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UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
Washington, D.C. 20549
________________________________________________________________________
FORM 10-K
(Mark One) 
ANNUAL REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
For the fiscal year ended December 31, 2021
or
TRANSITION REPORT PURSUANT TO SECTION 13 OR 15(d) OF THE SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 For the transition period from ____________to ____________
 Commission File Number 001-38598 
________________________________________________________________________
be-20211231_g1.jpg
BLOOM ENERGY CORPORATION
(Exact name of registrant as specified in its charter)
________________________________________________________________________
Delaware77-0565408
(State or other jurisdiction of incorporation or organization)(I.R.S. Employer Identification No.)
4353 North First Street, San Jose, California
95134
(Address of principal executive offices)(Zip Code)
(408) 543-1500
(Registrant’s telephone number, including area code)
Securities registered pursuant to Section 12(b) of the Act:
Title of Each Class(1)
Trading SymbolName of each exchange on which registered
Class A Common Stock, $0.0001 par valueBENew York Stock Exchange
(1) Our Class B Common Stock is not registered but is convertible into shares of Class A Common Stock at the election of the holder.
________________________________________________________________________
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is a well-known seasoned issuer, as defined in Rule 405 of the Securities Act. Yes þ No ¨
Indicate by check mark if the registrant is not required to file reports pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d) of the Act. Yes ¨ No þ
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant (1) has filed all reports required to be filed by Section 13 or 15(d) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to file such reports), and (2) has been subject to such filing requirements for the past 90 days.  Yes  þ    No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has submitted electronically every Interactive Data File required to be submitted pursuant to Rule 405 of Regulation S-T (§232.405 of this chapter) during the preceding 12 months (or for such shorter period that the registrant was required to submit such files).  Yes  þ    No ¨
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a large accelerated filer, an accelerated filer, a non-accelerated filer, a smaller reporting company, or an emerging growth company.  See the definitions of “large accelerated filer,” “accelerated filer,” “smaller reporting company,” and “emerging growth company” in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act.  
Large accelerated filer þ     Accelerated filer   ¨      Non-accelerated filer   ¨      Smaller reporting company        Emerging growth company   
If an emerging growth company, indicate by check mark if the registrant has elected not to use the extended transition period for complying with any new or revised financial accounting standards provided pursuant to Section 13(a) of the Exchange Act.  
1


Indicate by check mark whether the registrant has filed a report on and attestation to its management’s assessment of the effectiveness of its internal control over financial reporting under Section 404(b) of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act (15 U.S.C. 7262(b)) by the registered public accounting firm that prepared or issued its audit report.
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is a shell company (as defined in Rule 12b-2 of the Exchange Act).  Yes      No  þ
The aggregate market value of the registrant’s Class A common stock held by non-affiliates of the registrant was approximately $3.8 billion based upon the closing price of $26.87 per share of our Class A common stock on the New York Stock Exchange on June 30, 2021 (the last trading day of the registrant’s most recently completed second quarter). Shares of Class A common stock held by each executive officer, director and holder of 10% of more of the outstanding Class A common stock have been excluded in that such persons may be deemed to be affiliates. The determination of affiliate status if not necessarily a conclusive determination for other purposes.
The number of shares of the registrant’s common stock outstanding as of February 15, 2022 was as follows:
Class A Common Stock, $0.0001 par value 161,284,535 shares
Class B Common Stock, $0.0001 par value 15,832,833 shares
________________________________________________________________________

DOCUMENTS INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE

Portions of the registrant’s definitive proxy statement for the 2022 Annual Meeting of Stockholders (the “2022 Proxy Statement”) are incorporated into Part III hereof. The 2022 Proxy Statement will be filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission ("SEC") within 120 days after the registrant’s year ended December 31, 2021.

2


Bloom Energy Corporation
Annual Report on Form 10-K for the Years Ended December 31, 2021
Table of Contents
 Page
Part I
 5
Item 1A - Risk Factors
 18
 43
Part II
Item 6 - [Reserved]
Consolidated Statements of Redeemable Convertible Preferred Stock, Redeemable Noncontrolling Interest, Stockholders' Equity (Deficit) and Noncontrolling Interest
Item 9C - Disclosure Regarding Foreign Jurisdictions that Prevent Inspection
Part III
Part IV
Unless the context otherwise requires, the terms "we," "us," "our," "Bloom Energy," "Bloom" and the "Company" each refer to Bloom Energy Corporation and all of its subsidiaries.
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SPECIAL NOTE ABOUT FORWARD-LOOKING STATEMENTS
This Annual Report on Form 10-K contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"), and Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended (the "Exchange Act"). All statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K other than statements of historical fact, including statements regarding our future operating results and financial position, our business strategy and plans and our objectives for future operations, are forward-looking statements. The words “believe,” “may,” “will,” “estimate,” “continue,” “anticipate,” “predict,” “project,” “potential,” ”seek,” “intend,” “could,” “would,” “should,” “expect,” “plan” and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements.
Forward-looking statements in this Annual Report on Form 10-K include, but are not limited to, our plans and expectations regarding future financial results, including our expectations regarding: our ability to expand into and be successful in new markets, including the biogas and hydrogen market; the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic; statements about our supply chain; operating results; the sufficiency of our cash and our liquidity; projected costs and cost reductions; development of new products and improvements to our existing products; our manufacturing capacity and manufacturing costs; the adequacy of our agreements with our suppliers; legislative actions and regulatory and environmental compliance; competitive position; management’s plans and objectives for future operations; our ability to obtain financing; our ability to comply with debt covenants or cure defaults, if any; our ability to repay our debt obligations as they come due; trends in average selling prices; the success of our customer financing arrangements; capital expenditures; warranty matters; outcomes of litigation; our exposure to foreign exchange, interest and credit risk; general business and economic conditions in our markets; industry trends; the impact of changes in government incentives; risks related to cybersecurity breaches, privacy and data security; the likelihood of any impairment of project assets, long-lived assets and investments; trends in revenue, cost of revenue and gross profit (loss); trends in operating expenses including research and development expense, sales and marketing expense and general and administrative expense and expectations regarding these expenses as a percentage of revenue; future deployment of our Bloom Energy Servers and Bloom Electrolyzer; our ability to expand our business with our existing customers; our ability to increase efficiency of our products; our ability to market out products successfully in connection with the global energy transition and shifting attitudes around climate change; our business strategy and plans and our objectives for future operations; and the impact of recently adopted accounting pronouncements.
You should not rely upon forward-looking statements as predictions of future events. We have based the forward-looking statements contained in this Annual Report on Form 10-K primarily on our current expectations and projections about future events and trends that we believe may affect our business, financial condition, operating results and prospects. The outcome of the events described in these forward-looking statements is subject to risks, uncertainties and other factors including those discussed in Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Moreover, we operate in a very competitive and rapidly changing environment. New risks and uncertainties emerge from time to time and it is not possible for us to predict all risks and uncertainties or the extent to which any factor or combination of factors may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in any forward-looking statements we may make in this Annual Report on Form 10-K. We cannot assure you that the results, events and circumstances reflected in the forward-looking statements will be achieved or occur. Actual results, events or circumstances could differ materially and adversely from those described or anticipated in the forward-looking statements.
The forward-looking statements made in this Annual Report on Form 10-K relate only to events as of the date on which the statements are made. We undertake no obligation to update any forward-looking statements made in this Annual Report on Form 10-K to reflect events or circumstances after the date of this Annual Report on Form 10-K or to reflect new information or the occurrence of unanticipated events, except as required by law. We may not actually achieve the plans, intentions or expectations disclosed in our forward-looking statements and you should not place undue reliance on our forward-looking statements.
Our actual results and timing of selected events may differ materially from those anticipated in these forward-looking statements as a result of many factors including those discussed under Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors and elsewhere in this Annual Report on Form 10-K.

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Part I
ITEM 1 - BUSINESS
Overview
Our mission is to make clean, reliable energy affordable for everyone in the world. We created the first large-scale, commercially viable solid oxide fuel-cell based power generation platform that empowers businesses, essential services, critical infrastructure and communities to responsibly take charge of their energy.
Our technology, invented in the United States, is one of the most advanced electricity and hydrogen producing technologies on the market today. Our fuel-flexible Bloom Energy Servers can use biogas, hydrogen, natural gas, or a blend of fuels to create resilient, sustainable and cost-predictable power at significantly higher efficiencies than traditional, combustion-based resources. In addition, our same solid oxide platform that powers our fuel cells can be used to create hydrogen, which is increasingly recognized as a critically important tool necessary for the full decarbonization of the energy economy. Our enterprise customers include some of the largest multinational corporations in the world. We also have strong relationships with some of the largest utility companies in the United States and the Republic of Korea.
At Bloom Energy, we look forward to a net-zero future. Our technology is designed to help enable this future in order to deliver reliable, low-carbon, electricity in a world facing unacceptable levels of power disruptions. Our resilient platform has kept electricity available for our customers through hurricanes, earthquakes, typhoons, forest fires, extreme heat and grid failures. Unlike traditional combustion power generation, our platform is community-friendly and designed to significantly reduce emissions of criteria air pollutants. We have made tremendous progress making renewable fuel production a reality through our biogas, hydrogen and electrolyzer programs, and we believe that we are well-positioned as a core platform and fixture in the new energy paradigm to help organizations and communities achieve their net-zero objectives.
Our team has decades of experience in the various specialized disciplines and systems engineering concepts embedded in our technology. We have 287 issued patents in the United States and 147 issued patents internationally as of December 31, 2021.
The United States is currently our biggest market and represents our largest installed base of Bloom Energy Servers. Some of our largest customers in the United States include AT&T, Caltech, Delmarva Power & Light Company, Equinix, The Home Depot, Kaiser Permanente and The Wonderful Company. We also work with a number of U.S. financing partners who purchase and deploy our systems at end-customers’ facilities in order to provide “electricity-as-a service."
Outside of the United States, the Republic of Korea is a world leader in the deployment of fuel cells for utility-scale electric power generation. We entered this market with a first deployment of an 8.35-megawatt ("MW") Bloom Energy Server solution for a Korean utility that began commercial operation in 2018. The Republic of Korea now represents our second-largest market. SK ecoplant Co., Ltd. (“SK ecoplant,” formerly known as SK Engineering & Construction Co., Ltd.), a subsidiary of the SK Group, serves as the primary distributor of our systems in the Republic of Korea. In October 2021, we announced an expansion of our existing partnership with SK ecoplant, that includes purchase commitments of at least 500MW of power for our Energy Servers between 2022 and 2025 on a take or pay basis, the creation of hydrogen innovation centers in the United States and the Republic of Korea to advance green hydrogen commercialization, and an equity investment in Bloom Energy.
We are also operating smaller deployments in India and Japan with commercial customers, with additional projects in development in Europe, Southeast Asia and Australia.
Industry Background
There are numerous challenges facing the traditional system for producing and delivering electricity. We believe these challenges will be the foundation of a transformation in how electricity is produced, delivered and consumed. We believe this transformation will be similar to the seismic shifts seen in the computer and telecommunications industries, where centralized mainframe computing and landline telephone systems ultimately gave way to the ubiquitous and highly personalized distributed technologies seen today, as well as the reimagining of business processes, culture and customer experiences.
Resilience is now a strategic imperative. The rising frequency and intensity of natural disasters and extreme weather in recent years underscores a critical need for greater grid resilience. 2021 was characterized by increasing, frequent and costly extreme weather events. In the United States alone, there were 20 weather/climate disaster events with losses exceeding $1 billion each. These events included droughts, flooding, tropical cyclones, tsunamis, wildfires and winter storms, resulting in
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billions of dollars in economic impact. 2021 was also the seventh consecutive year with 10 or more billion dollar climate-related events in the United States. Extreme weather’s economic toll is rising as well. The total cost of 2021’s billion dollar weather events is estimated at $145 billion, the third most costly year on record, while the total cost for the last five years exceeds one-third of the total disaster cost of the last 42 years.
Stakeholders across industries grapple with the question of how to prepare for more intense natural disasters while maintaining course toward achieving their climate targets. These climate threats are compounded by an increasing concern over the threat of cyber-attacks and physical sabotage to the centralized grid infrastructure. These acute issues further add to a chronic concern; the fragility of decades-old energy system elements that have suffered from deferred maintenance and replacement, which can only be partially remedied by the billions of dollars of new investment from the recently passed infrastructure bill. In an increasingly electrified world, from electric vehicles, to automated manufacturing, to the digitalization of everything, power supply and reliability are more important now than ever. This has elevated the discussion around the essential role that distributed generation and microgrids can play in improving the resilience of both businesses and the grid. As outages increase, businesses are considering the “cost of not having power” instead of just the “cost of power.” Energy resilience is becoming an issue business leaders can no longer afford to neglect – both from a strategic and cost perspective.
Rise in centralized capacity constraints. The traditional centralized grid model is increasingly showing weaknesses. For example, in the summer of 2021, California issued an emergency proclamation order, documenting the drastic measures that must be taken to secure sufficient capacity to be able to avert catastrophic blackouts. Californians were asked to conserve energy, customers with diesel generators were being asked to run them and the state suspended many environmental permitting rules and regulations related to the deployment of power generation. This is one of the many reasons why microgrids, localized energy systems that can operate alongside a main grid or disconnect and operate autonomously, are playing an increasingly important role, providing a critical, twenty-four hours a day and seven days a week ("24x7"), always-on energy solution, powering critical infrastructure, offsetting demand on the grid, and supplying power to the grid when it is most needed.
Increasing focus on reducing harmful local emissions. Air pollution is the fifth leading risk factor for mortality worldwide. Indeed, calculations of the economic and health benefits associated with reducing localized air pollution such as nitrogen oxides, which are produced by combusting fuel, and particulate matter emissions have been found to exceed the economic and health benefits of reducing carbon emissions. And, unfortunately, the COVID-19 pandemic has only further shed light on these detrimental health impacts. Recent studies have linked long-term exposure to air pollution and COVID-19 death rates. They have also found that, nationwide, low-income communities of color are exposed to significantly higher levels of pollution, experiencing higher levels of lung disease and other ailments as a result. Policymakers are rightly increasing the emphasis on reducing such harmful local emissions as they consider the adoption of Renewable Portfolio Standards (“RPS”) or other mandated targets for low- or zero-carbon power generation.
Hydrogen is key to a zero-carbon future. We believe hydrogen will be a critical foundation for the energy industry of the future, a truly clean alternative for both natural gas and transportation fuels. Hydrogen’s unique advantages – high energy density, zero carbon gas emissions from consumption, and ease of storage and transportation – make it an especially attractive investment opportunity for those interested in a zero-carbon energy mix. Given the well-documented challenges that utilities and grid operators have faced as they integrate increasingly intermittent renewable resources on the grid, predictable round-the-clock hydrogen power will be an invaluable resource as more grids move towards a truly zero-carbon resource mix. The key limiting factor in the use of hydrogen, which does not readily exist in nature as a separate molecule, is that it cannot be mined, extracted or otherwise produced in its desired state without a manufacturing process. As both transportation and the electricity sector transition to a zero-carbon future, there will thus be increasing demand for both technologies that can efficiently generate power using hydrogen, and for large-scale electrolysis or carbon capture technology that can produce clean hydrogen at scale.
Our Solutions
We were the first company to successfully commercialize and scale the solid oxide platform. Our platform delivers distributed electricity and hydrogen generation through our stationary fuel cells, our solid oxide electrolyzer and our marine technology.
Distributed electricity production. Our stationary fuel cell solution, the Bloom Energy Server, is designed to deliver reliable, resilient, clean and affordable energy for utilities and organizations alike. Ideally suited for microgrid and primary power applications, the Bloom Energy Server is based on our proprietary solid oxide technology that converts fuel, such as natural gas, biogas, hydrogen, or a blend of these fuels, into electricity through an electrochemical process without combustion. The high-quality electrical output of our Energy Server can be connected to the customer’s main electrical feed, thereby avoiding the transmission and distribution losses associated with a centralized grid system. Each Bloom Energy Server is
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modular and composed of independent 50-kilowatt power modules. A typical configuration includes multiple power modules in a single Energy Server and can produce up to 300 kilowatts of power in a footprint roughly equivalent to that of a standard parking space. Any number of these Energy Server systems can be clustered together in various configurations to form solutions from hundreds of kilowatts to many tens of megawatts. The Bloom Energy Server can be easily integrated into community environments due to its aesthetically attractive design, compact space requirement, minimal noise profile and lack of criteria air pollutants.
Hydrogen generation. We believe we are uniquely positioned for the hydrogen future of tomorrow. Using the same solid oxide platform as our Energy Server, the Bloom Electrolyzer is designed to produce scalable and cost-effective hydrogen solutions. Our modular design makes the Bloom Electrolyzer ideal for applications across gas, utilities, nuclear, concentrated solar, ammonia and heavy industries. Our solid oxide, high-temperature electrolyzer is designed to produce hydrogen onsite more efficiently than low-temperature PEM and alkaline electrolyzers. Because it operates at high temperatures, the Bloom Electrolyzer is designed to require less energy to break up water molecules and produce hydrogen. As electricity accounts for nearly 80 percent of the cost of hydrogen from electrolysis, using less electricity increases the economics of hydrogen production and helps bolster adoption. The Bloom Electrolyzer is designed to produce green hydrogen from 100 percent renewable power. Using less electricity increases the economics of hydrogen production and helps bolster adoption. The hydrogen produced onsite at a customer’s facility can either be used as a fuel source or stored for consumption at a later point.

Marine Transportation. We have also adapted our fuel cell technology to advance the decarbonization of the marine industry through the design and development of fuel cell powered ships. The marine sector is a significant source of global pollution, as many ships continue to use carbon-rich fuels such as bunker fuel, diesel, and other hydrocarbons. As global infrastructure for hydrogen and other emission-free fuels continue to develop, our modular, fuel-flexible and upgradable platform is designed to allow for existing ships in service to be upgraded, allowing the marine sector long-term flexibility and scalability for improved, future-proof, ship design. Furthermore, noise pollution and mechanical vibrations are substantially reduced when Bloom’s fuel cells are used as a power source aboard ships. Our platform is IMO 2040- and 2050-ready today, with the ability to operate on liquefied natural gas, biogas and blended hydrogen. We are committed to developing the platform to accommodate multiple renewable fuels, like green methanol and bio-ethanol, as the marine fuel market develops.
Our Value Proposition
Our energy platform has three key value propositions: resiliency, sustainability and predictability. We seek to provide a complete, integrated “behind-the-meter” solution including installation, equipment, service, maintenance and, in limited cases, bundled fuel. The three elements of our value proposition emphasize those areas where there is a strong customer need and where we believe we can deliver superior performance.
Resiliency. Our Energy Servers avoid the vulnerabilities of conventional transmission and distribution lines by generating power on-site where the electricity is consumed. The system operates at very high availability due to its modular and fault-tolerant design, which includes multiple independent power generation modules that can be hot-swapped to provide uninterrupted service. Unlike traditional combustion generation, Bloom Energy Servers can be serviced and maintained without powering down the system. Importantly, Bloom Energy Servers that utilize existing natural gas infrastructure rely on a redundant underground mesh network, intended to provide for extremely high fuel availability that is protected from the natural disasters that often disrupt the power grid.
Sustainability. Our Energy Servers uniquely address both the causes and consequences of climate change. Our projects lower carbon emissions by displacing less-efficient fossil fuel generation on the grid, which improves air quality, including in vulnerable communities, by generating electricity without combustion, offsetting combustion from grid resources as well as eliminating the need for dirtier diesel backup power solutions. Our microgrid deployments provide customers with critical resilience to grid instability, including disruptions resulting from climate-related extreme weather events. Our products achieve this while consuming no water during operation, with optimized land use as a result of our high-power density.
We are focused on product innovation, including the continued reduction of carbon emissions from our products, and we are engaged in multiple efforts to align our product roadmap with a zero-carbon trajectory. We are developing new applications and market opportunities in sectors with dirtier grids and higher marginal emissions displacement. In July 2021, we announced that we will convert our entire global natural gas fleet to certified low-leak natural gas to reduce the release of harmful methane emissions stemming from upstream gas production. We are also focused on scaling use of renewable natural gas (“RNG”) – which is pipeline quality natural gas derived from biogas produced from decomposing organic waste, generally from landfills, agricultural waste and wastewater treatment facilities – as fuel for our Energy Servers and building capacity within the RNG market to broaden adoption.
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Additionally, we are pushing technology and business model boundaries to pioneer carbon capture and utilization and storage potential. It is both more feasible and cost-effective to capture carbon-dioxide emissions from our Energy Servers than from combustion generation, as no costly and complex separation of other gases like nitrogen is required. Captured carbon-dioxide emissions can be stored in underground geologic formations or utilized in new products or processes.
We continue to progress on our development and commercialization of scalable and cost-effective 100 percent hydrogen solutions and zero emission power generation. Our flexible and modular platform approach allows for customization at the time of equipment commissioning and a pathway to upgrade existing systems to align with the sustainability goals of our customers over time. In 2021, we announced the commercial availability of our hydrogen-powered fuel cells and electrolyzers capable of producing clean hydrogen. Our 100 kilowatt hydrogen-powered Energy Server project in the Republic of Korea commenced operations in April 2021 and our electrolyzer project has been successfully installed and began producing hydrogen in January 2022.
Finally, we continue to leverage our platform in innovative ways, including collaborating with the Department of Energy's Idaho National Lab to efficiently create clean hydrogen using our electrolyzer and excess nuclear energy; generating green hydrogen by integrating our electrolyzer with Heliogen’s concentrated solar energy system; and working with others to find uses of our products in the hydrogen economy.
Predictability. In contrast to the rising and unpredictable cost outlook for grid electricity, we offer our customers the ability to lock in cost for electric power over the long-term. Unlike the grid price of electricity, which reflects the cost to maintain and update the entire transmission and distribution system, our price to our customers is based solely on their individual project. In the regions where the majority of our Energy Servers are deployed, our solution typically provides electricity to our customers at a cost that is competitive with traditional grid power prices. In addition, our solution provides greater cost predictability versus rising grid prices. Whereas grid prices are regulated and subject to frequent change based on the utility’s underlying costs, customers can contract with us for a known price in each year of their contract. Moreover, we provide customers with a solution that offers all of the fixed equipment and maintenance costs for the life of the contract.
Our Energy Servers are designed to deliver 24x7 power with very high availability, mission-critical reliability and grid-independent capabilities. The Bloom Energy Server can be configured to eliminate the need for traditional backup power equipment such as diesel generators, batteries and uninterruptible power systems by providing primary power to a facility that seamlessly continues to deliver power even when the grid fails. Our Energy Servers are designed to offer consistent power quality supply for mission critical operations that require a high level of electrical reliability and uninterrupted availability, such as data centers, hospitals, and biotechnology facilities. This is particularly important as society becomes more reliant on digital systems and sophisticated operational technology. Power quality issues can cause equipment failure, downtime, data corruption and increased operational costs
Further, our Energy Servers were designed to provide ‘quick time to power’– the ability to be deployed and begin generating power in as little as days or weeks – as an important value proposition for customers that need to ramp up power quickly. This capability is ideal for customers who need critical power but are facing utility capacity constraints, delays or additional costs. The modularity, quick deployment, ease of installation and small footprint of our Energy Servers facilitate ease of accessibility to power.
Our Energy Server can be enhanced with microgrid components to deliver higher levels of reliability and grid-independent operation. Customers can optimize their solution for mission-critical level, power quality solutions, such as in a data center application, to more basic outage protection, such as for a retail store. Customers also have a variety of choices for financing vehicles, contract duration, pricing schedules and fuel procurement.
Technology
Our solid oxide technology platform is the foundation for both our Energy Servers and our Bloom Electrolyzer. The solid-oxide fuel cells in our Energy Servers convert fuel, such as natural gas, biogas, hydrogen, or a blend of fuels into electricity through an electrochemical reaction without burning the fuel. Each individual fuel cell is composed of three layers: an electrolyte sandwiched between a cathode and an anode. The electrolyte is a solid ceramic material, and the anode and cathode are made from inks that coat the electrolyte. Unlike other types of fuel cells, no precious metals, corrosive acids or molten materials are required. These fuel cells are the foundational building block of our Energy Server. Regardless of the starting size of a solution, further scaling can be accomplished after the initial solution deployment, creating ongoing flexibility and scalability for the customer.
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Our electrolyzer technology dates to the 1980s, when our co-founders first developed electrolyzers to support the U.S. military and later NASA’s Mars exploration programs. In the early 2000s, 19 patents were awarded to Bloom Energy for its electrolyzer technology. With reduced renewable energy costs and the global movement to decarbonize, we believe it is the right moment to commercialize our hydrogen technology. The Bloom Electrolyzer is based on our solid oxide technology, and is designed to generate hydrogen from electricity at superior efficiencies compared to PEM and alkaline solutions. Our electrolyzer advances decarbonization efforts by providing a clean fuel for carbon-free generation, injection into the natural gas pipeline, transportation, or for use in industrial processes. Because it operates at high temperatures, the Bloom Electrolyzer requires less energy to break up water molecules and produce hydrogen.
Research and Development
Our research and development organization has addressed complex applied materials, processing and packaging challenges through the invention of many proprietary advanced material science solutions. Over more than a decade, Bloom has built a world-class team of solid oxide fuel cell scientists and technology experts. Our team comprises technologists with degrees in Materials Science, Electrical Engineering, Chemical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Civil Engineering and Nuclear Engineering, and includes 43 PhDs within these or related fields. This team has continued to develop innovative technology improvements for our Energy Servers. Since our first-generation technology, we have reduced the costs and increased the output of our systems through the next generation of our Energy Servers and increased the life of our fuel cells by over two and half times.
We have invested and will continue to invest a significant amount in research and development. See our discussion of research and development expenses in Part II, Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations of this Annual Report on Form 10-K for further information.
Competition
We primarily compete against gas engines, combined heat and power systems, and the utility grid with diesel back-up, based on superior reliability, resiliency, cost savings, predictability and sustainability, all of which can be customized to the needs of individual customers. Customers do not currently have alternative solutions that provide all of these important attributes in one platform. As we drive our costs down and make technological improvements, we expect our value proposition to continue to improve relative to grid power in additional markets.
Other sources of competition – and the attributes that differentiate us – include:
Intermittent solar power paired with storage. Solar power is intermittent and best suited for addressing day-time peak power requirements, while our Energy Servers are designed to provide stable baseload generation. Storage technology is intended to address the intermittency of solar power, but the low power density of the combined technologies and the challenges of extended poor weather events that sharply decrease solar power production and battery recharging makes the solution impractical for most commercial and industrial customers looking to offset a significant amount of power. As a point of comparison, our Energy Servers provide the same power output in 1/125th of the footprint of a photovoltaic solar installation, allowing us to serve far more of a customer’s energy requirements based on a customer’s available and typically limited space.
Intermittent wind power. Power from wind turbines is intermittent, similar to solar power. Typically, wind power is deployed for utility-side, grid-scale applications in remote locations but not as a customer-side, distributed power alternative due to prohibitive space requirements and permitting issues. Where distributed wind power is available, it can be combined with storage, with similar benefits and challenges to solar-and-storage combinations. Remote wind farms feeding into the grid do not help end customers avoid the vulnerabilities and costs of the transmission and distribution system.
Traditional co-generation systems. These systems deliver a combination of electric power and heat from combustion sources. We believe we compete favorably because of our non-combustion platform, superior electrical efficiencies, significantly less complex deployment (avoiding heating systems integration and requiring less space), superior availability, aesthetic appeal and reliability. Unlike these systems, which depend on the full and concurrent utilization of waste heat to achieve high efficiencies, we can provide highly efficient systems to any customer based solely on their power needs.
Traditional backup equipment. As our Energy Servers deliver reliable power, particularly in microgrid configurations where our Energy Servers can operate during grid outages, they can obviate the need for traditional backup equipment
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such as diesel generators. By providing combustion-free power 24x7 rather than just as backup, we generally offer a better integrated, more reliable, cleaner and cost-effective solution than these grid-plus-backup systems.
Other commercially available fuel cells. Basic fuel cell technology is over 100 years old. Our Energy Server uses advanced solid oxide fuel cell technology, which produces electricity directly from oxidizing a fuel. The type of solid oxide fuel cell we compete against has a solid oxide or ceramic electrolyte. The advantages of our technology include higher efficiency, long-term stability, elimination of the need for an external fuel reformer, ability to use biogas, natural gas, or hydrogen as a fuel, low emissions and relatively low cost. There are a variety of fuel cell technologies, characterized by their electrolyte material, including:
Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (“PEM”). PEM fuel cells typically are used in onboard transportation applications, such as powering forklifts, because of their compactness and ability for quick starts and stops. However, PEM technology requires an expensive platinum catalyst, which is susceptible to poisoning by trace amounts of impurities in the fuel or exhaust products. These fuel cells require high cost fuel input sources of energy or an external fuel reformer, which adds to the cost, complexity and electrical inefficiency of the product. As a result, they are not typically an economically viable option for stationary baseload power generation.
Molten carbonate fuel cells (“MCFC”). MCFCs are high-temperature fuel cells that use an electrolyte composed of a molten carbonate salt mixture suspended in a porous, chemically inert ceramic matrix of beta-alumina solid electrolyte. The primary disadvantages of current MCFC technology are durability and lower electrical efficiency compared to solid oxide fuel cells. Current versions of the product are built for 300 kilowatt systems, and they are monolithic rather than modular. Smaller sizes are typically not economically viable. In many applications where the heat produced by these fuel cells is not commercially or internally useable continuously, mitigating the heat buildup also becomes a liability.
Phosphoric acid fuel cells (“PAFC”). PAFCs are a type of fuel cell that uses liquid phosphoric acid as an electrolyte. Developed in the mid-1960s and field-tested since the 1970s, they were the first fuel cells to be commercialized. PAFCs have been used for stationary power generators with output in the 100 kilowatt to 400 kilowatt range. PAFCs are best suited to combined heat and power output applications that require carefully matching and constant monitoring of power and heat requirements (heat is typically not required all year long thus significant efficiency is lost), often making the technology difficult to implement. Further, disadvantages include low power density and poor system output stability.
Intellectual Property
Intellectual property is an essential differentiator for our business, and we seek protection for our intellectual property whenever possible. We rely upon a combination of patents, copyrights, trade secrets, and trademark laws, along with employee and third-party non-disclosure agreements and other contractual restrictions to establish and protect our proprietary rights.
We have developed a significant patent portfolio to protect elements of our proprietary technology. As of December 31, 2021, we had 287 issued patents and 96 patent applications pending in the United States, and we had an international patent portfolio comprising 147 issued patents and 80 patent applications pending. Our U.S. patents are expected to expire between 2023 and 2040. While patents are an important element of our intellectual property strategy, our business as a whole is not dependent on any one patent or any single pending patent application.
We continually review our development efforts to assess the existence and patentability of new intellectual property. We pursue the registration of our domain names and trademarks and service marks in the United States and in some locations abroad. “Bloom Energy” and the “BE” logo are our registered trademarks in certain countries for use with Energy Servers and our other products. We also hold registered trademarks for, among others, “Bloom Box,” “BloomConnect,” “BloomEnergy,” and “Energy Server” in certain countries. In an effort to protect our brand, as of December 31, 2021, we had eight registered trademarks in the United States, 40 registered trademarks in Australia, China, the European Union, India, Japan, Republic of Korea, Taiwan, the United Kingdom and two pending applications in China.
When appropriate, we enforce our intellectual property rights against other parties. For more information about risks related to our intellectual property, please see the risk factors set forth under the caption Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors - Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property.
Manufacturing Facilities
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Our primary manufacturing facilities for fuel cells and Energy Servers assembly are in Sunnyvale, California, Fremont, California, and Newark, Delaware. We own our 76,000 square-foot manufacturing facility in Newark, which was our first purpose-built Bloom Energy manufacturing center and was designed specifically for copy-exact duplication as we expand, which we believe will help us scale more efficiently. Our Newark facility includes an additional 25 acres available for factory expansion and/or the co-location of supplier plants. We lease various manufacturing facilities in California. The current lease for our 50,000 square-foot principal Sunnyvale manufacturing facility expires in December 2023. We leased a new 89,000 square-foot R&D and manufacturing facility in Fremont, California that became operational in April 2021. Additionally, we leased a new 164,000 square-foot manufacturing facility in Fremont, California that became operational in January 2022.
In 2020, we established a light-assembly facility in the Republic of Korea, in connection with our efforts to develop a local supplier ecosystem through a joint venture with SK ecoplant. Operations began in early July 2020.
Please see Part I, Item 2, Properties for additional information regarding our facilities.
Supply Chain
Our supply chain has been developed, since our founding, with a group of high-quality suppliers that support automotive, semiconductor and other traditional manufacturing organizations. The production of fuel cell systems requires rare earth elements, precious metals, scarce alloys and industrial commodities. Our operations require raw materials, and in certain cases, third-party services that require special manufacturing processes. We generally have multiple sources of supply for our raw materials and services except in cases where we have specialized technology and material property requirements. Our supply base is spread around many geographies in Asia, Europe and India, consisting of suppliers with multiple areas of expertise in compaction, sintering, brazing and dealing with specialty material manufacturing techniques. That where possible, we responsibly source components like interconnects and balance of system components from various manufacturers on both a contracted and a purchase order basis. We have multi-year supply agreements with some of our supply partners for supply continuity and pricing stability. We are working with our suppliers and partners along all steps of the value chain to reduce costs by improving manufacturing technologies and expanding economies of scale.
There have been a number of disruptions throughout the global supply chain as the global economy opens up and drives demand for certain components that has outpaced the return of the global supply chain to full production. We continued to manage disruptions from an increase in lead times for most of our components due to a variety of factors, including supply shortages, shipping delays and labor shortages, and we expect this to continue into the first half of 2022. During 2021, we experienced delays from certain vendors and suppliers as a result of these factors, although we were able to mitigate the impact so that we did not experience delays in the manufacture of our Energy Servers and only one instance of a significant delay in the installation of our Energy Servers. For additional information on our supply chain, please see Part II, Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – COVID-19 Pandemic.
Services
We provide operations and maintenance agreements ("O&M Agreements") for all of our Energy Servers, which are renewable at the election of the customer on an annual basis. The customer agrees to pay an ongoing service fee and in return we monitor, maintain and operate the Energy Servers systems on the customer's behalf. We currently service and maintain every installed Bloom Server worldwide.
As of December 31, 2021, our in-house service organization had 78 dedicated field service personnel distributed across multiple locations in both the United States and internationally. Our standard O&M Agreements include full remote monitoring and 24x7 operation of the systems as well as preventative maintenance, in terms of filter and adsorbents replacements and on-site part and periodic fuel cell module replacements.
Our two Remote Monitoring and Control Centers (“RMCC”) provide 24x7 coverage of every installed Bloom Energy Server worldwide. By situating our RMCC centers in the United States and India we are able to provide 24x7 coverage cost effectively and also provide a dual redundant system with either site able to operate continuously should an issue arise. Each Bloom Energy Server we ship includes instrumentation and a secure telemetry connection that enables either RMCC to monitor over 500 system performance parameters real time. This comprehensive monitoring capability enables the RMCC operators to have a detailed understanding of the internal operation of our power modules. Using proprietary, internally developed software, the RMCC operators can detect changes and override the onboard automated control systems to remotely adjust parameters to ensure the optimum system performance is maintained. In addition, we undertake advanced predictive analytics to identify potential issues before they arise and undertake adjustments prior to a failure occurring.
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Our services organization also has a dedicated Repair & Overhaul ("R&O") facility, based in Delaware, in close proximity to our product manufacturing facility. This R&O facility undertakes full refurbishment of returned fuel cell modules with the capability to restore it to full power, efficiency and life with a less than three weeks turnaround. This close proximity to our Delaware manufacturing facility enables us to review the condition of returned modules and inform improved manufacturing processes.
Purchase and Financing Options

In order to appeal to the largest variety of customers, we make available several options to our customers. Both in the United States and abroad, we sell Energy Servers directly to customers. In the United States, we also enable customers' use of the Energy Servers through a pay as you go offering, made possible through third-party ownership financing arrangements.

Often our offerings take advantage of local incentives. In the United States, our financing arrangements are structured to optimize both federal and local incentives, including the Investment Tax Credit (“ITC”) and accelerated depreciation. Internationally, our sales are made primarily to distributors who on-sell to, and install for, customers; these deals are also structured to use local incentives applicable to our Energy Servers. Increasingly, we use trusted installers and other sourcing collaborations in the United States to generate transactions.
With respect to the third-party financing options in the United States, a customer may choose a contract for the use Energy Servers in exchange for a capacity-based flat payment (a “Managed Services Agreement”) or one for the purchase of electricity generated by the Energy Servers in exchange for a scheduled dollars per kilowatt hour rate (a “Power Purchase Agreement” or “PPA”).

Certain customer payments in a Managed Services Agreement are required regardless of the level of performance of the Energy Server; in some cases it may also include a variable payment based on the Energy Server's performance or a performance-related set-off. Managed Services Agreements are then financed pursuant to a sale-leaseback with a financial institution (a “Managed Services Financing”).

PPAs are typically financed on a portfolio basis. We have financed portfolios through tax equity partnerships, acquisition financings and direct sales to investors (each, a “Portfolio Financing”).
For additional information about our different financing options, please see Part II, Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Purchase and Financing Options.
Sales, Marketing and Partnerships
We sell our Energy Server platform through a combination of direct and indirect sales channels. At present, most of our U.S. sales are through our direct sales force, which is segmented by vertical and type of account. A large part of our direct sales force is now focused on our expansion efforts in the United States and creating new opportunities internationally. We are also expanding our relationship with utilities. We have developed a network of strategic energy advisors that originate new opportunities and referrals to Bloom Energy, which has been a valuable source of high-quality leads.

We pursue relationships with other companies and partners in areas where collaboration can produce product advancement and acceleration of entry into new geographic and vertical markets. The objectives and goals of these relationships can include one or more of the following: technology exchange, joint sales and marketing, or access to new geographic markets. SK ecoplant in the Republic of Korea is a strategic power generation and distribution partner. Together, we have transacted nearly 200 MW of projects totaling more than $1.8 billion of equipment and expected service revenue. In October 2021, we announced an expansion of our existing partnership with SK ecoplant, hat includes purchase commitments of at least 500MW of power for our Energy Servers between 2022 and 2025 on a take or pay basis, the creation of hydrogen innovation centers in the United States and the Republic of Korea to advance green hydrogen commercialization, and an equity investment in Bloom Energy in December 2021. Please see Note 18 - SK ecoplant Strategic Investment in in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
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Sustainability
As a manufacturer, our commitment to sustainability is reflected not only through the impacts of our products in operation but also through our internal commitment to resource efficiency, responsible design, materials management and recycling. We endeavor to consistently increase our supply chain responsibility and approach to human capital management in ways that help us to continue to deliver products that add long-term societal value.

We are driven by the promise of our contribution to the transformation and decarbonization of energy and transportation sectors globally. We are working to make our technology available across a growing list of applications including biogas, carbon capture, hydrogen, marine and microgrid projects critical to aligning with a two-degree warming trajectory.

Bloom Energy Servers produce clean, reliable energy without combustion that provide greenhouse gas, air quality, water, land-use and resilience benefits for customers and the communities they serve. The Bloom Electrolyzer is designed to utilize the same solid oxide technology platform in a highly efficient and cost-effective hydrogen production process. Our innovative solid oxide fuel cell platform technology offers modular and flexible solutions configurable to address both the causes and consequences of climate change.
Our Energy Servers withdraw water only during start-up and if the system needs to restart. Otherwise, Energy Servers use no water during operation, avoiding water withdrawals of more than 18,000 gallons per megawatt hour. Conversely, thermal power plants require significant amounts of water for cooling. In fact, the number one use of water in the United States is for cooling power plants. To produce one megawatt per hour for a year, thermoelectric power generation for the U.S. grid withdraws approximately 156 million gallons of water more than our platform.

We are focused on energy efficiency in our production and administrative processes, and have introduced a significant amount of energy-efficient plant automation over the last several years. Our own Energy Servers power our facilities, where suitable, as efficient and resilient energy sources. We also use our Energy Servers to charge employee vehicles at manufacturing facility locations, and as we broaden the integration of our Energy Servers across our real estate portfolio, we will continue to support our employees with lower carbon intensity and resilient onsite electric vehicle charging.

We take a cradle-to-grave perspective on product design and use. We strive to reuse components and recoverable materials where feasible and use conflict-free, non-toxic new resources where needed. We design our equipment so that components can be easily refurbished as needed instead of requiring new equipment. Finally, we cover as many materials and components as possible during end-of-life management, reusing these materials and components. As a function of an approximately 30,000-pound Bloom Energy Server, the weight of components that go to the landfill without a recycling or refurbishment stream comprises approximately 510 pounds, or less than approximately 2% of the total server weight.
U.S. & Global Climate Issues

Global warming and resulting extreme weather are having significant economic, environmental and social impacts in the United States and around the world. These and anticipated future impacts have resulted in wide array of market and regulatory responses, and will continue to do so. Our business can be impacted by climate change, and by those market and regulatory responses, in a variety of ways. We closely follow the impacts of climate change on the energy system and its customers, as well as the regulatory, policy and voluntary measures taken in response to those impacts, so that we may understand and respond to changing conditions that may affect our company, our customers, and our investors and business partners. We are responsive to the recommendations from the Task Force on Climate-related Financial Disclosures ("TCFD"), as well as disclosure guidance from the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (“SASB”). We issued our first TCFD and SASB aligned Sustainability Report in 2021, and plan to follow up with another aligned report in 2022.

The direct impacts of climate change on energy systems, including the increased risk they pose to energy service disruption, may provide increased opportunity for our extremely reliable and resilient energy generation. New or more stringent international accords, national or state legislation, or regulation of greenhouse gas emission may increase demand for our bioenergy and hydrogen-based products, but they may also make it more expensive or impractical to deploy natural gas-fueled Energy Servers in some markets notwithstanding their enhanced environmental performance relative to combustion-based technologies, or may cause the loss of regulatory or policy incentives for those deployments. Examples include an anticipated greenhouse gas standard for participation in favorable fuel cell tariffs under consideration in California, new climate emissions restrictions or the introduction of carbon pricing, and the adoption of bans or restrictions on new natural gas interconnections by some local jurisdictions. For more on climate and environmental related risks, see Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors – Risks Related to Legal Matters and Regulations.
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Permits and Approvals
Each Bloom Energy Server installation must be designed, constructed and operated in compliance with applicable federal, state, international and local regulations, codes, standards, guidelines, policies and laws. To operate our systems, we, our customers and our partners are required to obtain applicable permits and approvals from federal, state and local authorities for the installation of Bloom Energy Servers and the Bloom Electrolyzer and for the interconnection systems with the local electrical utility and, where the gas distribution system is used, the gas utility as well.
Government Policies and Incentives
There are varying policy frameworks across the United States and abroad designed to support and accelerate the adoption of clean and/or reliable distributed power generation and hydrogen technologies such as Bloom Energy Servers and the Bloom Electrolyzer. These policy initiatives come in the form of tax incentives, cash grants, performance incentives, environmental attribute credits, permitting regimes, interconnection policies and/or applicable gas or electric tariffs.
The U.S. federal government provides businesses with an ITC under Section 48 of the Internal Revenue Code, available to the owner of our Energy Server for systems purchased and placed into service. The credit is equal to 26 percent of expenditures for capital equipment and installation, and the credit for fuel cells is capped at $1,500 per 0.5 kilowatt of capacity. The credit will remain at 26 percent through 2022 and then step down to 22 percent in 2023. Under current law the credit is set to expire in 2024.
Our Energy Servers are currently installed at customer sites in eleven states in the United States, each of which has its own enabling policy framework. Some states have utility procurement programs and/or renewables portfolio standards for which our technology is eligible. Our Energy Servers currently qualify for tax exemptions, incentives or other customer incentives in many states including California, New Jersey, Connecticut, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Maryland and New York. These policy provisions are subject to change.
Government Regulations
Our business is subject to a changing patchwork of energy and environmental laws and regulations that prevail at the federal, state, regional and local level as well as in those foreign jurisdictions in which we operate. Most existing energy and environmental laws and regulations preceded the introduction of our innovative fuel cell technology and were adopted to apply to technologies existing at the time, namely large coal, oil or gas-fired power plants, and more recently solar and wind plants.
Although we generally are not regulated as a utility, existing and future federal, state, international and local government statutes and regulations concerning electricity heavily influence the market for our product and services. These statutes and regulations often relate to electricity pricing, net metering, incentives, taxation, competition with utilities, the interconnection of customer-owned electricity generation, interconnection to the gas distribution system, and other issues relevant to the deployment and operation of our products, as applicable. Federal, state, international and local governments continuously modify these statutes and regulations. Governments, often acting through state utility or public service commissions, change and adopt or approve different requirements for regulated entities and rates for commercial customers on a regular basis. These changes can have a positive or negative impact on our ability to deliver cost savings to customers.
At the federal level, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (“FERC”) has authority to regulate, under various federal energy regulatory laws, wholesale sales of electric energy, capacity, and ancillary services, and the delivery of natural gas in interstate commerce. Some of our tax equity partnerships in which we participate are subject to regulation under FERC with respect to market-based sales of electricity, which requires us to file notices and make other periodic filings with FERC. In addition, our project with Delmarva Power & Light Company is subject to laws and regulations relating to electricity generation, transmission, and sale at the federal level and in Delaware. To operate our systems, we obtain interconnection agreements from the applicable local primary electricity and gas utilities. In almost all cases, interconnection agreements are standard form agreements that have been pre-approved by the state or local public utility commission or other regulatory bodies with jurisdiction over interconnection agreements. As such, no additional regulatory approvals are typically required for deployment of our systems once interconnection agreements are signed, although they may be required for the export and subsequent sale of electricity or other regulated products.
Product safety standards for stationary fuel cell generators have been established by the American National Standards Institute (“ANSI”). These standards are known as ANSI/CSA FC-1. Our products are designed to meet these standards. Further, we utilize the Underwriters' Laboratory, or UL, to certify compliance with these standards. Energy Server installation guidance
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is provided by NFPA 853: Standard for the Installation of Stationary Fuel Cell Power Systems. Installations at sites are carried out to meet the requirements of these standards.
Currently, there is generally little guidance from environmental agencies on whether or how certain environmental laws and regulations may apply to our technologies. These laws can give rise to liability for administrative oversight costs, cleanup costs, property damage, bodily injury, fines, and penalties. Capital and operating expenses needed to comply with environmental laws and regulations can be significant, and violations may result in substantial fines and penalties or third-party damages. In addition, maintaining compliance with applicable environmental laws, such as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act in the United States, requires significant time and management resources.
Several states in which we currently operate, including California, require permits for emissions of hazardous air pollutants based on the quantity of emissions, most of which require permits only for quantities of emissions that are higher than those observed from our Energy Servers. Other states in which we operate, including New York, New Jersey and North Carolina, have specific exemptions for fuel cells.
For more information about the regulations to which we are subject and the risks to our costs and operations related thereto, please see the risk factors set forth under the caption Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors - Risks Related to Legal Matters and Regulations.
Backlog
The timing of delivery and installations of our products has a significant impact on the timing of the recognition of product and installation revenue. Many factors can cause a lag between the time a customer signs a purchase order and our recognition of product revenue. These factors include the number of Energy Servers installed per site, local permitting and utility requirements, environmental, health and safety requirements, weather, and customer facility construction schedules. Many of these factors are unpredictable and their resolution is often outside of our or our customers’ control. Customers may also ask us to delay an installation for reasons unrelated to the foregoing, including delays in their obtaining financing. Further, due to unexpected delays, deployments may require unanticipated expenses to expedite delivery of materials or labor to ensure the installation meets the timing objectives. These unexpected delays and expenses can be exacerbated in periods in which we deliver and install a larger number of smaller projects. In addition, if even relatively short delays occur, there may be a significant shortfall between the revenue we expect to generate in a particular period and the revenue that we are able to recognize. For our installations, revenue and cost of revenue can fluctuate significantly on a periodic basis depending on the timing of acceptance and the type of financing used by the customer.
See Part II, Item 7, Management's Discussion & Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Purchase and Financing Options – Delivery and Installation, for additional information on backlog.
Human Capital

We are committed to attracting and retaining exceptional talent. Investing in and inspiring our people to do their best work is critical for our success. As of December 31, 2021, we had approximately 1,719 full-time employees worldwide, of which 1,404 were located in the United States, 274 were located in India and 41 were located in other countries. During 2021, our workforce grew by 30% as compared to 2020.

In order to attract and retain our employees, we strive to maintain an inclusive, diverse and safe workplace, with opportunities for our employees to grow and develop in their careers, supported by strong compensation, benefits and health and wellness programs. We are mission driven, and we hire and develop talent with a passion toward achieving our mission.

Inclusion and Diversity

Our cultural foundation is one of innovation, results, respect and doing the right thing. One of our greatest strengths is the talent of our employees. We believe diverse talent leads to better decision making and that creating an inclusive environment best positions us to meet the needs of our customers, stockholders and the communities in which we live and work.

We continuously evolve our hiring strategies, tracking our progress and holding ourselves accountable to advancing global diversity. We seek to hire employees from a broad pool of talent with diverse backgrounds, perspectives and abilities and
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we believe diverse leaders serve as role models for our inclusive workforce. We are proud of our progress, yet we strive for continuous improvement.

Our continued engagement with organizations that work with diverse communities has been vital to our efforts to increase women and minority representation in our workforce. Our “Careers at Bloom Silicon Valley” Campaign targets recruiting diverse talent from underserved communities for hourly manufacturing roles. To promote inclusivity, we advertise our jobs in multiple languages and participate in community job fairs giving equal access to opportunities. We actively engage local community leaders to gain access to untapped underserved communities to attract talent that is generally not easily accessible. We are building a diverse talent slate of future generation leaders through our progressive university program.

We recruit talent in diverse communities through:

Veteran outreach programs
Society of Women Engineers
Society of Hispanic Engineers
Society of Black Engineers
Historical Black Colleges and Universities

We believe that our stats are strong, our culture of inclusivity is stronger (as of December 31, 2021):

60% of our employee population globally is ethnically diverse
Women make up 21% of our employee population globally
Our senior leadership team consists of four ethnically diverse individuals and three women
Women make up 20% of our leadership population (Director and above)

Talent Development

We recently introduced a comprehensive Contribution Assessment Program designed to link performance to business results enabling each employee to make a direct connection between their role and contributions and the success of Bloom. This comprehensive program includes goal setting, monthly check-ins, feedback solicitation and self-assessments. Our Contribution Assessment Program provide employees with the resources required to achieve their goals and engage in meaningful feedback discussions with their manager leading to development, exposure to new experiences, and real-time learnings.

We provide a series of global employee learning sessions to support our employees' ability to effectively engage with their manager. We have expanded our development focus by investing in building management capabilities. Our employees’ have easy access to resources to empower their success via our newly introduced internal website.

Compensation and Benefits

Our talent strategy is integral to our business success and we design competitive and innovative compensation and benefits programs to help meet the needs of our employees. In addition to salaries, these programs (which vary by country/region) include annual bonuses, stock awards, an employee stock purchase plan, a 401(k) plan, healthcare and insurance benefits, health savings and flexible spending accounts, paid time off, parental leave, flexible work schedules, an extensive mental health program and fitness center. We recently added access to financial planning and education for all levels of the organization. In addition to our broad-based equity award programs, we have used targeted equity-based grants to facilitate retention of critical talent with specialized skills and experience.

Building Connections - With Each Other and our Communities

Building connections between our employees and community is key to achieving our mission. Employee engagement is enhanced through connections, learnings and the pride of giving back. Our Connected Employee Series offers cross-functional learnings to all employees and our Employee Community Series introduces influential community leaders to our increasing role in the broader community and world.

We have actively played an impactful role in the community. In support of frontline hospital and healthcare workers, we launched our Inaugural Bloom Energy “Stars & Strides” community run/walk fundraiser where employees and families were
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encouraged to participate, and co-sponsoring mobile vaccinations in underserved communities. Employees are encouraged to participate in local volunteer activities.

Health, Safety and Wellness

The success of our business is fundamentally connected to the well-being of our people. Accordingly, we are committed to the health, safety and wellness of our employees. We provide our employees and their families with access to a variety of innovative, flexible and convenient health and wellness programs, including benefits that provide and encourage proactive protection and to support their financial, physical and mental well-being by providing tools and resources accessible at or outside of work.

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2020 and again in 2021, we implemented significant changes that we determined were in the best interest of our employees, as well as the communities in which we operate, and which comply with government regulations. This included having some of our employees work from home, while implementing additional safety measures for the 40% of our employees continuing critical on-site work in our manufacturing, installation and service organizations. For these populations, we have developed a robust program of on-site testing. Starting during the summer of 2021, we reopened our offices, with testing and vaccination requirements, but we continue to remain flexible and attentive to our employees concerns and safety.
Community Investment in 2021
The health and well-being of our people, communities and planet are paramount. Early in the COVID-19 pandemic, we were deemed an essential business. In collaboration with the University of Illinois and El Camino Health, we launched the University of Illinois’ Shield T3 COVID testing system and hosted a mobile laboratory at our facility in Sunnyvale. We have been powering and hosting the mobile lab to provide rapid testing for Bay Area organizations and schools.
Throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, our Energy Servers have been delivering power to facilities around the globe that are providing essential services. We have deployed more than 20,000 fuel cell modules since our first commercial shipments in 2009, sending power to hospitals, healthcare manufacturing facilities, biotechnology facilities, grocery stores, hardware stores, banks, telecom facilities and other critical infrastructure applications.
Our employees are mission-driven and passionately invest their time in support of our local communities. Our inaugural Bloom Energy Stars and Strides charity race in San Jose helped raise money for the Valley Medical Center Foundation in August 2021. In addition, our employees have helped tackle food insecurity by boxing 9,000 pounds of produce to feed 360 families in the Bay Area, mentored University of Delaware students to help them complete their senior design program, and organized holiday toy drives with Toys for Tots.
Seasonal Trends and Economic Incentives
Our business and results of financial operations are not subject to industry-specific seasonal fluctuations. The desirability of our solution can be impacted by the availability and value of various governmental, regulatory and tax-based incentives which may change over time.
Corporate Facilities
Our corporate headquarters and principal executive offices are located at 4353 North First Street, San Jose, CA 95134, and our telephone number is (408) 543-1500. Our headquarters is used for administration, research and development, and sales and marketing and also houses one of our RMCC facilities.
Please see Part I, Item 2, Properties for additional information regarding our facilities.
Available Information
Our website address is www.bloomenergy.com and our investor relations website address is
https://investor.bloomenergy.com. Websites are provided throughout this document for convenience only. The information contained on the referenced websites does not constitute a part of and is not incorporated by reference into this Annual Report on Form 10-K. Through a link on our website, we make available the following filings as soon as reasonably practicable after they are electronically filed with or furnished to the SEC: our Annual Reports on Form 10-K, Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q, Current Reports on Form 8-K, and any amendments to those reports filed or furnished pursuant to Section 13(a) or 15(d) of the Exchange Act, as well as proxy statements and certain filings relating to beneficial ownership of our securities. The SEC also
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maintains a website at www.sec.gov that contains all reports that we file or furnish with the SEC electronically. All such filings, including those on our website, are available free of charge.
ITEM 1A - RISK FACTORS
Investing in our securities involves a high degree of risk. You should carefully consider the material risks and uncertainties described below that make an investment in us speculative or risky, as well as the other information in this Annual Report on Form 10-K, including our consolidated financial statements and the related notes and “Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations” before you decide to purchase our securities. A manifestation of any of the following risks could, in circumstances we may or may not be able to accurately predict, render us unable to conduct our business as currently planned and materially and adversely affect our reputation, business, prospects, growth, financial condition, cash flows, liquidity and operating results. In addition, the occurrence of one or more of these risks may cause the market price of our Class A common stock to decline, and you could lose all or part of your investment. It is not possible to predict or identify all such risks and uncertainties, as our operations could also be affected by factors, events or uncertainties that are not presently known to us or that we currently do not consider to present significant risks to our operations. Therefore, you should not consider the following risks to be a complete statement of all the potential risks or uncertainties that we face.
Risk Factor Summary
The following summarizes the more complete risk factors that follow. It should be read in conjunction with the complete Risk Factors section and should not be relied upon as an exhaustive summary of all the material risks facing our business.
Risks Related to Our Business, Industry and Sales
The distributed generation industry is an emerging market and distributed generation may not receive widespread market acceptance, which may make evaluating our business and future prospects difficult.
Our products involve a lengthy sales and installation cycle, and if we fail to close sales on a regular and timely basis, our business could be harmed.
Our Energy Servers have significant upfront costs, and we will need to attract investors to help customers finance purchases.
The economic benefits of our Energy Servers to our customers depend on the cost of electricity available from alternative sources, including local electric utility companies, and such cost structure is subject to change.
If we are not able to continue to reduce our cost structure in the future, our ability to become profitable may be impaired.
We rely on interconnection requirements and net metering arrangements that are subject to change.
We currently face and will continue to face significant competition.
We derive a substantial portion of our revenue and backlog from a limited number of customers, and the loss of or a significant reduction in orders from a large customer could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and other key metrics.
Our ability to develop new products and enter into new markets could be negatively impacted if we are unable to identify partners to assist in such development or expansion, and our products may not be successful if we are unable to maintain alignment with evolving industry standards and requirements.
Risks Related to Our Products and Manufacturing
Our business has been and continues to be adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Our future success depends in part on our ability to increase our production capacity, and we may not be able to do so in a cost-effective manner.
If our Energy Servers contain manufacturing defects, our business and financial results could be harmed.
The performance of our Energy Servers may be affected by factors outside of our control, which could result in harm to our business and financial results.
If our estimates of the useful life for our Energy Servers are inaccurate or we do not meet our performance warranties and performance guaranties, or if we fail to accrue adequate warranty and guaranty reserves, our business and financial results could be harmed.
Our business is subject to risks associated with construction, utility interconnection, cost overruns and delays, including those related to obtaining government permits and other contingencies that may arise in the course of completing installations.
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The failure of our suppliers to continue to deliver necessary raw materials or other components of our Energy Servers in a timely manner and to specification could prevent us from delivering our products within required time frames and could cause installation delays, cancellations, penalty payments and damage to our reputation.
We have, in some instances, entered into long-term supply agreements that could result in insufficient inventory and negatively affect our results of operations.
We face supply chain competition, including competition from businesses in other industries, which could result in insufficient inventory and negatively affect our results of operations.
We, and some of our suppliers, obtain capital equipment used in our manufacturing process from sole suppliers and, if this equipment is damaged or otherwise unavailable, our ability to deliver our Energy Servers on time will suffer.
Possible new trade tariffs could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Any significant disruption in the operations at our headquarters or manufacturing facilities could delay the production of our Energy Servers, which would harm our business and results of operations.
Risks Related to Government Incentive Programs
Our business currently benefits from the availability of rebates, tax credits and other financial programs and incentives, and the reduction, modification, or elimination of such benefits could cause our revenue to decline and harm our financial results.
We rely on tax equity financing arrangements to realize the benefits provided by ITCs and accelerated tax depreciation and in the event these programs are terminated, our financial results could be harmed.
Risks Related to Legal Matters and Regulations
We are subject to various national, state and local laws and regulations that could impose substantial costs upon us and cause delays in the delivery and installation of our Energy Servers.
The installation and operation of our Energy Servers are subject to environmental laws and regulations in various jurisdictions, and there is uncertainty with respect to the interpretation of certain environmental laws and regulations to our Energy Servers, especially as these regulations evolve over time.
With respect to our products that run, in part, on fossil fuel, we may be subject to a heightened risk of regulation, to a potential for the loss of certain incentives, and to changes in our customers’ energy procurement policies.
Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property
Our failure to effectively protect and enforce our intellectual property rights may undermine our competitive position, and litigation to protect our intellectual property rights may be costly.
Our patent applications may not result in issued patents, and our issued patents may not provide adequate protection, either of which may have a material adverse effect on our ability to prevent others from commercially exploiting products similar to ours.
We may need to defend ourselves against claims that we infringed, misappropriated, or otherwise violated the intellectual property rights of others, which may be time-consuming and would cause us to incur substantial costs.
Risks Related to Our Financial Condition and Operating Results
We have incurred significant losses in the past and we may not be profitable for the foreseeable future.
Our financial condition and results of operations and other key metrics are likely to fluctuate on a quarterly basis in future periods, which could cause our results for a particular period to fall below expectations, resulting in a severe decline in the price of our Class A common stock.
If we fail to manage our growth effectively, our business and operating results may suffer.
If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, the accuracy and timing of our financial reporting may be adversely affected.
Our ability to use our deferred tax assets to offset future taxable income may be subject to limitations that could subject our business to higher tax liability.
Risks Related to Our Liquidity
We must maintain the confidence of our customers in our liquidity, including in our ability to timely service our debt obligations and in our ability to grow our business over the long-term.
Our substantial indebtedness, and restrictions imposed by the agreements governing our and our PPA Entities’ outstanding indebtedness, may limit our financial and operating activities and may adversely affect our ability to incur additional debt to fund future needs.
We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to meet our debt service obligations.
Risks Related to Our Operations
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We may have conflicts of interest with our PPA Entities.
Expanding operations internationally could expose us to additional risks.
Data security breaches and cyberattacks could compromise our intellectual property or other confidential information and cause significant damage to our business and reputation.
If we are unable to attract and retain key employees and hire qualified management, technical, engineering, finance and sales personnel, our ability to compete and successfully grow our business could be harmed.
Risks Related to Ownership of Our Common Stock
The stock price of our Class A common stock has been and may continue to be volatile.
We may issue additional shares of our Class A common stock in connection with any future conversion of the Green Notes (as defined herein) or in connection with our transaction with SK ecoplant, which may dilute our existing stockholders and potentially adversely affect the market price of our Class A common stock.
The dual class structure of our common stock and the voting agreements among certain stockholders have the effect of concentrating voting control of our Company with KR Sridhar, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and also with those stockholders who held our capital stock prior to the completion of our initial public offering, which limits or precludes your ability to influence corporate matters and may adversely affect the trading price of our Class A common stock.
Risks Related to Our Business, Industry and Sales
The distributed generation industry is an emerging market and distributed generation may not receive widespread market acceptance, which may make evaluating our business and future prospects difficult.
The distributed generation industry is still an emerging market in an otherwise mature and heavily regulated industry, and we cannot be sure that potential customers will accept distributed generation broadly, or our Energy Server products specifically. Enterprises may be unwilling to adopt our solution over traditional or competing power sources for any number of reasons, including the perception that our technology or our company is unproven, lack of confidence in our business model, the perceived unavailability of back-up service providers to operate and maintain the Energy Servers, and lack of awareness of our product or their perception of regulatory or political headwinds. Because distributed generation is an emerging industry, broad acceptance of our products and services is subject to a high level of uncertainty and risk. If the market for our products and services does not continue to develop as we anticipate, our business will be harmed. As a result, predicting our future revenue and appropriately budgeting for our expenses is difficult, and we have limited insight into trends that may emerge and affect our business. If actual results differ from our estimates or if we adjust our estimates in future periods, our operating results and financial position could be materially and adversely affected.
Our products involve a lengthy sales and installation cycle, and if we fail to close sales on a regular and timely basis, our business could be harmed.
Our sales cycle is typically 12 to 18 months but can vary considerably. In order to make a sale, we must typically provide a significant level of education to prospective customers regarding the use and benefits of our product and our technology. The period between initial discussions with a potential customer and the eventual sale of even a single product typically depends on a number of factors, including the potential customer’s budget and decision as to the type of financing it chooses to use, as well as the arrangement of such financing. Prospective customers often undertake a significant evaluation process that may further extend the sales cycle. Once a customer makes a formal decision to purchase our product, the fulfillment of the sales order by us requires a substantial amount of time. Generally, the time between the entry into a sales contract with a customer and the installation of our Energy Servers can range from nine to twelve months or more. This lengthy sales and installation cycle is subject to a number of significant risks over which we have little or no control. Because of both the long sales and long installation cycles, we may expend significant resources without having certainty of generating a sale.
These lengthy sales and installation cycles increase the risk that an installation may be delayed and/or may not be completed. In some instances, a customer can cancel an order for a particular site prior to installation, and we may be unable to recover some or all of our costs in connection with design, permitting, installation and site preparations incurred prior to cancellation. Cancellation rates can be between 10% and 20% in any given period due to factors outside of our control, including an inability to install an Energy Server at the customer’s chosen location because of permitting or other regulatory issues, delays or unanticipated costs in securing interconnection approvals or necessary utility infrastructure, unanticipated changes in the cost, or other reasons unique to each customer. Our operating expenses are based on anticipated sales levels, and many of our expenses are fixed. If we are unsuccessful in closing sales after expending significant resources or if we experience delays or cancellations, our business could be materially and adversely affected. Since, in general, we do not recognize revenue
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on the sales of our products until installation and acceptance, a small fluctuation in the timing of the completion of our sales transactions could cause our operating results to vary materially from period to period.
Our Energy Servers have significant upfront costs, and we will need to attract investors to help customers finance purchases.
Our Energy Servers have significant upfront costs. In order to expand our offerings to customers who lack the financial capability to purchase our Energy Servers directly and/or who prefer to lease the product or contract for our services on a pay-as-you-go model, we subsequently developed various financing options that enabled customers use of the Energy Servers without a direct purchase through third-party ownership financing arrangements. For an overview of these different financing arrangements, please see Part II, Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis of Financial Condition and Results of Operations – Purchase and Financing Options. If in any given quarter we are not able to secure funding in a timely fashion, our results of operations and financial condition will be negatively impacted. We continue to innovate our customer contracts to attempt to attract new customers and these may have different terms and financing conditions from prior transactions.
We rely on and need to grow committed financing capacity with existing partners or attract additional partners to support our growth, finance new projects and new types of product offerings, including fuel cells for the hydrogen market. In addition, at any point in time, our ability to deploy our backlog is contingent on securing available financing. Our ability to attract third-party financing depends on many factors that are outside of our control, including an investors' ability to utilize tax credits and other government incentives, interest rate and/or currency exchange fluctuations, our perceived creditworthiness and the condition of credit markets generally. Our financing of customer purchases of our Energy Servers is subject to conditions such as the customer’s credit quality and the expected minimum internal rate of return on the customer engagement, and if these conditions are not satisfied, we may be unable to finance purchases of our Energy Servers, which would have an adverse effect on our revenue in a particular period. If we are unable to help our customers arrange financing for our Energy Servers generally, our business will be harmed. Additionally, the Managed Services Financing option, as with all leases, is also limited by the customer’s willingness to commit to making fixed payments regardless of the performance of the Energy Servers or our performance of our obligations under the customer agreement. To the extent we are unable to arrange future financings for any of our current projects, our business would be negatively impacted.
Further, our sales process for transactions, which require financing, require that we make certain assumptions regarding the cost of financing capital. Actual financing costs may vary from our estimates due to factors outside of our control, including changes in customer creditworthiness, macroeconomic factors, the returns offered by other investment opportunities available to our financing partners, and other factors. If the cost of financing ultimately exceeds our estimates, we may be unable to proceed with some or all of the impacted projects or our revenue from such projects may be less than our estimates.
The economic benefits of our Energy Servers to our customers depend on the cost of electricity available from alternative sources, including local electric utility companies, and such cost structure is subject to change.
We believe that a customer’s decision to purchase our Energy Servers is significantly influenced by its price, the price predictability of electricity generated by our Energy Servers in comparison to the retail price, and the future price outlook of electricity from the local utility grid and other energy sources. These prices are subject to change and may affect the relative benefits of our Energy Servers. Factors that could influence these prices and are beyond our control include the impact of energy conservation initiatives that reduce electricity consumption; construction of additional power generation plants (including nuclear, coal or natural gas); technological developments by others in the electric power industry; the imposition of “departing load,” “standby,” power factor charges, greenhouse gas emissions charges, or other charges by local electric utility or regulatory authorities; and changes in the rates offered by local electric utilities and/or in the applicability or amounts of charges and other fees imposed or incentives granted by such utilities on customers. In addition, even with available subsidies for our products, the current low cost of grid electricity in some states in the United States and some foreign countries does not render our product economically attractive.
Furthermore, an increase in the price of natural gas or curtailment of availability (e.g., as a consequence of physical limitations or adverse regulatory conditions for the delivery of production of natural gas) or the inability to obtain natural gas service could make our Energy Servers less economically attractive to potential customers and reduce demand.
If we are not able to continue to reduce our cost structure in the future, our ability to become profitable may be impaired.
We must continue to reduce the manufacturing costs for our Energy Servers to expand our market. Additionally, certain of our existing service contracts were entered into based on projections regarding service costs reductions that assume
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continued advances in our manufacturing and services processes that we may be unable to realize. Future increases to the cost of components and raw materials would offset our efforts to reduce our manufacturing and services costs. For example, during the second half of 2021, we experienced price increases in raw materials, which are used in our components and subassemblies for our Energy Servers. Any increases in the costs of components, raw materials and/or labor, whether as a result of supply chain pressures, inflation or rising interest rates, could slow our growth and cause our financial results and operational metrics to suffer.
In addition, we may face increases in our other expenses including increases in wages or other labor costs as well as installation, marketing, sales or related costs. In order to expand into new electricity markets (in which the price of electricity from the grid is lower) while still maintaining our current margins, we will need to continue to reduce our costs. Increases in any of these costs or our failure to achieve projected cost reductions could adversely affect our results of operations and financial condition and harm our business and prospects. If we are unable to reduce our cost structure in the future, we may not be able to achieve profitability, which could have a material adverse effect on our business and our prospects.
We rely on interconnection requirements and export tariff arrangements that are subject to change.

Because our Energy Servers are designed to operate at a constant output 24x7, while our customers’ demand for electricity typically fluctuates over the course of the day or week, there are often periods when our Energy Servers are producing more electricity than a customer may require, and such excess electricity must generally be exported to the local electric utility. Export of customer-generated power is generally provided for in the United States under federal, state or local laws and regulations. Many, but not all, local electric utilities provide compensation to our customers for such electricity under “fuel cell net metering” (which often differs from solar net metering) or other customer generation programs. Utility tariffs and fees, interconnection agreements and fuel cell net metering requirements are subject to changes in availability and terms, and some jurisdictions do not allow interconnections or export at all. At times in the past, such changes have had the effect of significantly reducing or eliminating the benefits of such programs. Changes in the availability of, or benefits offered by, utility tariffs, the applicable net metering requirements or interconnection agreements in the jurisdictions in which we operate or in which we anticipate expanding into in the future could adversely affect the demand for our Energy Servers. For example, in California, the fuel cell net metering tariff currently expires in 2023. We cannot predict the outcome of regulatory proceedings addressing tariffs that would include customers utilizing fuel cells. If there is not an economical tariff for customers utilizing fuel cells in a given jurisdiction, it may limit or end our ability to sell and install our Energy Servers in that jurisdiction. Further, permitting and other requirements applicable to electric and gas interconnections are subject to change. For example, some jurisdictions are limiting new gas interconnections, although others are allowing new gas interconnections for non-combustion resources like our Energy Servers. In addition, the rules and regulations regarding the production, transportation and storage of hydrogen, including with respect to safety, environmental and market regulations and policies, are in flux and may limit the market for our products that operate with hydrogen.
We currently face and will continue to face significant competition.
We compete for customers, financing partners and incentive dollars with other electric power providers. Many providers of electricity, such as traditional utilities and other companies offering distributed generation products, have longer operating histories, customer incumbency advantages. access to and influence with local and state governments, and access to more capital resources than us. Significant developments in alternative technologies, such as energy storage, wind, solar or hydro power generation, or improvements in the efficiency or cost of traditional energy sources, including coal, oil, natural gas used in combustion, or nuclear power, may materially and adversely affect our business and prospects in ways we cannot anticipate. We may also face new competitors who are not currently in the market. If we fail to adapt to changing market conditions and to compete successfully with grid electricity or new competitors, our growth will be limited, which would adversely affect our business results.
We derive a substantial portion of our revenue and backlog from a limited number of customers, and the loss of or a significant reduction in orders from a large customer could have a material adverse effect on our operating results and other key metrics.
In any particular period, a substantial amount of our total revenue has and could continue to come from a relatively small number of customers. As an example, in the year ended December 31, 2021, two customers accounted for approximately 43% and 11% of our total revenue. The loss of any large customer order or any delays in installations of new Energy Servers with any large customer would materially and adversely affect our business results.
Our ability to develop new products and enter into new markets could be negatively impacted if we are unable to identify partners to assist in such development or expansion, and our products may not be successful if we are unable to maintain alignment with evolving industry standards and requirements.
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We continue to develop new products for new markets and, as we move into those markets, we may need to identify new business partners and suppliers in order to facilitate such development and expansion, such as our entry into the hydrogen market or the development of the Bloom Electrolyzer. Identifying such partners and suppliers is a lengthy process and is subject to significant risks and uncertainties, such as an inability to negotiate mutually-acceptable terms for the partnership. In addition, there could be delays in the design, manufacture and installation of new products and we may not be timely in the development of new products, limiting our ability to expand our business and harming our financial condition and results of operations.
In addition, as we continue to invest in research and development to sustain or enhance our existing products, the introduction of new technologies and the emergence of new industry standards or requirements could render our products obsolete. Further, in developing our products, we have made, and will continue to make, assumptions with respect to which standards or requirements will be adopted by our customers and standards-setting organizations. If market acceptance of our products is reduced or delayed or the standards-setting organizations fail to develop timely commercially viable standards our business would be harmed.
Risks Related to Our Products and Manufacturing
Our business has been and continues to be adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
We continue to monitor and adjust as appropriate our operations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The precautions that we have implemented in our operations may not be sufficient to prevent exposure to COVID-19. While we do maintain protocols to minimize the risk of COVID-19 transmission within our facilities, including enhanced cleaning, masking if required by the local authorities as well as providing testing for all employees, there is no guarantee that these measures will prevent an outbreak.
If a significant number of employees are exposed and sent home, particularly in our manufacturing facilities, our production could be significantly impacted. Furthermore, since our manufacturing process involves tasks performed at both our California and Delaware facilities, an outbreak at either facility would have a substantial impact on our overall production, and in such case, our cash flow and results of operations including revenue will be adversely affected.
During the COVID-19 pandemic, we have experienced delays from certain vendors and suppliers, which, in turn, could cause delays in the manufacturing and installation of our Energy Servers and adversely impact our cash flows and results of operations including revenue. Alternative or replacement suppliers may not be available and ongoing delays could affect our business and growth. In addition, new and potentially more contagious variants of the COVID-19 virus may develop, which can lead to future disruptions in the availability or price of these or other parts, and we cannot guarantee that we will succeed in finding alternate suppliers that are able to meet our needs. In addition, international air and sea logistics systems have been heavily impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Actions by government agencies may further restrict the operations of freight carriers and the operation of ports, which would negatively impact our ability to receive the parts and supplies we need to manufacture our Energy Servers or to deliver them to our customers.
Our installation operations have also been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. For example, our installation projects have experienced delays relating to, among other things, shortages in available labor for design, installation and other work; the inability or delay in our ability to access customer facilities due to shutdowns or other restrictions; the decreased productivity of our general contractors, their sub-contractors, medium-voltage electrical gear suppliers, and the wide range of engineering and construction related specialist suppliers on whom we rely for successful and timely installations; the stoppage of work by gas and electric utilities on which we are critically dependent for hook-ups; and the unavailability of necessary civil and utility inspections as well as the review of our permit submissions and issuance of permits by multiple authorities that have jurisdiction over our activities.
We are not the only business impacted by these shortages and delays, which means that we are subject to risk of increased competition for scarce resources, which may result in delays or increases in the cost of obtaining such services, including increased labor costs and/or fees. An inability to install our Energy Servers would negatively impact our acceptances, and thereby impact our cash flows and results of operations, including revenue.
As to maintenance operations, if we are delayed in or unable to perform scheduled or unscheduled maintenance, our previously-installed Energy Servers will likely experience adverse performance impacts including reduced output and/or efficiency, which could result in warranty and/or guaranty claims by our customers. Further, due to the nature of our Energy Servers, if we are unable to replace worn parts in accordance with our standard maintenance schedule, we may be subject to increased costs in the future.
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We continue to remain in close communication with our manufacturing facilities, employees, customers, suppliers and partners, but there is no guarantee we will be able to mitigate the impact of this ongoing situation.
Our future success depends in part on our ability to increase our production capacity, and we may not be able to do so in a cost-effective manner.
To the extent we are successful in growing our business, we may need to increase our production capacity. Our ability to plan, construct and equip additional manufacturing facilities is subject to significant risks and uncertainties, including the following:
The risks inherent in the development and construction of new facilities, including risks of delays and cost overruns as a result of factors outside our control, which may include delays in government approvals, burdensome permitting conditions, and delays in the delivery of manufacturing equipment and subsystems that we manufacture or obtain from suppliers.
Adding manufacturing capacity in any international location will subject us to new laws and regulations including those pertaining to labor and employment, environmental and export / import. In addition, it brings with it the risk of managing larger scale foreign operations.
We may be unable to achieve the production throughput necessary to achieve our target annualized production run rate at our current and future manufacturing facilities.
Manufacturing equipment may take longer and cost more to engineer and build than expected, and may not operate as required to meet our production plans.
We may depend on third-party relationships in the development and operation of additional production capacity, which may subject us to the risk that such third parties do not fulfill their obligations to us under our arrangements with them.
We may be unable to attract or retain qualified personnel. For example, currently the market for manufacturing labor has been constrained, which could pose a risk to our ability to increase production.
If we are unable to expand our manufacturing facilities or develop our existing facilities in a timely manner to meet increased demand, we may be unable to further scale our business, which would negatively affect our results of operations and financial condition. Conversely, if the demand for our Energy Servers or our production output decreases or does not rise as expected, we may not be able to spread a significant amount of our fixed costs over the production volume, resulting in a greater than expected per unit fixed cost, which would have a negative impact on our financial condition and our results of operations.
If our Energy Servers contain manufacturing defects, our business and financial results could be harmed.
Our Energy Servers are complex products and they may contain undetected or latent errors or defects. In the past, we have experienced latent defects only discovered once the Energy Server is deployed in the field. Changes in our supply chain or the failure of our suppliers to otherwise provide us with components or materials that meet our specifications could introduce defects into our products. As we grow our manufacturing volume, the chance of manufacturing defects could increase. In addition, new product introductions or design changes made for the purpose of cost reduction, performance improvement, fulfilling new customer requirements or improved reliability could introduce new design defects that may impact Energy Server performance and life. Any design or manufacturing defects or other failures of our Energy Servers to perform as expected could cause us to incur significant service and re-engineering costs, divert the attention of our engineering personnel from product development efforts, and significantly and adversely affect customer satisfaction, market acceptance, and our business reputation.
Furthermore, we may be unable to correct manufacturing defects or other failures of our Energy Servers in a manner satisfactory to our customers, which could adversely affect customer satisfaction, market acceptance, and our business reputation.
The performance of our Energy Servers may be affected by factors outside of our control, which could result in harm to our business and financial results.
Field conditions, such as the quality of the natural gas supply and utility processes, which vary by region and may be subject to seasonal fluctuations or environmental factors such as smoke from wild fires, have affected the performance of our Energy Servers and are not always possible to predict until the Energy Server is in operation. As we move into new geographies and deploy new service configurations, we may encounter new and unanticipated field conditions (including as a result of
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climate change). Adverse impacts on performance may require us to incur significant service and re-engineering costs or divert the attention of our engineering personnel from product development efforts. Furthermore, we may be unable to adequately address the impacts of factors outside of our control in a manner satisfactory to our customers. Any of these circumstances could significantly and adversely affect customer satisfaction, market acceptance, and our business reputation.
If our estimates of the useful life for our Energy Servers are inaccurate or we do not meet our performance warranties and performance guaranties, or if we fail to accrue adequate warranty and guaranty reserves, our business and financial results could be harmed.
We offer certain customers the opportunity to renew their O&M Agreements (defined herein) on an annual basis, for up to 30 years, at prices predetermined at the time of purchase of the Energy Server. We also provide performance warranties and performance guaranties covering the efficiency and output performance of our Energy Servers. Our pricing of these contracts and our reserves for warranty and replacement are based upon our estimates of the useful life of our Energy Servers and their components, including assumptions regarding improvements in power module life that may fail to materialize. We do not have a long history with a large number of field deployments, especially for new product introductions, and our estimates may prove to be incorrect. Failure to meet these warranty and performance guaranty levels may require us to replace the Energy Servers at our expense or refund their cost to the customer, or require us to make cash payments to the customer based on actual performance, as compared to expected performance, capped at a percentage of the relevant equipment purchase prices. We accrue for product warranty costs and recognize losses on service or performance warranties when required by U.S. GAAP based on our estimates of costs that may be incurred and based on historical experience. However, as we expect our customers to renew their O&M Agreements each year, the total liability over time may be more than the accrual. Actual warranty expenses have in the past been and may in the future be greater than we have assumed in our estimates, the accuracy of which may be hindered due to our limited history operating at our current scale. Therefore, if our estimates of the useful life for our Energy Servers are inaccurate or we do not meet our performance warranties and performance guaranties, or if we fail to accrue adequate warranty and guaranty reserves, our business and financial results could be harmed.
Our business is subject to risks associated with construction, utility interconnection, cost overruns and delays, including those related to obtaining government permits and other contingencies that may arise in the course of completing installations.
Because we generally do not recognize revenue on the sales of our Energy Servers until installation and acceptance except where a third party is responsible for installation (such as in our sales in the Republic of Korea and certain cases in the United States), our financial results depend to a large extent on the timeliness of the installation of our Energy Servers. Furthermore, in some cases, the installation of our Energy Servers may be on a fixed price basis, which subjects us to the risk of cost overruns or other unforeseen expenses in the installation process.
The construction, installation, and operation of our Energy Servers at a particular site is also generally subject to oversight and regulation in accordance with national, state, and local laws and ordinances relating to building codes, safety, environmental protection, and related matters, and typically require various local and other governmental approvals and permits, including environmental approvals and permits, that vary by jurisdiction. In some cases, these approvals and permits require periodic renewal. For more information regarding these restrictions, please see the risk factors in the section entitled "Risks Related to Legal Matters and Regulations." As a result, unforeseen delays in the review and permitting process could delay the timing of the construction and installation of our Energy Servers and could therefore adversely affect the timing of the recognition of revenue related to the installation, which could harm our operating results in a particular period.
In addition, the completion of many of our installations depends on the availability of and timely connection to the natural gas grid and the local electric grid. In some jurisdictions, local utility companies or the municipality have denied our request for connection or have required us to reduce the size of certain projects. In addition, some municipalities have recently adopted restrictions that prohibit any new construction that allows for the use of natural gas. For more information regarding these restrictions, please see the risk factor entitled "As a technology that runs, in part, on fossil fuel, we may be subject to a heightened risk of regulation, to a potential for the loss of certain incentives, and to changes in our customers’ energy procurement policies." Any delays in our ability to connect with utilities, delays in the performance of installation-related services, or poor performance of installation-related services by our general contractors or sub-contractors will have a material adverse effect on our results and could cause operating results to vary materially from period to period.
Furthermore, we rely on the ability of our third-party general contractors to install Energy Servers at our customers’ sites and to meet our installation requirements. We currently work with a limited number of general contractors, which has impacted and may continue to impact our ability to make installations as planned. Our work with contractors or their sub-contractors may
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have the effect of our being required to comply with additional rules (including rules unique to our customers), working conditions, site remediation, and other union requirements, which can add costs and complexity to an installation project. The timeliness, thoroughness, and quality of the installation-related services performed by some of our general contractors and their sub-contractors in the past have not always met our expectations or standards and may not meet our expectations and standards in the future.
The failure of our suppliers to continue to deliver necessary raw materials or other components of our Energy Servers in a timely manner and to specification could prevent us from delivering our products within required time frames and could cause installation delays, cancellations, penalty payments and damage to our reputation.
We rely on a limited number of third-party suppliers, and in some cases sole suppliers, for some of the raw materials and components for our Energy Servers, including certain rare earth materials and other materials that may be of limited supply. If our suppliers provide insufficient inventory at the level of quality required to meet our standards and customer demand or if our suppliers are unable or unwilling to provide us with the contracted quantities (as we have limited or in some case no alternatives for supply), our results of operations could be materially and negatively impacted. If we fail to develop or maintain our relationships with our suppliers, or if there is otherwise a shortage or lack of availability of any required raw materials or components, we may be unable to manufacture our Energy Servers or our Energy Servers may be available only at a higher cost or after a long delay.
Recently, due to increased demand across a range of industries, the global supply chain for certain raw materials and components, including semiconductor components and specialty metals, has experienced significant strain. The COVID-19 pandemic has also contributed to and exacerbated this strain. There can be no assurance that the impacts of the pandemic on the supply chain will not continue, or worsen, in the future. Significant delays and shortages could prevent us from delivering our Energy Servers to our customers within required time frames and cause order cancellations, which would adversely impact our cash flows and results of operations.
In some cases, we have had to create our own supply chain for some of the components and materials utilized in our fuel cells. We have made significant expenditures in the past to develop our supply chain. In many cases, we entered into contractual relationships with suppliers to jointly develop the components we needed. These activities are time and capital intensive. In addition, some of our suppliers use proprietary processes to manufacture components. We may be unable to obtain comparable components from alternative suppliers without considerable delay, expense, or at all, as replacing these suppliers could require us either to make significant investments to bring the capability in-house or to invest in a new supply chain partner. Some of our suppliers are smaller, private companies, heavily dependent on us as a customer. If our suppliers face difficulties obtaining the credit or capital necessary to expand their operations when needed, they could be unable to supply necessary raw materials and components needed to support our planned sales and services operations, which would negatively impact our sales volumes and cash flows.
The failure by us to obtain raw materials or components in a timely manner or to obtain raw materials or components that meet our quantity and cost requirements could impair our ability to manufacture our Energy Servers or increase their costs or service costs of our existing portfolio of Energy Servers under O&M Agreements. If we cannot obtain substitute materials or components on a timely basis or on acceptable terms, we could be prevented from delivering our Energy Servers to our customers within required time frames, which could result in sales and installation delays, cancellations, penalty payments, or damage to our reputation, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business and results of operations. In addition, we rely on our suppliers to meet quality standards, and the failure of our suppliers to meet those quality standards could cause delays in the delivery of our products, unanticipated servicing costs, and damage to our reputation.
We have, in some instances, entered into long-term supply agreements that could result in insufficient inventory and negatively affect our results of operations.
We have entered into long-term supply agreements with certain suppliers. Some of these supply agreements provide for fixed or inflation-adjusted pricing, substantial prepayment obligations and in a few cases, supplier purchase commitments. These arrangements could mean that we end up paying for inventory that we did not need or that was at a higher price than the market. Further, we face significant specific counterparty risk under long-term supply agreements when dealing with suppliers without a long, stable production and financial history. Given the uniqueness of our product, many of our suppliers do not have a long operating history and are private companies that may not have substantial capital resources. In the event any such supplier experiences financial difficulties, it may be difficult or impossible, or may require substantial time and expense, for us to recover any or all of our prepayments. We do not know whether we will be able to maintain long-term supply relationships with our critical suppliers or whether we may secure new long-term supply agreements. Additionally, many of our parts and
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materials are procured from foreign suppliers, which exposes us to risks including unforeseen increases in costs or interruptions in supply arising from changes in applicable international trade regulations such as taxes, tariffs, or quotas. Any of the foregoing could materially harm our financial condition and our results of operations.
We face supply chain competition, including competition from businesses in other industries, which could result in insufficient inventory and negatively affect our results of operations.
Certain of our suppliers also supply parts and materials to other businesses including businesses engaged in the production of consumer electronics and other industries unrelated to fuel cells. As a relatively low-volume purchaser of certain of these parts and materials, we may be unable to procure a sufficient supply of the items in the event that our suppliers fail to produce sufficient quantities to satisfy the demands of all of their customers, which could materially harm our financial condition and our results of operations.
We, and some of our suppliers, obtain capital equipment used in our manufacturing process from sole suppliers and, if this equipment is damaged or otherwise unavailable, our ability to deliver our Energy Servers on time will suffer.
Some of the capital equipment used to manufacture our products and some of the capital equipment used by our suppliers have been developed and made specifically for us, are not readily available from multiple vendors, and would be difficult to repair or replace if they did not function properly. If any of these suppliers were to experience financial difficulties or go out of business or if there were any damage to or a breakdown of our manufacturing equipment and we could not obtain replacement equipment in a timely manner, our business would suffer. In addition, a supplier’s failure to supply this equipment in a timely manner with adequate quality and on terms acceptable to us could disrupt our production schedule or increase our costs of production and service.
Possible new trade tariffs could have a material adverse effect on our business.
Our business is dependent on the availability of raw materials and components for our Energy Servers, particularly electrical components common in the semiconductor industry, specialty steel products / processing and raw materials. For example, prior tariffs imposed on steel and aluminum imports increased the cost of raw materials for our Energy Servers and decreased the available supply. Additional new trade tariffs or other trade protection measures that are proposed or threatened and the potential escalation of a trade war and retaliation measures could have a material adverse effect on our business, results of operations and financial condition. Consequently, the imposition of tariffs on items imported by us from China or other countries could increase our costs and could have a material adverse effect on our business and our results of operations.
A failure to properly comply with foreign trade zone laws and regulations could increase the cost of our duties and tariffs.
We have established two foreign trade zones, one in California and one in Delaware, through qualification with U.S. Customs and Border Protection, and are approved for "zone to zone" transfers between our California and Delaware facilities. Materials received in a foreign trade zone are not subject to certain U.S. duties or tariffs until the material enters U.S. commerce. We benefit from the adoption of foreign trade zones by reduced duties, deferral of certain duties and tariffs, and reduced processing fees, which help us realize a reduction in duty and tariff costs. However, the operation of our foreign trade zones requires compliance with applicable regulations and continued support of U.S. Customs and Border Protection with respect to the foreign trade zone program. If we are unable to maintain the qualification of our foreign trade zones, or if foreign trade zones are limited or unavailable to us in the future, our duty and tariff costs would increase, which could have an adverse effect on our business and results of operations.
Any significant disruption in the operations at our headquarters or manufacturing facilities could delay the production of our Energy Servers, which would harm our business and results of operations.

We manufacture our Energy Servers in a limited number of manufacturing facilities, any of which could become unavailable either temporarily or permanently for any number of reasons, including equipment failure, material supply, public health emergencies or catastrophic weather, including extreme weather events or flooding resulting from the effects of climate change, or geologic events. For example, our headquarters and several of our manufacturing facilities are located in the San Francisco Bay Area, an area that is susceptible to earthquakes, floods and other natural disasters. The occurrence of a natural disaster such as an earthquake, drought, extreme heat, flood, fire, localized extended outages of critical utilities (such as California's public safety power shut-offs) or transportation systems, or any critical resource shortages could cause a significant interruption in our business, damage or destroy our facilities, our manufacturing equipment, or our inventory, and cause us to incur significant costs, any of which could harm our business, our financial condition and our results of operations. The
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insurance we maintain against fires, earthquakes and other natural disasters may not be adequate to cover our losses in any particular case.
Risks Related to Government Incentive Programs
Our business currently benefits from the availability of rebates, tax credits and other financial programs and incentives, and the reduction, modification, or elimination of such benefits could cause our revenue to decline and harm our financial results.
The U.S. federal government and some state and local governments provide incentives to current and future end users and purchasers of our Energy Servers in the form of rebates, tax credits and other financial incentives, such as system performance payments and payments for renewable energy credits associated with renewable energy generation. In addition, some countries outside the United States also provide incentives to current and future end users and purchasers of our Energy Servers. We currently have operations and sell our products in Japan, India and the Republic of Korea (collectively, our "Asia Pacific region"), where in some locations such as the Republic of Korea, Renewables Portfolio Standard ("RP Standards") or Clean Energy Standards ("CE Standards") are in place to promote the adoption of renewable, low- or zero-carbon power generation, including, in some circumstances, fuel cells. Our Energy Servers have qualified for tax exemptions, incentives, or other customer incentives in many states including the states of California, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey and New York. Some states have utility procurement programs and/or RP Standards or CE Standards for which our technologies are eligible. Our Energy Servers are currently installed in eleven U.S. states, each of which may have its own enabling policy framework. We utilize governmental rebates, tax credits, and other financial incentives to lower the effective price of our products to our customers in the United States and the Asia Pacific region. Financiers and Equity Investors may also take advantage of these financial incentives, lowering the cost of capital and energy to our customers. However, these incentives and procurement programs or obligations may expire on a particular date, end when the allocated funding is exhausted, or be reduced or terminated as a matter of regulatory or legislative policy.
For example, the Korean RP Standards are scheduled to be replaced in 2022 with the Hydrogen Portfolio Standard (“HPS”). This may impact the demand for our Energy Servers in the Republic of Korea. Initially, we do not expect the HPS to require 100% hydrogen as a feedstock for fuel cell projects. The Ministry of Trade, Industry, and Economy is running a stakeholder process, which will determine the specifics of the HPS incentive mechanism. For the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020, our revenue in the Republic of Korea accounted for 38% and 34% of our total revenue, respectively. Therefore, if sales of our Energy Servers to this market decline in the future, this may have a material adverse effect on our financial condition and results of operations.

As another example, in the United States, commercial purchasers of fuel cells are eligible to claim the federal bonus depreciation benefit. Unless legislation extends the bonus depreciation deadlines, under current rules it will be phased down beginning in 2023, and will expire at the end of 2026. Similarly, commercial fuel cell purchasers can claim the ITC. While legislation under active consideration would extend the ITC for up to five years, under current law the ITC will end on December 31, 2023.
The ITC program has operational criteria that extend for five years. If the energy property is disposed or otherwise ceases to be qualified investment credit property before the close of the five-year recapture period is fulfilled, it could result in a partial reduction in incentives. In the case of a Portfolio Financing, the owner of the portfolio bears the risk of repayment if the assets placed in service do not meet the ITC operational criteria in the future.
As another example, many of our installations in California interconnect with investor-owned utilities on Fuel Cell Net Energy Metering (“FC NEM”) tariffs. FC NEM tariffs will be available for new California installations until December 31, 2023. However, to remain eligible for those FC NEM tariffs, at least some installations currently on those tariffs are likely to be required to meet greenhouse gas emissions standards. We are working through the appropriate regulatory channels to establish alternative tariffs for California customers utilizing fuel cells. If our customers are unable to interconnect under FC NEM tariffs or suitable alternatives, interconnection and tariff costs may increase and such an increase may negatively impact demand for our products. Additionally, the uncertainty regarding requirements for service under any of these tariffs could negatively impact the perceived value of or risks associated with our products, which could also negatively impact demand.
Changes in the availability of rebates, tax credits and other financial programs and incentives could reduce demand for our Energy Servers or future products, impair sales financing, and adversely impact our business results. The continuation of these programs and incentives depends upon political support which to date has been bipartisan and durable.
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We rely on tax equity financing arrangements to realize the benefits provided by ITCs and accelerated tax depreciation and in the event these programs are terminated, our financial results could be harmed.
We expect that Energy Server deployments through certain of our financed transactions will receive capital from Equity Investors who derive a significant portion of their economic returns through tax benefits. Equity Investors are generally entitled to substantially all of the project’s tax benefits, such as those provided by the ITC and Modified Accelerated Cost Recovery System ("MACRS") or bonus depreciation, until the Equity Investors achieve their respective agreed rates of return. The number of and available capital from potential Equity Investors is limited, we compete with other energy companies eligible for these tax benefits to access such investors, and the availability of capital from Equity Investors is subject to fluctuations based on factors outside of our control such as macroeconomic trends and changes in applicable taxation regimes. Concerns regarding our limited operating history, lack of profitability and that we are the only party who can perform operations and maintenance on our Energy Servers have made it difficult to attract investors in the past. Our ability to obtain additional financing in the future depends on the continued confidence of banks and other financing sources in our business model, the market for our Energy Servers, and the continued availability of tax benefits applicable to our Energy Servers. In addition, conditions in the general economy and financial and credit markets may result in the contraction of available tax equity financing. If we are unable to enter into tax equity financing agreements with attractive pricing terms, or at all, we may not be able to obtain the capital needed to fund our financing programs or use the tax benefits provided by the ITC and MACRS depreciation, which could make it more difficult for customers to finance the purchase of our Energy Servers. Such circumstances could also require us to reduce the price at which we are able to sell our Energy Servers and therefore harm our business, our financial condition, and our results of operations.
Risks Related to Legal Matters and Regulations
We are subject to various national, state and local laws and regulations that could impose substantial costs upon us and cause delays in the delivery and installation of our Energy Servers or future products.

The construction, installation, and operation of our Energy Servers or future products at a particular site is also generally subject to oversight and regulation in accordance with national, state, and local laws and ordinances relating to building codes, safety, environmental and climate protection, and related matters, as well as national, regional and/or local energy market rules, regulations and tariffs, and typically require various local and other governmental approvals and permits, including environmental approvals and permits, that vary by jurisdiction. In some cases, these approvals and permits require periodic renewal. These laws and regulations can affect the markets for our products and the costs and time required for their installation, and may give rise to liability for administrative oversight costs, compliance costs, clean-up costs, property damage, bodily injury, fines, and penalties. Capital and operating expenses needed to comply with the various laws and regulations can be significant, and violations may result in substantial fines and penalties or third-party damages.
It is difficult and costly to track the requirements of every individual authority having jurisdiction over our installations, to design our Energy Servers to comply with these varying standards, and to obtain all applicable approvals and permits. We cannot predict whether or when all approvals or permits required for a given project will be granted or whether the conditions associated with the approvals or permits will be achievable. The denial of a permit or utility connection essential to a project or the imposition of impractical conditions would impair our ability to develop the project. In addition, we cannot predict whether the approval or permitting process will be lengthened due to complexities and appeals. Delay in the review and approval or permitting process for a project can impair or delay our and our customers’ abilities to develop that project or may increase the cost so substantially that the project is no longer attractive to us or our customers. Furthermore, unforeseen delays in the review and permitting process could delay the timing of the installation of our Energy Servers and could therefore adversely affect the timing of the recognition of revenue related to the installation, which could harm our operating results in a particular period. Additionally, in many cases we contractually commit to performing all necessary installation work on a fixed-price basis, and unanticipated costs associated with approval, permitting and/or compliance expenses may cause the cost of performing such work to exceed our revenue. The costs of complying with all the various laws, regulations and customer requirements, and any claims concerning non-compliance, could have a material adverse effect on our financial condition or our operating results.
The installation and operation of our Energy Servers are subject to environmental laws and regulations in various jurisdictions, and there is uncertainty with respect to the interpretation of certain environmental laws and regulations to our Energy Servers, especially as these regulations evolve over time.
We are committed to compliance with applicable environmental laws and regulations including health and safety standards, and we continuously review the operation of our Energy Servers for health, safety, and environmental compliance. Our Energy Servers, like other fuel cell technology-based products of which we are aware, produce small amounts of hazardous wastes and air pollutants, and we seek to address these in accordance with applicable regulatory standards. In addition,
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environmental laws and regulations such as the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act in the United States impose liability on several grounds including for the investigation and clean-up of contaminated soil and ground water, impacts to human health and damages to natural resources. If contamination is discovered in the future at properties formerly owned or operated by us or currently owned or operated by us, or properties to which hazardous substances were sent by us, it could result in our liability under environmental laws and regulations. Many of our customers who purchase our Energy Servers have high sustainability standards, and any environmental non-compliance by us could harm our reputation and impact a current or potential customer’s buying decision.
Maintaining environmental compliance can be challenging given the changing patchwork of environmental laws and regulations that prevail at the federal, state, regional, and local level. Most existing environmental laws and regulations preceded the introduction of our innovative fuel cell technology and were adopted to apply to technologies existing at the time (i.e., large coal, oil, or gas-fired power plants). Guidance from these agencies on how certain environmental laws and regulations may or may not be applied to our technology can be inconsistent.
For example, natural gas, which is the primary fuel used in our Energy Servers, contains benzene, which is classified as a hazardous waste if it exceeds 0.5 milligrams per liter. A small amount of benzene found in the public natural gas supply (equivalent to what is present in one gallon of gasoline in an automobile fuel tank, which are exempt from federal regulation) is collected by the gas cleaning units contained in our Energy Servers; these gas cleaning units are typically replaced at customers' sites once every 15 to 36 months. From 2010 to late 2016 and in the regular course of maintenance of the Energy Servers, we periodically replaced the units in our servers relying upon a federal environmental exemption that permitted the handling of such units without manifesting the contents as containing a hazardous waste. Although over the years and with the approval of two states, we believed that we operated appropriately under the exemption, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ("EPA") issued guidance for the first time in late 2016 that differed from our belief and conflicted with the state approvals we had obtained. We have complied with the new guidance and, given the comparatively small quantities of benzene produced, we do not anticipate significant additional costs or risks from our compliance with the revised 2016 guidance. In order to put this matter behind us and with no admission of law or fact, we agreed to a consent agreement that was ratified and incorporated by reference into a final order that was entered by an Environmental Appeals Judge for EPA’s Environmental Appeals Board in May of 2020. Consistent with the consent agreement and final order, a final payment of approximately $1.2 million was made in the fourth quarter of 2020 and EPA has confirmed the matter is formally resolved. Additionally, a nominal penalty was paid to a state agency under that state’s environmental laws relating to the same issue.
Some states in which we operate, including New York, New Jersey and North Carolina, have specific permitting or environmental exemptions for fuel cells. Other states in which we currently operate, including California, have emissions-based requirements, most of which require permits or other notifications for quantities of emissions that are higher than those observed from our Energy Servers. For example, the Bay Area Air Quality Management District in California has an air permit and risk assessment exemption for emissions of chromium in the hexavalent form (“CR+6”) that are less than 0.00051 lbs/year. Emissions above this level may trigger the need for a permit. Also, California's Proposition 65 requires notification of the presence of CR+6 unless public exposure is below 0.001 µg/day, the level determined to represent no significant health risk. Since the California standards are more stringent than those in any other state or foreign location in which we have installed Energy Servers to date, we are focused on California's standards. If stricter standards are adopted in other states or jurisdictions or our servers can’t meet applicable standards, it could impact our ability to obtain regulatory approval and/or could result in us not being able to operate in a particular local jurisdiction.
These examples illustrate that our technology is moving faster than the regulatory process in many instances and that there are inconsistencies between how we are regulated in different jurisdictions. It is possible that regulators could delay or prevent us from conducting our business in some way pending agreement on, and compliance with, shifting regulatory requirements. Such actions could delay the installation of Energy Servers or future products, could result in penalties, could require modification or replacement or could trigger claims of performance warranties and defaults under customer contracts that could require us to repurchase equipment, any of which could adversely affect our business, our financial performance, and our reputation. In addition, new energy or environmental laws or regulations or new interpretations of existing laws or regulations could present marketing, political or regulatory challenges and could require us to upgrade or retrofit existing equipment, which could result in materially increased capital and operating expenses.
With respect to our products that run, in part, on fossil fuel, we may be subject to a heightened risk of regulation, to a potential for the loss of certain incentives, and to changes in our customers’ energy procurement policies.

The current generation of our Energy Servers that run on natural gas produces nearly 23% fewer carbon emissions than the average U.S. marginal power generation sources that our projects displace. However, the operation of our current Energy
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Servers does produce carbon dioxide ("CO2"), which contributes to global climate change. As such, we may be negatively impacted by CO2-related changes in applicable laws, regulations, ordinances, rules, or the requirements of the incentive programs on which we and our customers currently rely. Changes (or a lack of change to sufficiently recognize both the risks of climate change and the benefit of our technology as one means to maintain reliable and resilient electric service with a lower greenhouse gas emission profile) in any of the laws, regulations, ordinances, or rules that apply to our installations and new technology could make it more difficult or more costly for us or our customers to install and operate our Energy Servers on particular sites, thereby negatively affecting our ability to deliver cost savings to customers. Certain municipalities have banned or are considering banning new interconnections with gas utilities, while others have adopted bans that allow new interconnections for non-combustion resources, such as our Energy Servers. Some local municipalities have also banned or are considering banning the use of distributed generation products that utilize fossil fuel. Additionally, our customers’ and potential customers’ energy procurement policies may prohibit or limit their willingness to procure our natural gas-fueled Energy Servers. Our business prospects may be negatively impacted if we are prevented from completing new installations or our installations become more costly as a result of laws, regulations, ordinances, or rules applicable to our Energy Servers, or by our customers’ and potential customers’ energy procurement policies.
Existing regulations and changes to such regulations impacting the electric power industry may create technical, regulatory, and economic barriers, which could significantly reduce demand for our Energy Servers or affect the financial performance of current sites.
The market for electricity generation products is heavily influenced by U.S. federal, state, local, and foreign government laws, regulations and policies as well as by tariffs, internal policies and practices of electric utility providers. These regulations, tariffs and policies often relate to electricity pricing and technical interconnection of customer-owned electricity generation. These regulations, tariffs and policies are often modified and could continue to change, which could result in a significant reduction in demand for our Energy Servers. For example, utility companies commonly charge fees to industrial customers for disconnecting from the electric grid. These fees could change, thereby increasing the cost to our customers of using our Energy Servers and making them less economically attractive.
In addition, our project with Delmarva Power & Light Company (the "Delaware Project") is subject to laws and regulations relating to electricity generation, transmission, and sale in Delaware and at the regional and federal level.
A law governing the sale of electricity from the Delaware Project was necessary to implement part of several incentives that Delaware offered to us to build our major manufacturing facility ("Manufacturing Center") in Delaware. Those incentives have proven controversial in Delaware, in part because our Manufacturing Center, while a significant source of continuing manufacturing employment, has not expanded as quickly as projected. The opposition to the Delaware Project is an example of potentially material risks associated with electric power regulation.
At the federal level, FERC has authority to regulate under various federal energy regulatory laws, wholesale sales of electric energy, capacity, and ancillary services, and the delivery of natural gas in interstate commerce. Also, several of the tax equity partnerships in which we have an interest are subject to regulation under FERC with respect to market-based sales of electricity, which requires us to file notices and make other periodic filings with FERC, which increases our costs and subjects us to additional regulatory oversight.

Although we generally are not regulated as a utility, federal, state and local government statutes and regulations concerning electricity and natural gas, as well as organized market rules such as the PJM tariffs affecting the Delaware Project, heavily influence the market for our product and services. These statutes, regulations, tariffs and market rules often relate to electricity and natural gas pricing, fuel cell net metering, incentives, taxation, and the rules surrounding the interconnection of customer-owned electricity generation for specific technologies. In the United States, governments and market operators frequently modify these statutes, regulations, tariffs and market rules. Governments, often acting through state utility or public service commissions, as well as market operators, change, adopt or approve different utility requirements and rates for commercial and industrial customers on a regular basis. Changes, or in some cases a lack of change, in any of the laws, regulations, tariffs ordinances, or other rules that apply to our installations and new technology could make it more costly for us or our customers to install and operate our Energy Servers or future products on particular sites and, in turn, could negatively affect our ability to deliver cost savings to customers.
We may become subject to product liability claims, which could harm our financial condition and liquidity if we are not able to successfully defend or insure against such claims.
We may in the future become subject to product liability claims. Our Energy Servers are considered high energy systems because they use flammable fuels and may operate at 480 volts. High-voltage electricity poses potential shock hazards, and natural gas and hydrogen are flammable gases and therefore a potentially dangerous fuel. Although our Energy Servers are
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certified to meet ANSI, IEEE, ASME, and NFPA design and safety standards, if our equipment is not properly handled in accordance with our servicing and handling standards and protocols, there could be a system failure and resulting liability. These claims could require us to incur significant costs to defend. Furthermore, any successful product liability claim could require us to pay a substantial monetary award. Moreover, a product liability claim could generate substantial negative publicity about us and could materially impede widespread market acceptance and demand for our Energy Servers or future products, which could harm our brand, our business prospects, and our operating results. Our product liability insurance may not be sufficient to cover all potential product liability claims. Any lawsuit seeking significant monetary damages either in excess of our coverage or outside of our coverage may have a material adverse effect on our business and our financial condition.
Current or future litigation or administrative proceedings could have a material adverse effect on our business, our financial condition and our results of operations.
We have been and continue to be involved in legal proceedings, administrative proceedings, claims, and other litigation that arise in the ordinary course of business. Purchases of our products have also been the subject of litigation. For information regarding pending legal proceedings, please see Part I, Item 3, Legal Proceedings and Note 13 - Commitments and Contingencies in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. In addition, since our Energy Server and Electrolyzer are new types of product in a nascent market, we have in the past needed and may in the future need to seek the amendment of existing regulations, or in some cases the development of new regulations, in order to operate our business in some jurisdictions. Such regulatory processes may require public hearings concerning our business, which could expose us to subsequent litigation.
Unfavorable outcomes or developments relating to proceedings to which we are a party or transactions involving our products such as judgments for monetary damages, injunctions, or denial or revocation of permits, could have a material adverse effect on our business, our financial condition, and our results of operations. In addition, settlement of claims could adversely affect our financial condition and our results of operations.
Risks Related to Our Intellectual Property
Our failure to effectively protect and enforce our intellectual property rights may undermine our competitive position, and litigation to protect our intellectual property rights may be costly.
Policing unauthorized use of proprietary technology can be difficult and expensive, and the protective measures we have taken to protect our trade secrets may not be sufficient to prevent such use. For example, many of our engineers reside in California where it is not legally permissible to prevent them from working for a competitor. Also, litigation may be necessary to enforce our intellectual property rights, to protect our trade secrets, or to determine the validity and scope of the proprietary rights of others. Such litigation may result in our intellectual property rights being challenged, limited in scope, or declared invalid or unenforceable. We cannot be certain that the outcome of any litigation will be in our favor, and an adverse determination in any such litigation could impair our intellectual property rights, our business, our prospects, and our reputation.
We rely primarily on patent, trade secret, and trademark laws and non-disclosure, confidentiality, and other types of contractual restrictions to establish, maintain, and enforce our intellectual property and proprietary rights. However, our rights under these laws and agreements afford us only limited protection and the actions we take to establish, maintain, and enforce our intellectual property rights may not be adequate. For example, our trade secrets and other confidential information could be disclosed in an unauthorized manner to third parties, our owned or licensed intellectual property rights could be challenged, invalidated, circumvented, infringed, or misappropriated or our intellectual property rights may not be sufficient to provide us with a competitive advantage, any of which could have a material adverse effect on our business, financial condition, or operating results. In addition, the laws of some countries do not protect proprietary rights as fully as do the laws of the United States. As a result, we may not be able to protect our proprietary rights adequately abroad.
In connection with our expansion into new markets, we may need to develop relationships with new partners, including project developers and/or financiers who may require access to certain of our intellectual property in order to mitigate perceived risks regarding our ability to service their projects over the contracted project duration. If we are unable to come to agreement regarding the terms of such access or find alternative means to address this perceived risk, such failure may negatively impact our ability to expand into new markets. Alternatively, we may be required to develop new strategies for the protection of our intellectual property, which may be less protective than our current strategies and could therefore erode our competitive position.
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Our patent applications may not result in issued patents, and our issued patents may not provide adequate protection, either of which may have a material adverse effect on our ability to prevent others from commercially exploiting products similar to ours.
We cannot be certain that our pending patent applications will result in issued patents or that any of our issued patents will afford protection against a competitor. The status of patents involves complex legal and factual questions, and the breadth of claims allowed is uncertain. As a result, we cannot be certain that the patent applications that we file will result in patents being issued or that our patents and any patents that may be issued to us in the future will afford protection against competitors with similar technology. In addition, patent applications filed in foreign countries are subject to laws, rules, and procedures that differ from those of the United States, and thus we cannot be certain that foreign patent applications related to issued U.S. patents will be issued in other regions. Furthermore, even if these patent applications are accepted and the associated patents issued, some foreign countries provide significantly less effective patent enforcement than the United States.
In addition, patents issued to us may be infringed upon or designed around by others and others may obtain patents that we need to license or design around, either of which would increase costs and may adversely affect our business, our prospects, and our operating results.
We may need to defend ourselves against claims that we infringed, misappropriated, or otherwise violated the intellectual property rights of others, which may be time-consuming and would cause us to incur substantial costs.
Companies, organizations, or individuals, including our competitors, may hold or obtain patents, trademarks, or other proprietary rights that they may in the future believe are infringed by our products or services. These companies holding patents or other intellectual property rights allegedly relating to our technologies could, in the future, make claims or bring suits alleging infringement, misappropriation, or other violations of such rights, or otherwise assert their rights and by seeking licenses or injunctions. Several of the proprietary components used in our Energy Servers have been subjected to infringement challenges in the past. We also generally indemnify our customers against claims that the products we supply don't infringe, misappropriate, or otherwise violate third party intellectual property rights, and we therefore may be required to defend our customers against such claims. If a claim is successfully brought in the future and we or our products are determined to have infringed, misappropriated, or otherwise violated a third party’s intellectual property rights, we may be required to do one or more of the following:
cease selling or using our products that incorporate the challenged intellectual property;
pay substantial damages (including treble damages and attorneys’ fees if our infringement is determined to be willful);
obtain a license from the holder of the intellectual property right, which may not be available on reasonable terms or at all; or
redesign our products or means of production, which may not be possible or cost-effective.
Any of the foregoing could adversely affect our business, prospects, operating results, and financial condition. In addition, any litigation or claims, whether or not valid, could harm our reputation, result in substantial costs and divert resources and management attention.
We also license technology from third parties and incorporate components supplied by third parties into our products. We may face claims that our use of such technology or components infringes or otherwise violates the rights of others, which would subject us to the risks described above. We may seek indemnification from our licensors or suppliers under our contracts with them, but our rights to indemnification or our suppliers’ resources may be unavailable or insufficient to cover our costs and losses.

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Risks Related to Our Financial Condition and Operating Results
We have incurred significant losses in the past and we may not be profitable for the foreseeable future.
Since our inception in 2001, we have incurred significant net losses and have used significant cash in our business. As of December 31, 2021, we had an accumulated deficit of $3.3 billion. We expect to continue to expand our operations, including by investing in manufacturing, sales and marketing, research and development, staffing systems, and infrastructure to support our growth, as well as internationally. We may continue to incur net losses for the foreseeable future. Our ability to achieve profitability in the future will depend on a number of factors, including:
growing our sales volume;
increasing sales to existing customers and attracting new customers;
expanding into new geographical markets and industry market sectors;
attracting and retaining financing partners who are willing to provide financing for sales on a timely basis and with attractive terms;
continuing to improve the useful life of our fuel cell technology and reducing our warranty servicing costs;
reducing the cost of producing our Energy Servers;
improving the efficiency and predictability of our installation process;
introducing new products, including products for the hydrogen market;
improving the effectiveness of our sales and marketing activities; and
attracting and retaining key talent in a competitive marketplace.
Even if we do achieve profitability, we may be unable to sustain or increase our profitability in the future.
Our financial condition and results of operations and other key metrics are likely to fluctuate on a quarterly basis in future periods, which could cause our results for a particular period to fall below expectations, resulting in a severe decline in the price of our Class A common stock.
Our financial condition and results of operations and other key metrics have fluctuated significantly in the past and may continue to fluctuate in the future due to a variety of factors, many of which are beyond our control. For example, the amount of product revenue we recognize in a given period is materially dependent on the volume of installations of our Energy Servers in that period and the type of financing used by the customer.
In addition to the other risks described herein, the following factors could also cause our financial condition and results of operations to fluctuate on a quarterly basis:
the timing of installations, which may depend on many factors such as availability of inventory, product quality or performance issues, or local permitting requirements, utility requirements, environmental, health, and safety requirements, weather, the COVID-19 pandemic or such other health emergency, and customer facility construction schedules;
size of particular installations and number of sites involved in any particular quarter;
the mix in the type of purchase or financing options used by customers in a period, the geographical mix of customer sales, and the rates of return required by financing parties in such period;
disruptions in our supply chain;
whether we are able to structure our sales agreements in a manner that would allow for the product and installation revenue to be recognized upfront;
delays or cancellations of Energy Server installations;
fluctuations in our service costs, particularly due to unexpected costs of servicing and maintaining Energy Servers;
fluctuations in our research and development expense, including periodic increases associated with the pre-production qualification of additional tools as we expand our production capacity;
the length of the sales and installation cycle for a particular customer;
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the timing and level of additional purchases by new and existing customers;
the timing of the development of the market for hydrogen fuel cell products, including our Bloom Electrolyzer;
unanticipated expenses or installation delays associated with changes in governmental regulations, permitting requirements by local authorities at particular sites, utility requirements and environmental, health and safety requirements;
disruptions in our sales, production, service or other business activities resulting from disagreements with our labor force or our inability to attract and retain qualified personnel; and
unanticipated changes in federal, state, local, or foreign government incentive programs available for us, our customers, and tax equity financing parties.
Fluctuations in our operating results and cash flow could, among other things, give rise to short-term liquidity issues. In addition, our revenue, key operating metrics, and other operating results in future quarters may fall short of our projections or the expectations of investors and financial analysts, which could have an adverse effect on the price of our Class A common stock.
If we fail to manage our growth effectively, our business and operating results may suffer.
Our current growth and future growth plans may make it difficult for us to efficiently operate our business, challenging us to effectively manage our capital expenditures and control our costs while we expand our operations to increase our revenue. If we experience a significant growth in orders without improvements in automation and efficiency, we may need additional manufacturing capacity and we and some of our suppliers may need additional and capital-intensive equipment. Any growth in manufacturing must include a scaling of quality control as the increase in production increases the possible impact of manufacturing defects. In addition, any growth in the volume of sales of our Energy Servers may outpace our ability to engage sufficient and experienced personnel to manage the higher number of installations and to engage contractors to complete installations on a timely basis and in accordance with our expectations and standards. Any failure to manage our growth effectively could materially and adversely affect our business, our prospects, our operating results, and our financial condition. Our future operating results depend to a large extent on our ability to manage this expansion and growth successfully.
If we fail to maintain effective internal control over financial reporting in the future, the accuracy and timing of our financial reporting may be adversely affected.
We are required to comply with Section 404 of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 ("Sarbanes-Oxley Act"). The provisions of the act require, among other things, that we maintain effective internal control over financial reporting and disclosure controls and procedures. Preparing our financial statements involves a number of complex processes, many of which are done manually and are dependent upon individual data input or review. These processes include, but are not limited to, calculating revenue, deferred revenue and inventory costs. While we continue to automate our processes and enhance our review and put in place controls to reduce the likelihood for errors, we expect that for the foreseeable future many of our processes will remain manually intensive and thus subject to human error if we are unable to implement key operation controls around pricing, spending and other financial processes. For example, prior to our adoption of Section 404B of the Sarbanes-Oxley Act, we identified a material weakness in our internal control over financial reporting at December 31, 2019 related to the accounting for and disclosure of complex or non-routine transactions, which has been remediated. If we are unable to successfully maintain effective internal control over financial reporting, we may fail to prevent or detect material misstatements in our financial statements, in which case investors may lose confidence in the accuracy and completeness of our financial reports. Any failure to maintain effective disclosure controls and procedures or internal control over financial reporting could have a material adverse effect on our business and operating results and cause a decline in the price of our Class A common stock.
Our ability to use our deferred tax assets to offset future taxable income may be subject to limitations that could subject our business to higher tax liability.
We may be limited in the portion of net operating loss carryforwards ("NOLs") that we can use in the future to offset taxable income for U.S. federal and state income tax purposes. Our NOLs will expire, if unused, beginning in 2022 through 2028. A lack of future taxable income would adversely affect our ability to utilize these NOLs. In addition, under Section 382 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), a corporation that undergoes an “ownership change” is subject to limitations on its ability to utilize its NOLs to offset future taxable income. Changes in our stock ownership as well as other changes that may be outside of our control could result in ownership changes under Section 382 of the Code, which could cause our NOLs to be subject to certain limitations. Our NOLs may also be impaired under similar provisions of state law. Our
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deferred tax assets, which are currently fully reserved with a valuation allowance, may expire unutilized or underutilized, which could prevent us from offsetting future taxable income.
Risks Related to Our Liquidity
We must maintain the confidence of our customers in our liquidity, including in our ability to timely service our debt obligations and in our ability to grow our business over the long-term.
Currently, we are the only provider able to fully support and maintain our Energy Servers. If potential customers believe we do not have sufficient capital or liquidity to operate our business over the long-term or that we will be unable to maintain their Energy Servers and provide satisfactory support, customers may be less likely to purchase or lease our products, particularly in light of the significant financial commitment required. In addition, financing sources may be unwilling to provide financing on reasonable terms. Similarly, suppliers, financing partners, and other third parties may be less likely to invest time and resources in developing business relationships with us if they have concerns about the success of our business.
Accordingly, in order to grow our business, we must maintain confidence in our liquidity and long-term business prospects among customers, suppliers, financing partners and other parties. This may be particularly complicated by factors such as:
our limited operating history at a large scale;
the size of our debt obligations;
our lack of profitability;
unfamiliarity with or uncertainty about our Energy Servers and the overall perception of the distributed generation market;
prices for electricity or natural gas in particular markets;
competition from alternate sources of energy;
warranty or unanticipated service issues we may experience;
the environmental consciousness and perceived value of environmental programs to our customers;
the size of our expansion plans in comparison to our existing capital base and the scope and history of operations;
the availability and amount of tax incentives, credits, subsidies or other incentive programs; and
the other factors set forth in this “Risk Factors” section.
Several of these factors are largely outside our control, and any negative perceptions about our liquidity or long-term business prospects, even if unfounded, would likely harm our business.
Our substantial indebtedness, and restrictions imposed by the agreements governing our and our PPA Entities’ outstanding indebtedness, may limit our financial and operating activities and may adversely affect our ability to incur additional debt to fund future needs.
As of December 31, 2021, we and our subsidiaries had approximately $526.7 million of total consolidated indebtedness, of which an aggregate of $291.8 million represented indebtedness that is recourse to us, all of which is classified as non-current. Of this $291.8 million in debt, $69.0 million represented debt under our 10.25% Senior Secured Notes due March 2027, and $222.9 million represented debt under the $230.0 million aggregate principal amount of our 2.50% Green Convertible Senior Notes due August 2025 (the "Green Notes"). In addition, our PPA Entities’ (defined herein) outstanding indebtedness of $234.9 million represented indebtedness that is non-recourse to us. For a description and definition of PPA Entities, please see Part II, Item 7, Management’s Discussion and Analysis – Purchase and Financing Options – Portfolio Financings. As of December 31, 2021, we had $25.8 million in short-term debt and $500.9 million in long-term debt. Given our substantial level of indebtedness, it may be difficult for us to secure additional debt financing at an attractive cost, which may in turn impact our ability to expand our operations and our product development activities and to remain competitive in the market. Our liquidity needs could vary significantly and may be affected by general economic conditions, industry trends, performance, and many other factors not within our control.
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The agreements governing our and our PPA Entities’ outstanding indebtedness contain, and other future debt agreements may contain, covenants imposing operating and financial restrictions on our business that limit our flexibility including, among other things:
borrow money;
pay dividends or make other distributions;
incur liens;
make asset dispositions;
make loans or investments;
issue or sell share capital of our subsidiaries;
issue guaranties;
enter into transactions with affiliates;
merge, consolidate or sell, lease or transfer all or substantially all of our assets;
require us to dedicate a substantial portion of cash flow from operations to the payment of principal and interest on indebtedness, thereby reducing the funds available for other purposes such as working capital and capital expenditures;
make it more difficult for us to satisfy and comply with our obligations with respect to our indebtedness;
subject us to increased sensitivity to interest rate increases;
make us more vulnerable to economic downturns, adverse industry conditions, or catastrophic external events;
limit our ability to withstand competitive pressures;
limit our ability to invest in new business subsidiaries that are not PPA Entity-related;
reduce our flexibility in planning for or responding to changing business, industry and economic conditions; and/or
place us at a competitive disadvantage to competitors that have relatively less debt than we have.
Our PPA Entities’ debt agreements require the maintenance of financial ratios or the satisfaction of financial tests such as debt service coverage ratios and consolidated leverage ratios. Our PPA Entities’ ability to meet these financial ratios and tests may be affected by events beyond our control and, as a result, we cannot assure you that we will be able to meet these ratios and tests.
Upon the occurrence of certain events to us, including a change in control, a significant asset sale or merger or similar transaction, our liquidation or dissolution or the cessation of our stock exchange listing, each of which may constitute a fundamental change under the outstanding notes, holders of certain of the notes have the right to cause us to repurchase for cash any or all of such outstanding notes. We cannot provide assurance that we would have sufficient liquidity to repurchase such notes. Furthermore, our financing and debt agreements contain events of default. If an event of default were to occur, the trustee or the lenders could, among other things, terminate their commitments and declare outstanding amounts due and payable and our cash may become restricted. We cannot provide assurance that we would have sufficient liquidity to repay or refinance our indebtedness if such amounts were accelerated upon an event of default. Borrowings under other debt instruments that contain cross-acceleration or cross-default provisions may, as a result, be accelerated and become due and payable as a consequence. We may be unable to pay these debts in such circumstances. We cannot provide assurance that the operating and financial restrictions and covenants in these agreements will not adversely affect our ability to finance our future operations or capital needs, or our ability to engage in other business activities that may be in our interest or our ability to react to adverse market developments.
We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to meet our debt service obligations.
Our ability to generate sufficient cash to make scheduled payments on our debt obligations will depend on our future financial performance and on our future cash flow performance, which will be affected by a range of economic, competitive, and business factors, many of which are outside of our control.
If we do not generate sufficient cash to satisfy our debt obligations, including interest payments, or if we are unable to satisfy the requirement for the payment of principal at maturity or other payments that may be required from time to time under
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the terms of our debt instruments, we may have to undertake alternative financing plans such as refinancing or restructuring our debt, selling assets, reducing or delaying capital investments, or seeking to raise additional capital. We cannot provide assurance that any refinancing or restructuring would be possible, that any assets could be sold, or, if sold, of the timing of the sales and the amount of proceeds realized from those sales, that additional financing could be obtained on acceptable terms, if at all, or that additional financing would be available or permitted under the terms of our various debt instruments then in effect. Furthermore, the ability to refinance indebtedness would depend upon the condition of the finance and credit markets at the time which have in the past been, and may in the future be, volatile. Our inability to generate sufficient cash to satisfy our debt obligations or to refinance our obligations on commercially reasonable terms or on a timely basis would have an adverse effect on our business, our results of operations and our financial condition.
Under some circumstances, we may be required to or elect to make additional payments to our PPA Entities or the Equity Investors.
Three of our PPA Entities are structured in a manner such that, other than the amount of any equity investment we have made, we do not have any further primary liability for the debts or other obligations of the PPA Entities. All of our PPA Entities that operate Energy Servers for end customers have significant restrictions on their ability to incur increased operating costs, or could face events of default under debt or other investment agreements if end customers are not able to meet their payment obligations under PPAs or if Energy Servers are not deployed in accordance with the project’s schedule. In three cases, if our PPA Entities experience unexpected, increased costs such as insurance costs, interest expense or taxes or as a result of the acceleration of repayment of outstanding indebtedness, or if end customers are unable or unwilling to continue to purchase power under their PPAs, there could be insufficient cash generated from the project to meet the debt service obligations of the PPA Entity or to meet any targeted rates of return of Equity Investors. If a PPA Entity fails to make required debt service payments, this could constitute an event of default and entitle the lender to foreclose on the collateral securing the debt or could trigger other payment obligations of the PPA Entity. To avoid this, we could choose to contribute additional capital to the applicable PPA Entity to enable such PPA Entity to make payments to avoid an event of default, which could adversely affect our business or our financial condition.
Risks Related to Our Operations
Expanding operations internationally could expose us to additional risks.
Although we currently primarily operate in the United States, we continue to expand our business internationally. We currently have operations in the Asia Pacific region and more recently Dubai, United Arab Emirates to oversee operations in Europe and the Middle East. Managing any international expansion will require additional resources and controls including additional manufacturing and assembly facilities. Any expansion internationally could subject our business to risks associated with international operations, including:
conformity with applicable business customs, including translation into foreign languages and associated expenses;
lack of availability of government incentives and subsidies;
challenges in arranging, and availability of, financing for our customers;
potential changes to our established business model, including installation challenges that we may have not encountered before;
cost of alternative power sources, which could be meaningfully lower outside the United States;
availability and cost of natural gas;
effects of adverse changes in currency exchange rates and rising interest rates;
difficulties in staffing and managing foreign operations in an environment of diverse culture, laws, and customers, and the increased travel, infrastructure, and legal and compliance costs associated with international operations;
greater difficulties in securing or enforcing our intellectual property rights in certain jurisdictions;
difficulties in collecting payments in foreign currencies and associated foreign currency exposure;
restrictions on repatriation of earnings;
natural disasters (including as a result of climate change), acts of war or terrorism, and public health emergencies, including the COVID-19 pandemic; and
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adverse social, political and economic conditions.

We utilize a sourcing strategy that emphasizes global procurement of materials that has direct or indirect dependencies upon a number of vendors with operations in the Asia Pacific region. Physical, regulatory, technological, market, reputational, and legal risks related to climate change in these regions and globally are increasing in impact and diversity and the magnitude of any short-term or long-term adverse impact on our business or results of operations remains unknown. The physical impacts of climate change, including as a result of certain types of natural disasters occurring more frequently or with more intensity or changing weather patterns, could disrupt our supply chain, result in damage to or closures of our facilities, and could otherwise have an adverse impact on our business, operating results and financial condition. In addition, the outbreak of hostilities in Ukraine could result in increased sanctions that may affect the price of raw materials used in our products, which could have an adverse impact on our operating results.

Our international operations are subject to complex foreign and U.S. laws and regulations, including anti-bribery and corruption laws, antitrust or competition laws, data privacy laws, such as the GDPR, and environmental regulations, among others. In particular, recent years have seen a substantial increase in anti-bribery law enforcement activity by U.S. regulators, and we currently operate and seek to operate in many parts of the world that are recognized as having greater potential for corruption. Violations of any of these laws and regulations could result in fines and penalties, criminal sanctions against us or our employees, prohibitions on the conduct of our business and on our ability to offer our products and services in certain geographies, and significant harm to our business reputation. Our policies and procedures to promote compliance with these laws and regulations and to mitigate these risks may not protect us from all acts committed by our employees or third-party vendors, including contractors, agents and services partners. Additionally, the costs of complying with these laws (including the costs of investigations, auditing and monitoring) could adversely affect our current or future business.

The success of our international sales and operations will depend, in large part, on our ability to anticipate and manage these risks effectively. Our failure to manage any of these risks could harm our international operations, reduce our international sales, and could give rise to liabilities, costs or other business difficulties that could adversely affect our operations and financial results.
We may have conflicts of interest with our PPA Entities.
In most of our PPA Entities, we act as the managing member and are responsible for the day-to-day administration of the project. However, we are also a major service provider for each PPA Entity in our capacity as the operator of the Energy Servers under an O&M agreement. Because we are both the administrator and the manager of our PPA Entities, as well as a major service provider, we face a potential conflict of interest in that we may be obligated to enforce contractual rights that a PPA Entity has against us in our capacity as a service provider. By way of example, a PPA Entity may have a right to payment from us under a warranty provided under the applicable operations and maintenance agreement, and we may be financially motivated to avoid or delay this liability by failing to promptly enforce this right on behalf of the PPA Entity. While we do not believe that we had any conflicts of interest with our PPA Entities as of December 31, 2021, conflicts of interest may arise in the future that cannot be foreseen at this time. In the event that prospective future Equity Investors and debt financing partners perceive there to exist any such conflicts, it could harm our ability to procure financing for our PPA Entities in the future, which could have a material adverse effect on our business.

Data security breaches and cyberattacks could compromise our intellectual property or other confidential information and cause significant damage to our business and reputation.

We maintain information that is confidential, proprietary or otherwise sensitive in nature on our information technology systems, and on the systems of our third-party providers. This information includes intellectual property, financial information and other confidential information related to us and our employees, prospects, customers, suppliers and other business partners. For example, our Energy Servers are connected to and controlled and monitored by our centralized remote monitoring service, and we rely on our internal software applications for many of the functions we use to operate our business generally. Cyberattacks are increasing in frequency and evolving in nature. We and our third-party providers are at risk of attack through use of increasingly sophisticated methods, including malware, phishing and the deployment of artificial intelligence to find and exploit vulnerabilities.

Our information technology systems, and those maintained by our third-party providers, have been in the past, and may be in the future, subjected to attempts to gain unauthorized access, disable, destroy, maliciously control or cause other system disruptions. In some cases, it is difficult to anticipate or to detect immediately such incidents and the damage they caused. While these types of incidents have not had a material effect on our business to date, future incidents involving access to our
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network or improper use of our systems, or those of our third-parties, could compromise confidential, proprietary or otherwise sensitive information.

While we maintain reasonable and appropriate administrative, technical, and physical safeguards and take preventive and proactive measures to combat known and unknown cybersecurity risks, there is no assurance that such actions will be sufficient to prevent future security breaches and cyberattacks. The security of our infrastructure, including the network that connects our Energy Servers to our remote monitoring service, may be vulnerable to breaches, unauthorized access, misuse, computer viruses, or other malicious code and cyberattacks that could have a material adverse impact on our business and our Energy Servers in the field, and the protective measures we have taken may be insufficient to prevent such events. A breach or failure of our networks or computer or data management systems due to intentional actions such as cyberattacks, including but not limited to ransomware attacks, phishing or denial-of-service attacks, negligence, or other reasons, whether as a result of actions by third-parties or our employees, could seriously disrupt our operations or could affect our ability to control or to assess the performance in the field of our Energy Servers and could result in disruption to our business and potentially legal liability.

In addition, security breaches and cyberattacks could negatively impact our reputation and our competitive position and could result in litigation with third parties, regulatory action and increased remediation costs, any of which could adversely impact our business, our financial condition, and our operating results. Although we maintain insurance coverage that may cover certain liabilities in connection with some security breaches and cyberattacks, we cannot be certain it will be adequate for liabilities actually incurred or that any insurer will not deny coverage of future claims.
If we are unable to attract and retain key employees and hire qualified management, technical, engineering, finance and sales personnel, our ability to compete and successfully grow our business could be harmed.
We believe that our success and our ability to reach our strategic objectives are highly dependent on the contributions of our key management, technical, engineering, finance and sales personnel. The loss of the services of any of our key employees could disrupt our operations, delay the development and introduction of our products and services and negatively impact our business, prospects and operating results. In particular, we are highly dependent on the services of Dr. Sridhar, our Founder, President, Chief Executive Officer and Director, and other certain key employees. None of our key employees is bound by an employment agreement for any specific term and we cannot assure you that we will be able to successfully attract and retain senior leadership necessary to grow our business. In addition, many of the accounting rules related to our financing transactions are complex and require experienced and highly skilled personnel to review and interpret the proper accounting treatment with respect these transactions, and if we are unable to recruit and retain personnel with the required level of expertise to evaluate and accurately classify our revenue-producing transactions, our ability to accurately report our financial results may be harmed. There is increasing competition for talented individuals in our industry, and competition for qualified personnel is especially intense in the San Francisco Bay Area where our principal offices are located. Our failure to attract and retain our executive officers and other key management, technical, engineering and sales personnel, could adversely impact our business, our financial condition and our operating results.
Risks Related to Ownership of Our Common Stock
The stock price of our Class A common stock has been and may continue to be volatile.
The market price of our Class A common stock has been and may continue to be volatile. In addition to factors discussed in this Risk Factors section, the market price of our Class A common stock may fluctuate significantly in response to numerous factors, many of which are beyond our control, including:
overall performance of the equity markets;
actual or anticipated fluctuations in our revenue and other operating results;
changes in the financial projections we may provide to the public or our failure to meet these projections;
changing market and economic conditions, including rising interest rates and inflationary pressures, such as those pressures the market is currently experiencing, which could make our products more expensive or could increase our costs for materials, supplies, and labor;
failure of securities analysts to initiate or maintain coverage of us, changes in financial estimates by any securities analysts who follow us or our failure to meet these estimates or the expectations of investors;
the issuance of negative reports from short sellers;
recruitment or departure of key personnel;
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new laws, regulations, subsidies or credits, or new interpretations of them, applicable to our business;
negative publicity related to problems in our manufacturing or the real or perceived quality of our products;
rumors and market speculation involving us or other companies in our industry;
announcements by us or our competitors of significant technical innovations, acquisitions, strategic partnerships or capital commitments;
lawsuits threatened or filed against us; and
other events or factors including those resulting from war, natural disasters (including as result of climate change), incidents of terrorism or responses to these events.
In addition, the stock markets have experienced extreme price and volume fluctuations that have affected and continue to affect the market prices of equity securities of many companies. Stock prices of many companies have fluctuated in a manner unrelated or disproportionate to the operating performance of those companies. In the past, stockholders have instituted securities class action litigation following periods of market volatility. We are currently involved in securities litigation, which may subject us to substantial costs, divert resources and the attention of management from our business, and adversely affect our business.
We may issue additional shares of our Class A common stock in connection with any future conversion of the Green Notes or in connection with our transaction with SK ecoplant, which may dilute our existing stockholders and potentially adversely affect the market price of our Class A common stock.
In the event that some or all of the Green Notes are converted and we elect to deliver shares of common stock, the ownership interests of existing stockholders will be diluted, and any sales in the public market of any shares of our Class A common stock issuable upon such conversion could adversely affect the prevailing market price of our Class A common stock. If we were not able to pay cash upon conversion of the Green Notes, the issuance of shares of Class A common stock upon conversion of the Green Notes could depress the market price of our Class A common stock.
In addition, we entered into a Securities Purchase Agreement (the “SPA”) with SK ecoplant in October 2021 that allows SK ecoplant to purchase additional shares of Class A common stock. For additional details on this transaction, see Note 18 - SK ecoplant Strategic Investment. The exercise of this option to purchase additional shares may dilute our existing stockholders and potentially adversely affect the market price of our Class A common stock.
The dual class structure of our common stock and the voting agreements among certain stockholders have the effect of concentrating voting control of our Company with KR Sridhar, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and also with those stockholders who held our capital stock prior to the completion of our initial public offering, which limits or precludes your ability to influence corporate matters and may adversely affect the trading price of our Class A common stock.
Our Class B common stock has ten votes per share, and our Class A common stock has one vote per share. As of December 31, 2021, and after giving effect to the voting agreements between KR Sridhar, our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, and certain holders of Class B common stock, our directors, executive officers, significant stockholders of our common stock, and their respective affiliates collectively held approximately 45% of the voting power of our capital stock. Because of the ten-to-one voting ratio between our Class B and Class A common stock, the holders of our Class B common stock collectively will continue to have the ability to significantly influence the vote on all matters submitted to our stockholders for approval until the earliest to occur of (i) immediately prior to the close of business on July 27, 2023, (ii) immediately prior to the close of business on the date on which the outstanding shares of Class B common stock represent less than five percent (5%) of the aggregate number of shares of Class A common stock and Class B common stock then outstanding, (iii) the date and time or the occurrence of an event specified in a written conversion election delivered by KR Sridhar to our Secretary or Chairman of the Board to so convert all shares of Class B common stock, or (iv) immediately following the date of the death of KR Sridhar. This concentrated control limits or precludes Class A stockholders’ ability to influence corporate matters while the dual class structure remains in effect, including the election of directors, amendments of our organizational documents, and any merger, consolidation, sale of all or substantially all of our assets, or other major corporate transaction requiring stockholder approval. In addition, this may prevent or discourage unsolicited acquisition proposals or offers for our capital stock that Class A stockholders may feel are in their best interest as one of our stockholders.
Future transfers by holders of Class B common stock will generally result in those shares converting to Class A common stock, subject to limited exceptions such as certain transfers effected for estate planning purposes. The conversion of Class B
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common stock to Class A common stock will have the effect, over time, of increasing the relative voting power of those remaining holders of Class B common stock who retain their shares in the long-term.
In addition, the S&P Dow Jones and FTSE Russell have implemented changes to their eligibility criteria for inclusion of shares of public companies on certain indices, including the S&P 500, namely, to exclude companies with multiple classes of shares of common stock from being added to such indices. In addition, several shareholder advisory firms have announced their opposition to the use of multiple class structures. As a result, the dual class structure of our common stock may prevent the inclusion of our Class A common stock in such indices and has caused shareholder advisory firms to publish negative commentary about our corporate governance practices or otherwise seek to cause us to change our capital structure. Any such exclusion from indices could result in a less active trading market for our Class A common stock. Any actions or publications by shareholder advisory firms critical of our corporate governance practices or capital structure could also adversely affect the value of our Class A common stock.
We do not intend to pay dividends for the foreseeable future.
We have never declared or paid any cash dividends on our capital stock and do not intend to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future. We anticipate that we will retain all of our future earnings for use in the development of our business and for general corporate purposes. Any determination to pay dividends in the future will be at the discretion of our board of directors. Accordingly, investors must rely on sales of their Class A common stock after price appreciation, which may never occur, as the only way to realize any future gains on their investments.
Provisions in our charter documents and under Delaware law could make an acquisition of us more difficult, may limit attempts by our stockholders to replace or remove our current management, may limit our stockholders’ ability to obtain a favorable judicial forum for disputes with us or our directors, officers, or employees, and may limit the market price of our Class A common stock.
Provisions in our restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws may have the effect of delaying or preventing a change of control or changes in our management. Our restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws include provisions that:
require that our board of directors is classified into three classes of directors with staggered three year terms;
permit the board of directors to establish the number of directors and fill any vacancies and newly created directorships;
require super-majority voting to amend some provisions in our restated certificate of incorporation and amended and restated bylaws;
authorize the issuance of “blank check” preferred stock that our board of directors could use to implement a stockholder rights plan;
only the chairman of our board of directors, our chief executive officer, or a majority of our board of directors are authorized to call a special meeting of stockholders;
prohibit stockholder action by written consent, which thereby requires all stockholder actions be taken at a meeting of our stockholders;
establish a dual class common stock structure in which holders of our Class B common stock may have the ability to control the outcome of matters requiring stockholder approval even if they own significantly less than a majority of the outstanding shares of our common stock, including the election of directors and significant corporate transactions such as a merger or other sale of our Company or substantially all of our assets;
expressly authorize the board of directors to make, alter, or repeal our bylaws; and
establish advance notice requirements for nominations for election to our board of directors or for proposing matters that can be acted upon by stockholders at annual stockholder meetings.
In addition, our restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws provide that the Court of Chancery of the State of Delaware will be the exclusive forum for: any derivative action or proceeding brought on our behalf; any action asserting a breach of fiduciary duty; any action asserting a claim against us arising pursuant to the Delaware General Corporation Law, our restated certificate of incorporation or our amended and restated bylaws; or any action asserting a claim against us that is governed by the internal affairs doctrine. Our restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws provide that unless we consent in writing to the selection of an alternative forum, the federal district courts of
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the United States of America shall be the exclusive forum for the resolution of any complaint asserting a cause of action arising under the Securities Act. These choice of forum provisions may limit a stockholder’s ability to bring a claim in a judicial forum that it finds favorable for disputes with us or any of our directors, officers, or other employees, which thereby may discourage lawsuits with respect to such claims. Alternatively, if a court were to find the choice of forum provision contained in our restated certificate of incorporation and our amended and restated bylaws to be inapplicable or unenforceable in an action, we may incur additional costs associated with resolving such action in other jurisdictions, which could harm our business, our operating results, and our financial condition.
Moreover, Section 203 of the Delaware General Corporation Law may discourage, delay, or prevent a change in control of our Company. Section 203 imposes certain restrictions on mergers, business combinations, and other transactions between us and holders of 15% or more of our common stock.

ITEM 1B - UNRESOLVED STAFF COMMENTS
None.
ITEM 2 - PROPERTIES
The table below presents details for our principal properties:
FacilityLocationApproximate Square FootageHeldLease Term
Corporate headquarters1
San Jose, CA183,000 Leased2031
Manufacturing, research and developmentSunnyvale, CA193,000 Leased*
Manufacturing, research and developmentMountain View, CA53,000 Leased2022
Manufacturing, research and developmentFremont, CA254,000 Leased**
ManufacturingNewark, DE191,000 Leased***
Manufacturing2
Newark, DE76,000 Ownedn/a
* Lease terms expire over the period December 2021 through December 2023.
** Lease terms expire in December 2027 and February 2036.
*** Lease terms expire in February 2026 and April 2027.
1 Our corporate headquarters is used for administration, research and development, and sales and marketing.
2 Our first purpose-built Bloom Energy manufacturing center for the fuel cells and Energy Servers assembly, and was designed specifically for copy-exact duplication as we expand, which we believe will help us scale more efficiently.
We lease additional office space as field offices in the United States and office and manufacturing space around the world including in China, India, the Republic of Korea, Taiwan and the United Arab Emirates. To support our growth expectations, we have invested in additional manufacturing capacity at a new facility in Fremont, California. This facility will help us address current capacity constraints and provide for additional capacity necessary for future growth.

ITEM 3 - LEGAL PROCEEDINGS
We are, and from time to time we may become, involved in legal proceedings or be subject to claims arising in the ordinary course of our business. For a discussion of legal proceedings, see Note 13 - Commitments and Contingencies in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data. We are not presently a party to any other legal proceedings that in the opinion of our management and if determined adversely to us, would individually or taken together have a material adverse effect on our business, operating results, financial condition or cash flows.
ITEM 4 - MINE SAFETY DISCLOSURES
Not applicable.
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Part II
ITEM 5 - MARKET FOR REGISTRANT'S COMMON EQUITY, RELATED STOCKHOLDERS MATTERS AND ISSUER PURCHASES OF EQUITY SECURITIES
Our Class A common stock is listed on The New York Stock Exchange ("NYSE") under the symbol “BE." There is no public trading market for our Class B common stock. On February 15, 2022, there were 451 registered holders of record of our Class A common stock, 210 registered holders of record of our Class B common stock and one registered holder of record of Series A Preferred Stock.
We have not declared or paid any cash dividends on our capital stock and do not intend to pay any cash dividends in the foreseeable future.
STOCK PERFORMANCE GRAPH
The following graph compares the cumulative total return since our initial public offering provided stockholders on our common stock relative to the cumulative total returns of the NYSE Composite Index and the Nasdaq Clean Edge Green Energy Total Return Index. An investment of $100 (with reinvestment of all dividends, if any) is assumed to have been made in our common stock and in each of the indexes on July 25, 2018 (the date our Class A common stock began trading on the NYSE) and its relative performance is tracked through December 31, 2021.
This graph is not deemed to be “filed” with the SEC or subject to the liabilities of Section 18 of the Exchange Act, and the graph shall not be deemed to be incorporated by reference into any prior or subsequent filing by us under the Securities Act. Note that past stock price performance is not necessarily indicative of future stock price performance.
be-20211231_g2.jpg


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(in cumulative $)July 25, 2018September 30, 2018December 31, 2018March 31, 2019June 30, 2019September 30, 2019December 31, 2019March 31, 2020June 30, 2020September 30, 2020December 31, 2020March 31, 2021June 30, 2021September 30, 2021December 31, 2021
Bloom Energy Corporation$100.00$136.32$39.92$51.68$49.08$13.00$29.88$20.92$43.52$71.88$114.64$108.20$107.48$74.88$87.72
NYSE Composite Index$100.00$101.64$88.91$99.90$103.40$103.70$111.59$83.19$96.68$103.84$119.39$129.00$137.52$134.88$144.07
NASDAQ Clean Edge Green Energy Total Return Index$100.00$98.59$88.81$101.33$107.02$108.65$126.69$102.62$151.76$227.03$360.87$352.89$356.75$323.02$351.33



ITEM 6 - [RESERVED]
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ITEM 7 - MANAGEMENT'S DISCUSSION AND ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL CONDITION AND RESULTS OF
OPERATIONS
Overview
Description of Bloom Energy
Our mission is to make clean, reliable energy affordable for everyone in the world. We created the first large-scale, commercially viable solid oxide fuel-cell based power generation platform that empowers businesses, essential services, critical infrastructure and communities to responsibly take charge of their energy.
Our technology, invented in the United States, is one of the most advanced electricity and hydrogen producing technologies on the market today. Our fuel-flexible Bloom Energy Servers can use biogas, hydrogen, natural gas, or a blend of fuels to create resilient, sustainable and cost-predictable power at significantly higher efficiencies than traditional, combustion-based resources. In addition, our same solid oxide platform that powers our fuel cells can be used to create hydrogen, which is increasingly recognized as a critically important tool necessary for the full decarbonization of the energy economy. Our enterprise customers include some of the largest multinational corporations in the world. We also have strong relationships with some of the largest utility companies in the United States and the Republic of Korea.
At Bloom Energy, we look forward to a net-zero future. Our technology is designed to help enable this future in order to deliver reliable, low-carbon, electricity in a world facing unacceptable levels of power disruptions. Our resilient platform has kept electricity available for our customers through hurricanes, earthquakes, typhoons, forest fires, extreme heat and grid failures. Unlike traditional combustion power generation, our platform is community-friendly and designed to significantly reduce emissions of criteria air pollutants. We have made tremendous progress making renewable fuel production a reality through our biogas, hydrogen and electrolyzer programs, and we believe that we are well-positioned as a core platform and fixture in the new energy paradigm to help organizations and communities achieve their net-zero objectives.
We market and sell our Energy Servers primarily through our direct sales organization in the United States, and also have direct and indirect sales channels internationally. Recognizing that deploying our solutions requires a material financial commitment, we have developed a number of financing options to support sales of our Energy Servers to customers who lack the financial capability to purchase our Energy Servers directly, who prefer to finance the acquisition using third-party financing or who prefer to contract for our services on a pay-as-you-go model.
Our typical target commercial or industrial customer has historically been either an investment-grade entity or a customer with investment-grade attributes such as size, assets and revenue, liquidity, geographically diverse operations and general financial stability. We have also expanded our product and financing options to the below-investment-grade customers and have also expanded internationally to target customers with deployments on a wholesale grid. Given that our customers are typically large institutions with multi-level decision making processes, we generally experience a lengthy sales process.
Strategic Investment
On October 23, 2021, we entered into the SPA with SK ecoplant in connection with a strategic partnership. Pursuant to the SPA, on December 29, 2021, we sold to SK ecoplant 10 million shares of zero coupon, non-voting redeemable convertible Series A preferred stock in us, par value $0.0001 per share ("RCPS"), at a purchase price of $25.50 per share for an aggregate purchase price of $255 million (the "Initial Investment").
Simultaneous with the execution of the SPA, we and SK ecoplant executed an amendment to the Joint Venture Agreement ("JVA"), an amendment and restatement to our Preferred Distribution Agreement ("PDA Restatement") and a new Commercial Cooperation Agreement regarding initiatives pertaining to the hydrogen market and general market expansion for the Bloom Energy Server and Bloom Energy Electrolyzer. For additional details about the transaction with SK ecoplant, please see Note 18 - SK ecoplant Strategic Investment, and for more information about our joint venture with SK ecoplant, please see Note 12 - Related Party Transactions in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
COVID-19 Pandemic
General
We continue to monitor and adjust as appropriate our operations in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, including the Omicron variant. As a technology company that supplies resilient, reliable and clean energy, we have been able to conduct the majority of operations as an “essential business” in California and Delaware, where we manufacture and perform many of our
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R&D activities, as well as in other states and countries where we are installing or maintaining our Energy Servers. Many of our employees continue to work from home as a result of the spread of the Omicron variant unless they are directly supporting essential manufacturing production operations, installation work, and service and maintenance activities as well as some R&D and general administrative functions. We maintain protocols to minimize the risk of COVID-19 transmission within our facilities, including enhanced cleaning and masking if required by the local authorities, as well as providing testing for all employees. We will continue to follow CDC and local guidelines when notified of possible exposures. For more information regarding the risks posed to our company by the COVID-19 pandemic, refer to Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Products and Manufacturing – Our business has been and continues to be adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Liquidity and Capital Resources
COVID-19 created disruptions throughout various aspects of our business as noted herein, and impacted our results of operations in the year ended December 31, 2021. While we improved our liquidity in 2020, we increased our working capital spend in the first half of 2021. We have entered into new leases to maintain sufficient manufacturing facilities to meet anticipated demand in 2022, including new product line expansion. In addition, we also increased our working capital spend and resources to enhance our marketing efforts and to expand into new geographies both domestically and internationally.
We believe we have the sufficient capital to run our business over the next 12 months, including the completion of the build out of our manufacturing facilities. Our working capital was strengthened with the Initial Investment by SK ecoplant as described above. In addition, we may still enter the equity or debt market as need to support the expansion of our business. Please refer to Note 7 - Outstanding Loans and Security Agreements in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data; and Part I, Item 1A, Risk Factors – Risks Related to Our Liquidity – Our substantial indebtedness, and restrictions imposed by the agreements governing our and our PPA Entities’ outstanding indebtedness, may limit our financial and operating activities and may adversely affect our ability to incur additional debt to fund future needs, and We may not be able to generate sufficient cash to meet our debt service obligations, for more information regarding the terms of and risks associated with our debt.
Sales
We did not experience a significant impact on our selling activity related to COVID-19 during the year ended December 31, 2021.
Customer Financing

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a significant drop in the ability of many financiers (particularly financing institutions) to monetize tax credits, primarily the result of a potential drop in taxable income stemming from the pandemic. However, during the last two quarters, we began to see this constraint improving. Our ability to obtain financing for our Energy Servers partly depends on the creditworthiness of our customers, and a few of our customers’ credit ratings have fallen during the pandemic, which can impact the financing for their use of an Energy Server. We continue to work on obtaining the financing required for our 2022 installations but if we are unable to secure such financing our revenue, cash flow and liquidity will be materially impacted.
Installations and Maintenance of Energy Servers
Our installation and maintenance operations were impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic in 2021. Our installation projects have experienced some delays relating to, among other things, shortages in available parts and labor for design, installation and other work; and the inability or delay in our ability to access customer facilities due to shutdowns or other restrictions. Despite the impact on installations during the year ended December 31, 2021 and given our mitigation strategies, we only had one instance of a significant delay in the installation of our Energy Servers as a result of supply chain issues that pushed an installation out a quarter.
As to maintenance, if we are delayed in or unable to perform scheduled or unscheduled maintenance, our previously-installed Energy Servers will likely experience adverse performance impacts including reduced output and/or efficiency, which could result in warranty and/or guaranty claims by our customers. Further, due to the nature of our Energy Servers, if we are unable to replace worn parts in accordance with our standard maintenance schedule, we may be subject to increased costs in the future. During the year ended December 31, 2021, we experienced no delays in servicing our Energy Servers due to COVID-19.
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Supply Chain
During 2021, we experienced COVID-19 related delays from certain vendors and suppliers, although we were able to mitigate the impact so that we did not experience delays in the manufacture of our Energy Servers and experienced only one significant delay in the installation of our Energy Servers as mentioned above. We have a global supply chain and obtain components from Asia, Europe and India. In many cases, the components we obtain are jointly developed with our suppliers and unique to us, which makes it difficult to obtain and qualify alternative suppliers should our suppliers be impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic or related effects.

During the year ended December 31, 2021, we continued to experience supply chain disruptions due to direct and indirect COVID-19 impacts. There have been a number of disruptions throughout the global supply chain as the global economy opens up and drives demand for certain components that has outpaced the return of the global supply chain to full production. Although we were able to find alternatives for many component shortages, we experienced some delays and cost increases with respect to container shortages, ocean shipping and air freight. We have put actions in place to mitigate the disruptions by booking alternate sea routes, limiting our use of air shipments, creating virtual hubs and consolidating shipments coming from the same region. During the three months ended December 31, 2021, we continued to manage disruptions from an increase in lead times for most of our components due to a variety of factors, including supply shortages, shipping delays and labor shortages, and we expect this to continue through the first half of 2022. We expect raw material pricing pressures and component shortages especially for semiconductors and specialty metals to persist at least through this time period. In addition, the impact of inflation on the price of components, raw materials and labor may result in increased prices. In the event we are unable to mitigate the impact of delays and/or price increases in raw materials, electronic components and freight, it could delay the manufacturing and installation of our Energy Servers and increase the cost of our Energy Server, which would adversely impact our cash flows and results of operations, including revenue and gross margin.
If spikes in COVID-19 occur in regions in which our supply chain operates, including as a result of the Delta or Omicron variant, we could experience a delay in components and incur further freight price increases, which could in turn impact production and installations and our cash flow and results of operations, including revenue and gross margin.
Manufacturing

Although we have experienced labor shortages due to COVID-19 absences and the relative shortage of labor, overall this has not impacted our production given the safety protocols we have put in place augmented by our ability to increase our shifts and obtain a contingent work force for some of the manufacturing activities. We have incurred additional labor expense due to enhanced safety protocols designed to minimize exposure and risk of COVID-19 transmission as well as increased wages in general. If COVID-19 materially impacts our supply chain or if we experience a significant COVID-19 outbreak that affects our manufacturing workforce, our production could be adversely impacted which could adversely impact our cash flow and results of operation, including revenue.
Purchase and Financing Options
Overview
In order to appeal to the largest variety of customers, we make available several options to our customers. Both in the United States and abroad, we sell Energy Servers directly to customers. In the United States, we also enable customers' use of the Energy Servers through a pay as you go offering, made possible through third-party ownership financing arrangements.
Often our offerings take advantage of local incentives. In the United States, our financing arrangements are structured to optimize both federal and local incentives, including the ITC and accelerated depreciation. Internationally, our sales are made primarily to distributors who on-sell to, and install for, customers; these deals are also structured to use local incentives applicable to our Energy Servers. Increasingly, we use trusted installers and other sourcing collaborations in the United States to generate transactions.

Whichever option is selected by a customer in the Unites States or internationally, the contract structure will include obligations on our part to operate and maintain the Energy Server (“O&M Obligations”). The O&M Obligations may either be (i) for a one-year period, subject to annual renewal at the customer’s option, which historically are almost always renewed year over year, or (ii) for a fixed term. In the United States, the contract structure often includes obligations on our part to install the Energy Servers (“Installation Obligations”). Consequently, our transactions may generate revenue from the sale of Energy Servers and electricity, performance of O&M Obligations, and performance of Installation Obligations.
In addition to customary workmanship and materials warranties, as part of the O&M Obligations we provide warranties and guaranties regarding the efficiency and output of our Energy Servers to the customer and, in certain financing structures, to
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the financing parties too. We refer to a “performance warranty” as an obligation to repair or replace the Energy Servers as necessary to return performance of an Energy Server to the warranted performance level. We refer to a “performance guaranty” as an obligation to make a payment to compensate for the failure of the Energy Server to meet the guaranteed performance level. Our obligation to make payments under the performance guaranty is always contractually capped.
Energy Server Sales
There are customers who purchase our Energy Servers directly from us pursuant to customary equipment sales contracts. In connection with the purchase of Energy Servers, the customers also enter into a contract with us for the O&M Obligations. The customer may elect to engage us to provide the Installation Obligations or engage a third-party provider. Internationally, sales often occur through distribution arrangements pursuant to which local construction services providers perform the Installation Obligations, as is the case in the Republic of Korea; we contract directly with the customer to provide O&M Obligations.
A customer may enter into a contract for the sale of our Energy Servers and finance that acquisition through a sale-leaseback with a financial institution. In most cases, the financial institution completes its purchase from us immediately after commissioning. We both (i) facilitate this financing arrangement between the financial institution and the customer and (ii) provide ongoing operations and maintenance services for the Energy Servers (such arrangement, a “Traditional Lease”).
Customer Financing Options
With respect to the third-party financing options in the United States, a customer may choose a contract for the use Energy Servers in exchange for a capacity-based flat payment (a “Managed Services Agreement”) or one for the purchase of electricity generated by the Energy Servers in exchange for a scheduled dollars per kilowatt hour rate (a “Power Purchase Agreement” or “PPA”).
Certain customer payments in a Managed Services Agreement are required regardless of the level of performance of the Energy Server; in some cases it may also include a variable payment based on the Energy Server's performance or a performance-related set-off. Managed Services Agreements are then financed pursuant to a sale-leaseback with a financial institution (a “Managed Services Financing”).
PPAs are typically financed on a portfolio basis. We have financed portfolios through tax equity partnerships, acquisition financings and direct sales to investors (each, a “Portfolio Financing”).
In the United States, our capacity to offer our Energy Servers through either of these financed arrangements depends in large part on the ability of financing parties to optimize the tax benefits associated with a fuel cell, such as the ITC or accelerated depreciation. Interest rate fluctuations, and internationally, currency exchanges fluctuations, may also impact the attractiveness of any financing offerings for our customers. Our ability to finance a Managed Services Agreement or a PPA is also related to, and may be limited by, the creditworthiness of the customer. Additionally, the Managed Services Financing option is limited by a customer’s willingness to commit to making payments to a financing party regardless of the level of performance of the Energy Server.
In each of our financing options, we typically perform the functions of a project developer, including identifying end customers and financiers, leading the negotiations of the customer agreements and financing agreements, securing all necessary permitting and interconnections approvals, and overseeing the design and construction of the project up to and including commissioning the Energy Servers. Increasingly, however, we are making sales to third-party developers.
Each of our financing transaction structures is described in further detail below.

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Managed Services Financing

be-20211231_g3.jpg
Under our Managed Services Financing option, we enter into a Managed Services Agreement with a customer for a certain term. The fixed capacity-based payments made by the customer under the Managed Services Agreement are applied toward our obligation to pay down our periodic rent liability under a sale-leaseback transaction with a financier. We assign all our rights to such fixed payments made by the customer to the financier, as lessor.

Once we enter into a Managed Services Agreement with the customer, and a financier is identified, we sell the Energy Server to the financier, as lessor, who then leases it back to us, as lessee, pursuant to a sale-leaseback transaction. Certain of our sale-leaseback transactions failed to achieve all of the criteria for sale accounting. For such failed sale-and-leaseback transactions, the proceeds from the transaction are recognized as a financing obligation within our consolidated balance sheet. For successful sale-and-leaseback transactions, the financier of a Managed Services Agreement typically pays the purchase price for an Energy Server at or around acceptance, and we recognize the fair value of the Energy Servers sold within product and install revenue and recognize a right-of-use ("ROU") asset and a lease liability on our consolidated balance sheet. Any proceeds in excess of the fair value of the Energy Servers are recognized as a financing obligation.
The duration of our current Managed Services Agreement offerings is between five and ten years.

Our Managed Services Agreements typically provide for performance warranties of both the efficiency and output of the Energy Server and may include other warranties depending on the type of deployment. We often structure payments from the
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customer as a dollars per kilowatt-hour payment and our pricing assumes revenue at the 95% output level. This means that our revenue may be lower than expected if output is less than 95% and higher if output exceeds 95%. As of December 31, 2021, we had incurred no liabilities due to failure to repair or replace our Energy Servers pursuant to these performance warranties and the fleet of our Energy Servers deployed pursuant to the Managed Services Financings was performing at a lifetime average output of approximately 85%.
Portfolio Financings
In the past, we financed the Energy Servers subject to our PPAs through two types of Portfolio Financings. In one type of transaction, we sold a portfolio of PPAs to a tax equity partnership in which we held a managing member interest (such partnership in which we hold an interest, a “PPA Entity”). In these transactions, we sold the portfolio of Energy Servers to a limited liability project company of which the PPA Entity was the sole member (such portfolio owner, a “Portfolio Company”). Whether an investor, a tax equity partnership, or a single member limited liability company, the Portfolio Company is the entity that directly owns the portfolio. The Portfolio Company sells the electricity generated by the Energy Servers contemplated by the PPAs to the customers. We recognize revenue as the electricity is produced. Our current practices no longer contemplate these types of transactions.
We also finance PPAs through a second type of Portfolio Financing pursuant to which we (i) directly sell a portfolio of PPAs and the Energy Servers or (ii) sell a Portfolio Company, in each case to an investor or tax equity partnership in which we do not have an equity interest (a “Third-Party PPA”). Like the other Portfolio Financing structure, the investor or tax equity partnership owns the Portfolio Company or the Energy Servers directly, and in each case, sells the electricity generated by the Energy Servers contemplated by the PPAs to the customers. For further discussion, see Note 11 - Portfolio Financings in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
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When we finance a portfolio of Energy Servers and PPAs through a Portfolio Financing, we typically enter into a sale, engineering and procurement and construction agreement (“EPC Agreement”) and an O&M Agreement, with the Portfolio Company. As owner of the portfolio of PPAs and related Energy Servers, the Portfolio Company receives all customer payments generated under the PPAs, the benefits of the ITC and accelerated tax depreciation, and any other available state or local benefits arising out of the ownership or operation of the Energy Servers, to the extent not already allocated to the customer under the PPA.
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The sales of our Energy Servers in connection with a Portfolio Financing have many of the same terms and conditions as a direct sale. Payment of the purchase price is generally broken down into multiple installments, which may include payments prior to shipment, upon shipment or delivery of the Energy Server, and upon acceptance of the Energy Server.
Under an O&M Agreement, a one-year service package is provided with the initial sale that includes performance warranties and performance guaranties. After the expiration of the initial standard one-year package, the Portfolio Company has the option to extend our services under the O&M Agreement on an annual basis at a price determined at the time of purchase of our Energy Server. After the standard one-year service package, the Portfolio Company has almost always exercised the option to renew our services under the O&M Agreement.
As of December 31, 2021, we had incurred no liabilities to investors in Portfolio Financings due to failure to repair or replace Energy Servers pursuant to these performance warranties. Our obligation to make payments for underperformance against the performance guaranties was capped at an aggregate total of approximately $114.6 million (including payments both for low output and for low efficiency) and our aggregate remaining potential liability under this cap was approximately $104.4 million.
Obligations to Portfolio Companies
Our Portfolio Financings involve many obligations on our part to the Portfolio Company. These obligations are set forth in the applicable EPC Agreement and O&M Agreement, and may include some or all of the following obligations:
designing, manufacturing, and installing the Energy Servers, and selling such Energy Servers to the Portfolio Company;
obtaining all necessary permits and other governmental approvals necessary for the installation and operation of the Energy Servers, and maintaining such permits and approvals throughout the term of the EPC Agreements and O&M Agreements;
operating and maintaining the Energy Servers in compliance with all applicable laws, permits and regulations;
satisfying the performance warranties and guaranties set forth in the applicable O&M Agreements; and
complying with any other specific requirements contained in the PPAs with customers.
In some cases, the EPC Agreement obligates us to repurchase the Energy Server in the event of certain IP Infringement claims. In others, a repurchase of the Energy Server is only one optional remedy we have to cure an IP Infringement claim. The O&M Agreement grants a Portfolio Company the right to obligate us to repurchase the Energy Servers in the event the Energy Servers fail to comply with the performance warranties and guaranties in the O&M Agreement and we do not cure such failure in the applicable time period, or that a PPA terminates as a result of any failure by us to perform the obligations in the O&M Agreement. In some of our Portfolio Financings, our obligation to repurchase Energy Servers under the O&M extends to the entire fleet of Energy Servers sold in the event a systemic failure that affects more than a specified number of Energy Servers.
In some Portfolio Financings, we have also agreed to pay liquidated damages to the applicable Portfolio Company in the event of delays in the manufacture and installation of our Energy Servers, either in the form of a cash payment or a reduction in the purchase price for the applicable Energy Servers.
Administration of Portfolio Companies
In each of our Portfolio Financings in which we hold an equity interest in the PPA Entity, we perform certain administrative services as managing member, including invoicing the end customers for amounts owed under the PPAs, administering the cash receipts of the Portfolio Company in accordance with the requirements of the financing arrangements, interfacing with applicable regulatory agencies, and other similar obligations. We are compensated for these services on a fixed dollar-per-kilowatt basis.
For those Portfolio Financings with project debt, the Portfolio Company owned by each of our PPA Entities (with the exception of one PPA Entity) incurred debt in order to finance the acquisition of the Energy Servers. The lenders for these transactions are a combination of banks and/or institutional investors. In each case, the debt is secured by all of the assets of the applicable Portfolio Company, such assets being primarily comprised of the Energy Servers and a collateral assignment of each of the contracts to which the Portfolio Company is a party, including the O&M Agreement and the PPAs. As further collateral, the lenders receive a security interest in 100% of the membership interest of the Portfolio Company. The lenders have no
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recourse to us or to any of the other equity investors (the "Equity Investors") in the Portfolio Company for liabilities arising out of the portfolio.
We have determined that we are the primary beneficiary in the PPA Entities, subject to reassessments performed as a result of upgrade transactions. Accordingly, we consolidate 100% of the assets, liabilities and operating results of these PPA Entities, including the Energy Servers and lease income, in our consolidated financial statements. We recognize the Equity Investors’ share of the net assets of the investment entities as noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries in our consolidated balance sheet. We recognize the amounts that are contractually payable to these investors in each period as distributions to noncontrolling interests in our consolidated statements of redeemable convertible preferred stock, redeemable noncontrolling interest, stockholders' (deficit) equity and noncontrolling interest.
Our consolidated statements of cash flows reflect cash received from the Equity Investors as proceeds from investments by noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries. Our consolidated statements of cash flows also reflect cash paid to these investors as distributions paid to noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries. We reflect any unpaid distributions to these Equity Investors as distributions payable to noncontrolling interests in subsidiaries on our consolidated balance sheets. However, the PPA Entities are separate and distinct legal entities, and Bloom Energy Corporation may not receive cash or other distributions from the PPA Entities except in certain limited circumstances and upon the satisfaction of certain conditions, such as compliance with applicable debt service coverage ratios and the achievement of a targeted internal rates of return to the Equity Investors, or otherwise.
For further information about our Portfolio Financings, see Note 11 - Portfolio Financings in Part II, Item 8, Financial Statements and Supplementary Data.
Delivery and Installation
The transfer of control of our product to our customer based on the delivery and installations of our products has a significant impact on the timing of the recognition of product and installation revenue. Many factors can cause a lag between the time that a customer signs a contract and our recognition of product revenue. These factors include the number of Energy Servers installed per site, local permitting and utility requirements, environmental, health and safety requirements, weather, customer facility construction schedules, customers’ operational considerations and the timing of financing. Many of these factors are unpredictable and their resolution is often outside of our or our customers’ control. Customers may also ask us to delay an installation for reasons unrelated to the foregoing, such as, for sales contracts, delays in their obtaining financing. Further, due to unexpected delays, deployments may require unanticipated expenses to expedite delivery of materials or labor to ensure the installation meets the timing objectives. These unexpected delays and expenses can be exacerbated in periods in which we deliver and install a larger number of smaller projects. In addition, if even relatively short delays occur, there may be a significant shortfall between the revenue we expect to generate in a particular period and the revenue that we are able to recognize.
International Channel Partners
India. In India, sales activities are currently conducted by Bloom Energy (India) Pvt. Ltd., our wholly-owned subsidiary; however, we continue to evaluate the Indian market to determine whether the use of channel partners would be a beneficial go-to-market strategy to grow our India market sales.
Japan. In Japan, sales were previously conducted pursuant to a Japanese joint venture established between us and subsidiaries of SoftBank Corp., called Bloom Energy Japan Limited ("Bloom Energy Japan"). Under this arrangement, we sold Energy Servers to Bloom Energy Japan and we recognized revenue once the Energy Servers left the port in the United States. Bloom Energy Japan then entered into the contract with the end customer and performed all installation work as well as some of the operations and maintenance work. As of July 1, 2021, we acquired Softbank Corp.'s interest in Bloom Energy Japan for a cash payment and are now the sole owner of Bloom Energy Japan.
The Republic of Korea. In 2018, Bloom Energy Japan consummated a sale of Energy Servers in the Republic of Korea to Korea South-East Power Company. Following this sale, we entered into a Preferred Distributor Agreement in November 2018 with SK ecoplant for the marketing and sale of Bloom Energy Servers for the stationary utility and commercial and industrial South Korean power market.
As part of our expanded strategic partnership with SK ecoplant, the parties executed the PDA Restatement in October 2021, which incorporates previously amended terms and establishes: (i) SK ecoplant’s purchase commitments for the next three years (on a take or pay basis) for Bloom Energy Servers; (ii) rollover procedures; (iii) premium pricing for product and
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services; (iv) termination procedures for material breaches; and (v) procedures if there are material changes to the Republic of Korea Hydrogen Portfolio Standard. For additional details about the transaction with SK ecoplant, please see Note 18 - SK ecoplant Strategic Investment.
Under the terms of the PDA Restatement, we (or our subsidiary) contract directly with the customer to provide operations and maintenance services for the Energy Servers. We have established a subsidiary in the Republic of Korea, Bloom Energy Korea, LLC, to which we subcontract such operations and maintenance services. The terms of the operations and maintenance are negotiated on a case-by-case basis with each customer, but are generally expected to provide the customer with the option to receive services for at least 10 years, and for up to the life of the Energy Servers.
SK ecoplant Joint Venture Agreement. In September 2019, we entered into a joint venture agreement with SK ecoplant to establish a light-assembly facility in the Republic of Korea for sales of certain portions of our Energy Server for the stationary utility and commercial and industrial market in the Republic of Korea. The joint venture is majority controlled and managed by us, with the facility, which became operational in July 2020. Other than a nominal initial capital contribution by Bloom Energy, the joint venture will be funded by SK ecoplant. SK ecoplant, who currently acts as a distributor for our Energy Servers for the stationary utility and commercial and industrial market in the Republic of Korea, is our primary customer for the products assembled by the joint venture. In October 2021, as part of our expanded strategic partnership with SK ecoplant, the parties agreed to amend the JVA, which increases the scope of the assembly work done in the joint venture facility.
Community Distributed Generation Programs
In July 2015, the state of New York introduced its Community Distributed Generation ("CDG") program, which extends New York’s net metering program in order to allow utility customers to receive net metering credits for electricity generated by distributed generation assets located on the utility’s grid but not physically connected to the customer’s facility. This program allows for the use of multiple generation technologies, including fuel cells. Since then other states have instituted similar programs and we expect that other states may do so as well in the future. In June 2020, the New York Public Service Commission issued an Order that limited the CDG compensation structure for “high capacity factor resources,” including fuel cells, in a way that will make the economics for these types of projects more challenging in the future. However, projects already under contract were grandfathered into the program under the previous compensation structure.
We have entered into sales, installation, operations and maintenance agreements with three developers for the deployment of our Energy Servers pursuant to the New York CDG program for a total of 441 systems. As of December 31, 2021, we have recognized revenue associated with 271 systems. We continue to believe that these types of subscriber-based programs could be a source of future revenue and will continue to look to generate sales through these programs in the future.

Comparison of the Years Ended December 31, 2021 and 2020
A discussion regarding our results of operations for 2021 compared to 2020 is presented in this section. A discussion of 2020 to 2019 can be found under Item 7 of Part II of our Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2020, which is available free of charge on the SEC’s website at www.sec.gov and the Investor section of our website at www.bloomenergy.com.
Key Operating Metrics
In addition to the measures presented in the consolidated financial statements, we use certain key operating metrics below to evaluate business activity, to measure performance, to develop financial forecasts and to make strategic decisions:
Product accepted - the number of customer acceptances of our Energy Servers in any period. We recognize revenue when an acceptance is achieved. We use this metric to measure the volume of deployment activity. We measure each Energy Server manufactured, shipped and accepted in terms of 100 kilowatt equivalents.
Product costs of product accepted in the period (per kilowatt) - the average unit product cost for the Energy Servers that are accepted in a period. We use this metric to provide insight into the trajectory of product costs and, in particular, the effectiveness of cost reduction activities.
Period costs of manufacturing expenses not included in product costs - the manufacturing and related operating costs that are incurred to procure parts and manufacture Energy Servers that are not included as part of product costs. We use this metric to measure any costs incurred to run our manufacturing operations that are not capitalized (i.e.,
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absorbed, such as stock-based compensation) into inventory and therefore, expensed to our consolidated statement of operations in the period that they are incurred.
Installation costs on product accepted (per kilowatt) - the average unit installation cost for Energy Servers that are accepted in a given period. This metric is used to provide insight into the trajectory of install costs and, in particular, to evaluate whether our installation costs are in line with our installation billings.
We no longer consider billings related to our products to be a key operating metric. Billings as a metric was introduced to provide insight into our customer contract billings as differentiated from revenue when a significant portion of those customer contracts had product and installation billings recognized as electricity revenue over the term of the contract instead of at the time of delivery or acceptance. Today, a very small portion of our customer contracts has revenue recognized over the term of the contract, and thus it is no longer a meaningful metric for us.
Acceptances
We use acceptances as a key operating metric to measure the volume of our completed Energy Server installation activity from period to period. Acceptance typically occurs upon transfer of control to our customers, which depending on the contract terms is when the system is shipped and delivered to our customer, when the system is shipped and delivered and is physically ready for startup and commissioning, or when the system is shipped and delivered and is turned on and producing power.
The product acceptances in the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 were as follows:
 Years Ended
December 31,
Change
 20212020Amount %
   
Product accepted during the period
(in 100 kilowatt systems)
1,879 1,326 553 41.7 %

Product accepted for the year ended December 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020 increased by 553 systems, or 41.7%, as demand increased for our Energy Servers in the Republic of Korea and the utility sector where we accepted 196 systems as part of the CDG program.
Our customers have several purchase options for our Energy Servers. The portion of acceptances attributable to each purchase option in the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 was as follows:
 Years Ended
December 31,
 20212020
 
Direct Purchase (including Third-Party PPAs and International Channels)
96 %96 %
Managed Services
%%
100 %100 %
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The portion of total revenue attributable to each purchase option in the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 was as follows:
 Years Ended
December 31,
 20212020
 
Direct Purchase (including Third-Party PPAs and International Channels)
84 %88 %
Traditional Lease
%%
Managed Services
10 %%
Portfolio Financings
%%
100 %100 %
Costs Related to Our Products
Total product related costs for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 was as follows:
 Years Ended
December 31,
Change
20212020Amount%
   
Product costs of product accepted in the period$2,319/kW$2,368 /kW$(49)/kW(2.1)%
Period costs of manufacturing related expenses not included in product costs (in thousands)$22,794 $19,573 $3,221 16.5 %
Installation costs on product accepted in the period$561/kW$900/kW$(339)/kW(37.7)%
Product costs of product accepted for the year ended December 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020 decreased by approximately $49 per kilowatt driven generally by our ongoing cost reduction efforts to reduce material costs in conjunction with our suppliers and our reduction in labor and overhead costs through increased volume, improved processes and automation at our manufacturing facilities. This decrease was partially offset by increases in freight and other supply chain-related pricing pressures.
Period costs of manufacturing related expenses for the year ended December 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020 increased by approximately $3.2 million primarily driven by increases in freight charges and other supply chain-related pricing pressures.
Installation costs on product accepted for the year ended December 31, 2021 compared to the same period in 2020 decreased by approximately $339 per kilowatt. For the year ended December 31, 2021, the decrease in install cost was driven by site mix as many of the acceptances did not have installation, either because the installation was done by our distribution channel partner in the Republic of Korea or the final installation associated with a specific customer was scheduled to be completed at a later date although the Energy Servers were delivered and accepted during the period.
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Results of Operations
A discussion regarding the comparison of our financial condition and results of operations for the years ended December 31, 2021 and 2020 is presented below.
Revenue
 Years Ended
December 31,
Change
 20212020Amount%
(dollars in thousands)
Product$663,512$518,633$144,87927.9 %
Installation96,059101,887(5,828)(5.7)%
Service144,184109,63334,55131.5 %
Electricity68,42164,0944,3276.8 %
Total revenue$972,176$794,247$177,92922.4 %
Total Revenue
Total revenue increased by $177.9 million, or 22.4%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This increase was primarily driven by a $144.9 million increase in product revenue and a $34.6 million increase in service revenue partially offset by price reductions to expand our addressable market and $14.2 million of previously deferred revenue related to a specific contract that changed scope and was recognized in the year ended December 31, 2020.
Product Revenue
Product revenue increased by $144.9 million, or 27.9%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. The product revenue increase was driven primarily by a 41.7% increase in product acceptances as a result of expansion in existing markets and in our CDG program partially offset by price reductions to expand our addressable market and a $14.2 million of previously deferred revenue related to a specific contract that changed scope and was recognized in the year ended December 31, 2020.
Installation Revenue
Installation revenue decreased by $5.8 million, or (5.7)%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This decrease in installation revenue was driven by site mix as many of the acceptances did not have installation, either because the installation was done by our distribution channel partner in the Republic of Korea or the final installation associated with a specific customer was scheduled to be completed at a later date although the Energy Servers were delivered and accepted during the period. We expect our installation revenue to continue to decline as percentage of total revenue as we ramp up shipments to SK ecoplant under PDA Restatement.
Service Revenue
Service revenue increased by $34.6 million, or 31.5%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This increase was primarily due to the continued growth of our installation base driven by both an increase in new acceptances and renewal of existing service contracts. We expect our service revenue growth at a similar rate as we continue to expand our install base.
Electricity Revenue
Electricity revenue increased by $4.3 million, or 6.8%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period due to the increase in Managed Services Financings.
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Cost of Revenue
 Years Ended
December 31,
Change
 20212020Amount %
 (dollars in thousands)
Product$471,654 $332,724 $138,930 41.8 %
Installation110,214 116,542 (6,328)(5.4)%
Service148,286 132,329 15,957 12.1 %
Electricity44,441 46,859 (2,418)(5.2)%
Total cost of revenue$774,595 $628,454 $146,141 23.3 %
Total Cost of Revenue
Total cost of revenue increased by $146.1 million, or 23.3%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period primarily driven by a $138.9 million increase in cost of product revenue, $16.0 million increase in cost of service revenue, increased freight charges and other supply chain-related pricing pressures. This increase was partially offset by a $6.3 million decrease in cost of installation revenue and our ongoing cost reduction efforts to reduce material costs in conjunction with our suppliers and our reduction in labor and overhead costs through increased volume, improved processes and automation at our manufacturing facilities.
Cost of Product Revenue
Cost of product revenue increased by $138.9 million, or 41.8%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. The cost of product revenue increase was driven primarily by a 41.7% increase in product acceptances, increased freight charges and other supply chain-related pricing pressures. This increase was partially offset by our ongoing cost reduction efforts to reduce material costs in conjunction with our suppliers and our reduction in labor and overhead costs through increased volume, improved processes and automation at our manufacturing facilities.
Cost of Installation Revenue
Cost of installation revenue decreased by $6.3 million, or (5.4)%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This decrease, similar to the $5.8 million decrease in installation revenue, was driven by site mix as many of the acceptances did not have installation in the year ended December 31, 2021.
Cost of Service Revenue
Cost of service revenue increased by $16.0 million, or 12.1%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This increase was primarily due to the 41.7% increase in acceptances plus the maintenance contract renewals associated with the increase in our fleet of Energy Servers, partially offset by the significant improvements in power module life, cost reductions and our actions to proactively manage fleet optimizations.
Cost of Electricity Revenue
Cost of electricity revenue decreased by $2.4 million, or (5.2)%, for the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period, primarily due to the $1.2 million change in the fair value of the natural gas fixed price forward contract and lower property tax expenses partially offset by the increase in Managed Services Financings.
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Gross Profit and Gross Margin
 Years Ended
December 31,
Change
 20212020
 (dollars in thousands)
Gross profit:
Product$191,858$185,909$5,949
Installation(14,155)(14,655)500
Service(4,102)(22,696)18,594
Electricity23,98017,2356,745
Total gross profit$197,581$165,793$31,788
Gross margin:
Product29 %36 %
Installation(15)%(14)%
Service(3)%(21)%
Electricity35 %27 %
Total gross margin20 %21 %
Total Gross Profit
Gross profit increased by $31.8 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period primarily driven by the 41.7% increase in acceptances and our ongoing cost reduction efforts to reduce material costs in conjunction with our suppliers and our reduction in labor and overhead costs through increased volume, improved processes and automation at our manufacturing facilities. This increase was partially offset by price reductions to expand our addressable market and $14.2 million of previously deferred revenue related to a specific contract that changed scope and was recognized in the year ended December 31, 2020 without a corresponding increase in costs, increased freight charges and other supply chain-related pricing pressures.
Product Gross Profit
Product gross profit increased by $5.9 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. The improvement is driven by a 41.7% increase in product acceptances and our ongoing cost reduction efforts to reduce material costs in conjunction with our suppliers and our reduction in labor and overhead costs through increased volume, improved processes and automation at our manufacturing facilities. This increase was partially offset by price reductions to expand our addressable market and $14.2 million of previously deferred revenue related to a specific contract that changed scope and was recognized in the year ended December 30, 2020, increased freight charges and other supply chain-related pricing pressures.
Installation Gross Loss
Installation gross loss decreased by $0.5 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period driven by the site mix, as many of the acceptances did not have installation in the current time period, and other site related factors such as site complexity, size, local ordinance requirements and location of the utility interconnect.
Service Gross Profit (Loss)
Service gross loss improved by $18.6 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This was primarily due to the significant improvements in power module life, cost reductions and our actions to proactively manage fleet optimizations.
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Electricity Gross Profit
Electricity gross profit increased by $6.7 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period mainly due to the $1.2 million change in the fair value of the natural gas fixed price forward contract and lower property tax expenses.
Operating Expenses
 Years Ended
December 31,
Change
 20212020Amount %
 (dollars in thousands)
Research and development$103,396 $83,577 $19,819 23.7 %
Sales and marketing86,499 55,916 30,583 54.7 %
General and administrative122,188 107,085 15,103 14.1 %
Total operating expenses$312,083 $246,578 $65,505 26.6 %
Total Operating Expenses
Total operating expenses increased by $65.5 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This increase was primarily attributable to our investment in business development and front-end sales both in the United States and internationally, investment in brand and product management, and our continued investment in our R&D capabilities to support our technology roadmap.
Research and Development
Research and development expenses increased by $19.8 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period as we began shifting our investments from sustaining engineering projects for the current Energy Server platform, to continued development of the next generation platform and to support our technology roadmap, including our hydrogen, electrolyzer, carbon capture, marine and biogas solutions.
Sales and Marketing
Sales and marketing expenses increased by $30.6 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This increase was primarily driven by the efforts to expand our U.S. and international sales force, as well as increased investment in brand and product management.
General and Administrative
General and administrative expenses increased by $15.1 million in the year ended December 31, 2021 as compared to the prior year period. This increase was primarily driven by increases in outside services and consulting expense, payroll expense and facilities expense to ensure our infrastructure and control environment is ready to scale for growth, partially offset by lower legal expense.
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Stock-Based Compensation
 Years Ended
December 31,
Change
 20212020Amount %
 (dollars in thousands)
Cost of revenue$13,811 $17,475 $(3,664)(21.0)%
Research and development20,274 19,037 1,237 6.5 %
Sales and marketing17,085 10,997 6,088 55.4 %
General and administrative24,962 26,384 (1,422)(5.4)%
Total stock-based compensation$76,132 $73,893 $2,239 3.0 %
Total stock-based compensation for the year ended December 31, 2021 compared to the prior year period increased by $2.2 million primarily driven by the efforts to expand our U.S. and international sales force, as well as investment to build our brand and product management teams.
Other Income and Expense
 Years Ended
December 31,
Change
 20212020
 (in thousands)
Interest income$262 $1,475 $(1,213)
Interest expense(69,025)(76,276)