. Such manufacturers have the ability to provide their equipment at prices below those charged by AdaptHealth, and there can be no assurance that such direct-to-patient sales efforts will not increase in the future or that such manufacturers will not seek reimbursement contracts directly with AdaptHealth’s third-party payors, who could seek to provide equipment directly to patients from the manufacturer. In addition, pharmacy benefit managers (known as “PBMs”), including CVS Health Corporation and the OptumRx business of

20

UnitedHealth Group Incorporated, could enter the HME market and compete with AdaptHealth. Large technology companies, such as Amazon.com, Inc. and Alphabet Inc., have disrupted other supply businesses and have publicly stated an interest in the entering the healthcare market. In the event such companies enter the HME market, AdaptHealth may experience a loss of referrals or revenue.

Changes in medical equipment technology and development of new treatments may cause AdaptHealth’s current equipment or services to become obsolete.

AdaptHealth evaluates changes in home medical equipment technology and treatments on an ongoing basis for purposes of determining the feasibility of replacing or supplementing items currently included in the patient service equipment inventory and services that AdaptHealth offers patients. AdaptHealth’s selection of medical equipment and services is formulated on the basis of a variety of factors, including overall quality, functional reliability, availability of supply, payor reimbursement policies, product features, labor costs associated with the technology, acquisition, repair and ownership costs and overall patient and referral source demand, as well as patient therapeutic and lifestyle benefits. Manufacturers continue to invest in research and development to introduce new products to the marketplace. It is possible that major changes in available technology, payor benefit or coverage policies related to those changes or the preferences of patients and referral sources may cause AdaptHealth’s current product offerings to become less competitive or obsolete, and it will be necessary to adapt to those changes. Unanticipated changes could cause AdaptHealth to incur increased capital expenditures and accelerated equipment write-offs, and could force AdaptHealth to alter its sales, operations and marketing strategies.

AdaptHealth’s operations involve the transport of compressed and liquid oxygen, which carries an inherent risk of rupture or other accidents with the potential to cause substantial loss.

AdaptHealth’s operations are subject to the many hazards inherent in the transportation of medical gas products and compressed and liquid oxygen, including ruptures, leaks and fires. These risks could result in substantial losses due to personal injury or loss of life, severe damage to and destruction of property and equipment and pollution or other environmental damage and may result in curtailment or suspension of AdaptHealth’s related operations. If a significant accident or event occurs, it could adversely affect AdaptHealth’s business, financial position and results of operations. Additionally, corrective action plans, fines or other sanctions may be levied by government regulators who oversee transportation of hazardous materials such as compressed or liquid oxygen.

AdaptHealth provides a significant number of patients with oxygen-based therapy, and from time to time, AdaptHealth has operated medical gas facilities in several states subject to federal and state regulatory requirements. AdaptHealth’s medical gas facilities and operations are subject to extensive regulation by the Food and Drug Administration (“FDA”) and other federal and state authorities. The FDA regulates medical gases, including medical oxygen, pursuant to its authority under the federal Food, Drug and Cosmetic Act. Among other requirements, the FDA’s current Good Manufacturing Practice (“cGMP”) regulations impose certain quality control, documentation and recordkeeping requirements on the receipt, processing and distribution of medical gas. Further, in each such state, its medical gas facilities would be subject to regulation under state health and safety laws, which vary from state to state. The FDA and state authorities conduct periodic, unannounced inspections at medical gas facilities to assess compliance with the cGMP and other regulations, and AdaptHealth expends significant time, money and resources in an effort to achieve substantial compliance with the cGMP regulations and other federal and state law requirements at each of its medical gas facilities. AdaptHealth also complies with the FDA’s requirement for medical gas providers to register their sites with the agency. There can be no assurance, however, that these efforts will be successful and that AdaptHealth’s medical gas facilities will maintain compliance with federal and state law regulations. Failure by AdaptHealth to maintain regulatory compliance at its medical gas facilities could result in enforcement action, including warning letters, fines, product recalls or seizures, temporary or permanent injunctions, or suspensions in operations at one or more locations, and civil or criminal penalties which would materially harm its business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, capital resources and liquidity.

21

AdaptHealth is subject, directly or indirectly, to United States federal and state healthcare fraud and abuse and false claims laws and regulations. Prosecutions under such laws have increased in recent years and AdaptHealth may become subject to such litigation. If AdaptHealth is unable to or has not fully complied with such laws, it could face substantial penalties.

AdaptHealth’s operations are subject to various state and federal fraud and abuse laws, including, without limitation, the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, the federal Stark Law and the federal False Claims Act. These laws may impact, among other things, AdaptHealth’s sales, marketing and education programs.

The federal Anti-Kickback Statute prohibits persons from knowingly and willfully soliciting, offering, receiving or providing remuneration, directly or indirectly, in exchange for or to induce either the referral of an individual, or the furnishing or arranging for a good or service, for which payment may be made under a federal healthcare program such as the Medicare and Medicaid programs. Several courts have interpreted the statute’s intent requirement to mean that if any one purpose of an arrangement involving remuneration is to induce referrals of federal healthcare covered business, the statute has been violated. The Anti-Kickback Statute is broad and, despite a series of narrow safe harbors, prohibits many arrangements and practices that are lawful in businesses outside of the healthcare industry. Penalties for violations of the federal Anti-Kickback Statute include criminal penalties and civil sanctions such as fines, imprisonment and possible exclusion from Medicare, Medicaid and other federal healthcare programs. Many states have also adopted laws similar to the federal Anti-Kickback Statute, some of which apply to the referral of patients for healthcare items or services reimbursed by any source, not only the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

The federal Ethics in Patient Referrals Act of 1989, commonly known as the “Stark Law,” prohibits, subject to certain exceptions, physician referrals of Medicare and Medicaid patients to an entity providing certain “designated health services” if the physician or an immediate family member has any financial relationship with the entity. The Stark Law also prohibits the entity receiving the referral from billing any good or service furnished pursuant to an unlawful referral. Various states have corollary laws to the Stark Law, including laws that require physicians to disclose any financial interest they may have with a healthcare provider to their patients when referring patients to that provider. Both the scope and exceptions for such laws vary from state to state.

The federal False Claims Act prohibits persons from knowingly filing, or causing to be filed, a false claim to, or the knowing use of false statements to obtain payment from the federal government. Suits filed under the False Claims Act, known as qui tam actions, can be brought by any individual on behalf of the government and such individuals, commonly known as “whistleblowers,” may share in any amounts paid by the entity to the government in fines or settlement. The frequency of filing qui tam actions has increased significantly in recent years, causing greater numbers of medical device, pharmaceutical and healthcare companies to have to defend a False Claim Act action. When an entity is determined to have violated the federal False Claims Act, it may be required to pay up to three times the actual damages sustained by the government, plus civil penalties for each separate false claim. Various states have also enacted laws modeled after the federal False Claims Act.

From time to time, AdaptHealth has been and is involved in various governmental audits, investigations and reviews related to its operations. Reviews and investigations can lead to government actions, resulting in the assessment of damages, civil or criminal fines or penalties, or other sanctions, including restrictions or changes in the way AdaptHealth conducts business, loss of licensure or exclusion from participation in Medicare, Medicaid or other government programs. If AdaptHealth fails to comply with applicable laws, regulations and rules, its financial condition and results of operations could be adversely affected. Furthermore, becoming subject to these governmental investigations, audits and reviews may result in substantial costs as AdaptHealth cooperates with the government authorities, regardless of whether the particular investigation, audit or review leads to the identification of underlying issues.

AdaptHealth is unable to predict whether it could be subject to actions under any of these laws, or the impact of such actions. If AdaptHealth is found to be in violation of any of the laws described above or other applicable state and federal fraud and abuse laws, AdaptHealth may be subject to penalties, including civil and criminal penalties, damages, fines, exclusion from Medicare, Medicaid and other government healthcare reimbursement programs and the curtailment or restructuring of its operations.

22

Failure by AdaptHealth to maintain required licenses and accreditation could impact its operations.

AdaptHealth is required to maintain a significant number of state and/or federal licenses for its operations and facilities. Certain employees are required to maintain licenses in the states in which they practice. AdaptHealth manages the facility licensing function centrally. In addition, individual clinical employees are responsible for obtaining, maintaining and renewing their professional licenses, and AdaptHealth has processes in place designed to notify branch or pharmacy managers of renewal dates for the clinical employees under their supervision. State and federal licensing requirements are complex and often open to subjective interpretation by various regulatory agencies. Accurate licensure is also a critical threshold issue for the Medicare enrollment and the Medicare competitive bidding program. From time to time, AdaptHealth may also become subject to new or different licensing requirements due to legislative or regulatory requirements developments or changes in its business, and such developments may cause AdaptHealth to make further changes in its business, the results of which may be material. Although AdaptHealth believes it has appropriate systems in place to monitor licensure, violations of licensing requirements may occur and failure by AdaptHealth to acquire or maintain appropriate licensure for its operations, facilities and clinicians could result in interruptions in its operations, refunds to state and/or federal payors, sanctions or fines or the inability to serve Medicare beneficiaries in competitive bidding markets which could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

Accreditation is required by most of AdaptHealth’s managed care payors and is a mandatory requirement for all Medicare DMEPOS providers. If AdaptHealth or any of its branches lose accreditation, or if any of its new branches are unable to become accredited, such failure to maintain accreditation or become accredited could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

Compliance with regulations under the federal Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (“HIPAA”), the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (“HITECH Act”) and related rules relating to the transmission, security and privacy of health information could impose additional significant costs on AdaptHealth’s operations.

Numerous federal and state laws and regulations addressing patient privacy and consumer privacy, including HIPAA and the HITECH Act, govern the collection, dissemination, security, use and confidentiality of patient-identifiable health information or personal information. HIPAA and the HITECH Act require AdaptHealth to comply with standards for the use and disclosure of health information within AdaptHealth and with third parties. HIPAA and the HITECH Act also include standards for common healthcare electronic transactions and code sets, such as claims information, plan eligibility, payment information and the use of electronic signatures, and privacy and electronic security of individually identifiable health information.

HIPAA requires healthcare providers, including AdaptHealth, in addition to health plans and clearinghouses, to develop and maintain policies and procedures with respect to protected health information that is used or disclosed. The HITECH Act expands the notification requirement for breaches of patient-identifiable health information, restricts certain disclosures and sales of patient identifiable health information and provides a tiered system for civil monetary penalties for HIPAA violations.

In addition, under the Federal CAN-SPAM Act, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act and the Telemarketing Sales Rule and Medicare regulations, AdaptHealth is limited in the ways in which it can market and service its products and services by use of email or telephone marketing. If AdaptHealth does not comply with existing or new laws and regulations related to patient health information, it could be subject to criminal or civil sanctions. New health information standards, whether implemented pursuant to HIPAA, the HITECH Act, congressional action or otherwise, could have a significant effect on the manner in which AdaptHealth handles healthcare-related data and communicates with payors, and the cost of complying with these standards could be significant.

AdaptHealth is highly dependent upon senior management; failure by AdaptHealth to attract and retain key members of senior management could adversely affect AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

AdaptHealth is highly dependent on the performance and continued efforts of its senior management team. AdaptHealth’s future success is dependent on its ability to continue to attract and retain qualified executive officers and

23

senior management. Any inability to manage AdaptHealth’s operations effectively could adversely impact its financial condition and results of operations.

AdaptHealth’s reliance on relatively few suppliers for the majority of its patient service equipment and supplies could adversely affect AdaptHealth’s ability to operate.

AdaptHealth currently relies on a relatively small number of suppliers to provide it with the majority of its patient service equipment and supplies. Significant price increases, or disruptions in the ability to obtain such equipment and supplies from existing suppliers, may force AdaptHealth to use alternative suppliers. Additionally, any new excise taxes imposed on manufacturers of certain medical equipment could be passed on to customers, such as AdaptHealth. Such manufacturers may be forced to make other changes to their products or manufacturing processes that are unacceptable to AdaptHealth, resulting in a need to change suppliers. Any change in suppliers AdaptHealth uses could cause delays in the delivery of such products and possible losses in revenue, which could adversely affect AdaptHealth’s results of operations. In addition, alternative suppliers may not be available, or may not provide their products and services at similar or favorable prices. If AdaptHealth cannot obtain the patient service equipment and supplies it currently uses, or alternatives at similar or favorable prices, AdaptHealth’s ability to provide such products may be severely impacted, which could have an adverse effect on its business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, capital resources and liquidity. In December 2019, a novel strain of coronavirus began to impact the population of China, where several of AdaptHealth’s suppliers’ manufacturing facilities are located. In China, certain businesses have suspended or terminated operations, a portion of the population has been subject to self-imposed or mandatory quarantines and economic activity has slowed. While the closures and limitations on movement in China are expected to be temporary, the potential supply chain disruption or its duration, and its related financial impact, cannot be estimated at this time. Should the closures and limitations on movement continue for an extended period of time, the impact on AdaptHealth’s supply chain could materially and adversely affect AdaptHealth’s business and results of operations.

AdaptHealth’s strategic growth plan, which involves the acquisition of other companies, may not succeed.

AdaptHealth’s strategic plan calls for significant growth in its business over the next several years through an increase in its density in select markets where it is established as well as the expansion of its geographic footprint into new markets. This growth would place significant demands on AdaptHealth’s management team, systems, internal controls and financial and professional resources. As a result, AdaptHealth could be required to incur expenses for hiring additional qualified personnel, retaining professionals to assist in developing the appropriate control systems and expanding AdaptHealth’s information technology infrastructure. If AdaptHealth is unable to effectively manage growth, its financial results could be adversely impacted.

AdaptHealth’s strategic plan also contemplates continued growth from future acquisitions of home medical equipment providers. AdaptHealth may face increased competition for attractive acquisition candidates, which may limit the number of acquisition opportunities available to AdaptHealth or lead to the payment of higher prices for its acquisitions. Without successful acquisitions, AdaptHealth’s future growth rate could decline. In addition, AdaptHealth cannot guarantee that any future acquisitions, if consummated, will result in further growth.

AdaptHealth’s strategic plan contemplates successful integration of acquired home medical equipment providers with AdaptHealth’s existing business, including reduction in operating expenses with respect to the acquired companies. Integrating an acquisition could be expensive and time-consuming and could disrupt AdaptHealth’s ongoing business, negatively affect cash flow and distract management and other key personnel from day-to-day operations. AdaptHealth may not be able to combine successfully the operations of recently acquired companies with its operations, and, even if such integration is accomplished, AdaptHealth may never realize the potential benefits of such acquisition. The integration of acquisitions requires significant attention from management, may impose substantial demands on AdaptHealth’s operations or other projects and may impose challenges on us including, but not limited to, consistencies in business standards, procedures, policies and business cultures. There can be no assurance that any future acquisitions, if consummated, will result in further growth.

24

Specific integration risks relating to the acquisition of other companies by AdaptHealth may include:

·

difficulties related to combining previously separate businesses into a single unit, including patient transitions, product and service offerings, distribution and operational capabilities and business cultures;

·

availability of financing to the extent needed to fund acquisitions;

·

customer loss and other general business disruption;

·

managing the integration process while completing other independent acquisitions or dispositions;

·

diversion of management’s attention from day-to-day operations;

·

assumption of liabilities of an acquired business, including unforeseen or contingent liabilities or liabilities in excess of the amounts estimated;

·

failure to realize anticipated benefits and synergies, such as cost savings and revenue enhancements;

·

potentially substantial costs and expenses associated with acquisitions and dispositions;

·

failure to retain and motivate key employees;

·

coordinating research and development activities to enhance the introduction of new products and services;

·

difficulties in establishing and applying AdaptHealth’s internal control over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures to an acquired business;

·

obtaining necessary regulatory licenses and payor-specific approvals, which may impact the timing of when AdaptHealth is to bill and collect for services rendered;

·

AdaptHealth’s ability to transition patients in a timely manner may impact AdaptHealth’s ability to collect amounts for services rendered;

·

AdaptHealth’s estimates for revenue accruals during the integration of acquisitions may require adjustments in future periods as the transition of patient information is finalized; and

·

delays in obtaining new government and commercial payor identification numbers for acquired branches, resulting in a slowdown and/or loss of associated revenue.

In addition, AdaptHealth faces competition for acquisition candidates and, which may limit the number of acquisition opportunities available to AdaptHealth or lead to the payment of higher prices for its acquisitions. There can be no assurance that AdaptHealth will be able to identify suitable acquisition opportunities in the future or that any such opportunities, if identified, will be consummated on favorable terms, if at all. Without successful acquisitions, AdaptHealth’s future growth rate could decline.

While AdaptHealth conducts due diligence in connection with any acquisition opportunity, there may be risks or liabilities that such due diligence efforts fail to discover that are not disclosed to AdaptHealth or that AdaptHealth inadequately assesses. The failure to timely identify any material liabilities associated with any acquisitions could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations.

25

If AdaptHealth were required to write down all or part of its goodwill its net earnings and net worth could be materially adversely affected.

Goodwill represents a significant portion of AdaptHealth’s assets. Goodwill represents the excess of cost over the fair market value of net assets acquired in business combinations. For example, if our market capitalization drops significantly below the amount of net equity recorded on our balance sheet, it might indicate a decline in our fair value and would require us to further evaluate whether our goodwill has been impaired. If, as part of our annual review of goodwill, we are required to write down all or a significant part of AdaptHealth’s goodwill our net earnings and net worth could be materially adversely affected, which could affect our flexibility to obtain additional financing. In addition, if our assumptions used in preparing our valuations for purposes of impairment testing differ materially from actual future results, we may record impairment charges in the future and our financial results may be materially adversely affected. AdaptHealth had $266.8 million and $202.4 million of goodwill recorded on its Consolidated Balance Sheets at December  31, 2019 and December 31, 2018, respectively. It is not possible at this time to determine if there will be any future impairment charge, or if there is, whether such charges would be material.

AdaptHealth may not be able to generate sufficient cash flow to cover required payments or meet operating covenants under its long-term debt and long-term operating leases.

Failure to generate sufficient cash flow to cover required payments or meet operating covenants under AdaptHealth’s long-term debt and long-term operating leases could result in defaults under such agreements and cross-defaults under other debt or operating lease arrangements, which could harm its operating subsidiaries. AdaptHealth may not generate sufficient cash flow from operations to cover required interest, principal and lease payments. In addition, AdaptHealth’s outstanding credit facility contains restrictive covenants and requires AdaptHealth to maintain or satisfy specified coverage tests. These restrictions and operating covenants include, among other things, requirements with respect to total leverage ratios and fixed charge coverage ratios. These restrictions, together with the restrictive covenants included in promissory notes with certain affiliates of BlueMountain Capital Management, LLC, may interfere with AdaptHealth’s ability to obtain additional advances under its existing credit facility or to obtain new financing or to engage in other business activities, which may inhibit AdaptHealth’s ability to grow its business and increase revenue. In addition, failure by AdaptHealth to comply with these restrictive covenants could result in an event of default which, if not cured or waived, could result in the acceleration of its debt.

AdaptHealth may need additional capital to fund its operating subsidiaries and finance its growth, and AdaptHealth may not be able to obtain it on acceptable terms, or at all, which may limit its ability to grow.

AdaptHealth’s ability to maintain and enhance its operating subsidiaries and equipment to meet regulatory standards, operate efficiently and remain competitive in its markets requires AdaptHealth to commit substantial resources to continued investment in its affiliated facilities and equipment. Additionally, the continued expansion of its business through the acquisition of existing facilities, expansion of existing facilities and construction of new facilities may require additional capital, particularly if AdaptHealth were to accelerate its acquisition and expansion plans. Financing may not be available or may be available only on terms that are not favorable. In addition, some of AdaptHealth’s outstanding indebtedness restrict, among other things, its ability to incur additional debt. If AdaptHealth is unable to raise additional funds or obtain additional funds on acceptable terms, it may have to delay or abandon some or all of its growth strategies. Further, if additional funds are raised through the issuance of additional equity securities, the percentage ownership of our stockholders would be diluted. Any newly issued equity securities may have rights, preferences or privileges senior to those of the Common Stock.

Changes in the method of determining the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), or the replacement of LIBOR with an alternative reference rate, may adversely affect interest rates on AdaptHealth’s outstanding variable rate indebtedness.

Certain of AdaptHealth’s indebtedness, including LIBOR Rate Loans under its credit facility, bears interest at variable interest rates that use LIBOR as a benchmark rate. LIBOR is the subject of recent proposals for reform and, on July 27, 2017, the U.K. Financial Conduct Authority announced that it intends to stop compelling banks to submit rates for the calculation of LIBOR after 2021. The Federal Reserve Bank of New York has begun publishing a Secured

26

Overnight Funding Rate (“SOFR”), which is intended to replace U.S. dollar LIBOR, and central banks in several other jurisdictions have also announced plans for alternative reference rates for other currencies. These reforms may cause LIBOR to perform differently than in the past or to disappear entirely.  The consequences of these developments with respect to LIBOR cannot be entirely predicted but may result in an increase in the interest cost of AdaptHealth’s variable rate indebtedness. In the event that LIBOR is no longer available as a reference rate or is replaced by SOFR in the future, AdaptHealth’s credit facility permits its lenders, in good faith, to unilaterally suspend maintaining LIBOR Rate Loans under the credit facility and to adopt a new rate, such as SOFR. As a result, AdaptHealth may need to renegotiate its outstanding indebtedness or incur other indebtedness, and the phase-out of LIBOR may negatively impact the terms of such indebtedness. In addition, the overall financial market may be disrupted as a result of the phase-out or replacement of LIBOR. Disruption in the financial market could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

Political and economic conditions, including significant global or regional developments such as economic and political events, international conflicts, natural disasters, and public health crises that are out of AdaptHealth’s control, could adversely affect its revenue, financial condition and results of operations.  

AdaptHealth’s business can be affected by a number of factors that are beyond its control, such as general geopolitical, economic and business conditions, financial services market conditions, and general political and economic developments, including slower economic growth, disruptions in financial markets, economic downturns in the form of either contained or widespread recessionary conditions, inflation, elevated unemployment levels, sluggish or uneven economic recovery, government actions impacting trade agreements including the imposition of trade restrictions such as tariffs and retaliatory counter measures, government deficit reduction, natural and other disasters and public health crises affecting the operations of AdaptHealth or its customers or suppliers. Any Medicare, Medicaid or third-party payor reimbursement reductions as a result of such factors could adversely impact AdaptHealth’s business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flow, capital resources and liquidity. Turmoil in the financial markets, including in the capital and credit markets, and any uncertainty over its breadth, depth and duration may put pressure on the global economy and could have a negative effect on AdaptHealth’s business. Further, historical worldwide financial and credit turmoil could reduce the availability of liquidity and credit to fund the continuation and expansion of business operations worldwide. The shortage of liquidity and credit combined with substantial losses in worldwide equity markets could cause an economic recession in the United States or worldwide. If financial markets in the United States, Europe and Asia experience extreme disruption, including, among other things, extreme volatility in security prices, severely diminished liquidity and credit availability, rating downgrades of certain investments and declining valuations of others, governments may take unprecedented actions intended to address extreme market conditions that may include severely restricted credit and declines in real estate values. If conditions in the global economy, U.S. economy or other key vertical or geographic markets are weak or uncertain, AdaptHealth could experience material adverse impacts on its revenue, financial condition and results of operations.

If AdaptHealth’s subsidiary fails to comply with the terms of its Corporate Integrity Agreement, it could be subjected to substantial monetary penalties or suspension or termination from participation in the Medicare and Medicaid programs.

Braden Partners, L.P. (“BP”), d/b/a Pacific Pulmonary Services (“PPS”), which was acquired by AdaptHealth in May 2018, entered into a five-year Corporate Integrity Agreement (“CIA”) with the Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services (the “OIG-HHS”), effective March 31, 2017, concurrent with the execution of a settlement agreement with the United States, acting through the DOJ and on behalf of the OIG-HHS. The CIA imposes certain compliance, auditing (including by an independent review organization), self-reporting and training requirements with which BP must comply. If BP fails to comply with the terms of its CIA, it could be subjected to substantial monetary penalties and/or suspension or exclusion from participation in federal healthcare programs. Any such suspension, exclusion or termination would result in the revocation or termination of contracts and/or licenses and potentially have a material adverse effect on the results of BP’s operations. The imposition of monetary penalties and/or termination of contracts with respect to BP could adversely affect AdaptHealth’s profitability and financial condition. The CIA has a five-year term which expires in April 2022. In connection with the acquisition and integration of PPS by AdaptHealth, the OIG-HSS confirmed that the requirements of the CIA imposed upon PPS would only apply to the

27

operations of BP and therefore no operations of any other AdaptHealth affiliate are subject to the requirements of the CIA following the acquisition.

AdaptHealth’s current insurance program may expose it to unexpected costs and negatively affect its business, financial condition and results of operations, particularly if it incurs losses not covered by its insurance or if claims or losses differ from its estimates.

There is an inherent risk of liability in the provision of healthcare services. As participants in the healthcare industry, AdaptHealth may periodically be subject to lawsuits, some of which may involve large claims and significant costs to defend, such as mass tort or other class actions. Although AdaptHealth’s insurance coverage reflects deductibles, self-insured retentions, limits of liability and similar provisions that it believes are reasonable based on its operations, the coverage under its insurance programs may not be adequate to protect it in all circumstances. AdaptHealth’s insurance policies contain exclusions and conditions that could have a materially adverse impact on AdaptHealth’s ability to receive indemnification thereunder, as well as customary sub-limits for particular types of losses. Additionally, insurance companies that currently insure companies in AdaptHealth’s industry may cease to do so, may change the coverage provided or may substantially increase premiums in the future. The incurrence of losses and liabilities that exceed AdaptHealth’s available coverage, therefore, could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

AdaptHealth currently self-insures a significant portion of expected losses under its workers’ compensation, automobile liability and employee health insurance programs and, to offset negative insurance market trends, AdaptHealth may elect to increase its self-insurance coverage, accept higher deductibles or reduce the amount of coverage. Unanticipated changes in any applicable actuarial assumptions and management estimates underlying its liabilities for these losses could result in materially different expenses than expected under these programs, which could have a material adverse effect on AdaptHealth’s financial condition and results of operations. In addition, if AdaptHealth experiences a greater number of these losses than it anticipates, it could have a material adverse effect on its business, financial condition and results of operations.

AdaptHealth currently outsources, and from time to time in the future may outsource, a portion of its internal business functions to third-party providers. Outsourcing these functions has significant risks, and AdaptHealth’s failure to manage these risks successfully could materially adversely affect its business, results of operations, and financial condition.

AdaptHealth currently, and from time to time in the future, may outsource portions of its internal business functions, including billing and administrative functions relating to revenue cycle management, to third-party providers in India, the Philippines and Central America. These third-party providers may not comply on a timely basis with all of AdaptHealth’s requirements, or may not provide AdaptHealth with an acceptable level of service. In addition, AdaptHealth’s reliance on third-party providers could have significant negative consequences, including significant disruptions in its operations and significantly increased costs to undertake its operations, either of which could damage AdaptHealth’s relationships with its customers. In addition, AdaptHealth’s outsourced functions may be negatively impacted by any number of factors, including political unrest; social unrest; terrorism; war; vandalism; currency fluctuations; changes to the law of India, the Philippines, the United States or any of the states or other jurisdictions in which AdaptHealth does business or outsources operations; or increases in the cost of labor and supplies in India, the Philippines or Central America or any other jurisdiction in which AdaptHealth outsources any portion of its internal business functions. AdaptHealth’s outsourced operations may also be affected by trade restrictions, such as tariffs or other trade controls. As a result of its outsourcing activities, it may also be more difficult for AdaptHealth to recruit and retain qualified employees for its business needs at any time. AdaptHealth’s failure to successfully outsource certain of its business functions could materially adversely affect its business, results of operations, and financial condition.

28

Risks Related to Our Securities 

Our only significant assets are the ownership of a majority interest in AdaptHealth Holdings, and such ownership may not be sufficient to generate the funds necessary to meet our financial obligations or to pay any dividends on our Class A Common Stock.

We have no direct operations and no significant assets other than the ownership of a majority of the economic and voting interests in AdaptHealth Holdings. We depend on AdaptHealth Holdings and its subsidiaries for distributions, loans and other payments to generate the funds necessary to meet our financial obligations or to pay any dividends with respect to our Class A Common Stock. Legal and contractual restrictions in agreements governing the indebtedness of AdaptHealth Holdings and its subsidiaries may limit our ability to obtain cash from AdaptHealth Holdings. The earnings from, or other available assets of, AdaptHealth Holdings and its subsidiaries may not be sufficient to enable us to satisfy our financial obligations or pay any dividends on our Class A Common Stock. AdaptHealth Holdings is classified as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes and, as such, is generally not subject to entity-level U.S. federal income tax. Instead, taxable income is allocated to holders of units of AdaptHealth Holdings (“AdaptHealth Units”), including us. As a result, we generally will incur taxes on our allocable share of any net taxable income generated by AdaptHealth Holdings. Under the terms of the Fifth Amended and Restated Limited Liability Company Agreement of AdaptHealth Holdings, AdaptHealth Holdings is obligated to make tax distributions to holders of AdaptHealth Units, including us, except to the extent such distributions would render AdaptHealth Holdings insolvent or are otherwise prohibited by law or the terms of AdaptHealth’s credit facility. In addition to our tax obligations, we also incur expenses related to our operations and our interests in AdaptHealth Holdings, including costs and expenses of being a publicly-traded company, all of which could be significant. To the extent that we require funds and AdaptHealth Holdings or its subsidiaries are restricted from making distributions under applicable law or regulation or under the terms of their financing arrangements, or are otherwise unable to provide such funds, it could materially adversely affect our liquidity and financial condition, including our ability to pay our income taxes when due.

We are required to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement for certain tax benefits we may claim, and the amounts of such payments could be significant.

The Tax Receivable Agreement, which we entered into at the Closing with the Blocker Sellers and the owners of units of AdaptHealth Holdings prior to the Closing other than the Blocker Companies (the “Non-Blocker AdaptHealth Members” and, collectively with the Blocker Sellers, the “TRA Holders”), generally provides for the payment by us to the Blocker Sellers of 85% of the net cash savings, if any, in U.S. federal, state and local income tax that we actually realize (or are deemed to realize in certain circumstances) in periods after the Closing as a result of: (i) certain tax attributes of Access Point Medical, Inc. existing prior to the Business Combination; (ii) certain increases in tax basis resulting from exchanges of AdaptHealth Units; (iii) imputed interest deemed to be paid by us as a result of payments we make under the Tax Receivable Agreement; and (iv) certain increases in tax basis resulting from payments we make under the Tax Receivable Agreement. We will retain the benefit of the remaining 15% of these cash savings. The amount of the cash payments that we may be required to make under the Tax Receivable Agreement could be significant and is dependent upon significant future events and assumptions, including the timing of the exchanges of AdaptHealth Units, the price of our Class A Common Stock at the time of each exchange, the extent to which such exchanges are taxable transactions and the amount of the exchanging TRA Holder’s tax basis in its AdaptHealth Units at the time of the relevant exchange. The amount of such cash payments is also based on assumptions as to the amount and timing of taxable income we generate in the future, the U.S. federal income tax rate then applicable and the portion of our payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement that constitute interest or give rise to depreciable or amortizable tax basis. Moreover, payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement will be based on the tax reporting positions that we determine, which tax reporting positions are subject to challenge by taxing authorities. We are dependent on distributions from AdaptHealth Holdings to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement, and we cannot guarantee that such distributions will be made in sufficient amounts or at the times needed to enable us to make our required payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement, or at all. Any payments made by us to the TRA Holders under the Tax Receivable Agreement will generally reduce the amount of overall cash flow that might have otherwise been available to us. To the extent that we are unable to make timely payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement for any reason, the unpaid amounts will be deferred and will accrue interest until paid by us. Nonpayment for a specified period may constitute a breach of a material obligation under the Tax Receivable Agreement, and therefore, may accelerate

29

payments due under the Tax Receivable Agreement. The payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement are also not conditioned upon the TRA Holders maintaining a continued ownership interest in AdaptHealth Holdings or us.

In certain cases, payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement may be accelerated and/or significantly exceed the actual benefits, if any, we realize in respect of the tax attributes subject to the Tax Receivable Agreement.

The Tax Receivable Agreement provides that if we breach any of our material obligations under the Tax Receivable Agreement, if we undergo a change of control or if, at any time, we elect an early termination of the Tax Receivable Agreement, then the Tax Receivable Agreement will terminate and our obligations, or our successor’s obligations, to make payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement would accelerate and become immediately due and payable. The amount due and payable in those circumstances is determined based on certain assumptions, including an assumption that we would have sufficient taxable income to fully utilize all potential future tax benefits that are subject to the Tax Receivable Agreement. We may need to incur debt to finance payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement to the extent our cash resources are insufficient to meet our obligations under the Tax Receivable Agreement as a result of timing discrepancies or otherwise.

As a result of the foregoing, (i) we could be required to make cash payments to the TRA Holders that are greater than the specified percentage of the actual benefits we ultimately realize in respect of the tax benefits that are subject to the Tax Receivable Agreement, and (ii) we would be required to make a cash payment equal to the present value of the anticipated future tax benefits that are the subject of the Tax Receivable Agreement, which payment may be made significantly in advance of the actual realization, if any, of such future tax benefits. In these situations, our obligations under the Tax Receivable Agreement could have a substantial negative impact on our liquidity and could have the effect of delaying, deferring or preventing certain mergers, asset sales, other forms of business combination, or other changes of control due to the additional transaction costs a potential acquirer may attribute to satisfying such obligations. There can be no assurance that we will be able to finance our obligations under the Tax Receivable Agreement.

We will not be reimbursed for any payments made to TRA Holders under the Tax Receivable Agreement in the event that any tax benefits are disallowed.

We will not be reimbursed for any cash payments previously made to the TRA Holders pursuant to the Tax Receivable Agreement if any tax benefits initially claimed by us are subsequently challenged by a taxing authority and are ultimately disallowed. Instead, any excess cash payments made by us to a TRA Holder will be netted against any future cash payments that we might otherwise be required to make under the terms of the Tax Receivable Agreement. However, a challenge to any tax benefits initially claimed by us may not arise for a number of years following the initial time of such payment or, even if challenged early, such excess cash payment may be greater than the amount of future cash payments that we might otherwise be required to make under the terms of the Tax Receivable Agreement and, as a result, there might not be future cash payments from which to net against. The applicable U.S. federal income tax rules are complex and factual in nature, and there can be no assurance that the Internal Revenue Service or a court will not disagree with our tax reporting positions. As a result, it is possible that we could make cash payments under the Tax Receivable Agreement that are substantially greater than our actual cash tax savings.

Certain of the TRA Holders have substantial control over us, and their interests, along with the interests of other TRA Holders, in our business may conflict with the interests of our stockholders.

The TRA Holders may receive payments from us under the Tax Receivable Agreement upon any redemption or exchange of their AdaptHealth Units, including the issuance of shares of our Class A Common Stock upon any such redemption or exchange. As a result, the interests of the TRA Holders may conflict with the interests of holders of our Class A Common Stock. For example, the TRA Holders may have different tax positions from us, which could influence their decisions regarding whether and when to dispose of assets, whether and when to incur new or refinance existing indebtedness, especially in light of the existence of the Tax Receivable Agreement, and whether and when we should terminate the Tax Receivable Agreement and accelerate our obligations thereunder. In addition, the structuring of future transactions may take into consideration tax or other considerations of TRA Holders even in situations where no similar considerations are relevant to us.

30

We may not be able to timely and effectively implement controls and procedures required by Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act that are applicable to us.

As a public company, we are required to comply with the SEC’s rules implementing Sections 302 and 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, which require management to certify financial and other information in our quarterly and annual reports and provide an annual management report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting. To comply with the requirements of being a public company, we are required to provide attestation on internal controls, and we may need to undertake various actions, such as implementing additional internal controls and procedures and hiring additional accounting or internal audit staff. The standards required for a public company under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act are significantly more stringent than those that were required of AdaptHealth Holdings as a privately held company. Management may not be able to effectively and timely implement controls and procedures that adequately respond to the increased regulatory compliance and reporting requirements that are applicable to us after the Business Combination. If we are not able to implement the additional requirements of Section 404 in a timely manner or with adequate compliance, we may not be able to assess whether our internal controls over financial reporting are effective, which may subject us to adverse regulatory consequences and could harm investor confidence and the market price of our Class A Common Stock. Further, as an emerging growth company, our independent registered public accounting firm is not required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting pursuant to Section 404 until the date we are no longer an emerging growth company. At such time, our independent registered public accounting firm may issue a report that is adverse in the event that it is not satisfied with the level at which our controls are documented, designed or operating.

In connection with the audit of AdaptHealth’s consolidated financial statements for the fiscal years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018, there were certain controls over financial reporting relating to the timeliness of our review controls over non-routine transactions that did not operate as designed. AdaptHealth continues to be actively engaged in the development and implementation of its remediation plan to address such material weakness, including: 

·

implementation of processes to improve overall efficiency and accuracy of accounting;

·

assignment of dedicated and experienced technical resources, including engaging a third-party consultant to assist management, with its responsibility of strengthening corporate oversight over financial reporting and enhancing controls associated with complex accounting matters; and

·

hiring additional qualified personnel and continue to evaluate the adequacy of our accounting personnel staffing level.

This remediation plan is intended to ensure that the key controls over the financial reporting oversight process are operating effectively and are sustainable.

In addition, our management and other personnel will need to continue to devote a substantial amount of time to compliance initiatives applicable to public companies, including compliance with Section 404 and the evaluation of the effectiveness of our internal controls over financial reporting within the prescribed timeframe. AdaptHealth is in the process of evaluating the adequacy of its accounting personnel staffing level and other matters related to internal controls over financial reporting. AdaptHealth may discover additional deficiencies in existing systems and controls that it may not be able to remediate in an efficient or timely manner.

Certain of our principal stockholders have significant influence over us.

Entities affiliated with Deerfield Management Company, L.P. (collectively, “Deerfield Management”) collectively beneficially own approximately 26.14% of our Class A Common Stock, assuming (i) the exchange of 31,063,799 AdaptHealth Units together with the same number of shares of Class B Common Stock for shares of Class A Common Stock and (ii) the exercise of 1,640,981 private placement warrants and 833,333 public warrants held by Deerfield Management. Everest Trust beneficially owns approximately 21.717% of our Class A Common Stock, assuming (i) the exchange of 31,063,799 AdaptHealth Units together with the same number of shares of Class B Common Stock for shares of Class A Common Stock and (ii) the exercise of 665,628 private placement warrants held by

31

Clifton Bay Offshore Investments L.P. and 41,473 private placement warrants held by Quadrant Management, Inc. As long as Deerfield Management and/or Everest Trust own or control a significant percentage of our outstanding voting power, they will have the ability to significantly influence all corporate actions requiring stockholder approval, including the election and removal of directors and the size of our board of directors, any amendment to our certificate of incorporation or bylaws, or the approval of any merger or other significant corporate transaction, including a sale of substantially all of our assets.

The interests of Deerfield Management and/or Everest Trust may not align with the interests of our other stockholders. Each of Deerfield Management and Everest Trust is in the business of making investments in companies and may acquire and hold interests in businesses that compete directly or indirectly with us. Each of Deerfield Management and Everest Trust may also pursue acquisition opportunities that may be complementary to our business, and, as a result, those acquisition opportunities may not be available to us. Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation provides that our stockholders and our directors, including any who were designated by any of our stockholders, other than any such persons who are employees of us or any of our subsidiaries, do not have any obligation to offer to us any corporate opportunity of which he or she may become aware prior to offering such opportunities to other entities with which they may be affiliated, subject to certain limited exceptions.

We will continue to incur significant increased expenses and administrative burdens as a result of being a public company, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.

We will continue to face increased legal, accounting, administrative and other costs and expenses as a public company that AdaptHealth Holdings did not incur as a private company. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act), including the requirements of Section 404, as well as rules and regulations subsequently implemented by the SEC, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and the rules and regulations promulgated and to be promulgated thereunder, the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board and the securities exchanges, impose additional reporting and other obligations on public companies. Compliance with public company requirements increases costs and makes certain activities more time-consuming. A number of those requirements require us to carry out activities AdaptHealth had not prior to the Business Combination. In addition, additional expenses associated with SEC reporting requirements will continue to be incurred. Furthermore, if any issues in complying with those requirements are identified (for example, if the auditors identify a material weakness or significant deficiency in the internal control over financial reporting), we could incur additional costs rectifying those issues, and the existence of those issues could adversely affect our reputation or investor perceptions of us. It may also be more expensive to obtain director and officer liability insurance. Risks associated with our status as a public company may make it more difficult to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on the board of directors or as executive officers. The additional reporting and other obligations imposed by these rules and regulations will increase legal and financial compliance costs and the costs of related legal, accounting and administrative activities. These increased costs will require us to divert a significant amount of money that could otherwise be used to expand the business and achieve strategic objectives. Advocacy efforts by stockholders and third parties may also prompt additional changes in governance and reporting requirements, which could further increase costs.

AdaptHealth’s management has limited experience in operating a public company.

AdaptHealth’s executive officers and certain directors have limited experience in the management of a publicly traded company. AdaptHealth’s management team may not successfully or effectively manage its transition to a public company that is subject to significant regulatory oversight and reporting obligations under federal securities laws. Their limited experience in dealing with the increasingly complex laws pertaining to public companies could be a significant disadvantage in that it is likely that an increasing amount of their time may be devoted to these activities which will result in less time being devoted to the management and growth of the company. It is possible that we will be required to expand our employee base and hire additional employees to support our operations as a public company, which will increase our operating costs in future periods.

32

Because we have no current plans to pay cash dividends on our Class A Common Stock for the foreseeable future, our stockholders may not receive any return on investment unless they sell their Class A Common Stock for a price greater than that which they paid for it.

We may retain future earnings, if any, for future operations, expansion and debt repayment and have no current plans to pay any cash dividends for the foreseeable future. Any decision to declare and pay dividends as a public company in the future will be made at the discretion of our board of directors and will depend on, among other things, our results of operations, financial condition, cash requirements, contractual restrictions and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant. In addition, our ability to pay dividends may be limited by covenants of any existing and future outstanding indebtedness we or our subsidiaries incur. As a result, our stockholders may not receive any return on an investment in our Class A Common Stock unless they sell our Class A Common Stock for a price greater than that which they paid for it.

There can be no assurance that we will be able to continue to comply with the continued listing standards of Nasdaq.

Our Class A Common Stock is currently listed on Nasdaq. There can be no assurance that we will continue to be able to meet Nasdaq’s listing requirements with respect to our Class A Common Stock. If our Class A Common Stock is delisted, there could be limited availability of market quotations for the Class A Common Stock and reduced liquidity in trading. Our public warrants were formerly listed on Nasdaq; however, on November 27, 2019, we received a letter from Nasdaq stating that our public warrants failed to meet the Nasdaq Capital Market’s round lot holder requirement. Our public warrants were suspended from trading on Nasdaq on December 6, 2019 and subsequently delisted. Upon suspension of trading on Nasdaq, our public warrants began trading on the over-the-counter market. Although we anticipate that our Class A Common Stock, if delisted from Nasdaq, would be eligible for quotation and trading on the over-the-counter market, there can be no assurance that trading would be commenced or maintained on the over-the-counter market for our Class A Common Stock.

In addition, if we failed to meet Nasdaq’s listing requirements with respect to our Class A Common Stock, in addition to reduced liquidity, we and our stockholders could face significant material consequences including:

·

a determination that our Class A Common Stock is a “penny stock” which will require brokers trading in our Class A Common Stock to adhere to more stringent rules and possibly result in a reduced level of trading activity in the secondary trading market for our securities;

·

a limited amount of news and analyst coverage; and

·

a decreased ability to issue additional securities or obtain additional financing in the future.

The National Securities Markets Improvement Act of 1996, which is a federal statute, prevents or preempts the states from regulating the sale of certain securities, which are referred to as “covered securities.” Because our Class A Common Stock is listed on Nasdaq, it is a covered security. Although the states are preempted from regulating the sale of our Class A Common Stock, if we were no longer listed on Nasdaq, our Class A Common Stock would not be a covered security and we would be subject to regulation in each state in which we offer our Class A Common Stock.

A significant portion of our total outstanding Class A Common Stock is restricted from immediate resale but may be sold into the market in the near future. This could cause the market price of our Class A Common Stock to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.

Sales of a substantial number of shares of Class A Common Stock in the public market could occur at any time. These sales, or the perception in the market that the holders of a large number of shares intend to sell shares, could reduce the market price of our Class A Common Stock. After the Business Combination:

·

certain persons collectively own 3,672,500 shares of Class A Common Stock and 2,643,333 private placement warrants distributed to them by Deerfield/RAB Ventures LLC (our “Sponsor”) in connection with its

33

dissolution, subject to restrictions on transfer under the terms of a letter agreement entered into by our Sponsor at the time of our initial public offering (“IPO”);  

·

38,290,298 shares of Class A Common Stock which were either issued or may be issued upon the exchange of AdaptHealth Units are subject to restrictions on transfer under the terms of the Lock-up Agreements; and

·

Deerfield and Richard Barasch collectively own 12,500,000 shares of Class A Common Stock that are subject to restrictions on transfer under the terms of the Amended and Restated Subscription Agreement entered into on October 15, 2019 between the Company, Deerfield and RAB Ventures (DFB) LLC.

We may amend the terms of the warrants in a manner that may be adverse to holders with the approval by the holders of at least 65% of the then outstanding public warrants.

Our warrants are issued in registered form under a warrant agreement between Continental Stock Transfer & Trust Company, as warrant agent, and us. The warrant agreement provides that the terms of the warrants may be amended without the consent of any holder to cure any ambiguity or correct any defective provision, but requires the approval by the holders of at least 65% of the then outstanding public warrants to make any change that adversely affects the interests of the registered holders. Accordingly, we may amend the terms of the warrants in a manner adverse to a holder if holders of at least 65% of the then-outstanding public warrants approve of such amendment. Although our ability to amend the terms of the warrants with the consent of at least 65% of the then outstanding public warrants is unlimited, examples of such amendments could be amendments to, among other things, increase the exercise price of the warrants, shorten the exercise period or decrease the number of shares of our Class A Common Stock purchasable upon exercise of a warrant.

We may redeem unexpired public warrants prior to their exercise at a time that is disadvantageous to warrantholders, thereby making their public warrants worthless.

We have the ability to redeem outstanding warrants at any time after they become exercisable and prior to their expiration, at a price of $0.01 per warrant; provided that the last reported sales price of our Class A Common Stock equals or exceeds $18.00 per share (as adjusted for share splits, share dividends, reorganizations, recapitalizations and the like) for any 20 trading days within a 30 trading-day period ending on the third trading day prior to the date we send the notice of such redemption to the warrant holders. If and when the warrants become redeemable by us, we may exercise our redemption right even if we are unable to register or qualify the underlying securities for sale under all applicable state securities laws. Redemption of the outstanding warrants could force warrantholders (i) to exercise their warrants and pay the exercise price therefor at a time when it may be disadvantageous for them to do so, (ii) to sell their warrants at the then-current market price when they might otherwise wish to hold their warrants or (iii) to accept the nominal redemption price which, at the time the outstanding warrants are called for redemption, is likely to be substantially less than the market value of their warrants. In addition, we may redeem the public warrants after they become exercisable for a number of shares of Class A Common Stock determined based on the redemption date and the fair market value of our Class A Common Stock. Any such redemption may have similar consequences to a cash redemption described above. In addition, such redemption may occur at a time when the warrants are “out-of-the-money,” in which case warrantholders would lose any potential embedded value from a subsequent increase in the value of the Common Stock had their warrants remained outstanding.

In addition, we may redeem the public warrants after they become exercisable for a number of shares of Class A Common Stock determined based on the redemption date and the fair market value of our Class A Common Stock. Any such redemption may have similar consequences to a cash redemption described above. In addition, such redemption may occur at a time when the warrants are “out-of-the-money,” in which case warrantholders would lose any potential embedded value from a subsequent increase in the value of the Class A Common Stock had their warrants remained outstanding. None of the private placement warrants will be redeemable by us so long as they are held by our Sponsor or its permitted transferees.

34

Our warrants may have an adverse effect on the market price of our Class A Common Stock.

We issued warrants to purchase 8,333,333 shares of our Class A Common Stock as part of the units offered in our IPO and, simultaneously with the closing of our IPO, we issued in a private placement an aggregate of 4,333,333 private placement warrants, each exercisable to purchase one share of Class A Common Stock at $11.50 per share. To the extent such warrants are exercised, additional shares of our Class A Common Stock will be issued, which will result in dilution to our stockholders and increase the number of shares of Class A Common Stock eligible for resale in the public market. Sales of substantial numbers of such shares in the public market or the fact that such warrants may be exercised could adversely affect the market price of our Class A Common Stock.

The JOBS Act permits “emerging growth companies” like us to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies.

We qualify as an “emerging growth company” as defined in Section 2(a)(19) of the Securities Act, as modified by the JOBS Act. As such, we plan to take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies for as long as we continue to be an emerging growth company, including (i) the exemption from the auditor attestation requirements with respect to internal control over financial reporting under Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, (ii) the exemptions from say-on-pay, say-on-frequency and say-on-golden parachute voting requirements and (iii) reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in its periodic reports and proxy statements. We will remain an emerging growth company until the earliest of (i) the last day of the fiscal year in which the market value of our Class A Common Stock that is held by non-affiliates exceeds $700 million as of June 30 of that fiscal year, (ii) the last day of the fiscal year in which we have total annual gross revenue of $1 billion or more during such fiscal year, (iii) the date on which we have issued more than $1.07 billion in non-convertible debt in the prior three-year period or (iv) the last day of the fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of the date of the first sale of our common stock in the IPO, which would be December 31, 2023. AdaptHealth had revenues for the year ended December 31, 2019 of approximately $529.6 million. If we continue to expand our business through acquisitions and/or continue to grow revenues organically, we may cease to be an emerging growth company prior to December 31, 2023.

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the exemption from complying with new or revised accounting standards provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act as long as we are an emerging growth company. An emerging growth company can therefore delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. We have elected to take advantage of such extended transition period, which means that when a standard is issued or revised and it has different application dates for public or private companies, we, as an emerging growth company, can adopt the new or revised standard at the same time private companies adopt the new or revised standard. Investors may find our Class A Common Stock less attractive because we will rely on these exemptions, which may result in a less active trading market for our Class A Common Stock and its stock price may be more volatile.

We are also currently a “smaller reporting company.” In the event that we are still considered a “smaller reporting company,” at such time as we cease being an “emerging growth company,” the disclosure we will be required to provide in our SEC filings will increase, but will still be less than it would be if we were not considered either an “emerging growth company” or a “smaller reporting company.” Specifically, similar to “emerging growth companies,” “smaller reporting companies” are able to provide simplified executive compensation disclosures in their filings; are exempt from the provisions of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requiring that independent registered public accounting firms provide an attestation report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting; and have certain other decreased disclosure obligations in their SEC filings. Decreased disclosures in our SEC filings due to our status as an “emerging growth company” or “smaller reporting company” may make it harder for investors to analyze our results of operations and financial prospects.

Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation requires that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware and, to the extent enforceable, the federal district courts of the United States of America be the

35

exclusive forums for substantially all disputes between us and our stockholders, which may have the effect of discouraging lawsuits against our directors and officers.

Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation requires, to the fullest extent permitted by law, other than any claim to enforce a duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or other claim for which federal courts have exclusive jurisdiction, that derivative actions brought in our name, actions against directors, officers and employees for breach of fiduciary duty and other similar actions may be brought only in the Court of Chancery in the State of Delaware and, if brought outside of the State of Delaware, the stockholder bringing such suit will be deemed to have consented to service of process on such stockholder’s counsel. Our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation further provides that the federal district courts of the United States of America are the exclusive forum for resolving any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act. These provisions may have the effect of discouraging lawsuits against our directors and officers. If a court were to find either exclusive forum provision in our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving the dispute in other jurisdictions, which could seriously harm our business. For example, the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware determined in December 2018 that the exclusive forum provision of federal district courts of the United States of America for resolving any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act is not enforceable. However, this decision may be reviewed and ultimately overturned by the Delaware Supreme Court. If the Court of Chancery’s decision were to be overturned, we would enforce the federal district court exclusive forum provision in our second amended and restated certificate of incorporation.

Item 1B. Unresolved Staff Comments

None.

 

Item 2. Properties

We lease primarily all of our offices and facilities. Our corporate headquarters currently consists of approximately 12,000 square feet in an office building located at 220 Germantown Pike,  Suite 250, Plymouth Meeting,  Pennsylvania,  19462. In addition to our corporate headquarters, we lease facilities for our operating locations,  billing centers, and other warehouse and office space. All facilities are leased pursuant to operating leases. We believe that our facilities are suitable and adequate for our planned needs.

Item 3. Legal Proceedings

AdaptHealth is involved in investigations, claims, lawsuits and other proceedings arising in the ordinary course of its business. These matters involve personnel and employment issues, regulatory matters, personal injury, contract and other proceedings arising in the ordinary course of business, which have not resulted in any material losses to date. Although AdaptHealth does not expect the outcome of these proceedings will have a material adverse effect on its financial condition or results of operations, such matters are inherently unpredictable. Therefore, AdaptHealth could incur judgments or enter into settlements or claims that could materially impact its financial condition or results of operations.

Item 4. Mine Safety Disclosures

Not applicable.

 

36

PART II

Item 5. Market for Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

Market Information

Our Class A Common Stock is currently listed on Nasdaq under the symbol “AHCO” and our public warrants are quoted on the OTC Pink marketplace operated by OTC Markets Group, Inc. under the symbol “AHCOW.” Through November 8, 2019, our Class A Common Stock and warrants were quoted under the symbols “DFB” and “DFBW,” respectively. Each whole warrant entitles the holder to purchase one share of common stock at a price of $11.50 per share, subject to adjustment as described in our registration statement. Only whole warrants are exercisable and only whole warrants will trade. The warrants will expire on the fifth anniversary of the Closing, at 5:00 p.m., New York City time, or earlier upon redemption or liquidation.

As of March 3, 2020, there were 40 holders of record of shares of our Class A Common Stock, 18 holders of record of shares of our Class B Common Stock and 26 holders of record of our warrants. Such numbers do not include beneficial owners holding our securities through nominee names. There is no public market for our Class B Common Stock. 

Dividend Policy

We have not paid any cash dividends on our Common Stock to date. The payment of cash dividends in the future will be dependent upon our revenues and earnings, if any, capital requirements and general financial condition. The payment of any cash dividends will be within the discretion of our board of directors at such time. In addition, our board of directors is not currently contemplating and does not anticipate declaring any stock dividends in the foreseeable future. Further, our ability to declare dividends may be limited by restrictive covenants contained in any of our existing or future indebtedness.

Recent Sales of Unregistered Securities

Other than as follows, we had no sales of unregistered equity securities during the period covered by this report that were not previously reported in a Current Report on Form 8-K.

Unit Exchanges

Since the Closing of the Business Combination, the Company has issued 1,050,000 shares of Class A Common Stock to certain members of AdaptHealth Holdings in exchange for an equal number of shares of Class B Common Stock and AdaptHealth Units pursuant to the Exchange Agreement, dated as of November 8, 2019, between the Company, AdaptHealth Holdings and holders of AdaptHealth Units. The shares of Class A Common Stock were issued pursuant to the exemption from registration contained in Section 4(a)(2) of the Securities Act.

Plan-Related Issuances

Since the Closing of the Business Combination, the Company has approved the grant to certain of its officers, directors and employees of (i) 416,250 restricted shares of Class A Common Stock and (ii) options to purchase an aggregate of 3,416,666 shares of its Class A Common Stock under the AdaptHealth Corp. 2019 Stock Incentive Plan. The shares of Class A Common Stock and options are being issued pursuant to the exemption from registration contained in Rule 701 promulgated under Section 3(b) of the Securities Act.

Issuer Purchases of Equity Securities

None.

37

Item 6. Selected Financial Data

The following table shows selected historical consolidated financial information for the periods and as of the dates indicated. The selected historical consolidated financial information as of and for the years ended December 31, 2019 and 2018 was derived from the audited historical consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this report. The selected historical consolidated financial information as of and for the years ended December 31, 2017 and 2016 was derived from the audited historical consolidated financial statements not included in this report. 

Historical results are not necessarily indicative of future operating results. The selected historical consolidated financial information should be read in conjunction with “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” as well as our historical consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes included elsewhere in this report.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

Year Ended December 31, 

Consolidated Statement of Operations Data:

 

2019

 

2018

 

2017

 

2016

Total net revenue

 

$

529,644

 

$

345,278

 

$

192,559

 

$

174,316

Operating income

 

$

29,697

 

$

31,091

 

 

16,088

 

$

2,323

Net (loss) income attributable to AdaptHealth Corp.

 

$

(14,996)

 

$

23,260

 

$

9,687

 

$

(4,183)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Consolidated Statement of Operations Data:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net cash provided by operating activities

 

$

60,418

 

$

68,427

 

$

45,931

 

$

29,935

Net cash used in investing activities

 

$

(84,870)

 

$

(96,284)

 

$

(15,077)

 

$

(2,676)

Net cash provided by (used in) financing activities

 

$

76,144

 

$

48,769

 

$

(30,263)

 

$

(27,580)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(in thousands)

 

December 31,

 

 

 

Balance Sheet Data:

 

2019

 

2018

 

2017

 

 

 

Total assets

 

$

547,034

 

$

368,957

 

$

111,984

 

 

 

Total long-term debt, including current portion

 

$

396,833

 

$

134,185

 

$

20,312

 

 

 

Total stockholders' equity (deficit) / members’ equity (deficit)

 

$

(29,248)

 

$

102,769

 

$

(637)

 

 

 

 

The following table sets forth EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA less Patient Equipment Capex:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 

(in thousands)

 

2019

 

2018

 

2017

 

2016

 

 

(unaudited)

EBITDA

 

$

90,142

 

$

77,569

 

$

43,580

 

$

28,886

Adjusted EBITDA

 

$

123,021

 

$

84,447

 

$

45,035

 

$

33,104

Adjusted EBITDA less Patient Equipment Capex

 

$

75,600

 

$

45,083

 

$

19,186

 

$

7,625

 

38

The following table reconciles net income (loss) attributable to AdaptHealth Corp., the most directly comparable GAAP measure, to EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA less Patient Equipment Capex:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Year Ended December 31, 

(in thousands)

 

2019

 

2018

 

2017

 

2016

 

 

(unaudited)

Net (loss) income attributable to AdaptHealth Corp.

 

$

(14,996)

 

$

23,260

 

$

9,687

 

$

(4,183)

Income attributable to noncontrolling interest

 

 

2,111

 

 

1,077

 

 

580

 

 

563

Interest expense excluding change in fair value of interest rate swaps

 

 

27,878

 

 

8,000

 

 

5,041

 

 

5,761

Interest expense (income) - change in fair value of interest rate swaps

 

 

11,426

 

 

(547)

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Income tax expense (benefit)

 

 

1,156

 

 

(2,098)

 

 

249

 

 

(208)

Depreciation

 

 

62,567

 

 

47,877

 

 

27,816

 

 

26,563

Loss from discontinued operations, net of tax

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

207

 

 

390

EBITDA

 

 

90,142

 

 

77,569

 

 

43,580

 

 

28,886

Loss on extinguishment of debt, net(a)

 

 

2,121

 

 

1,399

 

 

324

 

 

 —

Equity-based compensation expense(b)

 

 

11,070

 

 

884

 

 

49

 

 

49

Transaction costs(c)

 

 

15,984

 

 

2,514

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Severance(d)

 

 

2,301

 

 

1,920

 

 

826

 

 

430

Non-recurring expenses

 

 

534

 

 

161

 

 

256

 

 

3,739

Earnout liability activity(e)

 

 

869

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

 

 

 —

Adjusted EBITDA

 

 

123,021

 

 

84,447

 

 

45,035

 

 

33,104

Less: Patient equipment capex(f)

 

 

(47,421)

 

 

(39,364)

 

 

(25,849)

 

 

(25,479)

Adjusted EBITDA less Patient Equipment Capex

 

$

75,600

 

$

45,083

 

$

19,186

 

$

7,625

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(a)

Represents write offs of deferred financing costs and prepayment penalty expense related to refinancing of debt offset by gain on debt extinguishment.

(b)

Represents amortization of equity‑based compensation to employees, including expense resulting from accelerated vesting and modification of certain awards.

(c)

Represents transaction costs related to acquisitions, the 2019 Recapitalization, and the Business Combination.

(d)

Represents severance costs related to acquisition integration and internal AdaptHealth restructuring and workforce reduction activities.

(e)

Represents fair value adjustments and other charges associated with earnout liabilities from acquisitions.

(f)

Represents the value of the patient equipment received during the respective period without regard to whether the equipment is purchased or financed through lease transactions.

 

Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations

The following discussion should be read in conjunction with AdaptHealth Corp.’s (“AdaptHealth” or the “Company”) consolidated financial statements and the accompanying notes included in this report. All amounts presented are in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“U.S. GAAP”), except as noted. In addition to historical information, this discussion contains forward-looking statements that involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions that could cause actual results to differ materially from management’s expectations. Factors that could cause such differences include, but are not limited to, those discussed in Item 1A, “Risk Factors”, of this report on Form 10-K.

39

AdaptHealth Corp. Overview

AdaptHealth is a leading provider of home healthcare equipment, supplies and related services in the United States. The Company focuses primarily on providing (i) sleep therapy equipment, supplies and related services (including CPAP and bi PAP services) to individuals suffering from obstructive sleep apnea, (ii) home medical equipment to patients discharged from acute care and other facilities, (iii) oxygen and related chronic therapy services in the home and (iv) other HME medical devices and supplies on behalf of chronically ill patients with diabetes care, wound care, urological, ostomy and nutritional supply needs.  The Company services beneficiaries of Medicare, Medicaid and commercial insurance payors. As of December 31, 2019, AdaptHealth serviced approximately 1.2 million patients annually in 49 states through its network of 173 locations in 35 states. Following its acquisition of PCS from McKesson Corporation in January 2020, AdaptHealth services over approximately 1.4 million patients annually in all 50 states through its network of 187 locations in 38 states. The Company’s principal executive offices are located at 220 West Germantown Pike, Suite 250, Plymouth Meeting, Pennsylvania 19462.

Trends and Factors Affecting AdaptHealth’s Future Performance

Significant trends and factors that AdaptHealth believes may affect its future performance include:

·

Home Medical Equipment Growth.  According to CMS, the HME industry has grown from $40 billion in 2010 to $56 billion in 2018 (representing a 4.3% CAGR), of which AdaptHealth’s total addressable market for its sleep therapy, oxygen services, mobility products and hospice HME business lines comprised approximately $12 billion to $15 billion in 2018. During that time Medicaid data shows a continued shift of long-term services and supports (LTSS) spending into the home, with 57% of that spending going to home and community-based services in 2016. According to CMS, the HME market is projected to continue to grow at a 6.1% CAGR over the next nine years. As a result of the acquisition of the diabetic, wound care, ostomy and urological supplies business of PCS in January 2020, the Company believes it has more than doubled its addressable market to more than $25 billion.

·

Aging U.S. Population.  The population of adults aged 65 and older in the U.S., a significant group of end users of AdaptHealth’s products and services, is expected to continue to grow and thus grow AdaptHealth’s market opportunity. According to CMS, in the U.S., the population of adults between the ages of 65 and 84 is expected to grow at a 2.5% CAGR through 2030, while the population of adults over 85 is projected to grow at a 2.9% CAGR during that same time period. Not only is the elderly population expected to grow, but they are also expected to make up a larger percentage of the total U.S. population. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the U.S. geriatric population was approximately 15% of the total population in 2014 and is expected to grow to approximately 24% of the total population by 2060.

·

Increasing Prevalence of Chronic Conditions.  HME is necessary to help treat significant health issues affecting millions of Americans, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, congestive heart failure, obstructive sleep apnea and diabetes.

·

Increasing Prevalence of and Preference for In-Home Treatments.  The number of conditions that can be treated in the home continues to grow, with recent additions including chronic wound care, sleep testing, dialysis and chemotherapy. In home care is also increasingly becoming the preferred method of treatment, particularly for the elderly population. According to the AARP Public Policy Institute, 90% of patients over age 55 have indicated a preference to receive care in the home rather than in an institutional setting.

·

Home Care is the Lowest Cost Setting.  Not only is in-home care typically just as effective as care delivered in an inpatient setting, but it has also proven to be more cost effective. This is especially important within the context of government pressures to lower the cost of care, pushing clinicians to seek care settings that are less costly than hospitals and inpatient facilities. On a daily basis, home healthcare has been estimated by Cain Brothers & Company, LLC to be approximately seven times less expensive than care provided in skilled nursing facilities, the closest acuity site of care. In-home care offers a significant cost reduction opportunity relative to facility based care without sacrificing quality.

40

Certain additional items may impact the comparability of the historical results presented below with AdaptHealth’s future performance, such as the cost of being a public company. To operate as a public company, AdaptHealth will be required to continue to implement changes in certain aspects of its business and develop, manage, and train management level and other employees to comply with ongoing public company requirements,  including compliance with Section 404 and the evaluation of the effectiveness of internal controls over financial reporting. AdaptHealth will also incur new expenses as a public company, including expenses associated with public reporting obligations, proxy statements and stockholder meetings, stock exchange fees, transfer agent fees, SEC and Financial Industry Regulatory Authority filing fees and offering expenses.

Key Components of Operating Results

Net Revenue.  Net revenues are recorded for services that AdaptHealth provides to patients for home healthcare equipment and related services. AdaptHealth’s primary service lines are (i) sleep therapy equipment, supplies and related services (including CPAP and bi-PAP services) to individuals suffering from OSA, (ii) home medical equipment to patients discharged from acute care and other facilities and (iii) respiratory, including oxygen and related chronic therapy services in the home. Net revenues also include other services and supplies, primarily related to orthotics, enteral and hospice. Revenues are recorded either (x) at a point in time for the sale of supplies and disposables, or (y) over the service period for equipment rental (including, but not limited to, CPAP machines, hospital beds, wheelchairs and other equipment), at amounts estimated to be received from patients or under reimbursement arrangements with Medicare, Medicaid and other third-party payors, including private insurers. For the year ended December 31, 2019, approximately 60% and 40% of revenues were recognized at a point in time and over the service period, respectively. For the year ended December 31, 2018, approximately 55% and 45% of revenues were recognized at a point in time and over the service period, respectively. Net revenues are net of related provision for doubtful accounts and implicit price concessions. Provision for doubtful accounts consists of billed charges that are ultimately deemed uncollectible due to a patient’s or a third-party payor’s inability or unwillingness to pay. The amount is based on management’s best estimate of the net realizable value of accounts receivable. Variable consideration in the form of implicit price concessions that is not expected to be collected from customers are recorded as a direct reduction of net revenues.

The Company adopted Financial Accounting Standards Board (“FASB”) Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) Topic 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (ASC 606), effective January 1, 2019, using the modified retrospective transition method.  Results for reporting periods beginning after January 1, 2019 are presented under ASC 606, while comparative information has not been restated and continues to be reported under the accounting standards in effect for those periods. The Company’s adoption of ASC 606 primarily impacts the presentation of revenues due to the inclusion of variable consideration in the form of implicit price concessions contained in certain of its contracts with customers. Under ASC 606, amounts estimated to be uncollectible are generally considered implicit price concessions that are a direct reduction to net revenues. Prior to adoption of ASC 606, such amounts were classified as provision for doubtful accounts.

Cost of Net Revenue.  Cost of net revenues includes the cost of non-capitalized medical equipment and supplies, distribution expenses, labor costs, facilities rental costs, third-party revenue cycle management costs and depreciation for capitalized patient equipment. Distribution expenses represents the cost incurred to coordinate and deliver products and services to the patients. Included in distribution expenses are leasing, maintenance, licensing and fuel costs for the vehicle fleet; salaries, benefits and other costs related to drivers and dispatch personnel; and amounts paid to couriers.

General and Administrative Expenses.  General and administrative expenses consist of corporate support costs including information technology, human resources, finance, contracting, legal, compliance, equity-based compensation, transaction expenses and other administrative costs.

Depreciation, Excluding Patient Equipment Depreciation.  Depreciation expense includes depreciation charges for capital assets other than patient equipment (which is included as part of the cost of net revenues).

Factors Affecting AdaptHealth’s Operating Results

41

AdaptHealth’s operating results and financial performance are influenced by certain unique events during the periods discussed herein, including the following:

Acquisitions

AdaptHealth accounts for its acquisitions in accordance with FASB ASC Topic 805, Business Combinations, and the operations of the acquired entities are included in the historical results of AdaptHealth for the periods following the closing of the acquisition. The most significant of these acquisitions impacting the comparability of AdaptHealth’s operating results in 2019 compared to 2018 were PPS HME Holdings (“PP”S) acquired in May 2018, Verus Healthcare, Inc. (“Verus”) acquired in May 2018, Home Medical Express, Inc. (“HMEI”) acquired in July 2018, Med Way Medical, Inc. (“Med Way”) acquired in December 2018, Continued Care of Long Island, Inc. (“CCLI”) acquired in October 2018, SleepMed Therapies, Inc. (“SleepMed”) acquired in July 2019, and Gould’s Discount Medical, LLC (“Gould’s”) acquired in January 2019. Refer to Note 3,  Acquisitions, included in our consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2019 included in this report for additional information regarding AdaptHealth’s acquisitions.

Debt and Recapitalization

On March 20, 2019, AdaptHealth entered into the Third Amended and Restated Credit and Guaranty Agreement and restructured its debt borrowings with its bank group. The debt restructuring consisted of $425 million in credit facilities, which includes a $300 million Initial Term Loan (the “Credit Facility Term Loan”), $50 million Delayed Draw Term Loan (the “Delayed Draw Loan”), and $75 million Revolving Credit Facility (the “New Revolver”), all with maturities in March 2024. The Credit Facility Term Loan may consist of Base Rate Loans or LIBOR Rate Loans (as defined in the agreement).”

On March 20, 2019, AdaptHealth entered into a Note and Unit Purchase Agreement with certain affiliates of BlueMountain Capital Management, LLC. In connection with the agreement, membership interests in AdaptHealth Holdings were purchased for $20 million, and AdaptHealth also signed a promissory note agreement with a principal amount of $100 million (the “BM Note”). The outstanding principal amount under the BM Note was due on the tenth anniversary of the agreement and bore interest at the following rates (a) for the period starting on the closing date and ending on the seventh anniversary, a rate of 12% per annum, with 6% payable in cash and 6% payment in kind, and (b) for the period starting on the day after the seventh anniversary of the closing date and ending on the maturity date, a rate equal to the greater of (i) 15% per annum or (ii) the twelve-month LIBOR plus 12% per annum.

The transactions consummated with respect to the Third Amended and Restated Credit and Guaranty Agreement and the Note and Unit Purchase Agreement are hereinafter referred to as the “2019 Recapitalization.”

In connection with the closing of the Business Combination, the Company amended its credit facility primarily to (i) increase the amount available under the Delayed Draw Loan from $50 million to $100 million, and (ii) revise the Consolidated Total Leverage Ratio thresholds and lower the applicable margin to determine the variable quarterly interest rate under the credit facility. In addition, the Company repaid $50.0 million under the Credit Facility Term Loan using the proceeds received from the transactions completed as part of the Business Combination; such repayment was applied to the principal payments required to be paid through September 2023. In addition, the Company repaid $31.5 million that was outstanding under the New Revolver. Further, in connection with the closing of the Business Combination,  the BM Note was replaced with a new amended and restated promissory note with a principal amount of $100 million. In addition, certain affiliates of BlueMountain Capital Management, LLC converted certain of its members’ equity interests to a $43.5 million promissory note. The new $100 million promissory note, together with the $43.5 million promissory note, are collectively referred to herein as the New Promissory Note. The outstanding principal amount under the New Promissory Note is due on November 8, 2029 and bears interest at the following rates (a) for the period starting on the closing date and ending on the seventh anniversary, a rate of 12% per annum, with 6% payable in cash and 6% Payment in Kind (“PIK”), and (b) for the period starting on the day after the seventh anniversary of the closing date and ending on the maturity date, a rate equal to the greater of (i) 15% per annum or (ii) the twelve-month LIBOR plus 12% per annum. The Company has the option to pay the PIK interest in cash.

42

Seasonality

AdaptHealth’s business is somewhat sensitive to seasonal fluctuations. Its patients are generally responsible for a greater percentage of the cost of their treatment or therapy during the early months of the year due to co-insurance, co-payments and deductibles, and therefore may defer treatment and services of certain therapies until meeting their annual deductibles. In addition, changes to employer insurance coverage often go into effect at the beginning of each calendar year which may impact eligibility requirements and delay or defer treatment. These factors may lead to lower net revenue and cash flow in the early part of the year versus the latter half of the year. Additionally, the increased incidence of respiratory infections during the winter season may result in initiation of additional respiratory services such as oxygen therapy for certain patient populations. AdaptHealth’s quarterly operating results may fluctuate significantly in the future depending on these and other factors.

Key Business Metrics

AdaptHealth focuses on net revenue, EBITDA, Adjusted EBITDA and Adjusted EBITDA less Patient Equipment Capex as it reviews its performance. Total net revenue is comprised of net sales revenue and net revenue from fixed monthly equipment reimbursements less a provision for doubtful accounts and implicit price concessions. Net sales revenue consists of revenue recognized at a point in time for the sale of supplies and disposables. Net revenue from fixed monthly equipment reimbursements consists of revenue recognized over the service period for equipment (including, but not limited to, CPAP machines, hospital beds, wheelchairs and other equipment).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 31, 2019

 

June 30, 2019

 

 

September 30, 2019

 

December 31, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Revenue

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

(in thousands)

 

Dollars

    

Percentage

 

Dollars

 

Percentage

 

 

Dollars

    

Percentage

 

Dollars

 

Percentage

 

 

Total

 

Percentage

 

 

 

(Unaudited)

Net sales revenue - Point in time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sleep

 

$

47,127

 

39.4

%  

$

50,433

 

40.6

%

 

$

59,117

 

43.3

%  

$

67,865

 

45.4

%

 

$

224,542

 

42.4

%

Respiratory

 

 

1,279

 

1.1

%  

 

1,445

 

1.2

%

 

 

1,397

 

1.0

%  

 

1,659

 

1.1

%

 

 

5,780

 

1.1

%

HME

 

 

11,042

 

9.2

%  

 

10,966

 

8.8

%

 

 

11,963

 

8.8

%  

 

11,977

 

8.0

%

 

 

45,948

 

8.7

%

Other

 

 

9,509

 

8.0

%  

 

10,151

 

8.2

%

 

 

10,587

 

7.8

%  

 

9,934

 

6.6

%

 

 

40,181

 

7.5

%

Total Net sales revenue

 

$

68,957

 

57.7

%  

$

72,995

 

58.8

%

 

$

83,064

 

60.9

%  

$

91,435

 

61.1

%

 

$

316,451

 

59.7

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net revenue from fixed monthly equipment reimbursements

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sleep

 

$

18,057

 

15.1

%  

$

18,944

 

15.3

%

 

$

20,761

 

15.2

%  

$

23,084

 

15.4

%

 

$

80,846

 

15.3

%

Respiratory

 

 

20,429

 

17.1

%  

 

20,010

 

16.1

%

 

 

19,646

 

14.4

%  

 

21,333

 

14.3

%

 

 

81,418

 

15.4

%

HME

 

 

10,370

 

8.7

%  

 

10,294

 

8.3

%

 

 

11,103

 

8.1

%  

 

11,445

 

7.7

%

 

 

43,212

 

8.2

%

Other

 

 

1,686

 

1.4

%  

 

1,910

 

1.5

%

 

 

1,877

 

1.4

%  

 

2,244

 

1.5

%

 

 

7,717

 

1.4

%

Total Net revenue from fixed monthly equipment reimbursements

 

$

50,542

 

42.3

%  

$

51,158

 

41.2

%

 

$

53,387

 

39.1

%  

$

58,106

 

38.9

%

 

$

213,193

 

40.3

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total net revenue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sleep

 

$

65,184

 

54.5

%  

$

69,377

 

55.9

%

 

$

79,878

 

58.5

%  

$

90,949

 

60.8

%

 

$

305,388

 

57.7

%

Respiratory

 

 

21,708

 

18.2

%  

 

21,455

 

17.3

%

 

 

21,043

 

15.4

%  

 

22,992

 

15.4

%

 

 

87,198

 

16.5

%

HME

 

 

21,412

 

17.9

%  

 

21,260

 

17.1

%

 

 

23,066

 

16.9

%  

 

23,422

 

15.7

%

 

 

89,160

 

16.9

%

Other

 

 

11,195

 

9.4

%  

 

12,061

 

9.7

%

 

 

12,464

 

9.2

%  

 

12,178

 

8.1

%

 

 

47,898

 

8.9

%

Total net revenue

 

$

119,499

 

100.0

%  

$

124,153

 

100.0

%

 

$

136,451

 

100.0

%  

$

149,541

 

100.0

%

 

$

529,644

 

100.0

%

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

43

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Three months ended

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

March 31, 2018

 

June 30, 2018

 

 

September 30, 2018

 

December 31, 2018

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Net Revenue

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

 

 

 

 

Revenue

 

(in thousands)

 

Dollars

    

Percentage

 

Dollars

 

Percentage

 

 

Dollars

    

Percentage

 

Dollars

 

Percentage

 

 

Total

 

Percentage

 

 

 

(Unaudited)

Net sales revenue - Point in time

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sleep

 

$

12,205

 

21.8

%  

$

25,760

 

32.8

%

 

$

41,226

 

40.4

%  

$

44,394

 

40.9

%

 

$

123,585

 

35.8

%

Respiratory

 

 

1,069

 

1.9

%  

 

1,193

 

1.5

%

 

 

1,267

 

1.2

%  

 

1,382

 

1.3

%

 

 

4,911

 

1.4

%

HME

 

 

9,069

 

16.2

%  

 

9,289

 

11.8

%

 

 

8,938

 

8.7

%  

 

9,428

 

8.7

%

 

 

36,724

 

10.6

%

Other

 

 

5,472

 

9.8

%  

 

6,043

 

7.8

%

 

 

6,062

 

6.0

%  

 

7,074

 

6.4

%

 

 

24,651

 

7.2

%

Total Net sales revenue

 

$

27,815

 

49.7

%  

$

42,285

 

53.9

%

 

$

57,493

 

56.3

%  

$

62,278

 

57.3

%

 

$

189,871

 

55.0