485APOS 1 acetft062519avantis485a.htm 485APOS Document


As Filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission on June 25, 2019

1933 Act File No. 333-221045
1940 Act File No. 811-23305

UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549
__________________
 
FORM N-1A
__________________
 
 
REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE SECURITIES ACT OF 1933
 
 
Pre-Effective Amendment No.
 
 
Post-Effective Amendment No. 22
 
 
and/or
 
 
REGISTRATION STATEMENT UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940
 
 
Amendment No. 24
(Check appropriate box or boxes.)
__________________
American Century ETF Trust
__________________
4500 MAIN STREET, KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 64111
  (Address of Principal Executive Offices)                  (Zip Code)   
 
REGISTRANT’S TELEPHONE NUMBER, INCLUDING AREA CODE: (816) 531-5575
CHARLES A. ETHERINGTON
4500 MAIN STREET, KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI 64111
(Name and Address of Agent for Service)
 
 
It is proposed that this filing will become effective (check appropriate box)
 
immediately upon filing pursuant to paragraph (b)
on (date) pursuant to paragraph (b)
60 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
on (date) pursuant to paragraph (a)(1)
75 days after filing pursuant to paragraph (a)(2)
on September 9, 2019 pursuant to paragraph (a)(2) of rule 485
 
 
   If appropriate, check the following box:
this post-effective amendment designates a new effective date for a previously filed post-effective amendment.





The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the
registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to
sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
[_________], 2019

American Century Investments
Prospectus

 
Ticker:
Exchange:
Avantis™ Emerging Markets Equity ETF
AVEM
 











Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the fund’s shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from the fund or from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be made available on a website, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the fund or your financial intermediary electronically by calling or sending an email request.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. You can inform the fund or your financial intermediary that you wish to continue receiving paper copies of your shareholder reports by calling or sending an email request. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all funds held with the fund complex/your financial intermediary.


The Securities and Exchange Commission has
not approved or disapproved these securities or
passed upon the adequacy of this prospectus. Any
representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
 




Table of Contents
Fund Summary
2

Investment Objective
2

Fees and Expenses
2

Principal Investment Strategies
2

Principal Risks
3

Fund Performance
4

Portfolio Management
4

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
4

Tax Information
4

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
4

Objectives, Strategies and Risks
5

Management
7

Investing in the Fund
8

Share Price and Distributions
10

Taxes
11

Additional Information
12

Financial Highlights
14




















©2019 American Century Proprietary Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.




Fund Summary
Investment Objective
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the fund. You may also incur usual and customary brokerage commissions when buying or selling shares of the fund, which are not reflected in the example that follows.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
—%
Other Expenses
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
—%
1 
Other expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
Example
The example below is intended to help you compare the costs of investing in the fund with the costs of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, that you earn a 5% return each year, and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. You may be required to pay brokerage commissions on your purchases of shares of the fund which are not reflected in the example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
 
 
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. Because the fund is new, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate is not available.
Principal Investment Strategies
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of companies related to emerging markets across market sectors, industry groups and countries. The fund may invest in companies of all market capitalizations.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of companies related to emerging market countries. The fund considers an emerging market country to be any country other than a developed country. However, the fund generally intends to focus its investments in the subset of emerging markets countries that comprise the MSCI Emerging Markets IMI Index. The countries comprising the index will change from time to time, but as of March 29, 2019 include: Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Egypt, Greece, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Russia, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey and United Arab Emirates. To determine whether a company is related to an emerging market country, the portfolio managers will consider various factors, including where the company is headquartered, where the company’s principal operations are located, where the company’s revenues are derived, where the principal trading market is located, the country in which the company was legally organized, and whether the company is in the fund’s benchmark. The weight given to each of these factors will vary depending on the circumstances in a given case. The fund may invest in securities that are denominated in foreign currencies and may also invest in foreign securities that are represented in the U.S. and other securities markets by American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), and other similar depositary arrangements.

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The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending and invest its collateral in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.
Principal Risks
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Currency Risk - The fund could experience gains or losses solely on changes in the exchange rate between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar.
Emerging Market Risk - Investing in emerging market countries generally is riskier than investing in foreign developed countries. Emerging market countries may have unstable governments, economies that are subject to sudden change, and significant volatility in their financial markets. These countries also may lack the legal, business and social framework to support securities markets.
Foreign Risk - Foreign securities are generally riskier than U.S. securities. Political events (such as civil unrest, national elections and imposition of exchange controls), social and economic events (such as labor strikes and rising inflation), and natural disasters occurring in a country where the fund invests could cause the fund’s investments in that country to experience gains or losses. Securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid, more volatile and harder to value than U.S. securities.
Depositary Receipts Risk - Investment in depositary receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of depositary receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the depositary receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - The fund may effect its creations and redemptions for cash, rather than for in-kind securities. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in fund shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - The fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, periods of high volatility and disruption in the creation and/or redemption process of the fund. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the fund’s shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.

3



Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to net asset value (NAV) and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
Fund Performance
The fund’s performance history is not available as of the date of this prospectus. When the fund has investment results for a full calendar year, this section will feature charts that show annual total returns, highest and lowest quarterly returns and average annual total returns for the fund. This information indicates the volatility of the fund’s historical returns from year to year. For current performance information, please visit americancenturyetfs.com.
Performance information is designed to help you see how fund returns can vary. Keep in mind that past performance (before and after taxes) does not predict how the fund will perform in the future.
Portfolio Management
Investment Advisor
American Century Investment Management, Inc.
Portfolio Managers

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is an ETF. Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The fund issues and redeems shares that have been aggregated into blocks of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof (Creation Units) to authorized participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor. The fund will generally issue and redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities (and an amount of cash) that the fund specifies each day.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred account such as a 401(k) or individual retirement account (in which case you may be taxed upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


4



Objectives, Strategies and Risks
What are the fund’s investment objectives?
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
The fund’s investment objective is a nonfundamental investment policy and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without approval by shareholders.
What are the fund’s principal investment strategies?
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of companies related to emerging markets across market sectors, industry groups and countries. The fund may invest in companies of all market capitalizations.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of companies related to emerging market countries. The fund considers an emerging market country to be any country other than a developed country. However, the fund generally intends to focus its investments in the subset of emerging markets countries that comprise the MSCI Emerging Markets IMI Index. The countries comprising the index will change from time to time, but as of March 29, 2019 include: Brazil, Chile, China, Colombia, Czech Republic, Egypt, Greece, Hungary, India, Indonesia, Korea, Malaysia, Mexico, Pakistan, Peru, Philippines, Poland, Qatar, Russia, South Africa, Taiwan, Thailand, Turkey and United Arab Emirates. To determine whether a company is related to an emerging market country, the portfolio managers will consider various factors, including where the company is headquartered, where the company’s principal operations are located, where the company’s revenues are derived, where the principal trading market is located, the country in which the company was legally organized, and whether the company is in the fund’s benchmark. The weight given to each of these factors will vary depending on the circumstances in a given case. The fund may invest in securities that are denominated in foreign currencies and may also invest in foreign securities that are represented in the U.S. and other securities markets by American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), and other similar depositary arrangements.
Equity securities in which the fund may invest include common stock, preferred stock, exchange traded funds, equity-equivalent securities, such as convertible securities, and derivative instruments that give exposure to equities, such as stock futures contract, stock index futures contracts, and swaps on equities.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending. Collateral received by the fund in connection with loaning its securities may consist of cash and U.S. government securities. Cash collateral may be invested in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.
In the event of exceptional market or economic conditions, the fund may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with the fund’s principal investment strategies. To the extent the fund assumes a defensive position, it may not achieve its investment objective.
A description of the policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the fund’s portfolio securities is available in the statement of additional information.
What are the principal risks of investing in the fund?
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities,

5



leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Currency Risk - The fund could experience gains or losses solely on changes in the exchange rate between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar.
Emerging Market Risk - Investing in emerging market countries generally is riskier than investing in foreign developed countries. Emerging market countries may have unstable governments, economies that are subject to sudden change, and significant volatility in their financial markets. These countries also may lack the legal, business and social framework to support securities markets.
Foreign Risk - Foreign securities are generally riskier than U.S. securities. Political events (such as civil unrest, national elections and imposition of exchange controls), social and economic events (such as labor strikes and rising inflation), and natural disasters occurring in a country where the fund invests could cause the fund’s investments in that country to experience gains or losses. Securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid, more volatile and harder to value than U.S. securities.
Depositary Receipts Risk - Investment in depositary receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of depositary receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the depositary receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions to avoid some costs, including being taxed on gains on the distributed portfolio securities at the fund level. However, because the fund may effect purchases or redemptions fully or partially in cash, rather than in-kind, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. If the fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause the fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. The fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at the fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - Although shares of the fund are listed for trading on one or more stock exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained. There are no obligations of market makers to make a market in the fund’s shares or of an authorized participant to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Decisions by market makers or authorized participants to reduce their role or step away from these activities in times of market stress could inhibit the effectiveness of the arbitrage process in maintaining the relationship between the underlying value of the fund’s portfolio securities and the fund’s market price. This reduced effectiveness could result in fund shares trading at a premium or discount to its NAV and also greater than normal intraday bid/ask spreads.
Shares of the fund may trade in the secondary market at times when the fund does not accept orders to purchase or redeem shares. At such times, shares may trade in the secondary market with more significant premiums or discounts than might be experienced at times when the fund accepts purchase and redemption orders. Secondary market trading in fund shares may be halted by a stock exchange because of market conditions or other reasons, and may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to “circuit breaker” rules on the stock exchange or market. There can be no assurance that the requirements necessary to maintain the listing or trading of fund shares will continue to be met or will remain unchanged. In addition, during a “flash crash,” the market prices of the fund’s shares may decline suddenly and significantly. Such a decline may not reflect the performance of the portfolio securities held by the fund. Flash crashes may cause authorized participants and other market makers to limit or cease trading in the fund’s shares for temporary or longer periods. Shareholders could suffer significant losses to the extent that they sell fund shares at these temporarily low market prices.
Shares of the fund may trade at prices other than NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it likely that the fund’s shares normally will trade on stock exchanges at prices close to the fund’s next calculated NAV, market prices are not expected to correlate exactly with the fund’s NAV due to timing reasons as well as market supply and demand factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions or extreme market

6



volatility may result in trading prices for shares of the fund that differ significantly from its NAV. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity. During times of market stress, spreads may widen causing investors to pay more.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.
Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. Any decline in the value of a security while the security is loaned will adversely affect performance. These events could also result in adverse tax consequences.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants, none of which are obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally. Authorized participant concentration risks may be heightened in scenarios where authorized participants have limited or diminished access to the capital required to post collateral.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
Management
Who manages the fund?
The Board of Trustees, investment advisor and fund management team play key roles in the management of the fund.
The Board of Trustees
The Board of Trustees is responsible for overseeing the advisor’s management and operations of the fund pursuant to the management agreement. In performing their duties, Board members receive detailed information about the fund and its advisor regularly throughout the year, and meet at least quarterly with management of the advisor to review reports about fund operations. The trustees’ role is to provide oversight and not to provide day-to-day management. The majority of the trustees are independent of the fund’s advisor. They are not employees, directors or officers of, and have no financial interest in, the advisor or any of its affiliated companies (other than as shareholders of American Century Investments funds), and they do not have any other affiliations, positions or relationships that would cause them to be considered “interested persons” under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (Investment Company Act).
The Investment Advisor
The fund’s investment advisor is American Century Investment Management, Inc. (the advisor). The advisor has been managing investment companies since 1958 and is headquartered at 4500 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111.
The advisor is responsible for managing the investment portfolio of the fund and directing the purchase and sale of its investment securities. The advisor also arranges for transfer agency, custody and all other services necessary for the fund to operate.

7



For the services it provides to the fund, the advisor receives a unified management fee based on a percentage of the daily net assets of the fund at the annual rate of [__]%. The amount of the fee is calculated daily and paid monthly in arrears. The advisor pays all expenses of managing and operating the fund, other than the management fee payable to the advisor, brokerage and other transaction fees and expenses relating to the acquisition and disposition of portfolio securities, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest (including without limitation borrowing costs and overdraft charges), taxes (including without limitation income, excise, transfer, and withholding taxes), litigation expenses (including without limitation litigation counsel fees and expenses), extraordinary expenses, and expenses incurred in connection with the provision of shareholder and distribution services under a plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. The advisor may pay unaffiliated third parties who provide recordkeeping and administrative services that would otherwise be performed by an affiliate of the advisor.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the fund’s investment advisory agreement with the advisor will be available in the fund’s semiannual report to shareholders for the period ended February 29, 2020.
The Fund Management Team
The advisor uses teams of portfolio managers and analysts to manage funds. The teams meet regularly to review portfolio holdings and discuss purchase and sale activity. Team members buy and sell securities for a fund as they see fit, guided by the fund’s investment objective and strategy.
The portfolio managers on the investment team who are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the fund are identified below.
[_______________]
The statement of additional information provides additional information about the accounts managed by the portfolio managers, the structure of their compensation, and their ownership of fund securities.
Fund Performance
The fund has the same management team and investment policies as another fund in the American Century Investments family of funds, the Avantis Emerging Markets Equity Fund. The fees and expenses of the funds are similar, and they are managed with substantially the same investment objective and strategies. Notwithstanding these general similarities, the Avantis Emerging Markets Equity Fund and the Avantis Emerging Markets Equity ETF are separate funds that have different investment performance. Differences in cash flows into the two funds, the size of their portfolios and specific investments held by the two funds, as well as differing expenses, cause performance to differ. Please consult the mutual fund prospectus for a description of the mutual fund, details on how the mutual fund is offered, and its associated fees.
Fundamental Investment Policies
Shareholders must approve any change to the fundamental investment policies contained in the statement of additional information. The Board of Trustees and/or the advisor may change any other policies, including the fund’s investment objective, or investment strategies described in this prospectus or otherwise used in the operation of the fund at any time, subject to applicable notice provisions.
Investing in the Fund
Buying and Selling Shares
Shares of the fund may be acquired or redeemed directly from the fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed below. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation and redemption transactions directly with the fund. Once created, shares of the fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.
Shares of the fund are listed on a national securities exchange for trading during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. American Century ETF Trust (the trust) does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the fund purchased on an exchange. Shares of the fund trade under the following ticker symbol: AVEM.
Buying or selling fund shares on an exchange involves two types of costs that may apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity.
The fund’s primary listing exchange is [____]., which is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on weekends and the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.
Book Entry

8



Shares of the fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no share certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (DTC) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.
Investors owning shares of the fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form.
Frequent Trading Practices
The Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of fund shares (frequent trading). The Board of Trustees believes that a frequent trading policy is unnecessary because fund shares are listed for trading on a national securities exchange. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shareholder could take advantage of a potential arbitrage opportunity presented by a lag between a change in the value of the fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the fund’s portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the fund’s NAV (market timing), because the fund generally sells and redeems its shares directly through transactions that are in-kind and/or for cash, subject to the conditions described below under Creations and Redemptions.
Investments by Other Investment Companies
Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act restricts investments by investment companies in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in SEC rules or in an SEC exemptive order issued to the trust. In order for a registered investment company to invest in shares of the fund beyond the limitations of Section 12(d)(1) pursuant to the exemptive relief obtained by the trust, the registered investment company must enter into an agreement with the trust.
Creations and Redemptions
Prior to trading in the secondary market, shares of the fund are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size Creation Units of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof. All orders to purchase Creation Units must be placed by or through an authorized participant that has entered into an authorized participant agreement (AP Agreement) with Foreside Fund Services, LLC (the distributor). Only an authorized participant may create or redeem Creation Units directly with the fund.
A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the trust, generally takes place when an authorized participant deposits into the fund a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities) in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units. Similarly, shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities). With respect to the fund, redemptions are generally on an in-kind basis, but the fund reserves the right to meet redemptions in cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares are not redeemable by the fund.
The prices at which creations and redemptions occur are based on the next calculation of NAV after a creation or redemption order is received in a proper form under the AP Agreement. The portfolio of securities required for purchase of a Creation Unit is generally the same as the portfolio of securities the fund will deliver upon redemption of fund shares, except under certain circumstances. As a result of any system failure or other interruption, creation or redemption orders either may not be executed according to the fund’s instructions or may not be executed at all, or the fund may not be able to place or change such orders.
Creations and redemptions must be made through a firm that is either a broker-dealer or other participant in the Continuous Net Settlement System of the National Securities Clearing Corporation or a DTC participant and, in either case, has executed an AP Agreement with the distributor. Information about the procedures regarding creations and redemptions of Creation Units (including the cut-off times for receipt of creation and redemption orders) is included in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI).
Because new shares may be created and issued on an ongoing basis, at any point during the life of the fund a “distribution,” as such term is used in the Securities Act of 1933 (Securities Act), may be occurring. Broker-dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner that could render them statutory underwriters and subject to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the Securities Act. Any determination of whether one is an underwriter must take into account all the relevant facts and circumstances of each particular case.
Broker-dealers should also note that dealers who are not “underwriters” but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted to ordinary secondary transactions), and thus dealing with shares that are part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(a)(3)(C) of the Securities Act, would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(a)(3) of the Securities Act. For delivery of prospectuses to exchange members, the prospectus delivery mechanism of Rule 153 under the Securities Act is available only with respect to transactions on a national securities exchange.

9



In addition, certain affiliates of the fund and the advisor may purchase and resell fund shares pursuant to this prospectus.
Share Price and Distributions
Share Price
The price of fund shares is based on market price. The trading prices of the fund’s shares in the secondary market generally differ from the fund’s daily NAV and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intraday value of shares of the fund, also known as the “indicative optimized portfolio value” (IOPV), is disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the fund’s shares are listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The IOPV is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash contained in the portfolio at the beginning of the trading day. The IOPV does not necessarily reflect the best possible valuation of the current portfolio of securities held by the fund, and may not be calculated in the same manner as the NAV. Therefore, the IOPV should not be viewed as a “real-time” update of the fund’s NAV, which is computed only once a day as described below. The IOPV is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities held by the fund. The quotations of certain fund holdings may not be updated during U.S. trading hours if such holdings do not trade in the United States. The fund, the advisor and their related entities are not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the IOPV and make no representation or warranty as to its accuracy.
Calculation of NAV
American Century Investments will price the fund shares purchased or redeemed by authorized participants based on the net asset value (NAV) next determined after an order is received in good order by the fund’s transfer agent. We determine the NAV of the fund as of the close of regular trading (usually 4 p.m. Eastern time) on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on each day the NYSE is open. On days when the NYSE is closed (including certain U.S. national holidays), we do not calculate the NAV.
 
The net asset value, or NAV, of the fund is the current value of the fund’s assets, minus any liabilities, divided by the number of shares of the fund outstanding.
 
The fund values portfolio securities for which market quotations are readily available at their market price. As a general rule, equity securities listed on a U.S. exchange are valued at the last reported sale price as of the time of valuation. Portfolio securities primarily traded on foreign securities exchanges are generally valued at the preceding official close price or last sale price of such securities on the foreign exchange where primarily traded or at the time the fund’s NAV is determined, if that foreign exchange is open later than the NYSE. The value of any security or other asset denominated in a currency other than U.S. dollars is then converted to U.S. dollars at the prevailing foreign exchange rate at the time the fund’s NAV is determined. Securities that are neither listed on a securities exchange or traded over the counter may be priced using the mean of the bid and asked prices obtained from an independent broker who is an established market maker in the security. The fund may use third party pricing services to assist in the determination of market value.
If the fund determines that the market price for a portfolio security is not readily available or that the valuation methods mentioned above do not reflect the security’s fair value, such security is valued as determined in good faith by the fund’s board or its designee, in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board. Circumstances that may cause the fund to use alternate procedures to value a security include, but are not limited to:
if, after the close of the foreign exchange on which a portfolio security is principally traded, but before the close of the NYSE, an event occurs that may materially affect the value of the security;
a debt security has been declared in default; or
trading in a security has been halted during the trading day.
If such circumstances occur, the fund will fair value the security if the fair valuation would materially impact the fund’s NAV. While fair value determinations involve judgments that are inherently subjective, these determinations are made in good faith in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board.
The effect of using fair value determinations is that the fund’s NAV will be based, to some degree, on security valuations that the board or its designee believes are fair rather than being solely determined by the market.
With respect to any portion of the fund’s assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies that are registered with the SEC (known as registered investment companies), the fund’s NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such registered investment companies. These registered investment companies are required by law to explain the circumstances under which they will use fair value pricing and the effects of using fair value pricing in their prospectuses.
Trading of securities in foreign markets may not take place every day the NYSE is open. Also, trading in some foreign markets and on some electronic trading networks may take place on weekends or holidays when the fund’s NAV is not calculated. So, the value of the fund’s portfolio may be affected on days when you will not be able to purchase or sell fund shares.

10



Distributions
Federal tax laws require the fund to make distributions to its shareholders in order to qualify as a regulated investment company. Qualification as a regulated investment company means the fund should not be subject to state or federal income tax on amounts distributed. The distributions generally consist of dividends and interest received by the fund, as well as capital gains realized by the fund on the sale of its investment securities.
 
Capital gains are increases in the values of capital assets, such as stocks or bonds, from the time the assets are purchased.
 
The fund generally expects to pay distributions from net income, if any, semiannually. The fund generally pays distributions from realized capital gains, if any, once a year. It may make more frequent distributions if necessary to comply with Internal Revenue Code provisions.
Although dividends generally will be treated as distributed when paid, any dividend declared by a fund in October, November or December and payable to shareholders of record in such a month that is paid during the following January will be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as received by shareholders on December 31 of the calendar year in which it was declared.
Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the fund. Distributions may be automatically reinvested in whole fund shares only if you purchased the shares through a broker that makes such option available.
Taxes
Some of the tax consequences of owning shares of the fund will vary depending on whether you own them through a taxable or tax-deferred account. Distributions by the fund of dividend and interest income, capital gains and other income it has generated through its investment activities will generally be taxable to shareholders who hold shares in a taxable account. Tax consequences also may result when investors sell fund shares.
Tax-Deferred Accounts
If you purchase fund shares through a tax-deferred account, such as an IRA or employer-sponsored retirement plan, income and capital gains distributions usually will not be subject to current taxation but will accumulate in your account under the plan on a tax-deferred basis. Likewise, moving from one fund to another fund within a plan or tax-deferred account generally will not cause you to be taxed. For information about the tax consequences of making purchases or withdrawals through a tax-deferred account, please consult your plan administrator, your summary plan description or a tax advisor.
Taxable Accounts
If you own fund shares through a taxable account, you may be taxed on your investments if the fund makes distributions or if you sell your fund shares.
Taxability of Distributions
Fund distributions may consist of income, such as dividends and interest earned by the fund from its investments, or capital gains generated by the fund from the sale of investment securities. Distributions of income are taxed as ordinary income, unless they are designated as qualified dividend income and you meet a minimum required holding period with respect to your shares of the fund, in which case distributions of income are taxed at the same rates as long-term capital gains.
 
Qualified dividend income is a dividend received by a fund from the stock of a domestic or qualifying foreign corporation, provided that the fund has held the stock for a required holding period and the stock was not on loan at the time of the dividend.
 
The tax character of any distributions from capital gains is determined by how long the fund held the underlying security that was sold, not by how long you have been invested in the fund or whether you reinvest your distributions or take them in cash. Short-term (one year or less) capital gains are taxable as ordinary income. Gains on securities held for more than one year are taxed at the lower rates applicable to long-term capital gains.
If a fund’s distributions exceed current and accumulated earnings and profits, such excess will generally be considered a return of capital. A return of capital distribution is generally not subject to tax, but will reduce your cost basis in the fund and result in higher realized capital gains (or lower realized capital losses) upon the sale of fund shares.
You will receive information regarding the tax character of fund distributions for each calendar year in an annual tax mailing.
If you meet specified income levels, you will also be subject to a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax which is imposed on net investment income, including interest, dividends and capital gains. Distributions also may be subject to state and local taxes. Because everyone’s tax situation is unique, you may want to consult your tax professional about federal, state and local tax consequences.

11



Taxes on Transactions
Your sales of fund shares are subject to capital gains tax. Short-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for 12 months or less. Long-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for more than 12 months. If your shares decrease in value, their sale will result in a long-term or short-term capital loss. However, you should note that loss realized upon the sale of shares held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any distribution of long-term capital gain to you with respect to those shares. If a loss is realized on the sale of fund shares, the reinvestment in additional fund shares within 30 days before or after the sale may be subject to the wash sale rules of the Internal Revenue Code. This may result in a postponement of the recognition of such loss for federal income tax purposes.
If you have not certified that your Social Security number or tax identification number is correct and that you are not subject to withholding, you may be subject to backup withholding at the applicable federal withholding tax rate on taxable dividends, capital gains distributions and proceeds from the sale of fund shares.
Taxes on Creations and Redemptions of Creation Units
An Authorized Participant who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or a loss equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time and the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered plus the amount of cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who redeems Creation Units will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of the aggregate market value of any securities received plus the amount of any cash received for such Creation Units. The IRS, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an exchange of securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position.
Any capital gain or loss realized upon the creation of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the securities exchanged for such Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon the redemption of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the shares comprising the Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Otherwise, such capital gains or losses will generally be treated as short-term capital gain or loss. Any loss upon a redemption of Creation Units held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any amounts treated as distributions to the applicable Authorized Participant of long-term capital gain with respect to the Creation Units (including any amounts credited to the Authorized Participant as undistributed capital gains).
If a fund redeems Creation Units in cash, it may recognize more capital gains than it will if it redeems Creation Units in-kind.
Buying a Dividend
Purchasing fund shares in a taxable account shortly before a distribution is sometimes known as buying a dividend. In taxable accounts, you must pay income taxes on the distribution whether you reinvest the distribution or take it in cash. In addition, you will have to pay taxes on the distribution whether the value of your investment decreased, increased or remained the same after you bought the fund shares.
The risk in buying a dividend is that a fund’s portfolio may build up taxable income and gains throughout the period covered by a distribution, as income is earned and securities are sold at a profit. The fund distributes the income and gains to you, after subtracting any losses, even if you did not own the shares when the income was earned or the gains occurred.
If you buy a dividend, you incur the full tax liability of the distribution period, but you may not enjoy the full benefit of the income earned or the gains realized in the fund’s portfolio.
Additional Information
Premium/Discount Information
Once the fund is operational, tables in this section will show the number of days the market price of the fund’s shares was greater than the fund’s NAV and the number of days the market price was less than the fund’s NAV for the most recently completed calendar quarters. Shareholders may pay more than NAV when they buy fund shares and receive less than NAV when they sell those shares, because shares are bought and sold at current market prices. Data presented represents past performance and cannot be used to predict future results.
Service, Distribution and Administrative Fees
Investment Company Act Rule 12b-1 permits investment companies that adopt a written plan to pay certain expenses associated with the distribution of their shares out of fund assets. The Board of Trustees has adopted a 12b-1 plan that allows the fund to pay annual fees not to exceed 0.25% to the distributor for distribution and individual shareholder services. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 plan fee at this time.
Because these fees may be used to pay for services that are not related to prospective sales of the fund, to the extent that a fee is authorized, the fund will continue to make payments under its plan even if it is closed to new investors. Because these fees are paid

12



out of the fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges.
The advisor or its affiliates may make payments to intermediaries for various additional services, other expenses and/or the intermediaries’ distribution of the fund out of their profits or other available sources. Such payments may be made for one or more of the following: (1) distribution, which may include expenses incurred by intermediaries for their sales activities with respect to the fund, such as preparing, printing and distributing sales literature and advertising materials and compensating registered representatives or other employees of such financial intermediaries for their sales activities, as well as the opportunity for the fund to be made available by such intermediaries; (2) shareholder services, such as providing individual and custom investment advisory services to clients of the financial intermediaries; and (3) marketing and promotional services, including business planning assistance, educating personnel about the fund, and sponsorship of sales meetings, which may include covering costs of providing speakers, meals and other entertainment. The advisor may pay partnership and/or sponsorship fees to support seminars, conferences, and other programs designed to educate intermediaries about the fund and may cover the expenses associated with attendance at such meetings, including travel costs. The advisor and its affiliates may also pay fees related to obtaining data regarding intermediary or financial advisor activities to assist American Century with sales reporting, business intelligence and training and education opportunities. These payments and activities are intended to provide an incentive to intermediaries to sell the fund by educating them about the fund and helping defray the costs associated with offering the fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the intermediary to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information. The amount of any payments described in this paragraph is determined by the advisor or its affiliates, and all such amounts are paid out of their available assets, and not paid by you or the fund. As a result, the total expense ratio of the fund will not be affected by any such payments.


13



Financial Highlights
There is no financial information for the fund because it is a new fund.

14



Notes




Where to Find More Information
Annual and Semiannual Reports
Additional information about the fund’s investments will be available in the fund’s annual and semiannual reports to shareholders. In the fund’s annual report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.
Statement of Additional Information (SAI)
The SAI contains a more detailed legal description of the fund’s operations, investment restrictions, policies and practices. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this prospectus. This means that it is legally part of this prospectus, even if you don’t request a copy.
You may obtain a free copy of the SAI, annual reports and semiannual reports, and you may ask questions about the fund or your accounts, online at americancenturyetfs.com, by contacting American Century Investments at the addresses or telephone numbers listed below or by contacting your financial intermediary.
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
Reports and other information about the fund are available on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website at sec.gov, and copies of this information may be obtained, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following email address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

This prospectus shall not constitute an offer to sell securities of the fund in any state, territory, or other jurisdiction where the fund’s shares have not been registered or qualified for sale, unless such registration or qualification is not required, or under any circumstances in which such offer or solicitation would be unlawful.



















American Century Investments
americancenturyetfs.com
Financial Professionals
P.O. Box 419385
Kansas City, Missouri 64141-6385
1-833-ACI-ETFS

Investment Company Act File No. 811-23305
CL-PRS-XXXXX 1906




The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the
registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to
sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
[_________], 2019

American Century Investments
Prospectus

 
Ticker:
Exchange:
Avantis™ International Equity ETF
AVDE
 











Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the fund’s shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from the fund or from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be made available on a website, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the fund or your financial intermediary electronically by calling or sending an email request.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. You can inform the fund or your financial intermediary that you wish to continue receiving paper copies of your shareholder reports by calling or sending an email request. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all funds held with the fund complex/your financial intermediary.


The Securities and Exchange Commission has
not approved or disapproved these securities or
passed upon the adequacy of this prospectus. Any
representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
 




Table of Contents
Fund Summary
2

Investment Objective
2

Fees and Expenses
2

Principal Investment Strategies
2

Principal Risks
3

Fund Performance
4

Portfolio Management
4

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
4

Tax Information
4

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
4

Objectives, Strategies and Risks
5

Management
7

Investing in the Fund
8

Share Price and Distributions
10

Taxes
11

Additional Information
12

Financial Highlights
14




















©2019 American Century Proprietary Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.




Fund Summary
Investment Objective
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the fund. You may also incur usual and customary brokerage commissions when buying or selling shares of the fund, which are not reflected in the example that follows.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
—%
Other Expenses
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
—%
1 
Other expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
Example
The example below is intended to help you compare the costs of investing in the fund with the costs of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, that you earn a 5% return each year, and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. You may be required to pay brokerage commissions on your purchases of shares of the fund which are not reflected in the example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
 
 
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. Because the fund is new, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate is not available.
Principal Investment Strategies
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of non-U.S. companies across countries, market sectors and industry groups. The fund may invest in companies of all market capitalizations.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in equity securities. The fund may invest in securities that are denominated in foreign currencies and may also invest in foreign securities that are represented in the U.S. and other securities markets by American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), and other similar depositary arrangements.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending and invest its collateral in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.

2



Principal Risks
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Currency Risk - The fund could experience gains or losses solely on changes in the exchange rate between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar.
Foreign Risk - Foreign securities are generally riskier than U.S. securities. Political events (such as civil unrest, national elections and imposition of exchange controls), social and economic events (such as labor strikes and rising inflation), and natural disasters occurring in a country where the fund invests could cause the fund’s investments in that country to experience gains or losses. Securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid, more volatile and harder to value than U.S. securities.
Depositary Receipts Risk - Investment in depositary receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of depositary receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the depositary receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - The fund may effect its creations and redemptions for cash, rather than for in-kind securities. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in fund shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - The fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, periods of high volatility and disruption in the creation and/or redemption process of the fund. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the fund’s shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.
Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to net asset value (NAV) and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.

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Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
Fund Performance
The fund’s performance history is not available as of the date of this prospectus. When the fund has investment results for a full calendar year, this section will feature charts that show annual total returns, highest and lowest quarterly returns and average annual total returns for the fund. This information indicates the volatility of the fund’s historical returns from year to year. For current performance information, please visit americancenturyetfs.com.
Performance information is designed to help you see how fund returns can vary. Keep in mind that past performance (before and after taxes) does not predict how the fund will perform in the future.
Portfolio Management
Investment Advisor
American Century Investment Management, Inc.
Portfolio Managers

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is an ETF. Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The fund issues and redeems shares that have been aggregated into blocks of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof (Creation Units) to authorized participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor. The fund will generally issue and redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities (and an amount of cash) that the fund specifies each day.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred account such as a 401(k) or individual retirement account (in which case you may be taxed upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


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Objectives, Strategies and Risks
What are the fund’s investment objectives?
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
The fund’s investment objective is a nonfundamental investment policy and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without approval by shareholders.
What are the fund’s principal investment strategies?
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of non-U.S. companies across countries, market sectors and industry groups. The fund may invest in companies of all market capitalizations.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in equity securities. Equity securities in which the fund may invest include common stock, preferred stock, exchange traded funds, equity-equivalent securities, such as convertible securities, and derivative instruments that give exposure to equities, such as stock futures contract, stock index futures contracts, and swaps on equities.
The fund may invest in securities that are denominated in foreign currencies and may also invest in foreign securities that are represented in the U.S. and other securities markets by American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), and other similar depositary arrangements.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending. Collateral received by the fund in connection with loaning its securities may consist of cash and U.S. government securities. Cash collateral may be invested in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.
In the event of exceptional market or economic conditions, the fund may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with the fund’s principal investment strategies. To the extent the fund assumes a defensive position, it may not achieve its investment objective.
A description of the policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the fund’s portfolio securities is available in the statement of additional information.
What are the principal risks of investing in the fund?
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Currency Risk - The fund could experience gains or losses solely on changes in the exchange rate between foreign currencies and the U.S. dollar.
Foreign Risk - Foreign securities are generally riskier than U.S. securities. Political events (such as civil unrest, national elections and imposition of exchange controls), social and economic events (such as labor strikes and rising inflation), and natural disasters occurring in a country where the fund invests could cause the fund’s investments in that country to experience gains or losses. Securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid, more volatile and harder to value than U.S. securities.

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Depositary Receipts Risk - Investment in depositary receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of depositary receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the depositary receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions to avoid some costs, including being taxed on gains on the distributed portfolio securities at the fund level. However, because the fund may effect purchases or redemptions fully or partially in cash, rather than in-kind, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. If the fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause the fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. The fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at the fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - Although shares of the fund are listed for trading on one or more stock exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained. There are no obligations of market makers to make a market in the fund’s shares or of an authorized participant to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Decisions by market makers or authorized participants to reduce their role or step away from these activities in times of market stress could inhibit the effectiveness of the arbitrage process in maintaining the relationship between the underlying value of the fund’s portfolio securities and the fund’s market price. This reduced effectiveness could result in fund shares trading at a premium or discount to its NAV and also greater than normal intraday bid/ask spreads.
Shares of the fund may trade in the secondary market at times when the fund does not accept orders to purchase or redeem shares. At such times, shares may trade in the secondary market with more significant premiums or discounts than might be experienced at times when the fund accepts purchase and redemption orders. Secondary market trading in fund shares may be halted by a stock exchange because of market conditions or other reasons, and may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to “circuit breaker” rules on the stock exchange or market. There can be no assurance that the requirements necessary to maintain the listing or trading of fund shares will continue to be met or will remain unchanged. In addition, during a “flash crash,” the market prices of the fund’s shares may decline suddenly and significantly. Such a decline may not reflect the performance of the portfolio securities held by the fund. Flash crashes may cause authorized participants and other market makers to limit or cease trading in the fund’s shares for temporary or longer periods. Shareholders could suffer significant losses to the extent that they sell fund shares at these temporarily low market prices.
Shares of the fund may trade at prices other than NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it likely that the fund’s shares normally will trade on stock exchanges at prices close to the fund’s next calculated NAV, market prices are not expected to correlate exactly with the fund’s NAV due to timing reasons as well as market supply and demand factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions or extreme market volatility may result in trading prices for shares of the fund that differ significantly from its NAV. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity. During times of market stress, spreads may widen causing investors to pay more.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity,

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interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.
Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. Any decline in the value of a security while the security is loaned will adversely affect performance. These events could also result in adverse tax consequences.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants, none of which are obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally. Authorized participant concentration risks may be heightened in scenarios where authorized participants have limited or diminished access to the capital required to post collateral.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
Management
Who manages the fund?
The Board of Trustees, investment advisor and fund management team play key roles in the management of the fund.
The Board of Trustees
The Board of Trustees is responsible for overseeing the advisor’s management and operations of the fund pursuant to the management agreement. In performing their duties, Board members receive detailed information about the fund and its advisor regularly throughout the year, and meet at least quarterly with management of the advisor to review reports about fund operations. The trustees’ role is to provide oversight and not to provide day-to-day management. The majority of the trustees are independent of the fund’s advisor. They are not employees, directors or officers of, and have no financial interest in, the advisor or any of its affiliated companies (other than as shareholders of American Century Investments funds), and they do not have any other affiliations, positions or relationships that would cause them to be considered “interested persons” under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (Investment Company Act).
The Investment Advisor
The fund’s investment advisor is American Century Investment Management, Inc. (the advisor). The advisor has been managing investment companies since 1958 and is headquartered at 4500 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111.
The advisor is responsible for managing the investment portfolio of the fund and directing the purchase and sale of its investment securities. The advisor also arranges for transfer agency, custody and all other services necessary for the fund to operate.
For the services it provides to the fund, the advisor receives a unified management fee based on a percentage of the daily net assets of the fund at the annual rate of [__]%. The amount of the fee is calculated daily and paid monthly in arrears. The advisor pays all expenses of managing and operating the fund, other than the management fee payable to the advisor, brokerage and other transaction fees and expenses relating to the acquisition and disposition of portfolio securities, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest (including without limitation borrowing costs and overdraft charges), taxes (including without limitation income, excise, transfer, and withholding taxes), litigation expenses (including without limitation litigation counsel fees and expenses), extraordinary expenses, and expenses incurred in connection with the provision of shareholder and distribution services under a plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. The advisor may pay unaffiliated third parties who provide recordkeeping and administrative services that would otherwise be performed by an affiliate of the advisor.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the fund’s investment advisory agreement with the advisor will be available in the fund’s semiannual report to shareholders for the period ended February 29, 2020.

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The Fund Management Team
The advisor uses teams of portfolio managers and analysts to manage funds. The teams meet regularly to review portfolio holdings and discuss purchase and sale activity. Team members buy and sell securities for a fund as they see fit, guided by the fund’s investment objective and strategy.
The portfolio managers on the investment team who are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the fund are identified below.
[_______________]
The statement of additional information provides additional information about the accounts managed by the portfolio managers, the structure of their compensation, and their ownership of fund securities.
Fund Performance
The fund has the same management team and investment policies as another fund in the American Century Investments family of funds, the Avantis International Equity Fund. The fees and expenses of the funds are similar, and they are managed with substantially the same investment objective and strategies. Notwithstanding these general similarities, the Avantis International Equity Fund and the Avantis International Equity ETF are separate funds that have different investment performance. Differences in cash flows into the two funds, the size of their portfolios and specific investments held by the two funds, as well as differing expenses, cause performance to differ. Please consult the mutual fund prospectus for a description of the mutual fund, details on how the mutual fund is offered, and its associated fees.
Fundamental Investment Policies
Shareholders must approve any change to the fundamental investment policies contained in the statement of additional information. The Board of Trustees and/or the advisor may change any other policies, including the fund’s investment objective, or investment strategies described in this prospectus or otherwise used in the operation of the fund at any time, subject to applicable notice provisions.
Investing in the Fund
Buying and Selling Shares
Shares of the fund may be acquired or redeemed directly from the fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed below. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation and redemption transactions directly with the fund. Once created, shares of the fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.
Shares of the fund are listed on a national securities exchange for trading during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. American Century ETF Trust (the trust) does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the fund purchased on an exchange. Shares of the fund trade under the following ticker symbol: AVDE.
Buying or selling fund shares on an exchange involves two types of costs that may apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity.
The fund’s primary listing exchange is [____]., which is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on weekends and the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.
Book Entry
Shares of the fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no share certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (DTC) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.
Investors owning shares of the fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form.

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Frequent Trading Practices
The Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of fund shares (frequent trading). The Board of Trustees believes that a frequent trading policy is unnecessary because fund shares are listed for trading on a national securities exchange. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shareholder could take advantage of a potential arbitrage opportunity presented by a lag between a change in the value of the fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the fund’s portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the fund’s NAV (market timing), because the fund generally sells and redeems its shares directly through transactions that are in-kind and/or for cash, subject to the conditions described below under Creations and Redemptions.
Investments by Other Investment Companies
Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act restricts investments by investment companies in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in SEC rules or in an SEC exemptive order issued to the trust. In order for a registered investment company to invest in shares of the fund beyond the limitations of Section 12(d)(1) pursuant to the exemptive relief obtained by the trust, the registered investment company must enter into an agreement with the trust.
Creations and Redemptions
Prior to trading in the secondary market, shares of the fund are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size Creation Units of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof. All orders to purchase Creation Units must be placed by or through an authorized participant that has entered into an authorized participant agreement (AP Agreement) with Foreside Fund Services, LLC (the distributor). Only an authorized participant may create or redeem Creation Units directly with the fund.
A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the trust, generally takes place when an authorized participant deposits into the fund a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities) in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units. Similarly, shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities). With respect to the fund, redemptions are generally on an in-kind basis, but the fund reserves the right to meet redemptions in cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares are not redeemable by the fund.
The prices at which creations and redemptions occur are based on the next calculation of NAV after a creation or redemption order is received in a proper form under the AP Agreement. The portfolio of securities required for purchase of a Creation Unit is generally the same as the portfolio of securities the fund will deliver upon redemption of fund shares, except under certain circumstances. As a result of any system failure or other interruption, creation or redemption orders either may not be executed according to the fund’s instructions or may not be executed at all, or the fund may not be able to place or change such orders.
Creations and redemptions must be made through a firm that is either a broker-dealer or other participant in the Continuous Net Settlement System of the National Securities Clearing Corporation or a DTC participant and, in either case, has executed an AP Agreement with the distributor. Information about the procedures regarding creations and redemptions of Creation Units (including the cut-off times for receipt of creation and redemption orders) is included in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI).
Because new shares may be created and issued on an ongoing basis, at any point during the life of the fund a “distribution,” as such term is used in the Securities Act of 1933 (Securities Act), may be occurring. Broker-dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner that could render them statutory underwriters and subject to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the Securities Act. Any determination of whether one is an underwriter must take into account all the relevant facts and circumstances of each particular case.
Broker-dealers should also note that dealers who are not “underwriters” but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted to ordinary secondary transactions), and thus dealing with shares that are part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(a)(3)(C) of the Securities Act, would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(a)(3) of the Securities Act. For delivery of prospectuses to exchange members, the prospectus delivery mechanism of Rule 153 under the Securities Act is available only with respect to transactions on a national securities exchange.
In addition, certain affiliates of the fund and the advisor may purchase and resell fund shares pursuant to this prospectus.

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Share Price and Distributions
Share Price
The price of fund shares is based on market price. The trading prices of the fund’s shares in the secondary market generally differ from the fund’s daily NAV and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intraday value of shares of the fund, also known as the “indicative optimized portfolio value” (IOPV), is disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the fund’s shares are listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The IOPV is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash contained in the portfolio at the beginning of the trading day. The IOPV does not necessarily reflect the best possible valuation of the current portfolio of securities held by the fund, and may not be calculated in the same manner as the NAV. Therefore, the IOPV should not be viewed as a “real-time” update of the fund’s NAV, which is computed only once a day as described below. The IOPV is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities held by the fund. The quotations of certain fund holdings may not be updated during U.S. trading hours if such holdings do not trade in the United States. The fund, the advisor and their related entities are not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the IOPV and make no representation or warranty as to its accuracy.
Calculation of NAV
American Century Investments will price the fund shares purchased or redeemed by authorized participants based on the net asset value (NAV) next determined after an order is received in good order by the fund’s transfer agent. We determine the NAV of the fund as of the close of regular trading (usually 4 p.m. Eastern time) on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on each day the NYSE is open. On days when the NYSE is closed (including certain U.S. national holidays), we do not calculate the NAV.
 
The net asset value, or NAV, of the fund is the current value of the fund’s assets, minus any liabilities, divided by the number of shares of the fund outstanding.
 
The fund values portfolio securities for which market quotations are readily available at their market price. As a general rule, equity securities listed on a U.S. exchange are valued at the last reported sale price as of the time of valuation. Portfolio securities primarily traded on foreign securities exchanges are generally valued at the preceding official close price or last sale price of such securities on the foreign exchange where primarily traded or at the time the fund’s NAV is determined, if that foreign exchange is open later than the NYSE. The value of any security or other asset denominated in a currency other than U.S. dollars is then converted to U.S. dollars at the prevailing foreign exchange rate at the time the fund’s NAV is determined. Securities that are neither listed on a securities exchange or traded over the counter may be priced using the mean of the bid and asked prices obtained from an independent broker who is an established market maker in the security. The fund may use third party pricing services to assist in the determination of market value.
If the fund determines that the market price for a portfolio security is not readily available or that the valuation methods mentioned above do not reflect the security’s fair value, such security is valued as determined in good faith by the fund’s board or its designee, in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board. Circumstances that may cause the fund to use alternate procedures to value a security include, but are not limited to:
if, after the close of the foreign exchange on which a portfolio security is principally traded, but before the close of the NYSE, an event occurs that may materially affect the value of the security;
a debt security has been declared in default; or
trading in a security has been halted during the trading day.
If such circumstances occur, the fund will fair value the security if the fair valuation would materially impact the fund’s NAV. While fair value determinations involve judgments that are inherently subjective, these determinations are made in good faith in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board.
The effect of using fair value determinations is that the fund’s NAV will be based, to some degree, on security valuations that the board or its designee believes are fair rather than being solely determined by the market.
With respect to any portion of the fund’s assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies that are registered with the SEC (known as registered investment companies), the fund’s NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such registered investment companies. These registered investment companies are required by law to explain the circumstances under which they will use fair value pricing and the effects of using fair value pricing in their prospectuses.
Trading of securities in foreign markets may not take place every day the NYSE is open. Also, trading in some foreign markets and on some electronic trading networks may take place on weekends or holidays when the fund’s NAV is not calculated. So, the value of the fund’s portfolio may be affected on days when you will not be able to purchase or sell fund shares.

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Distributions
Federal tax laws require the fund to make distributions to its shareholders in order to qualify as a regulated investment company. Qualification as a regulated investment company means the fund should not be subject to state or federal income tax on amounts distributed. The distributions generally consist of dividends and interest received by the fund, as well as capital gains realized by the fund on the sale of its investment securities.
 
Capital gains are increases in the values of capital assets, such as stocks or bonds, from the time the assets are purchased.
 
The fund generally expects to pay distributions from net income, if any, semiannually. The fund generally pays distributions from realized capital gains, if any, once a year. It may make more frequent distributions if necessary to comply with Internal Revenue Code provisions.
Although dividends generally will be treated as distributed when paid, any dividend declared by a fund in October, November or December and payable to shareholders of record in such a month that is paid during the following January will be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as received by shareholders on December 31 of the calendar year in which it was declared.
Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the fund. Distributions may be automatically reinvested in whole fund shares only if you purchased the shares through a broker that makes such option available.
Taxes
Some of the tax consequences of owning shares of the fund will vary depending on whether you own them through a taxable or tax-deferred account. Distributions by the fund of dividend and interest income, capital gains and other income it has generated through its investment activities will generally be taxable to shareholders who hold shares in a taxable account. Tax consequences also may result when investors sell fund shares.
Tax-Deferred Accounts
If you purchase fund shares through a tax-deferred account, such as an IRA or employer-sponsored retirement plan, income and capital gains distributions usually will not be subject to current taxation but will accumulate in your account under the plan on a tax-deferred basis. Likewise, moving from one fund to another fund within a plan or tax-deferred account generally will not cause you to be taxed. For information about the tax consequences of making purchases or withdrawals through a tax-deferred account, please consult your plan administrator, your summary plan description or a tax advisor.
Taxable Accounts
If you own fund shares through a taxable account, you may be taxed on your investments if the fund makes distributions or if you sell your fund shares.
Taxability of Distributions
Fund distributions may consist of income, such as dividends and interest earned by the fund from its investments, or capital gains generated by the fund from the sale of investment securities. Distributions of income are taxed as ordinary income, unless they are designated as qualified dividend income and you meet a minimum required holding period with respect to your shares of the fund, in which case distributions of income are taxed at the same rates as long-term capital gains.
 
Qualified dividend income is a dividend received by a fund from the stock of a domestic or qualifying foreign corporation, provided that the fund has held the stock for a required holding period and the stock was not on loan at the time of the dividend.
 
The tax character of any distributions from capital gains is determined by how long the fund held the underlying security that was sold, not by how long you have been invested in the fund or whether you reinvest your distributions or take them in cash. Short-term (one year or less) capital gains are taxable as ordinary income. Gains on securities held for more than one year are taxed at the lower rates applicable to long-term capital gains.
If a fund’s distributions exceed current and accumulated earnings and profits, such excess will generally be considered a return of capital. A return of capital distribution is generally not subject to tax, but will reduce your cost basis in the fund and result in higher realized capital gains (or lower realized capital losses) upon the sale of fund shares.
You will receive information regarding the tax character of fund distributions for each calendar year in an annual tax mailing.
If you meet specified income levels, you will also be subject to a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax which is imposed on net investment income, including interest, dividends and capital gains. Distributions also may be subject to state and local taxes. Because everyone’s tax situation is unique, you may want to consult your tax professional about federal, state and local tax consequences.

11



Taxes on Transactions
Your sales of fund shares are subject to capital gains tax. Short-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for 12 months or less. Long-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for more than 12 months. If your shares decrease in value, their sale will result in a long-term or short-term capital loss. However, you should note that loss realized upon the sale of shares held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any distribution of long-term capital gain to you with respect to those shares. If a loss is realized on the sale of fund shares, the reinvestment in additional fund shares within 30 days before or after the sale may be subject to the wash sale rules of the Internal Revenue Code. This may result in a postponement of the recognition of such loss for federal income tax purposes.
If you have not certified that your Social Security number or tax identification number is correct and that you are not subject to withholding, you may be subject to backup withholding at the applicable federal withholding tax rate on taxable dividends, capital gains distributions and proceeds from the sale of fund shares.
Taxes on Creations and Redemptions of Creation Units
An Authorized Participant who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or a loss equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time and the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered plus the amount of cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who redeems Creation Units will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of the aggregate market value of any securities received plus the amount of any cash received for such Creation Units. The IRS, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an exchange of securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position.
Any capital gain or loss realized upon the creation of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the securities exchanged for such Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon the redemption of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the shares comprising the Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Otherwise, such capital gains or losses will generally be treated as short-term capital gain or loss. Any loss upon a redemption of Creation Units held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any amounts treated as distributions to the applicable Authorized Participant of long-term capital gain with respect to the Creation Units (including any amounts credited to the Authorized Participant as undistributed capital gains).
If a fund redeems Creation Units in cash, it may recognize more capital gains than it will if it redeems Creation Units in-kind.
Buying a Dividend
Purchasing fund shares in a taxable account shortly before a distribution is sometimes known as buying a dividend. In taxable accounts, you must pay income taxes on the distribution whether you reinvest the distribution or take it in cash. In addition, you will have to pay taxes on the distribution whether the value of your investment decreased, increased or remained the same after you bought the fund shares.
The risk in buying a dividend is that a fund’s portfolio may build up taxable income and gains throughout the period covered by a distribution, as income is earned and securities are sold at a profit. The fund distributes the income and gains to you, after subtracting any losses, even if you did not own the shares when the income was earned or the gains occurred.
If you buy a dividend, you incur the full tax liability of the distribution period, but you may not enjoy the full benefit of the income earned or the gains realized in the fund’s portfolio.
Additional Information
Premium/Discount Information
Once the fund is operational, tables in this section will show the number of days the market price of the fund’s shares was greater than the fund’s NAV and the number of days the market price was less than the fund’s NAV for the most recently completed calendar quarters. Shareholders may pay more than NAV when they buy fund shares and receive less than NAV when they sell those shares, because shares are bought and sold at current market prices. Data presented represents past performance and cannot be used to predict future results.
Service, Distribution and Administrative Fees
Investment Company Act Rule 12b-1 permits investment companies that adopt a written plan to pay certain expenses associated with the distribution of their shares out of fund assets. The Board of Trustees has adopted a 12b-1 plan that allows the fund to pay annual fees not to exceed 0.25% to the distributor for distribution and individual shareholder services. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 plan fee at this time.
Because these fees may be used to pay for services that are not related to prospective sales of the fund, to the extent that a fee is authorized, the fund will continue to make payments under its plan even if it is closed to new investors. Because these fees are paid

12



out of the fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges.
The advisor or its affiliates may make payments to intermediaries for various additional services, other expenses and/or the intermediaries’ distribution of the fund out of their profits or other available sources. Such payments may be made for one or more of the following: (1) distribution, which may include expenses incurred by intermediaries for their sales activities with respect to the fund, such as preparing, printing and distributing sales literature and advertising materials and compensating registered representatives or other employees of such financial intermediaries for their sales activities, as well as the opportunity for the fund to be made available by such intermediaries; (2) shareholder services, such as providing individual and custom investment advisory services to clients of the financial intermediaries; and (3) marketing and promotional services, including business planning assistance, educating personnel about the fund, and sponsorship of sales meetings, which may include covering costs of providing speakers, meals and other entertainment. The advisor may pay partnership and/or sponsorship fees to support seminars, conferences, and other programs designed to educate intermediaries about the fund and may cover the expenses associated with attendance at such meetings, including travel costs. The advisor and its affiliates may also pay fees related to obtaining data regarding intermediary or financial advisor activities to assist American Century with sales reporting, business intelligence and training and education opportunities. These payments and activities are intended to provide an incentive to intermediaries to sell the fund by educating them about the fund and helping defray the costs associated with offering the fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the intermediary to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information. The amount of any payments described in this paragraph is determined by the advisor or its affiliates, and all such amounts are paid out of their available assets, and not paid by you or the fund. As a result, the total expense ratio of the fund will not be affected by any such payments.


13



Financial Highlights
There is no financial information for the fund because it is a new fund.

14



Notes




Where to Find More Information
Annual and Semiannual Reports
Additional information about the fund’s investments will be available in the fund’s annual and semiannual reports to shareholders. In the fund’s annual report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.
Statement of Additional Information (SAI)
The SAI contains a more detailed legal description of the fund’s operations, investment restrictions, policies and practices. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this prospectus. This means that it is legally part of this prospectus, even if you don’t request a copy.
You may obtain a free copy of the SAI, annual reports and semiannual reports, and you may ask questions about the fund or your accounts, online at americancenturyetfs.com, by contacting American Century Investments at the addresses or telephone numbers listed below or by contacting your financial intermediary.
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
Reports and other information about the fund are available on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website at sec.gov, and copies of this information may be obtained, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following email address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

This prospectus shall not constitute an offer to sell securities of the fund in any state, territory, or other jurisdiction where the fund’s shares have not been registered or qualified for sale, unless such registration or qualification is not required, or under any circumstances in which such offer or solicitation would be unlawful.



















American Century Investments
americancenturyetfs.com
Financial Professionals
P.O. Box 419385
Kansas City, Missouri 64141-6385
1-833-ACI-ETFS

Investment Company Act File No. 811-23305
CL-PRS-XXXXX 1906




The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the
registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to
sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
[_________], 2019

American Century Investments
Prospectus

 
Ticker:
Exchange:
Avantis™ International Small Cap Value ETF
AVDV
 











Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the fund’s shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from the fund or from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be made available on a website, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the fund or your financial intermediary electronically by calling or sending an email request.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. You can inform the fund or your financial intermediary that you wish to continue receiving paper copies of your shareholder reports by calling or sending an email request. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all funds held with the fund complex/your financial intermediary.


The Securities and Exchange Commission has
not approved or disapproved these securities or
passed upon the adequacy of this prospectus. Any
representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
 




Table of Contents
Fund Summary
2

Investment Objective
2

Fees and Expenses
2

Principal Investment Strategies
2

Principal Risks
3

Fund Performance
4

Portfolio Management
4

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
4

Tax Information
4

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
4

Objectives, Strategies and Risks
5

Management
7

Investing in the Fund
8

Share Price and Distributions
9

Taxes
11

Additional Information
12

Financial Highlights
14




















©2019 American Century Proprietary Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.




Fund Summary
Investment Objective
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the fund. You may also incur usual and customary brokerage commissions when buying or selling shares of the fund, which are not reflected in the example that follows.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
—%
Other Expenses
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
—%
1 
Other expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
Example
The example below is intended to help you compare the costs of investing in the fund with the costs of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, that you earn a 5% return each year, and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. You may be required to pay brokerage commissions on your purchases of shares of the fund which are not reflected in the example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
 
 
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. Because the fund is new, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate is not available.
Principal Investment Strategies
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of non-U.S. small cap value companies across market sectors, industry groups, and countries.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
When selecting investments for the fund, the portfolio managers consider the distribution of market capitalization of all companies in each country in which the fund invests, meaning that a company of a given size may be considered small in one country, but not in another. Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in securities of small capitalization companies. For purposes of the fund’s 80% test, small cap companies include companies with market capitalizations not greater than that of the largest company on the MSCI World ex USA Small Cap Index at the time of investment. Though capitalizations will change from time to time, as of ___________, 2019, the total market capitalization of the largest company in the index was $____ billion.
The fund may invest in securities that are denominated in foreign currencies and may also invest in foreign securities that are represented in the U.S. and other securities markets by American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), and other similar depositary arrangements.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending and invest its collateral in eligible securities.

2



The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.
Principal Risks
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Foreign Risk - Foreign securities are generally riskier than U.S. securities. Political events (such as civil unrest, national elections and imposition of exchange controls), social and economic events (such as labor strikes and rising inflation), and natural disasters occurring in a country where the fund invests could cause the fund’s investments in that country to experience gains or losses. Securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid, more volatile and harder to value than U.S. securities.
Depositary Receipts Risk - Investment in depositary receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of depositary receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the depositary receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - The fund may effect its creations and redemptions for cash, rather than for in-kind securities. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in fund shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - The fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, periods of high volatility and disruption in the creation and/or redemption process of the fund. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the fund’s shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.
Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to net asset value (NAV) and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally.

3



Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
Fund Performance
The fund’s performance history is not available as of the date of this prospectus. When the fund has investment results for a full calendar year, this section will feature charts that show annual total returns, highest and lowest quarterly returns and average annual total returns for the fund. This information indicates the volatility of the fund’s historical returns from year to year. For current performance information, please visit americancenturyetfs.com.
Performance information is designed to help you see how fund returns can vary. Keep in mind that past performance (before and after taxes) does not predict how the fund will perform in the future.
Portfolio Management
Investment Advisor
American Century Investment Management, Inc.
Portfolio Managers

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is an ETF. Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The fund issues and redeems shares that have been aggregated into blocks of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof (Creation Units) to authorized participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor. The fund will generally issue and redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities (and an amount of cash) that the fund specifies each day.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred account such as a 401(k) or individual retirement account (in which case you may be taxed upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


4



Objectives, Strategies and Risks
What are the fund’s investment objectives?
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
The fund’s investment objective is a nonfundamental investment policy and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without approval by shareholders.
What are the fund’s principal investment strategies?
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of non-U.S. small cap value companies across market sectors, industry groups, and countries.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
When selecting investments for the fund, the portfolio managers consider the distribution of market capitalization of all companies in each country in which the fund invests, meaning that a company of a given size may be considered small in one country, but not in another. Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in securities of small capitalization companies. For purposes of the fund’s 80% test, small cap companies include companies with market capitalizations not greater than that of the largest company on the MSCI World ex USA Small Cap Index at the time of investment. Though capitalizations will change from time to time, as of ___________, 2019, the total market capitalization of the largest company in the index was $____ billion. Securities in which the fund may invest include common stock, preferred stock, exchange traded funds, equity-equivalent securities, such as convertible securities, and derivative instruments that give exposure to equities, such as stock futures contract, stock index futures contracts, and swaps on equities.
The fund may invest in securities that are denominated in foreign currencies and may also invest in foreign securities that are represented in the U.S. and other securities markets by American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), and other similar depositary arrangements.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending. Collateral received by the fund in connection with loaning its securities may consist of cash and U.S. government securities. Cash collateral may be invested in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.
In the event of exceptional market or economic conditions, the fund may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with the fund’s principal investment strategies. To the extent the fund assumes a defensive position, it may not achieve its investment objective.
A description of the policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the fund’s portfolio securities is available in the statement of additional information.
What are the principal risks of investing in the fund?
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.

5



Foreign Risk - Foreign securities are generally riskier than U.S. securities. Political events (such as civil unrest, national elections and imposition of exchange controls), social and economic events (such as labor strikes and rising inflation), and natural disasters occurring in a country where the fund invests could cause the fund’s investments in that country to experience gains or losses. Securities of foreign issuers may be less liquid, more volatile and harder to value than U.S. securities.
Depositary Receipts Risk - Investment in depositary receipts does not eliminate all the risks inherent in investing in securities of non-U.S. issuers. The market value of depositary receipts is dependent upon the market value of the underlying securities and fluctuations in the relative value of the currencies in which the depositary receipts and the underlying securities are quoted.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions to avoid some costs, including being taxed on gains on the distributed portfolio securities at the fund level. However, because the fund may effect purchases or redemptions fully or partially in cash, rather than in-kind, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. If the fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause the fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. The fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at the fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - Although shares of the fund are listed for trading on one or more stock exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained. There are no obligations of market makers to make a market in the fund’s shares or of an authorized participant to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Decisions by market makers or authorized participants to reduce their role or step away from these activities in times of market stress could inhibit the effectiveness of the arbitrage process in maintaining the relationship between the underlying value of the fund’s portfolio securities and the fund’s market price. This reduced effectiveness could result in fund shares trading at a premium or discount to its NAV and also greater than normal intraday bid/ask spreads.
Shares of the fund may trade in the secondary market at times when the fund does not accept orders to purchase or redeem shares. At such times, shares may trade in the secondary market with more significant premiums or discounts than might be experienced at times when the fund accepts purchase and redemption orders. Secondary market trading in fund shares may be halted by a stock exchange because of market conditions or other reasons, and may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to “circuit breaker” rules on the stock exchange or market. There can be no assurance that the requirements necessary to maintain the listing or trading of fund shares will continue to be met or will remain unchanged. In addition, during a “flash crash,” the market prices of the fund’s shares may decline suddenly and significantly. Such a decline may not reflect the performance of the portfolio securities held by the fund. Flash crashes may cause authorized participants and other market makers to limit or cease trading in the fund’s shares for temporary or longer periods. Shareholders could suffer significant losses to the extent that they sell fund shares at these temporarily low market prices.
Shares of the fund may trade at prices other than NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it likely that the fund’s shares normally will trade on stock exchanges at prices close to the fund’s next calculated NAV, market prices are not expected to correlate exactly with the fund’s NAV due to timing reasons as well as market supply and demand factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions or extreme market volatility may result in trading prices for shares of the fund that differ significantly from its NAV. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity. During times of market stress, spreads may widen causing investors to pay more.

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Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.
Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. Any decline in the value of a security while the security is loaned will adversely affect performance. These events could also result in adverse tax consequences.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants, none of which are obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally. Authorized participant concentration risks may be heightened in scenarios where authorized participants have limited or diminished access to the capital required to post collateral.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
Management
Who manages the fund?
The Board of Trustees, investment advisor and fund management team play key roles in the management of the fund.
The Board of Trustees
The Board of Trustees is responsible for overseeing the advisor’s management and operations of the fund pursuant to the management agreement. In performing their duties, Board members receive detailed information about the fund and its advisor regularly throughout the year, and meet at least quarterly with management of the advisor to review reports about fund operations. The trustees’ role is to provide oversight and not to provide day-to-day management. The majority of the trustees are independent of the fund’s advisor. They are not employees, directors or officers of, and have no financial interest in, the advisor or any of its affiliated companies (other than as shareholders of American Century Investments funds), and they do not have any other affiliations, positions or relationships that would cause them to be considered “interested persons” under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (Investment Company Act).
The Investment Advisor
The fund’s investment advisor is American Century Investment Management, Inc. (the advisor). The advisor has been managing investment companies since 1958 and is headquartered at 4500 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111.
The advisor is responsible for managing the investment portfolio of the fund and directing the purchase and sale of its investment securities. The advisor also arranges for transfer agency, custody and all other services necessary for the fund to operate.
For the services it provides to the fund, the advisor receives a unified management fee based on a percentage of the daily net assets of the fund at the annual rate of [__]%. The amount of the fee is calculated daily and paid monthly in arrears. The advisor pays all expenses of managing and operating the fund, other than the management fee payable to the advisor, brokerage and other transaction fees and expenses relating to the acquisition and disposition of portfolio securities, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest (including without limitation borrowing costs and overdraft charges), taxes (including without limitation income, excise, transfer, and withholding taxes), litigation expenses (including without limitation litigation counsel fees and expenses), extraordinary expenses, and expenses incurred in connection with the provision of shareholder and distribution services under a plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. The advisor may pay unaffiliated third parties who provide recordkeeping and administrative services that would otherwise be performed by an affiliate of the advisor.

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A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the fund’s investment advisory agreement with the advisor will be available in the fund’s semiannual report to shareholders for the period ended February 29, 2020.
The Fund Management Team
The advisor uses teams of portfolio managers and analysts to manage funds. The teams meet regularly to review portfolio holdings and discuss purchase and sale activity. Team members buy and sell securities for a fund as they see fit, guided by the fund’s investment objective and strategy.
The portfolio managers on the investment team who are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the fund are identified below.
[_______________]
The statement of additional information provides additional information about the accounts managed by the portfolio managers, the structure of their compensation, and their ownership of fund securities.
Fund Performance
The fund has the same management team and investment policies as another fund in the American Century Investments family of funds, the Avantis International Small Cap Value Fund. The fees and expenses of the funds are similar, and they are managed with substantially the same investment objective and strategies. Notwithstanding these general similarities, the Avantis International Small Cap Value Fund and the Avantis International Small Cap Value ETF are separate funds that have different investment performance. Differences in cash flows into the two funds, the size of their portfolios and specific investments held by the two funds, as well as differing expenses, cause performance to differ. Please consult the mutual fund prospectus for a description of the mutual fund, details on how the mutual fund is offered, and its associated fees.
Fundamental Investment Policies
Shareholders must approve any change to the fundamental investment policies contained in the statement of additional information. The Board of Trustees and/or the advisor may change any other policies, including the fund’s investment objective, or investment strategies described in this prospectus or otherwise used in the operation of the fund at any time, subject to applicable notice provisions.
Investing in the Fund
Buying and Selling Shares
Shares of the fund may be acquired or redeemed directly from the fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed below. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation and redemption transactions directly with the fund. Once created, shares of the fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.
Shares of the fund are listed on a national securities exchange for trading during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. American Century ETF Trust (the trust) does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the fund purchased on an exchange. Shares of the fund trade under the following ticker symbol: AVDV.
Buying or selling fund shares on an exchange involves two types of costs that may apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity.
The fund’s primary listing exchange is [____]., which is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on weekends and the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.
Book Entry
Shares of the fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no share certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (DTC) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.
Investors owning shares of the fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of

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DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form.
Frequent Trading Practices
The Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of fund shares (frequent trading). The Board of Trustees believes that a frequent trading policy is unnecessary because fund shares are listed for trading on a national securities exchange. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shareholder could take advantage of a potential arbitrage opportunity presented by a lag between a change in the value of the fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the fund’s portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the fund’s NAV (market timing), because the fund generally sells and redeems its shares directly through transactions that are in-kind and/or for cash, subject to the conditions described below under Creations and Redemptions.
Investments by Other Investment Companies
Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act restricts investments by investment companies in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in SEC rules or in an SEC exemptive order issued to the trust. In order for a registered investment company to invest in shares of the fund beyond the limitations of Section 12(d)(1) pursuant to the exemptive relief obtained by the trust, the registered investment company must enter into an agreement with the trust.
Creations and Redemptions
Prior to trading in the secondary market, shares of the fund are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size Creation Units of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof. All orders to purchase Creation Units must be placed by or through an authorized participant that has entered into an authorized participant agreement (AP Agreement) with Foreside Fund Services, LLC (the distributor). Only an authorized participant may create or redeem Creation Units directly with the fund.
A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the trust, generally takes place when an authorized participant deposits into the fund a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities) in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units. Similarly, shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities). With respect to the fund, redemptions are generally on an in-kind basis, but the fund reserves the right to meet redemptions in cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares are not redeemable by the fund.
The prices at which creations and redemptions occur are based on the next calculation of NAV after a creation or redemption order is received in a proper form under the AP Agreement. The portfolio of securities required for purchase of a Creation Unit is generally the same as the portfolio of securities the fund will deliver upon redemption of fund shares, except under certain circumstances. As a result of any system failure or other interruption, creation or redemption orders either may not be executed according to the fund’s instructions or may not be executed at all, or the fund may not be able to place or change such orders.
Creations and redemptions must be made through a firm that is either a broker-dealer or other participant in the Continuous Net Settlement System of the National Securities Clearing Corporation or a DTC participant and, in either case, has executed an AP Agreement with the distributor. Information about the procedures regarding creations and redemptions of Creation Units (including the cut-off times for receipt of creation and redemption orders) is included in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI).
Because new shares may be created and issued on an ongoing basis, at any point during the life of the fund a “distribution,” as such term is used in the Securities Act of 1933 (Securities Act), may be occurring. Broker-dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner that could render them statutory underwriters and subject to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the Securities Act. Any determination of whether one is an underwriter must take into account all the relevant facts and circumstances of each particular case.
Broker-dealers should also note that dealers who are not “underwriters” but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted to ordinary secondary transactions), and thus dealing with shares that are part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(a)(3)(C) of the Securities Act, would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(a)(3) of the Securities Act. For delivery of prospectuses to exchange members, the prospectus delivery mechanism of Rule 153 under the Securities Act is available only with respect to transactions on a national securities exchange.
In addition, certain affiliates of the fund and the advisor may purchase and resell fund shares pursuant to this prospectus.
Share Price and Distributions
Share Price
The price of fund shares is based on market price. The trading prices of the fund’s shares in the secondary market generally differ from the fund’s daily NAV and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intraday value of shares of the fund, also known as the “indicative optimized portfolio value” (IOPV), is

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disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the fund’s shares are listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The IOPV is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash contained in the portfolio at the beginning of the trading day. The IOPV does not necessarily reflect the best possible valuation of the current portfolio of securities held by the fund, and may not be calculated in the same manner as the NAV. Therefore, the IOPV should not be viewed as a “real-time” update of the fund’s NAV, which is computed only once a day as described below. The IOPV is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities held by the fund. The quotations of certain fund holdings may not be updated during U.S. trading hours if such holdings do not trade in the United States. The fund, the advisor and their related entities are not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the IOPV and make no representation or warranty as to its accuracy.
Calculation of NAV
American Century Investments will price the fund shares purchased or redeemed by authorized participants based on the net asset value (NAV) next determined after an order is received in good order by the fund’s transfer agent. We determine the NAV of the fund as of the close of regular trading (usually 4 p.m. Eastern time) on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on each day the NYSE is open. On days when the NYSE is closed (including certain U.S. national holidays), we do not calculate the NAV.
 
The net asset value, or NAV, of the fund is the current value of the fund’s assets, minus any liabilities, divided by the number of shares of the fund outstanding.
 
The fund values portfolio securities for which market quotations are readily available at their market price. As a general rule, equity securities listed on a U.S. exchange are valued at the last reported sale price as of the time of valuation. Portfolio securities primarily traded on foreign securities exchanges are generally valued at the preceding official close price or last sale price of such securities on the foreign exchange where primarily traded or at the time the fund’s NAV is determined, if that foreign exchange is open later than the NYSE. The value of any security or other asset denominated in a currency other than U.S. dollars is then converted to U.S. dollars at the prevailing foreign exchange rate at the time the fund’s NAV is determined. Securities that are neither listed on a securities exchange or traded over the counter may be priced using the mean of the bid and asked prices obtained from an independent broker who is an established market maker in the security. The fund may use third party pricing services to assist in the determination of market value.
If the fund determines that the market price for a portfolio security is not readily available or that the valuation methods mentioned above do not reflect the security’s fair value, such security is valued as determined in good faith by the fund’s board or its designee, in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board. Circumstances that may cause the fund to use alternate procedures to value a security include, but are not limited to:
if, after the close of the foreign exchange on which a portfolio security is principally traded, but before the close of the NYSE, an event occurs that may materially affect the value of the security;
a debt security has been declared in default; or
trading in a security has been halted during the trading day.
If such circumstances occur, the fund will fair value the security if the fair valuation would materially impact the fund’s NAV. While fair value determinations involve judgments that are inherently subjective, these determinations are made in good faith in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board.
The effect of using fair value determinations is that the fund’s NAV will be based, to some degree, on security valuations that the board or its designee believes are fair rather than being solely determined by the market.
With respect to any portion of the fund’s assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies that are registered with the SEC (known as registered investment companies), the fund’s NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such registered investment companies. These registered investment companies are required by law to explain the circumstances under which they will use fair value pricing and the effects of using fair value pricing in their prospectuses.
Trading of securities in foreign markets may not take place every day the NYSE is open. Also, trading in some foreign markets and on some electronic trading networks may take place on weekends or holidays when the fund’s NAV is not calculated. So, the value of the fund’s portfolio may be affected on days when you will not be able to purchase or sell fund shares.

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Distributions
Federal tax laws require the fund to make distributions to its shareholders in order to qualify as a regulated investment company. Qualification as a regulated investment company means the fund should not be subject to state or federal income tax on amounts distributed. The distributions generally consist of dividends and interest received by the fund, as well as capital gains realized by the fund on the sale of its investment securities.
 
Capital gains are increases in the values of capital assets, such as stocks or bonds, from the time the assets are purchased.
 
The fund generally expects to pay distributions from net income, if any, semiannually. The fund generally pays distributions from realized capital gains, if any, once a year. It may make more frequent distributions if necessary to comply with Internal Revenue Code provisions.
Although dividends generally will be treated as distributed when paid, any dividend declared by a fund in October, November or December and payable to shareholders of record in such a month that is paid during the following January will be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as received by shareholders on December 31 of the calendar year in which it was declared.
Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the fund. Distributions may be automatically reinvested in whole fund shares only if you purchased the shares through a broker that makes such option available.
Taxes
Some of the tax consequences of owning shares of the fund will vary depending on whether you own them through a taxable or tax-deferred account. Distributions by the fund of dividend and interest income, capital gains and other income it has generated through its investment activities will generally be taxable to shareholders who hold shares in a taxable account. Tax consequences also may result when investors sell fund shares.
Tax-Deferred Accounts
If you purchase fund shares through a tax-deferred account, such as an IRA or employer-sponsored retirement plan, income and capital gains distributions usually will not be subject to current taxation but will accumulate in your account under the plan on a tax-deferred basis. Likewise, moving from one fund to another fund within a plan or tax-deferred account generally will not cause you to be taxed. For information about the tax consequences of making purchases or withdrawals through a tax-deferred account, please consult your plan administrator, your summary plan description or a tax advisor.
Taxable Accounts
If you own fund shares through a taxable account, you may be taxed on your investments if the fund makes distributions or if you sell your fund shares.
Taxability of Distributions
Fund distributions may consist of income, such as dividends and interest earned by the fund from its investments, or capital gains generated by the fund from the sale of investment securities. Distributions of income are taxed as ordinary income, unless they are designated as qualified dividend income and you meet a minimum required holding period with respect to your shares of the fund, in which case distributions of income are taxed at the same rates as long-term capital gains.
 
Qualified dividend income is a dividend received by a fund from the stock of a domestic or qualifying foreign corporation, provided that the fund has held the stock for a required holding period and the stock was not on loan at the time of the dividend.
 
The tax character of any distributions from capital gains is determined by how long the fund held the underlying security that was sold, not by how long you have been invested in the fund or whether you reinvest your distributions or take them in cash. Short-term (one year or less) capital gains are taxable as ordinary income. Gains on securities held for more than one year are taxed at the lower rates applicable to long-term capital gains.
If a fund’s distributions exceed current and accumulated earnings and profits, such excess will generally be considered a return of capital. A return of capital distribution is generally not subject to tax, but will reduce your cost basis in the fund and result in higher realized capital gains (or lower realized capital losses) upon the sale of fund shares.
You will receive information regarding the tax character of fund distributions for each calendar year in an annual tax mailing.
If you meet specified income levels, you will also be subject to a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax which is imposed on net investment income, including interest, dividends and capital gains. Distributions also may be subject to state and local taxes. Because everyone’s tax situation is unique, you may want to consult your tax professional about federal, state and local tax consequences.

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Taxes on Transactions
Your sales of fund shares are subject to capital gains tax. Short-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for 12 months or less. Long-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for more than 12 months. If your shares decrease in value, their sale will result in a long-term or short-term capital loss. However, you should note that loss realized upon the sale of shares held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any distribution of long-term capital gain to you with respect to those shares. If a loss is realized on the sale of fund shares, the reinvestment in additional fund shares within 30 days before or after the sale may be subject to the wash sale rules of the Internal Revenue Code. This may result in a postponement of the recognition of such loss for federal income tax purposes.
If you have not certified that your Social Security number or tax identification number is correct and that you are not subject to withholding, you may be subject to backup withholding at the applicable federal withholding tax rate on taxable dividends, capital gains distributions and proceeds from the sale of fund shares.
Taxes on Creations and Redemptions of Creation Units
An Authorized Participant who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or a loss equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time and the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered plus the amount of cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who redeems Creation Units will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of the aggregate market value of any securities received plus the amount of any cash received for such Creation Units. The IRS, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an exchange of securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position.
Any capital gain or loss realized upon the creation of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the securities exchanged for such Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon the redemption of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the shares comprising the Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Otherwise, such capital gains or losses will generally be treated as short-term capital gain or loss. Any loss upon a redemption of Creation Units held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any amounts treated as distributions to the applicable Authorized Participant of long-term capital gain with respect to the Creation Units (including any amounts credited to the Authorized Participant as undistributed capital gains).
If a fund redeems Creation Units in cash, it may recognize more capital gains than it will if it redeems Creation Units in-kind.
Buying a Dividend
Purchasing fund shares in a taxable account shortly before a distribution is sometimes known as buying a dividend. In taxable accounts, you must pay income taxes on the distribution whether you reinvest the distribution or take it in cash. In addition, you will have to pay taxes on the distribution whether the value of your investment decreased, increased or remained the same after you bought the fund shares.
The risk in buying a dividend is that a fund’s portfolio may build up taxable income and gains throughout the period covered by a distribution, as income is earned and securities are sold at a profit. The fund distributes the income and gains to you, after subtracting any losses, even if you did not own the shares when the income was earned or the gains occurred.
If you buy a dividend, you incur the full tax liability of the distribution period, but you may not enjoy the full benefit of the income earned or the gains realized in the fund’s portfolio.
Additional Information
Premium/Discount Information
Once the fund is operational, tables in this section will show the number of days the market price of the fund’s shares was greater than the fund’s NAV and the number of days the market price was less than the fund’s NAV for the most recently completed calendar quarters. Shareholders may pay more than NAV when they buy fund shares and receive less than NAV when they sell those shares, because shares are bought and sold at current market prices. Data presented represents past performance and cannot be used to predict future results.
Service, Distribution and Administrative Fees
Investment Company Act Rule 12b-1 permits investment companies that adopt a written plan to pay certain expenses associated with the distribution of their shares out of fund assets. The Board of Trustees has adopted a 12b-1 plan that allows the fund to pay annual fees not to exceed 0.25% to the distributor for distribution and individual shareholder services. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 plan fee at this time.
Because these fees may be used to pay for services that are not related to prospective sales of the fund, to the extent that a fee is authorized, the fund will continue to make payments under its plan even if it is closed to new investors. Because these fees are paid

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out of the fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges.
The advisor or its affiliates may make payments to intermediaries for various additional services, other expenses and/or the intermediaries’ distribution of the fund out of their profits or other available sources. Such payments may be made for one or more of the following: (1) distribution, which may include expenses incurred by intermediaries for their sales activities with respect to the fund, such as preparing, printing and distributing sales literature and advertising materials and compensating registered representatives or other employees of such financial intermediaries for their sales activities, as well as the opportunity for the fund to be made available by such intermediaries; (2) shareholder services, such as providing individual and custom investment advisory services to clients of the financial intermediaries; and (3) marketing and promotional services, including business planning assistance, educating personnel about the fund, and sponsorship of sales meetings, which may include covering costs of providing speakers, meals and other entertainment. The advisor may pay partnership and/or sponsorship fees to support seminars, conferences, and other programs designed to educate intermediaries about the fund and may cover the expenses associated with attendance at such meetings, including travel costs. The advisor and its affiliates may also pay fees related to obtaining data regarding intermediary or financial advisor activities to assist American Century with sales reporting, business intelligence and training and education opportunities. These payments and activities are intended to provide an incentive to intermediaries to sell the fund by educating them about the fund and helping defray the costs associated with offering the fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the intermediary to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information. The amount of any payments described in this paragraph is determined by the advisor or its affiliates, and all such amounts are paid out of their available assets, and not paid by you or the fund. As a result, the total expense ratio of the fund will not be affected by any such payments.


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Financial Highlights
There is no financial information for the fund because it is a new fund.

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Notes




Where to Find More Information
Annual and Semiannual Reports
Additional information about the fund’s investments will be available in the fund’s annual and semiannual reports to shareholders. In the fund’s annual report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.
Statement of Additional Information (SAI)
The SAI contains a more detailed legal description of the fund’s operations, investment restrictions, policies and practices. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this prospectus. This means that it is legally part of this prospectus, even if you don’t request a copy.
You may obtain a free copy of the SAI, annual reports and semiannual reports, and you may ask questions about the fund or your accounts, online at americancenturyetfs.com, by contacting American Century Investments at the addresses or telephone numbers listed below or by contacting your financial intermediary.
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
Reports and other information about the fund are available on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website at sec.gov, and copies of this information may be obtained, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following email address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

This prospectus shall not constitute an offer to sell securities of the fund in any state, territory, or other jurisdiction where the fund’s shares have not been registered or qualified for sale, unless such registration or qualification is not required, or under any circumstances in which such offer or solicitation would be unlawful.



















American Century Investments
americancenturyetfs.com
Financial Professionals
P.O. Box 419385
Kansas City, Missouri 64141-6385
1-833-ACI-ETFS

Investment Company Act File No. 811-23305
CL-PRS-XXXXX 1906




The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the
registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to
sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
[_________], 2019

American Century Investments
Prospectus

 
Ticker:
Exchange:
Avantis™ U.S. Equity ETF
AVUS
 











Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the fund’s shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from the fund or from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be made available on a website, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the fund or your financial intermediary electronically by calling or sending an email request.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. You can inform the fund or your financial intermediary that you wish to continue receiving paper copies of your shareholder reports by calling or sending an email request. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all funds held with the fund complex/your financial intermediary.


The Securities and Exchange Commission has
not approved or disapproved these securities or
passed upon the adequacy of this prospectus. Any
representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
 




Table of Contents
Fund Summary
2

Investment Objective
2

Fees and Expenses
2

Principal Investment Strategies
2

Principal Risks
3

Fund Performance
4

Portfolio Management
4

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
4

Tax Information
4

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
4

Objectives, Strategies and Risks
5

Management
7

Investing in the Fund
8

Share Price and Distributions
9

Taxes
11

Additional Information
12

Financial Highlights
14




















©2019 American Century Proprietary Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.




Fund Summary
Investment Objective
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the fund. You may also incur usual and customary brokerage commissions when buying or selling shares of the fund, which are not reflected in the example that follows.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
—%
Other Expenses
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
—%
1 
Other expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
Example
The example below is intended to help you compare the costs of investing in the fund with the costs of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, that you earn a 5% return each year, and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. You may be required to pay brokerage commissions on your purchases of shares of the fund which are not reflected in the example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
 
 
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. Because the fund is new, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate is not available.
Principal Investment Strategies
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of U.S. companies across market sectors and industry groups. The fund may invest in companies of all market capitalizations.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of U.S. companies. To determine whether a company is a U.S. company, the portfolio managers will consider various factors, including where the company is headquartered, where the company’s principal operations are located, where the company’s revenues are derived, where the principal trading market is located, the country in which the company was legally organized, and whether the company is in the fund’s benchmark.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending and invest its collateral in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.

2



Principal Risks
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - The fund may effect its creations and redemptions for cash, rather than for in-kind securities. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in fund shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - The fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, periods of high volatility and disruption in the creation and/or redemption process of the fund. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the fund’s shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.
Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to net asset value (NAV) and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.

3



Fund Performance
The fund’s performance history is not available as of the date of this prospectus. When the fund has investment results for a full calendar year, this section will feature charts that show annual total returns, highest and lowest quarterly returns and average annual total returns for the fund. This information indicates the volatility of the fund’s historical returns from year to year. For current performance information, please visit americancenturyetfs.com.
Performance information is designed to help you see how fund returns can vary. Keep in mind that past performance (before and after taxes) does not predict how the fund will perform in the future.
Portfolio Management
Investment Advisor
American Century Investment Management, Inc.
Portfolio Managers

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is an ETF. Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The fund issues and redeems shares that have been aggregated into blocks of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof (Creation Units) to authorized participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor. The fund will generally issue and redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities (and an amount of cash) that the fund specifies each day.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred account such as a 401(k) or individual retirement account (in which case you may be taxed upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


4



Objectives, Strategies and Risks
What are the fund’s investment objectives?
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
The fund’s investment objective is a nonfundamental investment policy and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without approval by shareholders.
What are the fund’s principal investment strategies?
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of U.S. companies across market sectors and industry groups. The fund may invest in companies of all market capitalizations.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of U.S. companies. To determine whether a company is a U.S. company, the portfolio managers will consider various factors, including where the company is headquartered, where the company’s principal operations are located, where the company’s revenues are derived, where the principal trading market is located, the country in which the company was legally organized, and whether the company is in the fund’s benchmark. Equity securities in which the fund may invest include common stock, preferred stock, exchange traded funds, equity-equivalent securities, such as convertible securities, and derivative instruments that give exposure to equities, such as stock futures contract, stock index futures contracts, and swaps on equities.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending. Collateral received by the fund in connection with loaning its securities may consist of cash and U.S. government securities. Cash collateral may be invested in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.
In the event of exceptional market or economic conditions, the fund may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with the fund’s principal investment strategies. To the extent the fund assumes a defensive position, it may not achieve its investment objective.
A description of the policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the fund’s portfolio securities is available in the statement of additional information.
What are the principal risks of investing in the fund?
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.

5



Cash Transactions Risk - ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions to avoid some costs, including being taxed on gains on the distributed portfolio securities at the fund level. However, because the fund may effect purchases or redemptions fully or partially in cash, rather than in-kind, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. If the fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause the fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. The fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at the fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - Although shares of the fund are listed for trading on one or more stock exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained. There are no obligations of market makers to make a market in the fund’s shares or of an authorized participant to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Decisions by market makers or authorized participants to reduce their role or step away from these activities in times of market stress could inhibit the effectiveness of the arbitrage process in maintaining the relationship between the underlying value of the fund’s portfolio securities and the fund’s market price. This reduced effectiveness could result in fund shares trading at a premium or discount to its NAV and also greater than normal intraday bid/ask spreads.
Shares of the fund may trade in the secondary market at times when the fund does not accept orders to purchase or redeem shares. At such times, shares may trade in the secondary market with more significant premiums or discounts than might be experienced at times when the fund accepts purchase and redemption orders. Secondary market trading in fund shares may be halted by a stock exchange because of market conditions or other reasons, and may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to “circuit breaker” rules on the stock exchange or market. There can be no assurance that the requirements necessary to maintain the listing or trading of fund shares will continue to be met or will remain unchanged. In addition, during a “flash crash,” the market prices of the fund’s shares may decline suddenly and significantly. Such a decline may not reflect the performance of the portfolio securities held by the fund. Flash crashes may cause authorized participants and other market makers to limit or cease trading in the fund’s shares for temporary or longer periods. Shareholders could suffer significant losses to the extent that they sell fund shares at these temporarily low market prices.
Shares of the fund may trade at prices other than NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it likely that the fund’s shares normally will trade on stock exchanges at prices close to the fund’s next calculated NAV, market prices are not expected to correlate exactly with the fund’s NAV due to timing reasons as well as market supply and demand factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions or extreme market volatility may result in trading prices for shares of the fund that differ significantly from its NAV. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity. During times of market stress, spreads may widen causing investors to pay more.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.
Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. Any decline in the value of a security while the security is loaned will adversely affect performance. These events could also result in adverse tax consequences.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants, none of which are

6



obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally. Authorized participant concentration risks may be heightened in scenarios where authorized participants have limited or diminished access to the capital required to post collateral.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
Management
Who manages the fund?
The Board of Trustees, investment advisor and fund management team play key roles in the management of the fund.
The Board of Trustees
The Board of Trustees is responsible for overseeing the advisor’s management and operations of the fund pursuant to the management agreement. In performing their duties, Board members receive detailed information about the fund and its advisor regularly throughout the year, and meet at least quarterly with management of the advisor to review reports about fund operations. The trustees’ role is to provide oversight and not to provide day-to-day management. The majority of the trustees are independent of the fund’s advisor. They are not employees, directors or officers of, and have no financial interest in, the advisor or any of its affiliated companies (other than as shareholders of American Century Investments funds), and they do not have any other affiliations, positions or relationships that would cause them to be considered “interested persons” under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (Investment Company Act).
The Investment Advisor
The fund’s investment advisor is American Century Investment Management, Inc. (the advisor). The advisor has been managing investment companies since 1958 and is headquartered at 4500 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111.
The advisor is responsible for managing the investment portfolio of the fund and directing the purchase and sale of its investment securities. The advisor also arranges for transfer agency, custody and all other services necessary for the fund to operate.
For the services it provides to the fund, the advisor receives a unified management fee based on a percentage of the daily net assets of the fund at the annual rate of [__]%. The amount of the fee is calculated daily and paid monthly in arrears. The advisor pays all expenses of managing and operating the fund, other than the management fee payable to the advisor, brokerage and other transaction fees and expenses relating to the acquisition and disposition of portfolio securities, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest (including without limitation borrowing costs and overdraft charges), taxes (including without limitation income, excise, transfer, and withholding taxes), litigation expenses (including without limitation litigation counsel fees and expenses), extraordinary expenses, and expenses incurred in connection with the provision of shareholder and distribution services under a plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. The advisor may pay unaffiliated third parties who provide recordkeeping and administrative services that would otherwise be performed by an affiliate of the advisor.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the fund’s investment advisory agreement with the advisor will be available in the fund’s semiannual report to shareholders for the period ended February 29, 2020.
The Fund Management Team
The advisor uses teams of portfolio managers and analysts to manage funds. The teams meet regularly to review portfolio holdings and discuss purchase and sale activity. Team members buy and sell securities for a fund as they see fit, guided by the fund’s investment objective and strategy.
The portfolio managers on the investment team who are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the fund are identified below.
[_______________]
The statement of additional information provides additional information about the accounts managed by the portfolio managers, the structure of their compensation, and their ownership of fund securities.

7



Fund Performance
The fund has the same management team and investment policies as another fund in the American Century Investments family of funds, the Avantis U.S. Equity Fund. The fees and expenses of the funds are similar, and they are managed with substantially the same investment objective and strategies. Notwithstanding these general similarities, the Avantis U.S. Equity Fund and the Avantis U.S. U.S. Equity ETF are separate funds that have different investment performance. Differences in cash flows into the two funds, the size of their portfolios and specific investments held by the two funds, as well as differing expenses, cause performance to differ. Please consult the mutual fund prospectus for a description of the mutual fund, details on how the mutual fund is offered, and its associated fees.
Fundamental Investment Policies
Shareholders must approve any change to the fundamental investment policies contained in the statement of additional information. The Board of Trustees and/or the advisor may change any other policies, including the fund’s investment objective, or investment strategies described in this prospectus or otherwise used in the operation of the fund at any time, subject to applicable notice provisions.
Investing in the Fund
Buying and Selling Shares
Shares of the fund may be acquired or redeemed directly from the fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed below. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation and redemption transactions directly with the fund. Once created, shares of the fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.
Shares of the fund are listed on a national securities exchange for trading during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. American Century ETF Trust (the trust) does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the fund purchased on an exchange. Shares of the fund trade under the following ticker symbol: AVUS.
Buying or selling fund shares on an exchange involves two types of costs that may apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity.
The fund’s primary listing exchange is [____]., which is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on weekends and the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.
Book Entry
Shares of the fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no share certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (DTC) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.
Investors owning shares of the fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form.
Frequent Trading Practices
The Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of fund shares (frequent trading). The Board of Trustees believes that a frequent trading policy is unnecessary because fund shares are listed for trading on a national securities exchange. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shareholder could take advantage of a potential arbitrage opportunity presented by a lag between a change in the value of the fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the fund’s portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the fund’s NAV (market timing), because the fund generally sells and redeems its shares directly through transactions that are in-kind and/or for cash, subject to the conditions described below under Creations and Redemptions.

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Investments by Other Investment Companies
Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act restricts investments by investment companies in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in SEC rules or in an SEC exemptive order issued to the trust. In order for a registered investment company to invest in shares of the fund beyond the limitations of Section 12(d)(1) pursuant to the exemptive relief obtained by the trust, the registered investment company must enter into an agreement with the trust.
Creations and Redemptions
Prior to trading in the secondary market, shares of the fund are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size Creation Units of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof. All orders to purchase Creation Units must be placed by or through an authorized participant that has entered into an authorized participant agreement (AP Agreement) with Foreside Fund Services, LLC (the distributor). Only an authorized participant may create or redeem Creation Units directly with the fund.
A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the trust, generally takes place when an authorized participant deposits into the fund a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities) in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units. Similarly, shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities). With respect to the fund, redemptions are generally on an in-kind basis, but the fund reserves the right to meet redemptions in cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares are not redeemable by the fund.
The prices at which creations and redemptions occur are based on the next calculation of NAV after a creation or redemption order is received in a proper form under the AP Agreement. The portfolio of securities required for purchase of a Creation Unit is generally the same as the portfolio of securities the fund will deliver upon redemption of fund shares, except under certain circumstances. As a result of any system failure or other interruption, creation or redemption orders either may not be executed according to the fund’s instructions or may not be executed at all, or the fund may not be able to place or change such orders.
Creations and redemptions must be made through a firm that is either a broker-dealer or other participant in the Continuous Net Settlement System of the National Securities Clearing Corporation or a DTC participant and, in either case, has executed an AP Agreement with the distributor. Information about the procedures regarding creations and redemptions of Creation Units (including the cut-off times for receipt of creation and redemption orders) is included in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI).
Because new shares may be created and issued on an ongoing basis, at any point during the life of the fund a “distribution,” as such term is used in the Securities Act of 1933 (Securities Act), may be occurring. Broker-dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner that could render them statutory underwriters and subject to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the Securities Act. Any determination of whether one is an underwriter must take into account all the relevant facts and circumstances of each particular case.
Broker-dealers should also note that dealers who are not “underwriters” but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted to ordinary secondary transactions), and thus dealing with shares that are part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(a)(3)(C) of the Securities Act, would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(a)(3) of the Securities Act. For delivery of prospectuses to exchange members, the prospectus delivery mechanism of Rule 153 under the Securities Act is available only with respect to transactions on a national securities exchange.
In addition, certain affiliates of the fund and the advisor may purchase and resell fund shares pursuant to this prospectus.
Share Price and Distributions
Share Price
The price of fund shares is based on market price. The trading prices of the fund’s shares in the secondary market generally differ from the fund’s daily NAV and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intraday value of shares of the fund, also known as the “indicative optimized portfolio value” (IOPV), is disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the fund’s shares are listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The IOPV is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash contained in the portfolio at the beginning of the trading day. The IOPV does not necessarily reflect the best possible valuation of the current portfolio of securities held by the fund, and may not be calculated in the same manner as the NAV. Therefore, the IOPV should not be viewed as a “real-time” update of the fund’s NAV, which is computed only once a day as described below. The IOPV is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities held by the fund. The quotations of certain fund holdings may not be updated during U.S. trading hours if such holdings do not trade in the United States. The fund, the advisor and their related entities are not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the IOPV and make no representation or warranty as to its accuracy.


9



Calculation of NAV
American Century Investments will price the fund shares purchased or redeemed by authorized participants based on the net asset value (NAV) next determined after an order is received in good order by the fund’s transfer agent. We determine the NAV of the fund as of the close of regular trading (usually 4 p.m. Eastern time) on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on each day the NYSE is open. On days when the NYSE is closed (including certain U.S. national holidays), we do not calculate the NAV.
 
The net asset value, or NAV, of the fund is the current value of the fund’s assets, minus any liabilities, divided by the number of shares of the fund outstanding.
 
The fund values portfolio securities for which market quotations are readily available at their market price. As a general rule, equity securities listed on a U.S. exchange are valued at the last reported sale price as of the time of valuation. Securities that are neither listed on a securities exchange or traded over the counter may be priced using the mean of the bid and asked prices obtained from an independent broker who is an established market maker in the security. The fund may use third party pricing services to assist in the determination of market value.
If the fund determines that the market price for a portfolio security is not readily available or that the valuation methods mentioned above do not reflect the security’s fair value, such security is valued as determined in good faith by the fund’s board or its designee, in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board. Circumstances that may cause the fund to use alternate procedures to value a security include, but are not limited to:
if, after the close of the foreign exchange on which a portfolio security is principally traded, but before the close of the NYSE, an event occurs that may materially affect the value of the security;
a debt security has been declared in default; or
trading in a security has been halted during the trading day.
If such circumstances occur, the fund will fair value the security if the fair valuation would materially impact the fund’s NAV. While fair value determinations involve judgments that are inherently subjective, these determinations are made in good faith in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board.
The effect of using fair value determinations is that the fund’s NAV will be based, to some degree, on security valuations that the board or its designee believes are fair rather than being solely determined by the market.
With respect to any portion of the fund’s assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies that are registered with the SEC (known as registered investment companies), the fund’s NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such registered investment companies. These registered investment companies are required by law to explain the circumstances under which they will use fair value pricing and the effects of using fair value pricing in their prospectuses.
Trading of securities in foreign markets may not take place every day the NYSE is open. Also, trading in some foreign markets and on some electronic trading networks may take place on weekends or holidays when the fund’s NAV is not calculated. So, the value of the fund’s portfolio may be affected on days when you will not be able to purchase or sell fund shares.
Distributions
Federal tax laws require the fund to make distributions to its shareholders in order to qualify as a regulated investment company. Qualification as a regulated investment company means the fund should not be subject to state or federal income tax on amounts distributed. The distributions generally consist of dividends and interest received by the fund, as well as capital gains realized by the fund on the sale of its investment securities.
 
Capital gains are increases in the values of capital assets, such as stocks or bonds, from the time the assets are purchased.
 
The fund generally expects to pay distributions from net income, if any, quarterly. The fund generally pays distributions from realized capital gains, if any, once a year. It may make more frequent distributions if necessary to comply with Internal Revenue Code provisions.
Although dividends generally will be treated as distributed when paid, any dividend declared by a fund in October, November or December and payable to shareholders of record in such a month that is paid during the following January will be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as received by shareholders on December 31 of the calendar year in which it was declared.
Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the fund. Distributions may be automatically reinvested in whole fund shares only if you purchased the shares through a broker that makes such option available.

10



Taxes
Some of the tax consequences of owning shares of the fund will vary depending on whether you own them through a taxable or tax-deferred account. Distributions by the fund of dividend and interest income, capital gains and other income it has generated through its investment activities will generally be taxable to shareholders who hold shares in a taxable account. Tax consequences also may result when investors sell fund shares.
Tax-Deferred Accounts
If you purchase fund shares through a tax-deferred account, such as an IRA or employer-sponsored retirement plan, income and capital gains distributions usually will not be subject to current taxation but will accumulate in your account under the plan on a tax-deferred basis. Likewise, moving from one fund to another fund within a plan or tax-deferred account generally will not cause you to be taxed. For information about the tax consequences of making purchases or withdrawals through a tax-deferred account, please consult your plan administrator, your summary plan description or a tax advisor.
Taxable Accounts
If you own fund shares through a taxable account, you may be taxed on your investments if the fund makes distributions or if you sell your fund shares.
Taxability of Distributions
Fund distributions may consist of income, such as dividends and interest earned by the fund from its investments, or capital gains generated by the fund from the sale of investment securities. Distributions of income are taxed as ordinary income, unless they are designated as qualified dividend income and you meet a minimum required holding period with respect to your shares of the fund, in which case distributions of income are taxed at the same rates as long-term capital gains.
 
Qualified dividend income is a dividend received by a fund from the stock of a domestic or qualifying foreign corporation, provided that the fund has held the stock for a required holding period and the stock was not on loan at the time of the dividend.
 
The tax character of any distributions from capital gains is determined by how long the fund held the underlying security that was sold, not by how long you have been invested in the fund or whether you reinvest your distributions or take them in cash. Short-term (one year or less) capital gains are taxable as ordinary income. Gains on securities held for more than one year are taxed at the lower rates applicable to long-term capital gains.
If a fund’s distributions exceed current and accumulated earnings and profits, such excess will generally be considered a return of capital. A return of capital distribution is generally not subject to tax, but will reduce your cost basis in the fund and result in higher realized capital gains (or lower realized capital losses) upon the sale of fund shares.
You will receive information regarding the tax character of fund distributions for each calendar year in an annual tax mailing.
If you meet specified income levels, you will also be subject to a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax which is imposed on net investment income, including interest, dividends and capital gains. Distributions also may be subject to state and local taxes. Because everyone’s tax situation is unique, you may want to consult your tax professional about federal, state and local tax consequences.
Taxes on Transactions
Your sales of fund shares are subject to capital gains tax. Short-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for 12 months or less. Long-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for more than 12 months. If your shares decrease in value, their sale will result in a long-term or short-term capital loss. However, you should note that loss realized upon the sale of shares held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any distribution of long-term capital gain to you with respect to those shares. If a loss is realized on the sale of fund shares, the reinvestment in additional fund shares within 30 days before or after the sale may be subject to the wash sale rules of the Internal Revenue Code. This may result in a postponement of the recognition of such loss for federal income tax purposes.
If you have not certified that your Social Security number or tax identification number is correct and that you are not subject to withholding, you may be subject to backup withholding at the applicable federal withholding tax rate on taxable dividends, capital gains distributions and proceeds from the sale of fund shares.
Taxes on Creations and Redemptions of Creation Units
An Authorized Participant who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or a loss equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time and the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered plus the amount of cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who redeems Creation Units will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of the aggregate market value of any securities received plus the amount of any cash received for such Creation Units. The IRS, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an

11



exchange of securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position.
Any capital gain or loss realized upon the creation of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the securities exchanged for such Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon the redemption of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the shares comprising the Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Otherwise, such capital gains or losses will generally be treated as short-term capital gain or loss. Any loss upon a redemption of Creation Units held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any amounts treated as distributions to the applicable Authorized Participant of long-term capital gain with respect to the Creation Units (including any amounts credited to the Authorized Participant as undistributed capital gains).
If a fund redeems Creation Units in cash, it may recognize more capital gains than it will if it redeems Creation Units in-kind.
Buying a Dividend
Purchasing fund shares in a taxable account shortly before a distribution is sometimes known as buying a dividend. In taxable accounts, you must pay income taxes on the distribution whether you reinvest the distribution or take it in cash. In addition, you will have to pay taxes on the distribution whether the value of your investment decreased, increased or remained the same after you bought the fund shares.
The risk in buying a dividend is that a fund’s portfolio may build up taxable income and gains throughout the period covered by a distribution, as income is earned and securities are sold at a profit. The fund distributes the income and gains to you, after subtracting any losses, even if you did not own the shares when the income was earned or the gains occurred.
If you buy a dividend, you incur the full tax liability of the distribution period, but you may not enjoy the full benefit of the income earned or the gains realized in the fund’s portfolio.
Additional Information
Premium/Discount Information
Once the fund is operational, tables in this section will show the number of days the market price of the fund’s shares was greater than the fund’s NAV and the number of days the market price was less than the fund’s NAV for the most recently completed calendar quarters. Shareholders may pay more than NAV when they buy fund shares and receive less than NAV when they sell those shares, because shares are bought and sold at current market prices. Data presented represents past performance and cannot be used to predict future results.
Service, Distribution and Administrative Fees
Investment Company Act Rule 12b-1 permits investment companies that adopt a written plan to pay certain expenses associated with the distribution of their shares out of fund assets. The Board of Trustees has adopted a 12b-1 plan that allows the fund to pay annual fees not to exceed 0.25% to the distributor for distribution and individual shareholder services. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 plan fee at this time.
Because these fees may be used to pay for services that are not related to prospective sales of the fund, to the extent that a fee is authorized, the fund will continue to make payments under its plan even if it is closed to new investors. Because these fees are paid out of the fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges.
The advisor or its affiliates may make payments to intermediaries for various additional services, other expenses and/or the intermediaries’ distribution of the fund out of their profits or other available sources. Such payments may be made for one or more of the following: (1) distribution, which may include expenses incurred by intermediaries for their sales activities with respect to the fund, such as preparing, printing and distributing sales literature and advertising materials and compensating registered representatives or other employees of such financial intermediaries for their sales activities, as well as the opportunity for the fund to be made available by such intermediaries; (2) shareholder services, such as providing individual and custom investment advisory services to clients of the financial intermediaries; and (3) marketing and promotional services, including business planning assistance, educating personnel about the fund, and sponsorship of sales meetings, which may include covering costs of providing speakers, meals and other entertainment. The advisor may pay partnership and/or sponsorship fees to support seminars, conferences, and other programs designed to educate intermediaries about the fund and may cover the expenses associated with attendance at such meetings, including travel costs. The advisor and its affiliates may also pay fees related to obtaining data regarding intermediary or financial advisor activities to assist American Century with sales reporting, business intelligence and training and education opportunities. These payments and activities are intended to provide an incentive to intermediaries to sell the fund by educating them about the fund and helping defray the costs associated with offering the fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the intermediary to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information. The amount of any payments described in this paragraph is determined by the advisor or its affiliates, and all such

12



amounts are paid out of their available assets, and not paid by you or the fund. As a result, the total expense ratio of the fund will not be affected by any such payments.


13



Financial Highlights
There is no financial information for the fund because it is a new fund.

14



Notes




Where to Find More Information
Annual and Semiannual Reports
Additional information about the fund’s investments will be available in the fund’s annual and semiannual reports to shareholders. In the fund’s annual report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.
Statement of Additional Information (SAI)
The SAI contains a more detailed legal description of the fund’s operations, investment restrictions, policies and practices. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this prospectus. This means that it is legally part of this prospectus, even if you don’t request a copy.
You may obtain a free copy of the SAI, annual reports and semiannual reports, and you may ask questions about the fund or your accounts, online at americancenturyetfs.com, by contacting American Century Investments at the addresses or telephone numbers listed below or by contacting your financial intermediary.
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
Reports and other information about the fund are available on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website at sec.gov, and copies of this information may be obtained, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following email address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

This prospectus shall not constitute an offer to sell securities of the fund in any state, territory, or other jurisdiction where the fund’s shares have not been registered or qualified for sale, unless such registration or qualification is not required, or under any circumstances in which such offer or solicitation would be unlawful.



















American Century Investments
americancenturyetfs.com
Financial Professionals
P.O. Box 419385
Kansas City, Missouri 64141-6385
1-833-ACI-ETFS

Investment Company Act File No. 811-23305
CL-PRS-XXXXX 1906




The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the
registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to
sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
[_________], 2019

American Century Investments
Prospectus

 
Ticker:
Exchange:
Avantis™ U.S. Small Cap Value ETF
AVUV
 











Beginning on January 1, 2021, as permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the fund’s shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from the fund or from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be made available on a website, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. You may elect to receive shareholder reports and other communications from the fund or your financial intermediary electronically by calling or sending an email request.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. You can inform the fund or your financial intermediary that you wish to continue receiving paper copies of your shareholder reports by calling or sending an email request. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all funds held with the fund complex/your financial intermediary.


The Securities and Exchange Commission has
not approved or disapproved these securities or
passed upon the adequacy of this prospectus. Any
representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.
 




Table of Contents
Fund Summary
2

Investment Objective
2

Fees and Expenses
2

Principal Investment Strategies
2

Principal Risks
3

Fund Performance
4

Portfolio Management
4

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
4

Tax Information
4

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
4

Objectives, Strategies and Risks
5

Management
7

Investing in the Fund
8

Share Price and Distributions
9

Taxes
11

Additional Information
12

Financial Highlights
14




















©2019 American Century Proprietary Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.




Fund Summary
Investment Objective
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
The following table describes the fees and expenses you may pay if you buy and hold shares of the fund. You may also incur usual and customary brokerage commissions when buying or selling shares of the fund, which are not reflected in the example that follows.
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fee
—%
Other Expenses
0.00%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
—%
1 
Other expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
Example
The example below is intended to help you compare the costs of investing in the fund with the costs of investing in other funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods, that you earn a 5% return each year, and that the fund’s operating expenses remain the same. You may be required to pay brokerage commissions on your purchases of shares of the fund which are not reflected in the example. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 year
3 years
 
 
Portfolio Turnover
The fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the fund’s performance. Because the fund is new, the fund’s portfolio turnover rate is not available.
Principal Investment Strategies
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of U.S. small cap companies across market sectors and industry groups.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in securities of small capitalization companies located in the United States. To determine whether a company is a U.S. company, the portfolio managers will consider various factors, including where the company is headquartered, where the company’s principal operations are located, where the company’s revenues are derived, where the principal trading market is located, the country in which the company was legally organized, and whether the company is in the fund’s benchmark. Currently, companies smaller than the largest 1000 U.S. companies or companies representing the bottom 10% of the float adjusted market capitalization of all U.S. listed companies or companies in the fund’s benchmark may be considered U.S. small capitalization companies. Though market capitalizations will change from time to time, as of _______, 2019, the fund considers companies with market capitalizations under $__ billion to be small capitalization companies.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending and invest its collateral in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a

2



security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.
Principal Risks
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - The fund may effect its creations and redemptions for cash, rather than for in-kind securities. Therefore, it may be required to sell portfolio securities and subsequently recognize gains on such sales that the fund might not have recognized if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. As such, investments in fund shares may be less tax-efficient than an investment in an ETF that distributes portfolio securities entirely in-kind.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - The fund faces numerous market trading risks, including the potential lack of an active market for fund shares, losses from trading in secondary markets, periods of high volatility and disruption in the creation and/or redemption process of the fund. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the fund’s shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.
Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to net asset value (NAV) and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.

3



Fund Performance
The fund’s performance history is not available as of the date of this prospectus. When the fund has investment results for a full calendar year, this section will feature charts that show annual total returns, highest and lowest quarterly returns and average annual total returns for the fund. This information indicates the volatility of the fund’s historical returns from year to year. For current performance information, please visit americancenturyetfs.com.
Performance information is designed to help you see how fund returns can vary. Keep in mind that past performance (before and after taxes) does not predict how the fund will perform in the future.
Portfolio Management
Investment Advisor
American Century Investment Management, Inc.
Portfolio Managers

Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
The fund is an ETF. Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer. The price of fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). The fund issues and redeems shares that have been aggregated into blocks of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof (Creation Units) to authorized participants who have entered into agreements with the fund’s distributor. The fund will generally issue and redeem Creation Units in return for a basket of securities (and an amount of cash) that the fund specifies each day.
Tax Information
Fund distributions are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred account such as a 401(k) or individual retirement account (in which case you may be taxed upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.


4



Objectives, Strategies and Risks
What are the fund’s investment objectives?
The fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
The fund’s investment objective is a nonfundamental investment policy and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without approval by shareholders.
What are the fund’s principal investment strategies?
The fund invests primarily in a diverse group of U.S. small cap companies across market sectors and industry groups.
The fund seeks securities of companies that it expects to have higher returns relative to other securities by placing an enhanced emphasis on securities of companies with smaller market capitalizations and securities of companies it defines as high profitability or value companies. Conversely, the fund seeks to underweight or exclude securities it expects to have lower returns, such as securities of large companies with lower levels of profitability and higher prices relative to their book values or other financial metrics. To identify small capitalization, high profitability, or value companies, the portfolio managers may use reported and estimated company financials and market data including, but not limited to, shares outstanding, book value and its components, cash flows, revenue, expenses, accruals and income. Value companies may be defined as those with lower price relative to book value ratio or other fundamental value. High profitability companies may be defined as those with higher cash based operating profitability. The portfolio managers may also consider other factors when selecting securities including, industry classifications, the past performance of the security relative to other securities, its liquidity, its float, and tax, governance or costs considerations, among others.
Under normal market conditions, the fund will invest at least 80% of its assets in securities of small capitalization companies located in the United States. To determine whether a company is a U.S. company, the portfolio managers will consider various factors, including where the company is headquartered, where the company’s principal operations are located, where the company’s revenues are derived, where the principal trading market is located, the country in which the company was legally organized, and whether the company is in the fund’s benchmark. Currently, companies smaller than the largest 1000 U.S. companies or companies representing the bottom 10% of the float adjusted market capitalization of all U.S. listed companies or companies in the fund’s benchmark may be considered U.S. small capitalization companies. Though market capitalizations will change from time to time, as of _______, 2019, the fund considers companies with market capitalizations under $__ billion to be small capitalization companies.
Securities in which the fund may invest include common stock, preferred stock, exchange traded funds, equity-equivalent securities, such as convertible securities, and derivative instruments that give exposure to equities, such as stock futures contract, stock index futures contracts, and swaps on equities.
The fund also may invest in derivative instruments such as futures contracts, currency forwards, and swap agreements. For example, the fund may use futures on securities and U.S. indices to gain exposure to equities to manage cash flows. The fund may also engage in securities lending. Collateral received by the fund in connection with loaning its securities may consist of cash and U.S. government securities. Cash collateral may be invested in eligible securities.
The fund is an actively managed exchange-traded fund (ETF) that does not seek to replicate the performance of a specified index. The portfolio managers continually analyze market and financial data to make buy, sell, and hold decisions. When buying or selling a security, the portfolio managers may consider the trade-off between expected returns of the security and implementation or tax costs of the trade in an attempt to gain trading efficiencies, avoid unnecessary risk, and enhance fund performance.
In the event of exceptional market or economic conditions, the fund may take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with the fund’s principal investment strategies. To the extent the fund assumes a defensive position, it may not achieve its investment objective.
A description of the policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the fund’s portfolio securities is available in the statement of additional information.
What are the principal risks of investing in the fund?
Equity Securities Risk - The value of equity securities, may fluctuate due to changes in investor perception of a specific issuer, changes in the general condition of the stock market, or occurrences of political or economic events that affect equity issuers and the market. Common stock prices may be particularly sensitive to rising interest rates, as the cost of capital rises and borrowing costs increase.
Small-Cap Stock Risk - Smaller companies may have limited financial resources, product lines, markets and have less publicly available information. These securities may trade less frequently and in more limited volumes than larger companies’ securities, leading to higher transaction costs. Smaller companies also may be more sensitive to changing economic conditions, and investments in smaller foreign companies may experience more price volatility.
Investment Process Risk - Stocks selected by the portfolio managers using quantitative models may perform differently than expected due to the portfolio managers’ judgments regarding the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues with the construction and implementation of the models (including,

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for example, data problems and/or software or other implementation issues). There is no guarantee that the use of the quantitative model will result in effective investment decisions for the fund. Additionally, the commonality of portfolio holdings across quantitative investment managers may amplify losses.
Cash Transactions Risk - ETFs generally are able to make in-kind redemptions to avoid some costs, including being taxed on gains on the distributed portfolio securities at the fund level. However, because the fund may effect purchases or redemptions fully or partially in cash, rather than in-kind, it may be required to sell portfolio securities in order to obtain the cash needed to distribute redemption proceeds. If the fund recognizes gain on these sales, this generally will cause the fund to recognize gain it might not otherwise have recognized, or to recognize such gain sooner than would otherwise be required if it were to distribute portfolio securities in-kind. The fund generally intends to distribute these gains to shareholders to avoid being taxed on this gain at the fund level and otherwise comply with the special tax rules that apply to it. This strategy may cause shareholders to be subject to tax on gains they would not otherwise be subject to, or at an earlier date than, if they had made an investment in a different ETF. Moreover, cash transactions may have to be carried out over several days if the securities market is relatively illiquid and may involve considerable brokerage fees and taxes. These brokerage fees and taxes, which will be higher than if the fund sold and redeemed its shares principally in-kind, will be passed on to purchasers and redeemers of Creation Units in the form of creation and redemption transaction fees.
Style Risk - If at any time the market is not favoring the fund’s quantitative investment style, the fund’s gains may not be as big as, or its losses may be bigger than, those of other equity funds using different investment styles.
Market Trading Risk - Although shares of the fund are listed for trading on one or more stock exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained. There are no obligations of market makers to make a market in the fund’s shares or of an authorized participant to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. Decisions by market makers or authorized participants to reduce their role or step away from these activities in times of market stress could inhibit the effectiveness of the arbitrage process in maintaining the relationship between the underlying value of the fund’s portfolio securities and the fund’s market price. This reduced effectiveness could result in fund shares trading at a premium or discount to its NAV and also greater than normal intraday bid/ask spreads.
Shares of the fund may trade in the secondary market at times when the fund does not accept orders to purchase or redeem shares. At such times, shares may trade in the secondary market with more significant premiums or discounts than might be experienced at times when the fund accepts purchase and redemption orders. Secondary market trading in fund shares may be halted by a stock exchange because of market conditions or other reasons, and may be subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to “circuit breaker” rules on the stock exchange or market. There can be no assurance that the requirements necessary to maintain the listing or trading of fund shares will continue to be met or will remain unchanged. In addition, during a “flash crash,” the market prices of the fund’s shares may decline suddenly and significantly. Such a decline may not reflect the performance of the portfolio securities held by the fund. Flash crashes may cause authorized participants and other market makers to limit or cease trading in the fund’s shares for temporary or longer periods. Shareholders could suffer significant losses to the extent that they sell fund shares at these temporarily low market prices.
Shares of the fund may trade at prices other than NAV. Thus, you may pay more (or less) than NAV when you buy shares of the fund in the secondary market, and you may receive less (or more) than NAV when you sell those shares in the secondary market. While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it likely that the fund’s shares normally will trade on stock exchanges at prices close to the fund’s next calculated NAV, market prices are not expected to correlate exactly with the fund’s NAV due to timing reasons as well as market supply and demand factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions or extreme market volatility may result in trading prices for shares of the fund that differ significantly from its NAV. The portfolio managers cannot predict whether shares will trade above (premium), below (discount) or at NAV.
When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity. During times of market stress, spreads may widen causing investors to pay more.
Market Risk - The value of the fund’s shares will go up and down based on the performance of the companies whose securities it owns and other factors generally affecting the securities market.
Derivative Risk - The use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional instruments. Derivatives are subject to a number of risks, including liquidity, interest rate, market, credit, and correlation risk. Derivative transactions may expose the fund to the effects of leverage, which could increase the fund’s exposure to the market and magnify potential losses, particularly when derivatives are used to enhance return rather than offset risk. Derivatives can also be highly illiquid and difficult to unwind or value, and changes in the value of a derivative held by the fund may not correlate with the value of the underlying instrument or the fund’s other investments.

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Securities Lending Risk - Securities lending involves the risk of loss of rights in, or delay in recovery of, the loaned securities if the borrower fails to return the security loaned or becomes insolvent. Any decline in the value of a security while the security is loaned will adversely affect performance. These events could also result in adverse tax consequences.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk - Only an authorized participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the fund. The fund may have a limited number of institutions that act as authorized participants, none of which are obligated to engage in creation or redemption transactions. To the extent that these institutions exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with respect to the fund and no other authorized participant is able to step forward to process creation and/or redemption orders, fund shares may trade at a discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be more pronounced in volatile markets, potentially where there are significant redemptions in ETFs generally. Authorized participant concentration risks may be heightened in scenarios where authorized participants have limited or diminished access to the capital required to post collateral.
Price Volatility - The value of the fund’s shares may fluctuate significantly in the short term.
Redemption Risk - The fund may need to sell securities at times it would not otherwise do so to meet shareholder redemption requests. Selling securities to meet such redemptions may cause the fund to experience a loss, increase the fund’s transaction costs or have tax consequences. To the extent that a large shareholder (including a fund of funds or 529 college savings plan) invests in the fund, the fund may experience relatively large redemptions as such shareholder reallocates its assets.
Principal Loss - At any given time your shares may be worth less than the price you paid for them. In other words, it is possible to lose money by investing in the fund.
An investment in the fund is not a bank deposit, and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) or any other government agency.
Management
Who manages the fund?
The Board of Trustees, investment advisor and fund management team play key roles in the management of the fund.
The Board of Trustees
The Board of Trustees is responsible for overseeing the advisor’s management and operations of the fund pursuant to the management agreement. In performing their duties, Board members receive detailed information about the fund and its advisor regularly throughout the year, and meet at least quarterly with management of the advisor to review reports about fund operations. The trustees’ role is to provide oversight and not to provide day-to-day management. The majority of the trustees are independent of the fund’s advisor. They are not employees, directors or officers of, and have no financial interest in, the advisor or any of its affiliated companies (other than as shareholders of American Century Investments funds), and they do not have any other affiliations, positions or relationships that would cause them to be considered “interested persons” under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (Investment Company Act).
The Investment Advisor
The fund’s investment advisor is American Century Investment Management, Inc. (the advisor). The advisor has been managing investment companies since 1958 and is headquartered at 4500 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111.
The advisor is responsible for managing the investment portfolio of the fund and directing the purchase and sale of its investment securities. The advisor also arranges for transfer agency, custody and all other services necessary for the fund to operate.
For the services it provides to the fund, the advisor receives a unified management fee based on a percentage of the daily net assets of the fund at the annual rate of [__]%. The amount of the fee is calculated daily and paid monthly in arrears. The advisor pays all expenses of managing and operating the fund, other than the management fee payable to the advisor, brokerage and other transaction fees and expenses relating to the acquisition and disposition of portfolio securities, acquired fund fees and expenses, interest (including without limitation borrowing costs and overdraft charges), taxes (including without limitation income, excise, transfer, and withholding taxes), litigation expenses (including without limitation litigation counsel fees and expenses), extraordinary expenses, and expenses incurred in connection with the provision of shareholder and distribution services under a plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. The advisor may pay unaffiliated third parties who provide recordkeeping and administrative services that would otherwise be performed by an affiliate of the advisor.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the fund’s investment advisory agreement with the advisor will be available in the fund’s semiannual report to shareholders for the period ended February 29, 2020.
The Fund Management Team
The advisor uses teams of portfolio managers and analysts to manage funds. The teams meet regularly to review portfolio holdings and discuss purchase and sale activity. Team members buy and sell securities for a fund as they see fit, guided by the fund’s investment objective and strategy.

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The portfolio managers on the investment team who are jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the fund are identified below.
[_______________]
The statement of additional information provides additional information about the accounts managed by the portfolio managers, the structure of their compensation, and their ownership of fund securities.
Fund Performance
The fund has the same management team and investment policies as another fund in the American Century Investments family of funds, the Avantis U.S. Small Cap Value Fund. The fees and expenses of the funds are similar, and they are managed with substantially the same investment objective and strategies. Notwithstanding these general similarities, the Avantis U.S. Small Cap Value Fund and the Avantis U.S. Small Cap Value ETF are separate funds that have different investment performance. Differences in cash flows into the two funds, the size of their portfolios and specific investments held by the two funds, as well as differing expenses, cause performance to differ. Please consult the mutual fund prospectus for a description of the mutual fund, details on how the mutual fund is offered, and its associated fees.
Fundamental Investment Policies
Shareholders must approve any change to the fundamental investment policies contained in the statement of additional information. The Board of Trustees and/or the advisor may change any other policies, including the fund’s investment objective, or investment strategies described in this prospectus or otherwise used in the operation of the fund at any time, subject to applicable notice provisions.
Investing in the Fund
Buying and Selling Shares
Shares of the fund may be acquired or redeemed directly from the fund only in Creation Units or multiples thereof, as discussed below. Only an authorized participant may engage in creation and redemption transactions directly with the fund. Once created, shares of the fund generally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit.
Shares of the fund are listed on a national securities exchange for trading during the trading day. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies. American Century ETF Trust (the trust) does not impose any minimum investment for shares of the fund purchased on an exchange. Shares of the fund trade under the following ticker symbol: AVUV.
Buying or selling fund shares on an exchange involves two types of costs that may apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling shares of the fund through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your broker. The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread,” that is, any difference between the bid price and the ask price. The spread varies over time for shares of the fund based on the fund’s trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally lower if the fund has a lot of trading volume and market liquidity, and higher if the fund has little trading volume and market liquidity.
The fund’s primary listing exchange is [____]., which is open for trading Monday through Friday and is closed on weekends and the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day.
Book Entry
Shares of the fund are held in book-entry form, which means that no share certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (DTC) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the fund and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.
Investors owning shares of the fund are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form.
Frequent Trading Practices
The Board of Trustees has not adopted a policy of monitoring for frequent purchases and redemptions of fund shares (frequent trading). The Board of Trustees believes that a frequent trading policy is unnecessary because fund shares are listed for trading on a national securities exchange. Therefore, it is unlikely that a shareholder could take advantage of a potential arbitrage opportunity presented by a lag between a change in the value of the fund’s portfolio securities after the close of the primary markets for the fund’s

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portfolio securities and the reflection of that change in the fund’s NAV (market timing), because the fund generally sells and redeems its shares directly through transactions that are in-kind and/or for cash, subject to the conditions described below under Creations and Redemptions.
Investments by Other Investment Companies
Section 12(d)(1) of the Investment Company Act restricts investments by investment companies in the securities of other investment companies. Registered investment companies are permitted to invest in the fund beyond the limits set forth in Section 12(d)(1), subject to certain terms and conditions set forth in SEC rules or in an SEC exemptive order issued to the trust. In order for a registered investment company to invest in shares of the fund beyond the limitations of Section 12(d)(1) pursuant to the exemptive relief obtained by the trust, the registered investment company must enter into an agreement with the trust.
Creations and Redemptions
Prior to trading in the secondary market, shares of the fund are “created” at NAV by market makers, large investors and institutions only in block-size Creation Units of [50,000] shares or multiples thereof. All orders to purchase Creation Units must be placed by or through an authorized participant that has entered into an authorized participant agreement (AP Agreement) with Foreside Fund Services, LLC (the distributor). Only an authorized participant may create or redeem Creation Units directly with the fund.
A creation transaction, which is subject to acceptance by the trust, generally takes place when an authorized participant deposits into the fund a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities) in exchange for a specified number of Creation Units. Similarly, shares can be redeemed only in Creation Units, generally for a designated portfolio of securities and/or cash (which may include cash in lieu of certain securities). With respect to the fund, redemptions are generally on an in-kind basis, but the fund reserves the right to meet redemptions in cash. Except when aggregated in Creation Units, shares are not redeemable by the fund.
The prices at which creations and redemptions occur are based on the next calculation of NAV after a creation or redemption order is received in a proper form under the AP Agreement. The portfolio of securities required for purchase of a Creation Unit is generally the same as the portfolio of securities the fund will deliver upon redemption of fund shares, except under certain circumstances. As a result of any system failure or other interruption, creation or redemption orders either may not be executed according to the fund’s instructions or may not be executed at all, or the fund may not be able to place or change such orders.
Creations and redemptions must be made through a firm that is either a broker-dealer or other participant in the Continuous Net Settlement System of the National Securities Clearing Corporation or a DTC participant and, in either case, has executed an AP Agreement with the distributor. Information about the procedures regarding creations and redemptions of Creation Units (including the cut-off times for receipt of creation and redemption orders) is included in the fund’s statement of additional information (SAI).
Because new shares may be created and issued on an ongoing basis, at any point during the life of the fund a “distribution,” as such term is used in the Securities Act of 1933 (Securities Act), may be occurring. Broker-dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner that could render them statutory underwriters and subject to the prospectus delivery and liability provisions of the Securities Act. Any determination of whether one is an underwriter must take into account all the relevant facts and circumstances of each particular case.
Broker-dealers should also note that dealers who are not “underwriters” but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted to ordinary secondary transactions), and thus dealing with shares that are part of an “unsold allotment” within the meaning of Section 4(a)(3)(C) of the Securities Act, would be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(a)(3) of the Securities Act. For delivery of prospectuses to exchange members, the prospectus delivery mechanism of Rule 153 under the Securities Act is available only with respect to transactions on a national securities exchange.
In addition, certain affiliates of the fund and the advisor may purchase and resell fund shares pursuant to this prospectus.
Share Price and Distributions
Share Price
The price of fund shares is based on market price. The trading prices of the fund’s shares in the secondary market generally differ from the fund’s daily NAV and are affected by market forces such as supply and demand, economic conditions and other factors. Information regarding the intraday value of shares of the fund, also known as the “indicative optimized portfolio value” (IOPV), is disseminated every 15 seconds throughout the trading day by the national securities exchange on which the fund’s shares are listed or by market data vendors or other information providers. The IOPV is based on the current market value of the securities and/or cash contained in the portfolio at the beginning of the trading day. The IOPV does not necessarily reflect the best possible valuation of the current portfolio of securities held by the fund, and may not be calculated in the same manner as the NAV. Therefore, the IOPV should not be viewed as a “real-time” update of the fund’s NAV, which is computed only once a day as described below. The IOPV is generally determined by using both current market quotations and/or price quotations obtained from broker-dealers that may trade in the portfolio securities held by the fund. The quotations of certain fund holdings may not be updated during U.S. trading hours if such

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holdings do not trade in the United States. The fund, the advisor and their related entities are not involved in, or responsible for, the calculation or dissemination of the IOPV and make no representation or warranty as to its accuracy.
Calculation of NAV
American Century Investments will price the fund shares purchased or redeemed by authorized participants based on the net asset value (NAV) next determined after an order is received in good order by the fund’s transfer agent. We determine the NAV of the fund as of the close of regular trading (usually 4 p.m. Eastern time) on the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on each day the NYSE is open. On days when the NYSE is closed (including certain U.S. national holidays), we do not calculate the NAV.
 
The net asset value, or NAV, of the fund is the current value of the fund’s assets, minus any liabilities, divided by the number of shares of the fund outstanding.
 
The fund values portfolio securities for which market quotations are readily available at their market price. As a general rule, equity securities listed on a U.S. exchange are valued at the last reported sale price as of the time of valuation. Securities that are neither listed on a securities exchange or traded over the counter may be priced using the mean of the bid and asked prices obtained from an independent broker who is an established market maker in the security. The fund may use third party pricing services to assist in the determination of market value.
If the fund determines that the market price for a portfolio security is not readily available or that the valuation methods mentioned above do not reflect the security’s fair value, such security is valued as determined in good faith by the fund’s board or its designee, in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board. Circumstances that may cause the fund to use alternate procedures to value a security include, but are not limited to:
if, after the close of the foreign exchange on which a portfolio security is principally traded, but before the close of the NYSE, an event occurs that may materially affect the value of the security;
a debt security has been declared in default; or
trading in a security has been halted during the trading day.
If such circumstances occur, the fund will fair value the security if the fair valuation would materially impact the fund’s NAV. While fair value determinations involve judgments that are inherently subjective, these determinations are made in good faith in accordance with procedures adopted by the fund’s board.
The effect of using fair value determinations is that the fund’s NAV will be based, to some degree, on security valuations that the board or its designee believes are fair rather than being solely determined by the market.
With respect to any portion of the fund’s assets that are invested in one or more open-end management investment companies that are registered with the SEC (known as registered investment companies), the fund’s NAV will be calculated based upon the NAVs of such registered investment companies. These registered investment companies are required by law to explain the circumstances under which they will use fair value pricing and the effects of using fair value pricing in their prospectuses.
Trading of securities in foreign markets may not take place every day the NYSE is open. Also, trading in some foreign markets and on some electronic trading networks may take place on weekends or holidays when the fund’s NAV is not calculated. So, the value of the fund’s portfolio may be affected on days when you will not be able to purchase or sell fund shares.
Distributions
Federal tax laws require the fund to make distributions to its shareholders in order to qualify as a regulated investment company. Qualification as a regulated investment company means the fund should not be subject to state or federal income tax on amounts distributed. The distributions generally consist of dividends and interest received by the fund, as well as capital gains realized by the fund on the sale of its investment securities.
 
Capital gains are increases in the values of capital assets, such as stocks or bonds, from the time the assets are purchased.
 
The fund generally expects to pay distributions from net income, if any, quarterly. The fund generally pays distributions from realized capital gains, if any, once a year. It may make more frequent distributions if necessary to comply with Internal Revenue Code provisions.
Although dividends generally will be treated as distributed when paid, any dividend declared by a fund in October, November or December and payable to shareholders of record in such a month that is paid during the following January will be treated for U.S. federal income tax purposes as received by shareholders on December 31 of the calendar year in which it was declared.
Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from the fund. Distributions may be automatically reinvested in whole fund shares only if you purchased the shares through a broker that makes such option available.

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Taxes
Some of the tax consequences of owning shares of the fund will vary depending on whether you own them through a taxable or tax-deferred account. Distributions by the fund of dividend and interest income, capital gains and other income it has generated through its investment activities will generally be taxable to shareholders who hold shares in a taxable account. Tax consequences also may result when investors sell fund shares.
Tax-Deferred Accounts
If you purchase fund shares through a tax-deferred account, such as an IRA or employer-sponsored retirement plan, income and capital gains distributions usually will not be subject to current taxation but will accumulate in your account under the plan on a tax-deferred basis. Likewise, moving from one fund to another fund within a plan or tax-deferred account generally will not cause you to be taxed. For information about the tax consequences of making purchases or withdrawals through a tax-deferred account, please consult your plan administrator, your summary plan description or a tax advisor.
Taxable Accounts
If you own fund shares through a taxable account, you may be taxed on your investments if the fund makes distributions or if you sell your fund shares.
Taxability of Distributions
Fund distributions may consist of income, such as dividends and interest earned by the fund from its investments, or capital gains generated by the fund from the sale of investment securities. Distributions of income are taxed as ordinary income, unless they are designated as qualified dividend income and you meet a minimum required holding period with respect to your shares of the fund, in which case distributions of income are taxed at the same rates as long-term capital gains.
 
Qualified dividend income is a dividend received by a fund from the stock of a domestic or qualifying foreign corporation, provided that the fund has held the stock for a required holding period and the stock was not on loan at the time of the dividend.
 
The tax character of any distributions from capital gains is determined by how long the fund held the underlying security that was sold, not by how long you have been invested in the fund or whether you reinvest your distributions or take them in cash. Short-term (one year or less) capital gains are taxable as ordinary income. Gains on securities held for more than one year are taxed at the lower rates applicable to long-term capital gains.
If a fund’s distributions exceed current and accumulated earnings and profits, such excess will generally be considered a return of capital. A return of capital distribution is generally not subject to tax, but will reduce your cost basis in the fund and result in higher realized capital gains (or lower realized capital losses) upon the sale of fund shares.
You will receive information regarding the tax character of fund distributions for each calendar year in an annual tax mailing.
If you meet specified income levels, you will also be subject to a 3.8% Medicare contribution tax which is imposed on net investment income, including interest, dividends and capital gains. Distributions also may be subject to state and local taxes. Because everyone’s tax situation is unique, you may want to consult your tax professional about federal, state and local tax consequences.
Taxes on Transactions
Your sales of fund shares are subject to capital gains tax. Short-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for 12 months or less. Long-term capital gains are gains on fund shares you held for more than 12 months. If your shares decrease in value, their sale will result in a long-term or short-term capital loss. However, you should note that loss realized upon the sale of shares held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any distribution of long-term capital gain to you with respect to those shares. If a loss is realized on the sale of fund shares, the reinvestment in additional fund shares within 30 days before or after the sale may be subject to the wash sale rules of the Internal Revenue Code. This may result in a postponement of the recognition of such loss for federal income tax purposes.
If you have not certified that your Social Security number or tax identification number is correct and that you are not subject to withholding, you may be subject to backup withholding at the applicable federal withholding tax rate on taxable dividends, capital gains distributions and proceeds from the sale of fund shares.
Taxes on Creations and Redemptions of Creation Units
An Authorized Participant who exchanges securities for Creation Units generally will recognize a gain or a loss equal to the difference between the market value of the Creation Units at the time and the sum of the exchanger’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered plus the amount of cash paid for such Creation Units. A person who redeems Creation Units will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the exchanger’s basis in the Creation Units and the sum of the aggregate market value of any securities received plus the amount of any cash received for such Creation Units. The IRS, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an

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exchange of securities for Creation Units cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position.
Any capital gain or loss realized upon the creation of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the securities exchanged for such Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon the redemption of Creation Units will generally be treated as long-term capital gain or loss if the shares comprising the Creation Units have been held for more than one year. Otherwise, such capital gains or losses will generally be treated as short-term capital gain or loss. Any loss upon a redemption of Creation Units held for six months or less will be treated as a long-term capital loss to the extent of any amounts treated as distributions to the applicable Authorized Participant of long-term capital gain with respect to the Creation Units (including any amounts credited to the Authorized Participant as undistributed capital gains).
If a fund redeems Creation Units in cash, it may recognize more capital gains than it will if it redeems Creation Units in-kind.
Buying a Dividend
Purchasing fund shares in a taxable account shortly before a distribution is sometimes known as buying a dividend. In taxable accounts, you must pay income taxes on the distribution whether you reinvest the distribution or take it in cash. In addition, you will have to pay taxes on the distribution whether the value of your investment decreased, increased or remained the same after you bought the fund shares.
The risk in buying a dividend is that a fund’s portfolio may build up taxable income and gains throughout the period covered by a distribution, as income is earned and securities are sold at a profit. The fund distributes the income and gains to you, after subtracting any losses, even if you did not own the shares when the income was earned or the gains occurred.
If you buy a dividend, you incur the full tax liability of the distribution period, but you may not enjoy the full benefit of the income earned or the gains realized in the fund’s portfolio.
Additional Information
Premium/Discount Information
Once the fund is operational, tables in this section will show the number of days the market price of the fund’s shares was greater than the fund’s NAV and the number of days the market price was less than the fund’s NAV for the most recently completed calendar quarters. Shareholders may pay more than NAV when they buy fund shares and receive less than NAV when they sell those shares, because shares are bought and sold at current market prices. Data presented represents past performance and cannot be used to predict future results.
Service, Distribution and Administrative Fees
Investment Company Act Rule 12b-1 permits investment companies that adopt a written plan to pay certain expenses associated with the distribution of their shares out of fund assets. The Board of Trustees has adopted a 12b-1 plan that allows the fund to pay annual fees not to exceed 0.25% to the distributor for distribution and individual shareholder services. However, the Board of Trustees has determined not to authorize payment of a 12b-1 plan fee at this time.
Because these fees may be used to pay for services that are not related to prospective sales of the fund, to the extent that a fee is authorized, the fund will continue to make payments under its plan even if it is closed to new investors. Because these fees are paid out of the fund’s assets on an ongoing basis, to the extent that a fee is authorized, over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and may cost you more than paying other types of sales charges.
The advisor or its affiliates may make payments to intermediaries for various additional services, other expenses and/or the intermediaries’ distribution of the fund out of their profits or other available sources. Such payments may be made for one or more of the following: (1) distribution, which may include expenses incurred by intermediaries for their sales activities with respect to the fund, such as preparing, printing and distributing sales literature and advertising materials and compensating registered representatives or other employees of such financial intermediaries for their sales activities, as well as the opportunity for the fund to be made available by such intermediaries; (2) shareholder services, such as providing individual and custom investment advisory services to clients of the financial intermediaries; and (3) marketing and promotional services, including business planning assistance, educating personnel about the fund, and sponsorship of sales meetings, which may include covering costs of providing speakers, meals and other entertainment. The advisor may pay partnership and/or sponsorship fees to support seminars, conferences, and other programs designed to educate intermediaries about the fund and may cover the expenses associated with attendance at such meetings, including travel costs. The advisor and its affiliates may also pay fees related to obtaining data regarding intermediary or financial advisor activities to assist American Century with sales reporting, business intelligence and training and education opportunities. These payments and activities are intended to provide an incentive to intermediaries to sell the fund by educating them about the fund and helping defray the costs associated with offering the fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the intermediary to recommend the fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information. The amount of any payments described in this paragraph is determined by the advisor or its affiliates, and all such

12



amounts are paid out of their available assets, and not paid by you or the fund. As a result, the total expense ratio of the fund will not be affected by any such payments.


13



Financial Highlights
There is no financial information for the fund because it is a new fund.

14



Notes




Where to Find More Information
Annual and Semiannual Reports
Additional information about the fund’s investments will be available in the fund’s annual and semiannual reports to shareholders. In the fund’s annual report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the fund’s performance during its last fiscal year.
Statement of Additional Information (SAI)
The SAI contains a more detailed legal description of the fund’s operations, investment restrictions, policies and practices. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this prospectus. This means that it is legally part of this prospectus, even if you don’t request a copy.
You may obtain a free copy of the SAI, annual reports and semiannual reports, and you may ask questions about the fund or your accounts, online at americancenturyetfs.com, by contacting American Century Investments at the addresses or telephone numbers listed below or by contacting your financial intermediary.
The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC)
Reports and other information about the fund are available on the EDGAR database on the SEC’s website at sec.gov, and copies of this information may be obtained, after paying a duplicating fee, by electronic request at the following email address: publicinfo@sec.gov.

This prospectus shall not constitute an offer to sell securities of the fund in any state, territory, or other jurisdiction where the fund’s shares have not been registered or qualified for sale, unless such registration or qualification is not required, or under any circumstances in which such offer or solicitation would be unlawful.



















American Century Investments
americancenturyetfs.com
Financial Professionals
P.O. Box 419385
Kansas City, Missouri 64141-6385
1-833-ACI-ETFS

Investment Company Act File No. 811-23305
CL-PRS-XXXXX 1906




The information in this statement of additional information is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This statement of additional information is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.
[_________], 2019

American Century Investments
Statement of Additional Information

American Century ETF Trust
 
Ticker:
Exchange:
Avantis™ Emerging Markets Equity ETF
AVEM
 
Avantis™ International Equity ETF
AVDE
 
Avantis™ International Small Cap Value ETF
AVDV
 
Avantis™ U.S. Equity ETF
AVUS
 
Avantis™ U.S. Small Cap Value ETF
AVUV
 













This statement of additional information adds to the discussion in the funds’ prospectuses dated __, 2019, but is not a prospectus. The statement of additional information should be read in conjunction with the funds’ current prospectuses. If you would like a copy of a prospectus, please contact us at one of the addresses or telephone numbers listed on the back cover or visit American Century Investments’ website at americancenturyetfs.com.
 

©2019 American Century Proprietary Holdings, Inc. All rights reserved.




Table of Contents
The Funds’ History
2

Exchange Listing and Trading
2

Fund Investment Guidelines
3

Fund Investments and Risks
3

Investment Strategies and Risks
3

Investment Policies
15

Temporary Defensive Measures
16

Portfolio Turnover
16

Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings
16

Management
17

The Board of Trustees
17

Officers
21

Code of Ethics
21

Proxy Voting Policies
21

The Funds’ Principal Shareholders
22

Creation and Redemption of Creation Units
23

Service Providers
28

Investment Advisor
29

Portfolio Managers
29

Transfer Agent
31

Administrator
31

Sub-Administrator
32

Distributor
32

Custodian Bank
32

Securities Lending Agent
33

Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
33

Brokerage Allocation
33

Information About Fund Shares
34

Valuation of a Fund’s Securities
34

Taxes
35

Federal Income Taxes
35

State and Local Taxes
38

Financial Statements
38

Appendix A - Principal Shareholders
A-1

Appendix B - Explanation of Fixed-Income Securities Ratings
B-1

Appendix C - Proxy Voting Policies
C-1

Appendix D - Regular Foreign Holidays and Settlement Periods
D-1






The Funds’ History
American Century ETF Trust is a registered open-end management investment company that was organized as a Delaware statutory trust on June 27, 2017. Throughout this statement of additional information (SAI) we refer to American Century ETF Trust as the trust.
Each fund described in this SAI (each, a “fund” and together, the “funds”) is a separate series of the trust. Each fund has its own investment objective, strategies, assets, and tax identification and stock registration numbers.
The funds offer and issue shares at their net asset value per share (NAV) only in aggregations of a specified number of shares (a Creation Unit), generally in exchange for a designated portfolio of securities (including any portion of such securities for which cash may be substituted) (Deposit Securities), together with the deposit of a specified cash payment (Cash Component). Shares of each fund are listed for trading on [_________] (Listing Exchange or [______]), a national securities exchange. Shares of each fund are traded in the secondary market and elsewhere at market prices that may be at, above or below the fund’s NAV. Shares of each fund are redeemable only in Creation Units, generally in exchange for portfolio securities and a Cash Component. Creation Units typically are a specified number of shares, generally 50,000 or multiples thereof.
The trust reserves the right to permit or require that creations and redemptions of shares are effected fully or partially in cash. Shares may be issued in advance of receipt of Deposit Securities, subject to various conditions, including a requirement to maintain with the trust a cash deposit equal to at least 105% and up to 115%, which percentage the trust may change from time to time, of the market value of the omitted Deposit Securities. See Creation and Redemption of Creation Units, page 23 of this SAI. Transaction fees and other costs associated with creations or redemptions that include a cash portion may be higher than the transaction fees and other costs associated with in-kind creations or redemptions. In all cases, transaction fees will be limited in accordance with the requirements of U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rules and regulations applicable to management investment companies offering redeemable securities.
Exchange Listing and Trading
A discussion of exchange listing and trading matters associated with an investment in each fund is contained in the Investing in the Fund section of that fund’s prospectus. The discussion below supplements, and should be read in conjunction with, that section of each prospectus.
Shares of the funds are listed for trading, and trade throughout the day, on the Listing Exchange and in other secondary markets. Shares of the funds may also be listed on certain non-U.S. exchanges. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the Listing Exchange necessary to maintain the listing of shares of the fund will continue to be met. The Listing Exchange may, but is not required to, remove the shares of a fund from listing if (i) following the initial 12-month period beginning upon the commencement of trading of fund shares, there are fewer than 50 beneficial owners of shares of the fund, (ii) the “indicative optimized portfolio value” (IOPV) of the fund is no longer calculated or available, or (iii) any other event shall occur or condition shall exist that, in the opinion of the Listing Exchange, makes further dealings on the Listing Exchange inadvisable. The Listing Exchange will also remove shares of a fund from listing and trading upon termination of the fund.
As in the case of other publicly traded securities, when you buy or sell shares through a broker, you will incur a brokerage commission determined by that broker.
To provide additional information regarding the indicative value of shares of a fund, the Listing Exchange or a market data vendor disseminates information every 15 seconds through the facilities of the Consolidated Tape Association, or through other widely disseminated means, an updated IOPV for the fund as calculated by an information provider or market data vendor. The trust is not involved in or responsible for any aspect of the calculation or dissemination of the IOPVs and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the IOPVs.
The IOPVs of the funds are based on the current market value of the Deposit Securities and the Cash Component. The IOPV does not necessarily reflect the best possible valuation of the current portfolio of securities held by a fund and may not be calculated in the same manner as the NAV. While the IOPV of the funds reflects the current value of the Deposit Securities required to be deposited in connection with the purchase of a Creation Unit, it does not necessarily reflect the precise composition of the current portfolio of securities held by a fund at a particular point in time because the current portfolio of the fund may include securities that are not a part of the current Deposit Securities. Therefore, a fund’s IOPV disseminated during the Listing Exchange trading hours should not be viewed as a real-time update of the fund’s NAV, which is calculated only once a day. Each fund’s IOPV is not calculated by the fund.
The cash component included in an IOPV may consist of other assets held by a fund, including cash, estimated accrued interest, dividends and other income, less expenses. If applicable, each IOPV also reflects changes in currency exchange rates between the U.S. dollar and the applicable currency.
The trust reserves the right to adjust the share prices of a fund in the future to maintain convenient trading ranges for investors. Any adjustments would be accomplished through stock splits or reverse stock splits, which would have no effect on the net assets of the fund or an investor’s equity interest in the fund.

2



Fund Investment Guidelines
This section explains the extent to which the funds’ advisor, American Century Investment Management, Inc. (ACIM or the advisor), can use various investment vehicles and strategies in managing a fund’s assets. Descriptions of the investment techniques and risks associated with each appear in the section, Investment Strategies and Risks, below. In the case of the funds’ principal investment strategies, these descriptions elaborate upon discussions contained in the prospectuses. In addition to the main types of investments and strategies undertaken by the funds as described in the prospectuses, the funds also may invest in other types of instruments and engage in and pursue other investment strategies, which are described in this SAI.
The funds are diversified as defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the Investment Company Act). Diversified means that, with respect to 75% of its total assets, each fund will not invest more than 5% of its total assets in the securities of a single issuer or own more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of a single issuer (other than the U.S. government and securities of other investment companies).
To meet federal tax requirements for qualification as a regulated investment company, each fund must limit its investments so that at the close of each quarter of its taxable year (1) no more than 25% of its total assets are invested in the securities of a single issuer (other than the U.S. government or a regulated investment company), and (2) with respect to at least 50% of its total assets, no more than 5% of its total assets are invested in the securities of a single issuer (other than the U.S. government or a regulated investment company) and it does not own more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of a single issuer.
The funds are actively managed ETFs that invest primarily in equity and equity-equivalent securities. In general, within the restrictions outlined here and in the funds’ prospectuses, the portfolio managers have broad powers to decide how to invest fund assets. Investments in the fund vary according to what is judged advantageous under changing economic conditions. It is the advisor’s policy to retain maximum flexibility in management without restrictive provisions as to the proportion of one or another class of securities that may be held, subject to the investment restrictions described on the following pages.
Incidental to a fund’s other investment activities, including in connection with a bankruptcy, restructuring, workout, or other extraordinary events concerning a particular investment a fund owns, the fund may receive securities (including convertible securities, warrants and rights), real estate or other investments that the fund normally would not, or could not, buy. If this happens, the fund may, although it is not required to, sell such investments as soon as practicable while seeking to maximize the return to shareholders.
Unless otherwise noted, all investment restrictions described below and in each fund’s prospectus are measured at the time of the transaction in the security.  If market action affecting fund securities (including, but not limited to, appreciation, depreciation or a credit rating event) causes a fund to exceed an investment restriction, the advisor is not required to take immediate action.  Under normal market conditions, however, the advisor’s policies and procedures indicate that the advisor will not make any purchases that will make the fund further outside the investment restriction.
Fund Investments and Risks
Investment Strategies and Risks
This section describes investment vehicles and techniques the portfolio managers can use in managing a fund’s assets. It also details the risks associated with each, because each investment vehicle and technique contributes to a fund’s overall risk profile.
Convertible Securities
A convertible security is a bond, debenture, note, preferred stock or other security that may be converted into or exchanged for a prescribed amount of common stock of the same or a different issuer within a particular time period at a specified price or formula. A convertible security entitles the holder to receive the interest paid or accrued on debt or the dividend paid on preferred stock until the convertible security matures or is redeemed, converted or exchanged. Before conversion or exchange, such securities ordinarily provide a stream of income with generally higher yields than common stocks of the same or similar issuers, but lower than the yield on non-convertible debt. Of course, there can be no assurance of current income because issuers of convertible securities may default on their obligations. In addition, there can be no assurance of capital appreciation because the value of the underlying common stock will fluctuate. Because of the conversion feature, the managers consider some convertible securities to be equity equivalents.
The price of a convertible security will normally fluctuate in some proportion to changes in the price of the underlying asset. A convertible security is subject to risks relating to the activities of the issuer and/or general market and economic conditions. The stream of income typically paid on a convertible security may tend to cushion the security against declines in the price of the underlying asset. However, the stream of income causes fluctuations based upon changes in interest rates and the credit quality of the issuer. In general, the value of a convertible security is a function of (1) its yield in comparison with yields of other securities of comparable maturity and quality that do not have a conversion privilege and (2) its worth, at market value, if converted or exchanged into the underlying common stock. The price of a convertible security often reflects such variations in the price of the underlying common stock in a way that a non-convertible security does not. At any given time, investment value generally depends upon such factors as the general level of interest rates, the yield of similar nonconvertible securities, the financial strength of the issuer and the seniority of the security in the issuer’s capital structure.

3



A convertible security may be subject to redemption at the option of the issuer at a predetermined price. If a convertible security held by a fund is called for redemption, the fund would be required to permit the issuer to redeem the security and convert it to underlying common stock or to cash or would sell the convertible security to a third party, which may have an adverse effect on the fund. A convertible security may feature a put option that permits the holder of the convertible security to sell that security back to the issuer at a predetermined price. A fund generally invests in convertible securities for their favorable price characteristics and total return potential and normally would not exercise an option to convert unless the security is called or conversion is forced.
Counterparty Risk
A fund will be exposed to the credit risk of the counterparties with which, or the brokers, dealers and exchanges through which, it deals, whether it engaged in exchange traded or off-exchange transactions. If a fund’s futures commission merchant, (FCM) becomes bankrupt or insolvent, or otherwise defaults on its obligations to the fund, the fund may not receive all amounts owed to it in respect of its trading, despite the clearinghouse fully discharging all of its obligations. The Commodity Exchange Act requires an FCM to segregate all funds received from its customers with respect to regulated futures transactions from such FCM’s proprietary funds. If an FCM were not to do so to the full extent required by law, the assets of an account might not be fully protected in the event of the bankruptcy of an FCM. Furthermore, in the event of an FCM’s bankruptcy, a fund would be limited to recovering only a pro rata share of all available funds segregated on behalf of an FCM’s combined customer accounts, even though certain property specifically traceable to the fund (for example, U.S. Treasury bills deposited by the fund) was held by an FCM. FCM bankruptcies have occurred in which customers were unable to recover from the FCM’s estate the full amount of their funds on deposit with such FCM and owing to them. Such situations could arise due to various factors, or a combination of factors, including inadequate FCM capitalization, inadequate controls on customer trading and inadequate customer capital. In addition, in the event of the bankruptcy or insolvency of a clearinghouse, the fund might experience a loss of funds deposited through its FCM as margin with the clearinghouse, a loss of unrealized profits on its open positions, and the loss of funds owed to it as realized profits on closed positions. Such a bankruptcy or insolvency might also cause a substantial delay before the fund could obtain the return of funds owed to it by an FCM who was a member of such clearinghouse.
Because bi-lateral derivative transactions are traded between counterparties based on contractual relationships, a fund is subject to the risk that a counterparty will not perform its obligations under the related contracts. Although each fund intends to enter into transactions only with counterparties which the advisor believes to be creditworthy, there can be no assurance that a counterparty will not default and that the funds will not sustain a loss on a transaction as a result. In situations where a fund is required to post margin or other collateral with a counterparty, the counterparty may fail to segregate the collateral or may commingle the collateral with the counterparty’s own assets. As a result, in the event of the counterparty’s bankruptcy or insolvency, a fund’s collateral may be subject to the conflicting claims of the counterparty’s creditors, and a fund may be exposed to the risk of a court treating a fund as a general unsecured creditor of the counterparty, rather than as the owner of the collateral.
A fund is subject to the risk that issuers of the instruments in which it invests and trades may default on their obligations under those instruments, and that certain events may occur that have an immediate and significant adverse effect on the value of those instruments. There can be no assurance that an issuer of an instrument in which a fund invests will not default, or that an event that has an immediate and significant adverse effect on the value of an instrument will not occur, and that a fund will not sustain a loss on a transaction as a result.
Transactions entered into by a fund may be executed on various U.S. and non-U.S. exchanges, and may be cleared and settled through various clearinghouses, custodians, depositories and prime brokers throughout the world. Although a fund attempts to execute, clear and settle the transactions through entities the advisor believes to be sound, there can be no assurance that a failure by any such entity will not lead to a loss to a fund.
Cyber Security Risk
As the funds increasingly rely on technology and information systems to operate, they become susceptible to operational risks linked to security breaches in those information systems. Both calculated attacks and unintentional events can cause failures in the funds’ information systems. Cyber attacks can include acquiring unauthorized access to information systems, usually through hacking or the use of malicious software, for purposes of stealing assets or confidential information, corrupting data, or disrupting fund operations. Cyber attacks can also occur without direct access to information systems, for example by making network services unavailable to intended users. Cyber security failures by, or breaches of the information systems of, the advisor, distributors, broker-dealers, other service providers (including, but not limited to, index providers, fund accountants, custodians, transfer agents and administrators), or the issuers of securities the fund invests in may also cause disruptions and impact the funds’ business operations. Breaches in information security may result in financial losses, interference with the funds’ ability to calculate NAV, impediments to trading, inability of fund shareholders to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs. Additionally, the funds may incur substantial costs to prevent future cyber incidents. The funds have business continuity plans in the event of, and risk management systems to help prevent, such cyber attacks, but these plans and systems have limitations including the possibility that certain risks have not been identified. Moreover, the funds do not control the cyber security plans and systems of our service providers and other third-party business partners. The funds and their shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.

4



Debt Securities
The funds may invest in debt securities. Each fund may invest in debt securities when the portfolio managers believe such securities represent an attractive investment for the funds. These funds may invest in debt securities for income or as a defensive strategy when the managers believe adverse economic or market conditions exist.
The funds may purchase sovereign debt instruments issued or guaranteed by foreign governments or their agencies, including debt of emerging market countries. Sovereign debt may be in the form of conventional securities or other types of debt instruments, such as loans or loan participations. Sovereign debt of emerging market countries may involve a high degree of risk and may present a risk of default or renegotiation or rescheduling of debt payments.
There are no credit or maturity restrictions on the fixed-income securities in which the high-yield portion of a fund’s portfolio may be invested. Debt securities rated lower than Baa by Moody’s or BBB by S&P, or their equivalent, are considered by many to be predominantly speculative. Changes in economic conditions or other circumstances are more likely to lead to a weakened capacity to make principal and interest payments on such securities than is the case with higher quality debt securities. Regardless of rating levels, all debt securities considered for purchase by the fund are analyzed by the investment manager to determine, to the extent reasonably possible, that the planned investment is sound, given the fund’s investment objective. See Explanation of Fixed-Income Securities Ratings in Appendix D.
In addition to other factors that will affect its value, the value of a fund’s investments in fixed income securities will change as prevailing interest rates change. In general, the prices of such securities vary inversely with interest rates. As prevailing interest rates fall, the prices of bonds and other securities that trade on a yield basis rise. When prevailing interest rates rise, bond prices generally fall. These changes in value may, depending upon the amount and type of fixed-income securities holdings of a fund, impact the net asset value of that fund’s shares.
Depositary Receipts
Depositary receipts are certificates evidencing ownership of shares of a foreign issuer. They include American Depositary Receipts (“ADRS”), as well as other “hybrid” forms of ADRs, European Depositary Receipts (“EDRs”), Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”), Non-Voting Depositary Receipts (“NVDRs”), and other similar depositary arrangements. Depositary receipts are securities that evidence ownership interests in a security or a pool of securities that have been deposited with a “depository” and may be sponsored or unsponsored. These certificates are issued by depository banks and generally trade on an established market in the United States or elsewhere. The underlying shares are held in trust by a custodian bank or similar financial institution in the issuer’s home country. The depository bank may not have physical custody of the underlying securities at all times and may charge fees for various services, including forwarding dividends and interest and corporate actions. Depositary receipts are alternatives to directly purchasing the underlying foreign securities in their national markets and currencies. However, depositary receipts continue to be subject to many of the risks associated with investing directly in foreign securities.
For ADRs, the depository is typically a U.S. financial institution and the underlying securities are issued by a foreign issuer. For other depositary receipts, the depository may be a foreign or a U.S. entity, and the underlying securities may have a foreign or a U.S. issuer. Depositary receipts will not necessarily be denominated in the same currency as their underlying securities. Generally, ADRs are issued in registered form, denominated in U.S. dollars. Other depositary receipts, such as GDRs and EDRs, may be issued in bearer form and denominated in other currencies, and are generally traded in securities markets outside the U.S. While the two types of depositary receipt facilities (unsponsored or sponsored) are similar, there are differences regarding a holder’s rights and obligations and the practices of market participants. A depository may establish an unsponsored facility without participation by (or acquiescence of) the underlying issuer; typically, however, the depository requests a letter of non-objection from the underlying issuer prior to establishing the facility. Holders of unsponsored depositary receipts generally bear all the costs of the facility. The depository usually charges fees upon deposit and withdrawal of the underlying securities, the conversion of dividends into U.S. dollars or other currency, the disposition of non-cash distributions, and the performance of other services. The depository of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the underlying issuer or to pass through voting rights to depositary receipt holders with respect to the underlying securities.
Sponsored depositary receipt facilities are created in generally the same manner as unsponsored facilities, except that sponsored depositary receipts are established jointly by a depository and the underlying issuer through a deposit agreement. The deposit agreement sets out the rights and responsibilities of the underlying issuer, the depository, and the depositary receipt holders. With sponsored facilities, the underlying issuer typically bears some of the costs of the depositary receipts (such as dividend payment fees of the depository), although most sponsored depositary receipts agree to distribute notices of shareholders meetings, voting instructions, and other shareholder communications and information to the depositary receipt holders at the underlying issuer’s request. The depositary of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the issuer of the deposited security or to pass through, to the holders of the receipts, voting rights with respect to the deposited securities. Depositary receipts do not eliminate all of the risks associated with directly investing in the securities of foreign issuers.

5



Derivative Instruments
To the extent permitted by its investment objectives and policies, each of the funds may invest in instruments that are commonly referred to as derivative instruments. Generally, a derivative instrument is a financial arrangement the value of which is based on, or derived from, a traditional security, asset, or market index. Examples of common derivative instruments include futures contracts, warrants, structured notes, credit default swaps, options contracts, swap transactions and forward currency contracts.
Certain derivative instruments are more accurately described as index/structured investments. Index/structured investments are derivative instruments whose value or performance is linked to other equity securities, currencies, interest rates, indices or other financial indicators (reference indices).
A structured investment is a security whose value or performance is linked to an underlying index or other security or asset class. Structured investments include asset-backed securities (ABS), asset-backed commercial paper (ABCP), commercial and residential mortgage-backed securities (MBS), collateralized debt obligations (CDO), collateralized loan obligations (CLO), and securities backed by other types of collateral or indices. Structured investments involve the transfer of specified financial assets to a special purpose entity, generally a corporation or trust, or the deposit of financial assets with a custodian; and the issuance of securities or depositary receipts backed by or representing interests in those assets.
Some structured investments are individually negotiated agreements or are traded over the counter. Structured investments may be organized and operated to restructure the investment characteristics of the underlying security. The cash flow on the underlying instruments may be apportioned among the newly issued structured investments to create securities with different investment characteristics, such as varying maturities, payment priorities and interest rate provisions, and the extent of such payments made with respect to structured investments is dependent on the extent of the cash flow on the underlying instruments. Because structured investments typically involve no credit enhancement, their credit risk generally will be equivalent to that of the underlying instruments. In addition, structured investments are subject to the risks that the issuers of the underlying securities may be unable or unwilling to repay principal and interest (credit risk) and may request to reschedule or restructure outstanding debt and to extend additional loan amounts (prepayment risk).
There are many different types of derivative instruments and many different ways to use them. Futures and options are commonly used for traditional hedging purposes to attempt to protect a fund from exposure to changing interest rates, securities prices, or currency exchange rates and for cash management purposes as a low-cost method of gaining exposure to a particular securities market without investing directly in those securities.
The return on a derivative instrument may increase or decrease, depending upon changes in the reference index or instrument to which it relates.
There are risks associated with investing in derivatives, including:
the risk that the underlying security, interest rate, market index or other financial asset will not move in the direction the portfolio managers anticipate or that the value of the structured or derivative instrument will not move or react to changes in the underlying security, interest rate, market index or other financial asset as anticipated;
the possibility that there may be no liquid secondary market, which may make it difficult or impossible to close out a position when desired;
the risk that daily limits on price fluctuations and speculative position limits on exchanges on which a fund may conduct its transactions in derivative instruments may prevent profitable liquidation of positions, subjecting a fund to the potential of greater losses;
the risk that adverse price movements in an instrument can result in a loss substantially greater than a fund’s initial investment;
the risk that the counterparty will fail to perform its obligations; and
the risk that a fund will be subject to higher volatility because some derivative instruments create leverage.
The funds’ Board of Trustees has reviewed the advisor’s policy regarding investments in derivative instruments. That policy specifies factors that must be considered in connection with a purchase of derivative instruments. The policy also establishes a committee that must review certain proposed purchases before the purchases can be made. The advisor will report on fund activity in derivative instruments to the Board of Trustees as necessary.
Equity Equivalents
In addition to investing in common stocks, the funds may invest in other equity securities and equity equivalents, including securities that permit a fund to receive an equity interest in an issuer, the opportunity to acquire an equity interest in an issuer, or the opportunity to receive a return on its investment that permits the fund to benefit from the growth over time in the equity of an issuer. Examples of equity securities and equity equivalents include preferred stock, convertible preferred stock, convertible securities, stock futures contracts or stock index futures contracts. Equity equivalents also may include securities whose value or return is derived from the value or return of a different security.

6



Foreign Currency Transactions and Forward Exchange Contracts
A fund may conduct foreign currency transactions on a spot basis (i.e., cash) or forward basis (i.e., by entering into forward currency exchange contracts, currency options and futures transactions to purchase or sell foreign currencies). Although foreign exchange dealers generally do not charge a fee for such transactions, they do realize a profit based on the difference between the prices at which they are buying and selling various currencies.
Forward contracts are customized transactions that require a specific amount of a currency to be delivered at a specific exchange rate on a specific date or range of dates in the future. Forward contracts are generally traded in an interbank market directly between currency traders (usually larger commercial banks) and their customers. The parties to a forward contract may agree to offset or terminate the contract before its maturity or may hold the contract to maturity and complete the contemplated currency exchange.
The following summarizes the principal currency management strategies involving forward contracts. A fund may also use swap agreements, indexed securities, and options and futures contracts relating to foreign currencies for the same purposes.
(1)
Settlement Hedges or Transaction Hedges. When the portfolio managers wish to lock in the U.S. dollar price of a foreign currency denominated security when a fund is purchasing or selling the security or when the fund expects to receive a dividend, the fund may enter into a forward contract to do so. This type of currency transaction, often called a “settlement hedge” or “transaction hedge,” protects the fund against an adverse change in foreign currency values between the date a security is purchased or sold and the date on which payment is made or received (i.e., settled). Forward contracts to purchase or sell a foreign currency may also be used by a fund in anticipation of future purchases or sales of securities denominated in foreign currency, even if the specific investments have not yet been selected by the portfolio managers. This strategy is often referred to as “anticipatory hedging.”
(2)
Position Hedges. When the portfolio managers wish to minimize the variation produced by changes in the foreign currency associated with a security, a fund may enter into a forward contract to sell foreign currency for a fixed U.S. dollar amount approximating the value of some or all of its portfolio securities either denominated in, or whose value is tied to, such foreign currency. This use of a forward contract is sometimes referred to as a “position hedge.” For example, if a fund owned securities denominated in Euro, it could enter into a forward contract to sell Euro in return for U.S. dollars to hedge against possible declines in the Euro’s value. This hedge would tend to offset both positive and negative currency fluctuations but would not tend to offset changes in security values caused by other factors.
A fund could also hedge the position by entering into a forward contract to sell another currency expected to perform similarly to the currency in which the fund’s existing investments are denominated. This type of hedge, often called a “proxy hedge,” could offer advantages in terms of cost, yield or efficiency, but may not hedge currency exposure as effectively as a simple position hedge against U.S. dollars. This type of hedge may result in losses if the currency used to hedge does not perform similarly to the currency in which the hedged securities are denominated.
The precise matching of forward contracts in the amounts and values of securities involved generally would not be possible because the future values of such foreign currencies will change as a consequence of market movements in the values of those securities between the date the forward contract is entered into and the date it matures. The successful execution of a short-term hedging strategy is highly uncertain.
At the maturity of the forward contract, the fund may either sell the portfolio security and make delivery of the foreign currency, or it may retain the security and terminate the obligation to deliver the foreign currency by purchasing an “offsetting” forward contract with the same currency trader obligating the fund to purchase, on the same maturity date, the same amount of the foreign currency.
It is impossible to forecast with absolute precision the market value of portfolio securities at the expiration of the forward contract. Accordingly, it may be necessary for a fund to purchase additional foreign currency on the spot market (and bear the expense of such purchase) if the market value of the security is less than the amount of foreign currency the fund is obligated to deliver and if a decision is made to sell the security and make delivery of the foreign currency the fund is obligated to deliver.
(3)
Shifting Currency Exposure. A fund may also enter into forward contracts to shift its investment exposure from one currency into another. This may include shifting exposure from U.S. dollars to foreign currency, or from one foreign currency to another foreign currency. This strategy tends to limit exposure to the currency sold, and increase exposure to the currency that is purchased, much as if a fund had sold a security denominated in one currency and purchased an equivalent security denominated in another currency. For example, if the portfolio managers have too much exposure to the U.S. dollar and need exposure to the Euro, they could enter into a forward contract to purchase Euros for a fixed amount of U.S. dollars. This transaction would protect against losses resulting from a decline in the value of the U.S. dollar, but would cause the fund to assume the risk of fluctuations in the value of the Euro.
Currency management strategies may substantially subject a fund’s investment exposure to changes in currency rates and could result in losses to a fund if currencies perform adversely. For example, if a currency’s value rose at a time when the fund hedged by selling the currency in exchange for U.S. dollars, a fund would not participate in the currency’s appreciation. Similarly, if the portfolio

7



managers increase a fund’s exposure to a currency and that currency’s value declines, a fund will sustain a loss. There is no assurance that the funds’ use of foreign currency management strategies will be advantageous or that it will hedge at appropriate times.
The fund will generally cover outstanding forward contracts by maintaining liquid portfolio securities denominated in, or whose value is tied to, the currency underlying the forward contract or the currency being hedged. To the extent that the fund is not able to cover its forward currency positions with underlying portfolio securities, the fund’s custodian will segregate cash or other liquid assets having a value equal to the aggregate amount of the fund’s commitments under forward contracts entered into with respect to position hedges, settlement hedges and anticipatory hedges.
Foreign Securities
The funds may invest in the securities of foreign issuers, including foreign governments, when these securities meet the fund’s standards of selection. The funds may make foreign investments either directly in foreign securities or indirectly by purchasing depositary receipts, depositary shares or similar instruments (DRs) for foreign securities. DRs are securities that are listed on exchanges or quoted in over-the-counter markets in one country but represent shares of issuers domiciled in another country. The funds also may purchase securities of issuers in foreign markets, either on foreign securities exchanges, electronic trading networks or in over-the-counter markets.
A description of the funds’ investment strategies regarding foreign securities is contained in the funds’ prospectuses. Investing in securities of foreign issuers generally involves greater risks than investing in the securities of domestic companies including:
Currency Risk. The value of the foreign investments held by the funds may be significantly affected by changes in currency exchange rates. The dollar value of a foreign security generally decreases when the value of the dollar rises against the foreign currency in which the security is denominated and tends to increase when the value of the dollar falls against such currency. In addition, the value of fund assets may be affected by losses and other expenses incurred in converting between various currencies in order to purchase and sell foreign securities, and by currency restrictions, exchange control regulation, currency devaluations and political developments.
Social, Political and Economic Risk. The economies of many of the countries in which the funds invest are not as developed as the economy of the United States and may be subject to significantly different forces. Political or social instability, expropriation, nationalization, or confiscatory taxation, and limitations on the removal of funds or other assets, could also adversely affect the value of investments. Further, the funds may find it difficult or be unable to enforce ownership rights, pursue legal remedies or obtain judgments in foreign courts.
Regulatory Risk. Foreign companies generally are not subject to the regulatory controls imposed on U.S. issuers and, in general, there is less publicly available information about foreign securities than is available about domestic securities. Many foreign companies are not subject to uniform accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards, practices and requirements comparable to those applicable to domestic companies and there may be less stringent investor protection and disclosure standards in some foreign markets. Income from foreign securities owned by the funds may be reduced by a withholding tax at the source, which would reduce dividend income payable to shareholders.
Market and Trading Risk. Brokerage commission rates in foreign countries, which are generally fixed rather than subject to negotiation as in the United States, are likely to be higher. The securities markets in many of the countries in which the funds invest will have substantially less trading volume than the principal U.S. markets. As a result, the securities of some companies in these countries may be less liquid, more volatile and harder to value than comparable U.S. securities. Furthermore, one securities broker may represent all or a significant part of the trading volume in a particular country, resulting in higher trading costs and decreased liquidity due to a lack of alternative trading partners. There is generally less government regulation and supervision of foreign stock exchanges, brokers and issuers, which may make it difficult to enforce contractual obligations. In addition, it may be more difficult in foreign countries to accurately determine appropriate brokerage commissions, taxes and other trading costs related to securities trades.
Clearance and Settlement Risk. Foreign securities markets also have different clearance and settlement procedures, and in certain markets there have been times when settlements have been unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions, making it difficult to conduct such transactions. Market practice may require that payments are made prior to receipt of the security which is being purchased or that delivery of a security must be made before payment is received. Delays in clearance and settlement could result in temporary periods when assets of the funds are uninvested and no return is earned. The inability of the funds to make intended security purchases due to clearance and settlement problems could cause the funds to miss attractive investment opportunities. Inability to dispose of portfolio securities due to clearance and settlement problems could result either in losses to the funds due to subsequent declines in the value of the portfolio security or, if the fund has entered into a contract to sell the security, liability to the purchaser. This risk may be magnified in emerging markets because settlement systems may be less organized, creating a risk that settlements may be not only delayed, but also lost because of failures or defects in such systems.
Ownership Risk. Evidence of securities ownership may be uncertain in many foreign countries. In many of these countries, the most notable of which is the Russian Federation, the ultimate evidence of securities ownership is the share register held by the issuing company or its registrar. While some companies may issue share certificates or provide extracts of the company’s share register, these are not negotiable instruments and are not effective evidence of securities ownership. In an ownership dispute, the company’s share

8



register is controlling. As a result, there is a risk that a fund’s trade details could be incorrectly or fraudulently entered on the issuer’s share register at the time of the transaction, or that a fund’s ownership position could thereafter be altered or deleted entirely, resulting in a loss to the fund. While the funds intend to invest directly in Russian companies that utilize an independent registrar, there can be no assurance that such investments will not result in a loss to the funds.
Emerging Markets Risk. Investing in emerging market companies generally is also riskier than investing in other foreign securities. Emerging market countries may have unstable governments and/or economies that are subject to sudden change. These changes may be magnified by the countries’ emergent financial markets, resulting in significant volatility to investments in these countries. These countries also may lack the legal, business and social framework to support securities markets.
As a result of the foregoing risks, these funds are intended for aggressive investors seeking significant gains through investments in foreign securities. Those investors must be willing and able to accept the significantly greater risks associated with the investment strategy that the funds will pursue. An investment in the funds is not appropriate for individuals with limited investment resources or who are unable to tolerate fluctuations in the value of their investment.
Risk of Focusing Investment on Region or Country. Investing a significant portion of assets in one country or region makes a fund more dependent upon the political and economic circumstances of that particular country or region.
Eurozone Investment Risk - The Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union (EMU) is comprised of the European Union (EU) members that have adopted the euro currency. By adopting the euro as its currency, a member state relinquishes control of its own monetary policies and is subject to fiscal and monetary controls. EMU members could voluntarily abandon, or be forced out of, the euro. Such events could impact the market values of Eurozone and various other securities and currencies, cause redenomination of certain securities into less valuable local currencies and create more volatile and illiquid markets. As a result, European countries are significantly affected by fiscal and monetary controls implemented by the EMU. The euro currency may not fully reflect the strengths and weaknesses of the various economies that comprise the EMU and Europe generally. Certain countries and regions in the EU are experiencing significant financial difficulties. Some of these countries may be dependent on assistance from other European governments and institutions or agencies. Assistance may be dependent on a country’s implementation of reforms or reaching a certain level of performance. Failure to reach those objectives or an insufficient level of assistance could result in an economic downturn that could significantly affect the value of investments in those and other European countries. One or more countries could depart from the EU, which could weaken the EU and, by extension, its remaining members. For example, the United Kingdom’s departure, described in more detail below.
United Kingdom Investment Risk - Commonly known as “Brexit,” the United Kingdom’s exit from the EU may result in substantial volatility in foreign exchange markets and may lead to a sustained weakness in the British pound’s exchange rate against the United States dollar, the euro and other currencies, which may impact fund returns. Brexit may destabilize some or all of the other EU member countries and/or the Eurozone. These developments could result in losses to the funds, as there may be negative effects on the value of a fund’s investments and/or on a fund’s ability to enter into certain transactions or value certain investments, and these developments may make it more difficult for funds to exit certain investments at an advantageous time or price. Such events could results from, among other things, increased uncertainty and volatility in the United Kingdom, the EU and other financial markets; fluctuations in asset values; fluctuations in exchange rates; decreased liquidity of investments located, traded or listed within the United Kingdom, the EU or elsewhere; changes in the willingness or ability of financial and other counterparties to enter into transactions or the price and terms on which other counterparties are willing to transact; and/or changes in legal and regulatory regimes to which fund investments are or become subject.
Risk of Investing in China. Investing in Chinese securities is riskier than investing in U.S. securities. Although the Chinese government is currently implementing reforms to promote foreign investment and reduce government economic control, there is no guarantee that the reforms will be ongoing or effective. Investing in China involves risk of loss due to nationalization, expropriation, and confiscation of assets and property. Losses may also occur due to new or expanded restrictions on foreign investments or repatriation of capital. Participants in the Chinese market are subject to less regulation and oversight than participants in the U.S. market. This may lead to trading volatility, difficulty in the settlement and recording of transactions, and uncertainty in interpreting and applying laws and regulations. Reduction in spending on Chinese products and services, institution of tariffs or other trade barriers, or a downturn in the economies of any of China’s key trading partners may adversely affect the securities of Chinese issuers. Regional conflict could also have an adverse effect on the Chinese economy.
Stock Connect Risk. Investments in China A-shares listed and traded through the Shanghai-Hong Kong Stock Connect and Shenzhen-Hong Kong Stock Connect programs (“Stock Connect Programs”) involve unique risks. The Stock Connect Programs are relatively new and there is no guarantee that they will continue. Trading through Stock Connect Programs is subject to daily quotas that limit the maximum daily net purchases and daily limits on permitted price fluctuations. Trading suspensions are more likely in the A-shares market than in many other global equity markets. There can be no assurance that a liquid market on an exchange will exist. In addition, investments made through Stock Connect Programs are subject to comparatively untested trading, clearance and settlement procedures. Stock Connect Programs are available only on days when markets in both China and Hong Kong are open. A fund’s ownership interest in Stock Connect Programs securities will not be reflected directly, and thus the fund may have to rely on the ability or willingness of a third party to enforce its rights. Investments in Stock Connect Program A-shares are generally subject to Chinese securities regulations and listing rules, among other restrictions. Hong Kong investor compensation funds, which protect

9



against trade defaults, are unavailable when investing through Stock Connect Programs. Uncertainties in Chinese tax rules could also result in unexpected tax liabilities for the fund.
Sanctions. The U.S. may impose economic sanctions against companies in various sectors of certain countries. This could limit a fund’s investment opportunities in such countries, impairing the fund’s ability to invest in accordance with its investment strategy and/or to meet its investment objective. For example, a fund may be prohibited from investing in securities issued by companies subject to such sanctions. In addition, the sanctions may require a fund to freeze its existing investments in sanctioned companies, prohibiting the fund from selling or otherwise transacting in these investments. Current sanctions or the threat of potential sanctions may also impair the value or liquidity of affected securities and negatively impact a fund.
Futures and Options
Each fund may enter into futures contracts, options or options on futures contracts. Futures contracts provide for the sale by one party and purchase by another party of a specific security at a specified future time and price. Generally, futures transactions will be used to:
protect against a decline in market value of the fund’s securities at a time the fund needs to raise cash (taking a short futures position), or
protect against the risk of an increase in market value for securities in which the fund generally invests at a time when the fund is not fully-invested (taking a long futures position), or
provide a temporary substitute for the purchase of an individual security or securities that may be purchased in an orderly fashion.
Some futures and options strategies, such as selling futures, buying puts and writing calls, hedge a fund’s investments against price fluctuations. Other strategies, such as buying futures, writing puts and buying calls, tend to increase market exposure.
Although other techniques may be used to control a fund’s exposure to market fluctuations, the use of futures contracts may be a more effective means of hedging this exposure. While a fund pays brokerage commissions in connection with opening and closing out futures positions, these costs are lower than the transaction costs incurred in the purchase and sale of the underlying securities.
For example, the sale of a future by a fund means the fund becomes obligated to deliver the security (or securities, in the case of an index future) at a specified price on a specified date. The purchase of a future means the fund becomes obligated to buy the security (or securities) at a specified price on a specified date. The portfolio managers may engage in futures and options transactions, provided that the transactions are consistent with the fund’s investment objectives. The managers also may engage in futures and options transactions based on specific securities. Futures contracts are traded on national futures exchanges. Futures exchanges and trading are regulated under the Commodity Exchange Act by the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), a U.S. government agency.
Index futures contracts differ from traditional futures contracts in that when delivery takes place, no stocks or bonds change hands. Instead, these contracts settle in cash at the spot market value of the index. Although other types of futures contracts by their terms call for actual delivery or acceptance of the underlying securities, in most cases the contracts are closed out before the settlement date. A futures position may be closed by taking an opposite position in an identical contract (i.e., buying a contract that has previously been sold or selling a contract that has previously been bought).
Unlike when the fund purchases or sells a security, no price is paid or received by the fund upon the purchase or sale of the future. Initially, the fund will be required to deposit an amount of cash or securities equal to a varying specified percentage of the contract amount. This amount is known as initial margin. The margin deposit is intended to ensure completion of the contract (delivery or acceptance of the underlying security) if it is not terminated prior to the specified delivery date. A margin deposit does not constitute a margin transaction for purposes of the fund’s investment restrictions. Minimum initial margin requirements are established by the futures exchanges and may be revised.
In addition, brokers may establish margin deposit requirements that are higher than the exchange minimums. Cash held in the margin accounts generally is not income producing. However, coupon bearing securities, such as Treasury bills and bonds, held in margin accounts generally will earn income. Subsequent payments, to and from the broker, called variation margin, will be made on a daily basis as the price of the underlying security or index fluctuates, making the future more or less valuable, a process known as marking the contract to market. Changes in variation margin are recorded by the fund as unrealized gains or losses. At any time prior to expiration of the future, the fund may elect to close the position by taking an opposite position. A final determination of variation margin is then made; additional cash is required to be paid by or released to the fund and the fund realizes a loss or gain.
Risks Related to Futures and Options Transactions
Futures and options prices can be volatile, and trading in these markets involves certain risks. If the portfolio managers apply a hedge at an inappropriate time or judge interest rate or equity market trends incorrectly, futures and options strategies may lower a fund’s return.
A fund could suffer losses if it were unable to close out its position because of an illiquid secondary market. Futures contracts may be closed out only on an exchange that provides a secondary market for these contracts, and there is no assurance that a liquid secondary market will exist for any particular futures contract at any particular time. Consequently, it may not be possible to close a futures position when the portfolio managers consider it appropriate or desirable to do so. In the event of adverse price movements, a fund would be required to continue making daily cash payments to maintain its required margin. If the fund had insufficient cash, it might

10



have to sell portfolio securities to meet daily margin requirements at a time when the portfolio managers would not otherwise elect to do so. In addition, a fund may be required to deliver or take delivery of instruments underlying futures contracts it holds. The portfolio managers will seek to minimize these risks by limiting the futures contracts entered into on behalf of the funds to those traded on national futures exchanges and for which there appears to be a liquid secondary market.
A fund could suffer losses if the prices of its futures and options positions were poorly correlated with its other investments, or if securities underlying futures contracts purchased by a fund had different maturities than those of the portfolio securities being hedged. Such imperfect correlation may give rise to circumstances in which a fund loses money on a futures contract while it experiences a decline in the value of its hedged portfolio securities. A fund also could lose margin payments it has deposited with a margin broker, if, for example, the broker became bankrupt.
Most futures exchanges limit the amount of fluctuation permitted in futures contract prices during a single trading day. The daily limit establishes the maximum amount that the price of a futures contract may vary either up or down from the previous day’s settlement price at the end of the trading session. Once the daily limit has been reached in a particular type of contract, no trades may be made on that day at a price beyond the limit. However, the daily limit governs only price movement during a trading day and, therefore, does not limit potential losses. In addition, the daily limit may prevent liquidation of unfavorable positions. Futures contract prices have occasionally moved to the daily limit for several consecutive trading days with little or no trading, thereby preventing prompt liquidation of futures positions and subjecting some futures traders to substantial losses.
Options Disclosure
By buying a put option, a fund obtains the right (but not the obligation) to sell the instrument underlying the option at a fixed strike price and in return a fund pays the current market price for the option (known as the option premium). A fund may terminate its position in a put option it has purchased by allowing it to expire, by exercising the option or by entering into an offsetting transaction, if a liquid market exists. If the option is allowed to expire, a fund will lose the entire premium it paid. If a fund exercises a put option on a security, it will sell the instrument underlying the option at the strike price. Purchasing an option on a futures contract does not require a fund to make margin payments unless the option is exercised. The buyer of a typical put option can expect to realize a gain if the value of the underlying instrument falls substantially. However, if the price of the instrument underlying the option does not fall enough to offset the cost of purchasing the option, a put buyer can expect to suffer a loss limited to the amount of the premium paid, plus related transaction costs.
The features of call options are essentially the same as those of put options, except that the buyer of a call option obtains the right to purchase, rather than sell, the instrument underlying the option at the option’s strike price. The buyer of a typical call option can expect to realize a gain if the value of the underlying instrument increases substantially and can expect to suffer a loss if security prices do not rise sufficiently to offset the cost of the option.
When a fund writes a put option, it takes the opposite side of the transaction from the option’s buyer. In return for the receipt of the premium, a fund assumes the obligation to pay the strike price for the instrument underlying the option if the other party to the option chooses to exercise it. A fund may seek to terminate its position in a put option it writes before exercise by purchasing an offsetting option in the market at its current price. Otherwise, a fund must continue to be prepared to pay the strike price while the option is outstanding, regardless of price changes, and must continue to post margin as discussed below. If the price of the underlying instrument rises, a put writer would generally realize as profit the premium it received. If the price of the underlying instrument remains the same over time, it is likely that the writer will also profit, because it should be able to close out the option at a lower price. If the price of the underlying instrument falls, the put writer would expect to suffer a loss.
A fund writing a call option is obligated to sell or deliver the option’s underlying instrument in return for the strike price upon exercise of the option. Writing calls generally is a profitable strategy if the price of the underlying instrument remains the same or falls. A call writer offsets part of the effect of a price decline by receipt of the option premium but gives up some ability to participate in security price increases. The writer of an exchange traded put or call option on a security, an index of securities or a futures contract is required to deposit cash or securities or a letter of credit as margin and to make mark to market payments of variation margin as the position becomes unprofitable.
The funds may write (or sell) call options that obligate them to sell (or deliver) the option’s underlying instrument upon exercise of the option. While the receipt of option premiums would mitigate the effects of price declines, the funds would give up some ability to participate in a price increase on the underlying security. If a fund were to engage in options transactions, it would own the futures contract at the time a call was written and would keep the contract open until the obligation to deliver it pursuant to the call expired.
Restrictions on the Use of Futures Contracts and Options
Each fund may enter into futures contracts, options, options on futures contracts, or swap agreements as permitted by its investment policies and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) rules. The advisor to each fund has claimed an exclusion from the definition of the term “commodity pool operator” under the Commodity Exchange Act and, therefore, the advisor is not subject to registration or regulation as a commodity pool operator under that Act with respect to its provision of services to each fund.
The CFTC recently adopted certain rule amendments that may impose additional limits on the ability of a fund to invest in futures contracts, options on futures, swaps, and certain other commodity interests if its investment advisor does not register with the CFTC as a “commodity pool operator” with respect to such fund. It is expected that the funds will be able to execute their investment strategies

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within the limits adopted by the CFTC’s rules. As a result, the advisor does not intend to register with the CFTC as a commodity pool operator on behalf of any of the funds. If one of the funds engages in transactions that necessitate future registration with the CFTC, the advisor will register as a commodity pool operator and comply with applicable regulations with respect to that fund.
To the extent required by law, each fund will segregate cash, cash equivalents or other appropriate liquid securities on its records in an amount sufficient to cover its obligations under the futures contracts, options and swap agreements.
Initial Public Offerings
The funds may invest in initial public offerings (IPOs) of common stock or other equity securities issued by a company including issuances in connection with a spin-off. The purchase of securities in an IPO may involve higher transaction costs than those associated with the purchase of securities already traded on exchanges or other established markets. In addition to the risks associated with equity securities generally, IPO securities may be subject to additional risk due to factors such as the absence of a prior public market, unseasoned trading and speculation, a potentially small number of securities available for trading, limited information about the issuer and other factors. These factors may cause IPO shares to be volatile in price. While a fund may hold IPO securities for a period, it may sell them in the aftermarket soon after the purchase, which could increase portfolio turnover and lead to increased expenses such as commissions and transaction costs. Investments in IPOs could have a magnified impact (either positive or negative) on performance if a fund’s assets are relatively small. The impact of IPOs on a fund’s performance may tend to diminish as assets grow.
Investments in Issuers with Limited Operating Histories
The funds may invest in securities of issuers with limited operating histories. The portfolio managers consider an issuer to have a limited operating history if that issuer has a record of less than three years of continuous operation. The managers will consider periods of capital formation, incubation, consolidations, and research and development in determining whether an issuer has a record of three years of continuous operation.
Investments in securities of issuers with limited operating histories may involve greater risks than investments in securities of more mature issuers. By their nature, such issuers present limited operating histories and financial information upon which the managers may base their investment decision on behalf of the funds. In addition, financial and other information regarding such issuers, when available, may be incomplete or inaccurate.
For purposes of this limitation, “issuers” refers to operating companies that issue securities for the purposes of issuing debt or raising capital as a means of financing their ongoing operations. It does not, however, refer to entities, corporate or otherwise, that are created for the express purpose of securitizing obligations or income streams. For example, a fund’s investments in a trust created for pooling mortgage obligations or other financial assets would not be subject to the limitation.
Loans of Portfolio Securities
To realize additional income, a fund may lend its portfolio securities. Such loans may not exceed one-third of the fund’s total assets valued at market, however, this limitation does not apply to purchases of debt securities in accordance with the fund’s investment objectives, policies and limitations, or to repurchase agreements with respect to portfolio securities.
Cash received from the borrower as collateral through loan transactions may be invested in other eligible securities. Investing this cash subjects that investment to market appreciation or depreciation. If a borrower defaults on a securities loan because of insolvency or other reasons, the lending fund could experience delays or costs in recovering the securities it loaned; if the value of the loaned securities increased over the value of the collateral, the fund could suffer a loss. To minimize the risk of default on securities loans, the advisor adheres to guidelines prescribed by the Board of Trustees governing lending of securities. These guidelines strictly govern:
(1)
the type and amount of collateral that must be received by the fund;
(2)
the circumstances under which additions to that collateral must be made by borrowers;
(3)
the return to be received by the fund on the loaned securities;
(4)
the limitations on the percentage of fund assets on loan; and
(5)
the credit standards applied in evaluating potential borrowers of portfolio securities.
In addition, the guidelines require that the fund have the option to terminate any loan of a portfolio security at any time and set requirements for recovery of securities from borrowers.
Other Investment Companies
Each of the funds may invest in other investment companies, such as closed-end investment companies, unit investment trusts, other exchange-traded funds (ETFs) and other open-end investment companies, provided that the investment is consistent with the fund’s investment policies and restrictions. Under the Investment Company Act, a fund’s investment in such securities, subject to certain exceptions, currently is limited to
3% of the total voting stock of any one investment company;

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5% of the fund’s total assets with respect to any one investment company; and
10% of a fund’s total assets in the aggregate.
A fund’s investments in other investment companies may include money market funds managed by the advisor. Investments in money market funds are not subject to the percentage limitations set forth above.
As a shareholder of another investment company, a fund would bear, along with other shareholders, its pro rata portion of the other investment company’s expenses, including advisory fees. These expenses would be in addition to the management fee that each fund bears directly in connection with its own operations.
Repurchase Agreements
Each fund may invest in repurchase agreements when they present an attractive short-term return on cash that is not otherwise committed to the purchase of securities pursuant to the investment policies of that fund.
A repurchase agreement occurs when, at the time the fund purchases an interest-bearing obligation, the seller (a bank or a broker-dealer registered under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934) agrees to purchase it on a specified date in the future at an agreed-upon price. The repurchase price reflects an agreed-upon interest rate during the time the fund’s money is invested in the security.
Because the security purchased constitutes collateral security for the repurchase obligation, a repurchase agreement can be considered a loan collateralized by the security purchased. The fund’s risk is the seller’s ability to pay the agreed-upon repurchase price on the repurchase date. If the seller defaults, the fund may incur costs in disposing of the collateral, which would reduce the amount realized thereon. If the seller seeks relief under the bankruptcy laws, the disposition of the collateral may be delayed or limited. To the extent the value of the security decreases, the fund could experience a loss.
The funds will limit repurchase agreement transactions to securities issued by the U.S. government, its agencies and instrumentalities, and will enter into such transactions with those banks and securities dealers who are deemed creditworthy by the funds’ advisor.
Repurchase Agreements maturing in more than seven days would count toward a fund’s 15% limit on illiquid securities.
Restricted and Illiquid Securities
The funds may, from time to time, purchase restricted or illiquid securities, including Rule 144A securities, when they present attractive investment opportunities that otherwise meet the funds’ criteria for selection. Restricted securities include securities that cannot be sold to the public without registration under the Securities Act of 1933 or the availability of an exemption from registration, or that are “not readily marketable” because they are subject to other legal or contractual delays in or restrictions on resale. Rule 144A securities are securities that are privately placed with and traded among qualified institutional investors rather than the general public. Although Rule 144A securities are considered restricted securities, they are not necessarily illiquid.
With respect to securities eligible for resale under Rule 144A, the staff of the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) has taken the position that the liquidity of such securities in the portfolio of a fund offering redeemable securities is a question of fact for the Board of Trustees to determine, such determination to be based upon a consideration of the readily available trading markets and the review of any contractual restrictions. Accordingly, the Board of Trustees is responsible for developing and establishing the guidelines and procedures for determining the liquidity of Rule 144A securities. As allowed by Rule 144A, the Board of Trustees has delegated the day-to-day function of determining the liquidity of Rule 144A securities to the portfolio managers. The board retains the responsibility to monitor the implementation of the guidelines and procedures it has adopted.
Because the secondary market for restricted securities is generally limited to certain qualified institutional investors, the liquidity of such securities may be limited accordingly, and a fund may, from time to time, hold a Rule 144A or other security that is illiquid. In such an event, the portfolio managers will consider appropriate remedies to minimize the effect on such fund’s liquidity. Each of the funds may invest no more than 15% of the value of its assets in illiquid securities.
Short-Term Securities
To meet anticipated redemptions, anticipated purchases of additional securities for a fund’s portfolio, or, in some cases, for temporary defensive purposes, the funds may invest a portion of their assets in money market and other short-term securities.
Examples of those securities include:
Securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government and its agencies and instrumentalities;
Commercial Paper;
Certificates of Deposit and Euro Dollar Certificates of Deposit;
Bankers’ Acceptances;
Short-term notes, bonds, debentures, or other debt instruments;
Repurchase agreements; and
Money market funds.

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Swap Agreements
Each fund may invest in swap agreements, consistent with its investment objective and strategies. A fund may enter into a swap agreement to, for example, attempt to obtain or preserve a particular return or spread at a lower cost than obtaining a return or spread through purchases and/or sales of instruments in other markets; protect against currency fluctuations; attempt to manage duration to protect against any increase in the price of securities the fund anticipates purchasing at a later date; or gain exposure to certain markets in the most economical way possible.
Swap agreements are two-party contracts entered primarily by institutional investors for periods ranging from a few weeks to more than one year. In a standard “swap” transaction, two parties agree to exchange the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on predetermined investments or instruments, which may be adjusted for an interest factor. The gross returns to be exchanged or “swapped” between the parties are generally calculated with respect to a “notional amount,” i.e., the return on or increase in value of a dollar amount invested at a particular interest rate, in a particular foreign currency, or in a “basket” of securities representing a particular index. Forms of swap agreements include, for example, interest rate swaps, under which fixed- or floating-rate interest payments on a specific principal amount are exchanged and total return swaps, under which one party agrees to pay the other the total return of a defined underlying asset (usually an index, including inflation indexes, stock, bond or defined portfolio of loans and mortgages) in exchange for fee payments, often a variable stream of cashflows based on LIBOR. The funds may enter into credit default swap agreements to hedge an existing position by purchasing or selling credit protection. Credit default swaps enable an investor to buy/sell protection against a credit event of a specific issuer. The seller of credit protection against a security or basket of securities receives an up-front or periodic payment to compensate against potential default event(s). The fund may enhance returns by selling protection or attempt to mitigate credit risk by buying protection. Market supply and demand factors may cause distortions between the cash securities market and the credit default swap market.
Interest rate swaps could result in losses if interest rate changes are not correctly anticipated by the fund. Total return swaps could result in losses if the reference index, security, or investments do not perform as anticipated by the fund. Credit default swaps could result in losses if the fund does not correctly evaluate the creditworthiness of the issuer on which the credit default swap is based. Because they are two-party contracts and because they may have terms of greater than seven days, swap agreements may be illiquid. Moreover, a fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap agreement in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap agreement counterparty. The funds will enter into swap agreements only with counterparties that meet certain standards of creditworthiness or that are cleared through a Derivatives Clearing Organization (“DCO”). Certain restrictions imposed on the funds by the Internal Revenue Code may limit the funds’ ability to use swap agreements.
The Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (the “Dodd-Frank Act”) and related regulatory developments require the clearing and exchange-trading of certain standardized derivative instruments that the CFTC and SEC have defined as “swaps.” The CFTC has implemented mandatory exchange-trading and clearing requirements under the Dodd-Frank Act and the CFTC continues to approve contracts for central clearing. Although exchange trading is designed to decrease counterparty risk, it does not do so entirely because the fund will still be subject to the credit risk of the central clearinghouse. Cleared swaps are subject to margin requirements imposed by both the central clearinghouse and the clearing member FCM. Uncleared swaps are now subject to post and collect collateral on a daily basis to secure mark-to-market obligations (variation margin). Requirements for posting of initial margin in connection with OTC derivatives will be phased-in through 2020. These requirements will increase the amount of collateral a fund is required to provide and the costs associated with providing it if a fund is subject to these requirements. Swaps data reporting may subject a fund to administrative costs, and the safeguards established to protect trader anonymity may not function as expected. Exchange trading, central clearing, margin requirements, and data reporting regulations may increase a fund’s cost of hedging risk and, as a result, may affect shareholder returns.
When-Issued and Forward Commitment Agreements
The funds may engage in securities transactions on a when-issued or forward commitment basis in which the transaction price and yield are each fixed at the time the commitment is made, but payment and delivery occur at a future date.
For example, a fund may sell a security and at the same time make a commitment to purchase the same or a comparable security at a future date and specified price. Conversely, a fund may purchase a security and at the same time make a commitment to sell the same or a comparable security at a future date and specified price. These types of transactions are executed simultaneously in what are known as dollar-rolls, buy/sell back transactions, cash and carry, or financing transactions. For example, a broker-dealer may seek to purchase a security that a fund owns. The fund will sell that security to the broker-dealer and simultaneously enter into a forward commitment agreement to buy it back at a future date. This type of transaction generates income for the fund if the dealer is willing to execute the transaction at a favorable price to acquire a specific security.
When purchasing securities on a when-issued or forward commitment basis, a fund assumes the rights and risks of ownership, including the risks of price and yield fluctuations. Market rates of interest on debt securities at the time of delivery may be higher or lower than those contracted for on the when-issued security. Accordingly, the value of the security may decline prior to delivery, which could result in a loss to the fund. While the fund will make commitments to purchase or sell securities with the intention of receiving or delivering them, it may sell the securities before the settlement date if doing so is deemed advisable as a matter of investment strategy.

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In purchasing securities on a when-issued or forward commitment basis, a fund will segregate cash, cash equivalents or other appropriate liquid securities on its records in an amount sufficient to meet the purchase price. To the extent a fund remains fully invested or almost fully invested at the same time it has purchased securities on a when-issued basis, there will be greater fluctuations in its net asset value than if it solely set aside cash to pay for when-issued securities. When the time comes to pay for the when-issued securities, a fund will meet its obligations with available cash, through the sale of securities, or, although it would not normally expect to do so, by selling the when-issued securities themselves (which may have a market value greater or less than the fund’s payment obligation). Selling securities to meet when-issued or forward commitment obligations may generate taxable capital gains or losses.
Investment Policies
Unless otherwise indicated, with the exception of the percentage limitations on borrowing, the following policies apply at the time a fund enters into a transaction. Accordingly, any later increase or decrease beyond the specified limitation resulting from a change in a fund’s assets will not be considered in determining whether it has complied with its investment policies.
Fundamental Investment Policies
The funds’ fundamental investment policies are set forth below. These investment policies and a fund’s status as diversified may not be changed without approval of a majority of the outstanding votes of shareholders of a fund. Under the Investment Company Act, the vote of a majority of the outstanding votes of shareholders means, the vote of (A) 67 percent or more of the voting securities present at a shareholder meeting, if the holders of more than 50 percent of the outstanding voting securities are present or represented by proxy; or (B) more than 50 percent of the outstanding voting securities, whichever is less.
Subject
Policy
Senior
Securities
A fund may not issue senior securities, except as permitted under the Investment Company Act.
Borrowing
A fund may not borrow money, except to the extent permitted by the Investment Company Act, or any rules, exemptions or interpretations thereunder that may be adopted, granted or issued by the SEC.
Lending
A fund may not make loans if, as a result, more than 33 1/3% of its total assets would be lent to other persons, including other investment companies to the extent permitted by the Investment Company Act or any rules, exemptions or interpretations thereunder that may be adopted, granted or issued by the SEC. This limitation does not apply to (i) the lending of portfolio securities, (ii) the purchase of debt securities, other debt instruments, loan participations and/or engaging in direct corporate loans in accordance with its investment goals and policies, and (iii) repurchase agreements to the extent the entry into a repurchase agreement is deemed to be a loan.
Real Estate
A fund may not purchase or sell real estate unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments. This policy shall not prevent a fund from investing in securities or other instruments backed by real estate or securities of companies that deal in real estate or are engaged in the real estate business.
Concentration
A fund may not concentrate its investments in securities of issuers in a particular industry (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities).
Underwriting
A fund may not act as an underwriter of securities issued by others, except to the extent that the fund may be considered an underwriter within the meaning of the 1933 Act in the disposition of restricted securities.
Commodities
A fund may not purchase or sell commodities, except to the extent permitted by the 1940 Act or any rules, exemptions or interpretations thereunder that may be adopted, granted or issued by the SEC.
Control
A fund may not invest for purposes of exercising control over management.
For purposes of the investment policy relating to senior securities, a fund may borrow from any bank provided that immediately after any such borrowing there is asset coverage of at least 300% for all borrowings of such fund. In the event that such asset coverage falls below 300%, the fund shall, within three days thereafter (not including Sundays and holidays) or such longer period as the SEC may prescribe by rules and regulations, reduce the amount of its borrowings to an extent that the asset coverage of such borrowings is at least 300%. In addition, when a fund enters into certain transactions involving potential leveraging, it will hold offsetting positions or segregate assets to cover such obligations at levels consistent with the guidance of the SEC and its staff.
In complying with the fundamental investment policy relating to concentration:
(a)
there is no limitation with respect to obligations issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, any state, territory or possession of the United States, the District of Columbia or any of their authorities, agencies, instrumentalities or political subdivisions and repurchase agreements secured by such obligations (except that an Industrial Development Bond backed only by the assets and revenues of a non-governmental user will be deemed to be an investment in the industry represented by such user);
(b)
wholly owned finance companies will be considered to be in the industries of their parents if their activities are primarily related to financing the activities of their parents;

15



(c)
utilities will be divided according to their services, for example, gas, gas transmission, electric and gas, electric and telephone will each be considered a separate industry; and
(d)
personal credit and business credit businesses will be considered separate industries.
Although the funds’ fundamental investment policy relating to commodities would permit investments in commodities, none of the funds currently intend to purchase or sell physical commodities unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments. The funds may, however, purchase or sell options and futures contracts or invest in securities or other instruments backed by physical commodities to the extent permitted by such fund’s investment objectives and policies.
Nonfundamental Investment Policies
The funds are subject to the following investment policies that are not fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees.
Each fund’s investment objective is a nonfundamental investment policy and may be changed by the Board of Trustees without approval by shareholders.
The funds have adopted nonfundamental investment policies in accordance with Rule 35d-1 under the 1940 Act to invest at least 80% of their assets in the type of investments suggested by their respective names. For purposes of such investment policy, “assets” include the fund’s net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes. Each fund’s Rule 35d-1 80% policy is nonfundamental, which means that it may be changed by the Board of Trustees without the approval of shareholders. Shareholders will be given at least 60 days’ notice of any change to a fund’s Rule 35d-1 80% policy.
The Investment Company Act imposes certain additional restrictions upon the funds’ ability to acquire securities issued by insurance companies, broker-dealers, underwriters or investment advisors, and upon transactions with affiliated persons as defined by the Act. It also defines and forbids the creation of cross and circular ownership. Neither the SEC nor any other agency of the federal or state government participates in or supervises the management of the funds or their investment practices or policies.
Temporary Defensive Measures
For temporary defensive purposes, each fund may invest in securities that may not fit its investment objective or its stated market. During a temporary defensive period, a fund may invest a portion of its assets in money market, cash, cash-equivalents or other short-term securities.
Portfolio Turnover
The portfolio turnover rate of each fund for its most recent fiscal year will be included in the Fund Summary section of that fund’s prospectus. The portfolio turnover rate for each fund’s last five fiscal years (or a shorter period if the fund is less than five years old) will be shown in the Financial Highlights tables in the prospectus. Variations in a fund’s portfolio turnover rate from year to year may be due to a fluctuating volume of shareholder purchase and redemption activity, varying market conditions, and/or changes in the managers’ investment outlook.
The portfolio managers do not have a predefined holding period for any security because changes in the market or security specific financial information may occur at any time. Turnover is expected to be low given that the portfolios managers consider the trade-off between expected returns and implementation costs when deciding to sell a security. However, there is no guarantee that portfolio turnover will always remain low. Higher turnover would generate correspondingly higher brokerage commissions, which is a cost the funds pay directly. Portfolio turnover also may affect the character of capital gains realized and distributed by the funds, if any, because short-term capital gains are taxable as ordinary income.
Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings
ACIM has adopted policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of fund portfolio holdings and characteristics, which are described below.
Distribution to the Public
On each business day of a fund, before commencement of trading in shares on a national securities exchange, the fund will disclose on its website the identities and quantities of the fund’s portfolio holdings that will form the basis for the fund’s calculation of NAV at the end of that business day.
Portfolio holdings are also disclosed in annual and semiannual shareholder reports, and on Form N-PORT, which disclosures are filed with the SEC within 60 days of each fiscal quarter end.
In addition, each business day, each fund’s portfolio holdings information will be provided to the funds’ transfer agent or other agents for dissemination through the facilities of the National Securities Clearing Corporation (NSCC) and/or other fee-based subscription services to NSCC members and/or subscribers to those other fee-based subscription services, including large institutional investors (known as “Authorized Participants”) that have been authorized to purchase and redeem large blocks of shares pursuant to legal requirements, and to entities that publish and/or analyze such information in connection with the process of purchasing or redeeming Creation Units or trading shares of a fund in the secondary market.

16



Portfolio holdings information made available in connection with the creation/redemption process may be provided to other entities that provide services to the fund in the ordinary course of business after it has been disseminated to the NSCC. From time to time, information concerning portfolio holdings other than portfolio holdings information made available in connection with the creation/redemption process, as discussed above, may be provided to other entities that provide services to a fund in the ordinary course of business, no earlier than one business day following the date of the information. The eligible third parties to whom portfolio holdings information may be released in advance of general release fall into the following categories: data consolidators (including rating agencies), fund rating/ranking services and other data providers and service providers to the fund, including Authorized Participants and pricing services.
Continuous Offering
The method by which Creation Units are created and traded may raise certain issues under applicable securities laws. Because new Creation Units are issued and sold by the funds on an ongoing basis, at any point a “distribution,” as such term is used in the 1933 Act, may occur. Broker-dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner that could render them statutory underwriters and subject them to the prospectus delivery requirement and liability provisions of the 1933 Act.
For example, a broker-dealer firm or its client may be deemed a statutory underwriter if it takes Creation Units after placing an order with the transfer agent, breaks them down into constituent shares and sells such shares directly to customers or if it chooses to couple the creation of new shares with an active selling effort involving solicitation of secondary market demand for shares. A determination of whether one is an underwriter for purposes of the 1933 Act must take into account all the facts and circumstances pertaining to the activities of the broker-dealer or its client in the particular case and the examples mentioned above should not be considered a complete description of all the activities that could lead to a categorization as an underwriter.
Broker-dealer firms should also note that dealers who are not “underwriters” but are effecting transactions in shares, whether or not participating in the distribution of shares, generally are required to deliver a prospectus. This is because the prospectus delivery exemption in Section 4(a)(3) of the 1933 Act is not available in respect of such transactions as a result of Section 24(d) of the 1940 Act. Firms that incur a prospectus delivery obligation with respect to shares of the fund are reminded that, pursuant to Rule 153 under the 1933 Act, a prospectus delivery obligation under Section 5(b)(2) of the 1933 Act owed to an exchange member in connection with a sale on the Listing Exchange is satisfied by the fact that the prospectus is available at the Listing Exchange upon request. The prospectus delivery mechanism provided in Rule 153 is available only with respect to transactions on an exchange.
Management
The Board of Trustees
The individuals listed below serve as trustees of the funds. Each trustee will continue to serve in this capacity until death, retirement, resignation or removal from office. The board has adopted a mandatory retirement age for trustees who are not “interested persons,” as that term is defined in the Investment Company Act (independent trustees). Trustees who are not also officers of the trust shall retire by December 31st of the year in which they reach their 75th birthday.
Jonathan S. Thomas is an “interested person” because he currently serves as President and Chief Executive Officer of American Century Companies, Inc. (ACC), the parent company of American Century Investment Management, Inc. (ACIM or the advisor). Reginald Browne is also an “interested person” because he currently serves as Senior Managing Director-ETF Group at Cantor Fitzgerald. Cantor Fitzgerald executes portfolio transactions for, and engages in principal transactions with, certain funds in the American Century family that also have ACIM as their advisor. The other trustees are independent. They are not employees, directors or officers of, and have no financial interest in, ACC or any of its wholly owned, direct or indirect, subsidiaries, including ACIM and American Century Services, LLC (ACS), and they do not have any other affiliations, positions or relationships that would cause them to be considered “interested persons” under the Investment Company Act. The following trustees also serve in this capacity for a number of other registered investment companies in the American Century Investments family of funds: Jonathan S. Thomas, 15; Ronald J. Gilson, 8; and Stephen E. Yates, 7.
The following table presents additional information about the trustees. The mailing address for each trustee other than Jonathan S. Thomas is 330 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10017. The mailing address for Jonathan S. Thomas is 4500 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111.

17



Name (Year of Birth)
Position(s)
Held with
Funds
Length of
Time Served
Principal Occupation(s) During Past 5 Years
Number of
American
Century
Portfolios
Overseen
by Trustee
Other Directorships
Held During Past
5 Years
Independent Trustees
 
 
 
 
Ronald J. Gilson
(1946)
Trustee
Since 2017
Charles J. Meyers Professor of Law and Business, Emeritus, Stanford Law School (1979 to 2016); Marc and Eva Stern Professor of Law and Business, Columbia University School of Law (1992 to present)
50
None
Barry A. Mendelson
(1958)
Trustee
Since 2017
Retired; Consultant regarding ETF and mutual fund matters (2015 to 2016); Principal and Senior Counsel, The Vanguard Group (investment management)(1998 to 2014)
5
None
Stephen E. Yates
(1948)
Trustee
Since 2017
Retired
72
None
Interested Trustees
 
 
 
 
Reginald M. Browne
(1968)

Trustee
Since 2017
Senior Managing Director, Co Global Head-ETF Group, Cantor Fitzgerald (financial services firm)(2013 to present); Managing Director, Co Global Head-ETF Group, Knight Capital Group (financial services firm)(2009 to 2013)
5
None
Jonathan S. Thomas
(1963)
Trustee and President
Since 2017
President and Chief Executive Officer, ACC (March 2007 to present). Also serves as Chief Executive Officer, ACS; Executive Vice President, ACIM; Director, ACC, ACIM and other ACC subsidiaries
117
BioMed Valley Discoveries, Inc.
Qualifications of Trustees
Generally, no one factor was decisive in the selection of the trustees to the board. Qualifications considered by the board to be important to the selection and retention of trustees include the following: (i) the individual’s business and professional experience and accomplishments; (ii) the individual’s educational background and accomplishments; (iii) the individual’s experience and expertise performing senior policy-making functions in business, government, education, accounting, law and/or administration; (iv) how the individual’s expertise and experience would contribute to the mix of relevant skills and experience on the board; (v) the individual’s ability to work effectively with the other members of the board; and (vi) the individual’s ability and willingness to make the time commitment necessary to serve as an effective trustee. In addition, the individuals’ ability to review and critically evaluate information, their ability to evaluate fund service providers, their ability to exercise good business judgment on behalf of fund shareholders, their prior service on the board, and their familiarity with the funds are considered important assets.
While the board has not adopted a specific policy on diversity, it takes overall diversity into account when considering and evaluating nominees for trustee. The board generally considers the manner in which each trustee’s professional experience, background, skills, and other individual attributes will contribute to the effectiveness of the board. Additional information about each trustee’s individual educational and professional experience (supplementing the information provided in the table above) follows and was considered as part of his or her nomination to, or retention on, the board.
Reginald M. Browne: BS in Business Administration, La Salle University; 15 years’ experience in the ETF industry with a core focus on market-making and institutional sales
Ronald J. Gilson: BA, Washington University; JD, Yale Law School; formerly, Attorney, Steinhart, Goldberg, Feigenbaum & Ladar
Barry A. Mendelson: AB, Geology, Vassar College; JD, The George Washington University School of Law; eight years’ experience with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, Division of Investment Management
Jonathan S. Thomas: BA in Economics, University of Massachusetts; MBA, Boston College; formerly held senior leadership roles with Fidelity Investments, Boston Financial Services, Bank of America and Morgan Stanley; serves on the Board of Governors of the Investment Company Institute 

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Stephen E. Yates: BS and MS in Industrial Engineering, University of Alabama; formerly, Executive Vice President, Technology & Operations, KeyCorp. (computer services); formerly, President, USAA Information Technology Company (financial services); 33 years’ of experience in Information Technology; formerly, Director, Applied Industrial Technologies, Inc.
Responsibilities of the Board
The board is responsible for overseeing the advisor’s management and operations of the funds pursuant to the management agreement. Trustees also have significant responsibilities under the federal securities laws. Among other things, they:
oversee the performance of the funds;
oversee the quality of the advisory and shareholder services provided by the advisor;
review annually the fees paid to the advisor for its services;
monitor potential conflicts of interest between the funds and their affiliates, including the advisor;
oversee custody of assets and the valuation of securities; and
oversee the funds’ compliance program.
In performing their duties, board members receive detailed information about the funds and the advisor regularly throughout the year, and they meet in person at least quarterly with management of the advisor to review reports about fund operations. The trustees’ role is to provide oversight and not to provide day-to-day management.
The board has all powers necessary or convenient to carry out its responsibilities. Consequently, the board may adopt bylaws providing for the regulation and management of the affairs of the funds and may amend and repeal them to the extent that such bylaws do not reserve that right to the funds’ shareholders. They may increase or reduce the number of board members and may, subject to the Investment Company Act, fill board vacancies. Board members also may elect and remove such officers and appoint and terminate such agents as they consider appropriate. They may establish and terminate committees consisting of two or more trustees who may exercise the powers and authority of the board as determined by the trustees. They may, in general, delegate such authority as they consider desirable to any officer of the funds, to any board committee and to any agent or employee of the funds or to any custodian, transfer agent, investor servicing agent, principal underwriter or other service provider for a fund.
To communicate with the board, or a member of the board, a shareholder should send a written communication addressed to the board or member of the board to the attention of the Corporate Secretary at the following address: P.O. Box 418210, Kansas City, Missouri 64141-9210. Shareholders who prefer to communicate by email may send their comments to corporatesecretary@americancentury.com. All shareholder communications received will be forwarded to the board or the independent chairman of the board.
Board Leadership Structure and Standing Board Committees
Jonathan S. Thomas, an interested trustee, currently serves as the chairman of the board and has served in such capacity since the board was formally constituted in November 2017. The independent trustees have not designated a lead independent trustee. The relatively small size of the board facilitates communication among the trustees, and between the trustees and management, and the board has concluded that designating one of the three independent trustees as the “lead” would not meaningfully enhance the effectiveness of the board. The independent trustees meet separately to consider a variety of matters that are scheduled to come before the board and meet periodically with the funds’ Chief Compliance Officer and fund auditors. They are advised by independent legal counsel. No independent trustee may serve as an officer or employee of a fund. The board has also established an Audit Committee, described below, comprised solely of independent trustees. The board believes that the current leadership structure is appropriate and allows for independent oversight of the funds.
The board has an Audit Committee that approves the funds’ (or trust’s) engagement of the independent registered public accounting firm and recommends approval of such engagement to the independent trustees. The committee also oversees the activities of the accounting firm, receives regular reports regarding fund accounting, oversees securities valuation (approving the funds’ valuation policy and receiving reports regarding instances of fair valuation thereunder) and receives regular reports from the advisor’s internal audit department. The committee currently consists of Barry A. Mendelson (chair), Ronald J. Gilson and Stephen E. Yates. It met three times during the fiscal year ended August 31, 2018.
Risk Oversight by the Board
As previously disclosed, the board oversees the advisor’s management of the funds and meets at least quarterly with management of the advisor to review reports and receive information regarding fund operations. Risk oversight relating to the funds is one component of the board’s oversight and is undertaken in connection with the duties of the board. The board oversees various types of risks relating to the funds, including, but not limited to, investment risk, operational risk and enterprise risk. Through its regular interactions with management of the advisor during and between meetings, the board will analyze, evaluate, and provide feedback on the advisor’s risk management processes. In addition, the board will receive information regarding, and have discussions with senior management of the advisor about, the advisor’s enterprise risk management systems and strategies. There can be no assurance that all elements of risk, or

19



even all elements of material risk, will be disclosed to or identified by the board, or that the advisor’s risk management systems and strategies, and the board’s oversight thereof, will mitigate all elements of risk, or even all elements of material risk to the funds.
Board Compensation
For the fiscal year ended August 31, 2018, trustees listed in the following table received the amounts shown for services on the trust’s board and on the boards of other funds in the American Century family of funds if applicable. Neither Jonathan S. Thomas nor any officers of the funds receives compensation from the funds.
Name of Trustee
Total Compensation for Service as Trustee to the Trust(1)
Total Compensation for Services as Directors/Trustees for the American Century Investments Family of Funds(2)
Reginald M. Browne
$28,292
$28,292
Ronald J. Gilson
$28,292
$391,625
Barry A. Mendelson
$32,333
$32,333
Stephen E. Yates
$28,292
$371,625
1 
Includes compensation paid to the trustees for the fiscal year ended August 31, 2018, and also includes amounts deferred at the election of the trustees under the American Century Mutual Funds’ Independent Directors’ Deferred Compensation Plan.
2 
Includes compensation paid to each trustee for his service as director/trustee for one (in the case of Mr. Gilson, nine, and in the case of Mr. Yates, eight) investment company in the American Century Investments family of funds. Includes deferred compensation paid under the American Century Mutual Funds’ Independent Directors’ Deferred Compensation Plan as follows: Mr. Gilson, $116,667; Mr. Yates, $371,625.
None of the funds currently provides any pension or retirement benefits to the trustees except pursuant to the American Century Mutual Funds’ Independent Directors’ Deferred Compensation Plan adopted by the trust. Under the plan, the independent trustees may defer receipt of all or any part of the fees to be paid to them for serving as trustees of the funds. All deferred fees are credited to accounts established in the names of the trustees. The amounts credited to each account then increase or decrease, as the case may be, in accordance with the performance of one or more American Century funds selected by the trustees. The account balance continues to fluctuate in accordance with the performance of the selected fund or funds until final payment of all amounts credited to the account. Trustees are allowed to change their designation of funds from time to time.
Generally, deferred fees are not payable to a trustee until the distribution date elected by the trustee in accordance with the terms of the plan. Such distribution date may be a date on or after the trustee’s retirement date, but may be an earlier date if the trustee agrees not to make any additional deferrals after such distribution date. Distributions may commence prior to the elected payment date for certain reasons specified in the plan, such as unforeseeable emergencies, death or disability. Trustees may receive deferred fee account balances either in a lump sum payment or in substantially equal installment payments to be made over a period not to exceed 10 years. Upon the death of a trustee, all remaining deferred fee account balances are paid to the trustee’s beneficiary or, if none, to the trustee’s estate.
The plan is an unfunded plan and, accordingly, the funds have no obligation to segregate assets to secure or fund the deferred fees. To date, the funds have met all payment obligations under the plan. The rights of trustees to receive their deferred fee account balances are the same as the rights of a general unsecured creditor of the funds. The plan may be terminated at any time by the administrative committee of the plan. If terminated, all deferred fee account balances will be paid in a lump sum.
Ownership of Fund Shares
The funds had not yet commenced operations as of the date of this registration statement. Accordingly, none of the trustees held equity securities in the funds as of such date. As of December 31, 2018, the aggregate dollar range of equity securities in all registered investment companies overseen by the trustees in the family of investment companies is shown in the table below.
 
Name of Trustee  
 
Reginald M. Browne
Ronald J. Gilson
Barry A. Mendelson
Jonathan S. Thomas
Stephen E. Yates
Aggregate Dollar Range of Equity Securities
in all Registered Investment Companies Overseen by Trustees in Family of Investment Companies
A
E
C
E  
E  
Ranges: A—none, B—$1-$10,000, C—$10,001-$50,000, D—$50,001-$100,000, E—More than $100,000

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Beneficial Ownership of Affiliates by Independent Trustees
No independent trustee or his or her immediate family members beneficially owned shares of the advisor, the funds’ principal underwriter or any other person directly or indirectly controlling, controlled by, or under common control with the advisor or the funds’ principal underwriter as of the date of this SAI.
Officers
The following table presents certain information about the executive officers of the funds. Each officer, except Edward Rosenberg and Peruvemba Satish, serves as an officer for each of the 16 investment companies in the American Century family of funds. No officer is compensated for his or her service as an officer of the funds. The listed officers are interested persons of the funds and are appointed or re-appointed on an annual basis. The mailing address for each officer listed below is 4500 Main Street, Kansas City, Missouri 64111.
Name
(Year of Birth)
Offices with the Funds
Principal Occupation(s) During the Past Five Years
Jonathan S. Thomas
(1963)
Trustee and President
since 2017
President and Chief Executive Officer, ACC (2007 to present). Also serves as Chief Executive Officer, ACS; Executive Vice President, ACIM; Director, ACC, ACIM and other ACC subsidiaries
R. Wes Campbell
(1974)
Chief Financial
Officer and Treasurer
since 2018
Investment Operations and Investment Accounting, ACS (2000 to present)
Amy D. Shelton
(1964)
Chief Compliance Officer and Vice President since 2017
Chief Compliance Officer, American Century funds, (2014 to present); Chief Compliance Officer, ACIM (2014 to present); Chief Compliance Officer, ACIS (2009 to present); Vice President, Client Interactions and Marketing, ACIS (2013 to 2014). Also serves as Vice President, ACIS
Charles A. Etherington
(1957)
General Counsel and
Vice President since 2017
Attorney, ACC (1994 to present); Vice President, ACC (2005 to present), General Counsel, ACC (2007 to present). Also serves as General Counsel, ACIM, ACS, ACIS and other ACC subsidiaries; and Senior Vice President, ACIM and ACS
David H. Reinmiller
(1963)
Vice President since 2017
Attorney, ACC (1994 to present); Also serves as Vice President, ACIM and ACS
Edward Rosenberg (1973)
Vice President since 2017
Senior Vice President, ACIM (2017 to present); Senior Vice President, Flexshares Head of ETF Capital Markets, Northern Trust (2012 to 2017)
Peruvemba Satish
(1965)
Vice President since 2017
Senior Vice President, Portfolio Manager and Director, Global Analytics, ACIM (2014 to present); Senior Managing Director, Allstate Investment Management Company (2013 to 2014); Managing Director, Allstate Investment Management Company (2010 to 2012)
C. Jean Wade
(1964)
Vice President since 2017
Senior Vice President, ACS (2017 to present); Vice President, ACS (2000 to 2017)
John P. Fordyce
(1985)
Secretary since 2018
Attorney, ACS (2018 to present); Counsel, Sprint Corporation (2015 to 2018); Counsel, Unite Here Health (2014 to 2015)
Code of Ethics
The funds and the advisor have adopted codes of ethics under Rule 17j-1 of the Investment Company Act. They permit personnel subject to the codes to invest in securities, including securities that may be purchased or held by the funds, provided that they first obtain approval from the compliance department before making such investments. The funds’ distributor (Foreside Fund Services, LLC) relies on the principal underwriters exception under Rule 17j-1(c)(3), specifically where the distributor is not affiliated with the Trust or the advisor, and no officer, director or general partner of the distributor serves as an officer, director or general partner of the Trust or the advisor.
Proxy Voting Policies
The advisor is responsible for exercising the voting rights associated with the securities purchased and/or held by the funds. The funds’ Board of Trustees has approved the advisor’s proxy voting policies to govern the advisor’s proxy voting activities.
A copy of the advisor’s proxy voting policies is attached hereto as Appendix C. Information regarding how the advisor voted proxies relating to portfolio securities during the most recent 12-month period ended June 30 will be available on the About Us page at americancentury.com. The advisor’s proxy voting record also is available on the SEC’s website at sec.gov.

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The Funds’ Principal Shareholders
The name and percentage ownership of each DTC Participant (as defined below) that owns of record 5% or more of the outstanding shares of a fund are listed in Appendix A. The trust does not have information concerning the beneficial ownership of shares held by DTC Participants.
Following the creation of the initial Creation Unit(s) of shares of a fund and immediately prior to the commencement of trading in the fund’s shares, a holder of shares may be a “control person” of the fund, as defined in the Investment Company Act. A fund cannot predict the length of time for which one or more shareholders may remain a control person of the fund.
Depository Trust Company (DTC) acts as securities depository for shares of the funds. Shares of the funds are represented by securities registered in the name of DTC or its nominee and deposited with, or on behalf of, DTC.
DTC was created in 1973 to enable electronic movement of securities between its participants (DTC Participants), and NSCC was established in 1976 to provide a single settlement system for securities clearing and to serve as central counterparty for securities trades among DTC Participants. In 1999, DTC and NSCC were consolidated within the Depository Trust & Clearing Corporation (DTCC) and became wholly owned subsidiaries of DTCC. The common stock of DTCC is owned by the DTC Participants, but the New York Stock Exchange and FINRA, through subsidiaries, hold preferred shares in DTCC that provide them with the right to elect one member each to the DTCC Board of Directors. Access to the DTC system is available to entities, such as banks, brokers, dealers and trust companies, that clear through or maintain a custodial relationship with a DTC Participant, either directly or indirectly (Indirect Participants).
Beneficial ownership of shares is limited to DTC Participants, Indirect Participants and persons holding interests