10-K 1 jbgs-123117x10xk.htm 10-K Document



UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
FORM 10-K
ý
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2017
OR
¨
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the transition period from ___________ to ___________
Commission file number 001-37994
logoverticaltransbluea02.jpg
JBG SMITH PROPERTIES
________________________________________________________________________________
(Exact name of Registrant as specified in its charter)
Maryland
 
81‑4307010

(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)
(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
4445 Willard Avenue, Suite 400
Chevy Chase, MD
 
20815
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
(Zip Code)
Registrant’s telephone number, including area code: (240) 333‑3600
 
_______________________________                
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Common Shares, par value $0.01 per share
New York Stock Exchange
(Title of each class)
 
(Name of exchange on which registered)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(g) of the Act: None
_______________________________
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act.Yes o No ý
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or Section 15(d) of the Act. Yes o No ý
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the Registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days. Yes ý No o
Indicate by check mark whether the Registrant has submitted electronically and posted on its corporate Website, if any, every Interactive Data File required to be submitted and posted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulations S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit and post such files). Yes ý No o
Indicate by check mark if disclosure of delinquent filers pursuant to Item 405 of Regulation S-K is not contained herein, and will not be contained, to the best of the registrant’s knowledge, in definitive proxy or information statements incorporated by reference in Part III of this Form 10-K or any amendment to this Form 10-K. ý
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company. See the definitions of "large accelerated filer," "accelerated filer," "smaller reporting company" and "emerging growth company" in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.
Large accelerated filer o Accelerated filer o Non-accelerated filer ý Smaller reporting company o
Emerging growth company o
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act. o
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act) Yes o No ý
The registrant was a wholly owned subsidiary of another company prior to July 18, 2017. Accordingly, there was no public market for the registrant’s common shares as of June 30, 2017, the last day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter.
As of March 5, 2018, JBG SMITH Properties had 117,954,877 common shares outstanding.
DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE
Part III incorporates by reference information from certain portions of the registrant's definitive proxy statement for its 2018 annual
meeting of shareholders to be filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission within 120 days after the end of the fiscal year to which this report relates.





JBG SMITH PROPERTIES
ANNUAL REPORT ON FORM 10-K
YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2017

TABLE OF CONTENTS

 
 
Page
PART I
Item 1.
Business
Item 1A.
Risk Factors
Item 1B.
Unresolved Staff Comments
Item 2.
Properties
Item 3.
Legal Proceedings
Item 4.
Mine Safety Disclosures
PART II
Item 5.
Market For Registrant’s Common Equity, Related Stockholder Matters and Issuer Purchases of
   Equity Securities
Item 6.
Selected Financial Data
Item 7.
Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations
Item 7A.
Quantitative and Qualitative Disclosures About Market Risk
Item 8.
Financial Statements and Supplementary Data
Item 9.
Changes in and Disagreements with Accountants on Accounting and Financial Disclosure
Item 9A.
Controls and Procedures
Item 9B.
Other Information
PART III
Item 10.
Directors, Executive Officers and Corporate Governance
Item 11.
Executive Compensation
Item 12.
Security Ownership of Certain Beneficial Owners and Management and Related Stockholder Matters
Item 13.
Certain Relationships and Related Transactions and Director Independence
Item 14.
Principal Accounting Fees and Services
PART IV
Item 15.
Exhibits and Financial Statement Schedules
Item 16.
Form 10-K Summary
 
Signatures
















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PART I


ITEM 1. BUSINESS
The Company
JBG SMITH Properties ("JBG SMITH") is a real estate investment trust ("REIT") that owns, operates, invests in and develops real estate assets concentrated in leading urban infill submarkets in and around Washington, DC. We own and operate a portfolio of high-quality office and multifamily assets, many of which are amenitized with ancillary retail. In addition, we have a third-party real estate services business that provides fee-based real estate services to the legacy funds formerly organized by The JBG Companies ("JBG Legacy Funds") and other third parties. References to "our share" refer to our ownership percentage of consolidated and unconsolidated assets in real estate ventures.
As of December 31, 2017, our Operating Portfolio consists of 69 operating assets comprising 51 office assets totaling over 13.7 million square feet (11.8 million square feet at our share), 14 multifamily assets totaling 6,016 units (4,232 units at our share) and four other assets totaling approximately 765,000 square feet (348,000 square feet at our share). Additionally, we have: (i) ten assets under construction comprising four office assets totaling approximately 1.3 million square feet (1.2 million square feet at our share), five multifamily assets totaling 1,767 units (1,568 units at our share) and one other asset totaling approximately 41,100 square feet (4,100 square feet at our share); and (ii) 43 future development assets totaling approximately 21.4 million square feet (17.9 million square feet at our share) of estimated potential development density. We present combined portfolio operating data that aggregates assets that we consolidate in our financial statements and assets in which we own an interest, but do not consolidate in our financial results. For more information regarding our assets, see Item 2 "Properties".
We define "square feet" or "SF" as the amount of rentable square feet of a property that can be rented to tenants, defined as (i) for office and other assets, rentable square footage defined in the current lease and for vacant space the rentable square footage defined in the previous lease for that space, (ii) for multifamily assets, management’s estimate of approximate rentable square feet, (iii) for the assets under construction and the near-term development assets, management’s estimate of approximate rentable square feet based on current design plans as of December 31, 2017, or (iv) for the future development assets, management’s estimate of developable gross square feet based on its current business plans with respect to real estate owned or controlled as of December 31, 2017. "Metro" is the public transportation network serving the Washington, DC metropolitan area operated by the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority, and we consider "Metro-served" to be locations, submarkets or assets that are generally nearby and within walking distance of a Metro station, defined as being within 0.5 miles of an existing or planned Metro station.
Corporate Structure and Formation Transaction
JBG SMITH was organized by Vornado Realty Trust ("Vornado" or "former parent") as a Maryland REIT on October 27, 2016 (capitalized on November 22, 2016). JBG SMITH was formed for the purpose of receiving, via the spin-off on July 17, 2017 (the "Separation"), substantially all of the assets and liabilities of Vornado’s Washington, DC segment, which operated as Vornado / Charles E. Smith, (the "Vornado Included Assets"). On July 18, 2017, JBG SMITH acquired the management business and certain assets and liabilities (the "JBG Assets") of The JBG Companies ("JBG") (the "Combination"). The Separation and the Combination are collectively referred to as the "Formation Transaction." Unless the context otherwise requires, all references to "we," "us," and "our," refer to the Vornado Included Assets (our predecessor and accounting acquirer) for periods prior to the Separation and to JBG SMITH for periods after the Separation. Substantially all of our assets are held by, and our operations are conducted through, JBG SMITH Properties LP ("JBG SMITH LP"), our operating partnership.
Our Strategy
Our mission is to own and operate a high-quality portfolio of Metro-served, urban-infill office, multifamily and retail assets concentrated in downtown Washington, DC, our nation’s capital, and other leading urban infill submarkets with proximity to downtown Washington, DC and to grow this portfolio through value-added development and acquisitions. We have significant expertise across multiple product types and consider office, multifamily and retail to be our core asset classes. We believe we are known for our creative deal-making and capital allocation skills and for our development and value creation expertise across our core product types.
One of our approaches to value creation uses a series of complementary disciplines through a process that we call "Placemaking." Placemaking involves strategically mixing high-quality multifamily and commercial buildings with anchor, specialty and neighborhood retail in a high density, thoughtfully planned and designed public space. Through this process, we are able to create synergies, and thus value, across those varied uses and create unique, amenity-rich, walkable neighborhoods that are desirable and enhance significant tenant and investor demand. We believe that our Placemaking approach will increase occupancy and rental rates in our portfolio, particularly with respect to our concentrated and extensive land and building holdings in Crystal City. Crystal

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City’s attractive attributes as an urban-infill location with close proximity to downtown Washington, DC, access to Metro and other key transportation infrastructure and strong surrounding demographics serve as a solid foundation upon which to build the mix of uses and amenities that today’s tenants demand. We believe that the application of our Placemaking approach will allow us to increase Crystal City’s attractiveness to potential tenants and create significant value for our shareholders. Our strategy in Crystal City focuses on creating a 24-hour environment with an active retail heart through the delivery of additional anchor and small store retail and the introduction of a greater mix of uses, including new multifamily and the conversion of certain out-of-service office buildings to multifamily. These elements, combined with thoughtfully planned streetscapes and public spaces, are all critical to the creation of a dynamic place that we believe will help increase occupancy and rental rates throughout the submarket over time. Importantly, the broader benefits of this repositioning should be achievable without the need to invest significant capital in repositioning all our holdings in the submarket.
Our primary business objectives are to maximize cash flow and generate strong risk-adjusted returns for our shareholders. We intend to pursue these objectives through the following strategies:
Focus on High-Quality Mixed-Use Assets in Metro-Served Submarkets in the Washington, DC Metropolitan Area. We intend to continue our longstanding strategy of owning and operating assets within urban-infill, Metro-served submarkets in the Washington, DC metropolitan area with high barriers to entry and key urban amenities, including being within walking distance of the Metro. These submarkets, which include the District of Columbia; Crystal City and Pentagon City, the Rosslyn-Ballston Corridor, Reston and Alexandria in Virginia; and Bethesda, Silver Spring and the Rockville Pike Corridor in Maryland, generally feature strong economic and demographic attributes, as well as a superior transportation infrastructure that caters to the preferences of our office, multifamily and retail tenants. We believe these positive attributes will allow our assets located in these submarkets to outperform the Washington, DC metropolitan area as a whole.
Realize Contractual Embedded Growth. We believe there are substantial near-term growth opportunities embedded in our existing Operating Portfolio, many of which are contractual in nature, including the burn-off of free rent, contractual rent escalators in our non-GSA office and retail leases based on increases in CPI or a fixed percentage, and the commencement of signed but not yet commenced leases. "GSA" refers to the General Services Administration, which is the independent federal government agency that manages real estate procurement for the federal government and federal agencies.
Drive Incremental Growth Through Lease-up of Our Assets. We believe that we are well-positioned to achieve significant internal growth through lease-up of the vacant space in our Operating Portfolio, including certain recently developed assets, given our leasing capabilities and the tenant demand for high-quality space in our submarkets. As of December 31, 2017, we had 51 operating office assets totaling over 13.7 million square feet (11.8 million square feet at our share), which were 88.0% leased at our share, resulting in approximately 1.4 million square feet available for lease.
Deliver Our Assets Under Construction. As of December 31, 2017, we had ten high-quality assets under construction in which we expect to make an estimated incremental investment of $766.0 million at our share. Our assets under construction consist of over 1.3 million square feet (1.2 million square feet at our share) of office space and 1,767 units (1,568 units at our share) of multifamily, all of which are Metro-served. We believe these projects provide significant potential for value creation. As of December 31, 2017, 62.1% (61.8% at our share) of our office assets under construction were pre-leased. We define "estimated incremental investment" to mean management’s estimate of the remaining cost to be incurred in connection with the development of an asset as of December 31, 2017, including all remaining acquisition costs, hard costs, soft costs, tenant improvements, leasing costs and other similar costs to develop and stabilize the asset but excluding any financing costs, ground rent expenses and capitalized payroll costs.
Develop Our Significant Future Development Pipeline. We have a significant pipeline of opportunities for value creation through ground-up development, with the goal of producing favorable risk-adjusted returns on invested capital. We expect to be active in developing these opportunities while maintaining prudent leverage levels. We have a future development pipeline consisting of 43 assets. We estimate our future development pipeline can support over 21.4 million square feet (17.9 million square feet at our share) of estimated potential development density, with 96.5% of this potential development density being Metro-served based on our share of estimated potential development density. The estimated potential development densities and uses reflect our current business plans as of December 31, 2017 and are subject to change based on market conditions. We characterize our future development pipeline as our assets that are development opportunities on which we do not intend to commence construction within 18 months of December 31, 2017 where we (i) own land or control the land through a ground lease or (ii) are under a long-term conditional contract to purchase or enter into a leasehold interest with respect to land.
Our future development pipeline includes eight parcels attached to assets in our Operating Portfolio that would require a redevelopment of approximately 341,000 office and/or retail square feet (207,000 square feet at our share) and 316 multifamily units (177 units at our share), which generated $2.9 million of net operating income ("NOI") for the year ended December 31,

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2017, in order to access approximately 4.7 million square feet (3.1 million square feet at our share) of total estimated potential development density.
Redevelop and Reposition Our Assets. We evaluate our portfolio on an ongoing basis to identify value-creating redevelopment and renovation opportunities, including the addition of amenities, unit renovations and building and landscaping enhancements. We intend to seek to increase occupancy and rents, improve tenant quality and enhance cash flow and value by completing the redevelopment and repositioning of certain of our assets, including the use of our Placemaking process. This approach is facilitated by our extensive proprietary research platform and deep understanding of submarket dynamics. We believe there will be significant opportunities to apply our Placemaking process across our portfolio.
Pursue Attractive Acquisition Opportunities. We are well known in the brokerage community and have deep relationships with the most active brokers and sellers in the Washington, DC market. In addition, we believe we have developed a reputation for fair dealing, performance and creative deal-making, making us a preferred counterparty among market participants. We believe that our longstanding market relationships, reputation and expertise will continue to provide us with access to a pipeline of deals that are often compelling, off-market opportunities. We will continue to pursue acquisition opportunities with a disciplined approach and will place an emphasis on well-located, public transit-oriented assets in improving neighborhoods that have strong prospects for growth and where we believe that we can increase value through increasing occupancy and rental rates, re-marketing tenant space, enhancing public spaces, employing Placemaking strategies and improving building management.
Third-Party Services Business
Our third-party asset management and real estate services platform provides fee-based real estate services to the JBG Legacy Funds and other third-parties. Although a significant portion of our real estate ventures' assets and interests in assets formerly owned by certain of the JBG Legacy Funds were contributed to us in the Combination, the JBG Legacy Funds retained certain assets that are not consistent with our long-term business strategy, which were generally categorized as (i) condominium and townhome assets, (ii) hotels, (iii) assets that were likely to be sold by the JBG Legacy Funds in the near term as of the time of the Combination, (iv) assets located outside of our core markets or that are not Metro-served, (v) noncontrolling real estate venture interests and (vi) single-tenant leased GSA assets that are encumbered with long-term, hyper-amortizing bond financing that is not consistent with our financing strategy. With respect to the JBG Legacy Funds and for most assets that we hold through real estate ventures, we will continue to provide the same asset management, property management, construction management, leasing and other services that were provided prior to the Combination by the management business that we acquired in the Combination. We do not intend to raise any future investment funds, and the JBG Legacy Funds will be managed and liquidated over time. We expect to continue to earn fees from these funds as they are wound down, as well as from any real estate venture arrangements currently in place and any new real estate venture arrangements entered into in the future. Certain individual members of our management team own direct equity co-investment and promote interests in the JBG Legacy Funds that were not contributed to us. As the JBG Legacy Funds are wound down over time, these economic interests will decrease and be eventually eliminated.
We believe that the fees we earn in connection with providing these services will enhance our overall returns, provide additional scale and efficiency in our operating, development and acquisition businesses and generate capital which we can use to absorb overhead and other administrative costs of the platform. This scale provides competitive advantages, including market knowledge, buying power and operating efficiencies across all product types. We also believe that our existing relationships arising out of our third-party asset management and real estate services business will continue to provide potential capital and new investment opportunities.
Competition

The commercial real estate markets in which we operate are highly competitive. We compete with numerous acquirers, developers, owners and operators of commercial real estate including other REITs, private real estate funds, domestic and foreign financial institutions, life insurance companies, pension trusts, partnerships and individual investors, many of which own or may seek to acquire or develop assets similar to ours in the same markets in which our assets are located. These competitors may have greater financial resources or access to capital than we do or be willing to acquire assets in transactions which are more highly leveraged or are less attractive from a financial viewpoint than we are willing to pursue. Leasing is a major component of our business and is highly competitive. The principal means of competition in leasing are lease terms (including rent charged and tenant improvement allowances), location, services provided and the nature and condition of the asset to be leased. If our competitors offer space at rental rates below current market rates, below the rental rates we currently charge our tenants, in better locations within our markets, in higher quality assets or offer better services, we may lose potential tenants and we may be pressured to reduce our rental rates below those we currently charge to retain tenants when our tenants’ leases expire.

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Seasonality
Our revenues and expenses are, to some extent, subject to seasonality during the year, which impacts quarterly net earnings, cash flows and funds from operations that affects the sequential comparison of our results in individual quarters over time. We have historically experienced higher utility costs in the first and third quarters of the year.
Segment Data
We operate in the following business segments: office, multifamily and third-party real estate services. Financial information related to these business segments for each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2017 is set forth in Note 16 - Segment Information to our consolidated and combined financial statements included herein.
Tax Status
We intend to elect to be taxed as a REIT under sections 856-860 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"). Under those sections, a REIT which distributes at least 90% of its REIT taxable income as dividends to its shareholders each year and which meets certain other conditions will not be taxed on that portion of its taxable income which is distributed to its shareholders. Prior to the Separation, Vornado operated as a REIT and distributed 100% of taxable income to its shareholders, accordingly, no provision for federal income taxes has been made in the accompanying financial statements for the periods prior to the Separation. We intend to adhere to these requirements and maintain our REIT status in future periods.

As a REIT, we are allowed to reduce taxable income by all or a portion of our distributions to shareholders. Future distributions will be declared and paid at the discretion of our Board of Trustees and will depend upon cash generated by operating activities, our financial condition, capital requirements, annual dividend requirements under the REIT provisions of the Code, as amended, and such other factors as our Board of Trustees deems relevant.
We also participate in the activities conducted by subsidiary entities which have elected to be treated as taxable REIT subsidiaries ("TRS") under the Code. As such, we are subject to federal, state, and local taxes on the income from these activities. Income taxes attributable to our TRSs are accounted for under the asset and liability method. Under the asset and liability method, deferred income taxes arise from temporary differences between the tax basis of assets and liabilities and their reported amounts in the financial statements, which will result in taxable or deductible amounts in the future.
Significant Tenants
Only the U.S. federal government accounted for 10% or more of our rental revenue, which consists of property rentals and tenant reimbursements, during each of the three years in the period ended December 31, 2017 as follows:
 
Year Ended December 31,
(Dollars in thousands)
2017
 
2016
 
2015
Rental revenue from the U.S. federal government
$
92,192

 
$
103,864

 
$
102,951

Percentage of office segment rental revenue
24.5
%
 
29.6
%
 
29.7
%
Percentage of total rental revenue
19.4
%
 
23.6
%
 
23.9
%
Environmental Matters
Under various federal, state and local laws, ordinances and regulations, an owner of real estate is liable for the costs of removal or remediation of certain hazardous or toxic substances on such real estate. These laws often impose such liability without regard to whether the owner knew of, or was responsible for, the presence of such hazardous or toxic substances. The costs of remediation or removal of such substances may be substantial and the presence of such substances, or the failure to promptly remediate such substances, may adversely affect the owner’s ability to sell such real estate or to borrow using such real estate as collateral. In connection with the ownership and operation of our assets, we may be potentially liable for such costs. The operations of current and former tenants at our assets have involved, or may have involved, the use of hazardous materials or generated hazardous wastes. The release of such hazardous materials and wastes could result in us incurring liabilities to remediate any resulting contamination if the responsible party is unable or unwilling to do so. In addition, our assets are exposed to the risk of contamination originating from other sources. While a property owner may not be responsible for remediating contamination that has migrated onsite from an identifiable and viable offsite source, the contaminant’s presence can have adverse effects on operations and the redevelopment of our assets.

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Most of our assets have been subject, at some point, to environmental assessments that are intended to evaluate the environmental condition of the subject and surrounding assets. These environmental assessments generally have included a historical review, a public records review, a visual inspection of the site and surrounding assets, visual or historical evidence of underground storage tanks, and the preparation and issuance of a written report. Soil and/or groundwater subsurface testing is conducted at our assets, when necessary, to further investigate any issues raised by the initial assessment that could reasonably be expected to pose a material concern to the property or result in us incurring material environmental liabilities as a result of redevelopment. They may not, however, have included extensive sampling or subsurface investigations. In each case where the environmental assessments have identified conditions requiring remedial actions required by law, we have initiated appropriate actions.
Each of our properties has been subjected to varying degrees of environmental assessment at various times. The environmental assessments did not reveal any material environmental contamination that we believe would have a material adverse effect on our overall business, financial condition or results of operations, or that have not been anticipated and remediated during site redevelopment as required by law. Nevertheless, there can be no assurance that the identification of new areas of contamination, changes in the extent or known scope of contamination, the discovery of additional sites or changes in cleanup requirements would not result in significant cost to us.
Employees
Our headquarters are located at 4445 Willard Avenue, Suite 400, Chevy Chase, MD 20815. As of December 31, 2017, we had 1,020 employees.
Available Information
Copies of our Annual Report on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and amendments to those reports are available free of charge through our website (www.JBGSMITH.com) as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with, or furnished to, the Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC"). Also available on our website are copies of our Audit Committee Charter, Compensation Committee Charter, Corporate Governance and Nominating Committee Charter, Code of Business Conduct and Ethics and Corporate Governance Guidelines. In the event of any changes to these charters or the code or guidelines, changed copies will also be made available on our website. Copies of these documents are also available directly from us free of charge. Our website also includes other financial information, including certain financial measures not in compliance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States ("GAAP"), none of which is a part of this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Copies of our filings under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 are also available free of charge from us, upon request.

ITEM 1A. RISK FACTORS

You should carefully consider the following risks in evaluating our company and our common shares. If any of the following risks were to occur, our business, prospects, financial condition, results of operations, cash flow and the ability to make distributions to our shareholders could be materially and adversely affected, which we refer herein collectively as a "material adverse effect on us," the per share trading price of our common shares could decline significantly, and you could lose all or a part of your investment. Some statements in this Form 10-K, including statements in the following risk factors, constitute forward-looking statements. Refer to the section entitled "Cautionary Statement Concerning Forward-Looking Statements" for additional information regarding these forward-looking statements.
 
Risks Related to Our Business and Operations
 
Our portfolio of assets is geographically concentrated in the Washington, DC metropolitan area and in particular submarkets therein, which makes us susceptible to regional and local adverse economic and other conditions such that an economic downturn affecting this area could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
All of our assets are located in the Washington, DC metropolitan area. As a result, we are particularly susceptible to adverse economic or other conditions in this market (such as periods of economic slowdown or recession, business layoffs or downsizing, industry slowdowns, relocations of businesses, increases in real estate and other taxes, and the cost of complying with governmental regulations or increased regulation), as well as to natural disasters (including earthquakes, floods, storms and hurricanes), potentially adverse effects of "global warming" and other disruptions that occur in this market (such as terrorist activity or threats of terrorist activity and other events), any of which may have a greater impact on the value of our assets or on our operating results than if we owned a more geographically diverse portfolio. This market experienced an economic downturn in recent years. A similar or worse economic downturn in the future could have a material adverse effect on us. We cannot assure you that this market will grow or that underlying real estate fundamentals will be favorable to our asset classes or future development.


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Moreover, the same risks that apply to the Washington, DC metropolitan area as a whole also apply to the individual submarkets where our assets are located. Any adverse economic or other conditions in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, our submarkets or any decrease in demand for office, multifamily or retail assets could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Our assets and the property development market in the Washington, DC metropolitan area are dependent on a metropolitan economy that is heavily reliant on federal government spending, and any actual or anticipated curtailment of such spending could have a material adverse effect on us.  
 
The real estate and property development market in the Washington, DC metropolitan area is heavily dependent upon actual and anticipated federal government spending, and the professional services and other industries that support the federal government. Any actual or anticipated curtailment of federal government spending, whether due to an actual or potential change of presidential administration or control of Congress, anticipation of federal government sequestrations, furloughs or shutdowns, a slowdown of the U.S. and/or global economy or other factors, could have an adverse impact on real estate values and property development in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, on demand and willingness to enter into long-term contracts for office space by the federal government and companies dependent upon the federal government, as well as on occupancy rates and annualized rents of multifamily and retail assets by occupants or patrons whose employment is by or related to the federal government. For example, sequestration, which mainly impacted government contractors and federal government agencies, resulted in a large decrease in federal government spending, and the implementation of BRAC (Base Realignment and Closure), which shifted Department of Defense real estate from leased space to owned bases, contributed to 5.2 million square feet of occupancy losses in the Washington, DC metropolitan area from 2012 through 2014, mainly in Northern Virginia. Similar curtailments in federal spending or changes in federal leasing policy could occur in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
We derive a significant portion of our revenues from U.S. federal government tenants.
 
In the year ended December 31, 2017, approximately 24.5% of the rental revenue from our office segment was generated by rentals to federal government tenants and federal government tenants historically have been a significant source of new leasing for us. The occurrence of events that have a negative impact on the demand for federal government office space, such as a decrease in federal government payrolls or a change in policy that prevents governmental tenants from renting our office space, would have a much larger adverse effect on our revenues than a corresponding occurrence affecting other categories of tenants. If demand for federal government office space were to decline, it would be more difficult for us to lease our buildings and could reduce overall market demand and corresponding rental rates, all of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
We may face additional risks and costs associated with directly managing assets occupied by government tenants.
 
As of December 31, 2017, we owned 27 assets in which some or all of the tenants were federal government agencies. Lease agreements with these federal government agencies contain provisions required by federal law, which require, among other things, that the lessor of the property, agree to comply with certain rules and regulations, including rules and regulations related to anti-kickback procedures, examination of records, audits and records, equal opportunity provisions, prohibition against segregated facilities, certain executive orders, subcontractor cost or pricing data, and certain provisions intending to assist small businesses. Through one of our wholly owned subsidiaries, we directly manage assets with federal government agency tenants and, therefore, we are subject to additional risks associated with compliance with all applicable federal rules and regulations. In addition, there are certain additional requirements relating to the potential application of equal opportunity provisions and the related requirement to prepare written affirmative action plans applicable to government contractors and subcontractors. Some of the factors used to determine whether these requirements apply to a company that is affiliated with the actual government contractor (the legal entity that is the lessor under a lease with a federal government agency) include whether such company and the government contractor are under common ownership, have common management, and are under common control. We own the entity that is the government contractor and the property manager, increasing the risk that requirements of the Employment Standards Administration’s Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs and requirements to prepare affirmative action plans pursuant to the applicable executive order may be determined to be applicable to us. Compliance with these regulations is costly and any increase in regulation could increase our costs, which could have a material adverse effect on us.  
 
Capital markets and economic conditions can materially affect our liquidity, financial condition and results of operations, as well as the value of our debt and equity securities.
 
There are many factors that can affect the value of our equity securities and any debt securities we may issue in the future, including the state of the capital markets and the economy. Demand for office space may decline nationwide as it did in 2008 and 2009, due to an economic downturn, bankruptcies, downsizing, layoffs and cost cutting. Government action or inaction may adversely affect the state of the capital markets. The cost and availability of credit may be adversely affected by illiquid credit markets and wider credit spreads, which may adversely affect our liquidity and financial condition, including our results of operations, and the liquidity

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and financial condition of our tenants. Our inability or the inability of our tenants to timely refinance maturing liabilities and access the capital markets to meet liquidity needs may materially affect our financial condition and results of operations and the value of our equity securities and any debt securities we may issue in the future.
 
We are exposed to risks associated with real estate development and redevelopment, such as unanticipated expenses, delays and other contingencies, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Real estate development and redevelopment activities are a critical element of our business strategy, and we expect to engage in such activities with respect to certain of our properties and with properties that we may acquire in the future. To the extent that we do so, we will be subject to certain risks, including, without limitation:
construction or redevelopment costs of a project may exceed original estimates, possibly making the project less profitable than originally estimated, or unprofitable;
time required to complete the construction or redevelopment of a project or to lease-up the completed project may be greater than originally anticipated, thereby adversely affecting our cash flow and liquidity;
contractor and subcontractor disputes, strikes, labor disputes, weather conditions or supply disruptions;
failure to achieve expected occupancy and/or rent levels within the projected time frame, if at all;
delays with respect to obtaining, or the inability to obtain, necessary zoning, occupancy, land use and other governmental permits, and changes in zoning and land use laws;
occupancy rates and rents of a completed project may not be sufficient to make the project profitable;
incurrence of design, permitting and other development costs for opportunities that we ultimately abandon;
the ability of prospective real estate venture partners or buyers of our properties to obtain financing; and
the availability and pricing of financing to fund our development activities on favorable terms or at all.

Furthermore, if we develop assets in new markets or asset classes where we do not have the same level of market knowledge or experience as with our current markets and asset classes, then we may experience weaker than anticipated performance. These risks could result in substantial unanticipated delays or expenses and, under certain circumstances, could prevent the initiation or the completion of development or redevelopment activities, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
We may be unable to identify and complete acquisitions of properties that meet our criteria, which may impede our growth.
Our business strategy includes the acquisition of office, multifamily and retail properties and properties to be held for development. We evaluate the market for suitable acquisition candidates or investment opportunities that meet our criteria and are compatible with our growth strategies. However, we may be unable to acquire properties identified as potential acquisition opportunities on favorable terms, or at all. We may incur significant costs and divert management attention in connection with evaluating and negotiating potential acquisitions, including ones that we are subsequently unable to complete. Even if we enter into agreements for the acquisition of properties, these agreements are subject to customary conditions to closing, including the completion of due diligence investigations and other conditions that are not within our control, which may not be satisfied. In addition, we may be unable to finance the acquisition on favorable terms or at all. Furthermore, if we acquire assets in new markets or asset classes where we do not have the same level of market knowledge or experience as with our current markets and asset classes, then we may experience weaker than anticipated performance. Our inability to identify, negotiate, finance or consummate property acquisitions, or acquire properties on favorable terms, or at all, could impede our growth and have a material adverse effect on us.
Our future acquisitions may not yield the returns we expect, and we may otherwise be unable to operate acquired properties to meet our financial expectations, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Our future acquisitions and our ability to successfully operate the properties we acquire in such acquisitions may be exposed to the following significant risks:
even if we are able to acquire a desired property, competition from other potential acquirers may significantly increase the purchase price;
we may acquire properties that are not accretive to our results upon acquisition, and we may not be able to successfully manage and lease those properties to meet our expectations;
we may spend more than budgeted amounts to make necessary improvements or renovations to acquired properties;

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we may be unable to integrate new acquisitions quickly and efficiently, particularly acquisitions of portfolios of properties, into our existing operations, and, as a result, our results of operations and financial condition could be adversely affected;
market conditions may result in higher than expected vacancy rates and lower than expected rental rates; and
we may acquire properties subject to liabilities and without any recourse, or with only limited recourse, with respect to unknown liabilities, such as liabilities for clean‑up of undisclosed environmental contamination, claims by tenants, vendors or other persons dealing with the former owners of such properties, liabilities incurred in the ordinary course of business and claims for indemnification by general partners, trustees, officers and others indemnified by the former owners of such properties.
If our future acquisitions do not yield the returns we expect, and we are otherwise unable to operate acquired properties to meet our financial expectations, it could have a material adverse effect on us.
We may not be able to control our operating expenses, or our operating expenses may remain constant or increase, even if our revenues do not increase, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Operating expenses associated with owning a property include real estate taxes, insurance, loan payments maintenance, repair and renovation costs, the cost of compliance with governmental regulation (including zoning) and the potential for liability under applicable laws. If our operating expenses increase, our results of operations may be adversely affected. Moreover, operating expenses are not necessarily reduced when circumstances such as market factors, competition or reduced occupancy cause a reduction in revenues from the property. As a result, if revenues decline, we may not be able to reduce our operating expenses associated with the property. An increase in operating expenses or the inability to reduce operating expenses commensurate with revenue reductions could have a material adverse effect on us.
Partnership or real estate venture investments could be adversely affected by our lack of sole decision-making authority, our reliance on partners’ or co-venturers’ financial condition and disputes between us and our partners or co-venturers, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
As of December 31, 2017, approximately 12.6% of our assets measured by total square feet were held through real estate ventures, and we expect to co-invest in the future with other third parties through partnerships, real estate ventures or other entities, acquiring noncontrolling interests in or sharing responsibility for managing the affairs of a property, partnership, real estate venture or other entity. In particular, we expect to use real estate ventures as a significant source of equity capital to fund our development strategy. Consequently, with respect to any such third-party arrangement, we would not be in a position to exercise sole decision-making authority regarding the property, partnership, real estate venture or other entity, or structure of ownership and may, under certain circumstances, be exposed to risks not present were a third party not involved, including the possibility that partners or co-venturers might become bankrupt or fail to fund their share of required capital contributions, and we may be forced to make contributions to maintain the value of the property. Partners or co-venturers may have economic or other business interests or goals that are inconsistent with our business interests or goals and may be in a position to take action or withhold consent contrary to our policies or objectives. In some instances, partners or co-venturers may have competing interests in our markets that could create conflict of interest issues. These investments may also have the potential risk of impasses on decisions, such as a sale, because neither we nor the partner or co-venturer would have full control over the partnership or real estate venture. We and our respective partners or co-venturers may each have the right to trigger a buy-sell right or forced sale arrangement, which could cause us to sell our interest, or acquire our partners’ or co-venturers’ interest, or to sell the underlying asset, either on unfavorable terms or at a time when we otherwise would not have initiated such a transaction. In addition, a sale or transfer by us to a third party of our interests in the partnership or real estate venture may be subject to consent rights or rights of first refusal in favor of our partners or co-venturers, which would in each case restrict our ability to dispose of our interest in the partnership or real estate venture. Where we are a limited partner or non-managing member in any partnership or limited liability company, if the entity takes or expects to take actions that could jeopardize our status as a REIT or require us to pay tax, we may be forced to dispose of our interest in that entity, including by contributing our interest to a subsidiary of ours that is subject to corporate level income tax. Disputes between us and partners or co-venturers may result in litigation or arbitration that would increase our expenses and prevent our officers and/or trustees from focusing their time and effort on our business. Consequently, actions by or disputes with partners or co-venturers might result in subjecting assets owned by the partnership or real estate venture to additional risk. In addition, we may in certain circumstances be liable for the actions of our third-party partners or co-venturers. Our real estate ventures may be subject to debt, and the refinancing of such debt may require equity capital calls. We will review the qualifications and previous experience of any partners and co-venturers, although we may not obtain financial information from, or undertake independent investigations with respect to, prospective partners or co-venturers. In addition, any cash distributions from real estate ventures will be subject to the operating agreements of the real estate ventures, which may limit distributions, the timing of distributions or specify certain preferential distributions among the respective parties. The occurrence of any of the risks described above could have a material adverse effect on us.


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We may be unable to renew leases, lease vacant space or re-let space as leases expire, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
As of December 31, 2017, leases representing 8.9% of our share of the office and retail square footage in our Operating Portfolio will expire during the year ended December 31, 2018 and 12.3% of our share of the square footage of the assets in our office and other portfolios was unoccupied and not generating rent. We cannot assure you that expiring leases will be renewed or that our assets will be re-let at rental rates equal to or above current average rental rates or that substantial free rent, tenant improvements, early termination rights or below-market renewal options will not be offered to attract new tenants or retain existing tenants.

In addition, our ability to lease our multifamily assets at favorable rates, or at all, may be adversely affected by any increase in supply and/or deterioration in the multifamily market, which is dependent upon the overall level of spending in the economy; and spending is adversely affected by, among other things, job losses and unemployment levels, recession, personal debt levels, housing market conditions, stock market volatility and uncertainty about the future.

If the rental rates on new leases at our assets decrease, our existing tenants do not renew their leases or we do not re-let a significant portion of our available space and space for which leases expire, it could have a material adverse affect on us.
 
We depend on major tenants in our office portfolio, and the bankruptcy, insolvency or inability to pay rent of any of these tenants could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
As of December 31, 2017, the 20 largest office and retail tenants in our operating portfolio represented approximately 49.3% of our share of total annualized office and retail rent. In many cases, through tenant improvement allowances and other concessions, we have made substantial upfront investments in leases with our major tenants that we may not recover if they fail to pay rent through the end of the lease term.
 
The inability of a major tenant to pay rent, or the bankruptcy or insolvency of a major tenant, may adversely affect the income produced by our Operating Portfolio. If a tenant becomes bankrupt or insolvent, federal law may prohibit us from evicting such tenant based solely upon such bankruptcy or insolvency. In addition, a bankrupt or insolvent tenant may be authorized to reject and terminate its lease with us. If a lease is rejected by a tenant in bankruptcy, we may have only a general unsecured claim for damages that is limited in amount and may only be paid to the extent that funds are available and in the same percentage as is paid to all other holders of unsecured claims. Moreover, any claim against this tenant for unpaid, future rent would be subject to a statutory cap that might be substantially less than the remaining rent owed under the lease.
 
If any of our major tenants were to experience a downturn in its business, or a weakening of its financial condition resulting in its failure to make timely rental payments or causing it to default under its lease, we may experience delays in enforcing our rights as landlord and may incur substantial costs in protecting our investment. Any such event could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
We derive a significant portion of our revenues from five of our assets.
 
As of December 31, 2017, five of our assets in the aggregate generated approximately 25% of our share of annualized rent. The occurrence of events that have a negative impact on one or more of these assets, such as a natural disaster that damages one or more of these assets, would have a much larger adverse effect on our revenues than a corresponding occurrence affecting a less significant property. A substantial decline in the revenues generated by one or more of these assets could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
We derive most of our revenues from office assets and are subject to risks that affect the businesses of our office tenants, which are generally financial, legal and other professional firms as well as the federal government and defense contractors.
 
As of December 31, 2017, our 51 operating office assets generated approximately 80.9% of our share of annualized rent. As a result, the occurrence of events that have a negative impact on the market for office space, such as increased unemployment in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, would have a much larger adverse effect on our revenues than a corresponding occurrence affecting our other segments. Our office tenants are generally financial, legal and other professional firms, as well as the federal government and defense contractors. Consequently, we are subject to factors that affect the financial, legal and professional services industries or the federal government generally, including the state of the economy, stock market volatility, and the level of unemployment. These factors could adversely affect the financial condition of our office tenants and the willingness of firms to lease space in our office buildings, which in turn could have a material adverse effect on us.


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Some of our assets depend on anchor or major retail tenants to attract shoppers and could be adversely affected by the loss of, or a store closure by, one or more of these tenants.
 
Some of our assets are anchored by large, nationally recognized tenants. These tenants may experience a downturn in their business that may significantly weaken their financial condition. As a result, these tenants may fail to comply with their contractual obligations to us, seek concessions to continue operations or declare bankruptcy, any of which could result in the termination of these tenants’ leases. In addition, some of our tenants may cease operations at stores in our assets while continuing to pay rent. Moreover, mergers or consolidations among large retail establishments could result in the closure of existing stores or duplicate or geographically overlapping store locations, which could include stores at our assets.
 
Loss of, or a store closure by, an anchor or significant tenant could decrease customer traffic, thereby decreasing sales for our other tenants at the applicable retail property. If sales of our other tenants decrease, they may be unable to pay their minimum rents or expense recovery charges. These circumstances may significantly reduce our occupancy level or the rent we receive from our retail assets, and we may not have the right to re-lease vacated space or we may be unable to re-lease vacated space at attractive rents or at all. Moreover, if a significant tenant or anchor store defaults, we may experience delays and costs in enforcing our rights as landlord to recover amounts due to us under the terms of our agreements with those parties.
 
The occurrence of any of the situations described above, particularly if it involves an anchor or major tenant with leases in multiple locations, could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Our Placemaking business model depends in significant part on a retail component, which frequently involves retail assets embedded or adjacent to our office and/or multifamily assets, making us subject to risks that affect the retail environment generally, such as competition from discount and online retailers, weakness in the economy, consumer spending and the financial condition of large retail companies, any of which could adversely affect market rents for retail space and the willingness or ability of retailers to lease space in our retail assets.

We own and operate retail real estate assets and, consequently, are subject to factors that affect the retail environment generally, as well as the market for retail space. The retail environment and the market for retail space have previously been, and could again be, adversely affected by increasing competition from online retailers and other online businesses, discount retailers and outlet malls, weakness in national, regional and local economies, consumer spending and consumer confidence, adverse financial condition of some large retailing companies, ongoing consolidation in the retail sector and an excess amount of retail space in a number of markets. Increases in online consumer spending may significantly affect our retail tenants’ ability to generate sales in their stores. This inability to generate sales may cause retailers to, among other things, close stores, decrease the size of new or existing stores, ask for concessions or go bankrupt, all of which could have a material adverse effect on us.

Additionally, our Placemaking model depends in significant part on a retail component, which frequently involves retail assets embedded in or adjacent to our office and/or multifamily assets and if our retail assets lose tenants, whether to the proliferation of e-commerce business or otherwise, it could have a material adverse effect on us.

If we fail to reinvest in and redevelop our assets so as to maintain their attractiveness to retailers and shoppers, then retailers or shoppers may perceive that shopping at other venues or online is more convenient, cost-effective or otherwise more attractive, which could negatively affect our ability to rent retail space at our assets.
 
Any of the foregoing factors could adversely affect the financial condition of our retail tenants, the willingness of retailers to lease space from us, and the success of our Placemaking business model, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

The composition of our portfolio by asset type may change over time, which could expose us to different asset class risks than if our portfolio composition remained static.

We own office, multifamily and other assets, with office representing 80.9% of our annualized rent and 64.5% of our portfolio based on square footage. Therefore, our results of operations are more affected by conditions in the office market than markets for other asset types. If the composition of our portfolio changes, however, then we would become more exposed to the risks and markets of other asset classes. Under our current business plan, we expect that multifamily assets will become a greater proportion of our portfolio. If we are successful in executing the current business plan, then we will become more exposed to the risks of the multifamily market and we may not manage those assets as well as our office assets, any of which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 

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Real estate is a competitive business.
 
We compete with numerous acquirers, developers, owners and operators of commercial real estate including other REITs, private real estate funds, domestic and foreign financial institutions, life insurance companies, pension trusts, partnerships and individual investors, some of which may have greater financial resources and be willing to accept lower returns on their investments than we are. The principal means of competition in leasing are lease terms (including rent charged and tenant improvement allowances), location, services provided and the nature and condition of the asset to be leased. If our competitors offer space at rental rates below current market rates, below the rental rates we currently charge our tenants, in better locations within our markets, in higher quality assets or offer better services, we may lose potential tenants and we may be pressured to reduce our rental rates below those we currently charge to retain tenants when our tenants’ leases expire.

Our success depends upon, among other factors, trends of the global, national, regional and local economies, the financial condition and operating results of current and prospective tenants and customers, availability and cost of capital, construction and renovation costs, taxes, governmental regulations, legislation and population and employment trends.    
 
We depend on leasing space to tenants on economically favorable terms and collecting rent from tenants who may not be able to pay.
 
Our financial results depend significantly on leasing space in our assets to tenants on economically favorable terms. In addition, because a majority of our income is derived from renting real property, our income, funds available to pay indebtedness and funds available for distribution to shareholders will decrease if our tenants cannot pay their rent or if we are not able to maintain occupancy levels on favorable terms. If a tenant does not pay its rent, we might not be able to enforce our rights as landlord without delays and might incur substantial legal and other costs. During periods of economic adversity, there may be an increase in the number of tenants that cannot pay their rent and an increase in vacancy rates, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
We may find it necessary to make rent or other concessions and/or significant capital expenditures to improve our assets to retain and attract tenants, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
We may find it necessary to make rent or other concessions to tenants, accommodate requests for renovations, build-to-suit remodeling and other improvements or provide additional services to our tenants. As a result, we may have to make significant capital or other expenditures to retain tenants whose leases expire and to attract new tenants in sufficient numbers. If the necessary capital is unavailable, we may be unable to make such expenditures. This could result in non-renewals by tenants upon expiration of their leases and our vacant space remaining untenanted, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Affordable housing and tenant protection regulations may limit our ability to increase rents and pass through new or increased operating expenses to our tenants.
 
Certain states and municipalities have adopted laws and regulations imposing restrictions on the timing or amount of rent increases and other tenant protections. As of December 31, 2017, approximately 5% of the multifamily units in our Operating Portfolio were designated as affordable housing. In addition, Washington, DC and Montgomery County, Maryland have laws that require, in certain circumstances, an owner of a multifamily rental property to allow tenant organizations the option to purchase the building at a market price if the owner attempts to sell the property. We expect to continue operating and acquiring assets in areas that either are subject to these types of laws or regulations or where such laws or regulations may be enacted in the future. Such laws and regulations limit our ability to charge market rents, increase rents, evict tenants or recover increases in our operating expenses and could make it more difficult for us to dispose of assets in certain circumstances.
 
Our success depends on our senior management team whose continued service is not guaranteed, and the loss of one or more of these persons could adversely affect our ability to manage our business and to implement our growth strategies, or could create a negative perception in the capital markets.
 
Our success and our ability to implement and manage anticipated future growth depend, in large part, upon the efforts of our senior management team, who have extensive market knowledge and relationships, and exercise substantial influence over our operational, financing, acquisition and disposition activity. Members of our senior management team have national or regional industry reputations that attract business and investment opportunities and assist us in negotiations with lenders, existing and potential tenants and other industry participants. The loss of services of one or more members of our senior management team, or our inability to attract and retain similarly qualified personnel, could adversely affect our business, diminish our investment opportunities and weaken our relationships with lenders, business partners, existing and prospective tenants and industry participants, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 

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The actual density of our future development pipeline and/or any particular future development parcel may not be consistent with our estimated potential development density.
 
As of December 31, 2017, we estimate that our 43-asset future development pipeline will total over approximately 21.4 million square feet (17.9 million square feet at our share) of estimated potential development density. We caution you not to place undue reliance on the potential development density estimates for our future development pipeline and/or any particular future development parcel because they are based solely on our estimates, using data available to us, and our business plans as of December 31, 2017. The actual density of our future development pipeline and/or any particular future development parcel may differ substantially from our estimates based on numerous factors, including our inability to obtain necessary zoning, land use and other required entitlements, legal challenges to our plans by activists and others, as well as building, occupancy and other required governmental permits and authorizations, and changes in the entitlement, permitting and authorization processes that restrict or delay our ability to develop, redevelop or use our future development pipeline at anticipated density levels. Moreover, we may strategically choose not to develop, redevelop or use our future development pipeline to its maximum potential development density or may be unable to do so as a result of factors beyond our control, including our ability to obtain financing on terms and conditions that we find acceptable, or at all, to fund our development activities. We can provide no assurance that the actual density of our future development pipeline and/or any particular future development parcel will be consistent with our estimated potential development density.
 
We may not be able to realize potential incremental annualized rent from our office, multifamily or other lease-up opportunities.
 
Based on current market demand in our submarkets and the efforts of our dedicated in-house leasing teams, we believe we can increase our occupancy and revenue at certain office, multifamily and retail assets. However, we cannot assure you that we will be able to realize potential incremental annualized rent from our office, multifamily or other lease-up opportunities. Our ability to increase our occupancy and revenue at certain office, multifamily and other assets may be adversely affected by an increase in supply and/or deterioration in the office, multifamily or other markets. In addition, if our competitors offer space at rental rates below current asking rates or below our in-place rates, we may experience difficulties attracting new tenants or retaining existing tenants and may be pressured to reduce our rental rates below those we currently charge or to offer more substantial free rent, tenant improvements, early termination rights or below-market renewal options in order to attract or retain tenants. We caution you not to place undue reliance on our belief that we can increase our occupancy and revenue at certain office, multifamily and retail assets.
 
Revenues from our third-party asset management and real estate services business may decline more quickly than expected, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

Our third-party asset management and real estate services business provides fee-based real estate services to the JBG Legacy Funds and third parties. Our expectation is that the fund portion of this business will wind down over the next several years, but the wind down could accelerate and the business could be less profitable than anticipated. Although we expect to receive fees for the services provided to the funds as they wind down, the amount of those fees will decrease significantly as the number of assets under management is reduced. In addition to reduced revenue, if we cannot reduce our general and administrative expenses to correspond to the decreasing asset management fees, our profitability will be negatively affected. Fees from management of real estate ventures and third parties may also be negatively affected if management contracts are terminated or if we are unable to secure new sources of fee-based revenue. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
We may from time to time be subject to litigation, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
We are a party to various claims and routine litigation arising in the ordinary course of business. Some of these claims or others to which we may be subject from time to time may result in defense costs, settlements, fines or judgments against us, some of which are not, or cannot be, covered by insurance. Payment of any such costs, settlements, fines or judgments that are not insured could have a material adverse effect on us. In addition, certain litigation or the resolution of certain litigation may affect the availability or cost of some of our insurance coverage, which could adversely impact our results of operations and cash flow, expose us to increased risks that would be uninsured, and/or adversely impact our ability to attract officers and trustees.
Some of our potential losses may not be covered by insurance.
 
We maintain general liability insurance as well as all-risk property and rental value insurance coverage, with sub-limits for certain perils such as floods and earthquakes on each of our properties. However, there can be no assurance that losses incurred by us will be covered by these insurance policies. We maintain coverage for terrorism acts including terrorism involving nuclear, biological, chemical and radiological terrorism events, as defined by the Terrorism Risk Insurance Program Reauthorization Act, which expires in December 2020. We will continue to monitor the state of the insurance market and the scope and costs of coverage for acts of

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terrorism. However, we cannot provide assurance that such coverage will be available on commercially reasonable terms in the future.
 
Our mortgage loans are generally non-recourse and contain customary covenants requiring adequate insurance coverage. Although we believe that we currently have adequate insurance coverage for purposes of these agreements, we may not be able to obtain an equivalent amount of coverage at reasonable costs in the future. If lenders insist on greater coverage than we are able to obtain, it could adversely affect the ability to finance or refinance the properties.
 
Compliance or failure to comply with the Americans with Disabilities Act or other safety regulations and requirements could result in substantial costs.
 
The Americans with Disabilities Act ("ADA") generally requires that public buildings, including our assets, meet certain federal requirements related to access and use by disabled persons. Noncompliance could result in the imposition of fines by the federal government or the award of damages to private litigants and/or legal fees to their counsel. If, under the ADA, we are required to make substantial alterations and capital expenditures in one or more of our assets, including the removal of access barriers, it could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Our assets are subject to various federal, state and local regulatory requirements, such as state and local fire and life safety requirements. If we fail to comply with these requirements, we could incur fines or private damage awards. We do not know whether existing requirements will change or whether compliance with future requirements will require significant unanticipated expenditures that will affect our cash flow and results of operations.
 
Terrorist attacks, such as those of September 11, 2001, may adversely affect the value of our assets and our ability to generate revenue.
 
Our assets are located in the Washington, DC metropolitan area, which has been and may be in the future the target of actual or threatened terrorism activity. As a result, some tenants in this market may choose to relocate their businesses to other markets or to lower-profile office buildings within this market that may be perceived to be less likely targets of future terrorist activity. This could result in an overall decrease in the demand for office space in this market generally or in our assets in particular, which could increase vacancies in our assets or necessitate that we lease our assets on less favorable terms or both. In addition, future terrorist attacks in the Washington, DC metropolitan area could directly or indirectly damage our assets, both physically and financially, or cause losses that materially exceed our insurance coverage. Properties that are occupied by federal government tenants may be more likely to be the target of a future attack.  As of December 31, 2017, 27 of our assets had federal government agencies as tenants. As a result of the foregoing, the value of our assets and our ability to generate revenues could decline materially, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
  
If one of our tenants were designated a "Prohibited Person" by the Office of Foreign Assets Control, we could be materially adversely effected.
 
Pursuant to Executive Order 13224 and other laws, the Office of Foreign Assets Control of the United States Department of the Treasury ("OFAC") maintains a list of persons designated as terrorists or who are otherwise blocked or banned ("Prohibited Persons") from conducting business or engaging in transactions in the United States and thereby restricts our doing business with such persons. In addition, our leases, loans and other agreements may require us to comply with OFAC and related requirements, and any failure to do so may result in a breach of such agreements. If a tenant or other party with whom we conduct business is placed on the OFAC list or is otherwise a party with whom we are prohibited from doing business, we may be required to terminate the lease or other agreement. Any such termination could result in a loss of revenue and negative publicity and could otherwise have a material adverse effect on us.

Our business and operations would suffer in the event of system failures.
 
Despite system redundancy, the implementation of security measures and the existence of a disaster recovery plan for our internal information technology systems, our systems are vulnerable to damages from any number of sources, including computer viruses, unauthorized access, energy blackouts, natural disasters, terrorism, war and telecommunication failures. Any system failure or accident that causes interruptions in our operations could result in a material disruption to our business. We may also incur additional costs to remedy damages caused by such disruptions. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
The occurrence of cyber incidents, or a deficiency in our cybersecurity, could negatively impact our business by causing a disruption to our operations, a compromise or corruption of our confidential information, regulatory enforcement and other legal proceedings and/or damage to our business relationships, all of which could negatively impact our financial results.

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A cyber incident is considered to be any adverse event that threatens the confidentiality, integrity, or availability of our information resources. More specifically, a cyber incident is an intentional attack or an unintentional event that can include unauthorized persons gaining access to systems to disrupt operations, corrupt data, or steal confidential information. As our reliance on technology has increased, so have the risks posed to our systems, both internal and those we have outsourced. Our primary risks that could directly result from the occurrence of a cyber incident are theft of assets; operational interruption; regulatory enforcement, lawsuits and other legal proceedings; damage to our relationship with our tenants; and private data exposure. We have implemented processes, procedures and controls to help mitigate these risks, but despite these measures and our increased awareness of a risk of a cyber incident, a cyber incident could have a material adverse effect on us.

We have a limited operating history as a REIT and may not be able to successfully operate as a REIT.
 
We have a limited operating history as a REIT. We cannot assure you that the experience of our senior management team will be sufficient to successfully operate our company as a REIT. We have control systems and procedures to maintain our qualification as a REIT, and these efforts could place a significant strain on our management systems, infrastructure and other resources. Failure to maintain our qualification as a REIT would have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Risks Related to the Formation Transaction
 
We have a limited history operating as an independent company, and our historical financial information is not necessarily representative of the results that we would have achieved as a separate, publicly traded company and may not be a reliable indicator of our future results.
 
The historical information included herein covering periods prior to the Formation Transaction refers to our business as operated by Vornado and JBG separately from each other. Our historical financial information included herein covering periods prior to the Formation Transaction is derived from the consolidated financial statements and accounting records of Vornado and does not include the results of the assets contributed by JBG for any period prior to completion of the Formation Transaction. Accordingly, the historical financial information included herein does not necessarily reflect the financial condition, results of operations or cash flows that we would have achieved as a separate, publicly traded company during the periods presented or those that we will achieve in the future. Factors that could cause our results to differ from those reflected in our historical financial information and which may adversely impact our ability to receive similar results in the future may include, but are not limited to, the following:
 
Prior to the Formation Transaction, our business was operated by Vornado or JBG, as applicable, as part of their broader organizations, rather than as an independent company. Vornado and JBG performed various management functions for our business, such as accounting, information technology and finance. Vornado continues to provide some of these functions to us, as described in Note 18 to our consolidated and combined financial statements included herein, and we provide some of these functions on our own behalf through the management business we acquired from JBG. Our historical financial results reflect allocations of expenses from Vornado for such functions and may be less than the expenses we would have incurred had we operated as a separate, publicly traded company. We may need to make certain investments to replicate or outsource from other providers certain facilities, systems, infrastructure and personnel previously provided by Vornado. Continuing to develop our ability to operate as a separate, publicly traded company is costly and difficult. We may not be able to operate our business efficiently or at comparable costs to when we were not a separate, publicly traded company, and our profitability may decline;
Although we have entered into certain transition and other separation-related agreements with Vornado, these arrangements may not fully capture the benefits we have enjoyed as a result of being integrated with Vornado and may result in us paying higher charges than in the past for these services. In addition, services provided to us under the Transition Services Agreement will generally only be provided for up to 24 months following the completion of the Formation Transaction in July 2017, and this may not be sufficient to meet our needs. As a separate, independent company, we may be unable to obtain goods and services at the prices and terms obtained prior to the Formation Transaction, which could decrease our overall profitability. As a separate, independent company, we may also not be as successful in negotiating favorable tax treatments and credits with governmental entities. Likewise, it may be more difficult for us to attract and retain desired tenants. This could have an adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition;
Generally, our working capital requirements and capital for our general business purposes, including acquisitions and capital expenditures, have historically been satisfied as part of the company-wide cash management policies of Vornado or of JBG, as applicable. Going forward, we may need to obtain additional financing from banks, through public offerings or private placements of debt or equity securities, strategic relationships or other arrangements, which may not be on terms as favorable to those obtained by Vornado or JBG, and the cost of capital for our business may be higher than Vornado’s or JBG’s cost of capital prior to the Formation Transaction; and

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As a separate public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Act and are required to prepare our financial statements according to the rules and regulations required by the SEC. We are required to develop and implement control systems and procedures to satisfy our periodic and current reporting requirements under applicable SEC regulations and comply with NYSE listing standards, and this transition could place a significant strain on our management systems, infrastructure and other resources. We cannot assure you that the past experience of our senior management team will be sufficient to successfully operate as a publicly traded company.
 
Other significant changes may occur in our cost structure, management, financing and business operations as a result of operating as an independent company. For additional information about the past financial performance of our business and the basis of presentation of the historical combined financial statements, refer to "Selected Historical Combined Financial Data," "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" and the historical financial statements and accompanying notes included herein.
 
We are dependent on Vornado to provide certain services to us pursuant to a Transition Services Agreement, and it may be difficult to replace the services provided under such agreement.
 
Prior to the Formation Transaction, we relied on Vornado to provide certain financial, administrative and other support functions to operate our business, and we will continue to rely on Vornado for certain of these services on a transitional basis pursuant to the Transition Services Agreement that we entered into with Vornado. See Note 18 to our consolidated and combined financial statements included herein. In addition, it may be difficult for us to replace the services provided by Vornado under the Transition Services Agreement, and the terms of any agreements to replace such services may be less favorable to us. Any failure by Vornado in the performance of such services, or any failure on our part to successfully transition these services away from Vornado by the expiration of the Transition Services Agreement in July of 2019, could have a material adverse effect on us.

We could be required to indemnify Vornado for certain material tax obligations that could arise as addressed in the Tax Matters Agreement.
 
The Tax Matters Agreement that we entered into with Vornado provides special rules that allocate tax liabilities if the distribution of JBG SMITH shares by Vornado, together with certain related transactions, is not tax-free. Under the Tax Matters Agreement, we may be required to indemnify Vornado against any taxes and related amounts and costs resulting from (i) an acquisition of all or a portion of our equity securities or our assets, whether by merger or otherwise, (ii) other actions or failures to act by us, or (iii) any of our representations or undertakings being incorrect or violated. In addition, under the Tax Matters Agreement, we are liable for any taxes attributable to us and our subsidiaries, unless such taxes are imposed on us or any of the REITs contributed by Vornado (i) with respect to a period before the distribution as a result of any action taken by Vornado after the distribution, or (ii) with respect to any period as a result of Vornado’s failure to qualify as a REIT for the taxable year of Vornado that includes the distribution.
 
Unless Vornado and JBG SMITH are both REITs immediately after the distribution of JBG SMITH from Vornado and at all times during the two years thereafter, JBG SMITH could be required to recognize certain corporate-level gains for tax purposes.
 
Section 355(h) of the Code provides that tax-free treatment will not be available unless, as relevant here, Vornado and JBG SMITH are both REITs immediately after the distribution.
 
In addition, the Treasury Department and the IRS recently released temporary Treasury regulations pursuant to which, subject to certain exceptions, a REIT must recognize corporate-level gain if it acquires property from a non-REIT "C" corporation in certain so-called "conversion" transactions and engages in a Section 355 transaction within ten years of such conversion. For this purpose, a conversion transaction refers to the qualification of a non-REIT "C" corporation as a REIT or the transfer of property owned by a non-REIT "C" corporation to a REIT. JBG SMITH or its subsidiaries have acquired property pursuant to conversion transactions within ten years of the distribution. One of the exceptions to the recognition of corporate-level gain applies to a distribution described in Section 355 of the Code in which the distributing corporation and the controlled corporation are both REITs immediately after such distribution and at all times during the two years thereafter.
 
We believe that each of Vornado and JBG SMITH qualifies as a REIT and intends to operate in a manner so that each qualified immediately after the distribution and will qualify at all times during the two years after the distribution. However, if either Vornado or JBG SMITH failed to qualify as a REIT immediately after the distribution of JBG SMITH from Vornado or fails to qualify at any time during the two years after the distribution, then, for our taxable year that includes the distribution, the IRS may assert that JBG SMITH would have to recognize corporate-level gain on assets acquired in conversion transactions. The Treasury Department recently issued a notice identifying the temporary Treasury regulations as a significant tax regulation that imposes an

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undue financial burden on U.S. taxpayers and/or adds undue complexity to the federal tax laws, pursuant to Executive Order 13789 (issued April 21, 2017). In its two reports to the President pursuant to Executive Order 13789, the Treasury Department has indicated that it intends to propose reforms to mitigate the burdens of the regulation.  It is unclear the exact form any such proposed reforms would take and what the impact of such reforms would be on JBG SMITH.
 
We may not be able to engage in potentially desirable strategic or capital-raising transactions for the 24-month period following the Formation Transaction. In addition, if we were able to engage in such transactions, we could be liable for adverse tax consequences resulting therefrom.
 
To preserve the tax-free treatment of the Formation Transaction, for the two-year period following the Formation Transaction, we are prohibited, except in specific circumstances, from: (i) entering into any transaction pursuant to which all or a portion of our shares would be acquired, whether by merger or otherwise, (ii) issuing equity securities beyond certain thresholds and except in certain circumscribed manners, (iii) repurchasing common shares, (iv) ceasing to actively conduct certain of our businesses, or (v) taking or failing to take any other action that prevents the distribution of JBG SMITH shares by Vornado and certain related transactions from being tax-free.
 
These restrictions may limit our ability to pursue strategic transactions or engage in new business or other transactions that may maximize the value of our business.

Potential indemnification liabilities to Vornado pursuant to the Separation and Distribution Agreement (the "Separation Agreement") could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
The Separation Agreement with Vornado governs our ongoing relationship with Vornado. Among other things, the Separation Agreement provides for indemnification obligations designed to make us financially responsible for substantially all liabilities that may exist relating to our business activities, whether incurred prior to or after the Formation Transaction, as well as those obligations of Vornado that we assumed pursuant to the Separation Agreement. If we are required to indemnify Vornado under the circumstances set forth in this agreement, we may be subject to substantial liabilities.
 
There may be undisclosed liabilities of the Vornado and JBG assets contributed to us in the Formation Transaction that might expose us to potentially large, unanticipated costs.
 
Prior to entering into the Master Transaction Agreement ("MTA"), each of Vornado and JBG performed diligence with respect to the business and assets of the other. However, these diligence reviews were necessarily limited in nature and scope, and may not have adequately uncovered all of the contingent or undisclosed liabilities that we assumed in connection with the Formation Transaction, many of which may not be covered by insurance. The MTA does not provide for indemnification for these types of liabilities by either party post-closing, and, therefore, we may not have any recourse with respect to such unexpected liabilities. Any such liabilities could cause us to experience losses, which may be significant, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Certain of our trustees and executive officers may have actual or potential conflicts of interest because of their previous or continuing equity interest in, or positions at, Vornado or JBG, as applicable, including members of our senior management, who have an ownership interest in the JBG Legacy Funds and own carried interests in certain JBG legacy Funds and in certain of our real estate ventures that entitles them to receive additional compensation if the fund or real estate venture achieves certain return thresholds.
 
Some of our trustees and executive officers are persons who are or have been employees of Vornado or were employees of JBG. Because of their current or former positions with Vornado or JBG, certain of our trustees and executive officers own Vornado common shares or other Vornado equity awards or equity interests in certain JBG Legacy Funds and related entities. In addition, one of our trustees continues to serve as chief executive officer and chairman of the Board of Trustees of Vornado. Ownership of Vornado common shares or interests in the JBG Legacy Funds, or service as a trustee or managing partner, as applicable, at either company, could create, or appear to create, potential conflicts of interest.
 
Certain of the JBG Legacy Funds own assets that were not contributed to us in the combination (the "JBG Excluded Assets"), which JBG Legacy Funds are owned in part by members of our senior management. In addition, although the asset management and property management fees associated with the JBG Excluded Assets were assigned to us upon completion of the Formation Transaction, the general partner and managing member interests in the JBG Legacy Funds held by former JBG executives (who became members of our management team) were not transferred to us and remain under the control of these individuals. As a result, our management’s time and efforts may be diverted from the management of our assets to management of the JBG Legacy Funds, which could adversely affect the execution of our business plan and our results of operations and cash flow.

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In addition, members of our senior management have an ownership interest in the JBG Legacy Funds and own carried interests in each fund and in certain of our real estate ventures that entitles them to receive additional compensation if the fund or real estate venture achieves certain return thresholds. As a result, members of our senior management could be incentivized to spend time and effort maximizing the cash flow from the assets being retained by the JBG Legacy Funds and certain real estate ventures, particularly through sales of assets, which may accelerate payments of the carried interest but would reduce the asset management and other fees that would otherwise be payable to us with respect to the JBG Excluded Assets. These actions could adversely impact our results of operations and cash flow.

Other potential conflicts of interest with the JBG Legacy Funds include transactions with these funds and competition for tenants. We have, and in the future we may, enter into transactions with the JBG Legacy Funds, such as purchasing assets from them. Any such transaction would create a conflict of interest as a result of our management team’s interests on both sides of the transaction, because we manage the JBG Legacy Funds and because members of our management own interests in the general partner or other managing entities of the funds. We may compete for tenants with the JBG Legacy Funds and because we typically manage the assets of the JBG Legacy Funds, we may have a conflict of interest when competing for a tenant if the tenant is interested in assets owned by us and the JBG Legacy Funds. Any of the above described conflicts of interest could have a material adverse effect on us.

Vornado is not required to present investments to us that satisfy our investment guidelines before pursuing such opportunities on Vornado’s behalf.
 
Our agreements with Vornado do not require Vornado to present to us investment opportunities that satisfy our investment guidelines before Vornado pursues such opportunities. While Vornado advised us at the time of the Formation Transaction that it did not intend to make acquisitions within the Washington, DC metropolitan area after the Formation Transaction, should it choose to do so, Vornado is free to direct investment opportunities away from us, and we may be unable to compete with Vornado in pursuing such opportunities. In addition, our declaration of trust provides that a trustee who is also a trustee, officer, employee or agent of Vornado or any of Vornado’s affiliates has no duty to communicate or present any business opportunity to us.
 
We may not achieve some or all of the expected benefits, including expected synergies, of the Formation Transaction.
 
JBG SMITH is a new public company with significantly more revenues, assets and employees than management of the company was responsible for prior to the combination and many members of management, including our CEO, did not have experience running a public company prior to our formation. A primary initial focus of our management team has been integrating the operations of the Vornado and JBG assets that were contributed to us in the Formation Transaction, which, consequently, has required a significant amount of their time and attention. In addition, as part of our integration plan, we expect to realize cost reductions, or synergies, compared to the cost of managing the assets contributed to us by Vornado and JBG separately and compared to the current cost of managing our assets. We may, however, overestimate the amount of synergies or fail to realize all or any of the synergies, which could cause our costs to be higher than expected. Furthermore, if our management team is unable to effectively manage a large, public company or successfully integrate the operations of the Vornado and JBG assets, then it could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
In connection with the Formation Transaction, Vornado agreed to indemnify us for certain pre-distribution liabilities and liabilities related to Vornado assets. However, there can be no assurance that these indemnities will be sufficient to protect us against the full amount of such liabilities, or that Vornado’s ability to satisfy its indemnification obligation will not be impaired in the future.
 
Pursuant to the Separation Agreement, Vornado agreed to indemnify us for certain liabilities. However, third parties could seek to hold us responsible for any of the liabilities that Vornado agreed to retain, and there can be no assurance that Vornado will be able to fully satisfy its indemnification obligations. Moreover, even if we ultimately succeed in recovering from Vornado any amounts for which we are held liable, such indemnification may be insufficient to fully offset the financial impact of such liabilities and/or we may be temporarily required to bear these losses while seeking recovery from Vornado.
 

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Failure to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in accordance with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act could have a material adverse effect on our business and share price.
 
As a public company, we are subject to the reporting requirements of the Exchange Act, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act and the Dodd-Frank Act and are required to prepare our financial statements according to the rules and regulations required by the SEC. In addition, the Exchange Act requires that we file annual, quarterly and current reports. Our failure to prepare and disclose this information in a timely manner or to otherwise comply with applicable law could subject us to penalties under federal securities laws, expose us to lawsuits and restrict our ability to access financing.
 
In addition, the Sarbanes-Oxley Act requires that we, among other things, establish and maintain effective internal controls and procedures for financial reporting and disclosure purposes. Internal control over financial reporting is complex and may be revised over time to adapt to changes in our business, or changes in applicable accounting rules. We cannot assure you that our internal control over financial reporting will be effective in the future or that a material weakness will not be discovered with respect to a prior period for which we had previously believed that internal controls were effective. If we are not able to maintain or document effective internal control over financial reporting, our independent registered public accounting firm will not be able to certify as to the effectiveness of our internal control over financial reporting.
 
Matters impacting our internal controls may cause us to be unable to report our financial information on a timely basis, or may cause our company to restate previously issued financial information, and thereby subject us to adverse regulatory consequences, including sanctions or investigations by the SEC, or violations of applicable stock exchange listing rules. There could also be a negative reaction in the financial markets due to a loss of investor confidence in our company and the reliability of our financial statements. Confidence in the reliability of our financial statements is also likely to suffer if we or our independent registered public accounting firm report a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on us.
 
Risks Related to Our Indebtedness and Financing
 
We have a substantial amount of indebtedness, which may limit our financial and operating activities and expose us to the risk of default under our debt obligations.
 
As of December 31, 2017, we had approximately $2.2 billion aggregate principal amount of consolidated debt outstanding and our unconsolidated real estate ventures had approximately $1.2 billion aggregate principal amount of debt outstanding ($396.3 million at our share), resulting in a total of over $2.6 billion aggregate principal amount of debt outstanding at our share. A portion of our outstanding debt is guaranteed by our operating partnership, and we may incur significant additional debt to finance future acquisition and development activities.
 
Payments of principal and interest on borrowings may leave us with insufficient cash resources to operate our assets or to pay the dividends currently contemplated. Our level of debt and the limitations imposed on us by our debt agreements could have significant adverse consequences, including the following:
 
our cash flow may be insufficient to meet our required principal and interest payments;
we may be unable to borrow additional funds as needed or on favorable terms, which could, among other things, adversely affect our ability to meet operational needs;
we may be unable to refinance our indebtedness at maturity or the refinancing terms may be less favorable than the terms of our original indebtedness;
we may be forced to dispose of one or more of our assets, possibly on unfavorable terms or in violation of certain covenants to which we may be subject;
we may violate restrictive covenants in our loan documents, which would entitle the lenders to accelerate our debt obligations; and
our default under any loan with cross-default provisions could result in a default on other indebtedness.

If any one of these events were to occur, it could have a material adverse effect on us.
 

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Our debt agreements include restrictive covenants, requirements to maintain financial ratios and default provisions, which could limit our flexibility and our ability to make distributions and require us to repay the indebtedness prior to its maturity.
 
The mortgages on our assets contain customary negative covenants that, among other things, limit our ability, without the prior consent of the lender, to further mortgage the property and to reduce or change insurance coverage. We have a $1.4 billion credit facility under which we have significant borrowing capacity. Additionally, our debt agreements contain customary covenants that, among other things, restrict our ability to incur additional indebtedness and may restrict our ability to engage in material asset sales, mergers, consolidations and acquisitions, and restrict our ability to make capital expenditures. These debt agreements, in some cases, also subject us to guarantor and liquidity covenants, and our credit facility requires, and other future debt may require, us to maintain various financial ratios. Some of our debt agreements contain cash flow sweep requirements and mandatory escrows, and our property mortgages generally require mandatory prepayments upon disposition of underlying collateral. Our ability to borrow is subject to compliance with these and other covenants, and failure to comply with our covenants could cause a default under the applicable debt instrument, and we may then be required to repay such debt with capital from other sources or give possession of a property to the lender. Under those circumstances, other sources of capital may not be available to us, or may be available only on unattractive terms.
 
We may not be able to obtain capital to make investments.
 
Because the Code requires us, as a REIT, to distribute at least 90% of our taxable income, excluding net capital gains, to our shareholders, we depend primarily on external financing to fund the growth of our business. There is a separate requirement to distribute net capital gains or pay a corporate level tax in lieu thereof. Our access to debt or equity financing depends on the willingness of third parties to lend or make equity investments and on conditions in the capital markets generally. There can be no assurance that new financing will be available or available on acceptable terms.

Our future development plans are capital intensive. To complete these plans, we anticipate financing this construction and development through asset sales, real estate ventures with third parties, recapitalizations of assets, and public or private equity offerings, or a combination thereof. Similarly, these plans require an even more significant amount of debt financing. If we are unable to obtain the required debt or equity capital, then we will not be able to execute our business plan, which could have a material adverse effect on us.

For information about our available sources of funds, see "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations-Liquidity and Capital Resources" and the notes to the consolidated and combined financial statements included herein.
  
High mortgage rates and/or unavailability of mortgage debt may make it difficult for us to finance or refinance properties, which could reduce the number of properties we can acquire or retain, our net income and the amount of cash distributions we can make.
If mortgage debt is not available at reasonable rates, or if lenders currently under contractual obligations to lend to us fail to perform on such obligations, we may not be able to finance the purchase of properties. If we place mortgages on properties, we may be unable to refinance the properties when the loans become due, or refinance on favorable terms or at all, including as a result of increases in interest rates or a decline in the value of our portfolio or portions thereof. If principal payments due at maturity cannot be refinanced, extended or paid with proceeds from other capital transactions, such as new equity issuances, our operating cash flow may not be sufficient in all years to repay all maturing debt. This, in turn, could reduce cash available for distribution to our shareholders and may hinder our ability to raise more capital by issuing more shares or by borrowing more money. In addition, payments of principal and interest made to service our debts may leave us with insufficient cash to make distributions necessary to meet the distribution requirements imposed on REITs under the Code. As a result, we may be forced to postpone capital expenditures necessary for the maintenance of our properties, we may have to dispose of one or more properties on terms that would otherwise be unacceptable to us or we may be forced to allow the mortgage holder to foreclose on a property, any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on us.  
Mortgage debt obligations expose us to the possibility of foreclosure, which could result in the loss of our investment in a property or group of properties subject to mortgage debt.
Incurring mortgage and other secured debt obligations increases our risk of property losses because defaults on indebtedness secured by properties may result in foreclosure actions initiated by lenders and ultimately our loss of the property collateralizing loans for which we are in default. Any foreclosure on a mortgaged property or group of properties could adversely affect the overall value of our portfolio of properties. For tax purposes, a foreclosure on any of our properties that is subject to a nonrecourse mortgage loan would be treated as a sale of the property for a purchase price equal to the outstanding balance of the debt secured

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by the mortgage. If the outstanding balance of the debt secured by the mortgage exceeds our tax basis in the property, we would recognize taxable income on foreclosure, but would not receive any cash proceeds, which could hinder our ability to meet the REIT distribution requirements imposed by the Code.  
Variable rate debt is subject to interest rate risk that could increase our interest expense, increase the cost to refinance and increase the cost of issuing new debt.
As of December 31, 2017, $664.0 million of our outstanding consolidated debt was subject to instruments that bear interest at variable rates, and we may also borrow additional money at variable interest rates in the future. Unless we have made arrangements that hedge against the risk of rising interest rates, increases in interest rates would increase our interest expense under these instruments, increase the cost of refinancing these instruments or issuing new debt, and adversely affect our cash flow and our ability to service our indebtedness and make distributions to our shareholders, which could, in turn, adversely affect the market price of our common shares. Based on our aggregate variable rate debt outstanding as of December 31, 2017, an increase of 100 basis points in interest rates would result in a hypothetical increase of approximately $6.7 million in interest expense on an annual basis. The amount of this change includes the benefit of swaps and caps we currently have in place.
Failure to hedge effectively against interest rate changes could have a material adverse effect on us.
The REIT provisions of the Code impose certain restrictions on our ability to utilize hedges, swaps and other types of derivatives to hedge our liabilities. Subject to these restrictions, we may enter into hedging transactions to protect ourselves from the effects of interest rate fluctuations on floating rate debt. Our hedging transactions may include entering into interest rate cap agreements or interest rate swap agreements. These agreements involve risks, such as the risk that such arrangements would not be effective in reducing our exposure to interest rate changes or that a court could rule that such an agreement is not legally enforceable. In addition, interest rate hedging can be expensive, particularly during periods of rising and volatile interest rates, which could reduce the overall returns on our investments. Failure to hedge effectively against interest rate changes could have a material adverse effect on us. In addition, while such agreements would be intended to lessen the impact of rising interest rates on us, they could also expose us to the risk that the other parties to the agreements would not perform, and that the hedging arrangements may not be effective in reducing our exposure to interest rate changes. Moreover, there can be no assurance that our hedging arrangements will qualify as highly effective cash flow hedges under Financial Accounting Standards Board, or FASB, Accounting Standards Codification, or ASC, Topic 815, Derivatives and Hedging, or that our hedging activities will have the desired beneficial impact on our results of operations. Furthermore, should we desire to terminate a hedging agreement, there could be significant costs and cash requirements involved to fulfill our obligation under the hedging agreement. Any of the foregoing could have a material adverse effect on us.
We may acquire properties or portfolios of properties through tax deferred contribution transactions, which could result in shareholder dilution and limit our ability to sell or refinance such assets.
In the future, we may acquire properties or portfolios of properties through tax deferred contribution transactions in exchange for partnership interests in our operating partnership, which may result in shareholder dilution through the issuance of common limited partnership units ("OP Units") that may be exchanged for common shares. This acquisition structure may have the effect of, among other things, reducing the amount of tax depreciation we could deduct (as compared to a transaction where we do not inherit the contributor’s tax basis but acquire tax basis equal to the value of the consideration exchanged) until the OP units issued in such transactions are redeemed for cash or converted into common shares.  While no such protection arrangements existed at December 31, 2017, in the future we may agree to protect the contributors’ ability to defer recognition of taxable gain through restrictions on our ability to dispose of, or refinance the debt on, the acquired properties for specified periods of time. Similarly, we may be required to incur or maintain debt we would otherwise not incur or maintain so that we can allocate the debt to the contributors to maintain their tax bases. These restrictions could limit our ability to sell an asset at a time, or on terms, that would be favorable absent such restrictions.
Our decision to dispose of real estate assets would change the holding period assumption in our valuation analyses, which could result in material impairment losses and adversely affect our financial results.
 
We evaluate real estate assets for impairment based on the projected cash flow of the asset over our anticipated holding period. If we change our intended holding period, due to our intention to sell or otherwise dispose of an asset, then under GAAP, we must reevaluate whether that asset is impaired. Depending on the carrying value of the property at the time we change our intention and the amount that we estimate we would receive on disposal, we may record an impairment loss that would adversely affect our financial results. This loss could be material to our results of operations in the period that it is recognized, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
 

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Risks Related to the Real Estate Industry
 
Real estate investments’ value and income fluctuate due to various factors.
 
The value of real estate fluctuates depending on conditions in the general economy and the real estate business. These conditions may also adversely impact our revenues and cash flows.
 
The factors that affect the value of our real estate include, among other things:
 
global, national, regional and local economic conditions; 
competition from other available space;
local conditions such as an oversupply of space or a reduction in demand for real estate in the area;
how well we manage our assets;
the development and/or redevelopment of our assets;
changes in market rental rates;
  the timing and costs associated with property improvements and rentals;
whether we are able to pass all or portions of any increases in operating costs through to tenants; 
  changes in real estate taxes and other expenses;
  whether tenants and users consider a property attractive;
the financial condition of our tenants, including the extent of tenant bankruptcies or defaults;
  availability of financing on acceptable terms or at all;  
inflation or deflation;
fluctuations in interest rates; 
our ability to obtain adequate insurance; 
changes in zoning laws and taxation; 
government regulation; 
consequences of any armed conflict involving, or terrorist attack against, the United States or individual acts of violence in public spaces;
potential liability under environmental or other laws or regulations; 
natural disasters;
general competitive factors; and 
climate changes.
 
The rents or sales proceeds we receive and the occupancy levels at our assets may decline as a result of adverse changes in any of these factors. If rental revenues, sales proceeds and/or occupancy levels decline, we generally would expect to have less cash available to pay indebtedness and for distribution to shareholders. In addition, some of our major expenses, including mortgage payments, real estate taxes and maintenance costs generally do not decline when the related rents decline.
 
It may be difficult to buy and sell real estate quickly, which may limit our flexibility.
 
Real estate investments are relatively difficult to buy and sell quickly. Consequently, we may have limited ability to vary our portfolio promptly in response to changes in economic or other conditions. Moreover, our ability to buy, sell, or finance real estate assets may be adversely affected during periods of uncertainty or unfavorable conditions in the credit markets as we, or potential buyers of our assets, may experience difficulty in obtaining financing.

Our property taxes could increase due to property tax rate changes or reassessment, which could have a material adverse effect on us.
Even if we qualify as a REIT for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we will be required to pay certain state and local taxes on our properties. The real property taxes on our properties may increase as property tax rates change or as our properties are assessed or reassessed by taxing authorities. Therefore, the amount of property taxes we pay in the future may increase substantially from what we have paid in the past and such increases may not be covered by tenants pursuant to our lease agreements. An increase in the property taxes we pay could have a material adverse effect on us.

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We may incur significant costs to comply with environmental laws, and environmental contamination may impair our ability to lease and/or sell real estate.
 
Our operations and assets are subject to various federal, state and local laws and regulations concerning the protection of the environment including air and water quality, hazardous or toxic substances and health and safety. Under some environmental laws, a current or previous owner or operator of real estate may be required to investigate and clean up hazardous or toxic substances released at a property. The owner or operator may also be held liable to a governmental entity or to third parties for property damage or personal injuries and for investigation and clean-up costs incurred by those parties because of the contamination. These laws often impose liability without regard to whether the owner or operator knew of the release of the substances or caused such release. The presence of contamination or the failure to remediate contamination may impair our ability to sell or lease real estate or to borrow using the real estate as collateral. Other laws and regulations govern indoor and outdoor air quality including those that can require the abatement or removal of asbestos-containing materials in the event of damage, demolition, renovation or remodeling, and also govern emissions of and exposure to asbestos fibers in the air. The maintenance and removal of lead paint and certain electrical equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are also regulated by federal and state laws. We are also subject to risks associated with human exposure to chemical or biological contaminants such as molds, pollens, viruses and bacteria which, above certain levels, can be alleged to be connected to allergic or other health effects and symptoms in susceptible individuals. Our predecessor companies may be subject to similar liabilities for activities of those companies in the past. We could incur fines for environmental noncompliance and be held liable for the costs of remedial action with respect to the foregoing regulated substances or related claims arising out of environmental contamination or human exposure at or from our assets.
 
Most of our assets have been subjected to varying degrees of environmental assessment at various times. To date, these environmental assessments have not revealed any environmental condition material to our business. However, identification of new compliance concerns or undiscovered areas of contamination, changes in the extent or known scope of contamination, human exposure to contamination or changes in cleanup or compliance requirements could result in significant costs to us.
 
In addition, we may become subject to costs or taxes, or increases therein, associated with natural resource or energy usage (such as a "carbon tax"). These costs or taxes could increase our operating costs and decrease the cash available to pay our obligations or distribute to equity holders.

If we default on or fail to renew at expiration the ground leases for land on which some of our assets are located or other long-term leases, our results of operations could be adversely affected.
We own leasehold interests in certain land on which some of our assets are located. If we default under the terms of any of these ground leases, we may be liable for damages and could lose our leasehold interest in the property or our option to purchase the underlying fee interest in such assets. In addition, unless we purchase the underlying fee interests in the land on which a particular property is located, we will lose our right to operate the property or we will continue to operate it at much lower profitability, which would significantly adversely affect our results of operations. In addition, if we are perceived to have breached the terms of a ground lease, the fee owner may initiate proceedings to terminate the lease. As of December 31, 2017, the remaining weighted average term of our ground leases, including unilateral as-of-right extension rights available to us, was approximately 67.1 years. Our share of annualized rent from assets subject to ground leases as of December 31, 2017 was approximately $53.8 million, or 9.6% of total annualized rent.

Climate change may adversely affect our business.
Climate change, including rising sea levels, extreme weather and changes in precipitation and temperature, may result in physical damage to, a decrease in demand for and/or a decrease in rent from and value of our properties located in the areas affected by these conditions. We own a number of assets in low-lying areas close to sea level, making those assets susceptible to a rise in sea level. If sea levels were to rise, we may incur material costs to protect our low-lying assets or sustain damage, a decrease in value or total loss to those assets. Furthermore, our insurance premiums may increase as a result of the threat of climate change or the effects of climate change may not be covered by our insurance policies. In addition, changes in federal and state legislation and regulations on climate change could result in increased capital expenditures to improve the energy efficiency of our existing properties or other related aspects of our properties in order to comply with such regulations or otherwise adapt to climate change. Any of the above could have a material and adverse effect on us.


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Risks Related to Our Organization and Structure
 
Tax consequences to holders of JBG SMITH LP limited partnership units upon a sale of certain of our assets may cause the interests of our senior management to differ from your own.
 
Some holders of JBG SMITH LP limited partnership units, including members of our senior management, may suffer different and more adverse tax consequences than holders of our common shares upon the sale of certain of the assets owned by our operating partnership, and therefore these holders may have different objectives regarding the appropriate pricing, timing and other material terms of any sale or refinancing of certain assets, or whether to sell such assets at all.
 
Our declaration of trust and bylaws, the partnership agreement of our operating partnership and Maryland law contain provisions that may delay, defer or prevent a change of control transaction that might involve a premium price for our common shares or that our shareholders otherwise believe to be in their best interest.
 
Our declaration of trust contains ownership limits with respect to our shares.
 
Generally, to maintain our qualification as a REIT, no more than 50% in value of our outstanding shares of beneficial interest may be owned, directly or indirectly, by five or fewer individuals at any time during the last half of our taxable year. The Code defines "individuals" for purposes of the requirement described in the preceding sentence to include some types of entities. Our declaration of trust authorizes our Board of Trustees to take such actions as it determines are necessary or advisable to preserve our qualification as a REIT. Our declaration of trust prohibits, among other things, the actual, beneficial or constructive ownership by any person of more than 7.5% in value or number of shares, whichever is more restrictive, of the outstanding shares of any class or series. For these purposes, our declaration of trust includes a "group" as that term is used for purposes of Section 13(d)(3) of the Exchange Act in the definition of "person." Our Board of Trustees may exempt a person, prospectively or retroactively, from these ownership limits if certain conditions are satisfied.
  
This ownership limit and the other restrictions on ownership and transfer of our shares contained in our declaration of trust may:
 
discourage a tender offer or other transactions or a change in management or of control that might involve a premium price for our common shares or that our shareholders might otherwise believe to be in their best interest; or
result in the transfer of shares acquired in excess of the restrictions to a trust for the benefit of a charitable beneficiary and, as a result, the forfeiture by the acquirer of the benefits of owning the additional shares.
 
Provisions of Maryland law could inhibit changes in control, which may discourage third parties from conducting a tender offer or seeking other change of control transactions that might involve a premium price for our common shares or that our shareholders might otherwise believe to be in their best interest.
 
Provisions of the Maryland General Corporation Law, or "MGCL", may have the effect of inhibiting a third party from making a proposal to acquire us or of impeding a change of control under circumstances that otherwise could provide the holders of common shares with the opportunity to realize a premium over the then-prevailing market price of such shares, including:
 
"business combination" provisions that, subject to limitations, prohibit business combinations between us and an "interested shareholder" (defined generally as any person who beneficially owns 10% or more of the voting power of our shares or an affiliate thereof or an affiliate or associate of ours who was the beneficial owner, directly or indirectly, of 10% or more of the voting power of our then-outstanding voting shares at any time within the two-year period immediately prior to the date in question) for five years after the most recent date on which the shareholder becomes an interested shareholder, and thereafter impose fair price and/or supermajority shareholder voting requirements on these combinations; and
"control share" provisions that provide that a shareholder’s "control shares" of our company (defined as shares that, when aggregated with other shares controlled by the shareholder, entitle the shareholder to exercise one of three increasing ranges of voting power in electing trustees) acquired in a "control share acquisition" (defined as the direct or indirect acquisition of ownership or control of issued and outstanding "control shares") have no voting rights with respect to their control shares, except to the extent approved by our shareholders by the affirmative vote of at least two-thirds of all the votes entitled to be cast on the matter, excluding all interested shares.
 
As permitted by the MGCL, we have elected in our bylaws to opt out of the business combination and control share provisions of the MGCL. However, we cannot assure you that our Board of Trustees will not opt to be subject to such provisions of the MGCL in the future, including opting to be subject to such provisions retroactively.
 

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The limited partnership agreement of our operating partnership requires the approval of the limited partners with respect to certain extraordinary transactions involving JBG SMITH, which may reduce the likelihood of such transactions being consummated, even if they are in the best interests of, and have been approved by, our shareholders.
 
The limited partnership agreement of JBG SMITH LP as amended and restated in connection with the Formation Transaction, provides that we may not engage in a merger, consolidation or other combination with or into another person, a sale of all or substantially all of our assets, or a reclassification, recapitalization or a change in outstanding shares (except for changes in par value, or from par value to no par value, or as a result of a subdivision or combination of our common shares), which we refer to collectively as an extraordinary transaction, unless specified criteria are met. In particular, with respect to any extraordinary transaction, if partners will receive consideration for their limited partnership units and if we seek the approval of our shareholders for the transaction (or if we would have been required to obtain shareholder approval of any such extraordinary transaction but for the fact that a tender offer shall have been accepted with respect to a sufficient number of our common shares to permit consummation of such extraordinary transaction without shareholder approval), then the limited partnership agreement prohibits us from engaging in the extraordinary transaction unless we also obtain "partnership approval." To obtain "partnership approval," we must obtain the consent of our limited partners (including us and any limited partners majority owned, directly or indirectly, by us) representing a percentage interest in JBG SMITH LP that is equal to or greater than the percentage of our outstanding common shares required (or that would have been required in the absence of a tender offer) to approve the extraordinary transaction, provided that we and any limited partners majority owned, directly or indirectly, by us will be deemed to have provided consent for our partnership units solely in proportion to the percentage of our common shares approving the extraordinary transaction (or, if there is no shareholder vote with respect to such extraordinary transaction because a tender offer shall have been accepted with respect to a sufficient number of our common shares to permit consummation of the extraordinary transaction without shareholder approval, the percentage of our common shares with respect to which such tender offer shall have been accepted).
 
The limited partners of JBG SMITH LP may have interests in an extraordinary transaction that differ from those of common shareholders, and there can be no assurance that, if we are required to seek "partnership approval" for such a transaction, we will be able to obtain it. As a result, if a sufficient number of limited partners oppose such an extraordinary transaction, the limited partnership agreement may prohibit us from consummating it, even if it is in the best interests of, and has been approved by, our shareholders.
 
Until the 2020 annual meeting of shareholders, we will have a classified Board of Trustees, and that may reduce the likelihood of certain takeover transactions.
 
Our declaration of trust divides our Board of Trustees into three classes. The initial terms of the first, second and third classes will expire at the first, second and third annual meetings of shareholders, held following the Formation Transaction. At the 2018 annual shareholders meeting, shareholders will elect successors to trustees of the first class for a two-year term and, at the 2019 annual shareholders meeting, successors to trustees of the second class for a one-year term. Commencing with the 2020 annual meeting of shareholders, each trustee shall be elected annually for a term of one year and shall hold office until the next succeeding annual meeting and until a successor is duly elected and qualifies. There is no cumulative voting in the election of trustees. Until the 2020 annual meeting of the shareholders, our Board is classified, which may reduce the possibility of a tender offer or an attempt to change control, even though a tender offer or change in control might be in the best interest of our shareholders.
 
We may issue additional shares in a manner that could adversely affect the likelihood of takeover transactions.
 
Our declaration of trust authorizes the Board of Trustees, without shareholder approval, to:
 
cause us to issue additional authorized but unissued common or preferred shares;
classify or reclassify, in one or more classes or series, any unissued common or preferred shares;
set the preferences, rights and other terms of any classified or reclassified shares that we issue; and
amend our declaration of trust to increase the number of shares of beneficial interest that we may issue.
 
The Board of Trustees could establish a class or series of common or preferred shares whose terms could delay, deter or prevent a change in control or other transaction that might involve a premium price or otherwise be in the best interest of our shareholders, although the Board of Trustees does not now intend to establish a class or series of common or preferred shares of this kind. Our declaration of trust and bylaws contain other provisions that may delay, deter or prevent a change in control or other transaction that might involve a premium price or otherwise be in the best interest of our shareholders.
 

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Substantially all of our assets are owned by subsidiaries. We depend on dividends and distributions from these subsidiaries. The creditors of these subsidiaries are entitled to amounts payable to them by the subsidiaries before the subsidiaries may pay any dividends or other distributions to us.
 
Substantially all of our assets are held through JBG SMITH LP which holds substantially all of its assets through wholly owned subsidiaries. JBG SMITH LP’s cash flow is dependent on cash distributions to it by its subsidiaries, and in turn, substantially all of our cash flow is dependent on cash distributions to us by JBG SMITH LP. The creditors of each of our subsidiaries are entitled to payment of that subsidiary’s obligations to them when due and payable before distributions may be made by that subsidiary to its equity holders. In addition, the operating agreements governing some of our subsidiaries which are parties to real estate joint ventures may have restrictions on distributions which could limit the ability of those subsidiaries to make distributions to JBG SMITH LP. Thus, JBG SMITH LP’s ability to make distributions to holders of its units, including us, depends on its subsidiaries’ ability first to satisfy their obligations to their creditors, and then to make distributions to JBG SMITH LP. Likewise, our ability to pay dividends to our shareholders depends on JBG SMITH LP’s ability first to satisfy its obligations, if any, to its creditors and make distributions payable to holders of preferred units (if any), and then to make distributions to us.
 
In addition, our participation in any distribution of the assets of any of our subsidiaries upon the liquidation, reorganization or insolvency of the subsidiary, occurs only after the claims of the creditors, including trade creditors, and preferred security holders, if any, of the applicable direct or indirect subsidiaries are satisfied.

Our rights and the rights of our shareholders to take action against our Trustees and officers are limited.
As permitted by Maryland law, under our declaration of trust, trustees and officers shall not be liable to us and our shareholders for money damages, except for liability resulting from:
actual receipt of an improper benefit or profit in money, property or services; or
a final judgment based upon a finding of active and deliberate dishonesty by the trustee or officer that was material to the cause of action adjudicated.

In addition, our declaration of trust requires us to indemnify our trustees and officers for actions taken by them in those and certain other capacities to the maximum extent permitted by Maryland law. The Maryland REIT law permits a REIT to indemnify and advance expenses to its trustees, officers, employees and agents to the same extent as permitted by the MGCL for directors and officers of a Maryland corporation. Generally, Maryland law permits a Maryland corporation to indemnify its present and former directors and officers except in instances where the person seeking indemnification acted in bad faith or with active and deliberate dishonesty, actually received an improper personal benefit in money, property or services or, in the case of a criminal proceeding, had reasonable cause to believe that his or her actions were unlawful. Under Maryland law, a Maryland corporation also may not indemnify a director or officer in a suit by or in the right of the corporation in which the director or officer was adjudged liable to the corporation or for a judgment of liability on the basis that a personal benefit was improperly received. A court may order indemnification if it determines that the director or officer is fairly and reasonably entitled to indemnification, even though the director or officer did not meet the prescribed standard of conduct; however, indemnification for an adverse judgment in a suit by us or in our right, or for a judgment of liability on the basis that personal benefit was improperly received, is limited to expenses. As a result, we and our shareholders may have more limited rights against our trustees and officers than might otherwise exist. Accordingly, if actions taken in good faith by any of our trustees or officers impede the performance of our company, your ability to recover damages from such trustee or officer will be limited.  
Risks Related to Our Status as a REIT
 
We may fail to qualify or remain qualified as a REIT and may be required to pay income taxes at corporate rates.
 
Although we believe that we are organized and intend to operate so as to qualify as a REIT for federal income tax purposes, we may fail to remain so qualified. Qualifications are governed by highly technical and complex provisions of the Code for which there are only limited judicial or administrative interpretations and depend on various facts and circumstances that are not entirely within our control. In addition, legislation, new regulations, administrative interpretations or court decisions may significantly change the relevant tax laws and/or the federal income tax consequences of qualifying as a REIT. If, with respect to any taxable year, we fail to maintain our qualification as a REIT and do not qualify under statutory relief provisions, we could not deduct distributions to shareholders in computing our taxable income and would have to pay federal income tax on our taxable income at regular corporate rates. If we had to pay federal income tax, the amount of money available to distribute to shareholders and pay our indebtedness would be reduced for the year or years involved, and we would not be required to make distributions to shareholders in that taxable year and in future years until we were able to qualify as a REIT. In addition, we would also be

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disqualified from treatment as a REIT for the four taxable years following the year during which qualification was lost, unless we were entitled to relief under the relevant statutory provisions.
 
REIT distribution requirements could adversely affect our liquidity and our ability to execute our business plan.
 
For us to qualify to be taxed as a REIT, and assuming that certain other requirements are also satisfied, we generally must distribute at least 90% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and excluding any net capital gains, to our shareholders each year, so that U.S. federal corporate income tax does not apply to earnings that we distribute. To the extent that we satisfy this distribution requirement and qualify for taxation as a REIT, but distribute less than 100% of our REIT taxable income, determined without regard to the dividends paid deduction and including any net capital gains, we will be subject to U.S. federal corporate income tax on our undistributed net taxable income. In addition, we will be subject to a 4% nondeductible excise tax if the actual amount that we distribute to our shareholders in a calendar year is less than a minimum amount specified under U.S. federal income tax laws. We intend to distribute 100% of our REIT taxable income to our shareholders out of assets legally available therefor.
 
From time to time, we may generate taxable income greater than our cash flow as a result of differences in timing between the recognition of taxable income and the actual receipt of cash or the effect of nondeductible capital expenditures, the creation of reserves, or required debt or amortization payments. Further, under amendments to the Code made by federal tax reform legislation , which was signed into law on December 22, 2017 and which we refer to as the 2017 Tax Act, income must be accrued for U.S. federal income tax purposes no later than when such income is taken into account as revenue in our financial statements, subject to certain exceptions, which could also create mismatches between REIT taxable income and the receipt of cash attributable to such income. If we do not have other funds available in these situations, we could be required to borrow funds on unfavorable terms, sell assets at disadvantageous prices, distribute amounts that would otherwise be invested in future acquisitions, capital expenditures or repayment of debt, or make taxable distributions of our shares or debt securities to make distributions sufficient to enable us to pay out enough of our taxable income to satisfy the REIT distribution requirement and avoid corporate income tax and the 4% excise tax in a particular year. These alternatives could increase our costs or reduce our equity. Further, amounts distributed will not be available to fund investment activities. Thus, compliance with the REIT requirements may hinder our ability to grow, which could adversely affect the value of our shares. Any restrictions on our ability to incur additional indebtedness or make certain distributions could preclude us from meeting the 90% distribution requirement. Decreases in funds from operations due to unfinanced expenditures for acquisitions of assets or increases in the number of shares outstanding without commensurate increases in funds from operations would each adversely affect our ability to maintain distributions to our shareholders. Consequently, there can be no assurance that we will be able to make distributions at the anticipated distribution rate or any other rate.

Dividends payable by REITs do not qualify for the reduced tax rates available for some dividends, which could depress the market price of our common shares if perceived as a less attractive investment.
The maximum tax rate applicable to income from "qualified dividends" payable by non‑REIT corporations to U.S. shareholders that are individuals, trusts and estates is 20%, and a 3.8% Medicare tax may also apply. Dividends payable by REITs, however, generally are not eligible for this reduced rate. Commencing with taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2018 and continuing through 2025, the 2017 Tax Act temporarily reduces the effective tax rate on ordinary REIT dividends (i.e., dividends other than capital gain dividends and dividends attributable to certain qualified dividend income received by us) for U.S. holders of our common shares that are individuals, estates or trusts by permitting such holders to claim a deduction in determining their taxable income equal to 20% of any such dividends they receive. Taking into account the 2017 Tax Act’s reduction in the maximum individual federal income tax rate from 39.6% to 37%, this results in a maximum effective rate of federal income tax (exclusive of the 3.8% Medicare tax) on ordinary REIT dividends of 29.6% through 2025, as compared to the 20% maximum federal income tax rate applicable to qualified dividend income received from a non-REIT corporation (although the maximum effective rate applicable to such dividends, after taking into account the 21% federal income tax applicable to non-REIT corporations, is 36.8%). Although these rules do not adversely affect the taxation of REITs or dividends payable by REITs, investors who are individuals, trusts and estates may perceive investments in REITs to be relatively less attractive than investments in the shares of non‑REIT corporations that pay dividends, which could adversely affect the value of the shares of REITs, including the per share trading price of our common shares.
The tax imposed on REITs engaging in "prohibited transactions" may limit our ability to engage in transactions that would be treated as sales for U.S. federal income tax purposes.
A REIT’s net income from prohibited transactions is subject to a 100% penalty tax. In general, prohibited transactions are sales or other dispositions of property, other than foreclosure property, held primarily for sale to customers in the ordinary course of business. Although we and our subsidiary REITs believe that we have held, and intend to continue to hold, our properties for

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investment and do not intend to hold any properties that could be characterized as held for sale to customers in the ordinary course of our business unless a sale or disposition qualifies under a statutory safe harbor applicable to REITs, such characterization is a factual determination and no guarantee can be given that the IRS would agree with our characterization of our properties or that we will always be able to make use of the available safe harbor. In the case of some of our properties held through partnerships with third parties, our ability to dispose of such properties in a manner that satisfies the statutory safe harbor depends in part on the action of third parties over which we have no control or only limited influence.
If our operating partnership failed to qualify as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes, we would cease to qualify as a REIT and suffer other adverse consequences.
We believe that our operating partnership will be treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes. As a partnership, our operating partnership will not be subject to U.S. federal income tax on its income. Instead, each of its partners, including us, will be allocated, and may be required to pay tax with respect to, its share of our operating partnership’s income. We cannot assure you, however, that the IRS will not challenge the status of our operating partnership or that a court would not sustain such a challenge. If the IRS were successful in treating our operating partnership as an entity taxable as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes we would fail to meet the gross income tests and certain of the asset tests applicable to REITs and, accordingly, we would cease to qualify as a REIT. Also, the failure of our operating partnership or any subsidiary partnership to qualify as a partnership could cause the entity to become subject to U.S. federal, state or local corporate income tax, which would reduce significantly the amount of cash available for debt service and for distribution to us.
Complying with REIT requirements may limit our ability to hedge effectively and may cause us to incur tax liabilities.
The REIT provisions of the Code may limit our ability to hedge our assets and operations. Under these provisions, income that we generate from transactions intended to hedge our interest rate and certain types of foreign currency risk generally will be excluded from gross income for purposes of the 75% and 95% gross income tests applicable to REITs if the instrument hedges interest rate or foreign currency risk on liabilities used to carry or acquire real estate assets or certain other types of foreign currency risk, and such instrument is properly identified. Income from certain hedges entered into in connection with the termination of a hedging transaction described in the preceding sentence, where the property or indebtedness that was the subject of the prior hedging transaction was extinguished or disposed of, will also be excluded from gross income for purposes of the 75% and 95% gross income tests. Income from hedging transactions that do not meet these requirements will generally constitute non‑qualifying income for purposes of both the 75% and 95% gross income tests. As a result of these rules, we may have to limit our use of hedging techniques that might otherwise be advantageous or implement those hedges through a TRS. This could increase the cost of our hedging activities, because our TRS would be subject to tax on gains, or could expose us to greater risks associated with changes in interest rates than we would otherwise want to bear. In addition, losses in our TRS will generally not provide any tax benefit, except to the extent they can be carried forward and used to offset future taxable income in the TRS.
Our subsidiary REITs may be subject to a corporate tax on recognized gain if some properties are sold within five years of their acquisition.
To the extent that our operating partnership contributes appreciated properties to a subsidiary REIT that were acquired in the Formation Transaction from tax partnerships in which investors that are C corporations under the Code hold interests, the subsidiary REIT will be subject to a corporate level tax on the portion of the net built‑in gain attributable to the C corporation investors’ interests that would have otherwise been taxable to such investors if such gain is recognized by the subsidiary REIT as the result of a sale of any such property within a five‑year period following the contribution of the properties to the subsidiary REIT. This corporate level tax will be borne proportionately by all of the holders of OP Units, including us. In the alternative, we may cause our operating partnership to elect to cause the recognition of such net built‑in gain at the time of the contribution of the properties to the subsidiary REIT (a so‑called deemed sale election). In this case, the taxable recognized gain would be allocated to the C corporation investors by the operating partnership (expected to be with respect to the operating partnership’s 2017 tax year), which would increase the operating partnership’s basis in the stock of the subsidiary REIT (as to the C corporation investors only) by the amount of net built‑in gain allocated to such investors. We will decide, as general partner of the operating partnership, whether or not to cause the operating partnership to make such a deemed sale election.
Our ownership of TRSs will be limited, and we will be required to pay a 100% penalty tax on certain income or deductions if our transactions with our TRSs are not conducted on arm’s length terms.
We own an interest in certain TRSs, and may establish additional TRSs in the future. A TRS is a corporation other than a REIT in which a REIT directly or indirectly holds stock, and that has made a joint election with such REIT to be treated as a TRS. If a TRS owns more than 35% percent of the total voting power or value of the outstanding securities of another corporation, such other corporation will also be treated as a TRS. Other than some activities relating to lodging and health care facilities, a TRS may

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generally engage in any business, including the provision of customary or non-customary services to tenants of its parent REIT. A TRS is subject to U.S. federal, state and local income tax as a regular C corporation, and its after-tax net income is available for distribution to the parent REIT but is not required to be distributed. As a result of the enactment of the 2017 Tax Act, effective for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2018 our domestic TRSs are subject to U.S. federal income tax on their taxable income at a maximum rate of 21% (as well as applicable state and local income tax), but net operating loss, or NOL, carryforwards of TRS losses arising in taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017 may be deducted only to the extent of 80% of TRS taxable income in the carryforward year (computed without regard to the NOL deduction). In contrast to prior law, which permitted unused NOL carryforwards to be carried back two years and forward 20 years, the 2017 Tax Act provides that losses arising in taxable years ending after December 31, 2017 can no longer be carried back but can be carried forward indefinitely. In addition, a 100% excise tax will be imposed on certain transactions between a TRS and its parent REIT that are not conducted on an arm’s length basis. Rules also limit the deductibility of interest paid or accrued by a TRS to its parent REIT to assure that the TRS is subject to an appropriate level of corporate taxation.
A REIT’s ownership of securities of a TRS is not subject to the 5% or 10% asset tests applicable to REITs. Not more than 25% (20% for taxable years beginning after December 31, 2017) of our total assets may be represented by securities (including securities of one or more TRSs), other than those securities includable in the 75% asset test. We anticipate that the aggregate value of the stock and securities of our TRSs and other nonqualifying assets will be less than 25% of the value of our total assets through December 31, 2017 (and less than 20% of the value of our total assets after that date), and we will monitor the value of these investments to ensure compliance with applicable ownership limitations. In addition, we intend to structure our transactions with our TRSs to ensure that they are entered into on arm’s length terms to avoid incurring the 100% excise tax described above. There can be no assurance, however, that we will be able to comply with the TRS asset limitation or to avoid application of the 100% excise tax discussed above.
Our ability to provide certain services to our tenants may be limited by the REIT provisions of the Code, or we may have to provide such services through a TRS.
As a REIT, we generally cannot provide services to our tenants other than those that are customarily provided by landlords, and we cannot derive income from a third party that provides such services. If we forego providing such services to our tenants, we may be at a disadvantage to competitors who are not subject to the same restrictions. However, we can provide such non‑customary services to tenants or share in the revenue from such services if we do so through a TRS, though income earned through the TRS will be subject to corporate income taxes.
We face possible adverse changes in tax laws, which may result in an increase in our tax liability and adverse consequences to our shareholders.
 
At any time, the U.S. federal income tax laws governing REITs or the administrative interpretations of those laws may be amended. We cannot predict when or if any new U.S. federal income tax law, regulation, or administrative interpretation, or any amendment to any existing U.S. federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation will be adopted, promulgated or become effective and any such law, regulation, or interpretation may take effect retroactively. Any such change in, or any new, U.S. federal income tax law, regulation or administrative interpretation, could have a material adverse effect on us.

In particular, the 2017 Tax Act, which generally takes effect for taxable years beginning on or after January 1, 2018 (subject to certain exceptions), makes many significant changes to the U.S. federal income tax laws that will profoundly impact the taxation of individuals, corporations (both regular C corporations as well as corporations that have elected to be taxed as REITs), and the taxation of taxpayers with overseas assets and operations. A number of changes that affect noncorporate taxpayers will expire at the end of 2025 unless Congress acts to extend them. These changes will impact us and our shareholders in various ways, some of which are adverse or potentially adverse compared to prior law. To date, the IRS has issued only limited guidance with respect to certain of the new provisions, and there are numerous interpretive issues that will require guidance. It is highly likely that technical corrections legislation will be needed to clarify certain aspects of the new law and give proper effect to Congressional intent. There can be no assurance, however, that technical clarifications or changes needed to prevent unintended or unforeseen tax consequences will be enacted by Congress in the near future.
 
Additionally, the rules of Section 355 of the Code and the Treasury regulations promulgated thereunder, which apply to determine the taxability of the Formation Transaction, have been the subject of change and may continue to be the subject of change, possibly with retroactive application, which could have a negative effect on us and our shareholders. If such changes occur, we may be required to pay additional taxes on our assets or income. These increased tax costs could have a material adverse effect on us.


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Other legislative proposals could be enacted in the future that could affect REITs and their shareholders. Prospective investors are urged to consult their tax advisors regarding the effect of the 2017 Tax Act and any other potential tax law changes on an investment in our common shares.
 
Risks Related to Our Common Shares
 
We cannot guarantee the timing, amount, or payment of dividends on our common shares.
 
Although we expect to pay regular cash dividends, the timing, declaration, amount and payment of future dividends to shareholders will fall within the discretion of our Board of Trustees. Our Board of Trustees’ decisions regarding the payment of dividends will depend on many factors, such as our financial condition, earnings, capital requirements, debt service obligations, limitations under our financing arrangements, industry practice, legal requirements, regulatory constraints, and other factors that it deems relevant. Our ability to pay dividends will depend on our ongoing ability to generate cash from operations and access the capital markets. We cannot guarantee that we will pay a dividend in the future.
 
Future offerings of debt or equity securities, which would be senior to our common shares upon liquidation, and/or preferred equity securities, which may be senior to our common shares for purposes of dividend distributions or upon liquidation, may adversely affect the per share trading price of our common shares.
In the future, we may attempt to increase our capital resources by offering debt or equity securities (or causing our operating partnership to issue debt securities), including medium-term notes, senior or subordinated notes and classes or series of preferred shares. Upon liquidation, holders of our debt securities and preferred shares and lenders with respect to other borrowings will be entitled to receive our available assets prior to distribution to the holders of our common shares. Additionally, any convertible or exchangeable securities that we issue in the future may have rights, preferences and privileges more favorable than those of our common shares and may result in dilution to owners of our common shares. Holders of our common shares are not entitled to preemptive rights or other protections against dilution. Our preferred shares, if issued, could have a preference on liquidating distributions or a preference on dividend payments that could limit our ability pay dividends to the holders of our common shares. Because our decision to issue securities in any future offering will depend on market conditions and other factors beyond our control, we cannot predict or estimate the amount, timing or nature of our future offerings.
Your percentage of ownership in our company may be diluted in the future.
 
Your percentage of ownership in us may be diluted because of equity issuances for acquisitions, capital market transactions or otherwise. We also have granted and anticipate continuing to grant compensatory equity awards to our trustees, officers, employees, advisors and consultants who provide services to us. Such awards have a dilutive effect on our earnings per share, which could adversely affect the market price of our common shares.
 
In addition, our declaration of trust authorizes us to issue, without the approval of our shareholders, one or more classes or series of preferred shares having such designation, voting powers, preferences, rights and other terms, including preferences over our common shares with respect to dividends and distributions, as our Board of Trustees generally may determine. The terms of one or more classes or series of preferred shares could dilute the voting power or reduce the value of our common shares. For example, we could grant the holders of preferred shares the right to elect some number of our trustees in all events or on the occurrence of specified events, or the right to veto specified transactions. Similarly, the repurchase or redemption rights or liquidation preferences we could assign to holders of preferred shares could affect the residual value of our common shares.
 
From time to time we may seek to make one or more material acquisitions. The announcement of such a material acquisition may result in a rapid and significant decline in the price of our common shares.
 
We are continuously looking at material transactions that we believe will maximize shareholder value. However, an announcement by us of one or more significant acquisitions could result in a quick and significant decline in the price of our common shares.

CAUTIONARY STATEMENT CONCERNING FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
Certain statements contained herein constitute forward-looking statements within the meaning of the federal securities laws. Forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance. They represent our intentions, plans, expectations and beliefs and are subject to numerous assumptions, risks and uncertainties. Our future results, financial condition and business may differ materially from those expressed in these forward-looking statements. You can find many of these statements by looking for words such as "approximates," "believes," "expects," "anticipates," "estimates," "intends," "plans," "would," "may" or other similar expressions in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

31



In particular, information included under "Business," "Risk Factors," and "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations" contains forward-looking statements. Many of the factors that will determine the outcome of these and our other forward-looking statements are beyond our ability to control or predict. For a discussion of factors that could materially affect the outcome of our forward-looking statements, see "Risk Factors" in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K or the date of any document incorporated by reference. All subsequent written and oral forward-looking statements attributable to us or any person acting on our behalf are expressly qualified in their entirety by the cautionary statements contained or referred to in this section. We do not undertake any obligation to release publicly any revisions to our forward-looking statements to reflect events or circumstances occurring after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 1B. UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS

There are no unresolved comments from the staff of the SEC as of the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

ITEM 2. PROPERTIES
Note on presentation of "at share" information. We present certain financial information and metrics "at JBG SMITH Share," which refers to our ownership percentage of consolidated and unconsolidated assets in real estate ventures. Financial information "at JBG SMITH Share" is calculated on an entity-by-entity basis. "At JBG SMITH Share" information, which we also refer to as being "at share," "our pro rata share" or "our share," is not, and is not intended to be, a presentation in accordance with GAAP. Because as of December 31, 2017, approximately 12.6% of our assets, as measured by total square feet, were held through real estate ventures, we believe this form of presentation, which includes our economic interests in the unconsolidated real estate ventures, provides investors important information regarding a significant component of our portfolio, its composition, performance and capitalization. We classify our portfolio as “operating,” “near-term development” or “future development.” “Near-term development” refers to assets that have substantially completed the entitlement process and on which we intend to commence construction within 18 months following December 31, 2017, subject to market conditions. We had no near-term development assets as of December 31, 2017. “Future development” refers to assets that are development opportunities on which we do not intend to commence construction within 18 months of December 31, 2017 where we (i) own land or control the land through a ground lease or (ii) are under a long-term conditional contract to purchase, or enter into a leasehold interest with respect to land.
The tables below provide information about each of our office, multifamily, other, near-term development and future development portfolios as of December 31, 2017. Many of our future development parcels are adjacent to or an integrated component of operating office, multifamily or other assets in our portfolio. A significant number of our assets included in the tables below are held through real estate ventures with third parties or are subject to ground leases. In addition to other information, the tables below indicate our percentage ownership, whether the assets are consolidated or unconsolidated and whether the asset is subject to a ground lease.

Office Assets
Office Assets
%
Ownership

C/U
(1)
Same Store (2) 
YTD 2016-2017
Total
Square Feet
%
Leased
Office % Occupied
Retail % Occupied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Universal Buildings
100.0
%
C
Y
686,919

97.7
%
98.9
%
99.6
%
2101 L Street
100.0
%
C
Y
380,375

98.7
%
99.0
%
100.0
%
Bowen Building
100.0
%
C
Y
231,402

86.1
%
86.1
%

1730 M Street (3)
100.0
%
C
Y
205,360

92.5
%
92.2
%
100.0
%
1233 20th Street
100.0
%
C
N
151,695

86.8
%
87.2
%

Executive Tower
100.0
%
C
Y
129,739

79.7
%
80.0
%
88.6
%
1600 K Street
100.0
%
C
N
84,601

92.6
%
91.0
%
100.0
%
L’Enfant Plaza Office-East (3)
49.0
%
U
N
437,518

89.7
%
89.9
%

L’Enfant Plaza Office-North
49.0
%
U
N
305,157

84.7
%
83.8
%
85.9
%
L’Enfant Plaza Retail (3)
49.0
%
U
N
143,614

78.1
%
100.0
%
79.0
%
The Warner
55.0
%
U
Y
585,040

98.6
%
99.6
%
90.4
%
Investment Building
5.0
%
U
Y
401,400

91.3
%
91.1
%
100.0
%
The Foundry
9.9
%
U
N
233,533

91.2
%
92.4
%
70.3
%
1101 17th Street
55.0
%
U
Y
215,675

97.0
%
98.4
%
82.7
%

32



Office Assets
%
Ownership

C/U
(1)
Same Store (2) 
YTD 2016-2017
Total
Square Feet
%
Leased
Office % Occupied
Retail % Occupied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Courthouse Plaza 1 and 2 (3)
100.0
%
C
Y
639,431

93.6
%
91.9
%
100.0
%
2345 Crystal Drive
100.0
%
C
Y
507,336

82.2
%
82.4
%
100.0
%
2121 Crystal Drive
100.0
%
C
Y
505,754

99.9
%
95.6
%

1550 Crystal Drive (4)
100.0
%
C
Y
489,997

78.7
%
80.2
%
75.5
%
RTC-West (4)
100.0
%
C
N
446,176

94.8
%
93.2
%

2231 Crystal Drive
100.0
%
C
Y
466,975

89.3
%
83.7
%
100.0
%
2011 Crystal Drive
100.0
%
C
Y
444,905

82.5
%
82.7
%
100.0
%
2451 Crystal Drive
100.0
%
C
Y
402,172

75.6
%
74.8
%
100.0
%
Commerce Executive (4)
100.0
%
C
Y
393,527

89.8
%
89.9
%
95.2
%
1235 S. Clark Street
100.0
%
C
Y
384,026

84.4
%
82.1
%
100.0
%
241 18th Street S.
100.0
%
C
Y
361,193

76.2
%
73.5
%
89.9
%
251 18th Street S.
100.0
%
C
Y
343,245

98.0
%
98.9
%
95.8
%
1215 S. Clark Street
100.0
%
C
Y
336,159

100.0
%
100.0
%
100.0
%
201 12th Street S.
100.0
%
C
Y
333,838

95.3
%
96.2
%
100.0
%
800 North Glebe Road
100.0
%
C
N
305,039

99.5
%
100.0
%
100.0
%
1225 S. Clark Street
100.0
%
C
Y
283,812

50.8
%
48.4
%
100.0
%
2200 Crystal Drive
100.0
%
C
Y
282,920

45.6
%
45.6
%

1901 South Bell Street
100.0
%
C
Y
277,003

100.0
%
100.0
%
100.0
%
2100 Crystal Drive
100.0
%
C
Y
249,281

98.8
%
100.0
%

200 12th Street S.
100.0
%
C
Y
202,736

86.7
%
83.1
%

2001 Jefferson Davis Highway
100.0
%
C
Y
160,817

62.4
%
61.4
%

Summit I (5)
100.0
%
C
N
145,768

100.0
%
100.0
%

Summit II (4) (5)
100.0
%
C
N
138,350

100.0
%
100.0
%
100.0
%
1800 South Bell Street (4)
100.0
%
C
N
74,701

100.0
%
100.0
%
100.0
%
Crystal City Shops at 2100
100.0
%
C
Y
79,755

93.3
%

93.5
%
Wiehle Avenue Office Building
100.0
%
C
N
77,528

55.9
%
57.5
%

1831 Wiehle Avenue (4)
100.0
%
C
N
25,152

100.0
%
100.0
%

Crystal Drive Retail
100.0
%
C
Y
56,965

100.0
%

100.0
%
Pickett Industrial Park
10.0
%
U
N
246,145

100.0
%
100.0
%

Rosslyn Gateway-North
18.0
%
U
N
144,483

91.4
%
86.6
%
96.0
%
Rosslyn Gateway-South
18.0
%
U
N
105,723

79.8
%
81.8
%
40.4
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MD
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7200 Wisconsin Avenue
100.0
%
C
N
270,628

68.7
%
67.6
%
82.2
%
One Democracy Plaza* (3)
100.0
%
C
Y
214,300

98.4
%
98.9
%
100.0
%
4749 Bethesda Avenue Retail
100.0
%
C
N
13,633

100.0
%

100.0
%
11333 Woodglen Drive
18.0
%
U
N
62,875

97.6
%
97.2
%
100.0
%
NoBe II Office (4)
18.0
%
U
N
39,836

61.9
%
51.7
%
100.0
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total / Weighted Average
 
 
13,704,212

88.5
%
87.9
%
93.5
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Recently Delivered
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RTC - West Retail
100.0
%
C
N
40,025

77.8
%

48.4
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating - Total / Weighted Average
 
13,744,237

88.5
%
87.9
%
91.7
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

33



Office Assets
%
Ownership

C/U
(1)
Same Store (2) 
YTD 2016-2017
Total
Square Feet
%
Leased
Office % Occupied
Retail % Occupied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Under Construction
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
1900 N Street (3) (6)
100.0
%
C
N
271,433

29.6
%
 
 
L’Enfant Plaza Office-Southeast
49.0
%
U
N
215,185

65.1
%
 
 
VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
CEB Tower at Central Place (3)
100.0
%
C
N
529,997

73.3
%
 
 
MD
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
4747 Bethesda Avenue (7)
100.0
%
C
N
287,183

69.8
%
 
 
Under Construction - Total / Weighted Average
 
1,303,798

62.1
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total / Weighted Average
 
 
15,048,035

86.2
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Totals at JBG SMITH Share
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating assets
 
 
 
11,829,162

88.0
%
87.2
%
92.9
%
Under construction assets
 
 
 
1,194,043

61.8
%
 
 
_______________
Note: At 100% share. Excludes our 10% subordinated interests in five commercial buildings held through a real estate venture in which we have no economic interest.
* Not Metro-served.

(1) 
"C" denotes a consolidated interest. "U" denotes an unconsolidated interest.
(2) 
"Y" denotes an asset as same store and "N" denotes an asset as non-same store. Same store refers to assets that were in service for the entirety of both periods being compared, except for assets for which significant redevelopment, renovation or repositioning occurred during either of the periods being compared. No JBG Assets are considered same store.
(3) 
Asset is subject to a ground lease.
(4) 
The following assets contain space that is held for development or not otherwise available for lease. This out-of-service square footage is excluded from area, leased, and occupancy metrics in the above table.
    
Office Asset
 
In-Service
Not Available
for Lease
1550 Crystal Drive
 
489,997

18,293

RTC - West
 
446,176

19,911

Commerce Executive
 
393,527

14,085

Summit II
 
138,350

6,480

1800 South Bell Street
 
74,701

146,079

1831 Wiehle Avenue
 
25,152

50,039

NoBe II Office
 
39,836

96,983


(5) 
In January 2018, we entered into an agreement for the sale of Summit I and II. See Note 20 to the financial statements for additional information.
(6) 
Subsequent to December 31, 2017, we recapitalized the asset through a real estate venture, which will reduce our ownership percentage from 100.0% to 55.0% as contributions are funded. See Note 20 to the financial statements for additional information.
(7) 
Includes JBG SMITH’s lease for approximately 80,200 square feet.




34



Multifamily Assets
Multifamily Assets
%
Ownership

C/U
(1)
Same Store (2) YTD 2016-2017
Number
of
Units
Total
Square
Feet
% Leased
Multifamily
%
Occupied
Retail
%
Occupied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Fort Totten Square
100.0
%
C
N
345

384,316

93.3
%
86.7
%
100.0
%
WestEnd25
100.0
%
C
Y
283

273,264

98.1
%
95.8
%

The Gale Eckington
5.0
%
U
N
603

466,716

94.2
%
91.8
%
100.0
%
Atlantic Plumbing
64.0
%
U
N
310

245,527

96.4
%
93.1
%
100.0
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
RiverHouse Apartments
100.0
%
C
Y
1,670

1,322,016

94.7
%
93.7
%
100.0
%
The Bartlett
100.0
%
C
N
699

619,372

95.2
%
94.1
%
100.0
%
220 20th Street
100.0
%
C
Y
265

271,790

96.8
%
94.3
%
83.3
%
2221 South Clark Street
100.0
%
C
Y
216

171,080

100.0
%
100.0
%

Fairway Apartments*
10.0
%
U
N
346

370,850

93.5
%
92.3
%

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MD
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Falkland Chase-South & West
100.0
%
C
N
268

222,949

97.7
%
96.6
%

Falkland Chase-North (3)
100.0
%
C
N
162

106,159

97.8
%
95.1
%

Galvan
1.8
%
U
N
356

390,650

92.4
%
88.5
%
96.8
%
The Alaire (4)
18.0
%
U
N
279

266,497

92.5
%
91.9
%
100.0
%
The Terano (3) (4)
1.8
%
U
N
214

195,864

90.7
%
88.1
%
76.2
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating - Total / Weighted Average
 
 
6,016

5,307,050

94.8
%
93.0
%
98.1
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Under Construction
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
West Half
95.4
%
C
N
465

388,174

 
 
 
965 Florida Avenue (5)
96.1
%
C
N
433

336,092

 
 
 
1221 Van Street
100.0
%
C
N
291

226,546

 
 
 
Atlantic Plumbing C
100.0
%
C
N
256

225,531

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MD
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
7900 Wisconsin Avenue
50.0
%
U
N
322

359,025

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Under Construction - Total
 
 
1,767

1,535,368

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total
 
 
 
7,783

6,842,418

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Totals at JBG SMITH Share
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating assets
 
 
 
4,232

3,647,031

95.6
%
93.8
%
99.8
%
Under construction assets
 
 
 
1,568

1,325,142

 
 
 
_______________
Note: At 100% share.
* Not Metro-served.

(1) 
"C" denotes a consolidated interest. "U" denotes an unconsolidated interest.
(2) 
"Y" denotes an asset as same store and "N" denotes an asset as non-same store. Same store refers to assets that were in service for the entirety of both periods being compared, except for assets for which significant redevelopment, renovation or repositioning occurred during either of the periods being compared. No JBG Assets are considered same store.
(3) 
The following assets contain space that is held for development or not otherwise available for lease. This out-of-service square footage is excluded from area, leased, and occupancy metrics in the above table.
Multifamily Asset
 
In-Service
Not Available
for Lease
Falkland Chase - North
 
106,159

13,284

The Terano
 
195,864

3,904

(4) 
Asset is subject to a ground lease.
(5) 
Ownership percentage reflects expected dilution of JBG SMITH's real estate venture partner as contributions are funded during the construction of the asset. As of December 31, 2017, JBG SMITH's ownership interest was 67.6%.

35




Other Assets
Other Assets
%
Ownership

C/U
(1)
Same Store (2) YTD 2016-2017
Total
Square
Feet
(3)
%
Leased
%
Occupied
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retail
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC
 
 
 
 
 
 
North End Retail
100.0%
C
N
27,432

100.0
%
99.0
%
VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vienna Retail*
100.0%
C
Y
8,547

100.0
%
100.0
%
Stonebridge at Potomac Town Center-Phase I*
10.0%
U
N
462,633

93.9
%
93.9
%
Total / Weighted Average
 
 
 
498,612

94.3
%
94.2
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Hotel
 
 
 
 
 
 
VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
Crystal City Marriott Hotel
100.0%
C
Y
266,000
(345 Rooms)

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating - Total
 
 
 
764,612

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Under Construction
 
 
 
 
 
 
VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
Stonebridge at Potomac Town Center-Phase II*
10.0%
U
N
41,050

100.0
%
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total
 
 
 
805,662

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Totals at JBG SMITH Share
 
 
 
 
 
 
Operating assets
 
 
 
348,242

96.5
%
96.2
%
Under construction assets
 
 
 
4,105

100.0
%
 
_______________
Note: At 100% share.
* Not Metro-served.

(1) 
"C" denotes a consolidated interest. "U" denotes an unconsolidated interest.
(2) 
"Y" denotes an asset as same store and "N" denotes an asset as non-same store. Same store refers to assets that were in service for the entirety of both periods being compared, except for assets for which significant redevelopment, renovation or repositioning occurred during either of the periods being compared. No JBG Assets are considered same store.

Near-Term Developments

As of December 31, 2017, we had no near-term development assets.


36



Future Developments
 
 
Estimated Commercial SF / Multifamily Units to be Replaced (1)
 
 
 
 
Number of Assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Estimated Total Investment
(In thousands)
 
 
 
Estimated Potential Development Density (SF)
 
 
Region
 
 
Total
 
Office
 
Multifamily
 
Retail
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Owned
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC Emerging
 
7

 
1,426,900

 
312,100

 
1,105,800

 
9,000

 

 
$
77,143

DC CBD
 
1

 
336,200

 
324,400

 

 
11,800

 

 
51,093

 
 
8

 
1,763,100

 
636,500

 
1,105,800

 
20,800

 

 
128,236

VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Pentagon City
 
5

 
4,572,800

 
1,429,100

 
2,999,100

 
144,600

 

 
163,284

Reston
 
6

 
4,193,100

 
1,282,800

 
2,683,600

 
226,700

 
 102,680 SF / 15 units

 
92,596

Crystal City
 
9

 
2,982,400

 
620,000

 
2,088,200

 
274,200

 
 74,701 SF

 
143,575

Other VA
 
5

 
951,300

 
496,400

 
394,300

 
60,600

 
 22,203 SF

 
33,122

 
 
25

 
12,699,600

 
3,828,300

 
8,165,200

 
706,100

 
 199,584 SF / 15 units

 
432,577

MD
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Silver Spring
 
1

 
1,276,300

 

 
1,156,300

 
120,000

 
 162 units

 
40,198

Greater Rockville
 
4

 
126,500

 
19,200

 
88,600

 
18,700

 
 7,170 SF

 
4,029

 
 
5

 
1,402,800

 
19,200

 
1,244,900

 
138,700

 
 7,170 SF /
162 units

 
44,227

Total / weighted average
 
38

 
15,865,500

 
4,484,000

 
10,515,900

 
865,600

 
206,754 SF / 177 units

 
$
605,040

Optioned (2)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DC Emerging
 
4

 
2,045,100

 
78,800

 
1,750,400

 
215,900

 

 
$
131,432

VA
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Other VA
 
1

 
11,300

 

 
10,400

 
900

 

 
1,019

Total / weighted average
 
5

 
2,056,400

 
78,800

 
1,760,800

 
216,800

 

 
$
132,451

Total / Weighted Average
 
43

 
17,921,900

 
4,562,800

 
12,276,700

 
1,082,400

 
206,754 SF / 177 units

 
$
737,491

_______________
Note: At JBG SMITH share.
(1) 
Represents management's estimate of the total office and/or retail rentable square feet and multifamily units that would need to be redeveloped to access some of the estimated potential development density.
(2) 
As of December 31, 2017, the weighted average remaining term for the optioned future development assets is 5.8 years.

Major Tenants
The following table sets forth information for our 10 largest tenants by annualized rent for the year ended December 31, 2017:
 
 
 
 
At JBG SMITH Share
Tenant
 
Number of Leases
 

Square Feet
 
% of Total Square Feet
 
Annualized Rent
(In thousands)
 
% of Total Annualized Rent
GSA
 
82

 
2,579,525

 
24.4
%
 
$
103,149

 
22.3
%
Family Health International
 
9

 
320,791

 
3.0
%
 
15,641

 
3.4
%
Lockheed Martin Corporation
 
5

 
274,361

 
2.6
%
 
13,493

 
2.9
%
Arlington County
 
9

 
241,288

 
2.3
%
 
11,608

 
2.5
%
Paul Hastings LLP
 
5

 
125,863

 
1.2
%
 
9,478

 
2.1
%
Greenberg Traurig LLP
 
1

 
115,315

 
1.1
%
 
8,904

 
1.9
%
Baker Botts
 
2

 
85,090

 
0.8
%
 
6,796

 
1.5
%
Public Broadcasting Service
 
5

 
140,885

 
1.3
%
 
5,707

 
1.2
%
WeWork
 
3

 
122,271

 
1.2
%
 
5,553

 
1.2
%
Accenture LLP
 
1

 
102,756

 
1.0
%
 
5,545

 
1.2
%
Total
 
122

 
4,108,145

 
38.9
%
 
$
185,874

 
40.2
%
________________

37



Note: Includes all in-place leases as of December 31, 2017 for office and retail space within JBG SMITH's operating portfolio.

Lease Expirations
The following table sets forth as of December 31, 2017 the anticipated expirations of tenant leases in our consolidated portfolio for each year from 2018 through 2026 and thereafter, assuming no exercise of renewal options or early termination rights:
 
 
 
 
At JBG SMITH Share
Year of Lease Expiration
 
Number
of Leases
 

Square Feet
 
% of
Total
Square Feet
 
Annualized
Rent
(in thousands)
 
% of
Total
Annualized
Rent
 
Annualized
Rent Per
Square Foot
 
Estimated
Annualized
Rent Per
Square Foot at
Expiration
(1)
Month-to-Month
 
77

 
126,322

 
1.2
%
 
$
2,949

 
0.6
%
 
$
23.34

 
$
23.34

2018
 
193

 
945,626

 
8.9
%
 
40,977

 
8.9
%
 
43.33

 
43.72

2019
 
174

 
1,182,027

 
11.2
%
 
53,758

 
11.6
%
 
45.48

 
46.65

2020
 
187

 
1,472,239

 
13.9
%
 
69,613

 
15.1
%
 
47.28

 
49.37

2021
 
130

 
1,044,166

 
9.9
%
 
47,870

 
10.4
%
 
45.84

 
49.58

2022
 
126

 
1,437,614

 
13.6
%
 
66,269

 
14.3
%
 
46.10

 
49.36

2023
 
74

 
462,611

 
4.4
%
 
18,683

 
4.0
%
 
40.39

 
45.85

2024
 
80

 
646,725

 
6.1
%
 
29,030

 
6.3
%
 
44.89

 
52.42

2025
 
57

 
417,943

 
4.0
%
 
16,299

 
3.5
%
 
39.00

 
45.34

2026
 
69

 
387,140

 
3.7
%
 
17,316

 
3.7
%
 
44.73

 
51.89

Thereafter
 
155

 
2,453,264

 
23.1
%
 
99,555

 
21.6
%
 
40.58

 
51.87

 In‑Place Leases - Total/Weighted Average
 
1,322

 
10,575,677

 
100.0
%
 
$
462,319

 
100.0
%
 
$
43.72

 
$
48.81

____________________
Note: Includes all leases for office and retail space within JBG SMITH's operating portfolio.

(1)
Represents monthly base rent before free rent, plus tenant reimbursements, as of lease expiration multiplied by 12 and divided by square feet. Triple net leases are converted to a gross basis by adding tenant reimbursements to monthly base rent. Tenant reimbursements at lease expiration are estimated by escalating tenant reimbursements as of December 31, 2017, or management’s estimate thereof, by 2.75% annually through the lease expiration year.

ITEM 3. LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
We are, from time to time, involved in legal actions arising in the ordinary course of business. In our opinion, the outcome of such matters is not expected to have a material adverse effect on our financial position, results of operations or cash flows.
ITEM 4. MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES

Not applicable.

PART II


ITEM 5. MARKET FOR REGISTRANT’S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDER MATTERS AND
ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES

Market Information and Dividends
Our common shares began regular way trading on the New York Stock Exchange, or NYSE, on July 18, 2017, under the symbol "JBGS." On March 5, 2018, there were 882 holders of record of our common shares. This does not reflect individuals or other entities who hold their shares in "street name." The following table sets forth the high and low closing prices and the cash dividends declared on our common shares by quarter for 2017 as applicable:


38



 
 
2017
 
 
High Price Per Share
 
Low Price per Share
 
Dividends Declared Per Common Share (1)
Third quarter (July 18 - September 30)
 
$
37.24

 
$
32.08

 
$

Fourth quarter
 
35.64

 
30.79

 
0.45

_______________
(1) Of the total dividends declared, dividends declared in December 2017 of $0.225 per common share were paid in January 2018.

Future declarations of dividends will be made at the discretion of our Board of Trustees and will depend upon cash generated by our operating activities, our financial condition, capital requirements, annual distribution requirements under the REIT provisions of the Code and such other factors as our Board of Trustees deems relevant. To qualify for the beneficial tax treatment accorded to REITs under the Code, we are currently required to make distributions to holders of our shares in an amount equal to at least 90% of our REIT taxable income as defined in Section 857 of the Code.

The annual dividend amounts are different from dividends as calculated for federal income tax purposes. Distributions to the extent of our current and accumulated earnings and profits for federal income tax purposes generally will be taxable to a shareholder as ordinary dividend income. Distributions in excess of current and accumulated earnings and profits will be treated as a nontaxable reduction of the shareholder’s basis in such shareholder’s shares, to the extent thereof, and thereafter as taxable capital gain. Distributions that are treated as a reduction of the shareholder’s basis in its shares will have the effect of increasing the amount of gain, or reducing the amount of loss, recognized upon the sale of the shareholder’s shares. No assurances can be given regarding what portion, if any, of distributions in 2018 or subsequent years will constitute a return of capital for federal income tax purposes. During a year in which a REIT earns a net long-term capital gain, the REIT can elect under Section 857(b)(3) of the Code to designate a portion of dividends paid to shareholders as capital gain dividends. If this election is made, the capital gain dividends are generally taxable to the shareholder as long-term capital gains.

Performance Graph

This performance graph shall not be deemed "soliciting material" or to be "filed" with the SEC for purposes of Section 18 of the Exchange Act, or otherwise subject to the liabilities under that Section, and shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any of our filings of under the Securities Act or the Exchange Act.

The graph below compares the cumulative total return of our common shares, the S&P MidCap 400 Index and the FTSE NAREIT Equity Office Index, from July 18, 2017 (the completion date of the Formation Transaction) through December 31, 2017. The comparison assumes $100 was invested on July 18, 2017 in our common shares and in each of the foregoing indexes and assumes reinvestment of dividends, as applicable. We have included the FTSE NAREIT Equity Office Index because we believe that it is representative of the industry in which we compete and is relevant to an assessment of our performance. There can be no assurance that the performance of our shares will continue in line with the same or similar trends depicted in the graph below.


39



chart-423c541315995fcacf1.jpg

 
Period Ending
 
07/18/17
07/31/17
08/31/17
09/30/17
10/31/17
11/30/17
12/31/17
JBG SMITH Properties
100.00
95.27
87.89
91.86
83.81
90.07
94.51
S&P MidCap 400 Index
100.00
99.90
98.37
102.22
104.54
108.38
108.61
FTSE NAREIT Equity Office Index
100.00
98.56
97.48
99.26
98.39
101.15
102.57

Sales of Unregistered Shares

In connection with the Separation, on July 17, 2017, JBG SMITH LP issued 100.6 million OP Units to VRLP in exchange for the contribution by VRLP of Vornado’s Washington, DC business (including interests in entities holding properties). In addition, we issued 94.7 million common shares to Vornado in exchange for the contribution by Vornado of the 94.7 million OP Units that Vornado received in the distribution by VRLP. The OP Units and common shares issued to VRLP and Vornado, respectively, were issued in reliance upon an exemption from registration pursuant to Section 4(a)(2) under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, which exempts transactions by an issuer not involving any public offering. Neither of these offerings was a “public offering” because only one person was involved in each transaction, neither JBG SMITH nor JBG SMITH LP has engaged in general solicitation or advertising with regard to the issuance and sale of the OP Units and common shares to VRLP and Vornado, and neither JBG SMITH nor JBG SMITH LP has offered securities to the public in connection with such issuances and sales to VRLP and Vornado.

In connection with the Combination, on July 18, 2017, we issued 23.2 million common shares and JBG SMITH LP issued 13.9 million OP Units as consideration for contribution of the JBG Assets, which were issued in reliance upon an exemption from registration pursuant to Regulation D under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended, which exempts transactions by an issuer not involving any public offering. Among other things, JBG SMITH and JBG SMITH LP relied on the fact that there was no general solicitation or advertising with regard to the issuance and sale of these securities. The OP Units are redeemable for cash or, at our election, common shares, beginning August 1, 2018, subject to certain limitations.
Repurchases of Equity Securities
During the year ended December 31, 2017, we did not repurchase any of our equity securities.

40



Equity Compensation Plan Information
Information regarding equity compensation plans is presented in Part III, Item 12 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K and incorporated herein by reference.

ITEM 6. SELECTED FINANCIAL DATA

The following table includes selected consolidated and combined financial data set forth as of and for each of the five years in the period ended December 31, 2017. The consolidated balance sheet as of December 31, 2017 reflects the consolidation of properties that are wholly owned and properties in which we own less than 100% interest, including JBG SMITH LP, but in which we have a controlling interest. The consolidated and combined statement of operations for the year ended December 31, 2017 includes our consolidated accounts and the combined accounts of the Vornado Included Assets. Accordingly, the results presented for the year ended December 31, 2017 reflect the operations, comprehensive income (loss), and changes in cash flows and equity on a carved-out and combined basis for the period from January 1, 2017 through the date of the Separation and on a consolidated basis subsequent to the Separation. Consequently, our results for the periods before and after the Formation Transaction are not directly comparable. The financial data for the periods prior to the Separation are derived from audited combined financial statements. This selected financial data should be read in conjunction with "Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations", and our audited consolidated and combined financial statements and related notes included in Part II, Items 7 and 8 of this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

41





 
Year Ended December 31,
 
2017
 
2016
 
2015
 
2014
 
2013
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Statement of Operations Data:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Total revenue
$
543,013

 
$
478,519

 
$
470,607

 
$
472,923

 
$
476,311

Depreciation and amortization
161,659

 
133,343

 
144,984

 
112,046

 
108,571

Property operating
111,055

 
100,304