0001213900-23-002427.txt : 20230112 0001213900-23-002427.hdr.sgml : 20230112 20230112121624 ACCESSION NUMBER: 0001213900-23-002427 CONFORMED SUBMISSION TYPE: 10-K PUBLIC DOCUMENT COUNT: 86 CONFORMED PERIOD OF REPORT: 20220930 FILED AS OF DATE: 20230112 DATE AS OF CHANGE: 20230112 FILER: COMPANY DATA: COMPANY CONFORMED NAME: Bantec, Inc. CENTRAL INDEX KEY: 0001704795 STANDARD INDUSTRIAL CLASSIFICATION: AIRCRAFT [3721] IRS NUMBER: 300967943 STATE OF INCORPORATION: DE FISCAL YEAR END: 0930 FILING VALUES: FORM TYPE: 10-K SEC ACT: 1934 Act SEC FILE NUMBER: 000-55789 FILM NUMBER: 23525431 BUSINESS ADDRESS: STREET 1: 195 PATERSON AVENUE CITY: LITTLE FALLS STATE: NJ ZIP: 07424 BUSINESS PHONE: 203-220-2296 MAIL ADDRESS: STREET 1: 195 PATERSON AVENUE CITY: LITTLE FALLS STATE: NJ ZIP: 07424 FORMER COMPANY: FORMER CONFORMED NAME: Bantek Inc. DATE OF NAME CHANGE: 20181113 FORMER COMPANY: FORMER CONFORMED NAME: Drone USA Inc. DATE OF NAME CHANGE: 20170426 10-K 1 f10k2022_bantecinc.htm ANNUAL REPORT

 

 

UNITED STATES

SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION

WASHINGTON, D.C. 20549

 

FORM 10-K

 

 ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDED SEPTEMBER 30, 2022

 

 TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934

 

FOR THE TRANSITION PERIOD FROM ______ TO _____

 

COMMISSION FILE NUMBER: 000-55789

 

BANTEC, INC.

(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)

 

Delaware   30-0967943
(State or other jurisdiction of
incorporation or organization)
  (I.R.S. Employer
Identification No.)

 

195 Paterson Avenue

Little Falls, NJ 07424

(Address of principal executive offices)

 

REGISTRANT’S TELEPHONE NUMBER, INCLUDING AREA CODE: (203) 220-2296

 

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(b) OF THE ACT: NONE

 

SECURITIES REGISTERED PURSUANT TO SECTION 12(g) OF THE ACT:

 

COMMON STOCK, $0.0001 PAR VALUE

(Title of Class)

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes ☐     No

 

Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes ☐     No

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed be Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ☒     No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Web site, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ☒     No ☐

 

Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K (Section 229.405 of this chapter) is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ☐

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act. 

 

Large accelerated filer Accelerated filer
Non-accelerated filer Smaller reporting company
  Emerging growth company

 

If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has fi led a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.

 

Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act). Yes ☐     No

 

The aggregate market value of the voting common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant (assuming officers and directors are affiliates) was approximately $2,171,943 as of March 31, 2022, computed on the basis of the closing price on such date.

 

As of December 31, 2022, there were 5,864,107,732 shares of the registrant’s Common Stock outstanding.

 

 

 

 

 

FORWARD LOOKING STATEMENTS

 

The Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 provides a “safe harbor” for forward-looking statements, which are identified by the words “believe,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “intend,” “plan” and similar expressions. The statements contained herein which are not based on historical facts are forward-looking statements that involve known and unknown risks and uncertainties that could significantly affect our actual results, performance or achievements in the future and, accordingly, such actual results, performance or achievements may materially differ from those expressed or implied in any forward-looking statements made by or on our behalf. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to, risks associated with our ability to successfully develop and protect our intellectual property, our ability to raise additional capital to fund future operations and compliance with applicable laws and changes in such laws and the administration of such laws. These risks are described below and in “Item 1. Business,” “Item 7. Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations,” and “Item 7A. Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk” included in this Form 10-K. Readers are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements which speak only as of the date the statements were made.

 

 

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 

PART I
     
ITEM 1. BUSINESS 1
ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS 5
ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS 29
ITEM 2. PROPERTIES 29
ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS 30
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES 30
     
PART II
     
ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES 31
ITEM 6. [RESERVED] 35
ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS 35
ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK 40
ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA F-1
ITEM 9. CHANGES IN AND DISAGREEMENTS WITH INDEPENDENT CERTIFYING ACCOUNTANTS ON ACCOUNTING AND FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE 41
ITEM 9A. CONTROLS AND PROCEDURES 41
ITEM 9B. OTHER INFORMATION 42
ITEM 9C. DISCLOSURE REGARDING FOREIGN JURISDICTIONS THAT PREVENT INSPECTIONS 42
     
PART III
     
ITEM 10. DIRECTORS, EXECUTIVE OFFICERS AND CORPORATE GOVERANCE 43
ITEM 11. EXECUTIVE COMPENSATION 44
ITEM 12. SECURITY OWNERSHIP OF CERTAIN BENEFICIAL OWNERS AND MANAGEMENT AND RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS 53
ITEM 13. CERTAIN RELATIONSHIPS AND RELATED TRANSACTIONS, AND DIRECTOR INDEPENDENCE 54
ITEM 14. PRINCIPAL ACCOUNTING FEES AND SERVICES 57
     
PART IV
     
ITEM 15. EXHIBITS AND FINANCIAL STATEMENT SCHEDULES 58
     
SIGNATURES 61

 

i

 

 

PART I

 

ITEM 1. BUSINESS

 

Organizational History

 

We were formed in Delaware on June 26, 1972 as OCR Corporation, underwent a series of name changes and businesses and on April 25, 2008 changed our name to Texas Wyoming Drilling, Inc. On January 26, 2016, we entered into an Equity Exchange Agreement (the “EEA”) whereby we acquired all of the issued and outstanding membership interests in Drone USA, LLC in exchange for 440,425 shares of our common stock and 250 shares of Series A preferred stock, subsequent and pursuant to our completing a 1-for-150 share reverse stock split on all issued and outstanding common stock which resulted in total issued and outstanding shares of common stock of 6,368 immediately prior to this issuance. In connection with the EEA, 1,253 shares of common stock were relinquished and an additional 44,043 shares of common stock were issued pursuant to a previous settlement agreement. In connection with the EEA, effective January 26, 2016, we accepted the resignation of Margaret Cadena, the former Chief Executive Officer and Board member, and Richard Kugelman, Dr. Robert Michet, and Dr. David Durkin, the remaining former officers and Board members, and appointed Michael Bannon as Chief Executive Officer, President, Chairman and Board member and the former Chief Financial Officer of Drone USA, LLC, as Secretary, Treasurer, and Board member. Our former CFO resigned as our CFO and as a member of our Board on July 10, 2017 and Michael Bannon was appointed as CFO. On May 19, 2016, we changed our name to Drone USA, Inc., we changed our ticker symbol to DRUS, and we completed a 1-for-12 share reverse stock split on all issued and outstanding common stock, with a record date of May 24, 2016, which resulted in total issued and outstanding shares of common stock of 40,842 on June 17, 2016 when all round lot issuances were completed. The company notified shareholders May 30, 2018 that it intended to increase the authorized shares from 200,000 to 1,500,000 and change the name to Bantek Inc. On February 24, 2019, the company notified the shareholders that intended to increase the authorized shares from 1,500,000,000 to 6,000,000,000 shares. Bantek, Inc. filed a change of name to Bantec, Inc. and to effect a reverse stock split (of the common stock) of 1 for 1,000 on September 16, 2019, which became effective on February 10, 2020. All share and per share data have been retrospectively adjusted for the effects of all reverse splits.

 

We are currently traded on the OTC Pink market under the symbol BANT.

 

On June 1, 2016, we entered into an agreement with BRVANT Technologic Solutions (“BRVANT”), a company in Brazil that develops and manufactures UAV systems, embedded systems and simulators for commercial and military customers. We acquired exclusive rights to BRVANT’s UAV technology and intellectual property relating to its UAV technology. As consideration for the agreement, Dr. Rodrigo Kuntz Rangel, BRVANT’s CEO, was appointed to the position of Chief Technology Officer (CTO) and issued a stock option grant for 2,000 shares of common stock in Drone USA. We have the option to acquire ownership of all outstanding capital stock of BRVANT for additional consideration of $1 million, but we have not made a decision to make that purchase at this time.

 

On September 9, 2016, Howco Distributing Co., (“Howco”) became a wholly owned subsidiary of Bantec, Inc. We acquired all of its issued and outstanding shares held by Paul Charles (“Chuck”) Joy and Kathryn B. Joy, the founders and officers of Howco, for $3,500,000, a warrant for 500 shares of Bantec, Inc. common stock with an exercise price of $10.00 per share, and earnout consideration, the funds for which were received from the TCA loan discussed below. We paid $2,600,000 in cash and issued a note to the sellers for $900,000. Howco is a supplier of spare and replacement parts to the United States Federal Government and commercial customers worldwide with expertise in Defense Logistics Agency, TACOM, NECO and other Department of Defense acquisition groups. Howco understands the entire contract and administration management process for Federal Government contracts and supply chain logistics for its Federal Government customers as well as prime contractors with Federal Government contracts. Prior to the acquisition, Howco reported revenues of approximately $18.78 million and $24.86 million, and net income of approximately $903,000 and $1,013,000, for the period from October 1, 2015 through September 9, 2016 and the year ended September 30, 2015, respectively. For the year ended September 30, 2022, one customer accounted for approximately 78% of Howco’s total sales. Howco’s dependence on one significant customer, is a risk for its ability to maintain or increase its future revenues since the loss of one or both could have significant adverse financial consequences for Howco and Bantec, Inc.

 

1

 

 

On November 15, 2017, we executed a Liability Purchase arrangement with Livingston Asset Management (“Livingston”) under which Livingston agreed to purchase up to $10,000,000 that we owe to our creditors through direct purchase of the debts from our creditors in return for (i) a convertible note issued by the Company in the principal amount of $50,000 bearing interest of 10% per year to cover certain legal fees and other expenses that matures in six months and is convertible into shares of our common stock at a 30% reduction off the lowest closing bid price for 20 trading days prior to the date of conversion, (ii) a convertible note subject to these same terms as the convertible note issued to Livingston, payable to Scottsdale Capital Advisors in the principal amount of $15,000 as a placement agent fee and (iii) the right of Livingston to retain 30% of any negotiated reduction off the face amount of the liability we owe to such creditors. Following a court judgment (March 2018) for the liabilities purchased by Livingston, we have been issuing free trading shares of our common stock under section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act to Livingston in the amount of such judgment in a series of tranches so that Livingston will not own more than 9.99% of our outstanding shares per tranche.

 

The Impact of COVID-19

 

The Company is a wholesale vendor to the Department of Defense through its wholly owned subsidiary Howco whose business has been affected due to the COVID-19 social distancing requirements mandated by the federal, state and local governments where the Company’s operations occur. For some businesses, like the Company’s, core business cannot always be done through “virtual” means, and even when this is possible, it requires significant capital and time to achieve. During the year ended September 30, 2022 sales and shipments at Howco have increased modestly from the year ended September 30, 2021. It is anticipated that COVID-19 restrictions had an impact on the Company’s operations during the year ended September 30, 2022, however the Company cannot assess the financial impact of the related COVID-19 restrictions as compared to other economic and business factors.

 

Growth Strategy

 

Our parent company intends to focus on raising capital to fund our expansion into the distribution, manufacturing, sanitizing and construction industries. Although, we will continually look to grow organically, through franchise creation and through acquisitions. We are looking for companies that will ultimately complement each other where we can cross sell our customers a wide variety of goods and services. For example, we are looking to purchase a distributor or manufacturer that will enable us to sell new products to the US government through our subsidiary Howco.

 

Drone Sales

 

Through our Drone USA website (droneusainc.com) and through limited direct selling efforts we offer police, fire, the US government drone programs. Our drone programs constitute selling our customers drones, drone accessories, accident reconstruction software, drone training, drone services, counter-drone technology, certificates of authorization (COAs) and Waivers.

 

Acquisitions

 

We are looking to acquire companies in industries where we possess experience. For example, we would like to acquire companies in the armament, environmental, solar, manufacturing, robotic and logistics industries. When acquired, we will initially run the companies as independent entities keeping their identities temporarily intact. When we are confident that we fully know the business and their customers, we will begin to bring them into the Bantec family changing their names to a Bantec division such as Bantec Robotics, Bantec Arms or Bantec Solar. In the future, we may to look to franchise some of our divisions. This will make up our primary growth path. These are our potential and intended divisions:

 

  1. Bantec Arms

 

  2. Bantec Robitics

 

  3. Bantec Environmental

 

  4. Bantec Logistics

 

  5. Bantec Solar

 

Bantec Sanitizing

 

Through Bantec Sanitizing (a division of Bantec), through our franchising efforts, we sell disinfecting products and equipment to facility owners in hospitals, universities, manufacturers and building owners. We sell sanitizing products through our website at Bantec.store.

 

2

 

 

Howco’s Business

 

Howco is a premier supplier of spare and replacement parts to a wide variety of Federal Government agencies, U.S. military prime contractors and commercial customers worldwide. Founded in 1990 and located in Vancouver, Washington, Howco’s services encompass bid solicitation, contract management, packaging and logistics for construction, transportation, mining and heavy equipment spare and replacement parts to customers worldwide utilizing a wide variety of supply chain solutions. Howco was the winner of the 2012 United States’ Department of Defense Logistics Agency’s Bronze Supplier Award. Howco reported revenues of approximately $2.3 million and $2.4 million, and net (loss) of approximately ($198,000) and ($163,000), for the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively.

 

Howco’s Government Services Contracts

 

Howco enters into various types of contracts with our customers, such as Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ), Cost-Plus-Fixed-Fee (CPFF) Level of Effort (LOE), Cost-Plus-Fixed-Fee (CPFF) Completion, Cost-reimbursement (CR), Firm-Fixed-Price (FFP), Fixed-Price Incentive (FPI) and Time-and-Materials (T&M). The majority of Howco’s revenues are derived from FFP contracts.

 

IDIQ contracts provide for an indefinite quantity of services or stated limits of supplies for a fixed period. They are used when the customer cannot determine, above a specified minimum, the precise quantities of supplies or services that the government will require during the contract period. IDIQs help streamline the contract process and speed service delivery. IDIQ contracts are most often used for service contracts and architect-engineering services. Awards are usually for base years and option years. The customer places delivery orders (for supplies) or task orders (for services) against a basic contract for individual requirements. Minimum and maximum quantity limits are specified in the basic contract as either a number of units (for supplies) or as dollar values (for services).

 

CPFF LOE contracts will be issued when the scope of work is defined in general terms requiring only that the contractor devote a specified LOE for a stated time period. A CPFF completion contract will be issued when the scope of work defines a definite goal or target which leads to an end product deliverable (e.g., a final report of research accomplishing the goal or target).

 

CR contracts provide for payment of allowable incurred costs, to the extent prescribed in the contract. These contracts establish an estimate of total cost for the purpose of obligating funds and establishing a ceiling that the contractor may not exceed (except at its own risk) without the approval of the contracting officer and are suitable for use only when uncertainties involved in contract performance do not permit costs to be estimated with sufficient accuracy to use any type of fixed-price contract.

 

FFP contract will be issued when acquiring supplies or services on the basis of definite or detailed specifications and fair and reasonable prices can be established at the outset.

 

FPI target delivery contract will be issued when acquiring supplies or services on the basis of reasonably definite or detailed specifications and cost can be reasonably predicted at the outset wherein the cost risk will be shared. A firm target cost, target profit, and profit adjustment formula will be negotiated to provide a fair and reasonable incentive and a ceiling that provides for the contractor to assume an appropriate share of the risk.

 

T&M contracts provide for acquiring supplies or services on the basis of (i) direct labor hours at specified fixed hourly rates that include wages, overhead, general and administrative expenses, and profit; and (ii) actual cost for materials. A customer may use this contract when it is not possible at the time of placing the contract to estimate accurately the extent or duration of the work or to anticipate costs with any reasonable degree of confidence.

 

Market Size

 

According to published reports one-third of the DoD budget request, $247.4 billion, is for procurement and research, development, test, and evaluation (“RDT&E”) in 2020. The U.S. Government spends a portion of this budget on the shipping of replacement parts annually.

 

Intellectual Property

 

We review each of our intellectual properties and make a determination as to the best means to protect such property, by trademark, by copyright, by patent, by trade secret, or otherwise. We believe that we have taken appropriate steps to protect our intellectual properties, based on our evaluation of the factors unique to each such property, but cannot guarantee that this is the case.

 

3

 

 

Regulatory Matters

 

The use of unmanned aerial vehicles for commercial purposes is governed by the Federal Aviation Administration (“FAA”). On August 29, 2016, the new FAA rules took effect for commercial use of small drones. Under the FAA rules commercial drones must be under 55 pounds and be registered with the FAA. The rules require a new “remote pilot certificate”, daylight-only operations 30 minutes before official sunrise and 30 minutes after official sunset, a requirement that all flights travel at a maximum groundspeed of 100 miles per hour remain, below 400 feet or within 400 feet of a structure and yield the right of way to other aircraft. Under the FAA rules, drone pilots must be at least 16 years old or be supervised by an adult with a remote pilot certificate. The pilot must also maintain “visual line of sight” with the drone at all times, among other requirements. The new rules also require that any drone-related incident that results in at least $500 worth of damage or causes serious injury be reported to the FAA within 10 days. The new restrictions can be waived, but pilots will need to apply directly to the FAA for an exemption and/or a waiver.

 

Competition

 

Drone USA LLC

 

The competition for Drone USA consists mainly of resellers of drones who sell to law enforcement, fire departments security companies and the U.S. government. These competitors primarily are Amazon, Best Buy, Drone Nerds, SYNNEX and other distributors of drones. On the training front our competitors consist of SMG and other training suppliers.

 

Howco

 

The business of supplying spare and replacement parts to Federal Government agencies, U.S. military prime contractors and commercial customers is very competitive. Among our U.S. based competitors are JGILS that supplies parts manufactured by Fairbanks Morse/Coltec and other brands, Ohio Cat that supplies Caterpillar parts, and Kampi Components and Brighton Cromwell, both of which compete with us in several brands. 

 

Bantec Construction & Environmental

 

In the construction & environmental industries located in the tristate area there is a tremendous amount of competition. In all three states, we will encounter competition from both small and large contractors, and from union and non-union contractors.

 

Employees

 

We have five full-time employees, one with Bantec and four are with Howco, along with two part-time employees with Howco. We have no labor union contracts and believe relations with our employees are satisfactory.

 

Emerging Growth Company

 

We are and we will remain an “emerging growth company” as defined under The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act (the “JOBS Act”), until the earliest to occur of (i) the last day of the fiscal year during which our total annual revenues equal or exceed $1 billion (subject to adjustment for inflation), (ii) the last day of the fiscal year following the fifth anniversary of our initial public offering, (iii) the date on which we have, during the previous three-year period, issued more than $1 billion in non-convertible debt securities, or (iv) the date on which we are deemed a “large accelerated filer” (with at least $700 million in public float) under the Securities and Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”).

 

4

 

 

As an “emerging growth company”, we may take advantage of specified reduced disclosure and other requirements that are otherwise applicable generally to public companies. These provisions include:

 

  only two years of audited financial statements in addition to any required unaudited interim financial statements with correspondingly reduced “Management’s Discussion and Analysis” disclosure;

 

  reduced disclosure about our executive compensation arrangements;

 

  no requirement that we hold non-binding advisory votes on executive compensation or golden parachute arrangements; and

 

  exemption from the auditor attestation requirement in the assessment of our internal control over financial reporting.

 

We have taken advantage of some of these reduced burdens, and thus the information we provide stockholders may be different from what you might receive from other public companies in which you hold shares.

 

In addition, Section 107 of the JOBS Act also provides that an emerging growth company can take advantage of the extended transition period provided in Section 7(a)(2)(B) of the Securities Act for complying with new or revised accounting standards. In other words, an emerging growth company can delay the adoption of certain accounting standards until those standards would otherwise apply to private companies. However, we are choosing to “opt out” of such extended transition period, and as a result, we will comply with new or revised accounting standards on the relevant dates on which adoption of such standards is required for non-emerging growth companies. Section 107 of the JOBS Act provides that our decision to opt out of the extended transition period for complying with new or revised accounting standards is irrevocable.

 

Notwithstanding the above, we are also currently a “smaller reporting company”, meaning that we are not an investment company, an asset-backed issuer, or a majority-owned subsidiary of a parent company that is not a smaller reporting company and have a public float of less than $250 million and annual revenues of less than $100 million during the most recently completed fiscal year. In the event that we are still considered a “smaller reporting company”, at such time as we cease being an “emerging growth company”, the disclosure we will be required to provide in our SEC filings will increase, but will still be less than it would be if we were not considered either an “emerging growth company” or a “smaller reporting company”. Specifically, similar to “emerging growth companies”, “smaller reporting companies” are able to provide simplified executive compensation disclosures in their filings; are exempt from the provisions of Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (“SOX”) requiring that independent registered public accounting firms provide an attestation report on the effectiveness of internal control over financial reporting; and have certain other decreased disclosure obligations in their SEC filings, including, among other things, only being required to provide two years of audited financial statements in annual reports.

 

Item 1A. Risk Factors.

 

RISKS RELATING TO OUR DRONE BUSINESS AND OUR INDUSTRY

 

We have an extremely limited operating history.

 

With respect to the manufacturing and sale of drones, we are currently a start-up company without any current material sales of our drone products. There is no historical basis to make judgments on the capabilities associated with our enterprise, management and/or employees’ ability to produce a commercial drone product leading to a profitable company beyond what we have acquired through our purchase of Howco which is in the business of spare parts and replacement parts.

 

We will need to raise additional capital.

 

Given the limited revenues from sales of our drone products to date, we expect that Bantec, Inc. will need to obtain additional operating capital either through equity offerings, debt offerings or a combination thereof, in the future. In addition, if, in the future, we are not capable of generating sufficient revenues from operations and its capital resources are insufficient to meet future requirements, we may have to raise funds to allow us to continue to commercialize, market and sell our products. We presently have no committed sources of funding and we have not entered into any agreements or arrangements with respect to our fundraising efforts. We cannot be certain that funding will be available on acceptable terms or at all. To the extent that we raise additional funds by issuing equity securities, our stockholders may experience significant dilution. Any debt financing, if available, may involve restrictive covenants that may impact our ability to conduct business. If we are unable to raise additional capital if required or on acceptable terms, we may have to significantly scale back, delay or discontinue the development and/or commercialization of our drone products, restrict our operations or obtain funds by entering into agreements on unattractive terms.

 

5

 

 

Our financial status raises doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern.

 

Our cash and cash equivalents were $186,386 at September 30, 2022. For the year ended September 30, 2022, the Company has incurred a net loss of $2,673,346 and used cash in operations of $1,644,132. The working capital deficit, stockholders’ deficit and accumulated deficit was $15,800,583, $16,578,533 and $35,630,186, respectively, at September 30, 2022. Furthermore, on September 6, 2019, we received a default notice on our payment obligations under the senior secured credit facility agreement with TCA, defaulted on our note payable – Seller in September 2017 and have defaulted on other promissory notes and as of September 30, 2022, we have received several demands for payment of past due amounts for services from several consultants and service providers. These matters raise substantial doubt about our ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of our consolidated financial statements included elsewhere in this Form 10-K. Our ability to continue as a going concern is dependent upon management’s ability to further implement its business plan and raise additional capital as needed from the sales of stock or debt. We continue to implement cost-cutting measures, raise equity through our effective S-1 private placement, restructure or repay our secured obligations and structure payment plans, if necessary, with vendors and service providers who are owed money. The accompanying consolidated financial statements elsewhere in this Form 10-K do not include any adjustments that might be required should we be unable to continue as a going concern. We continue to incur significant operating losses, and management expects that significant on-going operating expenditures will be necessary to successfully implement our business plan and develop and market our products. Implementation of our plans and our ability to continue as a going concern will depend upon our ability to market our drone technology, continue with sales of equipment spare and replacement parts to the U.S. Government and commercial customers and raise additional capital.

 

Management believes that we have access to capital resources through possible public or private equity offerings, exchange offers, debt financings, corporate collaborations or other means. On September 29, 2022 our current form S-1 became effective and since then we have issued shares for cash. Cash proceeds are been being utilized to reduce debt and fund current and planned operations. In addition, we continue to explore opportunities to strategically monetize our technology and our services, although there can be no assurance that we will be successful with such plans. We have historically been able to raise capital through equity and debt offerings, although no assurance can be provided that we will continue to be successful in the future. If we are unable to raise sufficient capital through 2023 or otherwise, we may be required to severely curtail, or even to cease, our operations.

 

Most of our management has limited experience in the drone industry

 

With the exception of our CTO, our management has limited experience in aerospace, aviation and unmanned aerial systems manufacturing sectors. While our management has considerable general management experience, some have specialized knowledge and abilities in the unmanned aerial industry, but none of the managers have experience managing a business that manufacturers and markets aircrafts. The management will rely on contracted individuals with the specified skills, qualifications and knowledge related to aircraft manufacturing and marketing, without impacting the overall budget for compensation.

 

Potential product liabilities may harm our operating results.

 

As a reseller of a UAV products, and with aircrafts and aviation sector companies being scrutinized heavily, we may be subject to FAA mandates and/or regulations, which could result in potential law suits. Defects in our product may lead to life, health and property risks. Currently, the unmanned aerial systems industry lacks a formative insurance market. It is possible that our operations could be adversely affected by the costs and disruptions of responding to such liabilities even if insurance against liabilities is available.

 

If our proposed marketing efforts are unsuccessful, we may not earn enough revenue to become profitable.

 

Our success will depend on investment in marketing resources and the successful implementation of our marketing plan. Our marketing plan may include attendance at trade shows and making private demonstrations, advertising and promotional materials and advertising campaigns in print and/or broadcast media. We cannot give any assurance that our marketing efforts will be successful. If they are not, revenue may not be sufficient to cover our fixed costs and we may not become profitable.

 

We may be unable to respond to rapid technology changes and innovative products.

 

In a constantly changing and innovative technology market with frequent new product introductions, enhancement and modifications, we may be forced to implement and develop new technologies into our products for anticipation of changing customer requirements that may significantly impact costs in order to retain or enhance our competitive position in existing and new markets.

 

6

 

 

There is intense competition in our market.

 

The aerospace and aviation markets are very saturated and intensely competitive. By entering this sector, our management is aware that failure to compete with direct market leading companies and new entrants will affect overall business and the product. Therefore, the faster innovative applications and technologies are implemented to the developed product; the better the pricing and commercial business strategies management will be able to offer to businesses purchasing drones. Competitive factors in this market are all related to product performance, price, customer service, training platforms, reputation, sales and marketing effectiveness.

 

Future acquisitions may be unsuccessful and may negatively affect operations and financial condition.

 

The integration of businesses, personnel, product lines and technologies can be difficult, time consuming and subject to significant risks. Any difficulties could disrupt our ongoing business, distract our management and employees, increase our expenses and decrease our revenue.

 

We may be unable to protect our intellectual property.

 

Our ability to protect proprietary technology and operate without infringing the rights of others will allow our UAV business to compete successfully and achieve future revenue growth. If we are unable to protect proprietary technology or infringe upon the rights of others, it could negatively impact our operating results.

 

We will be reliant on information systems, electronic communication systems, and internal and external data and applications.

 

Business operations and manufacturing are dependent on computer hardware, software and communication systems. Information systems are vulnerable and are subject to failures that could create internal or external events that will affect our business and operations. Management is mindful of these risks since we have developed a strategy by adopting third party information technology and system practices. Any breach of security could disrupt our overall UAV business and result in various effects in operations and efficiency. UAVs could encounter increased overhead costs, loss of important information and data, which may also hinder our reputation.

 

If we lose our key personnel or are unable to hire additional personnel, we will have trouble growing our business.

 

We depend to a large extent on the abilities of our key management. The loss of any key employee or our inability to attract or retain other qualified employees could seriously impair our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our future success depends on our ability to attract, retain and motivate highly skilled technical, marketing, management, accounting and administrative personnel. We plan to hire additional personnel in all areas of our business as we grow. Competition for qualified personnel is intense. As a result, we may be unable to attract and retain qualified personnel. We may also be unable to retain the employees that we currently employ or to attract additional technical personnel. The failure to retain and attract the necessary personnel could seriously harm our business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Because our executive officers collectively own a majority of our outstanding shares, they can elect our directors without regard to other stockholders’ votes.

 

Our CEO, Michael Bannon, has majority voting control through his ownership of 250 shares of Series A preferred stock. As a result, he may elect all of our directors, who in turn elect all executive officers, without regard to the votes of other stockholders. The voting control of Mr. Bannon gives him the ability to authorize change-in-control transactions, amendments to our certificate of incorporation and other matters that may not be in the best interests of our minority stockholders. In this regard, Mr. Bannon has absolute control over our management and affairs.

  

We face a higher risk of failure because we cannot accurately forecast our future revenues and operating results.

 

The rapidly changing nature of the markets in which we compete makes it difficult to accurately forecast our revenues and operating results. Furthermore, we expect our revenues and operating results to fluctuate in the future due to a number of factors, including the following:

 

  the timing of sales of our UAV products;

 

  unexpected delays in introducing new UAV products;

 

  increased expenses, whether related to sales and marketing, or administration;

 

  costs related to anticipated acquisitions of businesses.

 

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Our UAV products may suffer defects.

 

Products may suffer defects that may lead to substantial product liability, damage or warranty claims. Given our complex platforms and systems within our product, errors and defects may be related to flight and/or communications. Such an event could result in significant expenses arising from product liability, warranty claims, and reduce sales, which could have a material adverse effect on business, financial condition and results of operations.

 

Our products are subject to FAA regulations.

 

Compliance with the new FAA regulations by businesses interested in using UAVs may negatively affect commercial usage of our UAVs, which will adversely affect our operations and overall sales.

 

Since we intend to pursue acquisitions, investments or other strategic relationships or alliances, this will consume significant resources, may be unsuccessful and could dilute holders of our common stock.

 

Acquisitions, investments and other strategic relationships and alliances, if pursued, may involve significant cash expenditures, debt incurrence, operating losses, and expenses that could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and operating results. Acquisitions involve numerous other risks, including:

 

  Diversion of management time and attention from daily operations;

 

  Difficulties integrating acquired businesses, technologies and personnel into our business;

 

  Inability to obtain required regulatory approvals and/or required financing on favorable terms;

 

  Entry into new markets in which we have little previous experience;

 

  Prior approval of any acquisition by TCA (senior lender);

 

  Potential loss of our key employees, key contractual relationships or key customers of acquired companies; and

 

  Assumption of the liabilities and exposure to unforeseen liabilities of acquired companies.

 

If these types of transactions are pursued, it may be difficult for us to complete these transactions quickly and to integrate these acquired operations efficiently into its current business operations. Any acquisitions, investments or other strategic relationships and alliances by us may ultimately harm our business and financial condition. In addition, future acquisitions may not be as successful as originally anticipated and may result in impairment charges.

 

We may be required to record a significant charge to earnings as we are required to reassess our goodwill or other intangible assets arising from acquisitions.

 

We are required under U.S. GAAP to review our intangible assets, including goodwill for impairment when events or changes in circumstances indicate the carrying value may not be recoverable. Goodwill is required to be tested for impairment annually or more frequently if facts and circumstances warrant a review. Factors that may be considered a change in circumstances indicating that the carrying value of our amortizable intangible assets may not be recoverable include a decline in stock price and market capitalization and slower or declining growth rates in our industry. We may be required to record a significant charge to earnings in our financial statements during the period in which any impairment of our goodwill or amortizable intangible assets is determined. During the year ended September 30, 2019, the Company determined that the carrying value of Goodwill and other intangible assets related to the acquisition Howco were impaired and as a result, charges covering the entire carrying value of those assets was taken into operating results.

 

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Our products may be subject to export regulations; government agencies may require terms that are disadvantageous to our business.

 

Our business model contemplates working with law enforcement and possibly military agencies. Because we may sell our products to these customers, we may need to register with the U.S. Department of State under its International Trafficking in Arms Regulations (ITAR). If we choose to sell our products overseas, we may be required to obtain a license form the State Department or face substantial fines or, in an extreme case, a shutdown of our business. Additionally, government agencies typically require provisions in their contracts that allow them to terminate agreements or change purchasing terms in their discretion without notice. Such contractual provisions, if exercised by our customers in the future, could have a material adverse effect on our cash flow and business performance.

 

Risks Associated with the Environmental Cleaning and Sanitizing Industry

 

Estimating:

 

We and/or franchisees may estimate projects incorrectly and ultimately lose money. Depending on the scope and price of the project, this loss could be extensive (in hundreds of thousands or possibly millions).

 

Regulations:

 

In the Environmental Cleaning and Sanitizing we must comply with federal and state regulations. Federal OSHA/EPA inspectors or state Safety/Environmental inspectors might visit our projects and possibly find violations and ultimately levy thousands of dollars in fines on us. Being fined could also damage our reputation with our customers.

 

Workman’s Compensation

 

Our employees can become injured ultimately driving our workman’s compensation MOD higher forcing us to pay higher premiums. Our injured could potentially sue our customers via third party lawsuits. If that occurs, contractually, we may be obligated to pay defend our customers in court.

 

Theft

 

By storing equipment and supplies on project jobsites for long periods of time, we may become a victim of theft.

 

Collections

 

We may encounter customers who refuse to pay us. We will have to hire attorneys and expend a lot of management’s time collecting money from deadbeat customers.

 

Poor Workmanship

 

We may poorly perform on a project and be forced to correct our work ultimately costing us more money than we initially estimated.

 

Bonding

 

Larger projects may require bid and performance bonds. Due to our financial situation, we may find it difficult to find a company that will provide us with the necessary bonding capacity to bid larger projects.

 

Economic Downturn

 

If the northeast economy begins to go into recession, we may find it difficult to secure enough work to keep our construction businesses going. It appears the economy is peaking and will ultimately slide into a recession.

 

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Risks Related to Consolidated Operations

 

Since we have acquired Howco and changed its focus to higher margin business resulting in sales declines, it is difficult for potential investors to evaluate our future consolidated business.

 

We completed the Howco acquisition on September 9, 2016. Therefore, our limited consistent operating history makes it difficult for potential investors to evaluate our business or prospective operations and your purchase of our securities. Sales declines due to efforts to increase gross margin also impacted cash flow which in turn caused liquidity issues. The result has been that some vendors only accept purchase orders on cash on deliver basis. Therefore, we are subject to the risks inherent in the financing, expenditures, complications and delays inherent in a newly combined business. These risks are described below under the risk factor titled “Any future acquisitions that we may make could disrupt our business, cause dilution to our stockholders and harm our business, financial condition or operating results.”

 

Failure to manage or protect growth may be detrimental to our business because our infrastructure may not be adequate for expansion

 

The Howco acquisition and any planned acquisition require a substantial expansion of our systems, workforce and facilities. We may fail to adequately manage our anticipated future growth. The substantial growth in our operations as a result of the Howco and planned acquisitions is expected to place a significant strain on our administrative, financial and operational resources, and increase demands on our management and on our operational and administrative systems, controls and other resources. Howco’s growth strategy includes broadening its service and product offerings, implementing an aggressive marketing plan and employing leading technologies. There can be no assurance that our systems, procedures and controls will be adequate to support our operations as they expand. We cannot assure you that our existing personnel, systems, procedures or controls will be adequate to support our operations in the future or that we will be able to successfully implement appropriate measures consistent with our growth strategy. As part of this growth, we may have to implement new operational and financial systems, procedures and controls to expand, train and manage our employee base, and maintain close coordination among our staff. We cannot guarantee that we will be able to do so, or that if we are able to do so, we will be able to effectively integrate them into our existing staff and systems.

 

To the extent we acquire other businesses, we will also need to integrate and assimilate new operations, technologies and personnel. The integration of new personnel will continue to result in some disruption to ongoing operations. The ability to effectively manage growth in a rapidly evolving market requires effective planning and management processes. We will need to continue to improve operational, financial and managerial controls, reporting systems and procedures, and will need to continue to expand, train and manage our work force. There can be no assurance that we would be able to accomplish such an expansion on a timely basis. If we are unable to affect any required expansion and are unable to perform under contracts on a timely and satisfactory basis, the reputation and eligibility to secure additional contracts in the future could be damaged. The failure to perform could also result in a contract terminations and significant liability. Any such result would adversely affect our business and financial condition.

 

We will need to increase the size of our organization, and we may experience difficulties in managing growth, which would hurt our financial performance.

 

In addition to employees hired from Howco and any other companies which we may acquire, we will need to expand our employee infrastructure for managerial, operational, financial and other resources at the parent company level. Future growth will impose significant added responsibilities on members of management, including the need to identify, recruit, maintain and integrate additional employees. Our future financial performance and our ability to commercialize our product candidates and to compete effectively will depend, in part, on our ability to manage any future growth effectively.

 

In order to manage our future growth, we will need to continue to improve our management, operational and financial controls and our reporting systems and procedures. All of these measures will require significant expenditures and will demand the attention of management. If we do not continue to enhance our management personnel and our operational and financial systems and controls in response to growth in our business, we could experience operating inefficiencies that could impair our competitive position and could increase our costs more than we had planned. If we are unable to manage growth effectively, our business, financial condition and operating results could be adversely affected.

 

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Our business depends on experienced and skilled personnel, and if we are unable to attract and integrate skilled personnel, it will be more difficult for us to manage our business and complete contracts.

 

The success of our business depends on the skill of our personnel. Accordingly, it is critical that we maintain, and continue to build, a highly experienced management team and specialized workforce, including sales professionals. Competition for personnel, particularly those with expertise in government consulting and a security clearance is high, and identifying candidates with the appropriate qualifications can be costly and difficult. We may not be able to hire the necessary personnel to implement our business strategy given our anticipated hiring needs, or we may need to provide higher compensation or more training to our personnel than we currently anticipate. In addition, our ability to recruit, hire and indirectly deploy former employees of the U.S. Government is subject to complex laws and regulations, which may serve as an impediment to our ability to attract such former employees.

 

Our business is labor intensive and our success depends on our ability to attract, retain, train and motivate highly skilled employees, including employees who may become part of our organization in connection with future acquisitions. The increase in demand for consulting, technology integration and managed services has further increased the need for employees with specialized skills or significant experience in these areas. Our ability to expand our operations will be highly dependent on our ability to attract a sufficient number of highly skilled employees and to retain our employees and the employees of companies that we have acquired. We may not be successful in attracting and retaining enough employees to achieve our desired expansion or staffing plans. Furthermore, the industry turnover rates for these types of employees are high and we may not be successful in retaining, training or motivating our employees. Any inability to attract, retain, train and motivate employees could impair our ability to adequately manage and complete existing projects and to accept new client engagements. Such inability may also force us to increase our hiring of independent contractors, which may increase our costs and reduce our profitability on client engagements. We must also devote substantial managerial and financial resources to monitoring and managing our workforce. Our future success will depend on our ability to manage the levels and related costs of our workforce.

 

In the event we are unable to attract, hire and retain the requisite personnel and subcontractors, we may experience delays in completing contracts in accordance with project schedules and budgets, which may have an adverse effect on our financial results, harm our reputation and cause us to curtail our pursuit of new contracts. Further, any increase in demand for personnel may result in higher costs, causing us to exceed the budget on a contract, which in turn may have an adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results and harm our relationships with our customers.

 

We expect to expand our business, in part, through future acquisitions, but we may not be able to identify or complete suitable acquisitions, which could harm our financial performance.

 

Acquisitions are a significant part of our growth strategy. We continually review, evaluate and consider potential investments and acquisitions. In such evaluations, we are required to make difficult judgments regarding the value of business opportunities and the risks and cost of potential liabilities. We plan to use acquisitions of companies or technologies to expand our project skill-sets and capabilities, expand our geographic markets, add experienced management and increase our product and service offerings. Although we have identified several acquisition considerations, we may be unable to implement our growth strategy if we cannot reach agreement with acquisition targets on acceptable terms or arrange required financing for acquisitions on acceptable terms. In addition, the time and effort involved in attempting to identify acquisition candidates and consummate acquisitions may divert members of our management from the operations of our company.

 

Any future acquisitions that we may make could disrupt our business, cause dilution to our stockholders and harm our business, financial condition or operating results.

 

If we are successful in consummating acquisitions, those acquisitions could subject us to a number of risks, including, but not limited to:

 

  the purchase price we pay and/or unanticipated costs could significantly deplete our cash reserves or result in dilution to our existing stockholders;

 

  we may find that the acquired company or technologies do not improve market position as planned;

 

  we may have difficulty integrating the operations and personnel of the acquired company, as the combined operations will place significant demands on the Company’s management, technical, financial and other resources;

 

  key personnel and customers of the acquired company may terminate their relationships with the acquired company as a result of the acquisition;

 

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  we may experience additional financial and accounting challenges and complexities in areas such as tax planning and financial reporting;

 

  we may assume or be held liable for risks and liabilities (including environmental-related costs) as a result of our acquisitions, some of which we may not be able to discover during our due diligence or adequately adjust for in our acquisition arrangements;

 

  our ongoing business and management’s attention may be disrupted or diverted by transition or integration issues and the complexity of managing geographically or culturally diverse enterprises;

 

  we may incur one-time write-offs or restructuring charges in connection with the acquisition;

 

  we may acquire goodwill and other intangible assets that are subject to amortization or impairment tests, which could result in future charges to earnings; and

 

  we may not be able to realize the cost savings or other financial benefits we anticipated.

 

We cannot assure you that we will successfully integrate or profitably manage any acquired business. In addition, we cannot assure you that, following any acquisition, our continued business will achieve sales levels, profitability, efficiencies or synergies that justify acquisition or that the acquisition will result in increased earnings for us in any future period. These factors could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition and operating results.

 

Insurance and contractual protections may not always cover lost revenue, increased expenses or liquidated damages payments, which could adversely affect our financial results.

 

Although we maintain insurance and intend to obtain warranties from suppliers, obligate subcontractors to meet certain performance levels and attempt, where feasible, to pass risks we cannot control to our customers, the proceeds of such insurance, warranties, performance guarantees or risk sharing arrangements may not be adequate to cover lost revenue, increased expenses or liquidated damages payments that may be required in the future.

 

If we are unable to comply with certain financial and operating restrictions in our credit facilities, we may be limited in our business activities and access to credit or may default under our credit facilities

 

Pursuant to our Credit Agreement with TCA, all of our assets, including the assets of Howco, are secured with our senior lender. Provisions in the Credit Agreement and debt instruments impose restrictions or require prior approval on our and certain of our subsidiaries’ ability to, among other things:

 

  incur additional debt;

 

  pay cash dividends and make distributions;

 

  make certain investments and acquisitions;

 

  guarantee the indebtedness of others or our subsidiaries;

 

  redeem or repurchase capital stock;

 

  create liens or encumbrances;

 

  enter into transactions with affiliates;

 

  engage in new lines of business;

 

  sell, lease or transfer certain parts of our business or property;

 

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  restrictions on incurring obligations for capital expenditures;

 

  issue additional capital stock of the Company or any subsidiary of the Company;

 

  acquire new companies and merge or consolidate.

 

These agreements also contain other customary covenants, including covenants that require us to meet specified financial ratios and financial tests. We may not be able to comply with these covenants in the future. Our failure to comply with these covenants may result in the declaration of an event of default and cause us to be unable to borrow under our credit facilities and debt instruments. In addition to preventing additional borrowings under these agreements, an event of default, if not cured or waived, may result in the acceleration of the maturity of indebtedness outstanding under these agreements, which would require us to pay all amounts outstanding. If the maturity of our indebtedness is accelerated, we may not have sufficient funds available for repayment or we may not have the ability to borrow or obtain sufficient funds to replace the accelerated indebtedness on terms acceptable to us or at all. Our failure to repay our bank indebtedness would result in the bank foreclosing on all or a portion of our assets and force us to curtail our operations.

 

Our obligations to our senior secured lender, TCA, are secured by a security interest in substantially all of our assets, so if we default on those obligations, TCA could foreclose on, liquidate and/or take possession of our assets. If that were to happen, we could be forced to curtail, or even to cease, our operations.

 

Under the Credit Facility, effective September 13, 2016, with TCA Global Credit Master Fund, L.P. (“TCA”), we borrowed $3.5 million to acquire Howco and pay certain creditors. The initial loan was due 18 months from the date of the loan and an interest rate of 18% per annum and a default interest rate of 25% per annum. The note, accrued interest, contingency and advisory fees were restructured and as of September 30, 2022, we had approximately $5,326,285 in outstanding principal and $2,377,557 interest owed to TCA, in addition to $421,587, outstanding under the 3(a)(10) settlement agreement. Under the terms of the Credit Facility, all amounts due under it are secured by our assets, including the assets of Howco. As a result of being in default of our payment obligations under the Credit Facility, TCA could foreclose on its security interest and liquidate or take possession of some or all of these assets, which would harm our business, financial condition and results of operations and could require us to curtail, or even to cease, operations.

 

On September 6, 2019 the Company received a default notice on its payment obligations under the senior secured credit facility agreement from TCA. The Company has proposed a number of solutions including refinancing the debt with other parties. TCA’s funds and management companies are no longer operating and in receivership. The Company expects a favorable settlement following communication with the receiver.

 

TCA has certain rights upon an event of default under its Credit Facility that could harm our business, financial condition and results of operations and could require us to curtail or cease our operations.

 

In light of being in default under our payment obligations to TCA, it has certain rights under the Credit Facility to protect its financial position, including an increase in the interest rate on any amounts in default under the terms of the Credit Facility, the right to accelerate the payment of any outstanding loans made pursuant to the Credit Facility and the right to foreclose on our assets, among other rights. The Credit Facility includes in its definition of an event of default, among other occurrences, the failure to pay any principal or interest when due, our termination, winding up, liquidation or dissolution, a change of control, a material adverse change in our financial condition and the filing of any lien not bonded, vacated or dismissed within 60 days of its filing. The exercise of any of these rights upon an event of default could substantially harm our financial condition and force us to curtail, or even to cease, our operations.

 

We may be subject to damages resulting from claims that the Company or our employees have wrongfully used or disclosed alleged trade secrets of their former employers.

 

Upon completion of any acquisitions by the Company, we may be subject to claims that our acquired companies and their employees may have inadvertently or otherwise used or disclosed trade secrets or other proprietary information of former employers or competitors. Litigation may be necessary to defend against these claims. Even if we are successful in defending against these claims, litigation could result in substantial costs and be a distraction to management. If we fail in defending such claims, in addition to paying money claims, we may lose valuable intellectual property rights or personnel. A loss of key research personnel or their work product could hamper or prevent our ability to commercialize certain products, which could severely harm our business.

 

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The loss of our Chief Executive Officer (CEO) or other key personnel may adversely affect our operations.

 

The Company’s success depends to a significant extent upon the operation, experience, and continued services of certain of its officers, including our CEO, as well as other key personnel. While our CEO and the executive officers of Howco are all employed under employment contracts, there is no assurance we will be able to retain their services. The loss of our CEO or several of the other key personnel could have an adverse effect on the Company. If the CEO or other executive officers were to leave, we would face substantial difficulty in hiring a qualified successor and could experience a loss in productivity while any successor obtains the necessary training and experience. In addition, our CEO, CFO and other key personnel do not have prior experience in SEC reporting obligations. Furthermore, we do not maintain “key person” life insurance on the lives of any executive officer and their death or incapacity would have a material adverse effect on us. The competition for qualified personnel is intense, and the loss of services of certain key personnel could adversely affect our business.

 

Internal system or service failures could disrupt our business and impair our ability to effectively provide our services and products to our customers, which could damage our reputation and adversely affect our revenues and profitability.

 

Any system or service disruptions, including those caused by ongoing projects to improve our information technology systems and the delivery of services, if not anticipated and appropriately mitigated, could have a material adverse effect on our business including, among other things, an adverse effect on our ability to bill our customers for work performed on our contracts, collect the amounts that have been billed and produce accurate financial statements in a timely manner. We are also subject to systems failures, including network, software or hardware failures, whether caused by us, third-party service providers, cyber security threats, natural disasters, power shortages, terrorist attacks or other events, which could cause loss of data and interruptions or delays in our business, cause us to incur remediation costs, subject us to claims and damage our reputation. In addition, the failure or disruption of our communications or utilities could cause us to interrupt or suspend our operations or otherwise adversely affect our business. Our property and business interruption insurance may be inadequate to compensate us for all losses that may occur as a result of any system or operational failure or disruption and, as a result, our future results could be adversely affected.

 

Our financial performance could be adversely affected by decreases in spending on technology products and services by our public sector customers.

 

Our sales to our public sector customers are impacted by government spending policies, budget priorities and revenue levels. Although our sales to the federal government are diversified across multiple agencies and departments, they collectively accounted for approximately 89% of Howco’s net sales for fiscal 2022. An adverse change in government spending policies (including budget cuts at the federal level resulting from sequestration), budget priorities or revenue levels could cause our public sector customers to reduce their purchases or to terminate or not renew their contracts with us, which could adversely affect our business, results of operations or cash flows.

 

Our business could be adversely affected by the loss of certain vendor partner relationships and the availability of their products.

 

We purchase products for resale from vendor partners, which include OEMs and wholesale distributors. We are authorized by vendor partners to sell all or some of their products via direct marketing activities. Our authorization with each vendor partner is subject to specific terms and conditions regarding such things as sales channel restrictions, product return privileges, price protection policies and purchase discounts. In the event we were to lose one of our significant vendor partners, our business could be adversely affected. As mentioned above a few vendors have put the Company on a cash on delivery basis.

 

We expect to enter into joint ventures, teaming and other arrangements, and these activities involve risks and uncertainties.

 

We expect to enter into joint ventures, teaming and other arrangements. These activities involve risks and uncertainties, including the risk of the joint venture or applicable entity failing to satisfy its obligations, which may result in certain liabilities to us for guarantees and other commitments, the challenges in achieving strategic objectives and expected benefits of the business arrangement, the risk of conflicts arising between us and our partners and the difficulty of managing and resolving such conflicts, and the difficulty of managing or otherwise monitoring such business arrangements.

 

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Our business and operations expose us to numerous legal and regulatory requirements and any violation of these requirements could harm our business.

 

We are subject to numerous federal, state and foreign legal requirements on matters as diverse as data privacy and protection, employment and labor relations, immigration, taxation, anticorruption, import/export controls, trade restrictions, internal and disclosure control obligations, securities regulation and anti-competition. Compliance with diverse and changing legal requirements is costly, time-consuming and requires significant resources. We are also focused on expanding our business in certain identified growth areas, such as health information technology, energy and environment, which are highly regulated and may expose us to increased compliance risk. Violations of one or more of these diverse legal requirements in the conduct of our business could result in significant fines and other damages, criminal sanctions against us or our officers, prohibitions on doing business and damage to our reputation. Violations of these regulations or contractual obligations related to regulatory compliance in connection with the performance of customer contracts could also result in liability for significant monetary damages, fines and/or criminal prosecution, unfavorable publicity and other reputational damage, restrictions on our ability to compete for certain work and allegations by our customers that we have not performed our contractual obligations.

 

If we do not adequately protect our intellectual property rights, we may experience a loss of revenue and our operations may be materially harmed.

 

We registered a patent during the year ended September 30, 2021 and have contracted an attorney to search any potential infringements. In addition, we rely upon confidentiality agreements signed by our employees, consultants and third parties to protect our intellectual property. We cannot assure you that we can adequately protect our intellectual property or successfully prosecute potential infringement of our intellectual property rights. Also, we cannot assure you that others will not assert rights in, or ownership of, trademarks and other proprietary rights of ours or that we will be able to successfully resolve these types of conflicts to our satisfaction. Our failure to protect our intellectual property rights may result in a loss of revenue and could materially adversely affect our operations and financial condition.

 

Risks Relating to Howco’s Business and Industry

 

We depend on the U.S. Government for a substantial portion of our business and changes in government defense spending could have adverse consequences on our financial position, results of operations and business.

 

Approximately 89% of our U.S. revenues from Howco’s operations in fiscal 2022 have been from and will continue to be from sales and services rendered directly or indirectly to the U.S. Government. Our revenues from the U.S. Government largely result from contracts awarded to us under various U.S. Government programs, primarily defense-related programs with the Department of Defense (DoD), as well as a broad range of programs with the Department of Homeland Security, the intelligence community and other departments and agencies. Cost cutting including through consolidation and elimination of duplicative organizations and insurance has become a major initiative for DoD. The funding of our programs is subject to the overall U.S. Government budget and appropriation decisions and processes which are driven by numerous factors, including geo-political events and macroeconomic conditions. The overall level of U.S. defense spending increased in recent years for numerous reasons, including increases in funding of operations in Iraq and Afghanistan. However, with the winding down of both wars, defense spending levels are becoming increasingly difficult to predict and are expected to be affected by numerous factors. Such factors include priorities of the Administration and the Congress, and the overall health of the U.S. and world economies and the state of governmental finances.

 

We expect that budgetary constraints and concerns related to the national debt will continue to place downward pressure on DoD spending levels and that implementation of the automatic spending cuts without change will reduce, delay or cancel funding for certain of our contracts - particularly those with unobligated balances - and programs and could adversely impact our operations, financial results and growth prospects.

 

Significant reduction in defense spending could have long-term consequences for our size and structure. In addition, reduction in government priorities and requirements could impact the funding, or the timing of funding, of our programs, which could negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition. In addition, we are involved in U.S. Government programs, which are classified by the U.S. Government and our ability to discuss these programs, including any risks and disputes and claims associated with and our performance under such programs, could be limited due to applicable security restrictions.

 

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The U.S. Government Systems spare parts business is intensely competitive and we may not be able to win government bids when competing against much larger companies, which could reduce our revenues and profitability.

 

Large spare parts contracts awarded by the U.S. Government are few in number and are awarded through a formal competitive bidding process, including indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity (“IDIQ”), GSA Schedule and other multi-award contracts. Bids are awarded on the basis of price, compliance with technical bidding specifications, technical expertise and, in some cases, demonstrated management ability to perform the contract. There can be no assurance that the Company will win and/or fulfill additional contracts. Moreover, the award of these contracts is subject to protest procedures and there can be no assurance that the Company will prevail in any ensuing legal protest. Howco’s failure to secure a significant dollar volume of U.S. Government contracts in the future would adversely affect us.

 

The U.S. Government spare parts business is intensely competitive and subject to rapid change. Many of the existing and potential competitors have greater financial, operating and technological resources than Howco. The competitive environment may require us to make changes in our pricing, services or marketing. The competitive bidding process involves substantial costs and a number of risks, including significant cost and managerial time to prepare bids and proposals for contracts that may not be awarded to us, or that may be awarded, but for which we do not receive meaningful revenues. Accordingly, our success depends on our ability to develop services and products that address changing needs and to provide people and technology needed to deliver these services and products. To remain competitive, we must consistently provide superior service, technology and performance on a cost-effective basis to our customers. Our response to competition could cause us to expend significant financial and other resources, disrupt our operations, strain relationships with partners, any of which could harm our business and/or financial condition.

 

Our financial performance is dependent on our ability to perform on our U.S. Government contracts, which are subject to termination for convenience, which could harm our financial performance.

 

Our financial performance is largely dependent on our performance under our U.S. Government contracts. Government customers have the right to cancel any contract for its convenience. An unanticipated termination of, or reduced purchases under, one of the Company’s major contracts whether due to lack of funding, for convenience or otherwise, or the occurrence of delays, cost overruns and product failures could adversely impact our results of operations and financial condition. If one of our contracts were terminated for convenience, we would generally be entitled to payments for our allowable costs and would receive some allowance for profit on the work performed. If one of our contracts were terminated for default, we would generally be entitled to payments for our work that has been accepted by the government. A termination arising out of our default could expose us to liability and have a negative impact on our ability to obtain future contracts and orders. Furthermore, on contracts for which we are a subcontractor and not the prime contractor, the U.S. Government could terminate the prime contract for convenience or otherwise, irrespective of our performance as a subcontractor.

 

Our failure to comply with a variety of complex procurement rules and regulations could result in our being liable for penalties, including termination of our U.S. Government contracts, disqualification from bidding on future U.S. Government contracts and suspension or debarment from U.S. Government contracting that could adversely affect our financial condition.

 

We must comply with laws and regulations relating to the formation, administration and performance of U.S. Government contracts, which affect how we do business with our customers and may impose added costs on our business. U.S. Government contracts generally are subject to the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), which sets forth policies, procedures and requirements for the acquisition of goods and services by the U.S. Government, department-specific regulations that implement or supplement DFAR, such as the DOD’s Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) and other applicable laws and regulations. We are also subject to the Truth in Negotiations Act, which requires certification and disclosure of cost and pricing data in connection with certain contract negotiations; the Procurement Integrity Act, which regulates access to competitor bid and proposal information and government source selection information, and our ability to provide compensation to certain former government officials; the Civil False Claims Act, which provides for substantial civil penalties for violations, including for submission of a false or fraudulent claim to the U.S. Government for payment or approval; the Civil False Claims Act, which provides for substantial civil penalties for violations, including for submission of a false or fraudulent claim to the U.S. Government for payment or approval; and the U.S. Government Cost Accounting Standards, which impose accounting requirements that govern our right to reimbursement under certain cost-based U.S. Government contracts. These regulations impose a broad range of requirements, many of which are unique to government contracting, including various procurement, import and export, security, contract pricing and cost, contract termination and adjustment, and audit requirements. A contractor’s failure to comply with these regulations and requirements could result in reductions to the value of contracts, contract modifications or termination, and the assessment of penalties and fines and lead to suspension or debarment, for cause, from government contracting or subcontracting for a period of time. In addition, government contractors are also subject to routine audits and investigations by U.S. Government agencies such as the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA) and Defense Contract Management Agency (DCMA). These agencies review a contractor’s performance under its contracts, cost structure and compliance with applicable laws, regulations and standards. The DCAA also reviews the adequacy of and a contractor’s compliance with its internal control systems and policies, including the contractor’s purchasing, property, estimating, compensation and management information systems. During the term of any suspension or debarment by any U.S. Government agency, contractors can be prohibited from competing for or being awarded contracts by U.S. Government agencies. The termination of any of the Company’s significant Government contracts or the imposition of fines, damages, suspensions or debarment would adversely affect the Company’s business and financial condition.

 

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The U.S. Government may adopt new contract rules and regulations or revise its procurement practices in a manner adverse to us at any time.

 

Our industry has experienced, and we expect it will continue to experience, significant changes to business practices as a result of an increased focus on affordability, efficiencies, and recovery of costs, among other items. U.S. Government agencies may face restrictions or pressure regarding the type and amount of services that they may obtain from private contractors. Legislation, regulations and initiatives dealing with procurement reform, mitigation of potential conflicts of interest and environmental responsibility or sustainability, as well as any resulting shifts in the buying practices of U.S. Government agencies, such as increased usage of fixed price contracts, multiple award contracts and small business set-aside contracts, could have adverse effects on government contractors, including us. Any of these changes could impair our ability to obtain new contracts or renew our existing contracts when those contracts are compared to other contract bids. Any new contracting requirements or procurement methods could be costly or administratively difficult for us to implement and could adversely affect our future revenues, profitability and prospects.

 

We may incur cost overruns as a result of fixed priced government contracts which would have a negative impact on our operations.

 

A number of Howco’s current U.S. Government contracts are multi-award, multi-year IDIQ task order based contracts, which generally provide for fixed price schedules for products and services, have no pre-set delivery schedules, have very low minimum purchase requirements, are typically competed among multiple awardees and force us to carry the burden of any cost overruns. Due to their nature, fixed-priced contracts inherently have more risk than cost reimbursable contracts. If we are unable to control costs or if our initials cost estimates are incorrect, we can lose money on these contracts. In addition, some of our contracts have provisions relating to cost controls and audit rights, and if we fail to meet the terms specified in those contracts, we may not realize their full benefits. Lower earnings caused by cost overruns and cost controls would have a negative impact on our results of operations. The U.S. Government has the right to enter into contracts with other suppliers, which may be competitive with the Company’s IDIQ contracts. The Company also performs fixed priced contracts under which the Company agrees to provide specific quantities of products and services over time for a fixed price. Since the price competition to win both IDIQ and fixed price contracts is intense and the costs of future contract performance cannot be predicted with certainty, there can be no assurance as to the profits, if any, that the Company will realize over the term of such contracts.

 

Misconduct of employees, subcontractors, agents and business partners could cause us to lose existing contracts or customers and adversely affect our ability to obtain new contracts and customers and could have a significant adverse impact on our business and reputation.

 

Misconduct could include fraud or other improper activities such as falsifying time or other records and violations of laws, including the Anti-Kickback Act. Other examples could include the failure to comply with our policies and procedures or with federal, state or local government procurement regulations, regulations regarding the use and safeguarding of classified or other protected information, legislation regarding the pricing of labor and other costs in government contracts, laws and regulations relating to environmental, health or safety matters, bribery of foreign government officials, import-export control, lobbying or similar activities, and any other applicable laws or regulations. Any data loss or information security lapses resulting in the compromise of personal information or the improper use or disclosure of sensitive or classified information could result in claims, remediation costs, regulatory sanctions against us, loss of current and future contracts and serious harm to our reputation. Although we have implemented policies, procedures and controls to prevent and detect these activities, these precautions may not prevent all misconduct, and as a result, we could face unknown risks or losses. Our failure to comply with applicable laws or regulations or misconduct by any of our employees, subcontractors, agents or business partners could damage our reputation and subject us to fines and penalties, restitution or other damages, loss of security clearance, loss of current and future customer contracts and suspension or debarment from contracting with federal, state or local government agencies, any of which would adversely affect our business, reputation and our future results.

 

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We may fail to obtain and maintain necessary security clearances, which may adversely affect our ability to perform on certain U.S. government contracts and depress our potential revenues.

 

Many U.S. government programs require contractors to have security clearances. Depending on the level of required clearance, security clearances can be difficult and time-consuming to obtain. If we or our employees are unable to obtain or retain necessary security clearances, we may not be able to win new business, and our existing clients could terminate their contracts with us or decide not to renew them. To the extent we are not able to obtain and maintain facility security clearances or engage employees with the required security clearances for a particular contract, we may not be able to bid on or win new contracts, or effectively rebid on expiring contracts, as well as lose existing contracts, which may adversely affect our operating results and inhibit the execution of our growth strategy.

 

Our future revenues and growth prospects could be adversely affected by our dependence on other contractors.

 

If other contractors with whom we have contractual relationships either as a prime contractor or subcontractor eliminate or reduce their work with us, or if the U.S. Government terminates or reduces these other contractors’ programs, does not award them new contracts or refuses to pay under a contract our financial and business condition may be adversely affected. Companies that do not have access to U.S. Government contracts may perform services as our subcontractor and that exposure could enhance such companies’ prospect of securing a future position as a prime U.S. Government contractor which could increase competition for future contracts and impair our ability to perform on contracts.

 

We may have disputes with our subcontractors arising from, among other things, the quality and timeliness of work performed by the subcontractor, customer concerns about the subcontractor, our failure to extend existing task orders or issue new task orders under a subcontract, our hiring of a subcontractor’s personnel or the subcontractor’s failure to comply with applicable law. Current uncertain economic conditions heighten the risk of financial stress of our subcontractors, which could adversely impact their ability to meet their contractual requirements to us. If any of our subcontractors fail to timely meet their contractual obligations or have regulatory compliance or other problems, our ability to fulfill our obligations as a prime contractor or higher tier subcontractor may be jeopardized. Significant losses could arise in future periods and subcontractor performance deficiencies could result in our termination for default. A termination for default could eliminate a revenue source, expose us to liability and have an adverse effect on our ability to compete for future contracts and task orders, especially if the customer is an agency of the U.S. Government.

 

Our international business exposes us to geo-political and economic factors, regulatory requirements and other risks associated with doing business in foreign countries.

 

We intend to engage in additional foreign operations which pose complex management, foreign currency, legal, tax and economic risks, which we may not adequately address. These risks differ from and potentially may be greater than those associated with our domestic business.

 

Our international business is sensitive to changes in the priorities and budgets of international customers and geo-political uncertainties, which may be driven by changes in threat environments and potentially volatile worldwide economic conditions, various regional and local economic and political factors, risks and uncertainties, as well as U.S. foreign policy. Our international sales are subject to U.S. laws, regulations and policies, including the International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (see below) and other export laws and regulations. Due to the nature of our products, we must first obtain licenses and authorizations from various U.S. Government agencies before we are permitted to sell our products outside of the U.S. We can give no assurance that we will continue to be successful in obtaining the necessary licenses or authorizations or that certain sales will not be prevented or delayed. Any significant impairment of our ability to sell products outside of the U.S. could negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition.

 

Our international sales are also subject to local government laws, regulations and procurement policies and practices which may differ from U.S. Government regulations, including regulations relating to import-export control, investments, exchange controls and repatriation of earnings, as well as to varying currency, geo-political and economic risks. Our international contracts may include industrial cooperation agreements requiring specific in-country purchases, manufacturing agreements or financial support obligations, known as offset obligations, and provide for penalties if we fail to meet such requirements. Our international contracts may also be subject to termination at the customer’s convenience or for default based on performance, and may be subject to funding risks. We also are exposed to risks associated with using foreign representatives and consultants for international sales and operations and teaming with international subcontractors, partners and suppliers in connection with international programs. As a result of these factors, we could experience award and funding delays on international programs and could incur losses on such programs, which could negatively impact our results of operations and financial condition.

 

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We are also subject to a number of other risks including:

 

  the absence in some jurisdictions of effective laws to protect our intellectual property rights;

 

  multiple and possibly overlapping and conflicting tax laws;

 

  restrictions on movement of cash;

 

  the burdens of complying with a variety of national and local laws;

 

  political instability;

 

  currency fluctuations;

 

  longer payment cycles;

 

  restrictions on the import and export of certain technologies;

 

  price controls or restrictions on exchange of foreign currencies; and

 

  trade barriers.

 

Our international operations are subject to special U.S. government laws and regulations, such as the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, and regulations and procurement policies and practices, including regulations to import-export control, which may expose us to liability or impair our ability to compete in international markets.

 

Our international operations are subject to the U.S. Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, or the FCPA, and other laws that prohibit improper payments or offers of payments to foreign governments and their officials and political parties by U.S. and other business entities for the purpose of obtaining or retaining business. We have operations and deal with governmental customers in countries known to experience corruption, including certain countries in the Middle East and in the future, the Far East. Our activities in these countries create the risk of unauthorized payments or offers of payments by one of our employees, consultants or contractors that could be in violation of various laws including the FCPA, even though these parties are not always subject to our control. We are also subject to import-export control regulations restricting the use and dissemination of information classified for national security purposes and the export of certain products, services, and technical data, including requirements regarding any applicable licensing of our employees involved in such work.

 

As a U.S. defense contractor, we are vulnerable to security threats and other disruptions that could negatively impact our business.

 

As a U.S. defense contractor, we face certain security threats, including threats to our information technology infrastructure, attempts to gain access to our proprietary or classified information, and threats to physical security. These types of events could disrupt our operations, require significant management attention and resources, and could negatively impact our reputation among our customers and the public, which could have a negative impact on our financial condition, results of operations and liquidity. We are continuously exposed to cyber-attacks and other security threats, including physical break-ins. Any electronic or physical break-in or other security breach or compromise may jeopardize security of information stored or transmitted through our information technology systems and networks. This could lead to disruptions in mission-critical systems, unauthorized release of confidential or otherwise protected information and corruption of data. Although we have implemented policies, procedures and controls to protect against, detect and mitigate these threats, we face advanced and persistent attacks on our information systems and attempts by others to gain unauthorized access to our information technology systems are becoming more sophisticated. These attempts include covertly introducing malware to our computers and networks and impersonating authorized users, among others, and may be perpetrated by well-funded organized crime or state sponsored efforts. We seek to detect and investigate all security incidents and to prevent their occurrence or recurrence. We continue to invest in and improve our threat protection, detection and mitigation policies, procedures and controls. In addition, we work with other companies in the industry and government participants on increased awareness and enhanced protections against cyber security threats. However, because of the evolving nature and sophistication of these security threats, which can be difficult to detect, there can be no assurance that our policies, procedures and controls have or will detect or prevent any of these threats and we cannot predict the full impact of any such past or future incident. Although we work cooperatively with our customers and other business partners to seek to minimize the impacts of cyber and other security threats, we must rely on the safeguards put in place by those entities. Any remedial costs or other liabilities related to cyber or other security threats may not be fully insured or indemnified by other means. Occurrence of any of these security threats could expose us to claims, contract terminations and damages and could adversely affect our reputation, ability to work on sensitive U.S. Government contracts, business operations and financial results.

 

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Difficult conditions in the global capital markets and the economy generally may materially adversely affect our business and results of operations.

 

Our results of operations are materially affected by conditions in the global capital markets and the economy generally, both in the U.S. and elsewhere around the world. Weak economic conditions sustained uncertainty about global economic conditions, concerns about future U.S. budgetary cuts, or a prolonged or further tightening of credit markets could cause our customers and potential customers to postpone or reduce spending on technology products or services or put downward pressure on prices, which could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations or cash flows. In the event of extreme prolonged adverse market events, such as a global credit crisis, we could incur significant losses.

 

Risks Related to Our Common Stock

 

We are eligible to be treated as an “emerging growth company” as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, and we cannot be certain if the reduced disclosure requirements applicable to emerging growth companies will make our common stock less attractive to investors.

 

We are an “emerging growth company”, as defined in the Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act of 2012, or the JOBS Act. For as long as we continue to be an emerging growth company, we may take advantage of exemptions from various reporting requirements that are applicable to other public companies that are not emerging growth companies, including (1) not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, which we refer to as the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, (2) reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in this Form 10-K and our periodic reports and proxy statements and (3) exemptions from the requirements of holding a nonbinding advisory vote on executive compensation and stockholder approval of any golden parachute payments not previously approved. In addition, as an emerging growth company, we are only required to provide two years of audited financial statements and two years of selected financial data in this Form 10. We could be an emerging growth company for up to five years, although circumstances could cause us to lose that status earlier, including if the market value of our common stock held by non-affiliates exceeds $700.0 million as of any June 30 before that time or if we have total annual gross revenue of $1.0 billion or more during any fiscal year before that time, in which cases we would no longer be an emerging growth company as of the following December 31 or, if we issue more than $1.0 billion in non-convertible debt during any three-year period before that time, we would cease to be an emerging growth company immediately. Even after we no longer qualify as an emerging growth company, we may still qualify as a “smaller reporting company” which would allow us to take advantage of many of the same exemptions from disclosure requirements, including not being required to comply with the auditor attestation requirements of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and reduced disclosure obligations regarding executive compensation in our periodic reports and proxy statements. We cannot predict if investors will find our common stock less attractive because we may rely on these exemptions. If some investors find our common stock less attractive as a result, there may be a less active trading market for our common stock and our stock price may be more volatile.

 

Our independent registered public accounting firm will not be required to formally attest to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting until the later of our second annual report or the first annual report required to be filed with the Commission following the date we are no longer an “emerging growth company” as defined in the JOBS “Act. We cannot assure you that there will not be material weaknesses or significant deficiencies in our internal controls in the future.

 

Under the JOBS Act, emerging growth companies can also delay adopting new or revised accounting standards until such time as those standards apply to private companies. We have irrevocably elected not to avail ourselves of this exemption from new or revised accounting standards and, therefore, will be subject to the same new or revised accounting standards as other public companies that are not emerging growth companies.

 

Our directors and executive officers beneficially own a significant number of shares of our common stock. Their interests may conflict with our outside stockholders, who may be unable to influence management and exercise control over our business.

 

As of the date of this Form 10-K, our executive officers and directors beneficially own approximately 2.2% of our shares of common stock and the CEO owns 250 shares of Series A preferred stock the voting rights for the Series A shares entitles the shareholder to voting rights equal to the number of common shares outstanding divided by .99 which will always grant the holder a majority voting capability. As a result, our executive officers and directors may be able to: elect or defeat the election of our directors, amend or prevent amendment to our certificates of incorporation or bylaws, effect or prevent a merger, sale of assets or other corporate transaction, and control the outcome of any other matter submitted to the shareholders for vote. Accordingly, our outside stockholders may be unable to influence management and exercise control over our business.

 

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We do not intend to pay cash dividends to our stockholders, so you will not receive any return on your investment in our Company prior to selling your interest in the Company.

 

We have never paid any dividends to our common stockholders as a public company. We currently intend to retain any future earnings for funding growth and, therefore, do not expect to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. If we determine that we will pay cash dividends to the holders of our common stock, we cannot assure that such cash dividends will be paid on a timely basis. The success of your investment in the Company will likely depend entirely upon any future appreciation. As a result, you will not receive any return on your investment prior to selling your shares in our Company and, for the other reasons discussed in this “Risk Factors” section, you may not receive any return on your investment even when you sell your shares in our Company.

 

Anti-Takeover, Limited Liability and Indemnification Provisions

 

Some provisions of our certificate of incorporation and by-laws may deter takeover attempts, which may inhibit a takeover that stockholders consider favorable and limit the opportunity of our stockholders to sell their shares at a favorable price.

 

Under our certificate of incorporation, our Board of Directors may issue additional shares of common or preferred stock. Our Board of Directors has the ability to authorize “blank check” preferred stock without future shareholder approval. This makes it possible for our board of directors to issue preferred stock with voting or other rights or preferences that could impede the success of any attempt to acquire us by means of a merger, tender offer, proxy contest or otherwise, including a transaction in which our stockholders would receive a premium over the market price for their shares and/or any other transaction that might otherwise be deemed to be in their best interests, and thereby protects the continuity of our management and limits an investor’s opportunity to profit by their investment in the Company. Specifically, if in the due exercise of its fiduciary obligations, the Board of Directors were to determine that a takeover proposal was not in our best interest, shares could be issued by our Board of Directors without stockholder approval in one or more transactions that might prevent or render more difficult or costly the completion of the takeover by:

 

  diluting the voting or other rights of the proposed acquirer or insurgent stockholder group,

 

  putting a substantial voting block in institutional or other hands that might undertake to support the incumbent Board of Directors, or

 

  effecting an acquisition that might complicate or preclude the takeover.

 

Delaware’s Anti-Takeover Law may discourage acquirers and eliminate a potentially beneficial sale for our stockholders.

 

We are subject to the provisions of the Delaware Shareholder Protection Act concerning corporate takeovers. This section prevents many Delaware corporations from engaging in a business combination with any interested stockholder, under specified circumstances. For these purposes, a business combination includes a merger or sale of more than 5% of our assets, and an interested stockholder includes a stockholder who owns 10% or more of our outstanding voting stock, as well as affiliates and associates of these persons. Under these provisions, this type of business combination is prohibited for three years following the date that the stockholder became an interested stockholder unless:

 

  the transaction in which the stockholder became an interested stockholder is approved by the Board of directors prior to the date the interested stockholder attained that status;

 

  on consummation of the transaction that resulted in the stockholder’s becoming an interested stockholder, the interested stockholder owned at least 90% of the voting stock of the corporation outstanding at the time the transaction was commenced, excluding those shares owned by persons who are directors and also officers; or

 

  on or subsequent to that date, the business combination is approved by the Board of Directors and authorized at an annual or special meeting of stockholders by the affirmative vote of at least a majority of the outstanding voting stock that is not owned by the interested stockholder.

 

This statute could prohibit or delay mergers or other takeover or change in control attempts and, accordingly, may discourage attempts to acquire us.

 

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Our indemnification of our officers and directors may cause us to use corporate resources to the detriment of our stockholders.

 

Our certificate of incorporation eliminates the personal liability of our directors for monetary damages arising from a breach of their fiduciary duty as directors to the fullest extent permitted by Delaware law. This limitation does not affect the availability of equitable remedies, such as injunctive relief or rescission. Our certificate of incorporation requires us to indemnify our directors and officers to the fullest extent permitted by Delaware law, including in circumstances in which indemnification is otherwise discretionary under Delaware law.

 

Under Delaware law, we may indemnify our directors or officers or other persons who were, are or are threatened to be made a named defendant or respondent in a proceeding because the person is or was our director, officer, employee or agent, if we determine that the person:

 

  conducted himself or herself in good faith, reasonably believed, in the case of conduct in his or her official capacity as our director or officer, that his or her conduct was in our best interests, and, in all other cases, that his or her conduct was at least not opposed to our best interests; and

 

  in the case of any criminal proceeding, had no reasonable cause to believe that his or her conduct was unlawful.

 

These persons may be indemnified against expenses, including attorneys’ fees, judgments, fines, including excise taxes, and amounts paid in settlement, actually and reasonably incurred, by the person in connection with the proceeding. If the person is found liable to the corporation, no indemnification will be made unless the court in which the action was brought determines that the person is fairly and reasonably entitled to indemnity in an amount that the court will establish.

 

Insofar as indemnification for liabilities under the Securities Act may be permitted to directors, officers or persons controlling us under the above provisions, we have been informed that, in the opinion of the SEC, such indemnification is against public policy as expressed in the Securities Act and is, therefore, unenforceable.

 

Our bylaws designate the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware as the exclusive forum for certain litigation that may be initiated by our stockholders, which could limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us.

 

Under the provisions of our amended and restated bylaws (“bylaws”), unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware will be the sole and exclusive forum for: (i) any derivative action or proceeding brought on behalf of us; (ii) any action asserting a claim of breach of a fiduciary duty owed by any of our directors, officers or other employees or agents to us or our stockholders; (iii) any action asserting a claim against us arising pursuant to any provision of the Delaware General Corporation Law or our amended certificate of incorporation or bylaws; or (iv) any action asserting a claim against us governed by the internal affairs doctrine. By becoming a stockholder in our company, you will be deemed to have notice of and have consented to the provisions of our bylaws related to choice of forum. The choice of forum provision in our bylaws may limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us.

 

The obligations associated with being a public company require significant resources and management attention, which may divert from our business operations.

 

We are subject to the reporting requirements of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the “Exchange Act”), and The Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, or the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. The Exchange Act requires that we file annual, quarterly and current reports with respect to our business and financial condition, proxy statement, and other information. The Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires, among other things, that we establish and maintain effective internal controls and procedures for financial reporting. Our Chief Executive Officer and Chief Financial Officer will need to certify that our disclosure controls and procedures are effective in ensuring that material information we are required to disclose in reports that we file or submit under the Exchange Act is recorded, processed, summarized and reported within the time periods specified in the SEC’s rules and forms. We may need to hire additional financial reporting, internal controls and other financial personnel in order to develop and implement appropriate internal controls and reporting procedures. As a result, we will incur significant legal, accounting and other expenses. Furthermore, the need to establish the corporate infrastructure demanded of a public company may divert management’s attention from implementing our growth strategy, which could prevent us from improving our business, results of operations and financial condition. We have made, and will continue to make, changes to our internal controls and procedures for financial reporting and accounting systems to meet our reporting obligations as a public company. However, the measures we take may not be sufficient to satisfy our obligations as a public company. In addition, we cannot predict or estimate the amount of additional costs we may incur in order to comply with these requirements. We anticipate that these costs will materially increase our selling, general and administrative expenses.

 

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Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires annual management assessments of the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting. In connection with the implementation of the necessary procedures and practices related to internal control over financial reporting, we may identify deficiencies. If we are unable to comply with the internal controls requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002, then we may not be able to obtain the independent account and certifications required by that act, which may preclude us from keeping our filings with the SEC current, and interfere with the ability of investors to trade our securities and our shares to continue to be quoted on the OTCQB or our ability to list our shares on any national securities exchange.

 

If we fail to establish and maintain an effective system of internal controls, we may not be able to report our financial results accurately or prevent fraud. Any inability to report and file our financial results accurately and timely could harm our reputation and adversely impact the trading price of our common stock.

 

Effective internal controls are necessary for us to provide reliable financial reports and prevent fraud. If we cannot provide reliable financial reports or prevent fraud, we may not be able to manage our business as effectively as we would if an effective control environment existed, and our business and reputation with investors may be harmed. With each prospective acquisition we may make we will conduct whatever due diligence is necessary or prudent to assure us that the acquisition target can comply with the internal controls’ requirements of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act. Notwithstanding our diligence, certain internal controls deficiencies may not be detected. As a result, any internal control deficiencies may adversely affect our financial condition, results of operations and access to capital. We have not performed an in-depth analysis to determine if historical undiscovered failures of internal controls exist, and may in the future discover areas of our internal controls that need improvement.

 

Public company compliance may make it more difficult to attract and retain officers and directors.

 

The Sarbanes-Oxley Act and rules implemented by the SEC have required changes in corporate governance practices of public companies. As a public company, these rules and regulations increase our compliance costs and make certain activities more time consuming and costly. As a public company, these rules and regulations may make it more difficult and expensive for us to maintain our director and officer liability insurance and we may be required to accept reduced policy limits and coverage or incur substantially higher costs to obtain the same or similar coverage. As a result, it may be more difficult for us to attract and retain qualified persons to serve on our board of directors or as executive officers, and to maintain insurance at reasonable rates, or at all.

 

Our stock price may be volatile.

 

The market price of our common stock is likely to be highly volatile and could fluctuate widely in price in response to various factors, many of which are beyond our control, including the following:

 

  our ability to execute our business plan and complete prospective acquisitions;

 

  changes in our industry;

 

  competitive pricing pressures;

 

  our ability to obtain working capital financing;

 

  additions or departures of key personnel;

 

  limited “public float” in the hands of a small number of persons whose sales or lack of sales could result in positive or negative pricing pressure on the market price for our common stock;

 

  sales of our common stock;

 

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  operating results that fall below expectations;

 

  regulatory developments;

 

  economic and other external factors;

 

  period-to-period fluctuations in our financial results;

 

  our inability to develop or acquire new or needed technologies;

 

  the public’s response to press releases or other public announcements by us or third parties, including filings with the SEC;

 

  changes in financial estimates or ratings by any securities analysts who follow our common stock, our failure to meet these estimates or failure of those analysts to initiate or maintain coverage of our common stock;

 

  the development and sustainability of an active trading market for our common stock; and

 

  any future sales of our common stock by our officers, directors and significant stockholders.

 

In addition, the securities markets have from time-to-time experienced significant price and volume fluctuations that are unrelated to the operating performance of particular companies. These market fluctuations may also materially and adversely affect the market price of our common stock.

 

Our shares of common stock are thinly traded, the price may not reflect our value, and there can be no assurance that there will be an active market for our shares of common stock either now or in the future.

 

Our shares of common stock are thinly traded, our common stock is available to be traded and is held by a small number of holders, and the price may not reflect our actual or perceived value. There can be no assurance that there will be an active market for our shares of common stock either now or in the future. The market liquidity will be dependent on the perception of our operating business, among other things. We will take certain steps including utilizing investor awareness campaigns and firms, press releases, road shows and conferences to increase awareness of our business. Any steps that we might take to bring us to the awareness of investors may require that we compensate consultants with cash and/or stock. There can be no assurance that there will be any awareness generated or the results of any efforts will result in any impact on our trading volume. Consequently, investors may not be able to liquidate their investment or liquidate it at a price that reflects the value of the business, and trading may be at an inflated price relative to the performance of the Company due to, among other things, the availability of sellers of our shares.

 

If an active market should develop, the price may be highly volatile. Because there is currently a low price for our shares of common stock, many brokerage firms or clearing firms are not willing to effect transactions in the securities or accept our shares for deposit in an account. Many lending institutions will not permit the use of low-priced shares of common stock as collateral for any loans. Furthermore, our securities are currently traded on the OTCQB where it is more difficult (1) to obtain accurate quotations, (2) to obtain coverage for significant news events because major wire services generally do not publish press releases about these companies, and (3) to obtain needed capital.

 

Our common stock may be deemed a “penny stock,” which would make it more difficult for our investors to sell their shares.

 

Our common stock is currently subject to the “penny stock” rules adopted under Section 15(g) of the Exchange Act. The penny stock rules generally apply to companies whose common stock is not listed on The Nasdaq Stock Market or another national securities exchange and trades at less than $4.00 per share, other than companies that have had average revenues of at least $6,000,000 for the last three years or that have tangible net worth of at least $5,000,000 ($2,000,000 if the company has been operating for three or more years). These rules require, among other things, that brokers who trade penny stock to persons other than “established customers” complete certain documentation, make suitability inquiries of investors and provide investors with certain information concerning trading in the security, including a risk disclosure document and quote information under certain circumstances. Many brokers have decided not to trade penny stocks because of the requirements of the penny stock rules and, as a result, the number of broker-dealers willing to act as market makers in these securities is limited. If we remain subject to the penny stock rules for any significant period, it could have an adverse effect on the market, if any, for our securities. If our securities are subject to the penny stock rules, investors will find it more difficult to dispose of our securities.

 

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Offers or availability for sale of a substantial number of shares of our common stock may cause the price of our common stock to decline.

 

If our stockholders sell substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market upon the expiration of any statutory holding period under Rule 144, or shares issued upon the exercise of outstanding options or warrants, it could create a circumstance commonly referred to as an “overhang” and, in anticipation of which, the market price of our common stock could fall. The existence of an overhang, whether or not sales have occurred or are occurring, also could make more difficult our ability to raise additional financing through the sale of equity or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price that we deem reasonable or appropriate.

 

Our Form S-1 filings disclose the dilutive effect of the Company’s stock sales under various offerings.

 

Sales of substantial amounts of our common stock in the public market, or the perception that these sales could occur, could adversely affect the price of our common stock and impair our ability to raise capital through the sale of shares.

 

Because we became public by means of a reverse merger, we may not be able to attract the attention of major brokerage firms.

 

There may be risks associated with us having become public through a “reverse merger.” Securities analysts of major brokerage firms may not provide coverage of us since there is no incentive to brokerage firms to recommend the purchase of our common stock. No assurance can be given that brokerage firms will, in the future, want to conduct any offerings on our behalf.

 

Any substantial sale of stock by existing shareholders could depress the market value of our stock, thereby devaluing the market price and causing investors to risk losing all or part of their investment.

 

Stockholders, including our directors and officers hold a large number of our outstanding shares. We can make no prediction as to the effect, if any, that sales of shares, or the availability of shares for future sale, will have on the prevailing market price of our shares of common stock. Sales of substantial amounts of shares in the public market, or the perception that such sales could occur, could depress prevailing market prices for the shares. Such sales may also make it more difficult for us to sell equity securities or equity-related securities in the future at a time and price which it deems appropriate.

 

Our issuance of preferred stock in the future may adversely affect the rights of our common stockholders.

 

Our certificate of incorporation permits us to issue up to 5,000,000 shares of preferred stock with such rights and preferences as the Board of Directors may designate. As a result, our Board of Directors may authorize a series of preferred stock that would grant to preferred stockholders’ preferential rights to our assets upon liquidation; the right to receive dividends before dividends become payable to our common stockholders; the right to redemption of the preferred stock prior to the redemption of our common stock; and super-voting rights to our preferred stockholders. To the extent that we designate and issue such a class or series of preferred stock, the rights of our common stockholders may be impaired.

 

Risks Related to Our IP

 

Our Success May Depend on Our Ability to Obtain and Protect the Proprietary Information on Which We Base Our UAV Products.

 

As we acquire companies with intellectual property (“IP”) that is important to the development of our UAV products, we will need to:

 

  obtain valid and enforceable patents;

 

  protect trade secrets; and

 

  operate without infringing upon the proprietary rights of others.

 

We will be able to protect our proprietary technology from unauthorized use by third parties only to the extent that such proprietary rights are covered by valid and enforceable patents or are effectively maintained as trade secrets. Any non-confidential disclosure to or misappropriation by third parties of our confidential or proprietary information could enable competitors to quickly duplicate or surpass our technological achievements, thus eroding our competitive position in our market.

 

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The patent application process, also known as patent prosecution, is expensive and time-consuming, and we and our current or future licensors and licensees may not be able to prepare, file and prosecute all necessary or desirable patent applications at a reasonable cost or in a timely manner. It is also possible that we or our current licensors, or any future licensors or licensees, will fail to identify patentable aspects of inventions made in the course of development and commercialization activities before it is too late to obtain patent protection on them. Therefore, these and any of our patents and applications may not be prosecuted and enforced in a manner consistent with the best interests of our business. It is possible that defects of form in the preparation or filing of our patents or patent applications may exist, or may arise in the future, for example with respect to proper priority claims or inventorship. If we or our current licensors or licensees, or any future licensors or licensees, fail to establish, maintain or protect such patents and other intellectual property rights, such rights may be reduced or eliminated. If our current licensors or licensees, or any future licensors or licensees, are not fully cooperative or disagree with us as to the prosecution, maintenance or enforcement of any patent rights, such patent rights could be compromised. If there are material defects in the form or preparation of our patents or patent applications, such patents or applications may be invalid and unenforceable. Any of these outcomes could impair our ability to prevent competition from third parties, which may harm our business.

 

The patent applications that we may own or license may fail to result in issued patents in the United States or in other countries. Even if patents do issue on such patent applications, third parties may challenge the validity, enforceability or scope thereof, which may result in such patents being narrowed, invalidated or held unenforceable. For example, U.S. patents can be challenged by any person before the new USPTO Patent Trial and Appeals Board at any time within the one-year period following that person’s receipt of an allegation of infringement of the patents. Patents granted by the European Patent Office may be similarly opposed by any person within nine months from the publication of the grant. Similar proceedings are available in other jurisdictions, and in the United States, Europe and other jurisdictions third parties can raise questions of validity with a patent office even before a patent has granted. Furthermore, even if they are unchallenged, our patents and patent applications may not adequately protect our intellectual property or prevent others from designing around our claims. If the breadth or strength of protection provided by the patents and patent applications we hold or pursue with respect to our product candidates is successfully challenged, then our ability to commercialize such product candidates could be negatively affected, and we may face unexpected competition that could harm our business. Further, if we encounter delays in our clinical trials, the period of time during which we or our collaborators could market our product candidates under patent protection would be reduced.

 

The degree of future protection of our proprietary rights is uncertain. Patent protection may be unavailable or severely limited in some cases and may not adequately protect our rights or permit us to gain or keep our competitive advantage. For example:

 

  we might not have been the first to invent or the first to file the inventions covered by each of our pending patent applications and issued patents;

 

  others may be able to make, use, sell, offer to sell or import products that are similar to our products or product candidates but that are not covered by the claims of our patents; others may independently develop similar or alternative technologies or duplicate any of our technologies;

 

  the proprietary rights of others may have an adverse effect on our business;

 

  any proprietary rights we do obtain may not encompass commercially viable products, may not provide us with any competitive advantages or may be challenged by third parties;

 

  any patents we obtain or our in-licensed issued patents may not be valid or enforceable; or

 

  we may not develop additional technologies or products that are patentable or suitable to maintain as trade secrets.

 

If we or our current licensors or licensees, or any future licensors or licensees, fail to prosecute, maintain and enforce patent protection for our product candidates, our ability to develop and commercialize our product candidates could be harmed and we might not be able to prevent competitors from making, using and selling competing products. This failure to properly protect the intellectual property rights relating to our product candidates could harm our business, financial condition and operating results. Moreover, our competitors may independently develop equivalent knowledge, methods and know-how.

 

26

 

 

Even where laws provide protection, costly and time-consuming litigation could be necessary to enforce and determine the scope of our proprietary rights, and the outcome of such litigation would be uncertain. If we or one of our collaborators were to initiate legal proceedings against a third party to enforce a patent covering the product candidate, the defendant could assert an affirmative defense or counterclaim that our patent is not infringed, invalid and/or unenforceable. In patent litigation in the United States, defendant defenses and counterclaims alleging non-infringement, invalidity and/or unenforceability are commonplace. Grounds for a validity challenge could be an alleged failure to meet any of several statutory requirements, including lack of novelty, anticipation or obviousness, and lack of written description, definiteness or enablement. Patents may be unenforceable if someone connected with prosecution of the patent withheld material information from the USPTO, or made a misleading statement, during prosecution. The outcomes of proceedings involving assertions of invalidity and unenforceability are unpredictable. It is possible that prior art of which we and the patent examiner were unaware during prosecution exists, which would render our patents invalid. Moreover, it is also possible that prior art may exist that we are aware of, but that we do not believe are relevant to our current or future patents, that could nevertheless be determined to render our patents invalid. If a defendant were to prevail on a legal assertion of invalidity and/or unenforceability of our patents covering one of our product candidates, we would lose at least part, and perhaps all, of the patent protection on such product candidate. Such a loss of patent protection would harm our business. Moreover, our competitors could counterclaim in any suit to enforce our patents that we infringe their intellectual property. Furthermore, some of our competitors have substantially greater intellectual property portfolios, and resources, than we do.

 

Our ability to stop third parties from using our technology or making, using, selling, offering to sell or importing our products is dependent upon the extent to which we have rights under valid and enforceable patents that cover these activities. If any patent we currently or in the future may own or license is deemed not infringed, invalid or unenforceable, it could impact our commercial success. We cannot predict the breadth of claims that may be issued from any patent applications we currently or may in the future own or license from third parties.

 

To the extent that consultants or key employees apply technological information independently developed by them or by others to our product candidates, disputes may arise as to who has the proprietary rights to such information and product candidates, and certain of such disputes may not be resolved in our favor. Consultants and key employees that work with our confidential and proprietary technologies are required to assign all intellectual property rights in their inventions and discoveries created during the scope of their work to our company. However, these consultants or key employees may terminate their relationship with us, and we cannot preclude them indefinitely from dealing with our competitors.

 

If we are unable to prevent disclosure of our trade secrets or other confidential information to third parties, our competitive position may be impaired.

 

We also may rely on trade secrets to protect our technology, especially where we do not believe patent protection is appropriate or obtainable. Our ability to stop third parties from obtaining the information or know-how necessary to make, use, sell, offer to sell or import our products or practice our technology is dependent in part upon the extent to which we prevent disclosure of the trade secrets that cover these activities. Trade secret rights can be lost through disclosure to third parties. Although we use reasonable efforts to protect our trade secrets, our employees, consultants, contractors, outside scientific collaborators and other advisors may unintentionally or willfully disclose our trade secrets to third parties, resulting in loss of trade secret protection. Moreover, our competitors may independently develop equivalent knowledge, methods and know-how, which would not constitute a violation of our trade secret rights. Enforcing a claim that a third party is engaged in the unlawful use of our trade secrets is expensive, difficult and time consuming, and the outcome is unpredictable. In addition, recognition of rights in trade secrets and a willingness to enforce trade secrets differs in certain jurisdictions.

 

If we are sued for infringing intellectual property rights of third parties, it will be costly and time consuming, and an unfavorable outcome in that litigation could harm our business.

 

Our commercial success depends significantly on our ability to operate without infringing, violating or misappropriating the patents and other proprietary rights of third parties. Our own technologies we acquire or develop may infringe, violate or misappropriate the patents or other proprietary rights of third parties, or we may be subject to third-party claims of such infringement. Numerous U.S. and foreign issued patents and pending patent applications owned by third parties, exist in the fields in which we are developing our product candidates. Because some patent applications may be maintained in secrecy until the patents are issued, because publication of patent applications is often delayed, and because publications in the scientific literature often lag behind actual discoveries, we cannot be certain that we were the first to invent the technology or that others have not filed patent applications for technology covered by our pending applications. We may not be aware of patents that have already issued that a third party might assert are infringed by our product candidates. It is also possible that patents of which we are aware, but which we do not believe are relevant to our product candidates, could nevertheless be found to be infringed by our product candidates. Moreover, we may face patent infringement claims from non-practicing entities that have no relevant product revenue and against whom our own patent portfolio may thus have no deterrent effect. In the future, we may agree to indemnify our manufacturing partners against certain intellectual property claims brought by third parties.

 

27

 

 

Intellectual property litigation involves many risks and uncertainties, and there is no assurance that we will prevail in any lawsuit brought against us. Third parties making claims against us for infringement, violation or misappropriation of their intellectual property rights may seek and obtain injunctive or other equitable relief, which could effectively block our ability to further develop and commercialize our product candidates. Further, if a patent infringement suit were brought against us, we could be forced to stop or delay research, development, manufacturing or sales of the product or product candidate that is the subject of the suit. Defense of these claims, regardless of their merit, would cause us to incur substantial expenses and, would be a substantial diversion of resources from our business. In the event of a successful claim of any such infringement, violation or misappropriation, we may need to obtain licenses from such third parties and we and our partners may be prevented from pursuing product development or commercialization and/or may be required to pay damages. We cannot be certain that any licenses required under such patents or proprietary rights would be made available to us, or that any offer to license would be made available to us on commercially reasonable terms. If we cannot obtain such licenses, we and our collaborators may be restricted or prevented from manufacturing and selling products employing our technology. These adverse results, if they occur, could adversely affect our business, results of operations and prospects, and the value of our shares.

 

We may become involved in lawsuits to protect or enforce our patents or other intellectual property, which could be expensive, time consuming and unsuccessful.

 

The defense and prosecution of contractual or intellectual property lawsuits, USPTO interference or derivation proceedings, European Patent Office oppositions and related legal and administrative proceedings in the United States, Europe and other countries, involve complex legal and factual questions. As a result, such proceedings may be costly and time-consuming to pursue and their outcome is uncertain.

 

Litigation may be necessary to:

 

  protect and enforce our patents and any future patents issuing on our patent applications;

 

  enforce or clarify the terms of the licenses we have granted or may be granted in the future;

 

  protect and enforce trade secrets, know-how and other proprietary rights that we own or have licensed, or may license in the future; or

 

  determine the enforceability, scope and validity of the proprietary rights of third parties and defend against alleged patent infringement.

 

Competitors may infringe our intellectual property. As a result, we may be required to file infringement claims to stop third-party infringement or unauthorized use. This can be expensive, particularly for a company of our size, and time-consuming. In addition, in an infringement proceeding, a court may decide that a patent of ours is not valid or is unenforceable, or may refuse to stop the other party from using the technology at issue on the grounds that our patent claims do not cover its technology or that the factors necessary to grant an injunction against an infringer are not satisfied. An adverse determination of any litigation or other proceedings could put one or more of our patents at risk of being invalidated, interpreted narrowly, or amended such that they do not cover our product candidates. Moreover, such adverse determinations could put our patent applications at risk of not issuing, or issuing with limited and potentially inadequate scope to cover our product candidates or to prevent others from marketing similar products.

 

Interference, derivation or other proceedings brought at the USPTO, may be necessary to determine the priority or patentability of inventions with respect to our patent applications or those of our licensors or potential collaborators. Litigation or USPTO proceedings brought by us may fail or may be invoked against us by third parties. Even if we are successful, domestic or foreign litigation or USPTO or foreign patent office proceedings may result in substantial costs and distraction to our management. We may not be able, alone or with our licensors or potential collaborators, to prevent misappropriation of our proprietary rights, particularly in countries where the laws may not protect such rights as fully as in the United States.

 

Furthermore, because of the substantial amount of discovery required in connection with intellectual property litigation or other proceedings, there is a risk that some of our confidential information could be compromised by disclosure during this type of litigation or other proceedings. In addition, during the course of this kind of litigation or proceedings, there could be public announcements of the results of hearings, motions or other interim proceedings or developments or public access to related documents. If investors perceive these results to be negative, the market price for our common stock could be significantly harmed.

 

Some of our competitors may be able to sustain the costs of patent-related disputes, including patent litigation, more effectively than we can because they have substantially greater resources. In addition, any uncertainties resulting from the initiation and continuation of any litigation could have a material adverse effect on our ability to raise the funds necessary to continue our operations.

 

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We may not be able to enforce our intellectual property rights throughout the world.

 

Filing, prosecuting and defending patents on our product candidates in all countries throughout the world would be prohibitively expensive. The requirements for patentability may differ in certain countries, particularly in developing countries. Moreover, our ability to protect and enforce our intellectual property rights may be adversely affected by unforeseen changes in foreign intellectual property laws. Additionally, laws of some countries outside of the United States do not afford intellectual property protection to the same extent as the laws of the United States. Many companies have encountered significant problems in protecting and defending intellectual property rights in certain foreign jurisdictions. The legal systems of some countries, particularly developing countries, do not favor the enforcement of patents and other intellectual property rights. This could make it difficult for us to stop the infringement of our patents or the misappropriation of our other intellectual property rights. For example, many foreign countries have compulsory licensing laws under which a patent owner must grant licenses to third parties. Consequently, we may not be able to prevent third parties from practicing our inventions in all countries outside the United States. Competitors may use our technologies in jurisdictions where we have not obtained patent protection to develop their own products and, further, may export otherwise infringing products to territories where we have patent protection, if our ability to enforce our patents to stop infringing activities is inadequate. These products may compete with our products, and our patents or other intellectual property rights may not be effective or sufficient to prevent them from competing.

 

Proceedings to enforce our patent rights in foreign jurisdictions, whether or not successful, could result in substantial costs and divert our efforts and resources from other aspects of our business. Furthermore, while we intend to protect our intellectual property rights in major markets for our products, we cannot ensure that we will be able to initiate or maintain similar efforts in all jurisdictions in which we may wish to market our products. Accordingly, our efforts to protect our intellectual property rights in such countries may be inadequate.

 

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

 

None.

 

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES

 

Bantec, Inc.

 

Our headquarters is located at 195 Paterson Ave, Little Falls, New Jersey 07424.

 

Howco

 

Howco has its principal office and warehouse at 6025 East 18th St, Vancouver, WA 98661. Howco entered into a lease on April 28, 2009 that was extended on May 15, 2017 and June 1, 2020 to May 31, 2023 for approximately 7,500 square feet for its office and warehouse. The lease provides for initial monthly rent of approximately $5,154 per month with annual rent escalations.

 

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ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS

 

In connection with the 2016 fiscal year merger with Texas Wyoming Drilling, Inc., a vendor has a claim for unpaid bills of approximately $75,000 against the Company. The Company and its legal counsel believe the Company is not liable for the claim pursuant to its indemnification clause in the merger agreement.

 

On February 6, 2018 the Company sent a letter to the previous owners of Howco Distributing Co. (“Howco”) alleging that they made certain financial misrepresentations under the terms of the Stock Purchase Agreement by which the Company acquired control of Howco during 2016. The Company claimed that the previous owners took excessive amounts of cash from the business prior to the close of the merger. On March 13, 2018 the Company filed a lawsuit against the previous owners by issuing a summons. On April 12, 2018, the Company received the Defendants’ answer. On July 22, 2019, the Company sought and was granted a dismissal without prejudice of the lawsuit filed against the previous owners of Howco. The Company and the previous owners are in discussion to settle the matter as of September 30, 2022. An informal oral agreement with the Seller has been made whereby the Company has been paying the previous owners $3,000 per month since January 2021 in satisfaction of Sellers note payable.

 

In the suit Drone USA, Inc and Michael Bannon (plaintiffs) vs Dennis Antonelos (former Chief Financial Officer or CFO), currently pending in New York State court, the plaintiffs seek to compel the former CFO to meet his obligations under an agreement guaranteeing payments to another former executive. The former CFO filed a cross-claim against the plaintiffs for past due salary. The employment agreement with the former CFO allowed salary payments to be paid in cash or stock. During the year ended September 30, 2021, the Company issued 36,821,330 shares of its common stock for the past due salary and claims that this payment moots the former CFO’s claim for past due salary. During the year ended September 30, 2022 the Company cancelled the shares issued which were reclassified to equity. The former CFO filed a motion for summary judgement which was denied, then filed an appeal to that order. The appellate court reversed the lower court’s decision denying the summary judgement.

 

On April 10, 2019, a former service provider filed a complaint with three charges with the Superior Court Judicial District of New Haven, CT seeking payment for professional services. The Company has previously recognized expenses of $218,637, which remain unpaid in accounts payable. The Company has retained an attorney who is currently working to address the complaint. On August 9, 2019 the Company filed a motion to dismiss the charge of unjust enrichment. The judge granted the Company’s motion to dismiss. The Company, through its attorney, is working to negotiate a settlement. A trial is scheduled for March 2023.

 

During the year ended September 30, 2019, two vendors (The Equity Group and Toppan Vintage) have asserted claims for past due amounts of approximately $59,000, arising from services provided. The Company has fully recognized, in accounts payable, the amounts associated with these claims and expects to resolve the matters to satisfaction of all parties.

 

On December 30, 2020, a Howco vendor filed a lawsuit seeking payment of past due invoices totaling $276,430 and finance charges of $40,212. The Company has recorded the liability for the invoices in the normal course of business. Management at Howco as well as an intermediary consultant structured a repayment plan with this vender and other venders as well.

 

ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

 

None.

 

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PART II

 

ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

 

Market Information

 

Our common stock is quoted on the OTCPink under the trading symbol “BANT”.

 

The following table sets forth the quarterly high and low sales price per share of our common stock for the periods indicated. The prices represent inter-dealer quotations, which do not include retail mark-up, mark-down or commission and may not necessarily represent actual transactions.

 

QUARTER ENDED  HIGH   LOW 
September 30, 2022  $0.0003   $0.0002 
June 30, 2022  $0.0005   $0.0004 
March 31, 2022  $0.0007   $0.0006 
December 31, 2021  $0.0013   $0.0011 
           
September 30, 2021  $0.0072   $0.0028 
June 30, 2021  $0.0174   $0.0068 
March 31, 2021  $0.1   $0.003 
December 31, 2020  $0.0051   $0.0021 

 

Holders

 

As of December 31, 2022, there were 5,864,107,732, shares of common stock outstanding, which were held by approximately 314 record holders.

 

As of the date of this Form 10-K, we have no present commitments to issue shares of our capital stock to any 5% holder, director or nominee, other than pursuant to the exercise of outstanding options as more fully set forth elsewhere in this Form 10-K.

 

Dividends

 

We have never paid cash dividends on any of our capital stock and we currently intend to retain our future earnings, if any, to fund the development and growth of our business. We do not intend to pay cash dividends to holders of our common stock in the foreseeable future.

 

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Securities Authorized for Issuance under Equity Compensation Plans

 

The following table sets forth information regarding our equity compensation plans as of September 30, 2022. There are no equity compensation plans that have not been approved by our security holders.

 

Plan Category  Number of
securities to
be issued
upon exercise of outstanding
options,
warrants and
rights
   Weighted
average
exercise price of
outstanding
options,
warrants and
rights ($)
   Number of
securities
remaining
available for
future issuance
under
equity
compensation
plans
 
Equity compensation plans approved by security holders   16,423   $230    83,577 

 

Issuance of Unregistered Securities

 

Since June 30, 2022, the Company issued the following unregistered securities:

 

Shares Issued for Conversion of Convertible Notes

 

On July 12, 2022, Frondeur Partners LLC fully converted principal and accrued interest of $15,000 and $744 from the convertible note dated January 1, 2022 into 126,925,600 shares of common stock. Premium of $15,000 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On July 14, and 18, 2022 1800 Diagonal Lending LLC (f/k/a Sixth Street Lending LLC, fully converted principal and accrued interest of $53,750 and $2,688 from the convertible note dated November 12, 2021 into 217,067,308 shares of common stock. Premium of $28,942 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On September 23 2022, Frondeur Partners LLC fully converted principal and accrued interest of $15,000 and $777 from the convertible note dated February 1, 2022 into 127,144,733 shares of common stock. Premium of $15,000 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On October 3, 2022, the Company issued 191,826,700 shares of common stock in conversion of Frondeur Partners LLC, convertible note payable dated March 1, 2022, All principal of $15,000 and accrued interest of $888 were converted.

 

On November 17, 2022, the Company issued 384,804,200 shares of common stock in conversion of Frondeur Partners LLC, convertible note payable dated April 1, 2022, All principal of $15,000 and accrued interest of $945 were converted.

 

On December 1, 2022, the Company issued 383,489,000 shares of common stock in conversion of Frondeur Partners LLC, convertible note payable dated May 1, 2022, All principal of $15,000 and accrued interest of $879 were converted.

 

Warrants to Purchase Common Stock Issued

 

On July 1, 2022, the “Company entered into separate Securities Purchase Agreements with Trillium Partners, LP (“Trillium”) and with JP Carey Limited Partners, LP (“JPC”). Under the terms of each SPA, Trillium and JPC each agreed to advance funds under a merchant financing arrangement, treated as loans. Warrants for the purchase of 1,120,000,000 shares of Common Stock were issued as consideration for the advance agreement. In total 2,240,000,000 warrants were issued and a relative value for the bundled transaction of $200,387, was charged to debt discount (amortized to interest expense over the term of the related loans), additional paid in capital was credited for the same amount.

  

The Warrants are exercisable at $0.0002 for a term of 7 years, permit the Holder thereof to elect a cashless exercise, are subject to adjustment according to certain anti-dilution provisions, and carry no voting rights.

 

Preferred Stock Issued

 

On July 1, 2022 the Company’s Board of Directors designated as Series B Preferred Stock and authorized 1,000,000 shares which will not be subject to increase without the consent of the holders (each a “Holder” and collectively, the “Holders”) of a majority of the outstanding shares of Series B Preferred Stock. The designations, powers, preferences, rights and restrictions granted or imposed upon the Series B Preferred Stock are as set forth in the Certificate of Designation as filed. Each share of Series B Preferred Stock shall have a stated value of $1.00 (the “Stated Value”). Ranking The Series B Preferred Stock will, with respect to dividend rights and rights upon liquidation, winding-up or dissolution, rank: (a) senior with respect to dividends and right of liquidation with the Company’s common stock and (b) junior with respect to dividends and right of liquidation to all existing and future indebtedness of the Company and existing and outstanding preferred stock of the Company.

 

During July 2022, the Company issued 448,000 shares of the Series B Preferred Stock in conjunction with a debt financing with two investors (See also footnote 11 in the financial statements). The Company determined that under ASC 480, the Series B Preferred Stock should be treated as Temporary Equity and that it needed to apply the SAB topic 3c (SEC guidance) as well. Upon issuance of the shares the Company allocated a relative value of $101,368 to the Stock. On September 30, 2022 the Company remeasured the Stock to a have an aggregate value of $461,440, with $360,072 charged to additional paid in capital including the dividends due of $13,440 at September 30, 2022.

 

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Convertible Notes Issued

 

On July 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On July 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to an attorney for $4,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in seven months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $4,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On August 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On August 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to an attorney for $4,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in seven months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $4,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On September 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the twenty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On September 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to an attorney for $4,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in seven months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $4,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On October 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On October 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to an attorney for $4,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in seven months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $4,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

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On November 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On November 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to an attorney for $4,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in seven months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $4,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On December 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On December 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to an attorney for $4,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in seven months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $4,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On January 1, 2023, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

On January 1, 2023, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to an attorney for $4,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in seven months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $4,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date.

 

Other Notes Issued

 

On July 1, 2022, the “Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement with Trillium Partners, LP (“Trillium”) and with JP Carey Limited Partners, LP (“JPC”). Under the terms of the SPA, Trillium agreed to advance funds under a merchant financing arrangement, treated as a loan. The loan principal is $224,000, including legal fees of $5,000 and OID of $24,000, the Company received cash of $195,000. Loan bears interest of 12% per annum and matures on June 30, 2023. The Company agreed to issue 224,000 shares of the Company’s Series B Preferred Stock, and a Warrant for the purchase of 1,120,000,000 shares of Common Stock as consideration for the advance agreement. The Series B Preferred Stock met the criteria for treatment as temporary equity and debt discount of $50,684 was recognized. The Warrant caused a recognition of $100,194 in debt discount. Total debt discount recognized was $179,878, to be amortized over the term of the loan. $44,846 was recognized as interest expense as of September 30, 2022 from the amortization of discounts. The Company defaulted on the weekly payment terms of the note; however, the note holder granted a limited waiver of the default. Under the waiver amendment the default interest rate still applies and now the note accrues interest of 22% and the payments are due upon the notes maturity.

 

On July 1, 2022, the “Company entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement with JP Carey Limited Partners, LP (“JPC”). Under the terms of the SPA, JPC agreed to advance funds under a merchant financing arrangement, treated as a loan. The loan principal is $224,000, including legal fees of $5,000 and OID of $24,000, the Company received cash of $195,000. Loan bears interest of 12% per annum and matures on June 30, 2023. The Company agreed to issue 224,000 shares of the Company’s Series B Preferred Stock, and a Warrant for the purchase of 1,120,000,000 shares of Common Stock as consideration for the advance agreement. The Series B Preferred Stock met the criteria for treatment as temporary equity and debt discount of $50,684 was recognized. The Warrant caused a recognition of $100,194 in debt discount. Total debt discount recognized was $179,878, to be amortized over the term of the loan. $44,845 was recognized as interest expense as of September 30, 2022 from the amortization of discounts. The Company defaulted on the weekly payment terms of the note; however, the note holder granted a limited waiver of the default. Under the waiver amendment the default interest rate still applies and now the note accrues interest of 22%, and the payments are due upon the notes maturity.

 

The issuances of the above securities were made in reliance upon exemptions from registration available under Section 3(a)(10) of the Securities Act, among others, as transactions not involving a public offering. This exemption was claimed on the basis that these transactions did not involve any public offering and the purchasers in each offering were accredited or sophisticated and had sufficient access to the kind of information registration would provide. In each case, appropriate investment representations were obtained and certificates representing the securities were issued with restrictive legends.

 

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ITEM 6. [RESERVED]

 

Not Applicable.

 

ITEM 7. MANAGEMENT’S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

 

Forward Looking Statement Notice

 

Certain statements made in this Annual Report on Form 10-K are “forward-looking statements” (within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995) regarding the plans and objectives of management for future operations. Such statements involve known and unknown risks, uncertainties and other factors that may cause actual results, performance or achievements of Bantec, Inc. and Subsidiaries (“we”, “us”, “our” or the “Company”) to be materially different from any future results, performance or achievements expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. The forward-looking statements included herein are based on current expectations that involve numerous risks and uncertainties. The Company’s plans and objectives are based, in part, on assumptions involving the continued expansion of business. Assumptions relating to the foregoing involve judgments with respect to, among other things, future economic, competitive and market conditions and future business decisions, all of which are difficult or impossible to predict accurately and many of which are beyond the control of the Company. Although the Company believes its assumptions underlying the forward-looking statements are reasonable, any of the assumptions could prove inaccurate and, therefore, there can be no assurance the forward-looking statements included in this Annual Report will prove to be accurate. In light of the significant uncertainties inherent in the forward-looking statements included herein, the inclusion of such information should not be regarded as a representation by the Company or any other person that the objectives and plans of the Company will be achieved.

 

Overview

 

Bantec, Inc. is a product and service company targeting the U.S. Government, state governments, municipalities, hospitals, universities, manufacturers and other building owners. Bantec also provides product procurement, distribution, and logistics services through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Howco Distributing Co., (“Howco”) (collectively, the “Company”) to the United States Department of Defense and Defense Logistics Agency. The Company established Bantec Sanitizing in fiscal 2021, which offers sanitizing products and equipment through its new store bantec.store. The Company has operations based in Little Falls, New Jersey and Vancouver, Washington. The Company continues to seek strategic acquisitions and partnerships that offer us an opportunity to grow sales and profit.

 

Liquidity and Capital Resources

 

As of September 30, 2022 we had $703,917 in current assets, including $186,386 in cash, compared to $1,205,058 in current assets, including $985,953 in cash, at September 30, 2021. Current liabilities at September 30, 2022 totaled $16,504,500 compared to $15,914,650 at September 30, 2021. The decrease in current assets from September 30, 2021 to September 30, 2022 is primarily due decreased cash of approximately $800,000, partially offset by an increase in accounts receivable of approximately $292,000. Cash was lower due to the higher sales of common stock for cash in 2021. The increase in current liabilities from September 30, 2021 to September 30, 2022 is primarily due to the increases in: increase in accounts payable of approximately $63,000, accrued expenses of $778,000, partially offset by decreases in convertible notes payable and related premiums of approximately $240,000. While we have revenues as of this date, no significant construction, environmental or drone revenues are anticipated until we are implementing our full strategic plan of acquisitions and organic growth. We must raise cash to implement our strategy to grow and expand per our business plan. We anticipate over the next 12 months the cost of being a reporting public company will be approximately $250,000.

 

We are currently issuing shares under the S-1 offering but expect to raise additional proceeds with debt securities, and/or more loans, however if sufficient funding is not available, we would be required to cease business operations. As a result, investors would lose all of their investment. Under the terms of our credit agreement with TCA, all potential new investments must first be reviewed and approved by TCA, which may constrain our options for new fundraising. However, we have been in contact with the receiver for the TCA management companies and funds and do not expect any such objections over investment opportunities.

 

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We anticipate our short-term liquidity needs to be approximately $8,200,000 which will be used to satisfy certain of our existing current liabilities and we expect gross profits of approximately $500,000. To meet these needs, we intend to complete our equity financing and refinance or restructure certain existing liabilities. Once this is completed, and we implement our sales and marketing plan to sell UAV products, we anticipate minimal long-term liquidity needs which we expect to meet through equity financing or short-term borrowings.

 

Additionally, we will have to meet all the financial disclosure and reporting requirements associated with being a publicly reporting company. Our management will have to spend additional time on policies and procedures to make sure it is compliant with various regulatory requirements, especially that of Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002. This additional corporate governance time required of management could limit the amount of time management has to implement the business plan and may impede the speed of its operations.

 

The following is a summary of the Company’s cash flows provided by (used in) operating, investing and financing activities:

 

   Year Ended
September 30,
2022
   Year Ended
September 30,
2021
 
Net Cash Used in Operating Activities  $(1,644,132)  $(1,576,648)
Net Cash Used in Investing Activities  $-   $(44,650)
Net Cash Provided by Financing Activities  $844,565   $2,443,237 
Net (Decrease) Increase in Cash  $(799,567)  $821,939 

 

2022, Net cash used in operating activities of $1,644,132, is largely the result of net losses of $2,673,346, partially offset by net gain on debt extinguishment of $370,075 and increases in current liabilities $590,000.

 

2022, Cash provided by financing activities is largely the result of stock sales for cash of approximately $700,000 and cash received from issuance of convertible notes totaling $101,000, and other financing of $390,000 somewhat offset by repayments of various debts including fee notes and other financing arrangements at Howco having a net repayment of approximately $346,000.

 

Results of Operations

 

Year Ended September 30, 2022 and 2021

 

We generated sales of $2,466,198 and $2,422,996 for the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. For the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, we reported cost of goods sold of $2,048,173 and $1,553,516, respectively. The increase in sales is related to increased sales of drones. Cost of goods sold for the 2022 period is higher primarily due to decreased packaging services and greater sales of products at Howco.

 

For the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, we reported selling, general, and administrative expenses of $2,180,288 as compared to $2,834,856, an decrease of approximately $655,000 or 23%. For the year ended September 30, 2022, selling, general, and administrative expenses consist primarily of professional and consulting fees of approximately $822,000, payroll costs of approximately $1,082,000, and other expenses of approximately $276,000, including rent of approximately $73,000. For the year ended September 30, 2021, selling, general, and administrative expenses consist primarily of professional and consulting fees of approximately $905,000, payroll costs of approximately $1,549,000, other expenses of approximately $380,000, rent of approximately $67,000, and travel related costs of approximately $33,000. For the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, payroll costs and professional consulting fees included stock-based compensation of approximately $69,000 and $251,000, respectively. The decrease in selling, general, and administrative costs for the 2022 periods is primarily due to the decreases in professional fees of approximately $83,000 and compensation costs of approximately $468,000.

 

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For the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, depreciation expense amounted to approximately $0 and $7,000, respectively, amortization of intangibles amounted to $8,931, and $0, respectively. The related intangible asset was determined to be impaired and was written off. Depreciation, amortization and the impairment write-off are included in Operating Expenses in the consolidated statement of operations.

 

For the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, interest and financing costs amounted to approximately $1,221,000 and $1,440,000, respectively. The decrease in interest and financing costs is due primarily to the settlement of debt for cash and through conversions.

 

Fair market value loss of $8,710 during the year ended September 30, 2022, compares to the loss of $5,916 during the 2021 fiscal year.

 

During the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021 the Company incurred net gains on debt extinguishment of approximately $370,000 and approximately $1,537,000, respectively.

 

The above items resulted in total Other (Income) and Expenses of $866,433 for fiscal year 2022 compared to ($90,679) for fiscal 2021.

 

As a result, we reported a net loss of $2,673,346 and $1,882,071, for the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively.

 

Including the dividend of $584,072 related to the temporary equity, the net loss attributed to common shareholders was $3,257,418. There was no temporary equity with a related dividend in fiscal 2021.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the recoverability of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business.

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the recoverability of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. For the year ended September 30, 2022, the Company has incurred a net loss of $2,673,346 and used cash in operations of $1,644,132. The working capital deficit, stockholders’ deficit and accumulated deficit was $15,800,583, $16,578,533 and $35,630,186, respectively, at September 30, 2022. On September 6, 2019 the Company received a default notice on its payment obligations under the senior secured credit facility agreement, defaulted on its Note Payable – Seller in September 2017 and has since defaulted on other promissory notes. As of September 30, 2022 the Company has received demands for payment of past due amounts from several consultants and service providers. It is management’s opinion that these matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon management’s ability to further implement its business plan and raise additional capital as needed from the sales of stock or debt. The Company has continued to implement cost-cutting measures and restructuring or setting up payment plans with vendors and service providers and plans to raise equity through a private placement, and restructure or repay its secured obligations. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be required should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Off-Balance Sheet Arrangements

 

We do not have any off-balance sheet arrangements that have or are reasonably likely to have a current or future effect on our financial condition, changes in financial condition, revenues or expenses, results of operations, liquidity, capital expenditures or capital resources that are material to investors.

 

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Critical Accounting Policies and Significant Accounting Estimates

 

Our consolidated financial statements and accompanying notes have been prepared in accordance with United States generally accepted accounting principles applied on a consistent basis. The preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities, the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities at the date of the financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting periods.

 

We regularly evaluate the accounting policies and estimates that we use to prepare our consolidated financial statements. In general, management’s estimates are based on historical experience, and on various other assumptions that are believed to be reasonable under the facts and circumstances. Actual results could differ from those estimates made by management.

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates include the allowance for bad debt on accounts receivable, reserves on inventory, valuation of intangible assets for impairment analysis, valuation of the lease liability and related right-of-use asset, valuation of stock-based compensation, the valuation of derivative liabilities, valuation of redeemable preferred stock and the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets. 

 

We have identified the accounting policies below as critical to our business operations.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Trade receivables are recorded at net realizable value consisting of the carrying amount less the allowance for doubtful accounts, as needed. Factors used to establish an allowance include the credit quality of the customer and whether the balance is significant. The Company may also use the direct write-off method to account for uncollectible accounts that are not received. Using the direct write-off method, trade receivable balances are written off to bad debt expense when an account balance is deemed to be uncollectible.

 

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

 

The Company acquired a patent for a new product during the year ended September 30, 2021. The Company capitalized acquisition and related legal fees related to the patent totaling $44,650. The capitalized amount will be amortized over the next five years. Impairment will be tested annually or as indicators of impairment are available.

 

Long-Lived Assets

 

Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. Impairment is determined by comparing the carrying value of the long-lived assets to the estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to result from use of the assets and their ultimate disposition. In instances where impairment is determined to exist, the Company writes down the asset to its fair value based on the present value of estimated future cash flows.

 

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Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue From Contracts With Customers, which has a five-step process: a) Determine whether a contract exists; b) Identify the performance obligations; c) Determine the transaction price; d) Allocate the transaction price; and e) Recognize revenue when (or as) performance obligations are satisfied.

 

The Company sells a variety of products to government entities. The purchase order received specifies each item and its manufacturer; the Company only needs to fulfill the performance obligation by shipping the specified items. No other performance obligations exist under the terms of the contracts. The Company recognizes revenue for the agreed upon sales price when the product is shipped to the customer, which satisfies the performance obligation.

 

During the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, the Company through its subsidiary Howco entered into contracts to package products for a third-party company servicing the same government customer base. The contracts were on job lot basis as shipped to Howco for packaging. The customer was billed upon completion each job lot at which time revenue was recognized.

 

The Company sells drones and related products manufactured by third parties to various parties, primarily local government entities. The Company also offers technical services related to drone utilization and performs other services. Contracts for drone related products and services sales will be evaluated using the five-step process outline above. There have been no material sales for drone products or other services for which full compliance with performance obligations has not been met. Upon significant sales for drone products and services and insulation jackets, the Company will disaggregate sales by these lines of business and within the lines of business to the extent that the product or service has different revenue recognition characteristics.

 

The Company began sales of sanitizing products and services during the year ended September 30, 2022. Revenue for this line of business is recognized upon shipment and delivery of training services (as applicable).

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of ASC 718 – “Compensation –Stock Compensation”, which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee or director is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The ASC also requires measurement of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company utilizes the Black-Sholes option pricing model and uses the simplified method to determine expected term because of lack of sufficient exercise history. Additionally, effective October 1, 2016, the Company adopted the Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-09 (“ASU 2016-09”), Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting. Among other changes, ASU 2016-09 permits the election of an accounting policy for forfeitures of share-based payment awards, either to recognize forfeitures as they occur or estimate forfeitures over the vesting period of the award. The Company has elected to recognize forfeitures as they occur and the cumulative impact of this change did not have any effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

As of October 1, 2018, the Company has early adopted ASU 2018-7 Compensation-Stock Compensation which conforms the accounting for non-employees to the accounting treatment for employees. The new standard replaces using a fair value as of each reporting date with use of the calculated fair value as of the grant date. The implementation of the standard provides for the use of the fair market value as of the adoption date, rather than using the value as of the original grant date. Therefore, the values calculated and reported at September 30, 2018 become a proxy for the grant date value. The Company utilizes the Black-Sholes option pricing model and uses the simplified method to determine expected term because of lack of sufficient exercise history. There was no cumulative effect on the adoption date.

 

Derivative Liabilities

 

The Company has certain financial instruments that are derivatives or contain embedded derivatives. The Company evaluates all its financial instruments to determine if those contracts or any potential embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for in accordance with ASC 810-10-05-4 and 815-40. This accounting treatment requires that the carrying amount of any derivatives be recorded at fair value at issuance and marked-to-market at each balance sheet date. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, as is the case with the Company, the change in the fair value during the period is recorded as either other income or expense. Upon conversion, exercise or repayment, the respective derivative liability is marked to fair value at the conversion, repayment or exercise date and then the related fair value amount is reclassified to other income or expense as part of gain or loss on extinguishment.

 

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Convertible Notes with Fixed Rate Conversion Options

 

The Company may enter into convertible notes, some of which contain, predominantly, fixed rate conversion features, whereby the outstanding principal and accrued interest may be converted by the holder, into common shares at a fixed discount to the market price of the common stock at the time of conversion. This results in a fair value of the convertible note being equal to a fixed monetary amount. The Company records the convertible note liability at its fixed monetary amount by measuring and recording a premium, as applicable, on the Note date with a charge to interest expense in accordance with ASC 480 – “Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity”.

 

Net Loss Per Share

 

Basic loss per share is calculated by dividing the loss attributable to stockholders by the weighted-average number of shares outstanding for the period. Diluted loss per share reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that shared in the earnings (loss) of the Company. Diluted loss per share is computed by dividing the loss available to stockholders by the weighted average number of shares outstanding for the period and dilutive potential shares outstanding unless such dilutive potential shares would result in anti-dilution.

 

Lease Accounting

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases , which requires lessees to report on their balance sheets a right-of-use asset and a lease liability in connection with most lease agreements classified as operating leases under the prior guidance (ASC Topic 840). Under the new guidance, codified as ASC Topic 842, the lease liability must be measured initially based on the present value of future lease payments, subject to certain conditions. The right-of-use asset must be measured initially based on the amount of the liability, plus certain initial direct costs. The new guidance further requires that leases be classified at inception as either (a) operating leases or (b) finance leases. For operating leases, periodic expense generally is flat (straight-line) throughout the life of the lease. For finance leases, periodic expense declines over the life of the lease. The new standard, as amended, provides an option for entities to use the cumulative-effect transition method. As permitted, the Company adopted ASC Topic 842 effective June 1, 2020. The adoption of ASC Topic 842 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

ITEM 7A. QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DISCLOSURES ABOUT MARKET RISK

 

Not Applicable.

 

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ITEM 8. FINANCIAL STATEMENTS AND SUPPLEMENTARY DATA

 

The information required by Item 8 is contained on pages F-1 through F-48 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

 

    Page
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS    
     
Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm (PCAOB Firm ID 106)   F-2
Consolidated Balance Sheets – As of September 30, 2022 and 2021   F-4
Consolidated Statements of Operations for the Years Ended September 30, 2022 and 2021   F-5
Consolidated Statements of Changes in Stockholders’ Deficit for the Years Ended September 30, 2022 and 2021   F-6
Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows for the Years Ended September 30, 2022 and 2021   F-7
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements   F-8

 

F-1

 

 

 

Report of Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm

 

To the Stockholders and the Board of Directors of:

Bantec, Inc.

 

Opinion on the Financial Statements

 

We have audited the accompanying consolidated balance sheets of Bantec, Inc. and Subsidiaries (the “Company”) as of September 30, 2022 and 2021, the related consolidated statements of operations, changes in stockholders’ deficit, and cash flows, for each of the two years in the period ended September 30, 2022, and the related notes (collectively referred to as the “consolidated financial statements”). In our opinion, the consolidated financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the consolidated financial position of the Company as of September 30, 2022 and 2021, and the consolidated results of its operations and its cash flows for each of the two years in the period ended September 30, 2022, in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming that the Company will continue as a going concern. As discussed in Note 2 to the consolidated financial statements, the Company has a net loss and cash used in operations of $2,673,346 and $1,644,132 respectively, in fiscal 2022, and has a working capital deficit, stockholders’ deficit and accumulated deficit of $15,800,583, $16,578,533 and $35,630,186, respectively at September 30, 2022. These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. Management’s Plan in regard to these matters is also described in Note 2. The consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might result from the outcome of this uncertainty.

 

Basis for Opinion

 

These consolidated financial statements are the responsibility of the Company’s management. Our responsibility is to express an opinion on the Company’s consolidated financial statements based on our audits. We are a public accounting firm registered with the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board (United States) (“PCAOB”) and are required to be independent with respect to the Company in accordance with the U.S. federal securities laws and the applicable rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission and the PCAOB.

 

We conducted our audits in accordance with the standards of the PCAOB. Those standards require that we plan and perform the audits to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the consolidated financial statements are free of material misstatement, whether due to error or fraud. The Company is not required to have, nor were we engaged to perform, an audit of internal control over financial reporting. As part of our audits we are required to obtain an understanding of internal control over financial reporting but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company’s internal control over financial reporting. Accordingly, we express no such opinion.

 

Our audits included performing procedures to assess the risks of material misstatement of the consolidated financial statements, whether due to error or fraud and performing procedures that respond to those risks. Such procedures included examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the consolidated financial statements. Our audits also included evaluating the accounting principles used and significant estimates made by management, as well as evaluating the overall presentation of the consolidated financial statements. We believe that our audits provide a reasonable basis for our opinion.

 

F-2

 

 

Critical Audit Matters

 

The critical audit matters communicated below are matters arising from the current period audit of the consolidated financial statements that were communicated or required to be communicated to the audit committee and that: (1) relate to accounts or disclosures that are material to the consolidated financial statements and (2) involved our especially challenging, subjective, or complex judgments. The communication of critical audit matters does not alter in any way our opinion on the consolidated financial statements, taken as a whole, and we are not, by communicating the critical audit matters below, providing separate opinions on the critical audit matters or on the accounts or disclosures to which they relate.

 

Presentation and Accounting for Convertible Series B Preferred Stock issued with Debt

 

As described in Footnote 11 “Notes and Loans Payable” and Footnote 12 “Temporary Equity”, on July 1, 2022, the Company entered into two separate Securities Purchase Agreements “SPA”. Under the terms of the SPA, each lender agreed to advance funds under a merchant financing arrangement. Each loan principal amount is $224,000, including legal fees of $5,000 and an OID of $24,000. The Company received net aggregate cash proceeds of $390,000. The Company agreed to issue 448,000 shares of the Company’s Series B Preferred Stock, and Warrants for the purchase of 2,240,000,000 shares of Common Stock as consideration for each advance agreement.

 

We identified the presentation and accounting for the Convertible Series B Preferred Stock discussed above as a critical audit matter. Auditing management’s analysis of the presentation, accounting treatment and valuation for the Convertible Series B Preferred Stock was complex and subjective.

 

The primary procedures we performed to address these critical audit matters included (a) Inspected and reviewed all relevant legal and other documents supporting the transactions, (b) Reviewed management’s process to determine the proper valuation (c) Obtained management’s analysis regarding the accounting treatment, valuation and presentation of the Convertible Series B Preferred Stock and (d) compared and tested management’s analysis against authoritative and interpretive literature. We agreed with management’s final conclusions.

 

/s/ Salberg & Company, P.A.

 

SALBERG & COMPANY, P.A.

We have served as the Company’s auditor since 2017.

Boca Raton, Florida

January 12, 2023

 

 

 

2295 NW Corporate Blvd., Suite 240 ● Boca Raton, FL 33431

Phone: (561) 995-8270 ● Toll Free: (866) CPA-8500 ● Fax: (561) 995-1920

www.salbergco.com ● info@salbergco.com

Member National Association of Certified Valuation Analysts ● Registered with the PCAOB

Member CPAConnect with Affiliated Offices Worldwide Member Center for Public Company Audit Firms

 

F-3

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEETS

 

   September 30,   September 30, 
   2022   2021 
         
ASSETS        
Current Assets        
Cash  $186,386   $985,953 
Accounts receivable   419,951    128,386 
Inventory   92,917    61,837 
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   4,663    28,882 
           
Total Current Assets   703,917    1,205,058 
           
Property and equipment, net   1,461    1,461 
Patents and other intangibles   
-
    44,650 
Right of use lease asset   33,568    85,747 
Other assets   
-
    119,670 
           
Total non-current assets   35,029    251,528 
           
Total Assets  $738,946   $1,456,586 
           
LIABILITIES AND STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT          
Current Liabilities:          
Accounts payable  $2,730,309   $2,667,110 
Accrued expenses and interest   5,094,394    4,316,258 
Convertible notes payable – net of discounts and premiums   7,422,326    7,662,640 
Note payable – seller   837,000    873,000 
Line of credit – bank   
-
    4,885 
Current portion notes and loans payable – net of discounts   217,897    170,036 
Notes payable – related party   13,537    
-
 
Settlement payable   154,562    42,850 
Lease liability – current portion   34,475    52,178 
Derivative liabilities   
-
    125,693 
           
Total Current Liabilities   16,504,500    15,914,650 
           
Long-term Liabilities:          
Notes and loans payable – net of current portion   127,539    303,202 
Lease liability, less current portion   
-
    34,812 
           
Total Long-term Liabilities   127,539    338,014 
           
Total Liabilities   16,632,039    16,252,664 
           
Temporary Equity – Convertible Preferred Stock Series B - $1.50 stated value, 1,000,000 shares designated and authorized, 448,000 issued and outstanding at September 30, 2022   685,440    
-
 
           
Commitments and Contingencies (Note 17)   
 
    
 
 
           
Stockholders’ Deficit:          
Preferred stock - $0.0001 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized, Series A preferred stock – no par value, 250 shares designated, issued and outstanding at September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021, respectively   
-
    
-
 
Common stock - $0.0001 par value,12,000,000,000 shares authorized, 4,407,320,832 and 2,470,510,585 shares issued and outstanding at September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021, respectively
   440,733    247,052 
Additional paid-in capital   18,610,920    17,913,710 
Accumulated deficit   (35,630,186)   (32,956,840)
           
Total Stockholders’ Deficit   (16,578,533)   (14,796,078)
           
Total Liabilities and Stockholders’ Deficit  $738,946   $1,456,586 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

F-4

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF OPERATIONS

 

   For the Years Ended 
   September 30, 
   2022   2021 
Sales  $2,466,198   $2,422,996 
           
Cost of Goods Sold   2,048,173    1,553,516 
           
Gross Profit   418,025    869,480 
           
Operating Expenses:          
Selling, general, and administrative expenses   2,180,288    2,834,856 
Intangibles impairment   35,719    
-
 
Depreciation and amortization   8,931    7,374 
           
Total Operating Expenses   2,224,938    2,842,430 
           
Loss Before Other (Income) Expense   (1,806,913)   (1,972,750)
           
Other (Income) Expense:          
Other expense   7,068    
-
 
Interest and financing costs   1,220,730    1,440,220 
(Gain) loss on debt extinguishment and settlements, net   (370,075)   (1,536,815)
Loss on change in fair market value of derivative   8,710    5,916 
           
Total Other (Income) Expense   866,433    (90,679)
           
Net Loss before Provision for Income Tax   (2,673,346)   (1,882,071)
           
Provision for Income Tax   
-
    
-
 
           
Net Loss  $(2,673,346)  $(1,882,071)
           
Dividends Attributable to Series B Preferred Stock   584,072    
-
 
           
Net Loss Attributable to Common Stockholders  $(3,257,418)  $(1,882,071)
           
Basic and Diluted Loss Per Share
  $(0.00)  $(0.00)
           
Weighted Average Number of Common Shares Outstanding:          
Basic and diluted
   3,424,570,305    1,425,249,598 

  

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

F-5

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CHANGES IN STOCKHOLDERS’ DEFICIT

For the Years Ended September 30, 2022 and 2021

 

   Series A
Preferred Stock
   Common Stock   Additional
Paid-in
   Accumulated   Total
Stockholders’
 
   Shares   Amount   Shares   Amount   Capital   Deficit   Deficit 
                             
Balance – September 30, 2020   250   $
         -
    491,032,439   $49,104   $13,080,692   $(31,074,769)  $(17,944,973)
                                    
Share option expense   -    
-
    -    
-
    82,308    
-
    82,308 
                                    
Shares issued to employees   -    
-
    11,000,000    1,100    76,300    
-
    77,400 
                                    
Shares issued to non-employees for services   -    
-
    20,000,000    2,000    146,000    
-
    148,000 
                                    
Shares issued for legal settlement   -    
-
    36,821,330    3,682    115,988    
-
    119,670 
                                    
Shares issued for cash   -    
-
    1,393,006,910    139,299    2,944,631    
-
    3,083,930 
                                    
Shares issued for conversions of notes and accrued interest including premiums reclassified   -    
-
    518,649,906    51,867    1,467,791    
-
    1,519,658 
                                    
Net loss   -    
-
    -    
-
    
-
    (1,882,071)   (1,882,071)
Balance – September 30, 2021   250    
-
    2,470,510,585    247,052    17,913,710    (32,956,840)   (14,796,078)
                                    
Share option expense   -    
-
    -    
-
    69,108    
-
    69,108 
                                    
Cancellation of common stock issued for settlement   -    
-
    (36,821,330)   (3,682)   (115,988)   
-
    (119,670)
                                    
Shares issued for cash   -    
-
    849,313,000    84,931    614,658    
-
    699,589 
                                    
Shares issued for conversions of notes and accrued interest including premiums reclassified   -    
-
    1,124,318,577    112,432    513,117    
-
    625,549 
                                    
Relative fair value of warrants issued with debt   -    
-
    -    
-
    200,387    
-
    200,387 
                                    
Deemed dividend to adjust temporary equity to redemption value   -    
-
    -    
-
    (570,632)   
-
    (570,632)
                                    
Preferred Stock Series B dividend   -    -    -    -    (13,440)   -    (13,440)
                                    
Net loss   -    
-
    -    
-
    
-
    (2,673,346)   (2,673,346)
                                    
Balance – September 30, 2022   250   $
-
    4,407,320,832   $440,733   $18,610,920   $(35,630,186)  $(16,578,533)

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements.

 

F-6

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

CONSOLIDATED STATEMENTS OF CASH FLOWS

 

   For the Years Ended 
   September 30, 
   2022   2021 
Cash Flows from Operating Activities:        
Net loss  $(2,673,346)  $(1,882,071)
Adjustments to reconcile net loss to net cash used in operating activities:          
Share-based compensation and other expenses   69,108    250,709 
Stock based fee, upon conversion of notes   9,884    6,830 
Depreciation & amortization of intangibles   8,931    7,374 
Write-off of impaired intangible   35,719    
-
 
Amortization of debt discounts   157,446    183,992 
Accretion of premium on convertible note   258,557    407,186 
Net gain on settlement of accounts payable and accrued expenses   
-
    (31,479)
Net (gain) loss on debt extinguishments   (370,075)   (1,505,336)
Non-cash rent expense   (336)   848 
Fee notes issued   196,000    62,500 
Loss on change in fair market value of derivative   8,710    5,916 
Loan fee expense   
-
    2,670 
Changes in Operating Assets and Liabilities:          
Accounts receivable   (291,565)   221,003 
Inventory   (31,080)   (17,238)
Prepaid expenses and other current assets   24,219    6,521 
Accounts payable and accrued expenses and interest   961,654    703,927 
Settlements payable   (7,958)   
-
 
           
Cash Used in Operating Activities   (1,644,132)   (1,576,648)
           
Cash Flows from Investing Activities:          
Purchase of Patent (Intangible)   
-
    (44,650)
           
Cash Used in Investing Activities   
-
    (44,650)
           
Cash Flows from Financing Activities:          
Proceeds from stock sales   699,589    3,083,930 
Proceeds from convertible notes payable   101,250    487,500 
Repayments of convertible notes payable   (122,766)   (18,000)
Proceeds from loans and notes payable   390,000    752,382 
Repayments on loans and notes payable   (232,763)   (880,624)
Repayment of line of credit   (4,885)   (36,724)
Proceeds notes payable – related party   125,000    190,000 
Repayment of notes payable – related party   (110,860)   (190,000)
Proceeds from short-term advances – related party   
-
    60,400 
Repayments short-term advances related party   
-
    (60,400)
Repayment of loans and line of credit – related parties   
-
    (945,227)
           
Cash Provided by Financing Activities   844,565    2,443,237 
           
Net Increase (Decrease) in Cash   (799,567)   821,939 
Cash – beginning of year   985,953    164,014 
Cash – end of year  $186,386   $985,953 
           
Supplemental Disclosures of Cash Flow Information:          
Cash paid for:          
Interest  $37,551   $501,690 
Taxes  $
-
   $
-
 
Supplemental Disclosures of Noncash financing and investing activities:          
           
Original issue discounts notes  $65,500   $180,533 
Issuance of common stock for note conversions  $374,501   $822,545 
Issuance of common stock for accrued interest of note  $18,744   $60,298 
Reclassification of debt premium upon note conversions  $222,420   $629,984 
Issuance of common stock for accrued salary  $
-
   $57,000 
Deemed dividend to adjust temporary equity to redemption value  $570,632   $- 
Issuance of convertible preferred stock charged to debt discounts  $101,368  $
-
 
Dividend on convertible preferred stock  $13,440   $
-
 
Warrants for common stock issued  $200,387   $
-
 
Issuance/(cancellation) of common stock for potential legal settlement  $(119,670)  $119,670 
Issuance of convertible note for accounts payable  $

4,000

   $
-
 

 

See accompanying notes to consolidated financial statements

 

F-7

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

  

NOTE 1 – NATURE OF OPERATIONS

 

Bantec, Inc. is a product and service company targeting the U.S. Government, state governments, municipalities, hospitals, universities, manufacturers and other building owners. Bantec also provides product procurement, distribution, and logistics services through its wholly-owned subsidiary, Howco Distributing Co., (“Howco”) (collectively, the “Company”) to the United States Department of Defense and Defense Logistics Agency. The Company established Bantec Sanitizing in fiscal 2021, which offers sanitizing products and equipment through its new store bantec.store. Bantec Sanitizing is currently offering Bantec Sanitizing franchises for sale. The Company has operations based in Little Falls, New Jersey and Vancouver, Washington. The Company continues to seek strategic acquisitions and partnerships that offer us an opportunity to grow sales and profit.

 

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES AND GOING CONCERN

 

Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation

 

The Company prepares its consolidated financial statements in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles (“GAAP”). The accompanying consolidated financial statements include the accounts of Bantec, Inc. and its wholly-owned subsidiaries, Drone USA, LLC, Bantec Construction, LLC, Bantec Sanitizing, LLC, Bantec Logistics LLC and Howco. Bantec Construction, LLC, Bantec Logistics LLC and Bantec Sanitizing, LLC are in start-up stages with minor revenues and cash expenditures. All significant intercompany accounts and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. On October 28, 2021, the Wyoming Secretary of State approved the application to create Bantec Logistics, LLC which includes a new line of business focused on drone package delivery logistics and other delivery methods.

 

Going Concern

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been prepared assuming the Company will continue as a going concern, which contemplates the recoverability of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business. For the year ended September 30, 2022, the Company has incurred a net loss of $2,673,346 and used cash in operations of $1,644,132. The working capital deficit, stockholders’ deficit and accumulated deficit was $15,800,583, $16,578,533 and $35,630,186, respectively, at September 30, 2022. On September 6, 2019 the Company received a default notice on its payment obligations under the senior secured credit facility agreement (see Note 10), defaulted on its Note Payable – Seller in September 2017 and has since defaulted on other promissory notes. As of September 30, 2022 the Company has received demands for payment of past due amounts from several consultants and service providers. It is management’s opinion that these matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a period of twelve months from the issuance date of this report. The ability of the Company to continue as a going concern is dependent upon management’s ability to further implement its business plan and raise additional capital as needed from the sales of stock or debt. The Company has continued to implement cost-cutting measures and restructuring or setting up payment plans with vendors and service providers and plans to raise equity through a private placement, and restructure or repay its secured obligations. The accompanying consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments that might be required should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of consolidated financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosures of contingent liabilities at the date of the consolidated financial statements and the reported amounts of revenues and expenses during the reporting period. Actual results could differ from those estimates. Significant estimates include the allowance for bad debt on accounts receivable, reserves on inventory, valuation of intangible assets for impairment analysis, valuation of the lease liability and related right-of-use asset, valuation of stock-based compensation, the valuation of derivative liabilities, valuation of redeemable preferred stock and the valuation allowance on deferred tax assets.

 

Fair Value Measurements

 

The Company follows the FASB Fair Value Measurements standard, as they apply to its financial instruments. This standard defines fair value, outlines a framework for measuring fair value, and details the required disclosures about fair value measurements. 

 

F-8

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

Fair value is defined as the price that would be received to sell an asset, or paid to transfer a liability, in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The standard establishes a hierarchy in determining the fair value of an asset or liability. The fair value hierarchy has three levels of inputs, both observable and unobservable. Level 1 inputs include quoted market prices for identical assets or liabilities in an active market that the Company has the ability to access at the measurement date. Level 2 inputs are market data, other than Level 1, that are observable either directly or indirectly. Level 2 inputs include quoted market prices for similar assets or liabilities, quoted market prices in an inactive market, and other observable information that can be corroborated by market data. Level 3 inputs are unobservable and corroborated by little or no market data. The standard requires the utilization of the lowest possible level of input to determine fair value and carrying amounts of current liabilities approximate fair value due to their short-term nature. The Company accounts for certain instruments at fair value using level 3 valuation.

 

   At September 30, 2022   At September 30, 2021 
Description  Level 1   Level 2   Level 3   Level 1   Level 2   Level 3 
Derivative Liability   
-
    
-
   $
-
    
-
    
-
   $125,693 

 

A roll-forward of the level 3 valuation financial instruments is as follows:

 

   Derivative
Liabilities
 
Balance at September 30, 2020  $128,628 
Gain on debt extinguishment upon conversion of related note payable   (8,851)
Derivative expense   5,916 
Balance at September 30, 2021  $125,693 
Change in fair market value of warrant   8,710 
Surrender of warrants   (134,403)
Balance at September 30, 2022  $
-
 

 

The warrants were issued to a convertible note holder in November and December 2017 and initially determined to be equity instruments and recorded as note discount and as additional paid in capital. On June 4, 2018 the anti-dilutive provision of the warrants took effect and based on the new conversion formula management determined the warrant became a derivative liability and reclassified the Fair Value on June 4, 2018 from additional paid-in capital to derivative liability with fair market value changes recognized in operations for each reporting date. The derivative liability associated with the warrants has been extinguished on July 1, 2022 by the terms of the agreement made by the holder with the SEC and the fair value was recorded as a gain on extinguishment during fiscal 2022.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

Cash equivalents consist of liquid investments with maturities of three months or less at the time of purchase. There are no cash equivalents at the balance sheet dates.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Trade receivables are recorded at net realizable value consisting of the carrying amount less the allowance for doubtful accounts, as needed. Factors used to establish an allowance include the credit quality of the customer and whether the balance is significant. The Company may also use the direct write-off method to account for uncollectible accounts that are not received. Using the direct write-off method, trade receivable balances are written off to bad debt expense when an account balance is deemed to be uncollectible.

 

Inventory

 

Inventory consists of finished goods, which are purchased directly from manufacturers. The Company utilizes a just in time type of inventory system where products are ordered from the vendor only when the Company has received sales order from its customers. Inventory is stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value on a first-in, first-out basis.

 

Property & Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost and depreciated over their estimated useful lives. Maintenance and repairs are charged to expense as incurred. When assets are retired or disposed of, the cost and accumulated depreciation are removed from the accounts, and any resulting gains or losses are included in income in the year of disposition. The Company examines the possibility of decreases in the value of these assets when events or changes in circumstances reflect the fact that their recorded value may not be recoverable. The assets are fully operational drones used as demonstration units and each unit exceeds management’s threshold for capitalization of $2,000. The Company depreciates these demonstration units over a period of 3 years. Depreciation expense was $0 and $7,374 in year ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively. No depreciation was recognized during the year ended September 30, 2022, as the related equipment was depreciated to salvageable value as of September 30, 2021. Management believes that the salvageable value of $1,461 is an adequate representation of the value of the demonstration drones at September 30, 2022.

 

F-9

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

Goodwill and Intangible Assets

 

The Company acquired a patent for a new product during the year ended September 30, 2021. The Company capitalized acquisition and related legal fees related to the patent totaling $44,650. The capitalized amount will be amortized over five years. Impairment will be tested annually or as indicators of impairment are available. (see Note 5)

 

Long-Lived Assets

 

Long-lived assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable. Impairment is determined by comparing the carrying value of the long-lived assets to the estimated undiscounted future cash flows expected to result from use of the assets and their ultimate disposition. In instances where impairment is determined to exist, the Company writes down the asset to its fair value based on the present value of estimated future cash flows.

 

Deferred Financing Costs

 

All unamortized deferred financing costs related to the Company’s borrowings are presented in the consolidated balance sheets as a direct deduction from the related debt. Amortization of these costs is reported as interest and financing costs included in the consolidated statement of operations.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company follows Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 606, Revenue From Contracts With Customers, which has a five-step process: a) Determine whether a contract exists; b) Identify the performance obligations; c) Determine the transaction price; d) Allocate the transaction price; and e) Recognize revenue when (or as) performance obligations are satisfied.

 

The Company sells a variety of products to government entities. The purchase order received specifies each item and its manufacturer; the Company only needs to fulfill the performance obligation by shipping the specified items. No other performance obligations exist under the terms of the contracts. The Company recognizes revenue for the agreed upon sales price when the product is shipped to the customer, which satisfies the performance obligation.

 

During the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, the Company through its subsidiary Howco entered into contracts to package products for a third-party company servicing the same government customer base. The contracts were on job lot basis as shipped to Howco for packaging. The customer was billed upon completion each job lot at which time revenue was recognized.

 

The Company sells drones and related products manufactured by third parties to various parties, primarily local government entities. The Company also offers technical services related to drone utilization and performs other services. Contracts for drone related products and services sales will be evaluated using the five-step process outline above. There have been no material sales for drone products or other services for which full compliance with performance obligations has not been met. Upon significant sales for drone products and services and insulation jackets, the Company will disaggregate sales by these lines of business and within the lines of business to the extent that the product or service has different revenue recognition characteristics.

 

The Company began sales of sanitizing products and services during the year ended September 30, 2022. Revenue for this line of business is recognized upon shipment and delivery of training services (as applicable).

 

Stock-based compensation

 

Stock-based compensation is accounted for based on the requirements of ASC 718 – “Compensation –Stock Compensation”, which requires recognition in the financial statements of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments over the period the employee or director is required to perform the services in exchange for the award (presumptively, the vesting period). The ASC also requires measurement of the cost of employee and director services received in exchange for an award based on the grant-date fair value of the award. The Company utilizes the Black-Sholes option pricing model and uses the simplified method to determine expected term because of lack of sufficient exercise history. Additionally, effective October 1, 2016, the Company adopted the Accounting Standards Update No. 2016-09 (“ASU 2016-09”), Improvements to Employee Share-Based Payment Accounting. Among other changes, ASU 2016-09 permits the election of an accounting policy for forfeitures of share-based payment awards, either to recognize forfeitures as they occur or estimate forfeitures over the vesting period of the award. The Company has elected to recognize forfeitures as they occur and the cumulative impact of this change did not have any effect on the Company’s consolidated financial statements and related disclosures.

 

F-10

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

As of October 1, 2018, the Company has early adopted ASU 2018-7 Compensation-Stock Compensation which conforms the accounting for non-employees to the accounting treatment for employees. The new standard replaces using a fair value as of each reporting date with use of the calculated fair value as of the grant date. The implementation of the standard provides for the use of the fair market value as of the adoption date, rather than using the value as of the original grant date. Therefore, the values calculated and reported at September 30, 2018 become a proxy for the grant date value. The Company utilizes the Black-Sholes option pricing model and uses the simplified method to determine expected term because of lack of sufficient exercise history. There was no cumulative effect on the adoption date.

 

Shipping and Handling Costs

 

The Company has included freight-out as a component of cost of sales, which amounted to $61,032 and $47,716 for the year ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively.

 

Convertible Notes with Fixed Rate Conversion Options

 

The Company may enter into convertible notes, some of which contain, predominantly, fixed rate conversion features, whereby the outstanding principal and accrued interest may be converted by the holder, into common shares at a fixed discount to the market price of the common stock at the time of conversion. This results in a fair value of the convertible note being equal to a fixed monetary amount. The Company records the convertible note liability at its fixed monetary amount by measuring and recording a premium, as applicable, on the Note date with a charge to interest expense in accordance with ASC 480 - “Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity”.

 

Derivative Liabilities

 

The Company has certain financial instruments that are derivatives or contain embedded derivatives. The Company evaluates all its financial instruments to determine if those contracts or any potential embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivatives to be separately accounted for in accordance with ASC 810-10-05-4 and 815-40. This accounting treatment requires that the carrying amount of any derivatives be recorded at fair value at issuance and marked-to-market at each balance sheet date. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, as is the case with the Company, the change in the fair value during the period is recorded as either other income or expense. Upon conversion, exercise or repayment, the respective derivative liability is marked to fair value at the conversion, repayment or exercise date and then the related fair value amount is reclassified to other income or expense as part of gain or loss on extinguishment.

 

Lease Accounting

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases , which requires lessees to report on their balance sheets a right-of-use asset and a lease liability in connection with most lease agreements classified as operating leases under the prior guidance (ASC Topic 840). Under the new guidance, codified as ASC Topic 842, the lease liability must be measured initially based on the present value of future lease payments, subject to certain conditions. The right-of-use asset must be measured initially based on the amount of the liability, plus certain initial direct costs. The new guidance further requires that leases be classified at inception as either (a) operating leases or (b) finance leases. For operating leases, periodic expense generally is flat (straight-line) throughout the life of the lease. For finance leases, periodic expense declines over the life of the lease. The new standard, as amended, provides an option for entities to use the cumulative-effect transition method. As permitted, the Company adopted ASC Topic 842 effective June 1, 2020. The adoption of ASC Topic 842 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

The Company’s subsidiary has renewed the lease for the warehouse and office facility in Vancouver, Washington in May 2020 effective June 1, 2020, which extends through May 30, 2023, and is accounted for under ASC 842. The corporate office is an annual arrangement which provides for a single office in a shared office environment and is exempt from ASC 842 treatment. During the year ended September 30, 2020 the Company recognized a lease liability of $156,554 and the related right-of-use asset for the same amount and will amortize both over the life of the lease.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company’s current provision for income taxes is based upon its estimated taxable income in each of the jurisdictions in which it operates, after considering the impact on taxable income of temporary differences resulting from different treatment of items for tax and financial reporting purposes. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases and any operating loss or tax credit carryforwards. Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured using enacted tax rates expected to apply to taxable income in the year in which those temporary differences are expected to be recovered or settled. The ultimate realization of deferred tax assets is dependent upon the generation of future taxable income in those periods in which temporary differences become deductible. Should management determine that it is more likely than not that some portion of the deferred tax assets will not be realized, a valuation allowance against the deferred tax assets would be established in the period such determination was made. The Company follows the accounting for uncertainty in income taxes guidance, which clarifies the accounting and disclosures for uncertainty in income taxes recognized in the Company’s financial statements and prescribes a recognition threshold and measurement attribute for the financial statement recognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return. It also provides guidance on derecognition and measurement of a tax position taken or expected to be taken in a tax return.

 

F-11

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

The Company currently has no federal or state tax examinations in progress. As of September 30, 2022, the Company’s tax returns for the tax years 2021, 2020 and 2019 remain subject to audit, primarily by the Internal Revenue Service. The income tax returns for the tax year 2022 are on extension and have not yet been filed.

 

The Company did not have material unrecognized tax benefits as of September 30, 2022 and 2021 and does not expect this to change significantly over the next 12 months. The Company will recognize interest and penalties accrued on any unrecognized tax benefits as a component of the provision for income taxes.

 

Net Loss Per Share

 

Basic loss per share is calculated by dividing the loss attributable to stockholders by the weighted-average number of shares outstanding for the period. Diluted loss per share reflects the potential dilution that could occur if securities or other contracts to issue common stock were exercised or converted into common stock or resulted in the issuance of common stock that shared in the earnings (loss) of the Company. Diluted loss per share is computed by dividing the loss available to stockholders by the weighted average number of shares outstanding for the period and dilutive potential shares outstanding unless such dilutive potential shares would result in anti-dilution. As of September 30, 2022, 16,423 options were outstanding, warrants to purchase 2,240,000,000 shares of common stock were outstanding and exercisable. There are 448,000 shares of Series B Preferred Stock outstanding which are convertible into 4,480,000,000 shares of common stock at September 30, 2022. Additionally, as of September 30, 2022, the outstanding principal balance, including accrued interest of the third-party convertible debt, totaled $8,405,055 and was convertible into 31,756,035,787 shares of common stock. The total potentially dilutive shares calculated is 38,476,052,210. It should be noted that contractually the limitations on the third-party notes (and the related warrant) limit the number of shares converted to either 4.99% or 9.99% of the then outstanding shares. The Company’s CEO holds a control block of Series A Preferred Stock which confers upon him a majority vote in all Company matters including authorization of additional common shares or to reverse split the stock. The Company has filed a Pre 14C to effect the reverse stock split outlined below. Following that reverse split the shortfall in available stock will be remedied. As of September 30, 2022, and 2021, potentially dilutive securities consisted of the following:

 

   September 30,
2022
   September 30,
2021
 
Stock options   16,423    17,223 
Warrants   2,240,000,000    42,777,527 
Series B Preferred Stock   4,480,000,000    
-
 
Third party convertible debt (including senior debt)   31,756,035,787    2,549,848,072 
Total   38,476,052,210    2,592,642,822 

 

Effect of the Planned Reverse Split (Unaudited)

 

On December 15, 2022 the Company filed Form PRE 14C to effect a reverse split of between 1:500 and 1:1,000 shares of common stock. The Company expects approval in January 2023. The table below shows the Losses Per Share prior to the reverse split and following the reverse split. A key assumption to the earnings per share calculation is that post-reverse split price is equal to the pre-reverse split times the number of shares from the ratio. For example: pre-reverse split price of $0.003 times the reverse split of 1,000 is equal to $0.30.

 

   Year Ended
September 30,
2022
   Year Ended
September 30,
2021
 
Net losses available to common stockholders  $3,257,418   $1,882,071 
Current Weighted Average Shares Outstanding   3,424,570,305    1,425,249,598 
Loss Per Share  $0.0009   $0.001 
Post Reverse Split Effected          
Shares Outstanding   3,424,570    1,425,250 
Loss Per Share  $0.958   $1.32 

 

F-12

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

The assumption inherent in the table above is a reverse split of 1:1000.

 

The table below shows the earnings per share effect of reverse stock splits at 1:500, 1:750 and 1:1,000:

 

Split Ratio  1:500   1:750   1:1,000 
   Year Ended
September 30,
2022
   Year Ended
September 30,
2021
   Year Ended
September 30,
2022
   Year Ended
September 30,
2021
   Year Ended
September 30,
2022
   Year Ended
September 30,
2021
 
Net losses available to common stockholders  $3,257,418   $1,882,071   $3,257,418   $1,882,071   $3,257,418   $1,882,071 
Weighted Average Shares Outstanding   6,849,418    2,850,499    4,566,094    1,900,333    3,424,570    1,425,250 
Loss per share  $0.48   $0.66   $0.71   $0.99   $0.95   $1.32 

 

Segment Reporting

 

The Company uses “the management approach” in determining reportable operating segments. The management approach considers the internal organization and reporting used by the Company’s chief operating decision maker for making operating decisions and assessing performance as the source for determining the Company’s reportable segments. The Company’s chief operating decision maker is the chief executive officer of the Company, who reviews operating results to make decisions about allocating resources and assessing performance for the entire Company. As of September 30, 2022, the Company has three operating segments. Howco generates 94% of the consolidated sales which are primarily from department of defense. Drone LLC generated 6% of sales primarily to state and municipal government purchases of drones and accessories. Bantec Sanitizing Inc. had less than 1% of consolidated sales of its sanitizing products. Howco has 68% of the consolidated tangible assets, Drone has no allocated assets and Bantec Sanitizing Inc. has 4% of consolidated asset. The parent company has 29% of the consolidated tangible assets. and Additionally, there are no formal cost allocations to Howco or the other subsidiaries.

 

Management decisions about allocation of working capital and other assets are based on sales, inventory and operating costs, with no formal processes in place.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

On August 5, 2020, the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB) issued accounting standards update (ASU) No. 2020-06, Debt—Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging—Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40).

 

The amendments in the ASU remove certain separation models for convertible debt instruments and convertible preferred stock that require the separation of a convertible debt instrument into a debt component and an equity or derivative component. The ASU also amends the derivative scope exception guidance for contracts in an entity’s own equity. The amendments remove three settlement conditions that are required for equity contracts to qualify for the derivative scope exception.

 

In addition to the above, the ASU expands disclosure requirements for convertible instruments and simplifies areas of the guidance for diluted earnings-per-share calculations that are impacted by the amendments.

 

F-13

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

The ASU is effective for public business entities that meet the definition of a Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) filer, excluding smaller reporting companies as defined by the SEC, for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021. Early adoption is permitted. The FASB noted that an entity should adopt the guidance as of the beginning of its annual fiscal year. The standard is effective for the Company beginning in fiscal year September 30, 2024.

 

Entities may elect to adopt the amendments through either a modified retrospective method of transition or a fully retrospective method of transition. If an entity has convertible instruments that include a down round feature, early adoption of the ASU is permitted for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020.

 

ASU 2016-13 Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instrument is effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. This is not expected to apply to the Company.

 

In May 2021, the FASB issued ASU 2021-04, Earnings Per Share (Topic 260), Debt-Modifications and Extinguishments (Subtopic 470-50), Compensation-Stock Compensation (Topic 718), and Derivatives and Hedging-Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40). The new ASU addresses issuer’s accounting for certain modifications or exchanges of freestanding equity-classified written call options. This amendment is effective for all entities, for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, including interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact this new guidance will have on its financial statements.

 

The Company does not believe that any other recently issued but not yet effective accounting pronouncements, if adopted, would have a material effect on the accompanying consolidated financial statements.

 

NOTE 3 - ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE

 

The Company’s accounts receivable at September 30, 2022 and 2021 is as follow:

 

   September 30,
2022
   September 30,
2021
 
Accounts receivable  $419,951   $128,386 
Reserve for doubtful accounts   
-
    
-
 
   $419,951   $128,386 

 

Bad debt expense was $0 for the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021.

 

NOTE 4 - INVENTORY

 

At September 30, 2022 and 2021, inventory consists of finished goods and was valued at $92,917 and $61,837, respectively. No inventory reserve was deemed necessary at September 30, 2022 or 2021.

 

NOTE 5 - INTANGIBLE ASSETS

 

The Company acquired a patent for a new product during the year ended September 30, 2021. The Company capitalized acquisition and related legal fees related to the patent totaling $44,650. During the year ended September 30, 2022, amortization amounted to $8,931, however the net carrying value of the patent of $35,719, was determined to be impaired in 2022 and charged to Operating expenses.

 

NOTE 6 - LINE OF CREDIT - BANK

 

The Company has a revolving line of credit with a financial institution, which balance is due on demand and principal payments are due monthly at 1/60 th of the outstanding principal balance. This revolving line of credit is in the amount of $50,000, and is personally guaranteed by the Company’s Chief Executive Officer (“CEO”). The line bears interest at a fluctuating rate equal to the prime rate plus 4.25%, which at September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021 was 10.5% and 7.5%, respectively. As of September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, the balance of the line of credit was $0 and $4,885, with $50,000, available at September 30, 2022.

 

F-14

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

NOTE 7 - SETTLEMENTS PAYABLE

 

On July 20, 2018, the Company entered into a settlement agreement with a collection agent for American Express relating to $127,056 of past due charges. The agreement provides for initial payment of $12,706, monthly payments of $6,500 and final payment on January 27, 2020 of $3,850. Under the terms of the agreement, this debt is in default. On June 27, 2022, the Company entered into an agreement for the balance and the other losses were $7,042 for collection fees. Under the agreement established $5,000 per month is being paid by the Company. The amount due at September 30, 2022 and 2021, was $34,892 and $42,850, respectively.

 

During the year ended September 30, 2022, $119,670 was reclassified from other assets to equity upon the cancellation of the 36,821,330 shares and a liability, previously recorded is included in the settlement payable balance (see Note 17). The total amounts due at September 30, 2022, and 2021, was $154,562, and $42,850, respectively. 

 

NOTE 8 - NOTE PAYABLE – SELLER

 

In connection with the acquisition of Howco in September 2016, the Company issued a note payable in the amount of $900,000 to the sellers of Howco. The note matured on September 9, 2017 and bears interest at 5.50% per annum. The note requires payment of unpaid principal and interest upon maturity. The note is secured by all assets of Howco Distribution Co. and subordinated to the Senior Secured Credit Facility discussed below. The note is currently in default and the default interest rate is 8% per annum. At September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021, the principal and accrued interest on this note amounted to $837,000, $409,063 and $873,000, and $340,663, respectively. (see Note 17)

 

NOTE 9 - CONVERTIBLE AND PROMISSORY NOTES PAYABLE – RELATED PARTY OFFICER AND HIS AFFILIATES

 

The related party officer and his affiliates convertible and other notes balance consisted of the following at September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021:

 

   September 30,
2022
   September 30,
2021
 
Principal  $13,537   $
             -
 
Long term  $13,527   $
-
 

 

Convertible Notes

 

The Company has a $840,000 convertible note payable (“Note 1”) to a related party entity controlled by the Company’s CEO. Note 1 bear interest at an annual rate of 7% with an original maturity date of June 11, 2017, which has been extended to June 11, 2022, at which time all unpaid principal and interest is due. The holder of Note 1 has the option to convert the outstanding principal and accrued interest, in whole or in part, into shares of common stock at a conversion price equal to the volume weighted average price per share of common stock for the 30-day period prior to conversion.

 

On April 15, 2020, the Company amended the above Note 1 first issued to AIG and subsequently assigned to Pike Falls LLC (entities controlled by the Company’s CEO) in amount of $840,000, with a principal and accrued interest balance of $688,444, and $210,409, respectively at June 30, 2020. The amendment changes conversion terms, which now state the note principal and interest may be converted to common stock at 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty days prior to conversion, increases the interest rate to 10%, and has a maturity date of January 7, 2022. The change in conversion terms has been treated as a debt extinguishment and the modified note is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480, and a put premium of $688,444 was recognized with a charge to loss on debt extinguishment. The principal balance was $377,194 and accrued interest was $221,323 at September 30, 2020. As of September 30, 2021, Note 1 principal has been fully converted or paid in cash along with accrued interest of $224,370, and the accrued interest balance was $0 as of September 30, 2021. $377,194, related to put premiums was recognized as a gain on extinguishment of debt during the year ended September 30, 2021.

 

The Company has a convertible note payable (for an unspecified amount) with the Company’s CEO. This line of credit (“LoC”) bears interest at an annual rate of 7% with a maturity date of December 31, 2017, at which time all unpaid principal and interest was due. On December 15, 2017 the due date was extended to July 2, 2018 and then in July, 2018, the due date was extended to June 30, 2019, and on December 23, 2018 the maturity date of the LoC was extended to September 23, 2024. The holder of the LoC has the option to convert the outstanding principal and accrued interest, in whole or in part, into shares of common stock at a conversion price equal to the volume weighted average price per share of common stock for the 30-day period prior to conversion. This LoC is considered a stock settled debt in accordance with ASC 480 and the fixed monetary amount is equal to the principal amount based on the conversion formula. During the year ended September 30, 2020 the Company was advanced $64,940 and repaid $132,803, on this LoC. As of September 30, 2020, the LoC had not been converted and the balance was $99,142, and accrued interest was $31,260. During the year ended September 30, 2021 the balance of the LoC principal was fully paid in cash along with all accrued interest, totaling $32,900.

 

F-15

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On July 2, 2019, the Company issued a convertible note payable (“Note 2”) to an affiliate of the Company’s CEO for $15,000 cash. The funds were paid directly to a vendor to the Company. The note had an original maturity of June 9, 2020; however, the note was amended effective September 30, 2020 and the new maturity is May 31, 2022. The note bears interest at 10% and may be converted into the Company’s common stock at 50% of the lowest closing bid in the 20 trading days prior to notification of conversion. The Company accounted for the convertible promissory note as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded a debt premium of $15,000 with a charge to interest expense for the note. The note principal and accrued interest ($2,155) was fully repaid during the year ended September 30, 2021 and put premium of $15,000, was recognized as gain on debt extinguishment. Accrued interest was $0 at September 31, 2021 and $1,843, at September 30, 2020.

 

On September 13, 2019, the Company issued a convertible note payable to an entity controlled by the Company’s CEO for $17,000 in cash. The note had an original maturity of June 9, 2020., The note was amended, effective September 30, 2020, and the new maturity is May 31, 2022. The note bears interest at 10% and may be converted to the Company’s common stock at 50% of the lowest closing bid in the 20 trading days prior to notification of conversion. The Company has accounted for the convertible promissory note as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded a debt premium of $17,000 with a charge to interest expense for the notes. The note principal and accrued interest of $2,152 was fully repaid and a put premium of $17,000, was recognized as gain on debt extinguishment during the year ended September 30, 2021. Accrued interest was $1,799, at September 30, 2020.

 

On December 30, 2018 the Company issued a promissory note to the CEO for a $400,000 in cash. The note bears interest at 12% per annum, matures on January 7, 2024 and required monthly payment of principal of $5,000 with a balloon payment at maturity. On April 14, 2020, the Company amended the above note first issued to Michael Bannon (the Company’s CEO) with a principal and interest balance of $367,500, and $76,619, respectively at September 30, 2020. The amendment adds conversion terms, which state the note principal and interest may be converted to common stock at 50% of the lowest closing bid price during thirty days prior to conversion, and reduces the interest rate to 10%, and extends the maturity date to January 7, 2024. The change in conversion terms was treated as a debt extinguishment and the new note is considered a stock settled debt under ASC 480, and a put premium of $367,500 was recognized with a charge to interest expense. The note principal and accrued interest of $83,133 was fully repaid in cash during the year ended September 30, 2021 and a gain on debt extinguishment was recognized for the premium upon cash repayment. The accrued interest balance was $76,619 at September 30, 2020.

 

On January 19, 2019 the Company issued a, promissory note to the CEO for a $200,000, cash loan. The note bears interest at 12% per annum, matures on September 23, 2021 and requires monthly payments of $2,500 principal. On April 14, 2020, the Company amended the note with a principal and interest balance of $195,000, and $17,947. The amendment adds conversion terms, which state the note principal and interest may be converted to common stock at 50% of the lowest closing bid price during thirty days prior to conversion, and reduces the note interest rate to 10%, and extends the maturity date to April 15, 2026. The change in conversion terms has been treated as a debt extinguishment and the new note is considered a stock settled debt under ASC 480, and put premium of $195,000 has been recognized with a charge to loss on debt extinguishment. During 2020, $14,250 was repaid and $180,750 was converted to common stock. Accrued interest of $20,855 was repaid as of September 30, 2021.

 

On April 15, 2020, the Company issued a convertible note payable to Michael Bannon (the Company’s CEO) in the principal amount of $69,391, in replacement for the amounts owed to an entity controlled by Mr. Bannon The new note interest rate is 10%, and it matures on January 31, 2022. The new note principal and interest may be converted into the Company’s common stock at 50% of the lowest closing bid price in the thirty days preceding the conversion notice. This issuance was treated as a debt extinguishment of the old note and the new note conversion terms have been treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480, and put premium of $69,391 was recognized with a charge to interest expense. The principal and accrued interest was $69,391 and $5,332 respectively as of September 30, 2020. During the year ended September 30, 2021 the principal and accrued interest of $6,206 was fully paid in cash and $69,391 was recognized as gain on extinguishment of debt.

 

Other Notes Payable

 

On December 22, 2020 a promissory note was issued to the CEO by Howco for $50,000 having weekly payments of $2,580 for twenty-five weeks, which include a total of $14,500 of interest. The principal and interest due were fully paid at September 30, 2021.

 

On May 21, 2021 a promissory note was issued to the CEO by Howco for $40,000 having weekly payments of $2,080 for twenty-five weeks, which include a total of $12,000 of interest. During the year ended September 30, 2021, repayments of principal were $40,000 and interest of $8,308 were changed to Interest Expense and were made reducing the principal balance to $0. Interest charged was reduced due to early repayment.

 

F-16

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On June 27, 2021 a promissory note was issued to the CEO by Howco for $50,000 having weekly payments of $2,580 for twenty-five weeks, which include a total of $14,500 of interest. During the year ended September 30, 2021, repayments of principal were $50,000 and interest of $6,692 were changed to Interest Expense and were made reducing the principal balance to $0. Interest charged was reduced due to early repayment.

 

On July 12, 2021 a promissory note was issued to the CEO by Howco for $50,000 having weekly payments of $2,580 for twenty-five weeks, which include a total of $14,500 of interest. During the year ended September 30, 2021, repayments of principal of $50,000 were made reducing the principal balance to $0 and interest of $6,135, were changed to interest expense.

 

During the year ended September 30, 2021, the CEO extended short-term advances totaling $60,400, which were fully repaid as of September 30, 2021.

 

On January 25, 2022 a promissory note was issued to the CEO by Howco for $75,000 having weekly payments of $3,870 for twenty-five weeks, which include a total of $21,750 of interest. The principal at September 30, 2022 was $0 and interest of $18,945, was charged to interest expense. The note was repaid early therefore the interest charged was less than under the original agreement.

 

On April 25, 2022 a promissory note was issued to the CEO by Howco for $50,000 having weekly payments of $1,570 for fifty weeks, which include a total of $28,500 of interest. The principal at September 30, 2022 was $13,537 and interest of $10,783, was charged to interest expense. The note is being repaid faster than the original payment terms and therefore the interest will be lower than the original agreement terms.

 

NOTE 10 - CONVERTIBLE NOTES PAYABLE AND ADVISORY FEE LIABILITIES

 

The senior secured credit facility note balance and convertible debt balances consisted of the following at September 30, 2022 and 2021: 

 

   September 30,   September 30, 
   2022   2021 
Principal  $5,978,891   $6,167,407 
Premiums   1,443,435    1,509,673 
Unamortized discounts   -    (14,440)
   $7,422,326   $7,662,640 

 

For the years ended September 30, 2022 and 2021, amortization of debt discount on the above convertible notes amounted to $21,940 and $30,533, respectively.

 

Senior Secured Credit Facility Note - Default

 

On September 13, 2016, the Company entered into a senior secured credit facility note with an investment fund for the acquisition of Howco. The Company can borrow up to $6,500,000, subject to lender approval, with an initial convertible promissory note at closing of $3,500,000 (the “Note”). The Note bears interest at a rate of 18% per annum, required monthly payments of $52,500, which is interest only, starting on October 13, 2016 through February 13, 2017, and monthly payments, including interest and principal, of $298,341 starting on March 13, 2017 through maturity on March 13, 2018. In the event of default, the Note balance will bear interest at 25% per annum. In connection with this Agreement, the Company was obligated to pay additional advisory fees of $850,000 payable in the form of cash or common stock in accordance with the terms of the Agreement. The Company was also required to reserve 7,000 shares of common stock related to this transaction. The reserved shares will be released upon the satisfaction of the loan.

 

F-17

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

As of September 30, 2022, and September 30, 2021, the Company had issued 539, shares of common stock in satisfaction of the $850,000 advisory fee in accordance with the terms of the agreement, such shares being issued in September 2016. The proceeds from the sale of the 539, shares were to be applied to the $850,000 advisory fee due. Based upon the value of the shares, at the time the lender sells the shares, the Company may be required to redeem unsold shares for the difference between the $850,000 and the lender’s sales proceeds. Accordingly, the $850,000 was reflected as a current liability through December 31, 2017. In January 2018, in connection with a settlement agreement (see below), the accrued advisory fee was reclassified to the principal balance of the replacement Convertible Note. Through the date of the settlement agreement and through September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021, the lender had not reported any proceeds from the sale of these shares (see below). Prior to the settlement agreement in January 2018, notwithstanding anything contained in the Agreement to the contrary, in the event the Lender has not realized net proceeds from the sale of Advisory Fee Shares equal to at least the Advisory Fee by the earlier to occur of: (A) September 13, 2017; (B) the occurrence of an Event of Default; or (C) the Maturity Date, then at any time thereafter, the Lender shall have the right, upon written notice to the Borrower, to require that the Borrower redeem all Advisory Fee Shares then in Lender’s possession for cash equal to the Advisory Fee, less any cash proceeds received by the Lender from any previous sales of Advisory Fee Shares, if any within five (5) Business Days from the date the Lender delivers such redemption notice to the Borrower.

 

The Note is only convertible upon default or mutual agreement by both parties at a conversion rate of 85% of the lowest of the daily volume weighted average price of the Company’s common stock during the 5 business days immediately prior to the conversion date. At any time and from time to time while this Note is outstanding, but only upon: (i) the occurrence of an Event of Default under any of the Loan Documents; or (ii) mutual agreement between the Company and the Holder, this Note may be, at the sole option of the Holder, convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock, in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Note. Upon liquidation by the Holder of Conversion Shares issued pursuant to a conversion notice, provided that the Holder realizes a net amount from such liquidation equal to less than the conversion amount specified in the relevant conversion notice, the Company shall issue to the Holder additional shares of the Company’s common stock equal to: (i) the Conversion Amount specified in the relevant conversion notice; minus (ii) the realized amount, as evidenced by a reconciliation statement from the Holder (a “Sale Reconciliation”) showing the realized amount from the sale of the Conversion Shares; divided by (iii) the average volume weighted average price of the Company’s common stock during the five business days immediately prior to the date upon which the Holder delivers notice (the “Make-Whole Notice”) to the Company that such additional shares are requested by the Holder.

 

Once a default occurs, the Note and the $850,000 advisory fee payable will be accounted for as stock settled debt at its fixed monetary value. On March 13, 2017 the Company defaulted on the monthly principal and interest payment of $298,341. Due to this default, as of June 30, 2017, the Company has accounted for the embedded conversion option as stock settled debt and recorded a debt premium of $617,647 with a charge to interest expense, and the interest rate increased to 25% (default rate).

 

On March 28, 2017, the Company entered into an additional agreement with the above senior secured credit facility lender to receive a range of advisory services for a total of $1,200,000 with no definitive terms or length of service which was expensed in fiscal 2017 and had been recorded as an accrued liability – advisory fees through December 31, 2017. In connection with the settlement agreement discussed below, in January 2018, the advisory services fees payable were reclassified to the principal balance of the replacement Convertible Note.

 

On January 3, 2018, the Company entered into a settlement agreement (the “Settlement Agreement”) and replacement note agreements with the investment fund related to a senior secured credit facility note dated September 13, 2016. On the effective date of the Settlement Agreement, all amounts owed to the investment fund aggregated $5,788,642 and consisted of a convertible promissory note of $3,500,000, accrued interest payable of $238,642, and accrued advisory fees payable of $2,050,000. On the effective date of the Settlement Agreement, the amount due of $5,788,642 was split and apportioned into two separate replacement notes (“Replacement Note A” and Note B”). Replacement Note A had a principal amount of $1,000,000 and Replacement Note B had a principal balance of $4,788,642, both of which remained secured by the original security, pledge and guarantee agreements; and other applicable loan documents, and bear interest at 18% per annum. The default was not waived by this settlement agreement. The Company originally recorded a premium on stock settled debt of $617,647 on the $3,500,000, and subsequent to the settlement agreement recorded an additional premium on stock settled debt of $403,878 on the additional $2,288,642 for accrued interest and advisory fees payable that were capitalized as note principal. The interest rate was amended to 12% effective June 12, 2018.

 

The Credit Agreement was amended such that the maturity date was extended to January 13, 2019 (the “Extended Maturity Date”) for replacement Note B, while the Note A maturity date remained at March 13, 2018 but was due as of March 2017 due to the principal and interest payment default discussed above. Notwithstanding anything contained in this Agreement to the contrary, all obligations owing by the Company and all other Credit Parties under the Credit Agreement, First Replacement Note B, and all other Loan Documents shall be paid in full by the Extended Maturity Date as follows: $52,500 per month from January 13, 2018 to December 13, 2018 and the remaining principal and accrued interest on January 13, 2019. Interest payments made since the amendment have totaled $323,440 and are therefore not in accord with that amendment. However, TCA has received payments under the 3(a) (10) settlement (below) totaling $308,100 during the year ended September 30, 2018, and another $270,320, during the year ended September 30, 2019. The principal balance was $4,788,642 at September 30, 2018.

 

F-18

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On October 30, 2018, TCA the Company’s senior lender amended its credit facility which had been restructured in January 2018 when fees for advisory and other matters along with accrued but unpaid interest were capitalized and separated into two notes, Note A having $1,000,000 principal and Note B having $4,788,642 both having the same maturity terms, interest rates and conversion rights. Under the current amendment total amounts outstanding under the notes along with accrued interest of $537,643 has been capitalized with the principal amount due of $6,018,192, $5,326,285 for Note B and $691,907 for Note A. The restated note has the same conversion price discount and therefore continues to be stock settled debt under ASC 480, an additional $94,878 was charged to interest with a credit to debt premium. The restated note accrues interest on the principal balance at 12% per annum, includes amortization to the new maturity date of December 15, 2020. The amortization payments credited toward the principal amount and accrued interest vary and include payments made under the 3(a)(10) settlement agreement with a third party related to Note A. Economically the total principal and accrued interest outstanding remain unchanged as reported in the consolidated balance sheet. All other terms including conversion rights and a make-whole provision in the case of a conversion shortfall remain the same as stated in the footnotes above.

 

On September 6, 2019, the Company received a default notice on its payment obligations under the senior secured credit facility agreement from TCA. The Company has proposed a number of solutions including refinancing the debt with other parties. The default was declared due to non-payment of monthly scheduled amortization (principal and interest). TCA holds security interests in all assets of the Company including its subsidiary Howco. The Company is in negotiation with the receiver appointed by the court related to the senior secured creditor’s claim and has proposed a preliminary settlement.

 

On January 30, 2018 pursuant to the Liability Purchase Term Sheet, the TCA Replacement Note A in the principal amount of $1,000,000 was acquired by Livingston Asset Management LLC (“Livingston”) from the original lender. Principal of Replacement Note A is due to Livingston with all then accrued but unpaid interest due to the original lender. In accordance with the terms of the Settlement Agreement, the Court was advised of the Company’s intention to rely upon the exception to registration set forth in Section 3(a) (l0) of the Securities Act to support the issuance of its common shares and the Court held a fairness hearing regarding the issuance on March 12, 2018. Following entry of an Order by the Court which occurred on March 12, 2018, in settlement of the claims, the Company shall issue and deliver to Livingston shares of its common stock (the “Settlement Shares”) in one or more tranches as necessary, and subject to adjustment and ownership limitations as set forth in the Settlement Agreement, sufficient to generate proceeds such that the aggregate Remittance Amount equals the Claim Amount. The Company will issue free trading shares of its common stock under section 3(a) (10) of the Securities Act to Livingston in the amount of such judgment in a series of tranches so that Livingston will not own more than 9.99% of the Company’s outstanding shares per tranche. The parties reasonably estimate that the fair market value of the Settlement Shares to be received by Livingston is equal to approximately $1,666,667 which is based on a discount of 40%.

 

In the year ended September 30, 2022, there were no 3(a) (10) issuances. As of September 30, 2022, there have been seventeen issuances under section 3(a) (10) of the Securities Act totaling 1,374,885 shares; 1,273,261, in 2019, and 101,624, in 2018, which have been recorded at par value with an equal charge to additional paid-in capital. On November 17, 2019, 194,520 of the shares issued under the 3(a) (10) were cancelled at the request of Livingston. The value originally recorded as a liability remains in the convertible note balance, until these shares have been sold and reported to the Company by the lender as part of the Make-Whole provision at which time the proceeds value of such shares are reclassified to additional paid-in capital. During the years ended September 30, 2018 and September 30, 2019, proceeds of $308,100 and $270,320, respectively were remitted to TCA by Livingston and applied to reduce the liability with corresponding credits to additional paid in capital. $180,618 of debt premium was credited to additional paid in capital in conjunction with the payments to TCA. At September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021, the balance, of $421,587 along with related debt premium of $281,054 are included in convertible notes payable on the balance sheet.

 

At September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021, the principal of the Note B portion was $5,326,285 and accrued interest was $2,377,557 and $1,738,403 respectively and the Note A principal subject to the 3(a) (10) court order was $421,587 as noted above. During the year ended September 30, 2022, the Company has not paid interest or principal and Livingston Asset Management (under the 3(a) (10) settlement) has not made any payments to TCA.

 

On March 7, 2018 the Company entered into a placement agent and advisory agreement with Scottsdale Capital Advisors in connection with the Livingston liability purchase term sheet executed on November 15, 2017. The placement agent services fee amounted to $15,000 payable to Scottsdale Capital Advisors in the form of a convertible note. The note matures six months from the date of issuance and shall accrue interest at the rate of 10% per annum. The $15,000 note is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock at a discount of 30% of the low closing bid price for the twenty trading days prior to the conversion and is not subject to any registration rights. The Company has accounted for the convertible promissory note as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded a debt premium of $6,429 with a charge to interest expense. The note has not been converted and the principal balance is $15,000, at September 30, 2022 and September 30, 2021 with $7,777, and $6,273, of accrued interest, respectively. As the note has matured it is technically in default. Under the terms of the note no default interest or penalties accrue.

 

F-19

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

Other Convertible Debt

 

The $85,375 of principal from the Livingston Asset Management LLC notes issued December 1, 2018 through June 1, 2019, along with $8,475 of accrued interest were sold and assigned to Alpha Capital Anstalt, on February 20, 2020. The assigned notes became convertible as of the date of the assignment by virtue of an agreement between the Company and the new note holder. The terms of the notes provide for conversion of principal and accrued interest at a 50% discount to the lowest closing bid price over the 20 days prior to conversion. The notes have been accounted for as stock settled debt under ASC 480, and put premium of $93,850 has been recognized with a charge to interest expense. During the year ended September 30, 2020, $2,200 of the principal was converted into common stock. The total accrued unpaid interest (also not converted) is $5,277 at September 30, 2020. The assigned notes are in default and there are cross-default terms in the original notes or the assignment documentation. Following conversions during the year ended September 30, 2021 the principal balance was $0 at September 30, 2021 and $91,300 as of September 30, 2020. Accrued interest was $0 and $5,277 at September 30, 2021 and September 30, 2020, respectively. Put premiums of $91,300 were reclassified to additional paid in capital during the year ended September 30, 2021.

 

Under the terms of the June 1, 2018 consulting and services agreement with Livingston Asset Management, LLC, as amended on July 1, 2019, Livingston is to receive $20,000, per month including $3,000 cash and $17,000 in promissory notes. The notes bear interest of 10% per annum and mature in six months. The promissory notes are convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the 30 trading days prior to conversion. The notes having a conversion feature are treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $17,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. During the year ended September 30, 2021, the October 1, 2020, November 1, 2020, December 1, 2020 and January 1, 2020 notes were fully converted and Livingston agreed to forgive seven months (“February 1, 2020 through August 1, 2020”) of service including the cash payments due which were recorded as accounts payable. A gain on debt extinguishment was recognized of $263,938 related to the principal, premiums and accrued interest during the year ended September 30, 2021. The specific notes forgiven are indicated below.

 

Convertible notes were issued to Livingston as follows:

 

January 1, 2020 - $17,000 non-convertible note amended to original conversion terms, fully converted;

 

February 1, 2020 - $17,000 note and accrued interest forgiven;

 

March 1, 2020 - $17,000 note and accrued interest forgiven;

 

April 1, 2020 - $17,000 note and accrued interest forgiven;

 

May 1, 2020, $17,000 note and accrued interest forgiven;

 

June 1, 2020 - $17,000 note and accrued interest forgiven;

 

July 1, 2020 - $17,000 note and accrued interest forgiven; and

 

August 1, 2020 - $17,000, note and accrued interest forgiven.

 

Livingston has given the Company forbearance on fees beginning September 1, 2020 through June 1, 2021. Effective July 1, 2021 the agreement was amended changing the advisory fees to $15,000 due on the first day of each month. Fees are to be paid in the form of a convertible note having a nine-month maturity and conversion discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the 30 trading days prior to conversion. The principal balance for the Livingston notes was $45,000 and accrued interest totaled $752 at September 30, 2021, as detailed below.

 

Under the terms of the July 1, 2021 amendment to the consulting and services agreement with Livingston Asset Management, LLC, Livingston is to receive $15,000, per month in convertible promissory notes. On July 1, 2021 the Company issued a $15,000 convertible note bearing interest of 10% per annum which matures in nine months. The notes issued are convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the twenty trading days prior to conversion. The notes having a conversion feature are treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2021, the accrued interest was $378. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $0. See below (March 7, 2022, redemption).

 

F-20

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

August 1, 2021, the Company issued a $15,000 convertible promissory note to Livingston. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum which matures in nine months. The notes issued are convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the twenty trading days prior to conversion. The notes having a conversion feature are treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2021, the accrued interest was $251. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $0. See below (March 7, 2022, redemption).

 

September 1, 2021, the Company issued a $15,000 convertible promissory note to Livingston. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The notes issued are convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the twenty trading days prior to conversion. The notes having a conversion feature are treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2021, the accrued interest was $123. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $0. See below (March 7, 2022, redemption). 

 

On October 1, 2021, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Livingston Asset Management LLC for $15,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the twenty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $0. See below (March 7, 2022, redemption).

 

On November 1, 2021, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Livingston Asset Management LLC for $15,000 in principal for services. The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the twenty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $0. See below (March 7, 2022, redemption).

 

On March 7, 2022, the Company redeemed five fee notes issued to Livingston Asset Management LLC (July 1, through November 1, 2021 notes above) for $85,000 cash. Principal, penalty and accrued interest of $75,000, $7,612 and $2,388 was recognized along with gain on debt extinguishment of $67,388 during the year ended September 30, 2022. The penalty was recorded against the gain.

 

On December 1, 2021, the Company terminated its agreement with Livingston Asset Management and entered into a consulting and services arrangement with Frondeur Partners LLC which has no stipulated term. The arrangement provides for financial management services including accounting and related periodic reporting among other advisory services. Under the agreement the Company will issue to Frondeur Partners LLC convertible fee notes having principal of $15,000, interest of 10% per annum, maturity of seven months. The notes are convertible into common shares at a discount of 50% to the lowest bid price in the twenty trading days immediately preceding the notice of conversion. The notes are charged to professional fees for each corresponding service month. The principal balance for the Frondeur notes was $105,000 and accrued interest for the notes totaled $3,631 at September 30, 2022, as detailed below.

 

On December 1, 2021, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. During the year ended September 30, 2022 the principal and accrued interest of $748, were converted to common stock. Premium of $15,000 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On January 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. During the year ended September 30, 2022 the principal and accrued interest of $744, were converted to common stock. Premium of $15,000 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On February 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. During the year ended September 30, 2022 the principal and accrued interest of $777, were converted to common stock. Premium of $15,000 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

F-21

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On March 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $820.

 

On April 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $752.

 

On May 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $629.

 

On June 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $501.

 

On July 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $314.

 

On August 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $187.

 

On September 1, 2022, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Frondeur Partners LLC for $15,000 in principal for services (service agreement replacing agreement with Livingston Asset Management LLC). The convertible note bears interest of 10% per annum and matures in nine months. The note issued is convertible into shares of common stock at a discount of 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the thirty trading days prior to conversion. The note has a conversion feature and is treated as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and a debt premium of $15,000 is recognized as interest expense on note issuance date. At September 30, 2022 the accrued interest was $62.

 

The principal balance for the Frondeur notes was $105,000 and Livingston notes was $45,000 at September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively, as detailed above. Accrued interest for these notes totaled $3,631 and $752 at September 30, 2022 and 2021, respectively also detailed above.

 

F-22

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On August 29, 2018 the Company entered into an agreement with a legal firm to provide securities related and other legal services which has no stipulated term. Under the agreement the Company will issue convertible notes with varying principal amounts for services. The first note was issued on August 29, 2018, for $6,000, interest of 12%, and a maturity date of February 28, 2019. The conversion feature allows for conversion into common shares at the lesser of: a) 70% of the share price on the date of the note; or b) 50% of the lowest bid price during the 30 trading days preceding the date of the notice of conversion. In connection with the issuance of this Note, the Company determined that the terms of the Note contain a conversion formula that caused variations in the conversion price resulting in the treatment of the conversion option as a bifurcated derivative to be accounted for at fair value. Accordingly, under the provisions of FASB ASC Topic No. 815-40, “Derivatives and Hedging – Contracts in an Entity’s Own Stock”, the embedded conversion option contained in the convertible instruments were accounted for as derivative liabilities at the date of issuance and shall be adjusted to fair value through earnings at each reporting date. The fair values of the embedded conversion option derivatives were determined using the Binomial valuation model. $10,435 was recognized as derivative liability with $6,000 charged to debt discount and $4,035 charged to derivative expense on issuance. The debt discount of $6,000 was amortized to interest expense to the maturity date of the note. At March 31, 2019 the derivative fair value was determined to have decreased to $8,881. As the note reached its maturity date no further fair value adjustments will be recorded. For the year ended September 30, 2019, the $5,000, balance of the debt discount was charged to interest expense and debt discount balances was $0. During the year ended September 30, 2021 the note principal was fully repaid in cash and the derivative liability was recognized as gain on extinguishment of debt. The following notes have been issued to the law firm, each having six-month term to maturity and 12% annual interest but a change in the conversion terms such that a fixed discount of 50% of the lowest bid price in the 30 trading days immediately preceding the notice of conversion. The notes have cross default provisions. The Company has accounted for the convertible promissory notes as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded debt premiums equal to the face value of the notes with a charge to interest expense. The note principal amount was charged to professional fees during the month the note was issued.

 

April 18, 2019, $6,000 – in default, sold and assigned to Trillium Partners LP on May 28, 2020 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

May 18, 2019, $6,000 – in default, sold and assigned to Trillium Partners LP on May 28, 2020 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

June 18, 2019, $6,000 – in default, sold and assigned to Trillium Partners LP on May 28, 2020 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

  

July 18, 2019, $6,000 – assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

August 18, 2019, $6,000 – assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

September 18, 2019, $6,000 – assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

October 18, 2019, $6,000 – assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

November 18, 2019, $6,000 – assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

F-23

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

December 18, 2019, $6,000– assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

January 18, 2020, $6,000– assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

March 18, 2020, $6,000 – assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

April 18, 2020, $6,000– assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

May 18, 2020, $6,000– assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

June 18, 2020, $6,000– assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

July 18, 2020, $6,000 - assigned to Trillium Partners LP on February 12, 2021 and fully converted as of September 30, 2021;

 

August 18, 2020, $6,000 – principal fully repaid in cash as of September 30, 2021; and

 

September 18, 2020, $6,000– principal fully repaid in cash as of September 30, 2021;

 

On May 1, 2022, a $4,000 convertible note was issued for fees incurred;

 

On June 1, 2022, a $4,000 convertible note was issued for fees incurred;

 

On July 1, 2022, a $4,000 convertible note was issued for fees incurred;

 

On August 1, 2022, a $4,000 convertible note was issued for fees incurred; and

 

On September 1, 2022, a $4,000 convertible note was issued for fees incurred.

 

The principal balances owed under the agreement as of September 30, 2022 and 2021 were $20,000, and $0 respectively and accrued interest was $563 as of September 30, 2022.

 

The Company paid the monthly fee in cash during the first seven months of the year ended September 30, 2022.

 

On November 13, 2018, the Company issued a convertible promissory note for $90,000 to a vendor in settlement of approximately $161,700 of past due amounts due for services. The note bears interest at 5%, matures on June 30, 2019 and is convertible into the Company’s common stock at 50% of the lowest closing bid price during the 20 trading days immediately preceding the notice of conversion. The note matured on June 30, 2019, there is no default penalty associated with the note, nor are there any cross-default provisions in the note. The Company has accounted for the convertible promissory note as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded debt premium $90,000 with a charge to interest expense for the notes. The unconverted principal, premium and accrued interest were $90,000, $90,000, and $25,725 as of September 30, 2021. At September 30, 2022 the principal, premium and accrued interest were $90,000, $90,000, and $36,614 (see Note 17).

 

F-24

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On November 9, 2017, the Company received a first tranche payment of $75,500 under the terms of a Securities Purchase Agreement dated October 25, 2017, with Crown Bridge Partners, LLC (“Crown Bridge”) under which the Company issued to Crown Bridge a convertible note in the principal amount of $105,000 and a five-year warrant to purchase 100 shares of the Company’s common stock at an exercise price of $350, as a commitment fee which is equal to the product of one-third of the face value of each tranche divided by $350. Under the terms of the note Crown Bridge was to receive “right of first refusal” for any subsequent loans or notes to fund the Company. The Company violated this covenant when funding was received from other sources without offering Crown Bridge the opportunity to participate. On December 20, 2017 the Company cured this covenant violation by issuing 200 additional warrants which have the same exercise price and terms of the original warrants. The warrants have full ratchet price protection and cashless exercise rights.

 

The convertible note (the “Note”) issued to Crown Bridge in the principal amount of $105,000, has an original issue discount of $10,500 and issue costs of $19,000 both of which are recorded as debt discount along with the warrant relative fair value of $12,507 for the original 100 warrants and $31,529 for the penalty warrants to be amortized over the twelve month term of this tranche, bears interest of 10% (12% default rate) per annum, and has a maturity date of 12 months from the date of each tranche of payments under the Note with future tranches being at the discretion of Crown Bridge. The conversion rate for any conversion of unpaid principal and interest under the Notes is at a 35% discount to the lowest market price of the shares of the Company’s common stock within a 20 day trading period prior to the date of conversion to which an additional 10% discount will be added if the conversion price of the Company’s common stock is less than $50 per share and no shares of the Company’s common stock can be issued to the extent Crown Bridge would own more than 4.99% of the outstanding shares of the Company’s common stock and the conversion shares contain piggy-back registration rights. The Note is subject to customary default provisions including an event of default if the bid price of the Company’s common stock is less than its par value of $.0001 per share. The Company is entitled to prepay the Note between 30 days after its issuance until 180 days from its issuance at amounts that increase from 112% of the prepayment amount to 137% of the prepayment amount depending on the length of time when prepayments are made. The Company has accounted for the convertible promissory note as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded a debt premium of $56,538 with a charge to interest expense. As of September 30, 2018 the note holder fully converted principal and accrued interest into common shares. The debt premium on stock settled debt was fully recognized as additional paid in capital.

 

On March 1, 2019, the Company received a second tranche advance under the Crown Bridge Partners, LLC, master note dated October 25, 2017, for principal amount of $35,000, including covered fees and original issue discount totaling $5,000. Under the conversion terms of the above note, the holder is entitled to a 35% discount plus an additional 10% discount based on the conversion rights of certain other note holders. Therefore, a discount of 45% is assumed for any conversions of this note tranche. The Company has accounted for the convertible promissory note as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded a debt premium of $28,636 with a charge to interest expense. The original issue discount and fees charged were treated as debt discount and will be amortized to financing expenses over the term of the note. Following conversions during the year ended September 30, 2020 the principal balance and debt premium balances were reduced and the unamortized debt discount was $0, at September 30, 2020. The principal was increased by charges of $17,500 for technical default effective during the year ended September 30, 2020 and an additional put premium was calculated to be $26,250. The cross-default provisions of the note include defaults on any notes issued to third parties including any issued subsequent to the issuance of this note. The default charge and the put premium were charged to interest expense at June 30, 2020. The conversion discount increased to 60% as a result of the default. The note principal and accrued interest of $10,987 was redeemed for cash during the year ended September 30, 2022. The principal and accrued interest balances were $2,766 and $6,464, respectively at September 30, 2021.

 

F-25

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On July 12, 2019, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Trillium Partners LP for cash in the amount of $10,000. The note bears interest at 10%, matures on January 11, 2020, and was convertible into the Company’s common stock at 50% of the lowest closing bid price on the 20 trading days immediately preceding the notice of conversion. The Company accounted for the convertible promissory note as stock settled debt under ASC 480 and recorded debt premium $10,000 with a charge to interest expense for the note.

 

On November 1, 2019, Trillium Partners LP amended the terms of the notes issued July 12, 2019, such that the note is no longer convertible into common stock. The principal balance of $10,000 was reclassified to notes and loans payable and the related put premium totaling $10,000 was recognized as a gain on debt extinguishment on the date of the amendment.

 

The note issued to Trillium Partners LP, on July 12, 2019 was sold and assigned to Alpha Capital Anstalt on February 20, 2020. The assigned note became convertible as of the date of the assignment by virtue of an agreement between the Company and the new note holder. The terms of the note provide for conversion of principal and accrued interest at a 50% discount to the lowest closing bid price over the 20 days prior to conversion. The note matured on January 11, 2020 and therefore the default interest rate is 24%. There are no cross-default provisions in the note. The note has been accounted for as stock settled debt under ASC 480, and put premium of $10,395 was recognized with a charge to interest expense. The note balance and premium were $10,745 and $10,395, at September 30, 2020. Accrued interest was $1,854 at September 30, 2020. The note and accrued interest were fully converted during the year ended September 30, 2021. The balance of put premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital upon conversion.

 

On April 20, 2020, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings for $60,000, for $57,000, cash and fees of $3,000 (treated as OID to be amortized over the life of the note) having a 10% annual interest rate, maturity of April 20, 2021, and conversion right to a 42% discount to the lowest traded price in the 20 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. The cross-default terms in the note only include defaults on notes issued to related parties of the note holder. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, and recognized the put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The note and accrued interest were fully converted during the year ended September 30, 2021. $43,448 of put premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital upon conversion.

 

F-26

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On May 14, 2020, the Company issued a convertible promissory note for $35,000 issued to Tri-Bridge Ventures LLC for a cash loan of $35,000. The note has a one year maturity, 8% annual interest and can be converted to common stock at the contracted price of 60% of the lowest daily traded price during the 10 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. There are no cross-default provisions in the note. The Company has treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, and recognized the put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $1,550 were fully converted and balances were $0, and $0 respectively at September 30, 2021. $23,333 of put premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital upon conversion.

 

On June 9, 2020, the Company issued a convertible promissory note in the amount of $53,000 to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings Inc. The Company received $50,000, in cash on June 10, 2020 with $3,000, being retained for legal and underwriting fees which will be treated as OID and be amortized to interest expense over the term of the note. The note matures on June 10, 2021, bears interest at 10%, with a 22% default interest rate and may be converted at 58% of the lowest closing bid price in the 20 days preceding a conversion. The cross-default terms in the note only include defaults on notes issued to related parties of the note holder. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $38,379 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $2,650 were fully converted and balances were $0, and $0 respectively at September 30, 2021. $38,379 of put premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital upon conversion.

 

On July 10, 2020, the Company issued a convertible promissory note to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings Inc. in the amount of $53,000. The Company received $50,000, in cash on July 15, 2020 with $3,000, being retained for legal and underwriting fees which will be treated as debt discount and be amortized to interest expense over the term of the note. The note matures on July 10, 2021, bears interest at 10%, with a 22% default interest rate and may be converted at 58% of the lowest closing bid price in the 20 days preceding a conversion. The cross-default terms in the note only include defaults on notes issued to related parties of the note holder. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $38,379 as put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $2,650 were fully converted and balances were $0, and $0 respectively at September 30, 2021. $38,379 of put premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital upon conversion.

 

On August 28, 2020, the Company issued a convertible promissory note in the amount of $104,000 to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings Inc. The Company received $100,500, in cash on August 28, 2020 with $3,500, being retained for legal and underwriting fees which will be treated as OID and be amortized to interest expense over the term of the note. The note matures on August 28, 2021, bears interest at 10%, with a 22% default interest rate and may be converted at 58% of the lowest closing bid price in the 20 days preceding a conversion. The cross-default terms in the note only include defaults on notes issued to related parties of the note holder. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $75,310 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $5,200 were fully converted and balances were $0, and $0 respectively at September 30, 2021. $75,310 of put premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital upon conversion.

 

F-27

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On November 2, 2020, the Company executed a convertible promissory note issued to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings for $53,500, having a 10% annual interest rate, with a 22% default interest rate, maturity of November 2, 2021, and conversion right to a 40% discount to the lowest traded price in the 20 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. The note was funded for $50,000, with $3,500, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The cross-default terms in the note only include defaults on notes issued to related parties of the note holder. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $35,666 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $2,175 were fully converted and balances were $0, and $0 respectively at September 30, 2021. $35,666 of put premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital upon conversion.

 

On December 15, 2020, the Company executed a convertible promissory note issued to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings for $43,500, having a 10% annual interest rate, with a 22% default interest rate, maturity of December 15, 2021, and conversion right to a 40% discount to the lowest traded price in the 20 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. The note was funded for $40,000, with $3,500, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The cross-default terms in the note only include defaults on notes issued to related parties of the note holder. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $29,000 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $2,675 were fully converted and balances were $0, and $0 respectively at September 30, 2021. $29,000 of put premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital upon conversion.

 

On January 12, 2021, the Company executed a convertible promissory note issued to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings for $53,500, having a 10% annual interest rate, with a 22% default interest rate, maturity of January 12, 2022, and conversion right to a 35% discount to the lowest traded price in the 20 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. The note was funded for $50,000, with $3,500, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The Company will treat the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $28,807 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $53,500 and $2,675 were fully converted into common stock during the year ended September 30, 2021 and put premium of $28,807 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On February 15, 2021, the Company executed a convertible promissory note issued to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings for $53,500, having a 10% annual interest rate, with a 22% default interest rate, maturity of February 15, 2022, and conversion right to a 35% discount to the lowest traded price in the 20 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. The note was funded for $50,000, with $3,500, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The cross-default terms in the note only include defaults on notes issued to related parties of the note holder. The Company will treat the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $28,807 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $53,500 and $2,675 were fully converted into common stock during the year ended September 30, 2021 and put premium of $28,807 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On March 15, 2021, the Company executed a convertible promissory note issued to Geneva Roth Remark Holdings for $53,500, having a 10% annual interest rate, with a 22% default interest rate, maturity of March 15, 2022, and conversion right to a 35% discount to the lowest traded price in the 20 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. The note was funded for $50,000, with $3,500, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The cross-default terms in the note only include defaults on notes issued to related parties of the note holder. The Company will treat the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $28,807 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal and accrued interest of $53,500 and $2,675 were fully converted into common stock during the year ended September 30, 2021 and put premium of $28,807 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On May 3, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible promissory note with Geneva Roth Remark Holdings, Inc. (“Lender”) in the principal amount of $58,500, (the “May 3, 2021 Note”). The May 3, 2021 Note carries interest at the rate of 10%, matures on May 3, 2022, and is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.0001, at the Lender’s election, after 180 days, at a 35% discount, provided that the Lender may not own greater than 4.99% of the Company’s common stock at any time. The note was funded for $55,000, with $3,500, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The Company will treat the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $31,500 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal, premium and accrued interest were $58,500, $31,500 and $2,204 respectively at September 30, 2021. The principal and accrued interest of $58,500 and $2,925 were fully converted into common stock during the three months ended December 31, 2021 and put premium of $31,500 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

F-28

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

On June 14, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible promissory note with Geneva Roth Remark Holdings, Inc. (“Lender”) in the principal amount of $58,500, (the “June 14, 2021 Note”). The June 14, 2021 Note carries interest at the rate of 10%, matures on June 14, 2022, and is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.0001, at the Lender’s election, after 180 days, at a 35% discount, provided that the Lender may not own greater than 4.99% of the Company’s common stock at any time. The note was funded for $55,000, with $3,500, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The Company will treat the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $31,500 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The principal, premium and accrued interest were $58,500, $31,500 and $1,715 respectively at September 30, 2021. The principal and accrued interest of $58,500 and $2,925 were fully converted into common stock during the three months ended December 31, 2021 and put premium of $31,500 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On July 19, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible promissory note with Geneva Roth Remark Holdings, Inc. (“Lender”) in the principal amount of $53,750, (the “July 19, 2021 Note”). Note carries interest at the rate of 10%, matures on July 19, 2022, and is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.0001, at the Lender’s election, after 180 days, at a 35% discount, provided that the Lender may not own greater than 4.99% of the Company’s common stock at any time. The note was funded for $50,000, with $3,750, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $28,942 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. At September 30, 2021, the principal and accrued interest was $53,750 and $1,127, respectively. On January 21, 2022, the note was fully converted along with $2,688 of accrued interest and OID of $3,000 was recognized as interest expense and put premiums of $28,942 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On August 17, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible promissory note with Geneva Roth Remark Holdings, Inc. (“Lender”) in the principal amount of $45,000, (the “August 17, 2021 Note”). The August 17, 2021 Note carries interest at the rate of 10%, matures on August 17, 2022, and is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.0001, at the Lender’s election, after 180 days, at a 35% discount, provided that the Lender may not own greater than 4.99% of the Company’s common stock at any time. The note was funded for $41,250, with $3,750, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The Company will treat the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $24,231 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. At September 30, 2021, the principal and accrued interest was $45,000 and $561, respectively. On February 11, 2022, the Company redeemed the note for $63,746 in cash, for the principal of $45,000, penalties of $17,533 and accrued interest of $2,213, OID of $3,298 was recognized as interest expense and a gain on debt settlement of $7,698 was recognized. The penalty was recorded against the gain.

 

On September 17, 2021, the Company entered into a convertible promissory note with Geneva Roth Remark Holdings, Inc. (“Lender”) in the principal amount of $50,000, (the “September 17, 2021 Note”). The September 17, 2021 Note carries interest at the rate of 10%, matures on September 17, 2022, and is convertible into shares of the Company’s common stock, par value $0.0001, at the Lender’s election, after 180 days, at a 35% discount, provided that the Lender may not own greater than 4.99% of the Company’s common stock at any time. The note was funded for $46,250, with $3,750, disbursed for legal and execution fees. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $26,923 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. At September 30, 2021, the principal and accrued interest was $50,000 and $205, respectively. On March 25, 2022, the note was fully converted along with $2,500 of accrued interest and OID of $3,616 was recognized as interest expense and put premiums of $26,923 was reclassified to additional paid in capital. 

 

On November 12, 2021, the Company executed a convertible promissory note issued to Sixth Street Lending LLC for $55,000, having a 10% annual interest rate, maturity of November 12, 2022, and conversion right to a 35% discount to the average of the two lowest traded price in the 15 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $29,615 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The note was funded for $51,250, with $3,750, disbursed for legal and execution fees. At September 30, 2022, the note principal and accrued interest was fully converted into common stock and $29,615 of premium was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

On January 11, 2022, the Company executed a convertible promissory note issued to Sixth Street Lending LLC for $53,750, having a 10% annual interest rate, maturity of January 11, 2023, and conversion right to a 35% discount to the average of the two lowest traded price in the 15 days prior to delivery of a conversion notice. The Company treated the convertible note in accordance with ASC 480 Stock Settled Debt, recognizing $28,942 of put premium for the stock price discount as a liability with a charge to interest expense at the date of the issuance of the convertible promissory note. The note was funded for $50,000, with $3,750, disbursed for legal and execution fees. During the year ended September 30, 2022 the note holder fully converted principal and accrued interest of $53,750 and $2,688 into of common stock. Premium of $28,942 was reclassified to additional paid in capital.

 

F-29

 

 

BANTEC, INC. AND SUBSIDIARIES

NOTES TO CONSOLIDATED FINANCIAL STATEMENTS

SEPTEMBER 30, 2022 AND 2021

 

NOTE 11 – NOTES AND LOANS PAYABLE

 

The notes balance consisted of the following at September 30, 2022 and 2021:

 

   September 30,
2022
   September 30,
2021
 
Principal loans and notes  $615,500   $519,054 
Discounts   (270,064)   (45,816)
Total   345,436    473,238 
Less Current portion   (217,897)