F-1 1 nt10006851x6_f1.htm F-1

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As filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on July 10, 2020
Registration No. 333-   
UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
Form F-1
REGISTRATION STATEMENT
UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
IBEX LIMITED
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
Not Applicable
(Translation of Registrant’s name into English)
Bermuda
7389
Not Applicable
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
(Primary Standard Industrial
Classification Code Number)
(I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)
Crawford House, 50 Cedar Avenue
Hamilton HM11, Bermuda
(441) 295-6500
(Address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of registrant’s principal executive offices)
Robert Dechant, Chief Executive Officer
IBEX LIMITED
1700 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite 560
Washington, DC 20006
(202) 580-6200
(Name, address, including zip code, and telephone number, including area code, of agent for service)
Copies to:
Christopher C. Paci, Esq.
Stephen P. Alicanti, Esq.
DLA Piper LLP (US)
1251 Avenue of the Americas
New York, New York 10020
(212) 335-4500
Joseph C. Theis, Jr., Esq.
Goodwin Procter LLP
100 Northern Avenue
Boston, Massachusetts 02210
(617) 570-1000
Approximate date of commencement of proposed sale to the public: As soon as practicable after the effective date of this registration statement.
If any of the securities being registered on this Form are to be offered on a delayed or continuous basis pursuant to Rule 415 under the Securities Act of 1933, check the following box.
If this Form is filed to register additional securities for an offering pursuant to Rule 462(b) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.
If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(c) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.
If this Form is a post-effective amendment filed pursuant to Rule 462(d) under the Securities Act, check the following box and list the Securities Act registration statement number of the earlier effective registration statement for the same offering.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is an emerging growth company as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act of 1933.
Emerging growth company ☒
If an emerging growth company that prepares its financial statements in accordance with U.S. GAAP, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards† provided pursuant to Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act.
† The term “new or revised financial accounting standard” refers to any update issued by the Financial Accounting Standards Board to its Accounting Standards Codification after April 5, 2012.
CALCULATION OF REGISTRATION FEE
Title of Each Class of
Securities to be Registered
Amount to be
Registered(1)
Proposed Maximum
Offering Price per Share(2)
Proposed Maximum Aggregate Offering
Price(1)(2)
Amount of
Registration Fee(3)
Common Shares, par value $0.000111650536 per share
 
$   
$100,000,000
$12,980
(1)
Includes common shares subject to the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares.
(2)
Estimated solely for the purpose of calculating the registration fee in accordance with Rule 457(a) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended.
(3)
Pursuant to Rule 457(p) under the Securities Act, the Registrant is offsetting $9,337.50 against the amount of the registration fee payable with respect to this registration statement. The offsetting amount was originally paid by the Registrant in connection with the registration statement on Form F-1 filed by the Registrant on February 23, 2018 (File No. 333-223184), which was subsequently withdrawn by the Registrant. The Registrant has not sold any securities pursuant to the registration statement No. 333-223184. Accordingly, the amount of $9,337.50 is being offset against the total registration fee of $12,980 due for this registration statement, with the remaining $3,642.50 paid herewith.
The Registrant hereby amends this Registration Statement on such date or dates as may be necessary to delay its effective date until the Registrant shall file a further amendment which specifically states that this Registration Statement shall thereafter become effective in accordance with Section 8(a) of the Securities Act of 1933 or until the Registration Statement shall become effective on such date as the Securities and Exchange Commission, acting pursuant to said Section 8(a), may determine.

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The information in this preliminary prospectus is not complete and may be changed. The securities may not be sold until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This preliminary prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and it is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any jurisdiction where the offer or sale is not permitted.
Subject to Completion. Dated     , 2020
PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS
   Shares

IBEX LIMITED
COMMON SHARES
This is an initial public offering of common shares of IBEX Limited. We are offering     common shares. The selling shareholder identified in this prospectus is offering     additional common shares. We will not receive any of the proceeds from the sale of the shares by the selling shareholder.
Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our common shares. We anticipate that the initial public offering price will be between $    and $    per share. We have applied to list our common shares on the Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol “IBEX.”
We are an “emerging growth company” as that term is used in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act, and, as such, will be subject to reduced public company reporting requirements.
After completion of this offering, we will be a “controlled company” within the meaning of the Nasdaq Stock Market Rules because our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited, will own    % of our then outstanding common shares. See “Prospectus Summary—Controlled Company Status,” “Principal and Selling Shareholder” and “Risk Factors— Risks Related to Our Common Shares and this Offering.”
Investing in our common shares involves substantial risk. Please refer to the “Risk Factors” on page 26.
 
Per Share
Total
Initial public offering price
$      
$      
Underwriting discounts and commissions(1)
$
$
Proceeds to us, before expenses
$
$
Proceeds to the selling shareholder, before expenses
$
$
(1)
We have agreed to reimburse the underwriters for certain FINRA-related expenses. See “Underwriting.”
Delivery of the common shares is expected to be made on or about     , 2020.
The selling shareholder has granted the underwriters a 30-day option to purchase up to an additional     common shares at the initial public offering price less underwriting discounts and commissions.
Neither the Securities and Exchange Commission nor any other regulatory body has approved or disapproved of these securities or passed upon the adequacy or accuracy of this prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
Citigroup
RBC Capital Markets
Baird
SunTrust Robinson Humphrey
 
Piper Sandler
         , 2020



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Table of Contents
Prospectus
 
Page
You should rely only on the information contained in this prospectus. Neither we, the selling shareholder nor the underwriters have authorized any other person to provide you with any information, or to make any representations, other than as contained in this prospectus, any amendment or supplement to this prospectus or any free writing prospectus prepared by us or on our behalf. Neither we, the selling shareholder nor the underwriters take responsibility for, and provide assurance as to, the reliability of any information or representations that others may give you. This prospectus is an offer to sell only the shares offered hereby, and only under circumstances and in jurisdictions where it is lawful to do so. The information contained in this prospectus is accurate only as of the date of this prospectus and we undertake no obligation to update such information, except as may be required by law.
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Prospectus Summary
The items in the following summary are described in more detail later in this prospectus. This summary provides an overview of selected information and does not contain all the information you should consider. Therefore, you should also read the more detailed information set out in this prospectus and the financial statements. Some of the statements in this prospectus constitute forward-looking statements. See “Forward-Looking Statements.”
Except where the context otherwise requires or where otherwise indicated, the terms “IBEX,” “ibex,” “we,” “us,” “our,” the “Company,” the “Issuer” and “our business” refer to IBEX Limited, together with our consolidated subsidiaries.
This prospectus includes our trademarks as “IBEX,” which are protected under applicable intellectual property laws and are the property of IBEX Limited or our subsidiaries. This prospectus also contains trademarks, service marks, trade names and copyrights of other companies, which are the property of their respective owners.
Overview
IBEX is a leading global customer experience (“CX”) company delivering solutions to help the world’s preeminent brands more effectively engage with their customers.
The outsourced industry is undergoing a paradigm shift with blue chip companies in traditional industries pivoting toward digitally-enabled marketplaces and increasingly digitally-native consumers. Companies are reacting to this shifting landscape with a relentless focus on CX and customer lifetime value (“LTV”). They are beginning to view their customer contact center providers as essential partners and extensions of their brand rather than cost centers that manage customer interaction. We define this new model and vantage point as “BPO 2.0” and believe that our differentiated suite of services and organizational characteristics uniquely position us to lead in this market, including:
services that span the full customer lifecycle, ranging from customer acquisition to customer engagement to managing and measuring the customer experience;
technology tools that enhance ambassador performance and drive unique client insights;
multiple channels of engagement, ranging from voice to fast-growing digital channels such as chat and email;
differentiated global delivery centers, where we have been successful in offering clients lower costs while maintaining high levels of quality; and
unique, highly engaged culture that is overseen by a highly experienced management team that is flexible and moves at the speed of the client.
This marketplace driven shift to BPO 2.0 has been critical in our success, as we are well positioned on the leading edge which is demonstrated by our above-average revenue growth rates and success with both new economy and traditional blue chip branded clients. Our “New Economy” business, where we work with the faster-growing, new economy brands, has grown at a compound annual growth rate (“CAGR”) of 230% for the last four years. We define New Economy clients as those that are experiencing high degrees of top-line growth which, in turn, drives significant increases in such companies’ volume requirements for customer care BPO solutions. Between fiscal year 2015 and 2019, this category grew from 0.2% to 22.0% of our revenue. We have also been able to win blue chip brands that are looking for providers with a more innovative and outcome-oriented focus on customer engagement. Our work with New Economy clients has resulted in a rapid expansion of our non-voice solutions where we engage our client’s customers through means, such as chat and email. Our revenue from non-voice channels has similarly grown at a rapid CAGR of 55% over the last four years.
Through our integrated Customer Lifecycle Experience (“CLX”) platform, we provide solutions that span the entire customer lifecycle and range from broad-based integrated offerings to more customized solutions focused on specific client needs. Our top ten clients use an average of more than five services across our CLX platform.
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Our CLX Suite of Solutions
Digital (Digital Marketing)
“Add customers.”
Connect (Customer Engagement)
Engage customers.”
CX (Feedback Analytics)
“Grow relationships.”
Digital Marketing
Customer Service
Multi-Channel Digital Surveys
Lead Generation
Billing Support
Real-Time Issue Resolution
Online Sales
Technical Support
Analytics & Business Intelligence
Optimization
Up-Sell/Cross-Sell
Retention / Renewals
Text / Sentiment Analytics
Lead Conversion
Win-backs
 
During the fiscal year 2019, we managed approximately 138 million interactions with consumers on behalf of our clients through an omni-channel approach, using voice, web, chat and email. While traditional channels (voice) still account for a majority of our revenue, our revenue from non-voice channels (web, chat and email) increased from $33.3 million in the nine months ended March 31, 2019 to $51.4 million in the nine months ended March 31, 2020, and increased from $8.1 million in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2015 to $46.9 million in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019. Non-voice revenue as a percentage of total revenue increased from 13.6% in the quarter ended March 31, 2019 to 16.8% in the quarter ended March 31, 2020, 11.9% in the nine months ended March 31, 2019 to 16.9% in the nine months ended March 31, 2020, and increased from 2.9% in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2015 to 12.7% in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019. During the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, 76.0% and 48.6%, respectively, and during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, 56.5% and 32.6%, respectively, of our revenue growth was attributable to the expansion of our non-voice business. The growth of our non-voice business has a positive impact on our profitability because our non-voice business has a higher workstation capacity utilization. In addition, ambassador attrition rate has been lower for our non-voice business, which saves us significant costs associated with hiring and training.
Our clients fit primarily within two categories. The first category is made up of mostly Fortune 500 brands, across a broad range of industries that have large customer bases and rely on outsourced providers to maximize customer retention and improve customer expansion. We refer to these clients as “blue chip” companies. Increasingly, clients in this category look to us as a nimble provider offering differentiated services as they face challenges in the wake of digital disruption. We apply our execution expertise and end-to-end CLX technology suite to enable these clients to adapt in a changing environment that requires a different type of customer experience for digital-native consumers. The second category of clients we serve are digitally-driven “disruptors.” We refer to these clients as the “New Economy” companies. They tend to be faster-growing brands in high-growth industry verticals, such as (but not limited to) technology, e-commerce and consumer services. Our New Economy business is designed to meet these needs for new economy verticals and high-growth requirements, with a focus on launch, speed-to-performance and scale. While many of these New Economy clients are smaller, fast growing companies, there are several Fortune 500 companies within that group, such as Amazon and one of the leading ride-sharing companies in the United States. The success of our New Economy initiative with high-growth technology, e-commerce and consumer services clients is a key driver in the increase of our revenue from non-voice channels, and, as a result, has a positive effect on our profitability. Between fiscal year 2015 and fiscal year 2019, our revenue attributable to the high-growth New Economy business vertical increased at a 230% CAGR. In the nine months ended March 31, 2020, we derived $83.5 million, or 27.4%, of our revenue up from $58.0 million, or 20.7%, of our revenue in the nine months ended March 31, 2019 from our New Economy clients. In the quarter ended March 31, 2020, and March 31, 2019 we derived 28.6% and 24.3% of our revenue, respectively, from our New Economy clients. In fiscal year 2019, we derived $81.2 million, or 22.0% of our revenue, up from $45.9 million, or 13.4%, of our revenue in fiscal year 2018 and $0.7 million, or 0.2% of our revenue, in fiscal year 2015 from our New Economy clients. During the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, 100% and 100%, respectively, of our revenue growth was attributable to the expansion of our New Economy business vertical. During the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, 100% and 90%, respectively, of our revenue growth was attributable to the expansion of our New Economy business vertical. While most other client
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segments operate under economics typical of the outsourced customer care industry, the success of our New Economy business vertical is a result of differentiating factors such as its growth trajectory, its contribution to profitability and the greater propensity for these clients to leverage digital forms of service delivery.
Our delivery centers are strategically located in labor markets with relatively low levels of resource competition, which enables us to attract, hire and retain a highly engaged, well trained and motivated workforce, resulting in high levels of client satisfaction. In recent years, we have opened all of our new delivery centers in lower-cost markets outside the United States, such as the Philippines, Jamaica and Nicaragua, where we have been successful in offering our clients a lower cost base while maintaining high levels of quality. We believe that a key factor in our success has been our development of a unique ibex brand within these labor markets, where we have an attractive work culture, evidenced by multiple awards. We operate and staff our delivery centers in line with global health standards including appropriate social distancing, and complement these centers with a highly developed work-at-home program. In addition, a large portion of our services have been classified by the local authorities as essential in nature, allowing for the continued operation of those facilities through any lockdowns, and wherever appropriate and permitted by our clients, we have shifted any remaining work to a work-at-home platform.
We believe we have successfully taken share in the market and, as such, have maintained a growth trajectory that is in excess of the broader industry. As an example, of our top 10 clients, four have been onboarded since the beginning of fiscal year 2017. Of those four, we are providing an average of more than four services, which have been delivered across more than two major geographies (e.g., United States, Metro Philippines, Provincial Philippines, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Pakistan, and Senegal). A typical initial client launch involves providing a single solution from a single site and, therefore, we believe that our growth has been the result of excellent service delivery. It is our overall thesis that being awarded multiple services across several geographies serves as a proxy for our trusted client relationships and the value clients recognize in our offerings. We operate in 2.3 geographies on average for our top ten clients. Furthermore, our profitability has increased at a rate significantly higher than our revenue growth. For the nine months ended March 31, 2020, our revenue was $304.3 million, our net income was $11.6 million, our net income, continuing operations, was $11.6 million and our Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations was $40.6 million. For the nine months ended March 31, 2019, our revenue was $280.5 million, our net income was $11.2 million, our net income, continuing operations, was $0.1 million, and our Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations was $28.9 million. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019, our revenue was $368.4 million, our net income was $11.0 million, our net loss, continuing operations, was $4.5 million, and our Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations was $36.3 million. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2018, our revenue was $342.2 million, our net loss was $15.9 million, our net loss, continuing operations, was $20.8 million, and our Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations was $4.3 million. See “Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA from Continuing Operations from Net (Loss)/Income” on page 23.
Our financial position at June 30, 2019 and our results of operations for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 reflect our disposition of Etelequote Limited to our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited, on June 26, 2019 and its treatment as a discontinued operation. Our results of operations for the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, and the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019 reflect the impact of our adoption, effective July 1, 2018, of IFRS 15, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, and IFRS 16, Leases. IFRS 15 has been implemented using the cumulative effect method, and IFRS 16 using the modified retrospective approach. As a consequence, comparative amounts for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2018 are not restated to reflect the adoption of IFRS 15 and IFRS 16 but instead continue to reflect our accounting policies under IAS 18, Revenue, and IAS 17, Leases. For additional detail on the impact of the adoption of IFRS 15 and IFRS 16 and the treatment of Etelequote Limited as a discontinued operation and their impact on the comparability of our financial position at June 30, 2019 and 2018 and our results of operations for the years then ended, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Factors Affecting Comparability of Financial Position and Results of Operations.” For more information about our disposition of Etelequote Limited, refer to Note 30.3 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.
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Market Opportunity
We estimate that the total current addressable market for our suite of CLX solutions is well over $100 billion, and is comprised of the following areas of opportunity:
Customer Engagement (ibex Connect) – The largest portion of our addressable market is the customer care segment within the Business Process Outsourcing (“BPO”) industry, which makes up the largest portion of our revenue. International Data Corporation (“IDC”), a leading information technology research firm, estimates that the worldwide business process outsourcing services revenue in 2020 was $203.3 billion and expected to grow to $231 billion in 2024. Within this market, the customer care segment is the largest horizontal market, with approximately $77 billion of revenues in 2020 and expected to grow at a CAGR of 3.6% to $88.6 billion in revenues by 2024. Within the United States, customer care BPO spend accounted for $45 billion in 2020 and is expected to grow to $51.6 billion by 2024.
Customer Acquisition (ibex Digital) – Our customer acquisition solution is enabled primarily by digital marketing which is one of the fastest growing segments of the media advertising industry. According to eMarketer, a leading market research company, digital marketing will make up 43% of all advertising spending in 2020. A significant portion of this fast-growing market consists of outsourced customer acquisition specialists, who have primarily adopted a pay-for-performance business model in which advertisers only compensate marketers once a target consumer has taken a particular action, such as filling out an information form or completing a purchase of a product or service. Also according to eMarketer, in 2020 $28 billion is expected to be spent annually on paid search in North America, our primary digital marketing channel. The market is projected to continue to grow in the near term and is rapidly evolving due to increased expectations for BPO vendors to innovate and constantly improve service quality.
Customer Experience Management and Analytics (ibex CX) – With unprecedented access to technology, data and choices, consumers have elevated expectations about being heard, as well as how companies take action and respond in real time. As consumers gravitate toward digital channels (websites, mobile and social media), enterprises are seeking more technologically advanced solutions to collect data in real time and harness insights yielded by advanced analytics performed on those data to provide customized customer experiences. Markets and Markets, a leading B2B market research firm, estimates that the global customer experience management market will grow at a 13.3% CAGR, from $7.8 billion in 2019 to over $14.5 billion in 2023, with North America representing approximately $2.9 billion of market share in 2019. Similarly, Market Research Future estimates that the global market for customer experience analytics will increase to $12 billion by 2023.
Key Market Trends
A number of trends are driving growth and transformation in the outsourced customer interactions market. Historically, the industry was premised on labor arbitrage and cost. Offshoring of work to markets like India and the Philippines was driven primarily by the cost advantages those markets provided. However, the outsourced industry is undergoing a paradigm shift with blue chip clients pivoting toward technology-enabled marketplaces supporting an increasingly digitally-native consumer base. Companies are reacting to this shifting landscape with a relentless focus on CX and customer LTV. They view their customer contact center providers as essential partners and an extension of their brand rather than a cost center to manage customer interaction. In addition to clients in mature industries, emerging industries in the technology and consumer services sectors are changing the mix of solutions, channels and delivery locations. We believe that participants that offer a flexible, technology-oriented, and integrated solution will be best positioned to address the following key industry trends:
The Primacy of Customer Experience (CX)
A Dramatic Prioritization of CX – As brands recognize that digital feedback mechanisms, such as social media, can rapidly impact brand perception in a positive or negative manner, the importance of delivering an exceptional customer experience has become a top priority for companies.
Consumer Centricity & Customer Lifetime Value (LTV) Customer expectations and behaviors are changing dramatically. Enabled by immediate feedback channels, consumers expect that enterprises will meet their
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needs and preferences instantaneously in return for brand loyalty and greater share of customer spend. Accordingly, enterprises and brands are more focused on understanding their consumers’ needs and developing business models that hinge on maximizing customer lifetime value. In turn, they are demanding outsourced customer engagement partners that can deliver customer-centric solutions in an omni-channel manner that maximizes customer retention.
Evolution of Client Needs
Outsourcing Across the Operational Value Chain Enterprises are more frequently relying on outsourced providers to address their needs across the entire customer lifecycle. Many companies, especially in the healthcare, financial services, and utilities space, are beginning to increasingly rely on the expertise of external vendors to deliver cost savings, ensure compliance, drive performance enhancements, and offer technology suites that serve to improve overall CX while allowing the brand to focus on their core products and competencies. Mature companies seek to digitally transform their current operations to meet the demands of the digital economy and diversify their capabilities. Companies in emerging sectors outsource due to their limited experience and/ or resources to manage increasing volumes of customer interactions, and in order to drive new customer demand, scale operations, optimize costs, protect their brand investment, and accelerate profitability.
Rise of Omni-Channel to Drive Consumer CentricityCustomer expectations and behaviors are changing dramatically with the evolution of technology such as smart phones, tablets and social media. This has accelerated the speed of consumer interaction with the brands. Consumers expect the brands to meet their needs and preferences instantaneously in return for brand loyalty and a greater share of customer spend. To address this trend, brands are focused on providing a seamless experience via integration of all contact channels (chat, email, SMS, voice, etc.) to deliver customer-centric solutions in an omni-channel manner that maximize customer lifetime value.
Seeking Integrated, End-to-End Partners – We believe clients are increasingly looking to utilize outsourcing partners who can provide unified solutions for a variety of touchpoints along the customer interaction value chain, from digital marketing to customer sales and support to CX and surveys. Vendors with integrated offerings will command a larger share of wallet from their clients, drive a great degree of insight and performance, and become more ‘sticky’ with their clients for longer-lasting relationships.
Bestshore, Flexible Delivery Model – Clients are increasingly differentiating between providers based on their ability to provide a flexible, turnkey delivery model that can offer a mix of onshore, nearshore, offshore, and remote working capabilities. In light of recent global events, clients have indicated a heightened importance on the ability of providers to shift their delivery rapidly between various location models.
Data Protection & SecurityWith the rise of the digital economy has come a rise in both the concern toward, and vulnerability of, consumer data. Both mature and new economy brands are placing a higher degree of focus on the technology that underpins the data security & fraud systems deployed by their partners; having an advanced and secure system architecture along with data center redundancy and advanced security technologies are becoming increasingly important, understanding that any security breach can result in a devastating impact to a client’s brand and a consumer’s loyalty.
Impact of Technology, Automation, & Artificial Intelligence (“AI”)
Data and Analytics – Enterprises are increasingly demanding that their providers of customer interaction solutions integrate data analysis & insight into their core service offerings, in order to drive continuous performance and superior outcomes. These business intelligence tools can yield actionable insights across every customer touchpoint enabling clients to address customer issues in real time. We expect that investments in automation, digitization and machine learning will be key drivers in the industry as clients seek to adopt more technology-rich ways of servicing their customers.
Artificial Intelligence to Enhance Service DeliveryWith the increasing applicability of AI in enhancing business processes, the customer care industry is starting to integrate AI into its range of solutions.
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Favorable Emerging Market / Client Trends
Integrated Technology Solutions for Mature Sectors – Fortune 500 companies that historically utilized traditional live-agent, voice-based services are now integrating new technology-enabled solutions that include multi-channel delivery, self-serve options and automation. Such solutions allow them to achieve greater operational flexibility and innovate their service offerings.
Solutions Catered to High-Growth Sectors – The challenges that new economy “disruptors” face consist largely of managing high growth within their customer base, while simultaneously maintaining a high-quality customer experience. In contrast to mature business models, new economy companies have generally not focused on developing large-scale insourced customer operations; therefore, they rely on external partners that can deliver customer service, engagement and support while maintaining the quality of their brands. Most of these companies source their customer interaction needs from lower-cost locations outside their home markets.
Our Solutions
We work closely with our clients to optimize and accelerate every customer interaction. We offer technology-centric solutions through our integrated customer lifecycle experience (CLX) platform. Our solutions offer a variety of performance-enhancing and risk-mitigating capabilities, to help our clients protect and enhance their brands, grow and retain their customer bases, and maximize customer lifetime value. Our comprehensive offering of customizable solutions drives deep customer integration and long-term trusted relationships with our clients. Our solutions can be procured on a stand-alone, point solution basis, or in an integrated manner covering multiple stages across the customer lifecycle journey.
ibex Digital
In our Customer Acquisition solution, we work with consumer-facing businesses to drive online customer demand. We offer Search, Social, & Display advertising capabilities, helping our clients promote brand awareness and drive high-volume, low-churn new customer conversion. With proprietary algorithms that strategically target high-value customers and seamlessly optimize ad bidding and deployment, ibex Digital is capable of reducing a client’s customer acquisition costs. Additionally, ibex Digital can also seamlessly transition customers from client-to-call, where the initial interest is driven digitally, and the conversation is closed at an ibex call center with a trained sales agent. We are typically compensated by our clients on a pay-per-performance basis, where we earn a commission upon the successful addition of a new customer.
ibex Connect
Our Customer Engagement solution is the core of our CLX platform and generates the majority of our revenue. This solution is comprised of customer service (assisting customers with information about our clients’ and their products or services), technical support (providing specialized teams to provide information, assistance and technical guidance to our clients’ customers on a specific product or service) and other value-added outsourced back office services (finance and accounting, marketing support, sales operations, and human resources administration). We deliver this solution through our omni-channel platform, which integrates voice, email, chat, SMS, social media and other communication applications.
ibex CX
In our Customer Experience solution, we offer a comprehensive suite of proprietary software tools to measure, monitor and manage our clients’ customer experience, as well as a set of analytics capabilities that interpret data generated by our interactions and deliver recommendations to the benefit of their operations and brand. By applying these tools, we enable our clients to improve retention of their customers, identify and manage service issues in real time, predict future behavior and enhance overall customer satisfaction. Our platform includes management of omni-channel surveys, interactive artificial intelligence, text analytics and sentiment analysis, a business intelligence suite and case management capabilities. Given the significant preponderance of voice interactions within our solutions, we utilize technologies such as speech-to-text to deploy the above analytic tools.
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Underpinning our end-to-end CLX solutions is our ability to leverage technology to help clients drive insights and manage interactions across the customer journey. Over the past five years, we have invested significant resources into building and deploying proprietary technology, focusing on next-generation software deployed across the full customer lifecycle journey, driving revenue growth, productivity improvements, experience enhancement and competitive differentiation. Our technology efforts are led by ibex Wave X, which is staffed by a team of 400 developers, with expertise in major platform integration, and a 16-year legacy of value creation and outcome-oriented technology development.
We believe that we have built an industry-leading, comprehensive suite of software products and applications, deployed at enterprise scale across multiple industries along the full consumer lifecycle.
In particular, we have integrated AI functionality into multiple portions of our CLX solution suite. In our core Customer Engagement offering, we deploy third party technologies such as such as Afiniti, CallMiner, and Cogito that enhance customer interaction. For our Customer Acquisition offering, we have developed a technology called Adcast AI that uses AI to better match our search engine keyword bidding with our available call center capacity. Our technology innovations ensure that we are at the forefront of our industry in employing digital solutions on behalf of our customers. Across all three of our solutions areas (ibex Digital, ibex Connect and ibex CX), the portion of our revenue from digital services (i.e., digital support, including omni-channel and other digital services) comprises 30% and 28% of total revenue for the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.
Additionally, our business is highly data intensive, and as a result, we have collected datasets from more than 654 million customer interactions since 2013. We overlay our proprietary datasets with third-party data and other available data to derive insights into customer behaviors and preferences, which in turn optimizes our solutions and enables enhanced delivery of our services.
ibex Wave X is working to transform and augment the customer lifecycle through the use of embedded AI & Analytics across every customer touchpoint.
Our Strengths
We believe that we have established a leadership position in the CLX solutions market. Whether in mature, high-growth or emerging industries, we are able to provide clients with a compelling value proposition that combines our full spectrum of customer lifecycle solutions with a global delivery model and innovative technology. We believe that the investments we have made have placed us in a strong competitive position with substantial first-mover advantages. Our leadership position is founded on the following key competitive strengths, including:
Differentiated as a Nimble, Disruptive Provider We believe that we have a distinct organizational culture that embraces technological disruption and is characterized by innovation, speed and structural nimbleness. Our innovative and entrepreneurial culture is a key differentiator and gives us a competitive advantage in delivering high-quality solutions to clients around the globe. With mature clients, this culture plays to our advantage by showcasing the inflexibility of larger incumbents. With high-growth clients, which we refer to as New Economy clients, we believe that our entrepreneurial approach is in line with their own culture.
Technology Solutions & Continuous Innovation – ibex Wave X is the hub of our technology development and innovation effort to drive value-added technology development that improves ambassador interactions, client CX, and overall performance benchmarks. Our CLX platform combines our proprietary technology with our service delivery model to provide our clients with customized solutions at a large scale. We are integrating artificial intelligence into each stage of the customer lifecycle, from customer acquisition, to engagement, to surveys & analytics. Our proprietary technology allows us to provide innovative, automated and customizable solutions to our clients more efficiently than if delivered through a purely service-based delivery model.
Provider of Customizable Sets of Customer Lifecycle Experience Solutions – The customer lifecycle, from acquisition to retention, has become more challenging, complex and competitive for enterprises to manage. We designed a differentiated suite of digital and operational solutions that seamlessly manages interactions throughout all phases of the customer lifecycle, across multiple channels, customized to a client’s specific needs.
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Proven Expertise in Mature Industries – We believe that we have built a deep level of expertise in serving clients in mature industries, including the telecommunications and cable sectors. We believe that we are able to provide value at all stages of the customer lifecycle for these industries, from lowering the cost of customer acquisition to increasing customer lifetime value through improved retention and increased up-sell.
World-Class Global Delivery with Nearshore & Offshore Diversification – Our global delivery model is built on onshore, nearshore and offshore delivery centers, and includes our ability to also support work-at-home capabilities. We seek to operate state-of-the-art ‘highly-branded’ sites in labor markets that are underpenetrated in order to maintain our competitive advantage, retain our position in those labor markets as an employer of choice and deliver a highly scalable and cost-effective solution to our clients. Our highly-branded centers enable us to create a differentiated connection to our clients’ brands and customers. In addition, with a broad network of 27 contact centers spread across multiple geographies, we provide much needed geographic diversity for our clients. In particular, significant investments made in nearshore sites, such as Jamaica and Nicaragua, enable us to offer untapped talent pools for high quality service, proximity to home (US) operations and competitive price points, and often an existing brand affinity. We estimate a 77% CAGR in nearshore revenue for Jamaica and Nicaragua for the four year period from fiscal year ended June 30, 2016 through the fiscal year ending June 30, 2020 and a 21% CAGR in offshore revenue from fiscal year ended June 30, 2018 through June 30, 2020.
Innovative and Entrepreneurial Culture – We believe we have established a strong, unique corporate culture that is critical to our ability to recruit, engage, motivate, manage and retain our talented global workforce of over 22,500 employees. A culture which we actively foster through events including, employee galas, VIP events, talent shows, community outreach to engage, reward, and support our ambassadors. At ibex, we ensure our employees are extensions of our clients’ brand identities, delivering passionate and industry-leading results
Client Satisfaction and Retention – Our ability to build deep and trusted relationships with our clients is core to who we are. Since the end of fiscal year 2018, we have successfully retained all of our top 25 clients, which represented over 95% of our revenue in fiscal year 2018. Additionally, we monitor customer satisfaction in the form of a net promoter score (NPS) which is tracked through our ibex annual Client Satisfaction Survey. Based on ibex’s 2019 Client Satisfaction Survey, we scored a NPS of 68 which indicates strong, mutually-beneficial relationships with our clients built on the value clients place in our services and solutions and level of service we consistently deliver. We believe that our success with client retention is driven by our ability to perform at or above our client expectations and our competitors as well as our investment in building deep relationships with our clients at multiple levels within their businesses.
Our Growth Strategy
Our goal is to become a key strategic partner to both mature and high-growth companies that require outsourced customer interaction solutions, especially as they seek to address consumers that are increasingly digitally savvy. We have built a platform that we believe is well-positioned for strong, sustainable, long-term growth. Over the last five years, our revenues have increased at a CAGR of 10.1%, growing from $227.4 million in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2014 to $368.4 million in the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019. This growth rate is significantly greater than that of our constituent markets, especially the BPO industry, which, according to IDC, grew at an annualized rate of 2.9% between 2015 and 2020.
Our growth model is designed to deploy a “land and expand” approach by targeting and initiating delivery both with mature, global enterprises as well as relatively younger, high-growth clients, and subsequently expanding our services with these clients. The breadth of our capabilities, our ability to deliver a superior experience to our clients and our global delivery capabilities have allowed us to successfully land new clients and then expand our wallet share with them over time. We believe our growth will be bolstered in the future as clients continue to recognize the benefits of partnering with an end-to-end customer interactions provider, and we are able to cross-sell our broad suite of solutions through our client base. Moreover, the current capacity at our onshore and nearshore delivery centers will be able to support our near-term growth with minimal incremental investment, with future investments in capacity expected to be success-based and in response to growth demands of our business.
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Our growth strategy is based on the following key components:
Continue Winning Blue Chip Clients – We’ve been able to win marquee blue chip brands that are looking to transform their customer engagement strategy through a more innovative and outcome-oriented focus. For these customers, our value proposition is primarily focused on acting as a partner to drive digital transformation in their existing operations. The imperative of engaging digitally with a new type of consumer is all the more urgent as these companies increasingly face-off against emerging new economy players. ibex has increasingly gained share in these relationships, often displacing existing incumbent vendor(s).
Continue Winning New Clients with New Economy – Our New Economy initiative combines our Customer Engagement, Customer Acquisition and Customer Experience solutions into an integrated solution set that is focused on the needs of high-growth emerging technology markets. Our success in our New Economy segment can be traced to its inception in 2014, when we began servicing a new client in the emerging technology space. We launched our New Economy initiative in the summer of 2018 to help similar clients attain and support their high-growth objectives. We believe we are among the top tier of providers of outsourced customer interaction solutions that can address the unique needs of such clients. In addition, New Economy customers are generally higher margin as a result of lower customer acquisition costs and a greater portion of non-voice revenue, which is delivered with greater efficiency.
Grow Strategic Verticals with Specific Domain Strategies – Our ibex Financial, ibex Health, and ibex Utilities sub-brands are structured to accelerate growth using a highly targeted and performance-driven approach. Within ibex Financial, we intend to build on recent wins we have had with payments companies. Within ibex Health, we see significant opportunity to provide revenue cycle management as well as medical coding and billing services. Finally, within ibex Utilities, we see the opportunity to acting as the “utility mover” for our clients’, by facilitating our clients’ customers’ moves in the form of targeted offers and services that could be of interest at the time certain customers are undergoing a physical move or changing utility provider.
Expand Service & Lines of Business (LOBs) with Current Clients (“Expand”) – The breadth of our solutions over the full customer lifecycle creates the ability to cross-sell each solution throughout our client base. Our client base has many large, global brands that have multiple lines of business across multiple geographies. Our typical model is to provide a launch in one center with one CLX service such as Customer Engagement. Our goal is then to “expand” with additional CLX services or new geographies where we operate for our clients. We believe that the success of our initial launches has enabled our client teams to broaden our scope of engagement with these clients to include additional solutions within our suite of offerings.
Pursue Strategic Acquisitions – Our acquisition strategy targets situations in which it is optimal to acquire versus build. It will primarily be focused on adding additional omni-channel capabilities, providing access to new geographies and acquiring technologies that further differentiate our solutions.
By offering technology-enabled customer interactions solutions through our integrated CLX platform, and focusing on our strategies for growth, we believe we are well positioned to compete effectively in the customer engagement marketplace, continue to take market share and capitalize on market growth.
Risk Factors
Investing in our common shares involves a significant degree of risk. See “Risk Factors” beginning on page 26 of this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our common shares. These risks include:
The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely impacted our business and results of operations. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 on our business, financial condition and results of operations will depend on future developments which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted at this time, including the scope and duration of the pandemic and actions taken by federal, state and local governmental authorities in the United States, local governmental authorities in our international sites and our clients in response to the pandemic;
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Frontier, our largest client as of March 31, 2020, has filed a voluntary petition for relief under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations and cash flows;
Our business is dependent on key clients, and the loss of a key client could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations;
We enter into multi-year contracts with our clients. Our failure to price these contracts correctly may negatively affect our profitability;
The terms of our client contracts may limit our profitability or enable our clients to reduce or terminate their use of our solutions;
The consolidation of our clients or potential clients may adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects;
If our clients decide to enter into or further expand insourcing activities in the future, or if current trends toward outsourcing services and / or outsourcing activities are reversed, it may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects;
Natural events, health epidemics (including the outbreak of a novel strain of coronavirus (COVID-19)), wars, widespread civil unrest, terrorist attacks and other acts of violence involving any of the countries in which we or our clients have operations could adversely affect our operations and client confidence.
Our business is subject to a variety of U.S. and international laws and regulations, including those regarding privacy, data protection and information security, and our customers may be subject to regulations related to the handling and transfer of certain types of sensitive and confidential information. Any failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations would harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We have a limited operating history as an integrated company under the IBEX brand, which makes it difficult to evaluate our future prospects and the risks and uncertainties we may encounter;
Portions of our business have long sales cycles and long implementation cycles, which require significant resources and working capital;
Our business relies heavily on technology, telephone and computer systems as well as third-party telecommunications providers, which subjects us to various uncertainties;
Our business is heavily dependent upon our international operations, particularly in Pakistan and the Philippines and increasingly in Jamaica and Nicaragua, and any disruption to those operations would adversely affect us;
The inelasticity of our labor costs relative to short-term movements in client demand could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations;
If we are unable to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, the accuracy and timing of our financial reporting may be adversely affected, we may be unable to maintain compliance with securities law requirements regarding timely filing of periodic reports in addition to applicable stock exchange listing requirements, investors may lose confidence in our financial reporting, and our share price may decline as a result; and
Damage or disruptions to our technology systems and facilities either through events beyond or within our control could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Company History
Prior to June 30, 2017, our business was conducted through various wholly- or majority-owned portfolio companies of The Resource Group International Limited (“TRGI”), which we refer to as the Continuing Business Entities. The predecessor companies for our Customer Engagement and Customer Expansion solutions were established in 1996 and acquired by TRGI in 2004. The predecessor company for our Customer Experience solution was established in 1984 and acquired by TRGI in 2004. The predecessor company for our Customer Acquisition business was founded as a subsidiary of TRGI in 2008.
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On June 30, 2017, TRGI completed a series of transactions, which we refer to as the Reorganization Transaction, as a result of which the Continuing Business Entities became our subsidiaries. For more information on the Reorganization Transaction and our corporate group, see “Certain Relationships and Related Party Transactions—Reorganization Transaction.”
We are an exempted company with limited liability under the laws of Bermuda. We were incorporated on February 28, 2017 under the name Forward March Limited. We changed our name to IBEX Holdings Limited on September 15, 2017 and then changed our name to IBEX Limited on September 11, 2019. We maintain a registered office located at Crawford House, 50 Cedar Avenue, Hamilton HM11 Bermuda, and the telephone number for this office is (441) 295-6500. Our website address is http://www.ibex.co. The information contained on, or accessible through, our website is not a part of this prospectus, and you should only rely on the information contained in this prospectus when making a decision as to whether to invest in our common shares.
Emerging Growth Company
The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (the “JOBS Act”) was enacted in April 2012 with the intention of encouraging capital formation in the United States and reducing the regulatory burden on newly public companies that qualify as emerging growth companies. We are an emerging growth company within the meaning of the JOBS Act. As an emerging growth company, we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various public reporting requirements, including the requirement that we provide more than two years of audited financial statements and related management’s discussion and analysis of financial condition and results of operations, and that our internal control over financial reporting be audited by our independent registered public accounting firm pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 (the “Sarbanes-Oxley Act”) not applicable to foreign private issuers (“FPIs”). We may take advantage of these exemptions until we are no longer an emerging growth company.
We will remain an emerging growth company until the earliest to occur of:
the last day of the fiscal year in which we have more than $1.07 billion in annual revenues;
the date on which we become a “large accelerated filer” (the fiscal year-end on which at least $700 million of equity securities are held by non-affiliates as of the last day of our then-most recently completed second fiscal quarter);
the date on which we have issued, in any three-year period, more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt securities; and
the last day of the fiscal year ending after the fifth anniversary of the completion of this offering.
See the section titled “Risk Factors—Risks Related to Our Common Shares and this Offering.” We are an “emerging growth company” and the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies may make our common shares less attractive to investors due to certain risks related to our status as an emerging growth company.
Controlled Company Status
Following the completion of this offering, we will be a “controlled company” under Nasdaq rules because more than 50% of the voting power of our shares will be held by TRGI. See “Principal and Selling Shareholder.” We intend to rely upon the “controlled company” exception relating to the board of directors and committee independence requirements under the Nasdaq listing rules. Pursuant to this exception, we will be exempt from the rules that would otherwise require that our board of directors consist of a majority of independent directors and that our compensation committee and nominating and governance committee be composed entirely of independent directors. The “controlled company” exception does not modify the independence requirements for the audit committee, and we intend to comply with the requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and Nasdaq, which require that our audit committee have a majority of independent directors upon consummation of this offering, and exclusively independent directors within one year following the effective date of the registration statement relating to this offering.
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Basis of Presentation, Change in Reporting Segments and Other Information
We present our historic financial information under International Financial Reporting Standards (“IFRS”) as issued by the International Accounting Standards Board (the “IASB”) (which we refer to as “IFRS as issued by the IASB”). Our audited consolidated financial statements are prepared and presented in U.S. dollars, which is the functional and presentation currency of IBEX Limited.
Historically, we conducted our business in two reporting segments, Customer Acquisition and Customer Management. The audited consolidated financial statements as of June 30, 2019 and 2018 and for the fiscal years then ended are prepared on the basis of those two reporting segments. On June 26, 2019, we disposed of our health insurance acquisition business, which represented a significant portion of our Customer Acquisition segment, through the transfer of our equity interests in Etelequote Limited to our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited. We also integrated the remaining portion of our Customer Acquisition segment with our Customer Management business. In addition, the nature of our Customer Acquisition operations evolved during the last quarter of the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019 such that a significant portion of those operations bear significant similarity to the business conducted by our legacy Customer Management segment. As a result, effective July 1, 2019, we will report our results on a single segment basis. For financial statement purposes, Etelequote Limited is treated as a discontinued operation as of June 30, 2019 and for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018. For additional detail concerning our disposition of Etelequote Limited, refer to Note 30.3 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.
In this prospectus, all references to “U.S. dollar” and “$”are to the lawful currency of the United States, and all references to Pakistani Rupee (“PKR”) and Philippine Peso (“PHP”) are to the lawful currencies of Pakistan and the Philippines, respectively. Certain numerical figures set out in this prospectus, including financial data presented in millions or thousands and percentages, have been subject to rounding adjustments, and, as a result, the totals of the data in this prospectus may vary slightly from the actual arithmetic totals of such information.
Share Capital Structure; Conversion upon Initial Public Offering
As a result of a recapitalization implemented on December 21, 2018 in connection with our adoption of the 2018 Restricted Share Plan (the “2018 RSA Plan”), our authorized share capital is divided into three series of preferred shares (each carrying its own rights and preferences) and two classes of common shares. The authorized and outstanding shares of each series of preferred shares and class of common shares as of March 31, 2020 are as follows:
Series A Convertible Preferred Share (“Series A preferred share”) – 1 Series A preferred share is authorized, issued and outstanding, and it is held by our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited.
Series B Convertible Preferred Shares (“Series B preferred shares”) – The maximum authorized number of Series B preferred shares is 12,512,994.4665, of which 11,083,691.3814 were issued and outstanding and are held by our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited (10,764,317.9358 Series B preferred shares), and Mr. Jeffrey Cox, one of our executive officers (319,373.4456 Series B preferred shares).
Series C Convertible Preferred (“Series C preferred shares”, and together with the Series A preferred shares and the Series B preferred shares, the “preferred shares”) – The maximum authorized number of Series C preferred shares is 12,639,389.35, of which 111,986.4786 were issued and outstanding and are held by our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited (108,730.4842 Series C preferred shares), and Mr. Cox (3,225.9944 Series C preferred shares).
Class A Common Shares (“Class A common shares”) – The maximum authorized number of Class A common shares is 79,766,504.249454, of which none are issued and outstanding.
Class B Common Shares (“Class B common shares”) – The maximum authorized number of Class B common shares is 2,559,323.13, of which 1,851,788 were issued subject to vesting restrictions pursuant to awards made to our directors, executive officers and other senior management personnel.
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Upon the consummation of this offering, the outstanding preferred shares and then vested Class B common shares will automatically and mandatorily convert as follows:
The Series A preferred share will convert into one Series C preferred share;
Each Series B preferred share will convert into Series C preferred shares on a one-for-one basis;
Each Series C preferred share (including those issued as a result of the conversions of Series A preferred shares and Series B preferred shares into Series C preferred shares) will convert into a number of Class A common shares that will be determined in accordance with a formula that is set forth in the certificate of designations pursuant to which the Series C preferred shares were authorized and issued on December 21, 2018, which number of Class A common shares will vary depending on the initial public offering price per share in this offering and the number of preferred shares outstanding immediately prior to the pricing of this offering;
Each Class B common share will convert into Class A common shares on a one-for-one basis; and
Each Class A common share will be redesignated as a common share.
The information in this prospectus regarding the Class A common shares to be issuable upon conversion of our Series C preferred shares is based on an assumed initial public offering price per common share of $    , which is the midpoint of the estimated price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus. To the extent that the actual initial public offering price per share for this offering is greater or less than $    , the actual number of Class A common shares issued in connection with the conversion of the Series C preferred shares will be adjusted accordingly.
For additional detail concerning our current share capital structure and the conversions of Series A preferred shares and Series B preferred shares into Series C preferred shares and of Series C preferred shares and Class B common shares into Class A common shares, see “Description of Share Capital” and “Pricing Sensitivity Analysis.”
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THE OFFERING
Common Shares offered
By us:
   common shares
By the selling shareholder:
   common shares
Total:
   common shares
Common Shares to be outstanding immediately following this offering
    common shares
Option to Purchase Additional Shares
The selling shareholder has granted the underwriters an option to purchase an additional    common shares to cover over-allotments. The underwriters may exercise this option at any time within 30 days from the date of this prospectus.
Use of Proceeds
We estimate that the net proceeds to us from this offering, after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, will be approximately $    million, assuming an initial public offering price of $    per common share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus.
The principal purposes of this offering are to increase our capitalization and financial flexibility, enhance our visibility in the marketplace, create a public market for our common shares and fund growth initiatives. We intend to use between $    million and $    million of the net proceeds that we receive from this offering for: (i) $    million to $    million in capital expenditures to build out additional facilities to accommodate growth from new and existing clients, as well as expand our existing facilities to accommodate social distancing requirements related to the current COVID-19 situation; (ii) $    million to $    million to invest in upgraded support systems that improve our internal employee management as well as real time financial reporting; and (iii) $    million to $    million representing an increase in our investments in our research and development effort, and in particular our development and deployment of artificial intelligence tools. We will also consider using part of the net proceeds from this offering for repayment of some of our financial indebtedness that carries a higher interest rate. We may also use part of the net proceeds from this offering for working capital as well as future strategic acquisitions of, or investments in, other businesses or
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technologies that we believe will complement our current business and expansion strategies (although we have no binding obligations to enter into any such acquisitions or investments) and other general corporate purposes. See “Use of Proceeds.” We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of common shares by the selling shareholder.
Dividend Policy
We have never declared or paid any dividends on our common shares other than a dividend declared by one of our subsidiaries during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2017, the remaining $1.6 million of which was paid during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019. We currently do not plan to declare dividends on our common shares in the foreseeable future. See “Dividend Policy.”
Lock-Up Agreements
We, our directors, executive officers and all of our existing shareholders and warrant holders have agreed with the underwriters, subject to certain exceptions, not to sell, transfer or dispose of any of our shares or similar securities for 180 days after the date of this prospectus. See “Underwriting.”
Listing
We have applied to list our common shares on the Nasdaq Global Market under the symbol “IBEX.”
Risk Factors
See “Risk Factors” and other information included in this prospectus for a discussion of factors you should carefully consider before deciding to invest in our company shares.
Shares to be Issued and Outstanding
Except as otherwise indicated, all information in this prospectus assumes:
an initial public offering price of $    per share, the midpoint of the estimated price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus;
the automatic conversion, upon the completion of this offering, of one Series A preferred share, 11,083,691.3814 Series B preferred shares, 111,986.4786 Series C preferred shares and 1,137,768 Class B common shares into an aggregate of    common shares; and
no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase up to    additional common shares.
In this prospectus, unless otherwise indicated, the number of our common shares to be issued and outstanding after this offering excludes:
714,020 common shares issuable in respect of Class B common shares that have been issued under the 2018 Restricted Share Plan and remain subject to vesting conditions;
707,535 common shares available for future issuance as of March 31, 2020 under the 2018 Restricted Share Plan (all of which were transferred to the IBEX Limited 2020 Long Term Incentive Plan (the 2020 LTIP), which was approved and adopted on May 20, 2020, and included in a total of 1,287,326.13 common shares issuable thereunder as of May 20, 2020); and
up to 1,443,740.49 common shares issuable upon exercise of the warrant that we issued to Amazon.com NV Investment Holdings LLC, or Amazon, on November 13, 2017, as subsequently amended (the “Amazon Warrant”).
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RECENT DEVELOPMENTS
Preliminary Financial Results
Our consolidated financial statements for the year ended June 30, 2020 have not yet been prepared by management. We have presented preliminary estimated ranges of certain of our financial results below for the three months and fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 based on information currently available to management. Our financial closing procedures for the three months and fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 are not yet complete. As a result, our actual results for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 may differ materially from the preliminary estimated financial results set forth below upon the completion of our financial closing procedures, final adjustments, and other developments that may arise prior to the time our financial results are finalized. You should not place undue reliance on these estimates. The preliminary estimated range of financial results set forth below have been prepared by, and are the responsibility of, management and are based on a number of assumptions. Our independent registered public accounting firm, BDO LLP, has not audited, reviewed, compiled, or performed any procedures with respect to the preliminary estimated financial results. Accordingly, BDO LLP does not express an opinion or any other form of assurance with respect thereto. See “Risk Factors,” “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and “Forward-Looking Statements” for additional information regarding factors that could result in differences between the preliminary estimated ranges of certain of our financial results that are presented below and the actual financial results we will report for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020.
The preliminary estimated financial results set forth below should not be viewed as a substitute for full financial statements prepared in accordance with IFRS. We will not publicly file our actual audited consolidated financial statements and related notes for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2020 with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission until after the consummation of this offering. In addition, the preliminary estimated financial results set forth below are not necessarily indicative of results we may achieve in any future period. While we currently expect that our actual results will be within the ranges described below, it is possible that our actual results may not be within the ranges we currently estimate. Refer to “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” for additional information regarding our historical financial results.
We have presented the following preliminary estimated ranges of certain of our financial results for the three months ended and fiscal year ended June 30, 2020:
 
Three months ended June 30,
Year ended June 30,
 
2020
2019
2020
2019
 
estimated and
unaudited
 
estimated and
unaudited
 
 
Low
High
Low
High
Statement of operations data
 
 
 
 
Revenue
 
 
 
 
Net income for the period, continuing expenses
 
 
 
 
Other Financial Data
 
 
 
 
Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA from Continuing Operations from Net Income
 
 
 
 
Net income
 
 
 
 
Finance expenses
 
 
 
 
Income tax (expense)/benefit
 
 
 
 
Depreciation and amortization
 
 
 
 
EBITDA from continuing operations
 
 
 
 
Non-recurring expenses
 
 
 
 
Foreign exchange losses
 
 
 
 
Other income
 
 
 
 
Fair value adjustment
 
 
 
 
Share-based payments
 
 
 
 
Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations
 
 
 
 
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COVID-19
In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of the ongoing coronavirus outbreak (“COVID-19”) as a global pandemic (“Pandemic”). The Pandemic has had a widespread and detrimental effect on the global economy and has adversely impacted our business and results of operations. We have experienced travel bans, states of emergency, quarantines, lockdowns, “shelter in place” orders, business restrictions and shutdowns in most countries where we operate. To keep our personnel and sites safe, we rapidly deployed personal protective equipment for use by our personnel, installed hand sanitizing stations in our sites and began frequent deep cleaning of our sites.
On March 16, 2020, the government of the Philippines issued an immediate Enhanced Community Quarantine (“ECQ”) in Manila. The ECQ involved shutting down public transportation and non-essential businesses and implementing restrictions on outsourcing providers, including strict rules on social distancing and employee transportation. These rules initially reduced delivery capability from our five metro Manila sites by more than half. We immediately implemented a multi-prong recovery plan that included work at-home enablement, accommodation of our ambassadors at hotels in close proximity to our sites, private transportation for employees (generally within a five-kilometer radius of our sites) and a “Walk to Work” initiative. Similar delivery restrictions were implemented outside Manila in early April, and in Jamaica in mid-April. We launched similar recovery and enablement plans in those locations and pre-emptively undertook similar measures in our other facilities around the world. The measures included an accelerated rollout of work-at-home ambassador enablement as well as social distancing within our sites. As a result, we were able to maintain a high degree of continued delivery for our clients through the lockdown in our various geographies. Our proactive and nimble approach enabled us to launch in new markets for our clients, including Nicaragua and Pakistan. We believe our proven and flexible delivery model can mitigate the impact of similar situations in the future. Social distancing has now been launched in all our global delivery centers.
Client demand for our services was robust during the lockdown. With many of our clients operating in essential verticals such as telecommunications, shipping and delivery, money transfer, e-commerce, video streaming and food and grocery delivery, our client volumes for customer interactions exceeded our historical averages, including elevated volumes for 70% of our clients. Through a flexible, secured cloud-based IT platform, we were able to rapidly transition over 9,200 employees across 26 clients to a work-at-home arrangement. Our leading employee engagement and loyalty enabled us to accommodate over 1,600 employees at hotels in close proximity to our sites. These employees volunteered to stay at these hotels for over eight weeks, allowing them to comply with the ECQ and continue to work in our socially distanced sites. Less than 20% of our employees were impacted by furloughs in the initial months of the pandemic and as of May 31, 2020 we were operating with approximately 13% of our ambassadors furloughed. In addition, we have been able to offset diminished staff availability with a combination of higher work hours and higher volume utilization from our non-furloughed employees. As a result, we were able to secure market share from our competitors that were less nimble or faced technology challenges with a changed delivery environment.
We experienced continued success in our business development efforts since March 31, 2020. With typical client sales channels unavailable due to the Pandemic, we implemented an alternate sales strategy to win six new clients spanning strategic verticals such as healthcare and financial services. These wins also include new New Economy clients in the food delivery and internet-based home security verticals. This alternate sales strategy involved the use of virtual site visits, video sales calls and the virtual modeling in the CLX Test Kitchen. Of the six new clients, five have entered into agreements with us, and we expect to launch services during the current quarter or early in the first quarter of fiscal year 2021. We also experienced continued success with our existing client base, expanding to new geographies for four clients during this time.
For more information, see “Risk Factors—Risks Related To Our Business—The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely impacted our business and results of operations. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 on our business, financial condition and results of operations will depend on future developments which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted at this time, including the scope and duration of the pandemic and actions taken by federal, state and local governmental authorities in the United States and local governmental authorities in our international sites and our clients in response to the pandemic.”
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Frontier Chapter 11 Petition
On April 14, 2020, Frontier Communications Corporation (“Frontier”), our largest client measured by revenue as of March 31, 2020 representing 18.6% of revenue for the nine months ended March 31, 2020, filed a petition under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code, (“Bankruptcy Code”), in the U.S. Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of New York (“Bankruptcy Court”), along with certain of its subsidiaries. Frontier announced that this Chapter 11 filing is intended to effectuate a pre-arranged financial restructuring in accordance with a Restructuring Support Agreement, entered into by Frontier with certain of its creditors. According to Frontier, if implemented in accordance with the Restructuring Support Agreement, the pre-arranged financial restructuring is expected to reduce Frontier’s debt by more than $10 billion and provide significant financial flexibility to support continued investment in its long-term growth.
Under the pre-arranged financial restructuring described in the Restructuring Support Agreement, Frontier has indicated that its trade vendors such as us would be paid in full for both obligations incurred by Frontier before its Chapter 11 filing and obligations incurred by Frontier during its Chapter 11 proceedings. Consistent with such indication, on April 15, 2020, Frontier filed a motion with the Bankruptcy Court seeking, among other things, interim and final approval to pay all obligations owing by Frontier to independent contractors providing call center operation services to Frontier, including us. The Bankruptcy Court entered an interim order approving such payment on April 20, 2020. The Bankruptcy Court held a hearing on May 22, 2020 for final approval of the order and a final order approving such payment was entered by the Bankruptcy Court on May 26, 2020. As a result of these orders, Frontier has paid us all obligations owing by Frontier to us for periods prior to the Frontier Chapter 11 filing. In addition, Frontier has continued to pay us for services rendered in the ordinary course of business for periods after the Frontier Chapter 11 filing and is currently up to date in paying all amounts presently due and owing to us.
On May 1, 2020, Frontier completed the sale of its Northwest operations to Ziply Fiber in a transaction, first announced in May 2019, valued at $1.352 billion. With the sale, Ziply Fiber will be taking over approximately 500,000 of Frontier’s residential and business services customers. Prior to the sale, Frontier had approximately 4.1 million customers. Ziply Fiber has continued to retain our services to provide customer support to their newly acquired customers as a result of the transaction.
Frontier has stated that it intends its pre-arranged financial restructuring to be consummated through a Chapter 11 plan of reorganization (“Chapter 11 Plan”), which Frontier filed with the Bankruptcy Court on May 15, 2020. Frontier’s Chapter 11 Plan contemplates Frontier’s emergence from Chapter 11 as a going concern. Frontier filed a motion for its Chapter 11 Plan to be approved by its creditors and confirmed by the Bankruptcy Court, in each case in accordance with the Bankruptcy Code. If this motion is approved, and the current timetable remains unchanged, voting creditors will have until July 31, 2020 to file objections to and vote on the Chapter 11 Plan, and the hearing on confirmation of the Plan will be held on August 11, 2020. Consistent with the Restructuring Support Agreement, the Chapter 11 Plan provides that trade creditor claims are unimpaired and will either be paid in full, reinstated, or otherwise unimpaired. Frontier will have an opportunity to seek to reject (repudiate) any executory contracts it deems unfavorable, and any executory contracts not rejected will be deemed assumed (reaffirmed) by Frontier. As required under federal bankruptcy law, any accrued but unpaid amounts due to counterparties to assumed executory contracts will be paid in full by Frontier. Frontier has indicated that it will seek to achieve such creditor approval by July 31, 2020 and such Bankruptcy Code confirmation on August 11, 2020, before the August 12, 2020 deadline for such milestones set forth in the Restructuring Support Agreement. Like the Restructuring Support Agreement, the Chapter 11 Plan contemplates payment in full of all obligations of Frontier to trade creditors like us, whether such obligations were incurred by Frontier prior to or during Frontier’s Chapter 11 proceedings.
Frontier’s Chapter 11 Plan also contemplates the assumption, or affirmation, of all executory, or pending, contracts to which Frontier is a party, upon the consummation of that Chapter 11 Plan, except for contracts that Frontier has expressly indicated it will reject, or disavow, prior to or as of such consummation. We have not received any indication that Frontier will reject the pending contract between Frontier and us. To the contrary, we anticipate
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that Frontier will assume that contract upon the consummation of Frontier’s Chapter 11 Plan. Further, Frontier’s Chapter 11 Plan expressly releases any potential preferential transfer claims against its trade creditors in respect of payments made by Frontier to such trade creditors, including us, in the ninety days prior to Frontier’s Chapter 11 filing.
In conjunction with its Chapter 11 filing, Frontier announced that it had received commitments for $460 million in debtor-in-possession financing (“DIP Financing”) and that, following Bankruptcy Court approval, its liquidity will total over $1.1 billion, comprising the DIP Financing and more than $700 million cash on hand. Frontier’s Chapter 11 Plan indicates that, following approval of the DIP Financing and upon the consummation of Frontier’s Chapter 11 Plan following its approval and confirmation, the DIP Financing would be converted into an exit financing facility, or Exit Financing, rather than repaid, preserving Frontier’s liquidity in the period following its emergence from Chapter 11. Frontier’s proposed DIP Financing has not been approved by the Bankruptcy Court, and certain creditors of Frontier have objected to its approval on various grounds, including an argument that Frontier does not require the DIP Financing because it has sufficient liquidity without the DIP Financing. A hearing on the approval of the proposed DIP Financing is scheduled before the Bankruptcy Court on July 29, 2020. It cannot be determined at this time whether the creditors’ objections or any future filed objections will delay or impair Frontier’s ability to obtain required liquidity or to confirm its proposed plan within the timeframes set forth in the Restructuring Support Agreement, or what impact those objections may otherwise have on the timing or success of Frontier’s Chapter 11 Plan.
We are continuing to perform services for Frontier during the pending of its Chapter 11 proceedings. We believe that we will continue to collect amounts billed for services we render to Frontier in the ordinary course of business during Frontier’s Chapter 11 proceedings. Assuming that Frontier receives Bankruptcy Court approval of its DIP Financing Motion, the DIP Financing provides adequate liquidity for Frontier or Frontier otherwise has or obtains adequate liquidity, Frontier assumes the Company’s contracts, there are no other material impediments to timely confirmation of the Plan in its current form, Frontier emerges from Chapter 11 consistent with its Chapter 11 Plan, we also anticipate that we will continue render services to Frontier, and to be paid by Frontier for such services, following such emergence. Assuming Frontier emerges from Chapter 11 on its proposed timeline and consistent with the Chapter 11 Plan, we do not anticipate any material reduction in the volume of the business we undertake with Frontier as a result of Frontier’s Chapter 11 proceedings, except as noted above as a result of the Northwest operations sold to Ziply Fiber.
Frontier’s ability to successfully complete a reorganization process under its Chapter 11 proceedings is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. A Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding is an unpredictable process that can involve contested matters, evidentiary hearings, and trials over issues that can be raised by creditors or other parties in interest at any time during the course of the Chapter 11 case. These risks and uncertainties can delay, impair, or frustrate Frontier’s efforts to: (i) obtain approval of the DIP Financing or otherwise have or obtain adequate lioquidity to operate its business and pay its restructuring expenses; (ii) meet the deadlines and milestones set forth in the Restructuring Support Agreement that are required to retain the support of bondholders and other creditors and interested parties for the Chapter 11 Plan; (iii) obtain timely Bankruptcy Court approval of other relief sought by it in the Chapter 11 proceeding that is integral to the Restructuring Support Agreement and/or confirmation of the Chapter 11 Plan; (iv) avoid any adverse effect on liquidity, creditor support or business operations as a result of its Chapter 11 proceedings; (v) comply with the terms and conditions of the DIP Financing and any other financing arrangements; (vi) obtain the exit financing contemplated under the Restructuring Support Agreement and the Chapter 11 Plan in a timely manner and to meet the conditions of those arrangements; (vii) obtain the required votes in favor of the Chapter 11 Plan and receive Bankruptcy Court approval for the confirmation of the Chapter 11 Plan over the opposition of any dissenting creditors; and (viii) consummate the Chapter 11 Plan and emerge from bankruptcy in a timely fashion. All of these direct and indirect uncertainties regarding Frontier may affect, among other things, our ability to be paid by Frontier for services rendered to Frontier by us in a timely and compete manner, our ability to sustain or increase the volume of its business with Frontier, and the possibility of potential preferential transfer claims by or on behalf of Frontier against us with regard to payments made to us by Frontier in the 90 days prior to its Chapter 11 filing. In each case, the actions of Frontier and other parties in interest in Frontier’s Chapter 11 proceedings and the decisions of the Bankruptcy Court may affect these and other aspects of the Frontier Chapter 11 proceedings and the resulting implications for us. Because of the significant volume of business that we currently
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undertake with Frontier, any detrimental impact on Frontier’s Chapter 11 proceedings, the timing or availability of financing, its ability to timely obtain requested relief in the Chapter 11 proceedings, or its ability to timely confirm its Chapter 11 Plan could significantly and adversely affect the collectability our existing or future receivables, result in a decline in our revenues and profits, and have a material adverse impact on our business and financial conditions, results of operations, and cash flows.
For more information, see “Risk Factors—Risks Related To Our Business—Frontier Communications Corporation, our largest client as of March 31, 2020, has filed a voluntary petition for relief under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations and cash flows.”
Issuance and Transfer of Securities
On May 20, 2020, in connection with the approval and adoption of the 2020 LTIP, 707,535 common shares available for future issuance under the 2018 RSA Plan were transferred to the 2020 LTIP and included in a total of 1,287,326.13 common shares issuable thereunder as of May 20, 2020.
On June 30, 2020, we issued 338,432 incentive stock options under the 2020 LTIP. As of June 30, 2020, 40,500 of the options issued were vested and exercisable.
Additionally, on June 30, 2020, we entered into amendments to the restricted share awards with certain members of our management and directors (the “2020 RSA Amendments”) covering an aggregate of 78,264 restricted common shares. The terms of the original restricted share awards provided for vesting upon our initial public offering on a public exchange in the United States by December 31, 2019 and were amended on December 23, 2019 (the “2019 RSA amendments”) to provide for an extension of the date by which such initial public offering must occur to June 30, 2020. The restricted share awards were further amended on June 30, 2020 to provide for an extension of the date by which such initial public offering must occur to December 31, 2020. If the incremental fair value per share were to be recognized, it would be recorded over the vesting period which will occur at IPO or over a period occurring after IPO, respectively if such IPO event occurs before December 31, 2020.
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Summary Consolidated Historical Financial Information
The following summary consolidated historical financial and other data of IBEX Limited should be read in conjunction with, and are qualified by reference to, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” “Selected Consolidated Historical Financial Information” and our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The summary consolidated historical financial data as of June 30, 2019 and 2018 and for the years then ended are derived from the audited consolidated financial statements of IBEX Limited, included elsewhere in this prospectus and should be read in conjunction with those audited consolidated financial statements. The summary consolidated historical financial data as of March 31, 2020 and for the nine month periods ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 are derived from the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of IBEX Limited included elsewhere in this prospectus and should be read in conjunction with those unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements except the statement of financial position data as of March 31, 2019 which is sourced from the unaudited and unreviewed internal management accounts information. The unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements and the statement of financial position data as of March 31, 2019 have been prepared in accordance with IAS 34, Interim Financial Reporting, and, in the opinion of our management, include all normal recurring adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of the information set forth therein. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any future period.
Our statements of financial position data at June 30, 2019 and our statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income data for the fiscal year then ended reflect the impact of our adoption, effective July 1, 2018 of IFRS 15 – Revenue from Contracts with Customers and IFRS 16 Leases. Our statements of financial position data at June 30, 2019 and our statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income data for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 reflect our disposition of Etelequote Limited to our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited, on June 26, 2019 and its treatment as a discontinued operation. For additional detail on the impact of the adoption of IFRS 15 and IFRS 16 and the treatment of Etelequote Limited as a discontinued operation and their impact on the comparability of our financial position at June 30, 2019 and 2018 and our results of operations for the years then ended, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Factors Affecting Comparability of Financial Position and Results of Operations.” For more information about our disposition of Etelequote Limited, refer to Note 30.3 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.
 
Nine Months
Ended March 31,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30,
 
2020
2019
2019
2018
 
(unaudited)
 
 
 
(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)
Statements of Profit or Loss and Other Comprehensive Income Data:
 
 
 
 
Revenue
$304,255
$280,465
$368,380
$342,200
Payroll and related costs
(207,246)
(191,494)
(254,592)
(252,925)
Share-based payments
119
(4,039)
(4,087)
(8,386)
Reseller commission and lead expenses
(13,604)
(23,038)
(27,877)
(28,059)
Depreciation and amortization
(18,460)
(15,692)
(20,895)
(12,182)
Other operating expenses
(44,817)
(37,120)
(54,124)
(58,425)
Income/(loss)/income from operations
20,247
9,082
6,805
(17,777)
Finance expenses
(7,190)
(5,458)
(7,709)
(3,093)
Income/(loss) before taxation
13,057
3,624
(904)
(20,870)
Income tax (expense)/ benefit
(1,482)
(3,496)
(3,615)
108
Net income/(loss) for the period, continuing operations
11,575
128
(4,519)
(20,762)
Net income on discontinued operation, net of tax
11,085
15,484
4,881
Net income/(loss) for the period
$11,575
$11,213
$10,965
$(15,881)
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Nine Months
Ended March 31,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30,
 
2020
2019
2019
2018
 
(unaudited)
 
 
 
(in thousands, except share and per share amounts)
Loss per share from continuing operations attributable to the ordinary equity ordinary holders of the parent
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings/(loss) per share
$
$
$
$
Diluted earnings/(loss) per share
$
$
$(0.36)
$(1.85)
Loss per share attributable to ordinary equity holders of the parent - diluted(1)
 
 
 
 
Basic earnings loss per share
$
$
$
$
Diluted earnings/(loss) per share
$
$
$
$(1.42)
Weighted average number of shares outstanding – basic
1,137,768
859,556
956,835
Weighted average number of shares outstanding – diluted
12,678,194
12,338,691
12,461,182
11,195,649
 
 
 
 
 
Statements of Financial Position Data:
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
15,471
13,437
8,873
13,519
Total assets
196,187
246,631
188,302
157,081
Borrowings current
32,457
41,344
41,835
51,876
Due to related parties
6,106
5,899
6,169
11,546
Borrowings non-current
4,865
41,695
7,184
9,880
Total non-current liabilities
74,749
97,273
68,293
12,894
Total liabilities
176,063
210,250
179,674
129,128
Total equity
20,124
36,381
8,628
27,953
 
 
 
 
 
Statements of Cash Flows Data:
 
 
 
 
Net cash (outflow)/inflow from operating activities
$33,653
$(3,820)
$2,202
$(5,747)
Net cash used in investing activities
$(4,195)
$(2,795)
$(9,084)
$(5,439)
Net cash inflow/(outflow) from financing activities
$(22,822)
$6,789
$2,552
$3,187
 
 
 
 
 
Other Financial and Operating Data:
 
 
 
 
Revenue from Customer Management segment(2)
N/A
N/A
$315,483
$285,120
Revenue from Customer Acquisition segment
N/A
N/A
$52,897
$57,080
Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations (unaudited)(3)
$40,622
$28,909
$36,295
$4,296
Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations margin (unaudited)(4)
13.4%
10.3%
9.9%
1.3%
Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations excluding IFRS 15 & 16 (unaudited)(6)
N/A
N/A
$23,650
$4,296
Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations margin excluding IFRS 15 & 16 (unaudited)(6)
N/A
N/A
6.4%
1.3%
Net Debt (unaudited)(5)
$101,391
$128,125
$109,380
$49,437
Net Debt excluding IFRS 16 (unaudited)(6)
$29,222
$70,822
$42,466
$49,437
Net Debt, continuing operations, excluding IFRS 16 (unaudited)(6)
$29,222
$40,951
$42,466
$38,657
(1)
See Note 20 to our audited consolidated financial statements and Note 14 to our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included in this prospectus for additional information regarding the calculation of basic and diluted earnings/(loss) per share attributable to equity holders of the parent and weighted average number of shares outstanding - basic and diluted.
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(2)
Historically, we conducted our business in two reporting segments, Customer Acquisition and Customer Management. Effective July 1, 2019, we began reporting our results on a single segment basis.
(3)
We define “EBITDA from continuing operations” as net (loss)/income less discontinued operation, net of tax before finance costs, finance costs related to right-of-use of leased assets, depreciation and amortization, depreciation of right-of-use of leased assets, and income tax (credit)/expense.

We define “Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations” as EBITDA from continuing operations before the effect of the following items: litigation and settlement expenses, foreign exchange losses, goodwill impairment, other income, share-based payments and certain non-cash and non-recurring charges that we believe are not reflective of our long-term performance.” We use Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations internally to establish forecasts, budgets and operational goals to manage and monitor our business, as well as evaluate our underlying historical performance. We believe that Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations is a meaningful indicator of the health of our business as it reflects our ability to generate cash that can be used to fund recurring capital expenditures and growth. We also believe that Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations is widely used by investors, securities analysts and other interested parties as a supplemental measure of performance and liquidity.

Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures of other companies and has limitations as an analytical tool and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our operating results as reported under IFRS as issued by the IASB. Some of these limitations are as follows:

although depreciation and amortization expense is a non-cash charge, the assets being depreciated and amortized may have to be replaced in the future, however, Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations does not reflect cash capital expenditure requirements for such replacements or for new capital expenditure requirements;

Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations is not intended to be a measure of free cash flow for management’s discretionary use, as it does not reflect: (i) changes in, or cash requirements for, our working capital needs; (ii) debt service requirements; (iii) tax payments that may represent a reduction in cash available to us; and (iv) other cash costs that may recur in the future; and

other companies, including companies in our industry, may calculate Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations or similarly titled measures differently, which reduces its usefulness as a comparative measure.

Because of these and other limitations, you should consider Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations along with other IFRS-based financial performance measures, including cash flows from operating activities, investing activities and financing activities, net (loss)/income and our other IFRS financial results.

The following table provides a reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations from our net (loss)/income for the periods presented:
 
Nine Months
Ended March 31,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30,
 
2020
2019
2019
2018
 
(unaudited)
 
($ in thousands)
Reconciliation of Adjusted EBITDA from Continuing Operations from Net (Loss)/Income
 
 
 
 
Net income/(loss) for the period
$11,575
$11,213
$10,965
$(15,881)
Net income on discontinued operation, net of tax
(11,085)
(15,484)
(4,881)
Net loss, from continuing operations
$11,575
$128
(4,519)
(20,762)
Finance expenses
7,190
5,458
7,709
3,093
Income tax (benefit)/expense
1,482
3,496
3,615
(108)
Depreciation and amortization
18,460
15,692
20,895
12,182
EBITDA from continuing operations(a)
$38,707
$24,774
$27,700
$(5,595)
Non-recurring expenses(b)
$ 1,397
$
$4,239
$4,112
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Nine Months
Ended March 31,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30,
 
2020
2019
2019
2018
 
(unaudited)
 
($ in thousands)
Foreign exchange losses
523
925
1,274
1,266
Other income(c)
(518)
(464)
(641)
(547)
Fair value adjustment(d)
632
(365)
(364)
(3,326)
Share-based payments(e)
(119)
4,039
4,087
8,386
Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations
$40,622
$28,909
$36,295
$4,296
(4)
We calculate “Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations margin” as Adjusted EBITDA divided by revenue.
(a)
EBITDA from continuing operations includes the impact of the adoption of IFRS 16 in the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, and fiscal year ended June 30, 2019 (see Note 25.8 to our audited financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus).
(b)
For the nine months ended March 31, 2020, we incurred non-recurring expenses of $1.4 million related to COVID-19, net expenses (expenses net of customer reimbursements) of $0.7 million, legal settlement of $0.1 million and listing expenses of $0.6 million. The COVID-19 expenses primarily include the additional hoteling and transportation expenses incurred due to the Pandemic.
For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019, we incurred non–recurring legal expenses (including legal settlements) of $4.2 million related to IBEX Global Solutions Limited and, for the year ended June 30, 2018, we incurred non-recurring legal expenses of $0.3 million related to DGS EDU LLC and $1.3 million related to IBEX Global Solutions Limited, severance expenses of $1.1 million related to IBEX Global Solutions Limited and listing expenses of IBEX Limited of $1.4 million.
(c)
For the nine months ended March 31, 2020, other income represented deferred income of $0.5 million and for the nine months ended March 31, 2019, other income represented the proceeds from the sale of DGS EDU LLC of $0.2 million and deferred income of $0.3 million.
For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019, other income represented the proceeds from the sale of DGS EDU LLC of $0.2 million and deferred income of $0.4 million related to IBEX Global Solutions Limited and, for the year ended June 30, 2018, other income represented proceeds from a legal settlement received by Digital Globe Services, Inc. of $0.2 million and insurance proceeds of $0.3 million received by IBEX Global Solutions Limited.
(d)
For the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we recorded a revaluation associated with the Amazon Warrant (see Note 20 to our unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus).
For the year ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, we recorded a revaluation associated with the Amazon Warrant (see Note 28 to our audited financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus).
(e)
For the nine months ended March 31, 2020, this amount represents share-based payment expenses and, for the nine months ended March 31, 2019, this amount includes the cancellation of the 2017 IBEX Stock Plan (“2017 IBEX Plan”) and the phantom stock plans ($3.3 million) partially offset by the elimination of the liability associated with the phantom stock plans ($1.0 million).
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For the year ended June 30, 2019, the amount includes the cancellation of the 2017 IBEX Plan and the phantom stock plans ($3.3 million), partially offset by the elimination of the liability associated with the phantom plans ($1.0 million). For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2018, share-based payments were primarily related to share-based payments expense of $8.4 million pertaining to options to purchase an aggregate of 1,633,170 common shares awarded from December 22, 2017 through and including June 30, 2018, net of 145,399 option forfeitures.
(5)
The following table provides a reconciliation of Net Debt, Net Debt excluding IFRS Impact, and Net Debt, continuing operations, excluding IFRS 16 from total debt:
 
Nine Months Ended
March 31,
Fiscal Year Ended June 30,
 
2020
2019
2019
2018
 
(unaudited)
 
($ in thousands)
Net Debt Reconciliation
 
 
 
 
Borrowings – non current
$4,865
$41,695
$7,184
$9,880
Lease liabilities – non current(a)
$66,851
$48,681
58,602
Borrowings – current
$32,457
$41,344
41,835
51,876
Lease liabilities – current(a)
$12,689
$9,842
10,632
 
Convertible loan note – related party
1,200
Total Debt
$116,862
$141,562
$118,253
$62,956
Less: Cash and cash equivalents
15,471
13,437
8,873
13,519
Net Debt
$101,391
$128,125
$109,380
$49,437
IFRS 16 Impact(a)
72,169
57,303
66,914
Net Debt excluding IFRS 16 Impact(a)
29,222
70,822
42,466
49,437
Net Debt in discontinued operations
(29,871)
(10,780)
Net Debt, continuing operations, excluding IFRS 16
29,222
40,951
42,466
38,657
(a)
Total Debt includes non-current lease liabilities of $58.6 million and current lease liabilities of $10.6 million ($69.2 million in total) as of June 30, 2019. Net debt, excluding IFRS 16, excludes the impact of lease liabilities of $66.9 million which, in 2018, were treated as operating leases. The remaining balance of $2.3 million relates to items previously accounted for as obligations under finance leases.
(6)
For additional detail on the impact of the adoption of IFRS 15 and IFRS 16 and the treatment of Etelequote Limited as a discontinued operation and their impact on the comparability of our financial position at June 30, 2019 and 2018 and our results of operations for the years then ended, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Factors Affecting Comparability of Financial Position and Results of Operations.”
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RISK FACTORS
This offering and an investment in our common shares involve a significant degree of risk. You should carefully consider the risks described below, together with the financial and other information contained in this prospectus, before you decide to purchase our common shares. If any of the following risks actually occurs, our business, financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and prospects could be materially and adversely affected. As a result, the trading price of our common shares could decline and you could lose all or part of your investment in our common shares.
Risks Related to Our Business
The COVID-19 pandemic has adversely impacted our business and results of operations. The ultimate impact of COVID-19 on our business, financial condition and results of operations will depend on future developments which are highly uncertain and cannot be predicted at this time, including the scope and duration of the pandemic and actions taken by federal, state and local governmental authorities in the United States, governmental authorities in our international sites and our clients in response to the pandemic.
In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak of COVID-19 as a global pandemic. The Pandemic has had a widespread and detrimental effect on the global economy and has adversely impacted our business and results of operations. We have experienced travel bans, states of emergency, quarantines, lockdowns, “shelter in place” orders, business restrictions and shutdowns in most countries where we operate. While we are unable to accurately predict the full impact that the Pandemic will have on our results from operations, financial condition, liquidity and cash flows due to numerous uncertainties, including the duration and severity of the Pandemic and its containment measures, our compliance with these measures has impacted our day-to-day operations and disrupted our business. Because the severity, magnitude and duration of the Pandemic and its economic consequences are highly uncertain, rapidly changing and difficult to predict, the ultimate impact of the Pandemic on our business, financial condition and results of operations is currently unknown.
The extent to which the Pandemic continues to adversely impact our business and results of operations will depend on numerous evolving factors that are difficult to predict and outside of our control, including: the duration and scope of the Pandemic; actions taken by governments and other parties, such as our clients, in response to the Pandemic; the impact of the Pandemic on economic activity and actions taken in response; the effect of the Pandemic on our clients and client demand for our services and solutions; the ability of our clients to pay for our services and solutions on time or at all; our ability to sell and provide our services and solutions to clients and prospects; and the ability of our employees to successfully work remotely without suffering productivity issues due to, among other things, their own illness or the illness of family members, distractions at home, including family issues or virtual school learning for their children; and/or unreliable or unstable internet connections.
In the interest of the health and safety of our employees and due to restrictions imposed by national or local governments in places such as the Philippines, Jamaica, Nicaragua, Pakistan and the United States, we have rapidly mobilized our operations to deliver our services remotely from the homes of our individual employees to accommodate for social distancing in our sites, government imposed quarantines and other restrictions imposed by national or local governments. This effort has posed, and continues to pose, numerous operational risks and logistical challenges and has amplified certain risks to our business, including increased demand on our information technology resources and systems that were designed for most of our employees to work from our sites and not remotely, enhanced risk that remote assets like computers or routers might be damaged or not returned, the movement of assets from a tax free zone to a work from home location might trigger new increased taxation, the inability to logistically share equipment and workspaces, increased phishing, ransomware and other cybersecurity attacks as cybercriminals try to exploit the uncertainty surrounding the Pandemic, and increased data privacy and security risks as our employees are working from environments that may be less secure than those of our sites. Any failure to effectively manage these risks, including to timely identify and appropriately respond to any cyberattacks, may adversely affect our business.
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In addition, certain of our clients have not consented to or limited programs eligible for work-at-home arrangements in connection with the services we deliver to them or certain of our employees were logistically prohibited from providing services because of broadband and/or work environment deficiencies, and as a result we have been unable to fully staff as needed and to deliver at the same volumes to the same extent we were prior to the onset of the Pandemic. We are also exposed to the risk that continued government-imposed restrictions or frequently changing government-imposed restrictions such as enhanced quarantine areas, lock downs, cessation of transportation which adversely affect our employees’ ability to access our facilities could disrupt our ability to provide our services and solutions and result in, among other things, terminations of client contracts and losses of revenue or additional costs borne by us to provide temporary housing or transportation to our employees to allow them to access our facilities. Even after implementing social distancing, enhanced cleaning procedures and other mitigating measures, there is no guarantee that we will not have an outbreak of COVID-19 at one of our facilities, resulting in a significantly reduced workforce due to infection or a significant percentage of our workforce in a facility being quarantined due to exposure as a result of contact tracing, or that a governmental authority may close our facility as a result, which could impact cash flows from operations and liquidity. Further, even with respect to clients who have consented to work-at-home arrangements for some or all of their programs, there is no guarantee that these clients will continue to permit these work-at-home arrangements and revocation by any clients of their consent to these arrangements could also result in loss of revenue in the future.
The significant personal and business challenges presented by the Pandemic, including the potentially life-threatening health risks to employees and their families and friends, the closures of schools and the unavailability of various services our employees may rely upon, such as childcare, are a cause of employee morale concerns and may adversely impact employee productivity and result in increased absenteeism and leaves of absence. Further, as we look to backfill vacant positions and add headcount in preparation for ramp season, our time to fill and cost per hire could increase due to external factors beyond our control.
We may experience reluctance of the workforce to return to the sites during the Pandemic due to concerns related to returning to a communal workplace including, for their own health if they are part of a vulnerable population or have vulnerable family members at home and enhanced federal government unemployment incentives that may result in temporarily higher income from unemployment that may exceed local prevailing wages and may make it more difficult for us to encourage our workforce to return to work or hire a sufficient number of employees to support our contractual commitments or may result in higher costs, lower contract profitability, higher turnover and reduced operational efficiencies, which could, in the aggregate, have a material adverse impact on our results of operations. While our employees in the United States were designated as essential critical infrastructure workers pursuant to the Order from the CISA, there is no guarantee that such designation may not change in the future. Similarly, in some of our non-U.S. locations, certain of our clients in the telecommunications, shipping and delivery and fulfillment services industries were deemed to be essential and by virtue of such designation, our employees were considered to be essential workers. However, there is no guarantee that such designation may not change in the future.
The post-Pandemic social distancing rules and other government mandates are likely to permanently impact the structure and configuration of our sites, where employees work in close proximity. These new regulatory requirements may force us to make significant capital investments to reconfigure our existing facilities and to accept lower capacity utilization than the utilization priced under our multi-year contracts or to expand our capacity into new space in certain geographies to accommodate our workforce, which will result in increased capital expenditures and a degradation of our gross margin and profitability under the negotiated cost structures for the client. If we are unable to renegotiate our contracts to recoup these additional costs or adjust our cost structure to absorb them, our margins and profitability will be impacted and will result in adverse impact on our results of operations. Our ability to develop and implement agile workforce strategies while navigating sudden and massive workforce shifts may result in increased capital expenditures and a degradation of our gross margin and profitability under the negotiated structures for the client. Furthermore, there has been a significant upward trend in general with respect to labor litigation related to the impact of the Pandemic on the workforce, including workplace safety, FMLA and disability accommodations for vulnerable populations. As a result, this could result in increased claims related to the Pandemic or we may incur
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increased costs to accommodate the vulnerable population which could, in the aggregate, have an adverse effect on our results of operations. We could also see an increase in health care costs for employees due to emerging regulations regarding COVID-19 testing, telemedicine and extended COBRA coverage. Historically, pandemic conditions have led to sweeping changes in governmental regulations regarding the use and payment of sick time and vacation/leave time, which could have a material adverse effect on our future labor costs. Finally, periods of sustained high unemployment have historically led to increases in minimum wage rates, which could also have a material adverse effect on our future labor costs.
The effects of the Pandemic could result in slowed decision-making and delayed planned work by our clients. Our clients may also experience reduced volume to their business as a result of the Pandemic which could result in over-staffing or requests for reduced staffing on certain client accounts. As clients face reduced demand for their products and services, reduce their business activity and face increased financial pressure on their businesses, we have faced and expect to continue to face downward pressure on our pricing and gross margins due to pricing concessions to clients and requests from clients to extend payment cycles. In addition, clients have requested and may continue to request extended payment cycles, which may have an adverse effect on our cash flows from operations. We could also face a significantly elevated risk of client insolvency, bankruptcy or liquidity challenges where we may perform services and incurred expenses for which we are not paid.
The overall uncertainty regarding the economic impact of the Pandemic and the impact on our revenue growth could impact our cash flows from operations and liquidity. Asset impairment charges, increased currency exchange-rate fluctuations and an inability to recover costs or lost revenues or profits from insurance carriers could all adversely affect us, our financial condition and our results of operations. Additionally, the disruptions and volatility in the global and domestic capital markets may increase the cost of capital and limit our ability to access capital. Furthermore, the impact of the Pandemic on our lenders may limit our ability to borrow under our existing credit facilities.
Our efforts to mitigate the negative effects of the Pandemic on our business may not be effective, and we may be affected by a protracted economic downturn. Even after the Pandemic has subsided, we may continue to experience negative effects as a result of the Pandemic’s global economic impact. Further, as this Pandemic is unprecedented and continuously evolving, it may also affect our operating and financial results in a manner that is not presently known to us or in a manner that we currently do not consider will present significant risks to us or our operations. Addressing the significant personal and business challenges presented by the Pandemic, including various business continuity measures and the need to enable work-at-home arrangements for many of our employees, has demanded significant management time and attention and strained other corporate resources, and is expected to continue to do so.
For more information, see “Recent Developments—COVID-19.”
Frontier, our largest client as of March 31, 2020, has filed a voluntary petition for relief under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations and cash flows.
On April 14, 2020, Frontier, our largest client measured by revenue as of March 31, 2020 representing 18.6% of revenue for the nine months ended March 31, 2020, filed a petition under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code in the Bankruptcy Court, along with certain of its subsidiaries. Frontier announced that this Chapter 11 filing is intended to effectuate a pre-arranged financial restructuring in accordance with a Restructuring Support Agreement, entered into by Frontier with certain of its creditors. According to Frontier, if implemented in accordance with the Restructuring Support Agreement, the pre-arranged financial restructuring is expected to reduce Frontier’s debt by more than $10 billion and provide significant financial flexibility to support continued investment in its long-term growth.
Frontier’s ability to successfully complete a reorganization process under its Chapter 11 proceedings is subject to a number of risks and uncertainties. A Chapter 11 bankruptcy proceeding is an unpredictable process that can involve contested matters, evidentiary hearings, and trials over issues that can be raised by creditors or other parties in
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interest at any time during the course of the Chapter 11 case. These risks and uncertainties can delay, impair, or frustrate Frontier’s efforts to: (i) obtain approval of the DIP Financing; (ii) obtain and retain sufficient financing and/or access to cash, including cash collateral, to operate its business and pay its restructuring expenses; (iii) meet the deadlines and milestones set forth in the Restructuring Support Agreement that are required to retain the support of bondholders and other creditors and interested parties for the Chapter 11 Plan; (iv) obtain timely Bankruptcy Court approval of other relief sought by it in the Chapter 11 proceeding that is integral to the Restructuring Support Agreement and/or confirmation of the Chapter 11 Plan; (v) avoid any adverse effect on liquidity, creditor support or business operations as a result of its Chapter 11 proceedings; (vi) comply with the terms and conditions of the DIP Financing and any other financing arrangements; (vii) obtain the exit financing contemplated under the Restructuring Support Agreement and the Chapter 11 Plan in a timely manner and to meet the conditions of those arrangements; (viii) obtain the required votes in favor of the Chapter 11 Plan and receive Bankruptcy Court approval for the confirmation of the Chapter 11 Plan over the opposition of any dissenting creditors; and (ix) consummate the Chapter 11 Plan and emerge from bankruptcy in a timely fashion. All of these direct and indirect uncertainties regarding Frontier may affect, among other things, our ability to be paid by Frontier for services rendered to Frontier by us in a timely and compete manner, our ability to sustain or increase the volume of its business with Frontier, and the possibility of potential preferential transfer claims by or on behalf of Frontier against us with regard to payments made to us by Frontier in the 90 days prior to its Chapter 11 filing. In each case, the actions of Frontier and other parties in interest in Frontier’s Chapter 11 proceedings and the decisions of the Bankruptcy Court may affect these and other aspects of the Frontier Chapter 11 proceedings and the resulting implications for us. Because of the significant volume of business that we currently undertake with Frontier, any detrimental impact on Frontier’s Chapter 11 proceedings, the timing or availability of financing, its ability to timely obtain requested relief in the Chapter 11 proceedings, or its ability to timely confirm its Chapter 11 Plan could significantly and adversely affect the collectability our existing or future receivables, result in a decline in our revenues and profits, and have a material adverse impact on our business and financial conditions, results of operations, and cash flows=.
For more information, see “Recent Developments—Frontier Chapter 11 Petition.”
Our business is dependent on key clients, and the loss of a key client could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
We derive a substantial portion of our revenue from a few key clients. Our top three clients accounted for 45.0% and 51.8% of our revenue for the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Our largest client as of March 31, 2020 was responsible for 18.6% and 18.4% of our revenue for the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Our second largest client as of March 31, 2020 was responsible for 16.8% and 20.9% of our revenue for the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Our third largest client as of March 31, 2020 was responsible for 9.6% and 12.5% of our revenue for the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively. Our top three clients accounted for 50.6% and 56.9% of our revenues for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Our largest client as of June 30, 2019 was responsible for 20.3% and 23.0% of our revenue for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Our second largest client as of June 30, 2019 was responsible for 18.2% and 18.5% of our revenue for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. Our third largest client as of June 30, 2019 was responsible for 12.1% and 15.4% of our revenue for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, respectively. The loss of business with, or the failure to retain a significant amount of business with, any of our key clients could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations. In addition, our ability to collect revenue could be impacted by the financial condition of our clients.
We enter into multi-year contracts with our clients. Our failure to price these contracts correctly may negatively affect our profitability.
The pricing of our solutions is usually included in statements of work entered into with our clients, many of which are for terms of two to five years. In certain cases, we have committed to pricing over this period with limited to no sharing of risks regarding inflation and currency exchange rates. In addition, we are obligated under some of our
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contracts to deliver productivity benefits to our clients, such as reduction in handle time or speed to answer. If we fail to accurately estimate future wage inflation rates, unhedged currency exchange rates or our costs, or if we fail to accurately estimate the productivity benefits we can achieve under a contract, it could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
The terms of our client contracts may limit our profitability or enable our clients to reduce or terminate their use of our solutions.
Most of our client contracts do not have minimum volume requirements, and the profitability of each client contract or work order may fluctuate, sometimes significantly, throughout various stages of the program. Certain contracts have performance-related bonus (penalty) provisions that require the client to pay us a bonus (require us to issue the client a credit) based upon our meeting (failing to meet) agreed-upon service levels and performance metrics. In addition, certain of our client contracts may subject us to potential liability and / or rebate payments in certain circumstances. Moreover, although our objective is to sign multi-year agreements, our contracts generally allow the client to terminate the contract for convenience or reduce their use of our solutions. There can be no assurance that our clients will not terminate their contracts before their scheduled expiration dates, that the volume of services for these programs will not be reduced, that we will be able to avoid penalties or earn performance bonuses for our solutions, or that we will be able to terminate unprofitable contracts without incurring significant liabilities. For these reasons, there can be no assurance that our client contracts will be profitable for us or that we will be able to achieve or maintain any particular level of profitability through our client contracts.
The consolidation of our clients or potential clients may adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Consolidation of the potential users of our solutions, particularly those in the telecommunications, technology and cable industries, may decrease the number of clients who contract our solutions. Any significant reduction in or elimination of the use of the solutions we provide as a result of consolidation would result in reduced revenue to us and could harm our business. Such consolidation may encourage clients to apply increasing pressure on us to lower the prices we charge for our solutions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
If our clients decide to enter into or further expand insourcing activities in the future, or if current trends toward outsourcing services and/or outsourcing activities are reversed, it may materially adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
Our current agreements with our clients do not prevent our clients from insourcing services that are currently outsourced to us, and none of our clients have entered into any non-compete agreements with us. Our current clients may seek to insource services similar to those we provide. Any decision by our clients to enter into or further expand insourcing activities in the future could cause us to lose a significant volume of business and may materially adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Moreover, the trend towards outsourcing business processes may not continue and could be reversed by factors beyond our control, including negative perceptions attached to outsourcing activities or government regulations against outsourcing activities. Current or prospective clients may elect to perform such services in-house that may be associated with using an offshore provider. Political opposition to outsourcing services and / or outsourcing activities may also arise in certain countries if there is a perception that such actions have a negative effect on domestic employment opportunities.
In addition, our business may be adversely affected by potential new laws and regulations prohibiting or limiting outsourcing of certain core business activities of our clients in key jurisdictions in which we conduct our business, such as in the United States. The introduction of such laws and regulations or the change in interpretation of existing laws and regulations could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
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Natural events, health epidemics (including the outbreak of COVID-19), wars, widespread civil unrest, terrorist attacks and other acts of violence involving any of the countries in which we or our clients have operations could adversely affect our operations and client confidence.
Natural events (such as floods and earthquakes), health epidemics (including the outbreak of COVID-19), wars, widespread civil unrest, terrorist attacks and other acts of violence could result in significant worker absenteeism, increased attrition rates, lower asset utilization rates, voluntary or mandatory closure of our facilities, our inability to meet dynamic employee health and safety requirements, our inability to meet contractual service levels for our clients, our inability to procure essential supplies, travel restrictions on our employees, and other disruptions to our business. In addition, these events could adversely affect global economies, financial markets and our clients’ levels of business activity. Any of these events, their consequences or the costs related to mitigation or remediation could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
We have a limited operating history as an integrated company under the IBEX brand, which makes it difficult to evaluate our future prospects and the risks and uncertainties we may encounter.
Prior to June 30, 2017, our business was conducted through the Continuing Business Entities. In 2017, TRGI completed the Reorganization Transaction, pursuant to which the Continuing Business Entities became wholly-owned subsidiaries of our parent company. Although our subsidiaries have individually conducted operations for years, we have a limited history operating the Continuing Business Entities as an integrated business under the IBEX brand, which make it difficult to evaluate our future prospects and the risks and uncertainties we may encounter in seeking to execute on our strategies. These risks and uncertainties include our ability to:
cross-sell our full spectrum of CLX solutions;
educate the market on our full spectrum of CLX solutions;
reposition and expand our brand to reflect our full spectrum of CLX solutions; and
manage and execute our full spectrum of CLX solutions as part of an integrated company.
Our historical performance, or that of our subsidiaries, should not be considered indicative of our future performance. We have encountered and expect to continue to encounter risks and uncertainties frequently experienced by growing companies in rapidly changing industries, such as the risks and uncertainties described above and elsewhere in this prospectus. If we are unable to successfully address these risks and uncertainties, our business, financial condition, operating results and prospects could be materially adversely affected.
Portions of our business have long sales cycles and long implementation cycles, which require significant resources and working capital.
Many of our client contracts are entered into after long sales cycles, which require a significant investment of capital, resources and time by both our clients and us. Before committing to use our solutions, potential clients require us to expend substantial time and resources educating them as to the value of our solutions and assessing the feasibility of integrating our systems and processes with theirs. As a result, our selling cycle, which may extend up to two years, is subject to many risks and delays over which we have little or no control, including our clients’ decisions to choose alternatives to our solutions (such as other providers or in-house resources) and the timing of our clients’ budget cycles and approval processes.
In addition, implementing our solutions involves a significant commitment of resources over an extended period of time from both our clients and us. Our clients may also experience delays in obtaining internal approvals or may face delays associated with technology or system implementations, thereby further delaying the implementation process.
If we fail to close sales with potential clients to whom we have devoted significant time and resources, or if our current and future clients are not willing or able to invest the time and resources necessary to implement our solutions, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could suffer.
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Our business relies heavily on technology, telephone and computer systems as well as third-party telecommunications providers, which subjects us to various uncertainties.
We rely heavily on sophisticated and specialized communications and computer technology coupled with third-party telecommunications and bandwidth providers to provide high-quality and reliable real-time solutions on behalf of our clients through our delivery centers. In our Customer Acquisition solution, the majority of our sales are conducted via sales queues in our contact centers. In both our Customer Acquisition solution and our Customer Engagement solution, we are typically required to record and maintain recordings of telephonic interactions with customers. We rely on telephone, call recording, customer relationship management and other systems and technology in our contact center operations. Our operations, therefore, depend on the proper functioning of our equipment and systems, including telephone, hardware and software. Third-party suppliers provide most of our systems, hardware and software, while our development teams build some in-house. We also rely on the telecommunications and data services provided by local communication companies in the countries in which we operate as well as domestic and international long distance service providers. Despite our efforts for adequate backup and redundancy mechanisms, any disruptions in the delivery of our services due to the failure of our systems, hardware or software, whether provided and maintained by third parties or in-house teams, or due to interruptions in our telecommunications or data services that adversely affect the quality or reliability (or perceived quality or reliability) of our solutions or render us unable to handle increased volumes of customer interaction during periods of high demand, may result in reduction in revenue, loss of clients, or unexpected investment in new systems or technology to ensure that we can continue to provide high-quality and reliable solutions to our clients. The occurrence of any such interruption or unplanned investment could materially adversely affect our business, financial positions, operating results and prospects.
In addition, in some areas of our business, we depend upon the quality and reliability of the services and products of our clients which we help sell to their end customers. If the solutions we provide to our clients experience technical difficulties or quality issues, we may have a harder time selling services and products to end customers which could have an adverse impact on our business and operating results.
We further anticipate that it will be necessary to continue to invest in our technology and communications infrastructure to ensure reliability and maintain our competitiveness. This is likely to result in significant ongoing capital expenditures for maintenance as well as growth as we continue to grow our business. There can be no assurance that any of our information systems will be adequate to meet our future needs or that we will be able to incorporate new technology to enhance and develop our existing solutions. Moreover, investments in technology, including future investments in upgrades and enhancements to hardware or software, may not necessarily maintain our competitiveness. Our future success will also depend in part on our ability to anticipate and develop information technology solutions that keep pace with evolving industry standards and changing client demands.
Our business is heavily dependent upon our international operations, particularly in Pakistan and the Philippines and increasingly in Jamaica and Nicaragua, and any disruption to those operations would adversely affect us.
Outside of the United States, a substantial portion of our operations are conducted in Pakistan, the Philippines and increasingly, Jamaica and Nicaragua. Pakistan has experienced, and continues to experience, political and social unrest and acts of terrorism. The Philippines has experienced political instability and acts of natural disaster, such as typhoons and flooding, and continues to be at risk of similar and other events that may disrupt our operations. Our operations in Jamaica, which commenced in 2016 and have been growing quickly, are also subject to political instability, natural disasters, crime and similar other risks. We also conduct operations in Canada, Nicaragua, Senegal and the United Kingdom which are subject to various risks germane to those locations.
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Our international operations, particularly in Pakistan, the Philippines, Nicaragua and Jamaica, and our ability to maintain our offshore facilities in those jurisdictions is an essential component of our business model, as the labor costs in certain of those jurisdictions are substantially lower than the cost of comparable labor in the United States and other developed countries, which allows us to competitively price our solutions. Our competitive advantage will be greatly diminished and may disappear altogether as a result of a number of factors, including:
political unrest;
social unrest;
terrorism or war;
health epidemics (including the outbreak of COVID-19);
failure of power grids in certain of the countries in which we operate, which are subject to frequent outages;
currency fluctuations;
changes to the laws of the jurisdictions in which we operate; or
increases in the cost of labor and supplies in the jurisdictions in which we operate.
Our international operations may also be affected by trade restrictions, such as tariffs or other trade controls. If we are unable to continue to leverage the skills and experience of our international workforce, particularly in Pakistan and the Philippines and increasingly so in Jamaica, we may be unable to provide our solutions at an attractive price and our business could be materially and negatively impacted.
The inelasticity of our labor costs relative to short-term movements in client demand could adversely affect our business, financial condition and results of operations.
Our business depends on maintaining large numbers of ambassadors to service our clients’ business needs, and we tend not to terminate ambassadors on short notice to respond to temporary declines in demand in excess of agreed levels, as rehiring and retraining ambassadors at a later date would force us to incur additional expenses, and any termination of our employees would also involve the incurrence of significant additional costs in the form of severance payments to comply with labor regulations in the various jurisdictions in which we operate our business, all of which would have an adverse impact on our operating profit margins. For example, the Pandemic decreased client demand for our services in certain verticals which resulted in furloughs of employees in the initial months of the Pandemic. Additionally, the hiring and training of our ambassadors in response to increased demand takes time and results in additional short term expenses. These factors constrain our ability to adjust our labor costs for short-term movements in demand, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and results of operations.
The anticipated strategic and financial benefits of our relationship with Amazon may not be realized.
We issued a warrant to Amazon with the expectation that the warrant would result in various benefits including, among others, growth in revenues and improved cash flows. Achieving the anticipated benefits from the warrant is subject to a number of challenges and uncertainties. If we are unable to achieve our objectives or if we experience delays, the expected benefits may be only partially realized or not at all, or may take longer to realize than expected, which could adversely impact our financial condition and results of operations.
The success of our business depends on our senior management and key employees.
Our success depends on the continued service and performance of our senior management and other key personnel. In each of the industries in which we participate, there is competition for experienced senior management and personnel with industry-specific expertise. We may not be able to retain our key personnel or recruit skilled personnel with appropriate qualifications and experience. The loss of key members of our personnel, particularly to competitors, could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
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We may fail to attract, hire, train and retain sufficient numbers of ambassadors and other employees in a timely fashion at our facilities to support our operations, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Our business relies on large numbers of trained ambassadors and other employees at our facilities, and our success depends to a significant extent on our ability to attract, hire, train and retain ambassadors and other employees. The outsourcing industry experiences high employee turnover. In addition, we compete for employees not only with other companies in our industry, but also with companies in other industries. Increased competition for these employees, in our industry or otherwise, particularly in tight labor markets, could have an adverse effect on our business. Additionally, a significant increase in the turnover rate among trained employees could increase our costs and decrease our operating profit margins.
In addition, our ability to maintain and renew existing client engagements, obtain new business and increase our margins will depend, in large part, on our ability to attract, hire, train and retain employees with skills that enable us to keep pace with growing demands for outsourcing, evolving industry standards, new technology applications and changing client preferences. Our failure to attract, train and retain personnel with the experience and skills necessary to fulfill the needs of our existing and future clients or to assimilate new employees successfully into our operations could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
If we are not successful in converting visitors to our customer acquisition websites into purchasers or subscribers, our business and operating results may be harmed.
The growth of our customer acquisition business depends in part upon growth in the number of our customers or subscribers we are able to acquire for our clients. The rate at which we convert consumers into customers or subscribers using our customer acquisition websites is a significant factor in the growth of our customer acquisition business. A number of factors could influence this conversion rate for any given period, some of which are outside of our control. These factors include:
the quality of the consumer experience on our customer acquisition websites and with our delivery center;
the variety and affordability of the products and services that we offer on behalf of our clients and carrier partners;
system failures or interruptions in the operation of our customer acquisition websites; and
changes in the mix of consumers who are referred to us through our direct marketing partners, online advertising subscriber acquisition channels and other marketing channels.
Even if the rate at which we convert visitors to customers or subscribers declines, the marketing and lead generation costs that have already been incurred are unlikely to decline correspondingly. Therefore, such a decline in conversion rate of consumers visiting our customer acquisition websites is likely to result in reduced revenue and a further reduced margin, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.
We depend upon internet search engines to attract a significant portion of the consumers who visit our customer acquisition websites, and if we are unable to advertise on search engines on a cost-effective basis, our business and operating results would be harmed.
We maintain a number of different customer acquisition websites to market our clients’ offerings to consumers in their target customer segments. Such client service offerings include cable, internet and paid television services. We derive a significant portion of our customer acquisition website traffic from consumers who search products or services using Internet search engines, such as Google, MSN and Yahoo!. A critical factor in attracting consumers to our customer acquisition websites is whether our clients’ offerings are prominently displayed in response to an internet search relating to specific products or services that we market. Search engines typically provide two types of search results, unpaid (natural) listings and paid advertisements. We rely on both unpaid listings and paid advertisements to attract consumers to our customer acquisition websites.
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Unpaid search result listings are determined and displayed in accordance with a set of formulas or algorithms developed by the particular internet search engine. The algorithms determine the order of the listing of results in response to the consumer’s internet search. From time to time, search engines revise these algorithms. In some instances, these modifications have caused our customer acquisition websites to be listed less prominently in unpaid search results, which has resulted in decreased traffic to these websites. Our customer acquisition websites may also become listed less prominently in unpaid search results for other reasons, such as search engine technical difficulties, search engine technical changes and changes we decide to make to our websites. In addition, search engines have deemed the practices of some companies to be inconsistent with search engine guidelines and decided not to list their websites in search result listings at all. If we are listed less prominently in search result listings for any reason, the traffic to our customer acquisition websites would likely decline, which would harm our operating results. If we decide to attempt to replace this traffic, we may be required to increase our marketing expenditures, which also would harm our operating results and financial condition.
We also purchase paid advertisements on search engines in order to attract users to our customer acquisition websites. We typically pay a search engine for prominent placement of our name and website when certain specific terms are searched on the search engine, regardless of the unpaid search result listings. In some circumstances, the prominence of the placement of our name and website is determined by a combination of factors, including the amount we are willing to pay and algorithms designed to determine the relevance of our paid advertisement to a particular search term. We bid against our competitors and others for the display of these paid search engine advertisements. If there is increased competition for the display of paid advertisements in response to search terms related to our business, our advertising expenses could rise significantly or we could reduce or discontinue our paid search advertisements, either of which could harm our business, operating results and financial condition.
In addition to marketing through internet search engines, we frequently enter into contractual marketing relationships with other online and offline businesses that promote us to their customers. These marketing partners include financial and online service companies, affiliate programs and online advertisers and content providers.
Many factors influence the success of our relationship with our marketing partners, including:
the continued positive market presence, reputation and growth of the marketing partner;
the effectiveness of the marketing partner in marketing our websites and services;
the interest of the marketing partner’s customers in the products and services that we offer on our customer acquisition websites;
the contractual terms we negotiate with the marketing partner, including the marketing fee we agree to pay a marketing partner;
the percentage of the marketing partner’s customers that purchase products or services through our customer acquisition websites;
the ability of a marketing partner to maintain efficient and uninterrupted operation of its website; and
our ability to work with the marketing partner to implement website changes, launch marketing campaigns and pursue other initiatives necessary to maintain positive consumer experiences and acceptable traffic volumes.
If we are unable to maintain successful relationships with our existing marketing partners or fail to establish successful relationships with new marketing partners, our business, operating results and financial condition will be harmed.
Our business depends in part on our capacity to invest in technology as it develops, and substantial increases in the costs of technology and telecommunications services or our inability to attract and retain the necessary technologists could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
The use of technology in our industry has and will continue to expand and change rapidly. Our business depends, in part, upon our ability to develop and implement solutions that anticipate and keep pace with continuing changes in
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technology, industry standards and client preferences. We may incur significant expenses in an effort to keep pace with customer preferences for technology or to gain a competitive advantage through technological expertise or new technologies.
If we do not recognize the importance of a particular new technology to our business in a timely manner, are not committed to investing in and developing or adopting such new technology and applying these technologies to our business, or are unable to attract and retain the technologists necessary to develop and implement such technologies, our current solutions may be less attractive to existing and new clients, and we may lose market share to competitors who have recognized these trends and invested in such technology. There can be no assurance that we will have sufficient capacity or capital to meet these challenges. Any such failure to recognize the importance of such technology, a decision not to invest and develop or adopt such technology that keeps pace with evolving industry standards and changing client demands, or an inability to attract and retain the technologists necessary to develop and implement such technology could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Increases in employee expenses as well as changes to labor laws could reduce our profit margin.
For the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, payroll and related costs and share-based payments accounted for $207.1 million and $195.5 million, respectively, representing 68.1% and 69.7%, respectively, of our revenue in those periods. For the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, payroll and related costs and share-based payments accounted for $258.7 million and $261.3 million, respectively, representing, 70.2% and 76.4%, respectively, of our revenue in those periods.
Employee benefits expenses in each of the countries in which we operate are a function of the country’s economic growth, level of employment and overall competition for qualified employees in the country. In several locations including the United States, the Philippines and Pakistan, we have experienced increased labor cost during the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 due to increased demand and greater competition for qualified employees. For further details, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Components of Results of Operations—Operating Expenses.”
We may not be successful in our attempt to control costs associated with salaries and benefits as we continue to add capacity in locations where we consider wage levels of skilled personnel to be satisfactory. We may need to increase employee compensation more than in previous periods to remain competitive in attracting the quantity and quality of employees that our business requires, which may reduce our profit margins and have a material adverse effect on our cash flows, business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. In addition, wage increases or other expenses related to the termination of our employees may reduce our profit margins and have a material adverse effect on our cash flows, business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects. If we expand our operations into new jurisdictions, we may be subject to increased operating costs, including higher employee compensation expenses in these new jurisdictions relative to our current operating costs, which could have a negative effect on our profit margin.
Furthermore, many of the countries in which we operate have labor protection laws, which may include statutorily mandated minimum annual wage increases, legislation that imposes financial obligations on employers and laws governing the employment of workers. These labor laws in one or more of the key jurisdictions in which we operate, particularly in the United States, Pakistan, the Philippines, Jamaica or Nicaragua, may be modified in the future in a way that is detrimental to our business. If these labor laws become more stringent, or if there are increases in statutory minimum wages or higher labor costs in these jurisdictions, it may become more difficult for us to discharge employees, or cost effectively downsize our operations as our level of activity fluctuates, both of which would likely reduce our profit margins and have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
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We may face difficulties as we expand our operations into countries in which we have no prior operating experience.
We may expand our global operations in order to maintain an appropriate cost structure and meet our clients’ needs. This may involve expanding into countries other than those in which we currently operate and where we have less familiarity with local procedures. It may involve expanding into less developed countries, which may have less political, social or economic stability and less developed infrastructure and legal systems. As we expand our business into new countries, we may encounter economic, regulatory, personnel, technological and other difficulties that increase our expenses or delay our ability to start up our operations or become profitable in such countries. This may affect our relationships with our clients and could have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Our profitability will suffer if we are not able to maintain asset utilization levels, price appropriately and control our costs.
Our profitability is largely a function of the efficiency with which we utilize our assets, particularly our people and facilities, and the pricing that we are able to obtain for our solutions. Our utilization rates are affected by a number of factors, including our ability to transition employees from completed projects to new assignments, hire and assimilate new employees, forecast demand for our solutions and thereby maintain an appropriate headcount in each of our locations and geographies, manage attrition, accommodate our clients’ requests to shift the mix of delivery locations during the pendency of a contract, and manage resources for training, professional development and other typically non-billable activities. The prices we are able to charge for our solutions are affected by a number of factors, including our clients’ perceptions of our ability to add value through our solutions, competition, introduction of new services or products by us or our competitors, our ability to accurately estimate, attain and sustain revenues from client engagements, margins and cash flows over increasingly longer contract periods and general economic and political conditions. Therefore, if we are unable to price appropriately or manage our asset utilization levels, there could be a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
Our profitability is also a function of our ability to control our costs and improve our efficiency. As we increase the number of our employees and grow our business, we may not be able to manage the significantly larger and more geographically diverse workforce and our profitability may suffer.
The inability or unwillingness of clients that represent a large portion of our accounts receivable balance to pay such balances in a timely fashion could adversely affect our business.
We often carry significant accounts receivable balances from a limited number of clients that generate a large portion of our revenues. A client may become unable or unwilling to pay its balance in a timely fashion due to a general economic slowdown, economic weakness in its industry or the financial insolvency of its business. While we closely monitor our accounts receivable balances, a client’s financial inability or unwillingness, for any reason, to pay a large accounts receivable balance would adversely impact our financial condition and cash flow and could adversely impact our ability to draw upon our receivables-backed lines of credit.
If we are unable to fund our working capital requirements and new investments, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be adversely affected.
Our business is characterized by high working capital requirements and the need to make new investments in operating sites and employee resources to meet the requirements of our clients. Similar to our competitors in this industry, we incur significant start-up costs related to investments in infrastructure to provide our solutions and the hiring and training of employees, such expenses historically being incurred before revenues are generated.
We are exposed to adverse changes in our clients’ payment policies. If our key clients implement policies which extend the payment terms of our invoices, our working capital levels could be adversely affected and our financing
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costs may increase. If we are unable to fund our working capital requirements, access financing at competitive rates or make investments to meet the expanding business of our existing and potential new clients, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be adversely affected.
Our operating results may fluctuate from quarter to quarter due to various factors including seasonality.
Our operating results may vary significantly from one quarter to the next and our business may be impacted by factors such as client loss, the timing of new contracts and of new product or service offerings, termination of existing contracts, variations in the volume of business from clients resulting from changes in our clients’ operations, the business decisions of our clients regarding the use of our solutions, start-up costs, delays or difficulties in expanding our operating facilities and infrastructure, delays or difficulties in recruiting, changes to our revenue mix or to our pricing structure or that of our competitors, inaccurate estimates of resources and time required to complete ongoing projects, currency fluctuation and seasonal changes in the operations of our clients. The financial benefit of gaining a new client may not be recognized at the intended time due to delays in the implementation of our solutions or negatively impacted due to an increase in the start-up costs.
Based on our experience, the BPO industry experiences increased volumes during the fourth calendar quarter of the year. These seasonal effects also cause differences in revenues and income among the various quarters of any financial year, which means that the individual quarters of a year should not be directly compared with each other or used to predict annual financial results.
The sales cycle for our solutions, which may extend up to two years, and the internal budget and approval processes of our prospective clients, make it difficult to predict the timing of new client engagements.
Damage or disruptions to our technology systems and facilities either through events beyond or within our control could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Our key technology systems and facilities may be damaged in natural disasters such as earthquakes or fires or subject to damage or compromise from human error, technical disruptions, power failure, computer glitches and viruses, telecommunications failures, adverse weather conditions and other unforeseen events, all of which are beyond our control or through bad service or poor performance which are within our control. Such events may cause disruptions to information systems, electrical power and telephone service for sustained periods. Any significant failure, damage or destruction of our equipment or systems, or any major disruptions to basic infrastructure such as power and telecommunications systems in the locations in which we operate, could impede our ability to provide solutions to our clients and thus adversely affect their businesses, have a negative impact on our reputation and may cause us to incur substantial additional expenses to repair or replace damaged equipment or facilities.
While we maintain property and business interruption insurance, our insurance coverage may not be sufficient to guarantee costs of repairing the damage caused by such disruptive events and such events may not be covered under our policies. Prolonged disruption of our solutions, even if due to events beyond our control, could also entitle our clients to terminate their contracts with us or result in other brand and reputational damages, which would have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
We face substantial competition in our business.
The market in which we compete, which is comprised of the customer acquisition, customer engagement and customer experience management market segments, is highly fragmented and continuously evolving. We face competition from a variety of companies, including some of our own clients, which operate in distinct segments of the customer lifecycle journey. These segments are very competitive, and we expect competition to remain intense from a number of sources in the future. We believe that the most significant competitive factors in the markets in which we operate are service quality, value-added service offerings, industry experience, advanced technological capabilities,
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global coverage, reliability, scalability, security and price. The trend toward near- and offshore outsourcing, international expansion by foreign and domestic competitors and continued technological changes may result in new and different competitors entering our markets. These competitors may include entrants from the communications, software and data networking industries or entrants in geographical locations with lower costs than those in which we operate.
Some of our existing and future competitors have or will have greater financial, human and other resources, longer operating histories, greater technological expertise and more established relationships in the industries that we currently serve or may serve in the future. In addition, some of our competitors may enter into strategic or commercial relationships among themselves or with larger, more established companies in order to increase their ability to address customer needs and reduce operating costs, or enter into similar arrangements with potential clients. Further, trends of consolidation in our certain industries and among competitors may result in new competitors with greater scale, a broader footprint, better technologies and price efficiencies attractive to our clients. Increased competition, our inability to compete successfully, pricing pressures or loss of market share could result in reduced operating profit margins and diminished financial performance which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Unfavorable economic conditions, especially in the United States and in the telecommunications, technology and cable industries from which we generate most of our revenue, could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
Our results of operations may vary based on the impact of changes in the global economy on our clients. While it is often difficult to predict the impact of general economic conditions on our business, unfavorable economic conditions, such as those that occurred during the global financial crisis and economic downturn that began in 2008, could adversely affect the demand for some of our clients’ products and services and, in turn, could cause a decline in the demand for our solutions. Additionally, several of our clients, particularly in the telecommunications and technology industries, have experienced substantial price competition. As a result, we face increasing price pressure from such clients, which, if continued, could negatively affect our operating and financial performance.
Our business and future growth depend largely on continued demand for our solutions from clients based in the United States. For the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we derived 96.8% and 97.1%, respectively, of our revenue from such clients. In addition, a substantial portion of our clients are concentrated in the telecommunications, technology, cable and retail and e-commerce industries. For the nine months ended March 31, 2020, 36.9% of our revenue was derived from clients in the telecommunications industry, 13.3% of our revenue was derived from clients in the technology industry, 7.1% of our revenue was derived from clients in the cable industry and 15.5% of our revenue was derived from clients in the retail and e-commerce industries. For the nine months ended March 31, 2019, 41.3% of our revenue was derived from clients in the telecommunications industry, 14.9% of our revenue was derived from clients in the technology industry, 10.4% of our revenue was derived from clients in the cable industry and 6.7% of our revenue was derived from clients in the retail and e-commerce industry.
During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, we derived 97.1% and 96.2%, respectively, of our revenue from customers based in the United States. In addition, a substantial portion of our clients are concentrated in the telecommunications, technology, cable, retail and e-commerce industries. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019, 40.5% of our revenue was derived from clients in the telecommunications industry, 14.7% of our revenue was derived from clients in the technology industry, 9.9% of our revenue was derived from clients in the cable industry and 7.9% of our revenue was derived from clients in the retail and e-commerce industry. For the fiscal year ended June 30, 2018, 45.4% of our revenue was derived from clients in the telecommunications industry, 17.7% of our revenue was derived from clients in the technology industry, 12.3% of our revenue was derived from clients in the cable industry and 4.0% of our revenue was derived from clients in the retail and e-commerce industry.
For these reasons, among others, the occurrence of unfavorable economic conditions could adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
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If our solutions do not comply with the quality standards required by our clients under our agreements, our clients may assert claims for reduced payments to us or substantial damages against us, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Many of our client contracts contain service level and performance requirements, including requirements relating to the quality of our solutions. Failure to meet service requirements or real or perceived errors made by our employees in the course of delivering our solutions could result in a reduction of revenue, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
In addition, in connection with our service contracts, certain representations are made, including representations relating to the quality and experience of our personnel. A failure or inability to meet these requirements or a breach of such representations could result in a claim for damages against us and seriously damage our reputation and affect our ability to attract new business.
Our business prospects will suffer if we are unable to continue to anticipate our clients’ needs by adapting to market and technology trends.
Our success depends, in part, upon our ability to anticipate our clients’ needs by adapting to market and technology trends. We may need to invest significant resources in research and development to maintain and improve our solutions and respond to our clients’ changing needs. However, we may not be able to modify our current solutions or develop, introduce and integrate new solutions in a timely manner or on a cost-effective basis. If we are unable to further refine and enhance our solutions or to anticipate innovation opportunities and keep pace with evolving technologies, our solutions could become uncompetitive or obsolete and as a result our clients may terminate their relationship with us or choose to divert their business elsewhere, and our revenue may decline as a result. In addition, we may experience technical problems and additional costs as we introduce new solutions, deploy future iterations of our solutions and integrate new solutions with existing client systems and workflows. If any of these or related problems were to arise, our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects could be adversely affected.
In addition, we plan to expand across client industries and enter into new industry verticals such as travel and hospitality. If we are unable to successfully adapt our solutions to these industry verticals, our potential growth opportunities could be compromised.
If we fail to adequately protect our intellectual property and proprietary information in the United States and abroad, our competitive position could be impaired and we may lose valuable assets, experience reduced revenues and incur costly litigation to protect our rights.
We believe that our success is dependent, in part, upon protecting our intellectual property and proprietary information. We rely on a combination of intellectual property registrations, trade secrets and contractual restrictions to establish and protect our intellectual property. However, the steps we take to protect our intellectual property may provide only limited protection and may not now or in the future provide us with a competitive advantage. We may not be able to protect our intellectual property if we are unable to enforce our rights or if we do not detect unauthorized use of our intellectual property. Any of our intellectual property rights may be challenged by others or invalidated through administrative process or litigation. Furthermore, legal standards relating to the validity, enforceability and scope of protection of intellectual property rights are uncertain. Despite our precautions, it may be possible for unauthorized third parties to copy our technology and use information that we regard as proprietary to create products and services that compete with our solutions. In addition, the laws of some countries do not protect proprietary rights to the same extent as the laws of the United States.
We enter into confidentiality and invention assignment agreements with our employees and consultants and enter into confidentiality agreements with our directors, advisory board members and with the parties with whom we have strategic relationships and business alliances, as well as our clients. No assurance can be given that these
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agreements will be effective in controlling access to and the distribution of our proprietary information. Further, these agreements may not prevent potential competitors from independently developing technologies that are substantially equivalent or superior to ours, in which case we would not be able to assert trade secret rights.
We may be required to spend significant resources to monitor and protect our intellectual property rights. Litigation may be necessary in the future to enforce our intellectual property rights and to protect our trade secrets. Such litigation could be costly, time consuming and distracting to management and could result in the impairment or loss of portions of our intellectual property. Furthermore, our efforts to enforce our intellectual property rights may be met with defenses, counterclaims and countersuits attacking the eligibility, validity and enforceability of our intellectual property rights. Our inability to protect our proprietary technology against unauthorized copying or use, as well as any costly litigation, could make it more expensive for us to do business and adversely affect our operating results by delaying further sales or the implementation of our technologies, impairing the functionality of our platform and solutions, delaying introductions of new features or applications or injuring our reputation.
Others could claim that we infringe on their intellectual property rights or violate contractual protections, which may result in substantial costs, diversion of resources and management attention and harm to our reputation.
We or our clients may be subject to claims that our technology infringes upon the intellectual property rights of others. Any such infringement claims may result in substantial costs, divert management attention and other resources, harm our reputation and prevent us from offering our solutions. A successful infringement claim against us could materially and adversely affect our business, resulting in our substituting inferior or costlier technologies into our platform and solutions, monetary damages, reasonable royalties or an injunction against providing some or all of our solutions.
In our contracts, we agree to indemnify our clients for expenses and liabilities resulting from claimed infringement by our solutions, in some cases excluding third-party components, of the intellectual property rights of others. In some instances, the amount of these indemnity obligations may be greater than the revenues we receive from the client under the applicable contract. In addition, we may develop work product in connection with specific projects for our clients. While our contracts with our clients provide that we retain the ownership rights to our pre-existing proprietary intellectual property, in some cases we assign to clients intellectual property rights in and to some aspects of documentation or other work product developed specifically for these clients in connection with these projects, which may limit or prevent our ability to resell or reuse this intellectual property.
Our global operations expose us to numerous legal and regulatory requirements.
We provide solutions to our clients’ customers in 51 countries and four continents around the world. We are subject to numerous, and sometimes conflicting, legal regimes on matters as diverse as anticorruption, content requirements, trade restrictions, tariffs, taxation, sanctions, immigration, internal and disclosure control obligations, securities regulation, anti-competition, data security, privacy and labor relations. For example, our operations in the United States are subject to U.S. laws on these diverse matters and our operations outside of the United States may also be subject to U.S. laws on these diverse matters. U.S. laws may be different in several respects from the laws of Pakistan and the Philippines, where we have significant operations, and jurisdictions where we may seek to expand. We also have and may seek to expand operations in emerging market jurisdictions where legal systems may be less developed or familiar to us. In addition, there can be no assurance that the laws or administrative practices relating to taxation (including the current position as to income and withholding taxes), foreign exchange, export controls, economic sanctions or otherwise in the jurisdictions where we have operations will not change. Compliance with diverse legal requirements is costly, time-consuming and requires significant resources. Violations of one or more of these regulations in the conduct of our business could result in significant fines, criminal sanctions against us or our officers, prohibitions on doing business and damage to our reputation. Violations of these regulations in connection with the performance of our obligations to our clients also could result in liability for significant monetary damages,
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fines or criminal prosecution, unfavorable publicity and other reputational damage, restrictions on our ability to process information and allegations by our clients that we have not performed our contractual obligations. Due to the varying degrees of development of the legal systems of the countries in which we operate, local laws might be insufficient to protect our rights.
We are subject to economic sanctions, export control, anti-corruption, anti-bribery, and similar laws. Non-compliance with such laws can subject us to criminal or civil liability and harm our business, revenues, financial condition and results of operations.
We are subject to U.S. export controls and economic sanctions laws and regulations, including the U.S. Export Administration Regulations administered by the U.S. Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security and the economic and trade sanctions regulations administered by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Controls. Exports, re-exports and transfers of our software and services must be made in compliance with these laws and regulations, which could impair our ability to compete in international markets and subject us to liability if we are not in compliance with applicable laws. Specifically, the provision of our services and our international activities are subject to various economic and trade sanctions administered by the U.S. Treasury Department’s Office of Foreign Assets Control, which include prohibitions on the sale or supply of certain products and services to U.S. embargoed or sanctioned countries, governments, persons and entities. The OFAC rules also prohibit U.S. persons from facilitating a foreign person’s engagement in or with such countries, governments, persons and entities.
Although we take precautions to prevent our services from being provided or deployed in violation of such laws, our services could be provided inadvertently in violation of such laws despite the precautions we take, including usage by our customers in violation of our terms of service. We also cannot assure you that our employees and ambassadors will not take actions in violation of our policies and applicable law, for which we may be ultimately held responsible. If we fail to comply with these laws, we and our employees could be subject to civil or criminal penalties, including the possible loss of export privileges, monetary penalties, and, in extreme cases, imprisonment of responsible employees for knowing and willful violations of these laws. We may also be adversely affected through penalties, reputational harm, loss of access to certain markets, or otherwise.
In addition, various countries regulate the import and export of certain encryption and other technology, including import and export permitting and licensing requirements, and have enacted laws that could limit our ability to distribute our products or could limit our users’ ability to access our products in those countries. Changes in our products, or future changes in export and import regulations may prevent our users with international operations from utilizing our products globally or, in some cases, prevent the export or import of our products to certain countries, governments, or persons altogether. Any change in export or import regulations, economic sanctions, or related legislation, or change in the countries, governments, persons, or technologies targeted by such regulations, could result in decreased use of our products by, or in our decreased ability to export or sell products to, existing or potential users with international operations. Any decreased use of our platform or limitation on our ability to export or sell our products would likely adversely affect our business, results of operations, and financial results.
In many parts of the world, including countries in which we operate or seek to expand, practices in the local business community may not conform to international business standards and could violate anticorruption laws or regulations, including the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, the U.K. Bribery Act 2010 and the Bermuda Bribery Act of 2016. Our employees, subcontractors, agents and other third parties with which we associate could take actions that violate our policies or procedures designed to promote legal and regulatory compliance or applicable anticorruption laws or regulations. As we continue our international business, we may also engage with distributors and third-party intermediaries to market our solutions and to obtain necessary permits, licenses, and other regulatory approvals. In addition, we or our third-party intermediaries may have direct or indirect interactions with officials and employees of government agencies or state-owned or affiliated entities. We can be held liable for the corrupt or other illegal activities of these third-party intermediaries, our employees, representatives, contractors, partners and agents, even if we do not explicitly authorize such activities. Violations of these laws or regulations by us, our employees or any of
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these third parties could subject us to criminal or civil enforcement actions (whether or not we participated or knew about the actions leading to the violations) including fines or penalties, disgorgement of profits and suspension or disqualification from work, including U.S. federal contracting, any of which could materially adversely affect our business, including our results of operations and our reputation.
We cannot predict whether any material suits, claims, or investigations may arise in the future. Regardless of the outcome of any future actions, claims, or investigations, we may incur substantial defense costs and such actions may cause a diversion of management time and attention. Also, it is possible that we may be required to pay substantial damages or settlement costs which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Our client base includes many entities in highly regulated industries, potentially increasing our legal risk and compliance costs and requiring implementation of additional security measures.
Many of our clients are engaged in highly regulated industries that have an array of sector-specific regulatory obligations, including privacy and security requirements. Specifically, our focus on the telecommunications, technology and cable industries means that we may process or come into possession of data that must be treated with special care. In additional to government regulations, our client contracts contain requirements related to the retention of records.
In the United States, telecommunications providers are subject to rules on the use and sharing of Customer Proprietary Network Information, or CPNI. The Telecommunications Act of 1996 limits the uses to which such information may be put, and the parties with whom it may be shared, absent customer permission. It also requires that CPNI be adequately safeguarded. Compliance with these obligations has been a topic of increased interest for the U.S. Federal Communications Commission, or FCC, which has undertaken high-profile CPNI enforcement actions in recent years. The FCC also is in the process of applying such rules to broadband service providers, which could affect how we may provide our solutions to this segment of the telecommunications industry. We instruct our clients not to provide any CPNI to us, but this information may inadvertently be provided to us by our clients as part of their customer information.
In the United States, two federal agencies, the Federal Trade Commission, or FTC, and the FCC, and various states have enacted laws including, at the federal level, the Telephone Consumer Protection Act of 1991, that restrict the placing of certain telephone calls and texts to residential and wireless telephone subscribers by means of automatic telephone dialing systems, prerecorded or artificial voice messages and fax machines. Internationally, we are also subject to similar laws imposing limitations on marketing calls to wireline and wireless numbers and compliance with do not call rules. These laws require companies to institute processes and safeguards to comply with these restrictions. Some of these laws can be enforced by the FTC, FCC, state attorney generals, foreign regulators or private party litigants. In these types of actions, the plaintiff may seek damages, statutory penalties, costs and/or attorneys’ fees.
These and other sector-specific obligations could increase our legal risk and impose additional compliance costs on our solutions. If we fail to comply with these obligations, we could suffer a range of consequences, including contract breach claims from our clients, regulatory fines and other penalties, or reputational harm, all of which may have a material adverse impact on our business.
Our business is subject to a variety of U.S. and international laws and regulations, including those regarding privacy, data protection and information security, and our customers may be subject to regulations related to the handling and transfer of certain types of sensitive and confidential information. Any failure to comply with applicable laws and regulations would harm our business, results of operations and financial condition.
We and our customers may be subject to privacy- and data protection-related laws and regulations that impose obligations in connection with the collection, use, storage, transfer, dissemination, security, and/or other processing, or Processing, of personally identifiable information (such personally identifiable information collectively with all
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information defined or described by applicable law as “personal data,” “personal information,” “PII” or any similar term, is referred to as Personally Identifiable Information, data, financial data, health data or other similar data. Existing U.S. federal and various state and foreign privacy- and data protection-related laws and regulations are evolving and subject to potentially differing interpretations, and various legislative and regulatory bodies may expand current or enact new laws and regulations regarding privacy- and data protection-related matters. New laws, amendments to or re-interpretations of existing laws and regulations, rules of self-regulatory bodies, industry standards and contractual obligations may impact our business and practices, and we may be required to expend significant resources to adapt to these changes, or stop offering our products in certain countries. These developments could adversely affect our business, results of operations and financial condition.
The U.S. federal and various state and foreign governments have adopted or proposed limitations on, or requirements regarding, the Processing of Personally Identifiable Information of individuals. The U.S. Federal Trade Commission and numerous state attorneys general are applying federal and state consumer protection laws to impose standards on the Processing of data, and to the security measures applied to such data. Similarly, many foreign countries and governmental bodies, including the EU member states, have laws and regulations concerning the Processing of Personally Identifiable Information obtained from their residents individuals located in the EU or by businesses operating within their jurisdiction, which are often more restrictive than those in the United States. Laws and regulations in these jurisdictions apply broadly to the Processing of Personally Identifiable Information that identifies or may be used to identify an individual, such as names, email addresses and, in some jurisdictions, IP addresses and other online or device identifiers. In particular, on April 27, 2016 the European Union adopted the General Data Protection Regulation 2016 / 679 (GDPR) that took effect on May 25, 2018. The GDPR repeals and replaces the EU Data Protection Directive 95 / 46 / EC and it is directly applicable across EU member states. The GDPR applies to any company established in the EU as well as to those outside the EU if they process personal data, as defined under the GDPR, in connection with the provision of goods or services to individuals in the EU or monitor their behavior (for example, through online tracking). The GDPR enhances data protection obligations for businesses and provides direct legal obligations for service providers processing personal data on behalf of customers, including with respect to cooperation with European data protection authorities, implementation of security measures and keeping records of personal data processing activities. Moreover, the GDPR requirements apply not only to third-party transactions, but also to transfers of information between us and our subsidiaries, including employee information. Noncompliance with the GDPR can trigger steep fines of up to €20 million or 4% of global annual revenues, whichever is higher.
In addition to the GDPR, the European Union also is considering another draft data protection regulation. The proposed regulation, known as the Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communications, or ePrivacy Regulation, would replace the current ePrivacy Directive. Originally planned to be adopted and implemented at the same time as the GDPR, the ePrivacy Regulation has been delayed but could be enacted sometime in the relatively near future. While the new regulation contains protections for those using communications services (for example, protections against online tracking technologies), the potential timing of its enactment significantly later than the GDPR means that additional time and effort may need to be spent addressing differences between the ePrivacy Regulation and the GDPR. New rules related to the ePrivacy Regulation are likely to include enhanced consent requirements in order to use communications content and communications metadata, as well as obligations and restrictions on the processing of data from an end-user’s terminal equipment, which may negatively impact our product offerings and our relationships with our customers. Preparing for and complying with the GDPR and the ePrivacy Regulation (if and when it becomes effective) has required and will continue to require us to incur substantial operational costs and may require us to change our business practices. Despite our efforts to bring practices into compliance with the GDPR and before the effective date of the ePrivacy Regulation, we may not be successful either due to internal or external factors such as resource allocation limitations. Non-compliance could result in proceedings against us by governmental entities, customers, data subjects, consumer associations or others.
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With respect to all of the foregoing, any failure or perceived failure by us to comply with U.S., EU or other foreign privacy or data security laws, policies, industry standards or legal obligations, or any security incident that results in the unauthorized Processing of Personally Identifiable Information or other customer data may result in governmental investigations, inquiries, enforcement actions and prosecutions, private litigation, fines and penalties or adverse publicity.
We expect that there will continue to be new proposed laws, regulations and industry standards concerning privacy, data protection and information security in the United States, the European Union and other jurisdictions, and we cannot yet determine the impact such future laws, regulations and standards may have on our business. Because global laws, regulations, industry standards and other legal obligations concerning privacy and data security have continued to develop and evolve rapidly, it is possible that we or our business may not be, or may not have been, compliant with each such applicable law, regulation, industry standard or other legal obligation.
Any such new laws, regulations, other legal obligations or industry standards, or any changed interpretation of existing laws, regulations or other standards may require us to incur additional costs and restrict our business operations. If our privacy or data security measures fail to comply with current or future laws, regulations, policies, legal obligations or industry standards, we may be subject to litigation, regulatory investigations, fines or other liabilities, as well as negative publicity and a potential loss of business.
On June 28, 2018, California became the first U.S. state with a comprehensive consumer privacy law when it enacted the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “CCPA”), which became effective January 1, 2020, with some exceptions (Cal. Civ. Code §§ 1798.100-1798.199). The CCPA grants covered California residents new data protection rights regarding their Personal Information (as defined under the CCPA), including rights to access and delete their Personal Information, opt out of certain Personal Information sharing and receive detailed information about how their Personal Information is used. Additionally, the CCPA and imposes various data protection duties on certain entities conducting business in California. The CCPA regulates any for-profit entity doing “business” (who are not otherwise exempt) in California that meets one of the following: (a) has a gross revenue greater than $25 million. (b) annually buys, receives, sells or shares the Personal Information of more than 50,000 consumers, households or devices for commercial purposes, or (c) derives 50 percent (50%) or more of its annual revenues from selling consumers’ Personal Information. Under the CCPA, in the event of a data breach affecting California residents’ Personal Information, failure to maintain reasonable security procedures and practices can trigger a private right of action lawsuit, and is expected to increase data breach litigation. Damages available for private rights of action range from $100 to $750 per violation or actual damages, whichever greater, with injunctive or declaratory relief also possible. In addition to the data breach private right of action, the California Attorney General may independently bring administrative actions for civil penalties of $2,500 per violation, or up to $7,500 per violation if intentional. The CCPA may increase our compliance costs and potential liability. Some observers have noted that the CCPA could mark the beginning of a trend toward more stringent privacy legislation in the U.S., which could increase our potential liability and adversely affect our business.
Unauthorized or improper disclosure of Personally Identifiable Information or breach of privacy, whether inadvertent or as the result of a cyber-attack or improperly by our employees, could result in liability and harm our reputation which could adversely affect our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Our business depends significantly upon technology infrastructure, telephone systems, data and other equipment and systems. Internal or external attacks on any of those could disrupt the normal operations of our facilities and impede our ability to provide critical solutions to our clients, thereby subjecting us to liability under our contracts. In addition, our business involves the use, storage and transmission of information about our employees, our clients and customers of our clients in connection with our solutions such as Personally Identifiable Information of the customers of our clients. While we take measures to protect the security of, and against unauthorized access to, our systems, as well as the privacy of Personally Identifiable Information and proprietary information, it is possible that our security controls over our systems, as well as other security practices we follow, may not prevent the improper
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access to or disclosure of Personally Identifiable Information or proprietary information. Such disclosure could harm our reputation and subject us to significant liability under our contracts and laws that protect Personally Identifiable Information, resulting in increased costs or loss of revenue. Further, data privacy is subject to frequently changing rules and regulations, which sometimes conflict among the various jurisdictions and countries in which we provide solutions. Our failure to adhere to or successfully implement processes in response to changing regulatory requirements in this area or any other kind of improper access to private Personally Identifiable Information could result in legal liability or impairment to our reputation in the marketplace, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
Our existing debt may affect our flexibility in operating and developing our business and our ability to satisfy our obligations.
As of March 31, 2020, we had total indebtedness of $116.9 million. Our level of indebtedness may have significant negative effects on our future operations, including:
impairing our ability to obtain additional financing in the future (or to obtain such financing on acceptable terms) for working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions or other important needs;
requiring us to dedicate a substantial portion of our cash flow to the payment of principal and interest on our indebtedness, which could impair our liquidity and reduce the availability of our cash flow to fund working capital, capital expenditures, acquisitions and other important needs;
increasing the possibility of an event of default under the financial and operating covenants contained in our debt instruments; and
limiting our ability to adjust to rapidly changing conditions in the industry, reducing our ability to withstand competitive pressures and making us more vulnerable to a downturn in general economic conditions or business than our competitors with relatively lower levels of debt.
If we are unable to generate sufficient cash flow from operations to service our debt, we may be required to refinance all or a portion of our existing debt or obtain additional financing. We cannot assure you that any such refinancing would be possible or that any additional financing could be obtained. Our inability to obtain such refinancing or financing may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects.
In addition, several of our financing arrangements contain a number of covenants and restrictions including limits on our ability and our subsidiaries’ ability to incur additional debt, pay dividends and make certain investments. Complying with these covenants may cause us to take actions that make it more difficult to successfully execute our business strategy and we may face competition from companies not subject to such restrictions. Moreover, our failure to comply with these covenants could result in an event of default or refusal by our creditors to renew certain of our loans which may have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operation and prospects. In several recent instances, we have not been in compliance with certain applicable debt covenants in our financing arrangements.
If we experience challenges with respect to labor relations, our overall operating costs and profitability could be adversely affected and our reputation could be harmed.
If we fail to maintain good relations with our employees, we could suffer a strike or other significant work stoppage or other form of industrial action, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, results of operations and prospects and harm our reputation.
Fluctuations against the U.S. dollar in the local currencies in the countries in which we operate could have a material effect on our results of operations.
During the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, 3.2% and 2.9%, and the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018, 2.9% and 3.8%, respectively, of our revenue was generated in foreign currencies other than the U.S.
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dollar. A portion of our costs and expenses that were incurred outside of the United States were paid for in foreign currencies, mostly the local currencies of the Philippines, Jamaica and Pakistan. During the nine months ended March 31, 2020, out of our total payroll and related costs, 25.54% were incurred in the Philippines (currency Philippine Peso), 13.04% were incurred in the Jamaica (currency Jamaican Dollar) and 7.4% were incurred in Pakistan (currency Pakistani Rupee). Because our financial statements are presented in U.S. dollars and revenues are primarily generated in U.S. dollars whereas some portion of the cost is incurred in foreign currencies, any significant unhedged fluctuations in the currency exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and the currencies of countries in which we incur costs in local currencies will affect our results of operations and financial statements. This may also affect the comparability of our financial results from period to period, as we convert our subsidiaries’ statements of financial position into U.S. dollars from local currencies at the period-end exchange rate, and income and cash flow statements at average exchange rates for the year. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Factors Affecting the Comparability of Our Results of Operations.”
In addition to our exposure to the Philippine Peso, Jamaican Dollar and Pakistani Rupee, we also have exposures to the Canadian Dollar, CFA Franc (XOF), Emirati Dirham, Euro, and Nicaraguan Cordoba. Of these, the Nicaraguan Cordoba are most significant after the Philippine Peso, Jamaican Dollar and Pakistani Rupee.
As we increase our revenues from non-U.S. locations or expand our solution delivery or back office footprint to other international locations, this effect may be magnified. We may in the future engage in hedging strategies in an effort to reduce the adverse impact of fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates, which may not be successful. See also “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Foreign Currency Exchange Risk” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Impact of Foreign Currency Translation.”
The estimates of market opportunity and forecasts of market growth included in this prospectus may prove to be inaccurate, and even if the market in which we compete achieves the forecasted growth, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all.
Market opportunity estimates and growth forecasts are subject to significant uncertainty and are based on assumptions and estimates that may not prove to be accurate. The estimates and forecasts in this prospectus relating to the size and expected growth of the market for our portfolio of integrated solutions may prove to be inaccurate. Any expansion in our market depends on a number of factors, including the cost, performance and perceived value associated with our solutions and those of our competitors. Even if the markets in which we currently compete meet the size estimates and growth forecasted in this prospectus, our business could fail to grow at similar rates, if at all. Our growth is subject to many factors, including our success in implementing our business strategy, which is subject to many risks and uncertainties. Accordingly, the forecasts of market growth included in this prospectus should not be taken as indicative of our future growth. For more information regarding the estimates of market opportunity and the forecasts of market growth included in this prospectus, see “Market and Industry Data.”
We have entered into certain related-party transactions and may continue to rely on related parties for certain key development and support activities.
We have entered, and may continue to enter, into transactions with affiliates of TRGI for corporate and operational services. See “Related Party Transactions.” Such transactions may not have been entered into on an arm’s-length basis, and we may have achieved more favorable terms because such transactions were entered into with our related parties. We rely, and will continue to rely, on our related parties to maintain these services. If the pricing for these services changes, or if our related parties cease to provide these services, including by terminating agreements with us, we may be unable to obtain replacements for these services on the same terms without disruption to our business. This could have a material effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition.
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We may acquire other companies in pursuit of growth, which may divert our management’s attention, result in dilution to our shareholders and consume resources that are necessary to sustain our business.
We may in the future acquire complementary businesses. Negotiating these transactions can be time-consuming, difficult and expensive, and our ability to complete these transactions may be subject to conditions or approvals that are beyond our control, including anti-takeover and antitrust laws in various jurisdictions. Consequently, these transactions, even if undertaken and announced, may not close.
An acquisition, investment or new business relationship may result in unforeseen operating difficulties and expenditures. In particular, we may encounter difficulties assimilating or integrating the businesses, technologies, services, products, personnel or operations of acquired companies, particularly if the key personnel of the acquired company choose not to work for us, the acquired company’s technology is not easily compatible with ours or we have difficulty retaining the customers of any acquired business due to changes in management or otherwise. Mergers or acquisitions may also disrupt our business, divert our resources and require significant management attention that would otherwise be available for the development of our business. Moreover, the anticipated benefits of any merger, acquisition, investment or similar partnership may not be realized or we may be exposed to unknown liabilities, including litigation against the companies we may acquire. For one or more of those transactions, we may:
issue additional equity securities that would dilute our shareholders;
use cash that we may need in the future to operate our business;
incur debt on terms unfavorable to us or that we are unable to repay or that may place burdensome restrictions on our operations or cash flows;
incur large charges or substantial liabilities; or
become subject to adverse tax consequences, or substantial depreciation or amortization, deferred compensation or other acquisition related accounting charges.
Any of these risks could materially and adversely affect our business, results of operations, financial condition and prospects.
Our facilities operate on leasehold property, and our inability to renew our leases on commercially acceptable terms or at all may adversely affect our results of operations.
Our facilities operate on leasehold property. Our leases are subject to renewal and we may be unable to renew such leases on commercially acceptable terms or at all. Our inability to renew our leases, or a renewal of our leases with a rental rate higher than the prevailing rate under the applicable lease prior to expiration, may have an adverse impact on our operations, including disrupting our operations or increasing our cost of operations. In addition, in the event of non-renewal of our leases, we may be unable to locate suitable replacement properties for our facilities or we may experience delays in relocation that could lead to a disruption in our operations. Any disruption in our operations could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operation.
If our goodwill or amortizable intangible assets become impaired, we could be required to record a significant charge to earnings.
We had goodwill and other intangible assets totaling $15.2 million as of March 31, 2020. We review our goodwill and amortizable intangible assets for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. We assess whether there has been an impairment in the value of goodwill at least annually. In the nine months ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we did not recognize an impairment of goodwill or other intangible assets. In the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019, we recognized a $0.2 million impairment of intangibles due to the disposal of DGS EDU. In the year ended June 30, 2018, we did not recognize an impairment of goodwill or other intangible assets. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances indicating that the carrying value of our goodwill or amortizable intangible assets may not be recoverable include declines in stock price, market capitalization or cash flows and slower growth rates in our industry. We could be required to record a significant
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charge to earnings in our financial statements during the period in which any impairment of our goodwill or amortizable intangible assets were determined, negatively impacting our results of operations.
Our ability to use our U.S. net operating loss carry forwards may be subject to limitation.
As of March 31, 2020, we had estimated U.S. federal net operating loss carry forwards of $15.5 million and U.S. state net operating loss carry forwards of $19.8 million, which will begin to expire in 2029. As of that same date, our European subsidiaries had net operating loss carry forwards of $5.5 million, which can be carried forward indefinitely with no expiry date, and our Canadian subsidiary had a net operating loss carry forward of $2.2 million, which expires over the period 2027 through 2037. The timing and manner in which we may utilize net operating losses may be limited by tax rules regarding changes in ownership and a lack of future taxable income could adversely affect our ability to utilize our net operating losses before they expire. In general, net operating losses in one country cannot be used to offset income in any other country and net operating losses in one state cannot be used to offset income in any other state. Accordingly, we may be subject to tax in certain jurisdictions even if we have unused net operating losses in other jurisdictions. Furthermore, each jurisdiction in which we operate may have its own limitations on our ability to utilize net operating losses or tax credit carryovers generated in that jurisdiction. These limitations may increase our U.S. federal, state or foreign income tax liability.
Risks Related to Being Incorporated in Bermuda
Tax matters, new legislation and actions by taxing authorities may have an adverse effect on our operations, effective tax rate and financial condition.
We may not be able to predict our future tax liabilities due to the international nature of our operations, as we are subject to the complex and varying tax laws and rules of several foreign jurisdictions. Our results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected if tax contingencies are resolved adversely or if we become subject to increased levels of taxation.
We are also subject to income taxes in the United States and numerous other foreign jurisdictions. Our tax expense and cash tax liability in the future could be adversely affected by numerous factors, including, but not limited to, changes in tax laws, regulations, accounting principles or interpretations and the potential adverse outcome of tax examinations and pending tax-related litigation. Changes in the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, which may result from a decline in our profitability or changes in tax rates or legislation, could have a material adverse effect on our tax expense. The governments of foreign jurisdictions from which we deliver solutions may assert that certain of our clients have a “permanent establishment” in such foreign jurisdictions by reason of the activities we perform on their behalf, particularly those clients that exercise control over or have substantial dependency on our solutions. Such an assertion could affect the size and scope of the solutions requested by such clients in the future.
Transfer pricing regulations, to which we are subject, require that any transaction among us and our subsidiaries be on arm’s-length terms. If the applicable tax authorities were to determine that the transactions among us and our subsidiaries do not meet arm’s length criteria, we may incur increased tax liability, including accrued interest and penalties. Such increase on our tax expenses would reduce our profitability and cash flows.
On December 5, 2017, following an assessment of the tax policies of various countries by the Code of Conduct Group for Business Taxation of the European Union, the Council of the European Union (the “Council”) approved and published Council conclusions containing a list of “non-cooperative jurisdictions” for tax purposes. In response to the Council’s findings, on December 31, 2018, the Bermuda government enacted the Economic Substance Act 2018, and related regulations, as subsequently amended (the “Substance Act”), with effect from July 1, 2019 for existing Bermuda entities, requiring certain entities in Bermuda engaged in “relevant activities” to maintain a substantial economic presence in Bermuda and to satisfy economic substance requirements. The list of “relevant activities” includes holding entities, and the legislation requires Bermuda companies engaging in a “relevant activity” to be locally managed and directed, to carry on core income generating activities in Bermuda, to maintain adequate physical presence in Bermuda, and to have an adequate level of local full time qualified employees and incur
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adequate operating expenditure in Bermuda. Under the Substance Act, any entity that must satisfy economic substance requirements but fails to do so could face automatic disclosure to competent authorities in the European Union of the information filed by the entity with the Bermuda Registrar of Companies in connection with the economic substance requirements and may also face financial penalties, restriction or regulation of its business activities or may be struck as a registered entity in Bermuda. As a result of implementing the Substance Act, Bermuda does not currently appear on the Council’s list of “non-cooperative jurisdictions” for tax purposes and is therefore “white listed”. Although we believe we comply with the requirements of the Substance Act, we are not able to predict how the Bermuda authorities will interpret and enforce the Substance Act or the potential impact of compliance or noncompliance on our results of operations and financial condition.
In addition, the United States enacted the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act of 2017 (the “TCJA”), which has significantly changed the U.S. federal income tax system. Significant changes introduced by TCJA include reduction in US federal tax rate, limitations on the deductibility of interest expense and executive compensation, a base erosion focused minimum tax (the Base Erosion and Anti-Abuse tax), transitional tax, tangible property expensing, current tax on global intangible low-taxed income (GILTI) and carry forward of net operating losses (“NOLs”). Although we believe we currently comply with the applicable requirements of TCJA, it is difficult to predict whether and to what extent legislative changes or administrative guidance could further change or interpret the meaning of the TCJA. See “Material U.S. and Bermuda Tax Consequences—U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences.”
Prospective investors should consult their tax advisors regarding the potential impact to them of the TCJA and any subsequent legislative changes and administrative guidance to them.
In 2020, the Luxembourg tax authorities challenged our tax position with respect to a royalties-related tax exemption and, in response, we filed a petition to defend our position. In response to our petition, the Luxembourg tax authorities accepted our tax position and permitted the tax exemption, issuing a revised tax assessment on June 17, 2020
We may become subject to taxes in Bermuda after 2035, which may have a material adverse effect on our results of operations and shareholders’ investments.
The Bermuda Minister of Finance, under the Exempted Undertakings Tax Protection Act 1966 of Bermuda, as amended, has given us assurances that if any legislation is enacted in Bermuda that would impose tax computed on profits or income, or computed on any capital asset, gain or appreciation, or any tax in the nature of estate duty or inheritance tax, then the imposition of any such tax will not be applicable to us or any of our operations, shares, debentures or other obligations until March 31, 2035, except insofar as such tax applies to persons ordinarily residing in Bermuda or to any taxes payable by us in respect of real property owned or leased by us in Bermuda. See “Material United States and Bermuda Income Tax Considerations—Bermuda Tax Consequences.” Given the limited duration of the Bermuda Minister of Finance’s assurance, we cannot assure shareholders that we will not be subject to any Bermuda tax after March 31, 2035.
We will be a foreign private issuer and, as a result, we will not be subject to U.S. proxy rules and will be subject to Exchange Act reporting obligations that, to some extent, are more lenient and less frequent than those of a U.S. domestic public company.
Upon consummation of this offering, we will report under the Exchange Act as a non-U.S. company with foreign private issuer status. Because we qualify as a foreign private issuer under the Exchange Act and although we are subject to Bermuda laws and regulations with regard to such matters and intend to furnish quarterly financial information to the SEC, we are exempt from certain provisions of the Exchange Act that are applicable to U.S. domestic public companies, including:
the sections of the Exchange Act regulating the solicitation of proxies, consents or authorizations in respect of a security registered under the Exchange Act;
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the sections of the Exchange Act requiring insiders to file public reports of their share ownership and trading activities and liability for insiders who profit from trades made in a short period of time; and
the rules under the Exchange Act requiring the filing with the SEC of quarterly reports on Form 10-Q containing unaudited financial and other specified information, or current reports on Form 8-K, upon the occurrence of specified significant events.
In addition, foreign private issuers are not required to file their annual report on Form 20-F until 120 days after the end of each fiscal year, while U.S. domestic issuers that are accelerated filers are required to file their annual report on Form 10-K within 75 days after the end of each fiscal year. Foreign private issuers are also exempt from Regulation Fair Disclosure, aimed at preventing issuers from making selective disclosures of material information. As a result of the above, you may not have the same protections afforded to shareholders of companies that are not foreign private issuers.
As a foreign private issuer and a controlled company, we are not subject to certain Nasdaq corporate governance rules applicable to U.S. listed companies.
As a foreign private issuer who has applied to list our common shares on Nasdaq, we rely on a provision in the Nasdaq corporate governance listing standards that allows us to follow Bermuda law with regard to certain aspects of corporate governance. This allows us to follow certain corporate governance practices that differ in significant respects from the corporate governance requirements applicable to U.S. companies listed on the Nasdaq Global Market.
For example, we are exempt from Nasdaq regulations that require a listed U.S. company to:
have a majority of the board of directors consist of independent directors;
require non-management directors to meet on a regular basis without management present;
adopt a code of conduct and promptly disclose any waivers of the code for directors or executive officers that should address certain specified items;
have an independent compensation committee;
have an independent nominating committee;
solicit proxies and provide proxy statements for all shareholder meetings;
review related-party transactions; and
seek shareholder approval for the implementation and modification of certain equity compensation plans and issuances of common shares.
As a foreign private issuer, we are permitted to follow home country practice in lieu of the above requirements. In accordance with our Nasdaq Global Market listing, our audit committee is required to comply with the provisions of Section 301 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, and Rule 10A-3 of the Exchange Act, both of which are also applicable to U.S. companies listed on the Nasdaq Global Market. Because we are a foreign private issuer, however, our audit committee is not subject to additional Nasdaq corporate governance requirements applicable to listed U.S. companies, including the requirements to have a minimum of three members and to affirmatively determine that all members are “independent,” using more stringent criteria than those applicable to us as a foreign private issuer. These reduced compliance requirements may make our common shares less attractive to some investors, which could adversely affect their market price.
In the event we no longer qualify as a foreign private issuer, we intend to rely on the “controlled company” exemption under Nasdaq corporate governance rules. A “controlled company” under Nasdaq corporate governance rules is a company of which more than 50% of the voting power is held by an individual, group or another company. Our principal shareholder, The Resource Group International Limited, controls, and following this offering will continue to
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control, a majority of the voting power of our outstanding shares, making us a “controlled company” within the meaning of Nasdaq corporate governance rules. As a controlled company, we are eligible to, and, in the event we no longer qualify as a foreign private issuer, we intend to, elect not to comply with certain of corporate governance standards.
We may lose our foreign private issuer status which would then require us to comply with the Exchange Act’s domestic reporting regime and cause us to incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses.
We are a foreign private issuer and therefore we are not required to comply with all of the periodic disclosure and current reporting requirements of the Exchange Act applicable to U.S. domestic issuers. In order to maintain our current status as a foreign private issuer, either:
a majority of our common shares must be either directly or indirectly owned of record by non-residents of the United States; or
a majority of our “executive officers” or directors may not be U.S. citizens or residents, more than 50% of our assets cannot be located in the United States, and our business must be administered principally outside the United States.
A majority of our executives, assets and business are located in and managed from the United States. As a result, if a majority of our common shares become either directly or indirectly owned of record by United States residents, we will lose our foreign private issuer status. If we lost this status, we would be required to comply with the Exchange Act reporting and other requirements applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, which are more detailed and extensive than the requirements for foreign private issuers.
We may also be required to make changes in our corporate governance practices in accordance with various SEC and Nasdaq rules. The regulatory and compliance costs to us under U.S. securities laws if we are required to comply with the reporting requirements applicable to a U.S. domestic issuer may be significantly higher than the cost we would incur as a foreign private issuer. As a result, we expect that a loss of foreign private issuer status would increase our legal and financial compliance costs and would make some activities more time consuming and costly. We also expect that if we were required to comply with the rules and regulations applicable to U.S. domestic issuers, it would make it more difficult and expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain coverage. These rules and regulations could also make it more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified members of our board of directors.
Bermuda law differs from the laws in effect in the United States and may afford less protection to holders of our common shares.
We are incorporated under the laws of Bermuda. As a result, our corporate affairs are governed by the Companies Act 1981, as amended (the “Companies Act”) which differs in some material respects from laws typically applicable to U.S. corporations and shareholders, including the provisions relating to interested directors, amalgamations, mergers and acquisitions, takeovers, shareholder lawsuits and indemnification of directors. See “Bermuda Company Considerations.” Generally, the duties of directors and officers of a Bermuda company are owed to the company only. Shareholders of Bermuda companies typically do not have rights to take action against directors or officers of the company and may only do so in limited circumstances. Class actions are not available under Bermuda law. The circumstances in which derivative actions may be available under Bermuda law are substantially more prescribed and less clear than they would be to shareholders of U.S. corporations. The Bermuda courts, however, would ordinarily be expected to permit a shareholder to commence an action in the name of a company to remedy a wrong to the company where the act complained of is alleged to be beyond the corporate power of the company or illegal, or would result in the violation of the company’s memorandum of association or bye-laws. Furthermore, consideration would be given by a Bermuda court to acts that are alleged to constitute a fraud against the minority shareholders or, for instance, where an act requires the approval of a greater percentage of the company’s shareholders than that which actually approved it. However, our bye-laws contain a provision by virtue of which unless we consent in writing
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to the selection of an alternative forum, the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York will be the exclusive forum for any private action asserting violations by us or any of our directors or officers of the Securities Act or the Exchange Act, or the rules and regulations promulgated thereunder, and of all suits in equity and actions at law brought to enforce any liability or duty created by those statutes or the rules and regulations under such statutes. If any action the subject matter of which is within the scope of the preceding sentence is filed in a court other than the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, the plaintiff or plaintiffs shall be deemed by this provision of the bye-laws (i) to have consented to removal of the action by us to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York, in the case of an action filed in a state court, and (ii) to have consented to transfer of the action pursuant to 28 U.S.C. § 1404 to the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York. Section 27 of the Exchange Act creates exclusive federal jurisdiction over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Exchange Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. Section 22 of the Securities Act creates concurrent jurisdiction for federal and state courts over all suits brought to enforce any duty or liability created by the Securities Act or the rules and regulations thereunder. Accordingly, there is uncertainty as to whether a court would enforce such provision with respect to claims under the Securities Act, and in any event, our shareholders cannot waive compliance with federal securities laws and the rules and regulations thereunder. If a court were to find the choice of forum provision to be unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions, which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition or results of operations.
When the affairs of a company are being conducted in a manner that is oppressive or prejudicial to the interests of some shareholders, one or more shareholders may apply to the Supreme Court of Bermuda, which may make such order as it sees fit, including an order regulating the conduct of the company’s affairs in the future or ordering the purchase of the shares of any shareholders by other shareholders or by the company. In addition, under our bye-laws and as permitted by Bermuda law, each shareholder has waived any claim or right of action against our directors or officers for any action taken by directors or officers in the performance of their duties, except for actions involving fraud or dishonesty. In addition, the rights of holders of our common shares and the fiduciary responsibilities of our directors under Bermuda law are not as clearly established as under statutes or judicial precedent in existence in jurisdictions in the United States, particularly the State of Delaware. Therefore, holders of our common shares may have more difficulty protecting their interests than would shareholders of a corporation incorporated in a jurisdiction within the United States. See “Enforceability of Civil Liabilities.”
Any U.S. or other foreign judgments you may obtain against us may be difficult to enforce against us in Bermuda.
We are incorporated in Bermuda and a significant portion of our assets is located outside the United States. In addition, certain of our directors are non-residents of the United States. As a result, it may be difficult or impossible for U.S. investors to serve process within the United States upon us or our directors and executive officers, or to enforce a judgment against us for civil liabilities in U.S. courts.
In addition, you should not assume that courts in the countries in which we are incorporated or where our assets are located would enforce judgments of U.S. courts obtained in actions against us based upon the civil liability provisions of applicable U.S. federal and state securities laws or would enforce, in original actions, liabilities against us based on those laws.
Risks Related to Our Common Shares and this Offering
There has been no prior public market for our common shares, and an active market may not develop or be sustained, and you may not be able to resell your shares at or above the initial public offering price, if at all.
Prior to this offering, there has been no public market for our common shares. We cannot predict the extent to which a trading market for our common shares will develop or how liquid that market might become. An active trading market for our common shares may never develop or may not be sustained, which could adversely affect your ability to sell your common shares and the market price of your common shares. Also, if you purchase common shares in this offering, you
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will pay a price that was not established in public trading markets. The initial public offering price for the common shares will be determined by negotiations between us, the selling shareholder and the underwriters and does not purport to be indicative of prices at which our common shares will trade upon completion of this offering. Consequently, you may not be able to sell your common shares above the initial public offering price and may suffer a loss on your investment.
The market price of our common shares may be volatile and may trade at prices below the initial public offering price.
The stock market in general, and the market for equities of newly-public companies in particular, have been highly volatile. As a result, the market price of our common shares is likely to be similarly volatile, and investors in our common shares may experience a decrease, which could be substantial, in the value of their common shares, including decreases unrelated to our operating performance or prospects, or a complete loss of their investment. The price of our common shares could be subject to significant fluctuations in response to a number of factors, including those listed elsewhere in this “Risk Factors” section and others such as:
variations in our operating performance and the performance of our competitors;
actual or anticipated fluctuations in our quarterly or annual operating results;
changes in our revenues or earnings estimates or recommendations by securities analysts;
publication of research reports by securities analysts about us or our competitors in our industry;
failure of securities analysts to initiate or maintain coverage of us, changes in ratings and financial estimates and the publication of other news by any securities analysts who follow our company, or our failure to meet these estimates or the expectations of investors;
our failure or the failure of our competitors to meet analysts’ projections or guidance that we or our competitors may give to the market;
additions or departures of key personnel;
strategic decisions by us or our competitors, such as acquisitions, divestitures, spin-offs, joint ventures, strategic investments or changes in business strategy;
announcement of technological innovations by us or our competitors;
the passage of legislation, changes in interpretations of laws or other regulatory events or developments affecting us;
speculation in the press or investment community;
changes in accounting principles;
terrorist acts, acts of war or periods of widespread civil unrest;
health pandemics (including COVID-19);
changes in general market and economic conditions;
changes or trends in our industry;
investors’ perception of our prospects; and
adverse resolution of any new or pending litigation against us.
In the past, securities class action litigation has often been initiated against companies following periods of volatility in their stock price. This type of litigation could result in substantial costs and divert our management’s attention and resources, and could also require us to make substantial payments to satisfy judgments or to settle or defend litigation.
If securities or industry analysts do not publish research about our business, or publish inaccurate or unfavorable research, the price and trading volume of our common shares could decline.
The market for our common shares will likely depend, in part, on the research and reports that securities or industry analysts publish about us or our business. There can be no assurance that analysts will cover us or provide favorable coverage. In addition, if one or more analysts cease coverage of our company or fail to regularly publish reports on
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us, we could lose visibility in the financial markets, which could cause our share price or trading volume to decline. Moreover, if one or more analysts downgrade our common shares or change their opinion of our common shares, our share price would likely decline.
You will experience substantial dilution as a result of this offering and future equity issuances.
The initial public offering price per share is substantially higher than the pro forma net tangible book value per common share outstanding prior to this offering. As a result, investors purchasing common shares in this offering will experience immediate dilution of $   per share in net tangible book value after giving effect to the sale of common shares in this offering at an assumed public offering price of $   per share, the midpoint of the estimated initial public offering price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus. See “Dilution.”
As of March 31, 2020, 1,851,788 restricted stock awards were issued at a fair market value of $0.61 per share, of which 1,137,768 have vested. In addition, up to 1,443,740.49 common shares may be issuable under the Amazon Warrant, with an exercise price of $11.20 per share, if all of the vesting conditions under that warrant are satisfied. To the extent additional stock awards vest and the Amazon Warrant is ultimately exercised, there will be further dilution to investors in this offering. This dilution is due in large part to the fact that our earlier investors paid substantially less than the initial public offering price when they purchased their common shares. In addition, if we issue additional equity securities, you will experience additional dilution.
Our future earnings and earnings per share, as reported under IFRS as issued by the IASB, could be adversely impacted by the Amazon Warrant and if Amazon exercises its right to acquire our common shares pursuant to the Amazon Warrant, it will dilute the ownership interests of our then-existing shareholders and could adversely affect the market price of our common shares.
The Amazon Warrant increases the number of diluted shares reported, which has an effect on our fully diluted earnings per share. Further, the Amazon Warrant will be presented as a liability in our audited consolidated balance sheet and is subject to fair value measurement adjustments during the periods that it is outstanding. Accordingly, future fluctuations in the fair value of the Amazon Warrant could adversely impact our results of operations. If Amazon exercises its right to acquire our common shares pursuant to the Amazon Warrant, it will dilute the ownership interests of our then-existing shareholders and reduce our earnings per share. In addition, any sales in the public market of any common shares issuable upon the exercise of the Amazon Warrant by Amazon could adversely affect the market price of our common shares.
After the completion of this offering, we may not pay any dividends. Accordingly, investors may only realize future gains on their investments if the price of their common shares increases, which may never occur.
We have never declared or paid any dividends on our common shares, other than a dividend declared by one of our subsidiaries during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2017, the remaining $1.6 million of which was paid during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019. We currently do not plan to declare dividends on our common shares in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain all of our future earnings, if any, to finance the growth and development of our business. The payment of dividends, if any, would be at the discretion of our board of directors and would depend on our results of operations, capital requirements, financial condition, prospects, contractual arrangements, any limitations on payment of dividends present in our current and future debt agreements and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant. Accordingly, if our board of directors deems it appropriate not to pay any dividends, our investors may only realize future gains on their investments if the price of their common shares increases, which may never occur. See “Dividend Policy.”
We are an “emerging growth company,” and the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies may make our common shares less attractive to investors.
We are an “emerging growth company,” as defined in the JOBS Act, and we may take advantage of certain exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not “emerging growth companies” including, but not limited to, not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements
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of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, reduced financial disclosure obligations, reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements, and exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and any golden parachute payments not previously approved. We may take advantage of these provisions until we are no longer an “emerging growth company.” We would cease to be an “emerging growth company” upon the earliest to occur of: the last day of the fiscal year in which we have more than $1.07 billion in annual revenue; the date we qualify as a “large accelerated filer,” with at least $700 million of equity securities held by non-affiliates; the issuance, in any three-year period, by us of more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt securities; and the last day of the fiscal year ending after the fifth anniversary of this offering. If we take advantage of any of these reduced reporting requirements in future filings, the information that we provide our security holders may be different than you might get from other public companies in which you hold equity interests. We cannot predict if investors will find our common shares less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common shares less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common shares and our share price may be more volatile.
If we are unable to implement and maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, our results of operations and the price of our common shares could be adversely affected.
In connection with our fiscal year ended June 30, 2018, we and our independent registered public accounting firm identified two material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting as defined in Rule 12b-2 under the Exchange Act. A “material weakness” is a deficiency, or combination of deficiencies, in internal control over financial reporting such that there is a reasonable possibility that a material misstatement in our financial statements will not be prevented or detected on a timely basis. Specifically, the material weaknesses related to various control deficiencies related to (i) information technology general controls and (ii) revenue recognition at one of our subsidiaries. As of June 30, 2019, we and our independent registered public accounting firm determined that these material weaknesses were remediated.
In addition, during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2018, we assessed the presentation of our consolidated statement of cash flows and concluded that it was necessary to restate our previously issued financial statements for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2017 in order to correct an error in presentation. In accordance with International Accounting Standard (IAS) 7, Statement of Cash Flows, the cash flow associated with the proceeds and payments relating to the line of credit borrowing did not meet the criteria for net presentation as the maturity associated with the line of credit was significantly greater than 90 days and, therefore, we were required to present the cash flow activities associated with the line of credit by presenting separately proceeds from the line of credit and the associated repayments. For more information about this restatement, refer to Note 2.2, Basis of accounting and presentation, in our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.
During the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019, we and our independent registered public accounting firm identified one material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting related to our estimate of renewable revenue and related provision for Etelequote Limited. During the preparation of our interim condensed consolidated financial statements as of March 31, 2020 and for the nine month periods ended March 31, 2020 and 2019, we and our independent registered public accounting firm identified material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting related to our estimate of renewable revenue and related provision, and related tax effects, for Etelequote Limited for the nine month period ended March 31, 2019. We disposed of Etelequote Limited to our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited, on June 26, 2019 and have treated Etelequote Limited as a discontinued operation in our financial statements for all periods presented in this prospectus. For more information about our disposition of Etelequote Limited, refer to Notes 22 and 30.3 to our interim condensed consolidated financial statements and our audited consolidated financial statements, respectively, included elsewhere in this prospectus.
We cannot assure you that the measures we have taken to date, and actions we may take in the future, will prevent potential future material weaknesses. In addition, neither our management nor an independent registered public accounting firm has performed an evaluation of our internal control over financial reporting in accordance with the
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provisions of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act because no such evaluation has been required to date. As an emerging growth company and pursuant to Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, beginning with our Annual Report on Form 20-F for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2021, our management is required to report on the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. The rules governing the standards that must be met for management to assess our internal control over financial reporting are complex and require significant documentation, testing and possible remediation. We have not yet made a formal assessment of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting for that purpose. Also, once we no longer qualify as an EGC, the independent registered public accounting firm that audits our financial statements will also be required to audit our internal control over financial reporting. Any delays or difficulty in satisfying these requirements could adversely affect our future results of operations and the price of our shares. Moreover, it may cost us more than we expect to comply with these control- and procedure-related requirements. Failure to comply with Section 404 or to implement required new or improved controls, or difficulties encountered in their implementation, could harm our operating results or cause us to fail to meet our reporting obligations could potentially result in a loss in investor confidence in our reported financial information and subject us to sanctions or investigations by regulatory authorities.
If we are unable to successfully remediate any future material weaknesses in our internal control over financial reporting, or identify any additional material weaknesses, the accuracy and timing of our financial reporting may be adversely affected, we may be unable to maintain compliance with securities law requirements regarding timely filing of periodic reports in addition to applicable stock exchange listing requirements, investors may lose confidence in our financial reporting, and our share price may decline as a result.
We will incur increased costs and demands upon management as a result of complying with the laws and regulations affecting public companies, particularly after we are no longer an “emerging growth company,” which could adversely affect our business, operating results and financial condition.
As a public company, and particularly after we cease to be an “emerging growth company,” we will incur significantly greater legal, accounting and other expenses than we incurred as a private company. We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, and Nasdaq rules and regulations. These requirements have increased and will continue to increase our legal, accounting and financial compliance costs and have made and will continue to make some activities more time consuming and costly. For example, we expect these rules and regulations to make it more difficult and more expensive for us to obtain director and officer liability insurance, and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to maintain the same or similar coverage. As a result, it may be more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified individuals to serve on our board of directors or as our executive officers.
The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we assess the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting annually and the effectiveness of our disclosure controls and procedures quarterly. In particular, Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, or Section 404, will require us to perform system and process evaluation and testing of our internal control over financial reporting to allow management to report on, and our independent registered public accounting firm potentially to attest to, the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. As an emerging growth company, we expect to avail ourselves of the exemption from the requirement that our independent registered public accounting firm attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting under Section 404. However, we may no longer avail ourselves of this exemption when we cease to be an emerging growth company. When our independent registered public accounting firm is required to undertake an assessment of our internal control over financial reporting, the cost of our compliance with Section 404 will correspondingly increase. Our compliance with applicable provisions of Section 404 will require that we incur substantial accounting expense and expend significant management time on compliance-related issues as we implement additional corporate governance practices and comply with reporting requirements. Moreover, if we are not able to comply with the requirements of Section 404 applicable to us in a timely manner, or if we or our
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independent registered public accounting firm identify deficiencies in our internal control over financial reporting that are deemed to be material weaknesses, the market price of our shares could decline and we could be subject to sanctions or investigations by the SEC or other regulatory authorities, which would require additional financial and management resources.
Furthermore, investor perceptions of our company may suffer if deficiencies are found, and this could cause a decline in the market price of our common shares. Irrespective of compliance with Section 404, any failure of our internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our stated operating results and harm our reputation. If we are unable to implement these requirements effectively or efficiently, it could harm our operations, financial reporting, or financial results and could result in an adverse opinion on our internal controls from our independent registered public accounting firm.
After we are no longer an emerging growth company, or sooner if we choose not to take advantage of certain exemptions set forth in the JOBS Act, we expect to incur significant expenses and devote substantial management effort toward ensuring compliance with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. In that regard, we will need to hire additional accounting and financial staff with appropriate public company experience and technical accounting knowledge.
Certain U.S. holders of our common shares may suffer adverse U.S. tax consequences if we are characterized as a passive foreign investment company.
Based on our estimated gross income and average value of our gross assets, taking into account the assumed initial public offering price of our shares in this offering and the expected price of our shares following the offering, as well as the nature of our business, we do not expect to be classified as a “passive foreign investment company,” or PFIC, for U.S. federal income tax for the current tax year or in tax years in the foreseeable future. A corporation organized outside the United States generally will be classified as a PFIC for U.S. federal income tax purposes in any taxable year in which at least 75% of its gross income is passive income or on average at least 50% of the gross value of its assets is attributable to assets that produce passive income or are held for the production of passive income. Passive income for this purpose generally includes dividends, interest, royalties, rents and gains from commodities and securities transactions. Our status in any taxable year will depend on our assets and activities in each year, and because this is a factual determination made annually after the end of each taxable year, there can be no assurance that we will not be considered a PFIC for the current taxable year or any future taxable year. The market value of our assets may be determined in large part by reference to the market price of our common shares, which is likely to fluctuate after the offering. If we were to be treated as a PFIC for any taxable year during which a U.S. holder held our common shares, however, certain adverse U.S. federal income tax consequences could apply to the U.S. holder. See “Material United States and Bermuda Income Tax Consequences—U.S. Federal Income Tax Consequences—Passive Foreign Investment Company Considerations.”
After this offering, our executive officers, directors and principal shareholders will maintain the ability to control all matters submitted to shareholders for approval.
Upon the closing of this offering, our executive officers, directors and shareholders who owned more than 5% of our outstanding common shares before this offering, which we refer to as our principal shareholders, will, in the aggregate, beneficially own shares representing approximately   % of our common shares (  % if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares). As a result, if some or all of these shareholders were to choose to act together, they would be able to control all matters submitted to our shareholders for approval, as well as our management and affairs. For example, these persons, if they choose to act together, would control the election of directors and approval of any merger, amalgamation, consolidation or sale of all or substantially all of our assets. This concentration of voting power could delay or prevent an acquisition of our company on terms that other shareholders may desire.
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Our largest shareholder, The Resource Group International Limited, and its major shareholder, TRG Pakistan Limited, will continue to have substantial control over us after this offering and could limit your ability to influence the outcome of key transactions, including any change of control.
Upon the closing of this offering, our largest shareholder, TRGI, will beneficially own, in the aggregate, approximately    % of our outstanding common shares (   % if the underwriters exercise in full their option to purchase additional shares). As of March 31, 2020, TRG Pakistan Limited (“TRGP”), a publicly traded Pakistan corporation listed on the Pakistan Stock Exchange, beneficially owned 46.33% of TRGI’s outstanding voting securities 45.71%, if all outstanding non-voting common shares are converted into voting common shares). The members of the boards of directors of TRGP and TRGI have substantial overlap. Peter Riepenhausen serves as the chairman and director of both TRGP and TRGI. Zia Chishti serves as a director of both TRGP and TRGI and is also TRGP’s largest shareholder and a significant shareholder in TRGI. In addition, Mohammed Khaishgi serves on the boards of directors of TRGP, TRGI and TRGI’s portfolio management company, TRG Holdings LLC (See “Management” and “Principal and Selling Shareholder”).
Additionally, pursuant to a stockholder’s agreement, dated September 15, 2017, between TRGI and us (the “TRGI Stockholder’s Agreement”), we will not take or commit to take, or cause or permit any of our subsidiaries to take, certain enumerated actions without TRGI’s consent, to be withheld or given in TRGI’s sole discretion. The TRGI Stockholder’s Agreement will remain in effect until the date that TRGI ceases to hold 10% or more of all shares issued by us, as measured on an as-converted basis. As a result, we expect that TRGP and TRGI will be able to exert significant influence over our business. TRGP and TRGI may have interests that differ from your interests and may cause TRGI’s shares in our company to be voted in a way with which you disagree and that may be adverse to your interests. The concentration of ownership of our share capital may have the effect of delaying, preventing or deterring a change of control of our company and its subsidiaries, as well as certain M&A activity and securities offerings, and could deprive our shareholders of an opportunity to receive a premium for their common shares as part of a sale of our company and may adversely affect the market price of our common shares. In addition, because of TRGI’s majority ownership of our company, even if we no longer qualify as a foreign private issuer, we may be able to take advantage of many of the same exemptions from the Nasdaq corporate governance rules for as long as we continue to qualify as a “controlled company” within the meaning of the Nasdaq corporate governance standards. See “As a foreign private issuer, we are not subject to certain Nasdaq corporate governance rules applicable to U.S. listed companies.” Our bye-laws provide that any shareholder holding 50% or more of the nominal value of our voting shares will have the right to appoint five directors to our board of directors. If there is no such 50% holder, then any shareholder holding 25% or more of the nominal value of our voting shares (first in time as compared to any other 25% shareholder) will have the right to appoint five directors to our board of directors. See “Description of Share Capital—Election and Removal of Directors.”
Our management will have broad discretion over the use of the proceeds we receive in this offering and might not apply the proceeds in ways that increase the value of your investment.
Our management will have broad discretion to use the net proceeds from this offering and you will be relying on the judgment of our management regarding the application of these proceeds. Our management might not apply the net proceeds in ways that increase the value of your investment. We plan to invest the net proceeds from this offering until they are used, and the investments we make may not yield a favorable rate of return. If we do not invest or apply the net proceeds from this offering in ways that enhance shareholder value, we may fail to achieve expected financial results, which could cause our share price to decline. See “Use of Proceeds.”
A significant portion of our total outstanding shares are restricted from immediate resale but may be sold into the market in the near future. This could cause the market price of our common shares to drop significantly, even if our business is doing well.
Sales of a substantial number of our common shares in the public market could occur at any time. These sales, or the perception in the market that the holders of a large number of shares intend to sell shares, could reduce the market price of our common shares. After this offering, we will have  outstanding common shares of based on the
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number of shares outstanding as of March 31, 2020. Of these common shares,    shares to be sold in this offering, plus any shares sold upon exercise of the underwriters’ over-allotment option, will be freely tradable, without restriction, in the public market immediately following this offering. All remaining    shares are currently restricted as a result of securities laws or lock-up arrangements but will be able to be sold after the offering as described in the “Shares Eligible for Future Sale” section of this prospectus. Moreover, after this offering, certain of our security holders will have rights, subject to some conditions, to require us to file registration statements covering the    common shares that it will hold immediately after this offering or to include their shares in registration statements that we may file for ourselves or other shareholders. We also intend to register all of our common shares that we may issue under our equity compensation plans. Once we register these shares, they can be freely sold in the public market upon issuance, subject to volume limitations applicable to affiliates and the lock-up arrangements described in the “Underwriting” section of this prospectus.
Anti-takeover provisions in our bye-laws could make an acquisition of us, which may be beneficial to our shareholders, more difficult and may prevent attempts by our shareholders to replace or remove our current management.
Provisions in our bye-laws that will become effective upon the closing of this offering may delay or prevent an acquisition of us or a change in our management. In addition, by making it more difficult for shareholders to replace members of our board of directors, these provisions also may frustrate or prevent any attempts by our shareholders to replace or remove our current management because our board of directors is responsible for appointing the members of our management team. These provisions include:
the ability of our board of directors to determine the rights, preferences and privileges of our preferred shares and to issue the preferred shares without shareholder approval; and
the ability of major shareholders (i.e., shareholders holding 50% or more; in the absence of such a holder, 25% or more) to appoint directors to the Board.
These provisions could make it more difficult for a third party to acquire us, even if the third party’s offer may be considered beneficial by many shareholders. As a result, shareholders may be limited in their ability to obtain a premium for their shares.
We have the ability to issue preferred shares without shareholder approval.
Our common shares may be subordinate to classes of preferred shares issued in the future in the payment of dividends and other distributions made with respect to the common shares, including distributions upon liquidation or dissolution. Our board of directors is authorized to issue preferred shares without first obtaining shareholder approval. If we issue preferred shares, it will create additional securities that may have dividend or liquidation preferences senior to the common shares. If we issue convertible preferred shares, a subsequent conversion may dilute the current common shareholders’ interest.
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FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This prospectus contains forward-looking statements that are subject to risks and uncertainties. All statements other than statements of historical fact included in this prospectus are forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements give our current expectations and projections relating to our financial condition, results of operations, plans, objectives, future performance and business. You can identify forward-looking statements by the fact that they do not relate strictly to historical or current facts. These statements may include words such as “anticipate,” “estimate,” “expect,” “project,” “plan,” “intend,” “believe,” “may,” “will,” “should,” “can have,” “likely” and other words, the negative forms of such words and terms of similar meaning in connection with any discussion of the timing or nature of future operating or financial performance or other events. These statements relate to events that involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors, including those listed under “Risk factors,” which may cause our actual results, performance or achievements to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by the forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements contained in this prospectus include, but are not limited to, statements about:
The developments relating to COVID-19, including the scope and duration of the pandemic and actions taken by federal, state and local governmental authorities in the United States, local governmental authorities in our international sites and our clients in response to the pandemic and the effect on our operations, operating budgets, cash flows and liquidity.
The effect on our business, financial conditions, results of operations and cash flows in connection with the Frontier restructuring and the proceedings under Chapter 11 of the United States Bankruptcy Code.
Our ability to attract new business and retain key clients.
Our ability to enter into multi-year contracts with our clients at appropriate rates.
The potential for our clients or potential clients to consolidate.
Our clients deciding to enter into or further expand their insourcing activities.
Our ability to operate as an integrated company under the IBEX brand.
Our ability to manage portions of our business that have long sales cycles and long implementation cycles that require significant resources and working capital.
Our ability to manage our international operations, particularly in Pakistan and the Philippines and increasingly in Jamaica and Nicaragua.
Our ability to comply with applicable laws and regulations, including those regarding privacy, data protection and information security.
Our ability to manage the inelasticity of our labor costs relative to short-term movements in client demand.
Our ability to realize the anticipated strategic and financial benefits of our relationship with Amazon.
Our ability to recruit, engage, motivate, manage and retain our global workforce.
Our ability to anticipate, develop and implement information technology solutions that keep pace with evolving industry standards and changing client demands.
Our ability to maintain and enhance our reputation and brand.
We derive many of our forward-looking statements from our operating budgets and forecasts, which are based upon many detailed assumptions. While we believe that our assumptions are reasonable, we caution that it is very difficult to predict the impact of known factors, and, it is impossible for us to anticipate all factors that could affect our actual results. Important factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from our expectations, or cautionary statements, are disclosed under “Risk Factors” and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” in this prospectus. All written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us, or persons acting on our behalf, are expressly qualified in their entirety by these cautionary statements as well as other cautionary statements that are made from time to time in our other SEC filings and public communications. You should evaluate all forward-looking statements made in this prospectus in the context of these risks and uncertainties.
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We caution you that the important factors referenced above may not contain all of the factors that are important to you. In addition, we cannot assure you that we will realize the results or developments we expect or anticipate or, even if substantially realized, that they will result in the consequences or affect us or our operations in the way we expect. The forward-looking statements included in this prospectus are made only as of the date hereof. We undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statement as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as otherwise required by law.
MARKET AND INDUSTRY DATA
Market data and certain industry forecast data used in this prospectus were obtained from market research, publicly available information and industry publications and organizations, including, among others, International Data Corporation, Gartner, Inc., eMarketer and Markets and Markets Research Pvt. Ltd., as well as other information based on our internal sources. These third party sources generally indicate that they have obtained their information from sources believed to be reliable but do not guarantee the accuracy and completeness of their information. This information involves a number of assumptions and limitations, and you are cautioned not to give undue weight to these estimates, as there is no assurance that any of them will be reached. Based on our industry experience, we believe that the third party sources are reliable and that the conclusions contained in the publications are reasonable. The industry in which we operate is subject to a high degree of uncertainty and risk due to a variety of factors, including those described in the section titled “Risk Factors.” These and other factors could cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed in the estimates made by the third party sources and by us.
The Gartner Reports described herein (the “Gartner Reports”) represent research opinion or viewpoints published, as part of a syndicated subscription service, by Gartner, Inc. (“Gartner”), and are not representations of fact. Each Gartner Report speaks as of its original publication date (and not as of the date of this prospectus) and the opinions expressed in the Gartner Report are subject to change without notice. The report from IDC described herein is Worldwide and U.S. Business Process Outsourcing Services Forecast, 2019-20123, IDC #US43778119, dated April 2019.
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NON-GAAP FINANCIAL MEASURES
This prospectus contains financial measures and ratios, including Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations (both consolidated and by segment), Adjusted EBITDA from continuing operations margin, financial results excluding IFRS 15 & 16, and Net Debt that are not required by, or presented in accordance with IFRS as issued by the IASB. We refer to these measures as “non-GAAP financial measures.” For a definition of how these financial measures and ratios are calculated, see the sections entitled “Summary Consolidated Historical Financial Information” and “Selected Consolidated Historical Financial Information” elsewhere in this prospectus.
We present non-GAAP financial measures because we believe that they and other similar measures are widely used by certain investors, securities analysts and other interested parties as supplemental measures of performance and liquidity. We also use these measures internally to establish forecasts, budgets and operational goals to manage and monitor our business, as well as evaluate our underlying historical performance, as we believe that these non-GAAP financial measures depict the true performance of the business by encompassing only relevant and controllable events, enabling us to evaluate and plan more effectively for the future. The non-GAAP financial measures may not be comparable to other similarly titled measures of other companies and have limitations as analytical tools and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for analysis of our operating results as reported under IFRS as issued by the IASB. Non-GAAP financial measures and ratios are not measurements of our performance, financial condition or liquidity under IFRS as issued by the IASB and should not be considered as alternatives to operating profit or net (loss) / income or as alternatives to cash flow from operating, investing or financing activities for the period, or any other performance measures, derived in accordance with IFRS as issued by the IASB or any other generally accepted accounting principles.
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USE OF PROCEEDS
We estimate that we will receive net proceeds from this offering of $    , based upon an assumed initial public offering price of $    per common share (the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus), after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.
A $    increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $    per common share, the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase (decrease) the net proceeds to us from this offering by approximately $    , assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. Similarly, each increase (decrease) of one million shares in the number of common shares offered by us would increase (decrease) the net proceeds to us from this offering by approximately $    , assuming the assumed initial public offering price remains the same and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. We do not expect that a change in the initial price to the public or the number of shares by these amounts would have a material effect on uses of the proceeds from this offering, although it may accelerate the time at which we will need to seek additional capital.
The principal purposes of this offering are to increase our capitalization and financial flexibility, enhance our visibility in the marketplace, create a public market for our common shares and fund growth initiatives. We intend to use between $    million and $    million of the net proceeds that we receive from this offering for: (i) $   million to $   million in capital expenditures to build out additional facilities to accommodate growth from new and existing clients, as well as expand our existing facilities to accommodate social distancing requirements related to the current COVID-19 situation; (ii) $    million to $   million to invest in upgraded support systems that improve our internal employee management as well as real time financial reporting; and (iii) $    million to $   million representing an increase in our investments in our research and development effort, and in particular our development and deployment of artificial intelligence tools. We will also consider using part of the net proceeds from this offering for repayment of some of our financial indebtedness that carries a higher interest rate. As of March 31, 2020, we had total financial indebtedness of $44.7 million, excluding the impact of IFRS 16, with interest rates ranging from 0.25% to 11% and maturity dates ranging from 2020 to 2024. We may also use part of the net proceeds from this offering for working capital as well as future strategic acquisitions of, or investments in, other businesses or technologies that we believe will complement our current business and expansion strategies (although we have no binding obligations to enter into any such acquisitions or investments) and other general corporate purposes. See “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Liquidity and Capital Resources—Financing Arrangements.”
We will not receive any proceeds from the sale of common shares by the selling shareholder.
The amount, and timing of our expenditures for these purposes may vary significantly and will depend on a number of factors, including our future revenues and cash generated by operations and the other factors described in the section of this prospectus captioned “Risk Factors.” Accordingly, our management will have broad discretion in applying the net proceeds of this offering. Pending these uses, we intend to invest the net proceeds of this offering in high-quality, investment-grade instruments.
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DIVIDEND POLICY
We have never declared or paid any dividends on our common shares, other than a dividend declared by one of our subsidiaries during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2017, the remaining $1.6 million of which was paid during the fiscal year ended June 30, 2019. We currently do not plan to declare dividends on our common shares in the foreseeable future. We currently intend to retain all of our future earnings, if any, to finance the growth and development of our business. The payment of dividends, if any, would be at the discretion of our board of directors and would depend on our results of operations, capital requirements, financial condition, prospects, contractual arrangements, any limitations on payment of dividends present in our current and future debt agreements and other factors that our board of directors may deem relevant.
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CAPITALIZATION
The following table sets forth our cash and cash equivalents and capitalization as of March 31, 2020:
on an actual basis;
on a pro forma as adjusted basis to give effect to (i) our issuance and sale of our common shares in this offering at an assumed initial offering price of $   per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, and (ii) the receipt of $   of the net proceeds therefrom, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.
This table should be read with our audited consolidated financial statements and the related notes, and the section titled “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” that is included elsewhere in this prospectus.
 
As of March 31, 2020
 
Actual
Proforma as
Adjusted(1)
 
(unaudited)
($ in thousands)
Cash and cash equivalents
$15,471
       
Current loans and financing:
 
 
Lease liabilities
12,689
 
Borrowings
32,457
      
Total current loans and financing
45,146
 
Non-current loans and financing:
 
 
Lease liabilities
66,851
 
Borrowings
4,865
      
Total non-current loans and financing
71,716
      
Total loans and financing
116,862
      
Total equity
20,124
      
Total capitalization
$136,986
      
(1)
Each $1.00 increase (decrease) in the assumed initial public offering price of $   per share, which is the midpoint of the estimated price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus, would increase (decrease) the pro forma as adjusted amount of each of cash and cash equivalents, total equity and total capitalization by approximately $   million, assuming that the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover of this prospectus, remains the same and after deducting estimated underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us. Each increase or decrease of 1.0 million shares we are offering at the assumed initial public offering price of $   per share, which is the midpoint of the estimated price range set forth on the cover of this prospectus, would increase (decrease) the pro forma as adjusted amount of each of cash and cash equivalents, total equity and total capitalization by approximately $    million.
The foregoing table and calculations are based on the automatic conversion, upon the completion of this offering, of one Series A preferred share, 11,083,691.3814 Series B preferred shares, 111,986.4786 Series C preferred shares and 1,137,768 Class B common shares into an aggregate of     common shares, and excludes:
714,020 common shares issuable in respect of Class B common shares that have been issued under the 2018 Restricted Share Plan and remain subject to vesting conditions;
707,535 common shares available for future issuance as of March 31, 2020 under the 2018 Restricted Share Plan (all of which were transferred to the 2020 LTIP, which was approved and adopted on May 20, 2020, and included in a total of 1,287,326.13 common shares issuable thereunder as of May 20, 2020); and
up to 1,443,740.49 common shares issuable upon exercise of the Amazon Warrant.
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DILUTION
If you invest in our common shares, your ownership interest will be diluted to the extent of the difference between the initial public offering price per share and the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering.
Our historical net tangible book value as of March 31, 2020 was $4.9 million, or $4.3 per common share. Historical net tangible book value represents the amount of our total tangible assets less our total liabilities. Historical net tangible book value per share represents our historical net tangible book value divided by 1,137,768 common shares outstanding as of March 31, 2020.
Our pro forma net tangible book value as of March 31, 2020 was $4.9 million, or $4.1 per common share. Pro forma net tangible book value represents the amount of our total tangible assets less our total liabilities, after giving effect to the automatic conversion, upon the completion of this offering, of one Series A preferred share, 11,083,691.3814 Series B preferred shares, 111,986.4786 Series C preferred shares and 1,137,768 Class B common shares into an aggregate of    common shares. Pro forma net tangible book value per share represents pro forma net tangible book value divided by the total number of shares outstanding as of March 31, 2020, after giving effect to the automatic conversion, upon the completion of this offering, of one Series A preferred share, 11,083,691.3814 Series B preferred shares, 111,986.4786 Series C preferred shares and 1,137,768 Class B common shares into an aggregate of    common shares.
After giving effect to the sale by us of common shares in this offering at an assumed initial public offering price of $   per common share, which is the midpoint of the estimated price range on the cover of this prospectus, after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us, our pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value as of March 31, 2020, would have been $   , or $   per common share. This amount represents an immediate increase in pro forma net tangible book value of $   per common share to our existing shareholders and an immediate dilution in net tangible book value of $    per common share to new investors purchasing common shares in this offering at the assumed initial public offering price. We determine dilution by subtracting the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per common share after this offering from the amount of cash that a new investor paid for a common share.
The following table illustrates this dilution to new investors on a per share basis:
Assumed initial public offering price per common share
$   
Historical net tangible book value per common share as of March 31, 2020
$4.3
Increase in net tangible book value per share as of March 31, 2020 attributable to the conversion of Series A preferred share, Series B preferred shares, Series C preferred shares and Class B common shares
$
Pro forma net tangible book value per common share as of March 31, 2020 before giving effect to this offering
$
Increase in pro forma net tangible book value per common share attributable to new investors in this offering
$
Pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per common share as of March 31, 2020 after giving effect to this offering
$
Dilution per share to new investors in this offering
$
A $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of $   per common share, which is the midpoint of the estimated price range on the cover of this prospectus, would increase or decrease the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value by $   million, the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share by $   per common share, and dilution per share to new investors purchasing shares in this offering by $   per common share, assuming the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus,
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remains the same, and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated expenses payable by us. We may also increase or decrease the number of shares we are offering. An increase of one million shares in the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering by $   and decrease the dilution per share to new investors participating in this offering by $  , assuming no change in the assumed initial public offering price and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated expenses payable by us. A decrease of one million shares in the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would decrease the pro forma as adjusted net tangible book value per share after this offering by $    and increase the dilution per share to new investors participating in this offering by $   , assuming no change in the assumed initial public offering price and after deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated expenses payable by us. The pro forma as adjusted information discussed above is illustrative only and will adjust based on the actual initial public offering price and other terms of this offering determined at pricing.
If any shares are issued upon exercise of the Amazon Warrant, or if additional options or other equity awards are granted and exercised or become vested, or if other issuances of common shares are made, you will experience further dilution.
The table below summarizes as of March 31, 2020, on the pro forma as adjusted basis described above, the number of our common shares, the total consideration and the average price per share (a) paid to us by existing shareholders and (b) to be paid by new investors purchasing our common shares in this offering at an assumed initial public offering price of $   per share, the midpoint of the estimated price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, before deducting underwriting discounts and commissions and estimated offering expenses payable by us.
 
Shares
Purchased
Total
Consideration
 
Number
Percent
Amount
(in millions)
Percent
Average
Price
Per Share
Existing shareholders
 
 
 
 
 
New investors in this offering
 
 
 
 
 
Total
 
 
 
 
 
A $1.00 increase or decrease in the assumed initial public offering price of $   per share, which is the midpoint of the price range set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase or decrease the total consideration paid by new investors by $   million and, in the case of an increase, would increase the percentage of total consideration paid by new investors by   % and, in the case of a decrease, would decrease the percentage of total consideration paid by new investors by   %, assuming that the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, remains the same. An increase or decrease of shares in the number of shares offered by us, as set forth on the cover page of this prospectus, would increase or decrease the total consideration paid by new investors by $    and, in the case of an increase, would increase the percentage of total consideration paid by new investors by    % and, in the case of a decrease, would decrease the percentage of total consideration paid by new investors by   %, assuming no change in the assumed initial public offering price.
The table above assumes no exercise of the underwriters’ option to purchase additional shares in this offering. If the underwriters exercise their option to purchase additional common shares in full, the number of common shares beneficially owned by existing shareholders would decrease to approximately    % of the total number of common shares outstanding after this offering, and the number of shares held by new investors will be increased    % of the total number of common shares outstanding after this offering.
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The foregoing tables and calculations are based on the automatic conversion, upon the completion of this offering, of one Series A preferred share, 11,083,691.3814 Series B preferred shares, 111,986.4786 Series C preferred shares and 1,137,768 Class B common shares into an aggregate of    common shares, and excludes:
714,020 common shares issuable in respect of Class B common shares that have been issued under the 2018 Restricted Share Plan and remain subject to vesting conditions;
707,535 common shares available for future issuance as of March 31, 2020 under the 2018 Restricted Share Plan (all of which were transferred to the 2020 LTIP, which was approved; and adopted on May 20, 2020, and included in a total of 1,287,326.13 common shares issuable thereunder as of May 20, 2020); and
up to 1,443,740.49 common shares issuable upon exercise of the Amazon Warrant.
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SELECTED CONSOLIDATED HISTORICAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION
The following selected consolidated historical financial and other data of IBEX Limited should be read in conjunction with, and are qualified by reference to, “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” and our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus. The selected consolidated historical financial data as of June 30, 2019 and 2018 and for the years then ended are derived from the audited consolidated financial statements of IBEX Limited, included elsewhere in this prospectus and should be read in conjunction with those audited consolidated financial statements. The selected consolidated historical financial data as of March 31, 2020 and for the nine month periods ended March 31, 2020 and 2019 are derived from the unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements of IBEX Limited included elsewhere in this prospectus and should be read in conjunction with those unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements except the statement of financial position data as of March 31, 2019 which is sourced from the unaudited and unreviewed internal management accounts information. The unaudited condensed consolidated interim financial statements and the statement of financial position data as of March 31, 2019 have been prepared in accordance with IAS 34, Interim Financial Reporting, and, in the opinion of our management, include all normal recurring adjustments necessary for a fair presentation of the information set forth therein. Our historical results are not necessarily indicative of the results that may be expected for any future period.
Our statements of financial position data at June 30, 2019 and our statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income data for the fiscal year then ended reflect the impact of our adoption, effective July 1, 2018 of IFRS 15 – Revenue from Contracts with Customers and IFRS 16 – Leases. Our statements of financial position data at June 30, 2019 and our statements of profit or loss and other comprehensive income data for the fiscal years ended June 30, 2019 and 2018 reflect our disposition of Etelequote Limited to our parent company, The Resource Group International Limited, on June 26, 2019 and its treatment as a discontinued operation. For additional detail on the impact of the adoption of IFRS 15 and IFRS 16 and the treatment of Etelequote Limited as a discontinued operation and their impact on the comparability of our financial position at June 30, 2019 and 2018 and our results of operations for the years then ended, see “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations—Factors Affecting Comparability of Financial Position and Results of Operations.” For more information about our disposition of Etelequote Limited, refer to Note 30.3 to our audited consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this prospectus.
 
Nine Months Ended
March 31,
Fiscal Year Ended
June 30,
 
2020
2019
2019
2018